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Sample records for 6g r6g molecules

  1. Surface enhanced Raman scattering detection of single R6G molecules on nanoporous gold films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongwen; Zhang, L.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Iwasaki, H.; Inouye, Y.; Xue, Q. K.; Chen, M. W.

    2011-03-01

    Detecting single molecules with high sensitivity and molecular specificity is of great practical interest in many fields such as chemistry, biology, medicine, and pharmacology. For this purpose, cheap and highly active substrates are of crucial importance. Recently, nanoporous metals (NPMs), with a three-dimensional continuous network structure and pore channels usually much smaller than the wavelength of visible light, revealed outstanding optical properties in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, we further modify the nanoporous gold films by growing a high density of gold nano-tips on the surface. Extremely focused electromagnetic fields can be produced at the apex of the nano-tips, resulting in so-called hot spots. With this NPM-based and affordable substrate, single molecule-detection is achievable with ultrahigh enhancement in SERS.

  2. R6G molecule induced modulation of the optical properties of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets for use in ultrasensitive SPR sensing.

    PubMed

    Xue, Tianyu; Yu, Shansheng; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Xinzheng; Wang, Lei; Bao, Qiaoliang; Chen, Caiyun; Zheng, Weitao; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    A proper understanding of the role that molecular doping plays is essential to research on the modulation of the optical and electronic properties of graphene. The adsorption of R6G molecules onto defect-rich reduced graphene oxide nanosheets results in a shift of the Fermi energy and, consequently, a variation in the optical constants. This optical variation in the graphene nanosheets is used to develop an ultrasensitive surface plasmon resonance biosensor with a detection limit of 10(-17) M (0.01 fM) at the molecular level. A density functional theory calculation shows that covalent bonds were formed between the R6G molecules and the defect sites on the graphene nanosheets. Our study reveals the important role that defects play in tailoring the properties and sensor device applications of graphene materials. PMID:26887525

  3. R6G molecule induced modulation of the optical properties of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets for use in ultrasensitive SPR sensing

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Tianyu; Yu, Shansheng; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Xinzheng; Wang, Lei; Bao, Qiaoliang; Chen, Caiyun; Zheng, Weitao; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    A proper understanding of the role that molecular doping plays is essential to research on the modulation of the optical and electronic properties of graphene. The adsorption of R6G molecules onto defect-rich reduced graphene oxide nanosheets results in a shift of the Fermi energy and, consequently, a variation in the optical constants. This optical variation in the graphene nanosheets is used to develop an ultrasensitive surface plasmon resonance biosensor with a detection limit of 10−17 M (0.01 fM) at the molecular level. A density functional theory calculation shows that covalent bonds were formed between the R6G molecules and the defect sites on the graphene nanosheets. Our study reveals the important role that defects play in tailoring the properties and sensor device applications of graphene materials. PMID:26887525

  4. How does the surface charge of ionic surfactant and cholesterol forming vesicles control rotational and translational motion of rhodamine 6G perchlorate (R6G ClO₄)?

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Surajit; Roy, Arpita; Banik, Debasis; Kundu, Niloy; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Dhir, Anjali; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2015-03-01

    The rotational dynamics and translational diffusion of a hydrophilic organic molecule, rhodamine 6G perchlorate (R6G ClO4) in small unilamellar vesicles formed by two different ionic surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), with cholesterol have been investigated using fluorescence spectroscopic methods. Moreover, in this article the formation of vesicle using anionic surfactant, SDS at different cholesterol-to-surfactant molar ratio (expressed by Q value (Q = [cholesterol]/[surfactant])) has also been reported. Visual observation, dynamic light scattering (DLS) study, turbidity measurement, steady state fluorescence anisotropy (r0) measurement, and eventually microscopic images reveal the formation of small unilamellar vesicles in aqueous solution. Also, in this study, an attempt has been made to observe whether the cationic probe molecule, rhodamine 6G (R6G) experiences similar or different microenvironment in cholesterol-SDS and cholesterol-CTAB assemblies with increase in cholesterol concentration. The influence of cholesterol on rotational and translational diffusion of R6G molecules has been investigated by monitoring UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, and finally fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements. In cholesterol-SDS assemblies, due to the strong electrostatic attractive interaction between the negatively charged surface of vesicle and cationic R6G molecules, the rotational and diffusion motion of R6G becomes slower. However, in cholesterol-CTAB aggregates, the enhanced hydrophobicity and electrostatic repulsion induces the migration of R6G from vesicle bilayer to aqueous phase. The experimental observations suggest that the surface charge of vesicles has a stronger influence than the hydrophobicity of the vesicle bilayer on the rotational and diffusion motion of R6G molecules. PMID:25643899

  5. Solid- and solution-phase synthesis and application of R6G dual-labeled oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Skoblov, Aleksander Yu; Vichuzhanin, Maxim V; Farzan, Valentina M; Veselova, Olga A; Konovalova, Tatiana A; Podkolzin, Alexander T; Shipulin, German A; Zatsepin, Timofei S

    2015-10-15

    A novel N-TFA-protected carboxyrhodamine 6G (R6G) phosphoramidite was synthesized for use in an automated DNA synthesis to prepare 5'-labeled oligonucleotides. Deprotection and purification conditions were optimized for 5'-labeled and dual-labeled oligonucleotide probes. As an alternative we synthesized an azide derivative of R6G for CuAAC post-synthetic oligonucleotide labeling. Dual-labeled probes obtained by both methods showed the same efficacy in a quantitative PCR assay. R6G-labeled probes demonstrated superior properties in a qPCR assay in comparison with alternative HEX, JOE and SIMA dyes due to more efficient fluorescence quenching by BHQ-1. We successfully used R6G dual-labeled probes for rotavirus genotyping. PMID:26392371

  6. LSP spectral changes correlating with SERS activation and quenching for R6G on immobilized Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futamata, M.; Maruyama, Y.

    2008-10-01

    In terms of chemical enhancement in Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS), we investigated the effect of halide and other anions to rhodamine 6G (R6G) adsorbed Ag particles that were immobilized on the substrates. The residual species on chemically prepared Ag particles such as citrate or a-carbon were thoroughly substituted by various anions, e.g., Cl-, Br-, I-, SCN-, CN-, or S2O3 2- anions, whose adsorption features are elucidated by the formation constants for AgX2 ( m-1)-, here X denotes the above anions. In particular, Cl-, Br-, or SCN- ions activated SERS of R6G via intrinsic electronic interaction with Ag, whereas CN-, S2O3 2-, or I- anions quenched it due to their exclusive adsorption onto the Ag surfaces. We found that the activation process with the anions commonly yields a marked blue-shift of the coupled plasmon peak from ca. 650-700 to 500-550 nm in elastic scattering. It is rationalized by slight increase of the gap size between adjacent Ag nanoparticles by only ca. 1 nm based on theoretical simulations. This is probably caused by slight dissolution, oxidative etching, of the particles according to large formation constants of the complexes. Consequently, partly remaining negative charges on the Ag surface, and a slight increase in the gap size, providing huge electric field, facilitated R6G cations to adsorb on the nanoparticles, especially at the junction.

  7. SERS detection of R6G based on a novel graphene oxide/silver nanoparticles/silicon pyramid arrays structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Jiang, S Z; Huo, Y Y; Liu, A H; Xu, S C; Liu, X Y; Sun, Z C; Xu, Y Y; Li, Z; Man, B Y

    2015-09-21

    We present a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on graphene oxide/silver nanoparticles/silicon pyramid arrays structure (GO/Ag/PSi). The SERS behaviors are discussed and compared by the detection of R6G. Based on the contrast experiments with PSi, GO/PSi, Ag/PSi and GO/AgA/PSi as SERS substrate, the perfect bio-compatibility, good homogeneity and chemical stability were confirmed. We also calculated the electric field distributions using Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) analysis to further understand the GO/Ag/PSi structure as a perfect SERS platform. These experimental and theoretical results imply that the GO/Ag/PSi with regular pyramids array is expected to be an effective substrate for label-free sensitive SERS detections in areas of medicine, food safety and biotechnology. PMID:26406681

  8. Detection of single rhodamine 6g molecules in levitated microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Ng, K.C.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M. )

    1993-09-01

    Single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules in levitated glycerol microdroplets have been detected with signal-to-noise ratios of >40 using CW laser-induced fluorescence. The fluorescence signal from single R6G molecules was identified by the magnitude of the fluorescence signal and by the unique time dependence of the fluorescence count rate before photobleaching. This high sensitivity allows single molecules to be counted by use of a digital detection approach offering significantly lower detection limits than those possible with conventional detection methods. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of individual rhodamine 6G molecules on large Ag nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, A.M.; Nirmal, M.; Brus, L.E.

    1999-11-03

    To explore the relationship between local electromagnetic field enhancement and the large SERS (surface enhanced Raman scattering) enhancement that enables the observation of single molecule Raman spectra, they measure both resonant Rayleigh scattering spectra and rhodamine 6G Raman spectra from single Ag particles. The apparatus combines the techniques of dark-field optical microscopy for resonant Rayleigh measurements, and grazing incidence Raman spectroscopy. The Rayleigh spectra show that the citrate-reduced Ag colloid is extremely heterogeneous. Only the larger particles, in part created by salt induced aggregation, show a large SERS effect. In agreement with the work of Nie and Emory, a few nanocrystals show huge single molecule R6G SERS intensities. While all SERS active particles have some resonant Rayleigh scattering at the 514.5 nm laser wavelength, there is no correlation between the resonant Rayleigh spectra and the SERS intensity. A model is discussed in which huge SERS intensities result from single chemisorbed molecules interacting with ballistic electrons in optically excited large Ag particles. This model is a natural consequence of the standard local electromagnetic field model for SERS and the high surface sensitivity of plasmon dephasing in the noble metals.

  10. Fluorescent monodisperse spherical particles based on mesoporous silica containing rhodamine 6G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimova, E. Yu.; Grudinkin, S. A.; Kukushkina, Yu. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Medvedev, A. V.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2012-06-01

    Fluorescent monodisperse spherical silica (SiO2) particles with a regular mesoporous structure containing encapsulated Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye have been synthesized. The as-synthesized particles have been coated with SiO2 and SiO2-CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, C16H33N(CH3)3Br) shells in order to prevent uncontrolled release of the dye from pores. The kinetics of R6G release from the pores of silica particles has been studied. It has been found that the particles synthesized by adding CTAB and R6G to the reaction mixture, as well as the particles coated with the SiO2-CTAB shell, are characterized by the maximum duration of dye release from the pores, which is probably associated with the formation of chemical bonds between R6G and CTAB molecules.

  11. Observing single molecule chemical reactions on metal nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Emory, S. R.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Goodwin, P. M.; Keller, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    We report the study of the photodecomposition of single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were immobilized and spatially isolated on polylysine-derivatized glass coverslips, and confocal laser microspectroscopy was used to obtain surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra from individual R6G molecules. The photodecomposition of these molecules was observed with 150-ms temporal resolution. The photoproduct was identified as graphitic carbon based on the appearance of broad SERS vibrational bands at 1592 cm{sup -1} and 1340 cm{sup -1} observed in both bulk and averaged single-molecule photoproduct spectra. In contrast, when observed at the single-molecule level, the photoproduct yielded sharp SERS spectra. The inhomogeneous broadening of the bulk SERS spectra is due to a variety of photoproducts in different surface orientations and is a characteristic of ensemble-averaged measurements of disordered systems. These single-molecule studies indicate a photodecomposition pathway by which the R6G molecule desorbs from the metal surface, an excited-state photoreaction occurs, and the R6G photoproduct(s) readsorbs to the surface. A SERS spectrum is obtained when either the intact R6G or the R6G photoproduct(s) are adsorbed on a SERS-active site. This work further illustrates the power of single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) to reveal unique behaviors of single molecules that are not discernable with bulk measurements.

  12. Influence of lithium iodide on association of rhodamine 6G molecules in mixtures of isopropanol with CCl/sub 4/

    SciTech Connect

    Saletskii, A.M.; Shekunov, V.A.; Yuzhakov, V.I.

    1987-11-01

    The spectral-luminescent properties of rhodamine 6G on addition of lithium iodide to the solutions were studied in mixtures of polar (isopropanol) and nonpolar (carbon tetrachloride) solvents. It was found that when LiI is added, the complex associates of the dye molecules formed in solutions containing more than 90 vol. % of CCl/sub 4/ dissociate into rhodamine 6G monomers. The enthalpy of association of rhodamine depends on the concentration of the salt in the system. The volume and the geometry of the complexes have been evaluated from the data of the polarization characteristics of the fluorescence of the associates.

  13. Influence of silver nanoparticles on relaxation processes and efficiency of dipole - dipole energy transfer between dye molecules in polymethylmethacrylate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryukhanov, V. V.; Konstantinova, E. I.; Borkunov, R. Yu; Tsarkov, M. V.; Slezhkin, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    The fluorescence and phosphorescence of dyes in thin polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) films in the presence of ablated silver nanoparticles has been investigated in a wide temperature range by methods of femtosecond and picosecond laser photoexcitation. The fluorescence and phosphorescence times, as well as spectral and kinetic characteristics of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules in PMMA films are measured in a temperature range of 80 - 330 K. The temperature quenching activation energy of the fluorescence of R6G molecules in the presence of ablated silver nanoparticles is found. The vibrational relaxation rate of R6G in PMMA films is estimated, the efficiency of the dipole - dipole electron energy transfer between R6G and brilliant green molecules (enhanced by plasmonic interaction with ablated silver nanoparticles) is analysed, and the constants of this energy transfer are determined.

  14. Resonance Raman Scattering of Rhodamine 6G as Calculated Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Lasse; Schatz, George C.

    2006-03-27

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In this work, we present the first calculation of the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) spectrum of rhodamine 6G (R6G) which is a prototype molecule in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The calculation is done using a recently developed time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method, which uses a short-time approximation to evaluate the Raman scattering cross section. The normal Raman spectrum calculated with this method is in good agreement with experimental results. The calculated RRS spectrum shows qualitative agreement with SERS results at a wavelength that corresponds to excitation of the S1 state, but there are significant differences with the measured RRS spectrum at wavelengths that correspond to excitation of the vibronic sideband of S1. Although the agreement with the experiments is not perfect, the results provide insight into the RRS spectrum of R6G at wavelengths close to the absorption maximum where experiments are hindered due to strong fluorescence. The calculated resonance enhancements are found to be on the order of 105. This indicates that a surface enhancement factor of about 1010 would be required in SERS in order to achieve single-molecule detection of R6G.

  15. Silver nanocluster films as novel SERS substrates for ultrasensitive detection of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upender, G.; Satyavathi, R.; Raju, B.; Shadak Alee, K.; Narayana Rao, D.; Bansal, C.

    2011-08-01

    Highly reproducible, active and stable SERS substrates were prepared by a nanocluster deposition system. SERS studies were carried out on these substrates with R6G as a test molecule using near Raman resonant and off resonant laser excitation wavelengths. Our results show that Ag nanoclusters of average particle size of (157 ± 119) nm act as very good SERS substrates for the ultra trace detection of R6G with an AEF of 2 × 10 12 corresponding to a detection limit of 10 -16 M. The present substrates could improve the detection limit of R6G by two orders of magnitude as compared to the previous reports.

  16. Kinetic peculiarities of rhodamine 6G photodegradation in polymethylmethacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Mardaleishvili, I.R.; Anisimov, V.M.

    1986-10-01

    Dye-activated polymer matrices have found recently wide technological applications as active laser media. The kinetic mechanism for dye photodegradation has been studied in this work for polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) activated by rhodamine 6G (R6G). It has been found that the dye molecules are not equivalent with respect to their stability to the light and the effective width of their distribution over this parameter depends on the photon energy acting on the system. For the short wavelength UV irradiation (lambda = 254 nm) the distribution is narrow and it widens with an increase in the excitation wavelength. Optically transparent PMMA films (molecular weight 160,000 and thickness ca.20 mum) have been used in the present work. The necessity of accounting for the kinetics and effectiveness of the relaxation processes leading to a change in the reactivity of the molecules added to the polymer matrix limit the applicability of the kinetic stabilization method. A detailed study of the relaxation processes has been carried out, where it has been demonstrated for a number of polymer matrices, including PMMA, that a relaxation of guest molecules, leading to an enhancement of their reactivity, is effective only at the temperatures close to T /SUB c/ of the polymer. For PMMA activated by R6G the dark incubation of the previously irradiated sample for 30 min at 90 C leads to a substantial increase in the further photodegradation process. This is due to the fact that the relaxation process leads to an increased fraction of the highly reactive molecules. Diagrams are included.

  17. Rhodamine 6G laser pumped by cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitsyn, V.M.; Lyakh, G.O.; Orlovskii, V.M.; Osipov, V.V.; Urbazaev, M.N.

    1984-08-01

    Cathodoluminescence from a CdS crystal, generated by the action of high-power short-duration electron beam pulses was used to pump a rhodamine 6G (R6G) laser. Measurements were made of the energy spectrum of the electrons in the beam exciting the CdS crystal, of the cathodoluminescence spectrum of CdS, of the absorption and emission spectra of the dye, and also of the time characteristics of the cathodoluminescence and of the dye laser radiation. When the electron beam incident on the crystal was characterized by a current of 500 A and duration 8 nsec at half-height, the radiation pulses emitted by R6G had an energy of approx.1 mJ and the efficiency of generation of these pulses was approx.0.3%. OFF

  18. Intersystem crossing from highly excited states. rhodamine 6G

    SciTech Connect

    Ryl'kov, V.V.; Cheshev, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    The authors carried out an investigation of ethanolic solutions of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) at 20 C by laser flash photolysis. The excitation of dilute (3 /SUP ./ 10/sup -5/ M) solutions of R6G with an initial optical density of 1.5 up to an intensity of 100 MW/cm/sup 2/ resulted in only weak triplet-triplet absorption. The introduction of additions of lithium chloride or lithium bromide in 0.1 M concentrations into a solution of R6G (3.10/sup -5/ M) resulted in the appearance of induced absorption and the introduction of an addition of lithium nitrate in the same concentration into the solution did not result in enhancement of triplet-triplet absorption.

  19. Background-free, highly sensitive surface-enhanced IR absorption of rhodamine 6G molecules deposited onto an array of microholes in thin silver film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Pavel N.; Gonchukov, Sergey A.; Ionin, Andrey A.; Khmelnitskii, Roman A.; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Nguyen, Trang T. H.; Rudenko, Andrey A.; Saraeva, Irina N.; Zayarny, Dmitry A.

    2016-05-01

    Selective IR absorption at 1261 cm-1 enhanced by 455 times, was demonstrated for rhodamine 6G molecules, covering a 2D-photonic crystal, represented by a regular array of 4-micron wide holes in a 30 nm thick silver film on a CaF2 substrate. The reference absorption lines were taken near 2900 cm-1, where the IR radiation is freely channeling through the microholes, indicating the reference substrate coverage by the dye molecules for its relative internal calibration. The limit of background-free detection for the analyte was determined at the level ~10-2 monolayer.

  20. Selectable Ultrasensitive Detection of Hg2+ with Rhodamine 6G-Modified Nanoporous Gold Optical Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Yang, Min; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Ling; Zeng, Heping

    2016-07-01

    An extremely sensitive fluorescence sensor has been developed for selectively detection of mercury ions based on metallophilic Hg2+-Au+ interactions, which results in an effective release of pre-adsorbed rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules from the nanoporous gold substrate, associated with a significant decrease of fluorescence intensity. The optical sensor has a detection sensitivity down to 0.6 pM for Hg2+ and CH3Hg+ ions, in particular a superior selectivity in a complex aqueous system containing 13 different types of metal ions, meanwhile maintaining a long-term stability after 10 cycles. Such a fluorescence sensor combining multiple advantages therefore present promising potentials in various applications.

  1. Selectable Ultrasensitive Detection of Hg(2+) with Rhodamine 6G-Modified Nanoporous Gold Optical Sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Yang, Min; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Ling; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    An extremely sensitive fluorescence sensor has been developed for selectively detection of mercury ions based on metallophilic Hg(2+)-Au(+) interactions, which results in an effective release of pre-adsorbed rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules from the nanoporous gold substrate, associated with a significant decrease of fluorescence intensity. The optical sensor has a detection sensitivity down to 0.6 pM for Hg(2+) and CH3Hg(+) ions, in particular a superior selectivity in a complex aqueous system containing 13 different types of metal ions, meanwhile maintaining a long-term stability after 10 cycles. Such a fluorescence sensor combining multiple advantages therefore present promising potentials in various applications. PMID:27403721

  2. Selectable Ultrasensitive Detection of Hg2+ with Rhodamine 6G-Modified Nanoporous Gold Optical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Yang, Min; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Ling; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    An extremely sensitive fluorescence sensor has been developed for selectively detection of mercury ions based on metallophilic Hg2+-Au+ interactions, which results in an effective release of pre-adsorbed rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules from the nanoporous gold substrate, associated with a significant decrease of fluorescence intensity. The optical sensor has a detection sensitivity down to 0.6 pM for Hg2+ and CH3Hg+ ions, in particular a superior selectivity in a complex aqueous system containing 13 different types of metal ions, meanwhile maintaining a long-term stability after 10 cycles. Such a fluorescence sensor combining multiple advantages therefore present promising potentials in various applications. PMID:27403721

  3. Spectroscopy and laser action of rhodamine 6G doped aluminosilicate xerogels

    SciTech Connect

    McKiernan, J.M.; Yamanaka, S.A.; Dunn, B.; Zink, J.I. )

    1990-07-26

    Rhodamine 6G (R6G) doped aluminosilicate glass synthesized by the sol-gel method exhibits laser action. Transparent 5 mm {times} 5 mm {times} 10 mm monoliths were used as cast in a simple laser cavity. This new material was pumped at rates of up to 25 Hz and was still active after as many as 40,000 pump pulses. Luminescence and free-running laser spectra are measured. The dependence of the R6G doped aluminosilicate dye laser output on the number of pump pulses and the pump pulse energy is discussed.

  4. Real-time monitoring of single-molecule reactions in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Xiao; Xu, N.; Yeung, E.S. |

    1997-12-31

    Direct measurement of dynamics of single molecules, e.g., rhodamine 6G (R-6G) and single R-6G tagged with single biological molecules in aqueous solution, was achieved by using thin-layer laser-induced total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TLTIRFM). Single-molecule reactions can be directly and simultaneously monitored with spatial resolution down to 0.2 {mu}m and temporal resolution down to 0.2 ms. Dynamics of single-molecule reactions, for example, single dye molecules reacting with a proton and single proteins adsorbing on an active surface, are investigated and evident by monitoring their reaction environment, e.g., temperature and pH. Novel approaches and applications of these studies will be prospected in this presentation.

  5. Rotational motion of rhodamine 6G tethered to actin through oligo(ethylene glycol) linkers studied by frequency-domain fluorescence anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Wazawa, Tetsuichi; Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Nagai, Takeharu; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the rotational motion of a fluorescent probe tethered to a protein helps to elucidate the local properties of the solvent and protein near the conjugation site of the probe. In this study, we have developed an instrument for frequency-domain fluorescence (FDF) anisotropy measurements, and studied how the local properties around a protein, actin, can be elucidated from the rotational motion of a dye tethered to actin. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was attached to Cys-374 using newly-synthesized R6G-maleimide with three different oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) linker lengths. The time-resolved anisotropy decay of R6G tethered to G-actin was revealed to be a combination of the two modes of the wobbling motion of R6G and the tumbling motion of G-actin. The rotational diffusion coefficient (RDC) of R6G wobbling was ~0.1 ns−1 at 20°C and increased with OEG linker length. The use of the three R6G-actin conjugates of different linker lengths was useful to not only figure out the linker length dependence of the rotational motion of R6G but also validate the analyses. In the presence of a cosolvent of glycerol, although the tumbling motion of G-actin was retarded in response to the bulk viscosity, the wobbling motion of R6G tethered to actin exhibited an increase of RDC as glycerol concentration increased. This finding suggests an intricate relationship between the fluid properties of the bulk solvent and the local environment around actin. PMID:27493858

  6. A facile surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of rhodamine 6G and crystal violet using Au nanoparticle substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuibao; Zeng, Tixian; Tan, Xiulan; Wu, Weidong; Tang, Yongjian; Zhang, Haibin

    2015-08-01

    In this study, Au nanoparticle (5 nm) colloid was employed for a facile preparation of SERS substrates from three approaches: (1) original Au nanoparticles, (b) Au colloid coated 200 nm polystyrene (PS) beads, and (3) Au colloid annealed at 200-500 °C. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and crystal violet were employed as the Raman active probes. The Au colloid deposited PS beads (PS@Au) exhibit intensive SERS signal for R6G detection, which is promising for crystal violet detection after being annealed at 400 °C. The 200 °C annealed Au nanoparticles demonstrate excellent combined SERS sensitivity for both R6G and crystal violet. For the original Au colloid, elevated annealing temperature from 200 °C to 500 °C decreases the SERS intensity as Au particles were coarsened gradually.

  7. Kinetic behavior of rhodamine 6G in microheterogeneous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatrick, David A.; Black, Isobelle; Smith, Sheila; Birch, David J. S.

    1995-05-01

    In this study we report on the interfacial kinetic behavior of the widely used laser dye Rhodamine 6G in two different matrices frequently used for dye immobilization in fluorescence sensing applications. The water content of Nafion membranes and Silica Gel has been shown to be the critical parameter which determines the probe motion. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements indicate a free rotation of the R6G in wet and dry Nafion even through this cationic dye is held electrostatically within the water pores of the system. These results indicate that in Nafion the interfacial microviscosity of the water pore increases as water is removed but the dye position does not changes. Conversely in the case of silica gel the R6G is initially hindered in its motion when the water content is high but becomes free to rotate as the gel is dehydrated. This indicates that the level of water within the sol gel pore determines the strength of the interaction between the charged surface and the rhodamine 6G.

  8. Single Molecule Raman Spectroscopy Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2014-06-01

    Pressure effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of Rhdoamine 6G adsorbed on silver nanoparticle surfaces was studied using a confocal Raman microscope. Colloidal silver nanoparticles were treated with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and its isotopically substituted partner, R6G-d4. Mixed isotopomers let us identify single-molecule spectra, since multiple-molecule spectra would show vibrational transitions from both species. The nanoparticles were embedded into a poly vinyl alcohol film, and loaded into a diamond anvil cell for the high-pressure Raman scattering measurement. Argon was the pressure medium. Ambient pressure Raman scattering spectra showed few single-molecule spectra. At moderately high pressure ( 1GPa), a surprising effect was observed. The number of sites with observable spectra decreased dramatically, and most of the spectra that could be observed were due to single molecules. The effects of high pressure suppressed the multiple-molecule Raman sites, leaving only the single-molecule sites to be observed.

  9. Influence of rhodamine 6G doping on the optical properties of TiO2 sol-gel films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás, S. A.; Stolik, S.; Palomino, R.; Lozada, R.; Persson, C.; Pepe, I.; da Silva, A. Ferreira

    2005-10-01

    Amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films doped with rhodamine 6G (R6G) were deposited on glass substrates by the sol-gel process. The optical properties of the films were characterized by photoacoustic, excitation, and fluorescence spectroscopies. The absorption spectra of the R6G-doped TiO2 films exhibited two well-defined absorption regions: an absorption band over 2.0 eV attributed to rhodamine 6G and a band above 3.0 eV corresponding to TiO2 absorption. While the onset of the R6G absorption band was shifted by 0.06 eV towards lower energies as the R6G doping concentration increased within the interval of 0.01-0.10 mol %, the onset to high absorption (TiO2 band) for the doped films decreased only by 0.01 eV within the same interval. In addition, the optical absorption of undoped rutile-phase bulk TiO2 was calculated and compared to the experimental results. The estimated theoretical value of rutile TiO2 sample was 3.0 eV. This theoretical result shows good agreement when compared with the experimental data of undoped TiO2 sol-gel films, as well as the undoped TiO2 film prepared by sputtering.

  10. Determination of the rate constants of molecular processes regulating the level of induced absorption in a laser based on an aqueous-micellar solution of rhodamine 6G with lamp pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.B.; Snegov, M.I.; Cherkasov, A.S.

    1987-03-01

    A method of determining the average lifetime tau of the products responsible for inverse induced absorption in aqueous--micellar solutions of rhodamine 6G (R6G) on lamp pumping based on a comparison of threshold intensities of excitation (W/sub th/) in the resonators of a laser with a different Q is proposed. Using the value of tau found (0.2 ..mu..sec) and experimental data on the change in W/sub th/ with the concentration of cyclooctatetraene (COT) added to the solution the rate constant of quenching of the absorbing products by COT molecules (K/sub q/ = 2.6 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/sec/sup -1/) was determined. In the assumption that the absorbing products are triplet dye molecules, the value of the rate constant of interconversion (K/sub 32/) of R6G into an aqueous--micellar solution (K/sub 32/ = 1.3 x 10/sup 7/ sec/sup -1/) was determined. A comparison was made of the values of the constants found with the corresponding values known from the literature.

  11. [Determination of vitamin B12 concentration by fluorescence quenching with acridine orange-rhodamine 6G energy transfer system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bao-sheng; Gao, Jing; Yang, Geng-liang

    2005-07-01

    An energy transfer technique between acridine orange (AO) and rhodamine 6G (R6G) was studied, and the optimum experimental conditions of energy transfer were defined. It was found that the effective energy transfer could occur between AO and R6G in the dodecylbenzene sodium sulfonate solution with Na2 HPO4-citric acid buffer solution at pH 5.0. The fluorescence intensity of AO-R6G system was diminished by vitamin B12 in an alkalescence medium. Based on the AO-R6G energy transfer system anovel fluorescence quenching method for the determination of vitamin B12 has been developed. Under optimal conditious, the linear range of calibration curves for the determination of vitamin B12 was 0-3.0 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1). The detection limits were 4.8 x 10(-7) mol x L(-1) for Vitamin B12. Among six times of determination, the relative standard deviation was 0.51%-0.64%, and the recovery was 98.40% -103.62%. The method features good recurrence, rapidity of reaction, good stability, and few interfering substances. It can be satisfactorily used in the determination of the injection content of vitamin B12. PMID:16241060

  12. An enhanced cerium(IV)-rhodamine 6G chemiluminescence system using guest-host interactions in a lab-on-a-chip platform for estimating the total phenolic content in food samples.

    PubMed

    Al Haddabi, Buthaina; Al Lawati, Haider A J; Suliman, FakhrEldin O

    2016-04-01

    Two chemiluminescence-microfluidic (CL-MF) systems, e.g., Ce(IV)-rhodamine B (RB) and Ce(IV)-rhodamine 6G (R6G), for the determination of the total phenolic content in teas and some sweeteners were evaluated. The results indicated that the Ce(IV)-R6G system was more sensitive in comparison to the Ce(IV)-RB CL system. Therefore, a simple (CL-MF) method based on the CL of Ce(IV)-R6G was developed, and the sensitivity, selectivity and stability of this system were evaluated. Selected phenolic compounds (PCs), such as quercetin (QRC), catechin (CAT), rutin (RUT), gallic acid (GA), caffeic acid (CA) and syringic acid (SA), produced analytically useful chemiluminescence signals with low detection limits ranging from 0.35 nmol L(-1) for QRC to 11.31 nmol L(-1) for SA. The mixing sequence and the chip design were crucial, as the sensitivity and reproducibility could be substantially affected by these two factors. In addition, the anionic surfactant (i.e., sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) can significantly enhance the CL signal intensity by as much as 300% for the QRC solution. Spectroscopic studies indicated that the enhancement was due to a strong guest-host interaction between the cationic R6G molecules and the anionic amphiphilic environment. Other parameters that could affect the CL intensities of the PCs were carefully optimized. Finally, the method was successfully applied to tea and sweetener samples. Six different tea samples exhibited total phenolic/antioxidant levels from 7.32 to 13.5 g per 100g of sample with respect to GA. Four different sweetener samples were also analyzed and exhibited total phenolic/antioxidant levels from 500.9 to 3422.9 mg kg(-1) with respect to GA. The method was selective, rapid and sensitive when used to estimate the total phenolic/antioxidant level, and the results were in good agreement with those reported for honey and tea samples. PMID:26838423

  13. Polarizabilities of Halide Ions Co-Adsorbed on Silver Nanoparticles and Their Relationship to Increased Surface-Enhanced Raman Intensities of Rhodamine-6G and Pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Michael; Jagodzinski, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Glaspell et. al. (2004), found a linear relationship between the intensities of surface-enhanced Raman (SER) signals of selected vibrational modes of rhodamine-6G (R6G) and the polarizabilities of co-adsorbed halide ions. Furthermore, they noticed that the slopes of intensity versus time plots for R6G also exhibit a linear relationship with the halide polarizabilities. We will present similar results from the SER signals from selected vibrational modes of pyridine and the polarizabilities of co-adsorbed halide ions. In addition, we will present a plausible relationship between the adsorbates and the electric field of the induced dipole of the halide ions.

  14. Single molecule detection using SERS study in PVP functionalized Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Parul; Dhara, S.

    2013-02-01

    Non-spherical functionalized Ag nanoparticles (NPs) with homogenous size ˜ 40 nm have been grown using soft chemical route. Solution of silver nitrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone is reduced in excess of ethylene glycol for the preparation of the NPs. Substrates has been prepared by dip coating of the NPs on c-Si for Raman studies. Rhodamine (R6G) is used as a test molecule to study the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) effect. A single molecule detection of R6G along with an enhancement factor of ˜ 4×103 orders of magnitude in the intensity, for the concentration as low as 10-12 M using polymer coated Ag NPs as SERS substrates, has been achieved.

  15. Comparison and mechanism of photocatalytic activities of N-ZnO and N-ZrO2 for the degradation of rhodamine 6G.

    PubMed

    Sudrajat, Hanggara; Babel, Sandhya

    2016-05-01

    N-doped ZnO (N-ZnO) and N-doped ZrO2 (N-ZrO2) are synthesized by novel, simple thermal decomposition methods. The catalysts are evaluated for the degradation of rhodamine 6G (R6G) under visible and UV light. N-ZnO exhibits higher dye degradation under both visible and UV light compared to N-ZrO2 due to possessing higher specific surface area, lower crystalline size, and lower band gap. However, it is less reusable than N-ZrO2 and its photocatalytic activity is also deteriorated at low pH. At the same intensity of 3.5 W/m(2), UVC light is shown to be a better UV source for N-ZnO, while UVA light is more suitable for N-ZrO2. At pH 7 with initial dye concentration of 10 mg/L, catalyst concentration of 1 g/L, and UVC light, 94.3 % of R6G is degraded by N-ZnO within 2 h. Using UVA light under identical experimental conditions, 93.5 % degradation of R6G is obtained by N-ZrO2. Moreover, the type of light source is found to determine the reactive species produced in the R6G degradation by N-ZnO and N-ZrO2. Less oxidative reactive species such as superoxide radical and singlet oxygen play a major role in the degradation of R6G under visible light. On the contrary, highly oxidative hydroxyl radicals are predominant under UVC light. Based on the kinetic study, the adsorption of R6G on the catalyst surface is found to be the controlling step. PMID:26873829

  16. Ag-nanoparticles on UF-microsphere as an ultrasensitive SERS substrate with unique features for rhodamine 6G detection.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhixian; Mansuer, Mulati; Guo, Yuqing; Zhu, Zhirong; Wang, Xiaogang

    2016-01-01

    Urea and formaldehyde (UF) microsphere (MS) adsorbing Ag nanoparticles (NPs) was employed as a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for rhodamine 6G (R6G) detection. The UF MSs and citrate-reduced Ag colloid supplying Ag NPs are synthesized separately and all the subsequent fabrication procedure is then implemented within 2 mL centrifuge tube. Influences of the composition and drying temperature of the UF MSs and the drying method and modification of AgNP/UFMS on the final SERS performance have first been reported. Excess formaldehyde useful in the formation of UF MSs again plays an important role in the SERS detection. Some interesting phenomena in the approach, such as swelling/deswelling of UF MSs and R6G diffusion within hydrophilic environment of UF MSs, are found to be of variable factors affecting the SERS performance. The substrate AgNP/UFMS confidently achieves a detection limit of 10(-13) M R6G and can be used as a simple and effective platform in the SERS spectroscopy. PMID:26695301

  17. Investigating the Energy Transfer from Dye Molecules to DNA Stabilized Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Arun Singh; Sahoo, Harekrushna; Mohanty, T

    2016-09-01

    Double-stranded DNA stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are synthesized by chemical reduction method and characterized with different spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), & circular-dichroism (CD) as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These NPs show absorption maximum at 520 nm and size of most of the particles are of the order of 3.5 ± 1.0 nm. These Au NPs show crystalline nature as confirmed from electron diffraction pattern. The effect of formation of Au NPs on the macromolecule has been studied using infrared and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Formation of NPs causes conformational changes in the DNA molecules. These Au NPs are further used as resonant energy acceptor of fluorescence emission from dye molecules (Rhodamine 6G). The fluorescence intensity of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) is quenched in presence of Au NPs. The effect of DNA molecules on the fluorescence quenching and the rate of energy transfer from R6G molecules to Au NPs have been explored. PMID:27422695

  18. Spectrally resolved photon-echo spectroscopy of Rhodamine-6G

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajitesh; Karthick, S. K.; Goswami, D.

    2013-01-01

    Wavelength dependent study of a laser dye: Rhodamine-6G (Rh6G) by using spectrally resolved photon-echo spectroscopy is presented. The coherence and population dynamics of Rh6G solution in methanol changes as the excitation wavelength is tuned near its absorption maxima of 528 nm. Specifically, the central wavelength of the femtosecond laser pulse was set to 535 nm and to 560 nm while the respective spectra of the photon-echo signals were collected. This gives information on how the ultrafast dynamics of the Rh6G molecule changes with a change in the excitation wavelength. PMID:24098869

  19. Simultaneous time and frequency resolved fluorescence microscopy of single molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, Carl C.; Gradinaru, Claudiu C.; Chandler, David W.; Luong, A. Khai

    2005-01-01

    Single molecule fluorophores were studied for the first time with a new confocal fluorescence microscope that allows the wavelength and emission time to be simultaneously measured with single molecule sensitivity. In this apparatus, the photons collected from the sample are imaged through a dispersive optical system onto a time and position sensitive detector. This detector records the wavelength and emission time of each detected photon relative to an excitation laser pulse. A histogram of many events for any selected spatial region or time interval can generate a full fluorescence spectrum and correlated decay plot for the given selection. At the single molecule level, this approach makes entirely new types of temporal and spectral correlation spectroscopy of possible. This report presents the results of simultaneous time- and frequency-resolved fluorescence measurements of single rhodamine 6G (R6G), tetramethylrhodamine (TMR), and Cy3 embedded in thin films of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA).

  20. Highly fluorescent colloids based on rhodamine 6G, modified layered silicate, and organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Bujdák, Juraj; Iyi, Nobuo

    2012-12-15

    Synthetic layered silicate saponite was modified with dodecyltrimethylammonium (C12), octadecyltrimethylammonium (C18), and dioctadecyldimethylammonium (2C18) cations for use as sorbents of the laser dye, rhodamine 6G (R6G). Via solvent exchange, transparent colloids in xylene were prepared and investigated using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. Molecular aggregation and partial quenching of the fluorescence were observed for the colloids based on 2C18 cations. Maximal fluorescence yields were observed for the colloids with C12 and C18 cations. Transparent gels without an apparent loss of luminescent efficiency could be prepared by concentrating the colloids. These highly fluorescent colloids and gels represent new types of materials with interesting optical properties. PMID:22995248

  1. Spectroscopic Studies of Abiotic and Biological Nanomaterials: Silver Nanoparticles, Rhodamine 6G Adsorbed on Graphene, and c-Type Cytochromes and Type IV Pili in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrall, Elizabeth S.

    photooxidation rate does not track the plasmon resonance of the silver nanoparticles but instead rises monotonically with photon energy. These results are discussed in terms of plasmonic enhancement mechanisms and a theoretical model describing hot carrier photochemistry. The second chapter explores the electronic absorption and resonance Raman scattering of the dye molecule rhodamine 6G (R6G) adsorbed on graphene. Graphene has been shown to quench the fluorescence of adsorbed molecules and quantum dots, and some previous studies have reported that the Raman scattering from molecules adsorbed on graphene is enhanced. We show that reflective contrast spectroscopy can be used to obtain the electronic absorption spectrum of R6G adsorbed on graphene, allowing us to estimate the surface concentration of the dye molecule. From these results we are able to calculate the absolute Raman scattering cross-section for R6G adsorbed on bilayer graphene. We find that there is no evidence of enhancement but instead that the cross-section is reduced by more than three-fold from its value in solution. We further show that a model incorporating electromagnetic interference effects can reproduce the observed dependence of the R6G Raman intensity on the number of graphene layers. The third and final chapter describes the preliminary results from studies of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens . This anaerobic bacterium couples the oxidation of organic carbon sources to the reduction of iron oxides and other extracellular electron acceptors, a type of anaerobic respiration that necessitates an electron transport chain that can move electrons from the interior of the cell to the extracellular environment. The electron transport chain in G. sulfurreducens has not been completely characterized and two competing mechanisms for the charge transport have been proposed. The first holds that G. sulfurreducens produces type IV

  2. Rotational and translational dynamics of rhodamine 6G in a pyrrolidinium ionic liquid: a combined time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and NMR study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianchang; Han, Kee Sung; Mahurin, Shannon M; Baker, Gary A; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Hagaman, Edward W; Shaw, Robert W

    2012-07-12

    NMR spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay (TRFAD) are two of the most commonly used methods to study solute-solvent interactions. However, only a few studies have been reported to date using a combined NMR and TRFAD approach to systematically investigate the overall picture of diffusional and rotational dynamics of both the solute and solvent. In this paper, we combined NMR and TRFAD to probe fluorescent rhodamine dye in a pyrrolidinium-based room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), an emergent environmentally friendly solvent type used in several energy-related applications. A specific interaction of the R6G cation and [Tf2N] anion was identified, resulting in near-stick boundary condition rotation of R6G in this RTIL. The diffusional rates of the R6G solute and [C4mpyr][Tf2N] solvent derived from (1)H NMR suggest the rates are proportional to their corresponding hydrodynamic radii. The (1)H and (13)C NMR studies of self-rotational dynamics of [C4mpyr][Tf2N] showed that the self-rotational correlation time of [C4mpyr](+) is 47 ± 2 ps at 300 K. At the same temperature, we find that the correlation time for N-CH3 rotation in [C4mpyr](+) is 77 ± 2 ps, comparable to overall molecular reorientation. This slow motion is attributed to properties of the cation structure. PMID:22690897

  3. Rotational and Translational Dynamics of Rhodamine 6G in a Pyrrolidinium Ionic Liquid: A Combined Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy Decay and NMR Study

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianchang; Han, Kee Sung; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Baker, Gary A; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Shaw, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay (TRFAD) are two of the most commonly used methods to study solute-solvent interactions. However, only a few studies have been reported to date using a combined NMR and TRFAD approach to systematically investigate the overall picture of diffusional and rotational dynamics of both the solute and solvent. In this paper, we combined NMR and TRFAD to probe fluorescent rhodamine dyes in a pyrrolidinium-based room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), an emergent environmentally-friendly solvent type used in several energy-related applications. A specific interaction of the R6G cation and [Tf2N]- anion was identified, resulting in near-stick boundary condition rotation of R6G in this RTIL. The diffusional rates of the R6G solute and [C4mpyr][Tf2N] solvent derived from 1H NMR suggest the rates are proportional to their corresponding hydrodynamic radii. The 1H and 13C NMR studies of self-rotational dynamics of [C4mpyr][Tf2N] showed that the self-rotational correlation time of [C4mpyr]+ is 47 2 ps at 300 K. At the same temperature, we find that the correlation time for N-CH3 rotation in [C4mpyr]+ is 77 2 ps, comparable to overall molecular reorientation. This slow motion is attributed to properties of the cation structure.

  4. Pressure-induced changes on the optical properties and microstructure of silica-gel matrices doped with rhodamine 6G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Tania Maria Haas; Hoffmann, Helena Sofia; Benvenutti, Edilson Valmir; Stefani, Valter; Gallas, Marcia Russman

    2005-12-01

    Sol-gel method and high-pressure technique were associated to produce silica compacts with low porosity and doped with rhodamine 6G (R6G). Acid catalyzed solutions of tetraethyl orthosilicate mixed with dye previously dissolved in ethanol were used for the synthesis of doped silica gel. The monolith obtained was comminuted and the powder was compacted between 3.0 and 7.7 GPa, at room temperature, using a toroidal-type high-pressure chamber. Excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy was used to investigate the optical properties of R6G embedded in the closed pores of the silica matrix. Measurements of surface areas and pore size distribution for the powders and compacts, using the N2 isotherms were performed, showing a great reduction in surface area and porosity, after compaction. The dye entrapped in the compacted silica maintains its optical properties similar to that in ethanolic solutions, meaning that the dye is dispersed in a molecular level. Additionally, these samples are optically transparent, hard and resistant to dye leaching and to chemical attacks, being a promising material to be used in optical devices.

  5. Concentration quenching of rhodamine 6G fluorescence in the adsorbed state

    SciTech Connect

    Zemskii, V.I.; Meshkovskii, I.K.; Sokolov, I.A.

    1985-08-01

    Porous glass to which molecules of organic dyes have been added is a promising active solid medium for tunable lasers. The spectroluminescent characteristics of samples of porous glass activated with rhodamine 6G molecules have been studied. It is shown that molecules of rhodamine 6G adsorbed in porus glass retain their capacity for fluorescence with a high quantum yield. Fixation of rhodamine 6G molecules on the pore walls interferes with their association in the concentration range up to 10/sup 19/ cm/sup -3/. Concentration quenching of fluorescence is observed starting with a concentration of dye molecules of 5 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/; this is explained by inductive-resonance energy transfer between monomeric molecules under conditions of inhomogeneous broadening of the electronic spectra of the adsorbed molecules.

  6. Optical Properties of Rhodamine 6G Laser Dye and Ag-Nanoparticle Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noginov, M. A.; Drachev, V. P.

    2005-03-01

    Optical absorption and luminescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) laser dye of different concentration with a solution of aggregated silver nanoparticles are studied. New emission band located near 610 nm is found at very high concentration of Rh6G and/or in a solution of Rh6G and Ag nanoparticles. Electron energy structure and optical functions of single Rh6G molecules, molecular complexes, and Rh6G molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) surface are studied by generalized gradient approximation method within density functional theory using ab initio pseudopotentials. Equilibrium geometries of the systems studied are obtained from both molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray diffraction measurements. Electronic structure of J-type molecular complexes (when two molecules aligned along their dipole moment axes) substantially differs from that of H-type aggregates (with parallel and anti-parallel molecular dipole moments). It is demonstrated that new luminescence line is associated with J-type molecular complexes. Observed modifications of optical properties of Rh6G and Rh6G+Ag complexes are explained in terms of both the changes of electronic structure of the systems and due to the electromagnetic interactions of dipole-dipole and dipole-surface types.

  7. Effects of Organic Molecules with Different Structures and Absorption Bandwidth on Modulating Photoresponse of MoS2 Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanmin; Zheng, Wei; Qiu, Yunfeng; Hu, PingAn

    2016-09-01

    Organic dye molecules possessing modulated optical absorption bandwidth and molecular structures can be utilized as sensitizing species for the enhancement of photodetector performance of semiconductor via photoinduced charge transfer mechanism. MoS2 photodetector were modified by drop-casting of methyl orange (MO), rhodamine 6G (R6G), and methylene blue (MB) with different molecular structures and extinction coefficients, and enhanced photodetector performance in terms of photocurrent, photoresponsity, photodetectivity, and external quantum efficiency were obtained after modification of MO, R6G, and MB, respectively. Furthermore, dyes showed different modulating abilities for photodetector performance after combination with MoS2, mainly due to the variation of molecular structures and optical absorption bandwidth. Among tested dyes, deposition of MB onto monolayer MoS2 grown by CVD resulted in photocurrent ∼20 times as high as pristine MoS2 due to favorable photoinduced charge transfer of photoexcited electrons from flat MB molecules to the MoS2 layer. Meanwhile, the corresponding photoresponsivity, photodetectivity, and an external quantum efficiency are 9.09 A W(1-), 2.2 × 10(11) Jones, 1729% at 610 nm, respectively. Photoinduced electron-transfer measurements of the pristine MoS2 and dye-modified MoS2 indicated the n-doping effect of dye molecules on the MoS2. Additionally, surface-enhanced Raman measurements also confirmed the direct correlation with charge transfer between organic dyes and MoS2 taking into account the chemically enhanced Raman scattering mechanism. Present work provides a new clue for the manipulation of high-performance of two-dimensional layered semiconductor-based photodetector via the combination of organic dyes. PMID:27530058

  8. Silver nanoparticle size-dependent measurement of quantum efficiency of Rhodamine 6G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basheer, N. Shemeena; Kumar, B. Rajesh; Kurian, Achamma; George, Sajan D.

    2013-12-01

    The plasmonic absorption band of silver nanoparticles in the visible range of electromagnetic spectrum has been successfully exploited to alter the emission characteristics of the Rhodamine 6G dye molecule. The influence of the nanoparticle size on the fluorescence quantum yield of Rhodamine 6G is interrogated via steady state fluorescence as well as dual beam thermal lens technique. The potential of the thermal lens technique that probe nonradiative path in contrast to radiative path exhibited in the fluorescence spectra as a complementary method to measure the quantum yield of a dye molecule is exploited. Analysis of the results clearly indicates that the particle size and the spectral overlap between the emission spectra of Rhodamine 6G, and absorption spectra of the silver nanoparticles determine the quantum yield value of dye-nanoparticle mixture.

  9. Mechanism for radiative energy transfer and expansion of the spectral lasing range in a rhodamine 6G--oxazine 17 system

    SciTech Connect

    Reva, M.G.; Akimov, A.I.; Korol'kova, N.V.; Kurokhtin, N.V.; Uzhinov, B.M.

    1985-12-01

    The nature of radiative transfer of electronic excitation energy from rhodamine 6G to oxazine 17 is determined. As a result of laser excitation, lasing in the acceptor (oxazine 17) is achieved due to absorption of donor (rhodamine 6G) luminescence by its molecules. The continuous tuning range of single-component ethanol solutions of rhodamine 6G and oxazine 17, and of a binary rhodamine 6G--oxazine 17 system with energy transfer, is determined.

  10. Computational study of Gleevec and G6G reveals molecular determinants of kinase inhibitor selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yen -Lin; Meng, Yilin; Huang, Lei; Roux, Benoît

    2014-10-22

    Gleevec is a potent inhibitor of Abl tyrosine kinase but not of the highly homologous c-Src kinase. Because the ligand binds to an inactive form of the protein in which an Asp-Phe-Gly structural motif along the activation loop adopts a so-called DFG-out conformation, it was suggested that binding specificity was controlled by a “conformational selection” mechanism. In this context, the binding affinity displayed by the kinase inhibitor G6G poses an intriguing challenge. Although it possesses a chemical core very similar to that of Gleevec, G6G is a potent inhibitor of both Abl and c-Src kinases. Both inhibitors bind to the DFG-out conformation of the kinases, which seems to be in contradiction with the conformational selection mechanism. To address this issue and display the hidden thermodynamic contributions affecting the binding selectivity, molecular dynamics free energy simulations with explicit solvent molecules were carried out. Relative to Gleevec, G6G forms highly favorable van der Waals dispersive interactions upon binding to the kinases via its triazine functional group, which is considerably larger than the corresponding pyridine moiety in Gleevec. Upon binding of G6G to c-Src, these interactions offset the unfavorable free energy cost of the DFG-out conformation. When binding to Abl, however, G6G experiences an unfavorable free energy penalty due to steric clashes with the phosphate-binding loop, yielding an overall binding affinity that is similar to that of Gleevec. Such steric clashes are absent when G6G binds to c-Src, due to the extended conformation of the phosphate-binding loop.

  11. Computational study of Gleevec and G6G reveals molecular determinants of kinase inhibitor selectivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Yen -Lin; Meng, Yilin; Huang, Lei; Roux, Benoît

    2014-10-22

    Gleevec is a potent inhibitor of Abl tyrosine kinase but not of the highly homologous c-Src kinase. Because the ligand binds to an inactive form of the protein in which an Asp-Phe-Gly structural motif along the activation loop adopts a so-called DFG-out conformation, it was suggested that binding specificity was controlled by a “conformational selection” mechanism. In this context, the binding affinity displayed by the kinase inhibitor G6G poses an intriguing challenge. Although it possesses a chemical core very similar to that of Gleevec, G6G is a potent inhibitor of both Abl and c-Src kinases. Both inhibitors bind to themore » DFG-out conformation of the kinases, which seems to be in contradiction with the conformational selection mechanism. To address this issue and display the hidden thermodynamic contributions affecting the binding selectivity, molecular dynamics free energy simulations with explicit solvent molecules were carried out. Relative to Gleevec, G6G forms highly favorable van der Waals dispersive interactions upon binding to the kinases via its triazine functional group, which is considerably larger than the corresponding pyridine moiety in Gleevec. Upon binding of G6G to c-Src, these interactions offset the unfavorable free energy cost of the DFG-out conformation. When binding to Abl, however, G6G experiences an unfavorable free energy penalty due to steric clashes with the phosphate-binding loop, yielding an overall binding affinity that is similar to that of Gleevec. Such steric clashes are absent when G6G binds to c-Src, due to the extended conformation of the phosphate-binding loop.« less

  12. Flashlamp pumped polymer dye laser containing Rhodamine 6G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, A. J.; Peters, N.; Kolinsky, P. V.; Venner, M. R. W.

    1998-04-01

    Polymeric rods incorporating the laser dye Rhodamine 6G in a copolymer of hydroxypropyl acrylate and methylmethacrylate have been shown to lase under flashlamp excitation. The rods exhibit high bulk transmission levels, coupled with positive lensing characteristics, that have enabled output energies up to 354 mJ/pulse with a 0.14% energy efficiency to be demonstrated in a preliminary study.

  13. Effect of gold nanoparticles on the optical properties of Rhodamine 6G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzan, Mohammad; Hajiesmaeilbaigi, Fereshteh

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles are synthesized by the laser ablation method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The absorption and emission spectra and powers of Rhodamine 6G in the absence and presence of 27 nm diameter gold nanoparticles were studied. Empirical measurements represented that presence of gold nanoparticles lead to decrease the fluorescence power and fluorescence quantum yield, and increase the absorbance and absorbed power of Rhodamine 6G. Also, Stern-Volmer quenching constant of dye in proximity of nanoparticles shows high value which implies efficient quenching of the dye fluorescence by gold nanoparticles. Fluorescence quantum yield, radiative and nonradiative decay rate of Rhodamine 6G-gold nanoparticles assembly, in parallel orientation, as a function of dye's dipole moment distance from gold nanoparticle's surface, based on Gersten-Nitzan model, are calculated. Calculations show variations of the fluorescence quenching is strongly depended on the distance between the dye molecules and the Nps' surface. Also, calculated radiative decay rate indicates good agreement with the experimental value, and results of the ratio of the nonradiative to the radiative decay rate of Rhodamine 6G-gold nanoparticles mixture show nonradiative energy transfer is better explained in terms of NSET rather than FRET mechanism.

  14. Sonocatalytic and sonophotocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine 6G containing wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Bokhale, Nileema B; Bomble, Snehal D; Dalbhanjan, Rachana R; Mahale, Deepika D; Hinge, Shruti P; Banerjee, Barnali S; Mohod, Ashish V; Gogate, Parag R

    2014-09-01

    The present work deals with degradation of aqueous solution of Rhodamine 6G (Rh 6G) using sonocatalytic and sonophotocatalytic treatment schemes based on the use of cupric oxide (CuO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) as the solid catalysts. Experiments have been carried out at the operating capacity of 2 L and constant initial pH of 12.5. The effect of catalyst loading on the sonochemical degradation has been investigated by varying the loading over the range of 1.5-4.5 g/L. It has been observed that the maximum degradation of 52.2% was obtained at an optimum concentration of CuO as 1.5 g/L whereas for TiO2 maximum degradation was observed as 51.2% at a loading of 4 g/L over similar treatment period. Studies with presence of radical scavengers such as methanol (CH3OH) and n-butanol (C4H9OH) indicated lower extents of degradation confirming the dominance of radical mechanism. The combined approach of ultrasound, solid catalyst and scavengers has also been investigated at optimum loadings to simulate real conditions. The optimal solid loading was used for studies involving oxidation using UV irradiations where 26.4% and 28.9% of degradation was achieved at optimal loading of CuO and TiO2, respectively. Studies using combination of UV and US irradiations have also been carried out using the optimal concentration of the catalysts. It has been observed that maximum degradation of 63.3% is achieved using combined US and UV with TiO2 (4 g/L) as the photocatalyst. Overall it can be said that the combined processes give higher extent of degradation as compared to the individual processes based on US or UV irradiations. PMID:24726320

  15. Stimulated emission from aluminium anode oxide films doped with rhodamine 6G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrayev, N. Kh; Zeinidenov, A. K.; Aimukhanov, A. K.; Napolskii, K. S.

    2015-07-01

    The spectral and luminescent properties of the rhodamine 6G dye in a porous matrix of aluminium anode oxide are studied. The films with a highly-ordered porous structure are produced using the method of two-stage anodic oxidation. By means of raster electron microscopy it is found that the diameter of the pores amounts to nearly 50 nm and the separation between the adjacent channels is almost 105 nm. The thickness of the films is equal to 55 μm, and the specific surface area measured using the method of nitrogen capillary condensation is 15.3 m2 g-1. Fluorescence and absorption spectra of rhodamine 6G molecules injected into the pores of the aluminium anode oxide are measured. It is found that under the excitation of samples with the surface dye concentration 0.3 × 1014 molecules m-2 by the second harmonic of the Nd : YAG laser in the longitudinal scheme with the pumping intensity 0.4 MW cm-2, a narrow band of stimulated emission with the intensity maximum at the wavelength 572 nm appears against the background of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum. A further increase in the pumping radiation intensity leads to the narrowing of the stimulated emission band and an increase in its intensity. The obtained results demonstrate the potential possibility of using the porous films of aluminium anode oxide, doped with laser dyes, in developing active elements for quantum electronics.

  16. Investigating Two-Photon-Induced Fluorescence in Rhodamine-6G in Presence of Cetyl-Trimethyl-Ammonium-Bromide.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Sandeep Kumar; Yadav, Dheerendra; Goswami, Debabrata

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the effect of cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium-bromides (CTAB) concentration on the fluorescence of Rhodamine-6G in water. This spectroscopic study of Rhodamine-6G in presence of CTAB was performed using two-photon-induced-fluorescence at 780 nm wavelength using high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses. We report an increment of ∼10 % in the fluorescence in accordance with ∼12 % enhancement in the absorption intensity of the dye molecule around the critical micellar concentration. We discuss the possible mechanism for the enhancement in the two-photon fluorescence intensity and the importance of critical micellar concentration. PMID:27324955

  17. Absorption-polarization characteristics of rhodamine 6G and its base in poly(methyl methacrylate)

    SciTech Connect

    Prishchepov, A.S.; Nizamou, N.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented of the measurement and analysis of the absorption-polarization characteristics of rhodamine 6G and the base of rhodamine 6G (BR6G) in polymeric films of poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA). The absorption spectrum of a PMMA film containing BR6G and the cationic dye in the monomeric and associated states are shown.

  18. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of various carbon nanostructures (GO, G and nanodiamond) in Rd6G solution

    PubMed Central

    Bavali, A.; Parvin, P.; Mortazavi, S. Z.; Nourazar, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of carbon nanostructures such as graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO) and nanodiamond (ND) on the spectral properties of Rhodamine 6G (Rd6G) emission due to the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was investigated. It is shown that the addition of carbon nano- structures lead to sensible Red/Blue shifts which depend on the optical properties and surface functionality of nanoparticles. The current theories such as resonance energy transfer (RET), fluorescence quenching and photon propagation in scattering media support the experimental findings. Stern-Volmer curves for dynamic and static quenching of Rd6G molecules embedded with G, GO and nanodiamond are correlated with spectral shifts. Furthermore, time evolution of the spectral shift contributes to determine loading/release rates of fluorescent species with large S-parameter on the given nano-carriers. PMID:26137372

  19. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of various carbon nanostructures (GO, G and nanodiamond) in Rd6G solution.

    PubMed

    Bavali, A; Parvin, P; Mortazavi, S Z; Nourazar, S S

    2015-05-01

    The effect of carbon nanostructures such as graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO) and nanodiamond (ND) on the spectral properties of Rhodamine 6G (Rd6G) emission due to the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was investigated. It is shown that the addition of carbon nano- structures lead to sensible Red/Blue shifts which depend on the optical properties and surface functionality of nanoparticles. The current theories such as resonance energy transfer (RET), fluorescence quenching and photon propagation in scattering media support the experimental findings. Stern-Volmer curves for dynamic and static quenching of Rd6G molecules embedded with G, GO and nanodiamond are correlated with spectral shifts. Furthermore, time evolution of the spectral shift contributes to determine loading/release rates of fluorescent species with large S-parameter on the given nano-carriers. PMID:26137372

  20. Accurate and absolute diffusion measurements of Rhodamine 6G in low-concentration aqueous solutions by the PGSE-WATERGATE sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majer, G.; Zick, K.

    2015-04-01

    A pulsed field gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sequence with solvent suppression (PGSE-WATERGATE) was applied to accurately measure the diffusion coefficients of Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in low-concentration aqueous solutions. Three samples with Rh6G concentrations of CRh6G = 1, 4.5, and 25 μM were investigated. The precise determination of the diffusion coefficients in this low-concentration range was made possible by using a cryogenically cooled NMR probe and by the effective solvent suppression of the PGSE-WATERGATE sequence. The present results bridge the gap between diffusion data measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in the single molecule limit and diffusivities obtained by pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) without solvent suppression at higher concentrations. To further extend the concentration range, the diffusion coefficient of Rh6G was also measured on a sample with CRh6G = 410 μM by PFG-NMR. The overall concentration dependence of the Rh6G diffusion at 25 °C is discussed in terms of dimerization of the Rh6G molecules. The concentration-dependent monomer/dimer proportion is deduced from the diffusion data.

  1. Accurate and absolute diffusion measurements of Rhodamine 6G in low-concentration aqueous solutions by the PGSE-WATERGATE sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, G.; Zick, K.

    2015-04-28

    A pulsed field gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sequence with solvent suppression (PGSE-WATERGATE) was applied to accurately measure the diffusion coefficients of Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in low-concentration aqueous solutions. Three samples with Rh6G concentrations of C{sub Rh6G} = 1, 4.5, and 25 μM were investigated. The precise determination of the diffusion coefficients in this low-concentration range was made possible by using a cryogenically cooled NMR probe and by the effective solvent suppression of the PGSE-WATERGATE sequence. The present results bridge the gap between diffusion data measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in the single molecule limit and diffusivities obtained by pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) without solvent suppression at higher concentrations. To further extend the concentration range, the diffusion coefficient of Rh6G was also measured on a sample with C{sub Rh6G} = 410 μM by PFG-NMR. The overall concentration dependence of the Rh6G diffusion at 25 °C is discussed in terms of dimerization of the Rh6G molecules. The concentration-dependent monomer/dimer proportion is deduced from the diffusion data.

  2. Cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates for rhodamine 6-G in levitated microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M. ); Arnold, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence decay kinetics of Rhodamine 6-G molecules in levitated glycerol microdroplets (4--20 microns in diameter) have been investigated to determine the effects of spherical cavity resonances on spontaneous emission rates. For droplet diameters greater than 10 microns, the fluorescence lifetime is essentially the same as in bulk glycerol. As the droplet diameter is decreased below 10 microns, bi-exponential decay behavior is observed with a slow component whose rate is similar to bulk glycerol, and a fast component whose rate is as much as a factor of 10 larger than the bulk decay rate. This fast component is attributed to cavity enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate and, within the weak coupling approximation, a value for the homogeneous linewidth at room temperature can be estimated from the fluorescence lifetime data.

  3. Cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates for rhodamine 6-G in levitated microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.; Arnold, S.

    1992-11-01

    Fluorescence decay kinetics of Rhodamine 6-G molecules in levitated glycerol microdroplets (4--20 microns in diameter) have been investigated to determine the effects of spherical cavity resonances on spontaneous emission rates. For droplet diameters greater than 10 microns, the fluorescence lifetime is essentially the same as in bulk glycerol. As the droplet diameter is decreased below 10 microns, bi-exponential decay behavior is observed with a slow component whose rate is similar to bulk glycerol, and a fast component whose rate is as much as a factor of 10 larger than the bulk decay rate. This fast component is attributed to cavity enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate and, within the weak coupling approximation, a value for the homogeneous linewidth at room temperature can be estimated from the fluorescence lifetime data.

  4. Air heating approach for multilayer etching and roll-to-roll transfer of silicon nanowire arrays as SERS substrates for high sensitivity molecule detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiujuan; Gao, Peng; Shao, Zhibin; Zhang, Xiwei; Han, Yuanyan; Jie, Jiansheng

    2014-01-22

    SiNW array represents an attractive system for construction of high-performance energy, electronic, and sensor devices. To meet the demand for flexible devices as well as address the concern about the full use of the Si material, large-area transfer of the SiNW array from growth substrate is very desirable. Here, we report a simple air heating approach to achieve the multilayer etched SiNW array. This method allows the fabrication of up to a five-layer (while perfectly three-layer) cracked SiNW array on single-crystalline Si wafer via a templateless metal-assisted etching approach. Fractures could happen at the crack position when an appropriate pressure was applied on the SiNW array, facilitating the wafer-scale layer-by-layer transfer of the SiNW array onto a flexible substrate through a low-cost and time-efficient roll-to-roll (R2R) technique. Further releasing of the SiNW array to other receiving substrates was accomplished with the aid of a thermal release tape. After modification with sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs), the flexible SiNW array showed great potential as a high-sensitivity surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate for detecting rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecule with concentration as low as 10(-9) M. PMID:24377283

  5. Synthesis and SERS activity of V2O5 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Li, M.; Luo, Y. Y.; Wu, H.; Zhong, L.; Wang, Q.; Li, G. H.

    2015-04-01

    Vanadium pentoxide nanoparticles with different sizes were prepared by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal reduction combined with subsequent annealing treatment. The surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) activity of rhodamine 6G (R6G) over V2O5 nanoparticles was investigated. It was found that the SERS activity of R6G is size-dependent, and the smaller the nanoparticle size the higher the SERS activity. The V2O5 nanoparticles with an average size about 42 nm have a detecting limit better than 10-8 M R6G. The SERS activity of R6G over V2O5 nanoparticles is also excitation wavelength-dependent, and the 532 nm laser displays an optimal SERS activity because of the energy matching between V2O5 nanoparticles and R6G molecules in the photo-induced charge transfer process.

  6. Development of magnetic luminescent core/shell nanocomplex particles with fluorescence using Rhodamine 6G

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee Uk; Song, Yoon Seok; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A simple method was developed to synthesize Co-B/SiO{sub 2}/dye/SiO{sub 2} composite particles. ► The magnetic particle shows that highly luminescent and core/shell particles are formed. ► Such core/shell particles can be easily suspended in water. ► The magnetic particles could detect fluorescence for the application of biosensor. -- Abstract: A simple and reproducible method was developed to synthesize a novel class of Co-B/SiO{sub 2}/dye/SiO{sub 2} composite core/shell particles. Using a single cobalt core, Rhodamine 6G of organic dye molecules was entrapped in a silica shell, resulting in core/shell particles of ∼200 nm diameter. Analyses using a variety of techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibration sample magnetometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and fluorescence intensity demonstrated that dye molecules were trapped inside the core/shell particles. A photoluminescence investigation showed that highly luminescent and photostable core/shell particles were formed. Such core/shell particles can be easily suspended in water. The synthesized magnetic particles could be used to detect fluorescence on glass substrate arrays for bioassay and biosensor applications.

  7. Recent Progress in the Study of Single Molecule Chemistry at the Nanometer Length Scale and Picosecond Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duyne, Richard

    2015-03-01

    During the last few years, there has been an explosion of interest and activity in the field of plasmonics. The goal of plasmonics is to control and manipulate light on the nanometer length scale using the properties of the collective electronic excitations in noble metal films or nanoparticles, known as surface plasmons. An improved understanding of the interactions between adsorbed molecules and plasmonic nanostructures (i.e., molecular plasmonics) is having a significant impact in a number of research areas including electrochemistry, surface science, catalysis for energy conversion and storage, the materials science of nanoparticles, biomedical diagnostics, art conservation science, and nanolithography. In the first part of this lecture, I will provide some background material on the basic physical concepts underlying molecular plasmonics with an emphasis on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy, and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). In the second part of this lecture, I will focus in on three recent advances in TERS which illustrate the power of this nanoscale vibrational spectroscopy. First, new insights into the nature of the relative intensity fluctuations in single molecule tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SMTERS) will be discussed. Second, our current understanding of the adsorbate surface interactions involved in the low temperature (LT), ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) TERS of the Ag tip/Rhodamine 6G (R6G) /Ag(111) system will be described. Finally, an update on our new results in coupling ultrafast lasers with TERS. This last topic illuminates a path forward toward the goal of understanding chemistry at the space-time limit.

  8. When is a single molecule heterogeneous? A multidimensional answer and its application to dynamics near the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sachin Dev; Vanden Bout, David A.; Berg, Mark A.

    2015-07-01

    Even for apparently simple condensed-phase processes, bulk measurements of relaxation often yield nonexponential decays; the rate appears to be dispersed over a range of values. Taking averages over individual molecules is an intuitive way to determine whether heterogeneity is responsible for such rate dispersion. However, this method is in fundamental conflict with ergodic behavior and often yields ambiguous results. This paper proposes a new definition of rate heterogeneity for ergodic systems based on multidimensional time correlation functions. Averages are taken over both time and molecules. Because the data set is not subdivided, the signal-to-noise ratio is improved. Moment-based quantities are introduced to quantify the concept of rate dispersion. As a result, quantitative statements about the fraction of the dispersion due to heterogeneity are possible, and the experimental noise is further averaged. The practicality of this approach is demonstrated on single-molecule, linear-dichroism trajectories for R6G in poly(cyclohexyl acrylate) near its glass transition. Single-molecule averaging of these data does not provide useful conclusions [C. Y. Lu and D. A. Vanden Bout, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 124701 (2006)]. However, full-ensemble, two- and three-dimensional averages of the same data give clear and quantitative results: the rate dispersion is 95% ± 5% due to heterogeneity, and the rate exchange is at least 11 times longer than the mean rotation time and possibly much longer. Based on these results, we suggest that the study of heterogeneous materials should not focus on "ensemble" versus "single-molecule" experiments, but on one-dimensional versus multidimensional measurements.

  9. Thermal-Lens Study on the Distance-Dependent Energy Transfer from Rhodamine 6G to Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. Rajesh; Basheer, N. Shemeena; Kurian, Achamma; George, Sajan D.

    2013-10-01

    A study on energy transfer from the Rhodamine 6G (donor) to gold nanoparticles (acceptor) is investigated using a laser-based dual-beam thermal-lens technique. The nanoparticles are observed to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of the dye molecule via a nonradiative energy transfer mechanism. The influence of nanoparticle concentration on the energy transfer mechanism with Rhodamine 6G is investigated. Analysis of the results indicates that the energy transfer efficiency is high (more than 50 %) in the presence of nanoparticles and the efficiency is enhanced with an increase in the nanoparticle concentration. The distance between the nanoparticle and dye molecule is evaluated on the basis of the nanomaterial surface energy transfer model. The thermal-lens studies probe the nonradiative path of de-excitation of the excited molecule, and the comparison between this technique and the conventional fluorescence method in measuring the distance as well as the energy-transfer efficiency clearly indicates that the thermal-lens technique is a complementary approach to study the energy-transfer mechanism between a donor and an acceptor.

  10. Photodegradation and self-healing in a Rhodamine 6G dye and nanoparticle-doped polyurethane random laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin R.; Gunawidjaja, Ray; Eilers, Hergen

    2015-07-01

    One of the fundamental difficulties in implementing organic dyes in random lasers is irreversible photodegradation of the dye molecules, leading to loss of performance and the need to replace the dye. We report the observation of self-healing after photodegradation in a Rhodamine 6G dye and nanoparticle-doped polyurethane random laser. During irradiation, we observe two distinct temporal regions in which the random lasing emission first increases in intensity and redshifts, followed by further redshifting, spectral broadening, and decay in the emission intensity. After irradiation, the emission intensity is found to recover back to its peak value, while still being broadened and redshifted, which leads to the result of an enhancement of the spectrally integrated intensity. We also perform IR-VIS absorbance measurements and find that the results suggest that during irradiation, some of the dye molecules form dimers and trimers and that the polymer host is irreversibly damaged by photooxidation and Norrish type I photocleavage.

  11. Study of concentration-dependent quantum yield of Rhodamine 6G by gold nanoparticles using thermal-lens technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. Rajesh; Basheer, N. Shemeena; Kurian, Achamma; George, Sajan D.

    2014-06-01

    Tailoring optical properties of the dye molecules using metal nanoparticles is a burgeoning area of research. In this work, we report our results on the studies of how the absorption and emission behavior of Rhodamine 6G dye is tailored using gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, the influence of dye concentration on these properties for a given concentration of nanoparticles in the dye-nanoparticle mixture is investigated. In addition, the difference between the concentration-dependent fluorescence quantum yield of the dye molecules is measured in the absence and presence of nanoparticles using the dual-beam thermal-lens technique. Our absorption spectral studies show additional spectral features due to nanoparticle aggregation on interaction with cationic Rhodamine 6G dye. Dye concentration-dependent steady-state fluorescence studies in the presence of nanoparticles indicate a blue shift in peak fluorescence emission wavelength. The quantum yield value measured using thermal-lens technique exhibit a non-monotonic behavior with dye concentration with substantial quenching for lower dye concentrations. The results are interpreted in terms of dye-nanoparticle interaction and the formation of dye shell around the nanoparticle.

  12. Aggregation of Rhodamine 6G in titanium dioxide nanolayers and bulk xerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewkowicz, Aneta; Synak, Anna; Bojarski, Piotr; Grobelna, Beata; Karczewski, Jakub; Jankowski, Dawid; Mahlik, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    Nanolayers and bulk xerogels of Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in titanium dioxide (Rh6G/TiO2) were prepared using the sol-gel method. The spectroscopic and structural properties of these two types of hybrid matrices were studied as a function of dye concentration. In both cases absorption, fluorescence and time resolved emission spectra show the formation of fluorescent aggregates. The observed stronger changes in characteristics of bulk xerogels can be explained not only by the formation of aggregates but also by different structure of both materials.

  13. Output characteristics of a laser utilizing rhodamine 6G in microporous glass

    SciTech Connect

    Al'tshuler, G.B.; Dul'neva, E.G.; Krylov, K.I.; Meshkovskii, I.K.; Urbanovich, V.S.

    1983-06-01

    A study was made of the lasing characteristics of new active media in the form of microporous glass containing a dye. The efficiency of conversion of the pump radiation, and the spatial and frequency spectra of the output radiation were determined for lasers with dispersive and nondispersive resonators and with active elements in the form of an ethanol solution of rhodamine 6G or microporous glass containing either rhodamine 6G or its ethanol solution. It was found that the use of active elements made of microporous glass and containing rhodamine 6G improved considerably the spatial characteristics of the output radiation compared with those obtained using liquid active media.

  14. Fabrication and Photostability of Rhodamine-6G Gold Nanoparticle Doped Polymer Optical Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suneetha, Sebastian; Ajina, C.; P. G Vallabhan, C.; P. N. Nampoori, V.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Kailasnath, M.

    2013-11-01

    We report on fabrication of a rhodamine-6G-gold-nanoparticle doped polymer optical fiber. The gold nanoparticle is synthesized directly into the monomer solution of the polymer using laser ablation synthesis in liquid. The size of the particle is found from the transmission electron microscopy. Rhodamine-6G is then mixed with the nanoparticle-monomer solution and optical characterization of the solution is investigated. It is found that there is a pronounced quenching of fluorescence of rhodamine 6G due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The monomer solution containing rhodamine 6G and gold nanoparticles is now made into a cylindrical rod and drawn into a polymer optical fiber. Further, the photostability is calculated with respect to the pure dye doped polymer optical fiber.

  15. Ly6G-mediated depletion of neutrophils is dependent on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Kevin W; Dekitani, Ken; Nielsen, Travis B; Pantapalangkoor, Paul; Spellberg, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils is commonly used to study neutropenia. However, the mechanisms by which antibodies deplete neutrophils have not been well defined. We noticed that mice deficient in complement and macrophages had blunted neutrophil depletion in response to anti-Ly6G monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment. In vitro, exposure of murine neutrophils to anti-Ly6G MAb in the presence of plasma did not result in significant depletion of cells, either in the presence or absence of complement. In vivo, anti-Ly6G-mediated neutrophil depletion was abrogated following macrophage depletion, but not complement depletion, indicating a requirement for macrophages to induce neutropenia by this method. These results inform the use and limitations of anti-Ly6G antibody as an experimental tool for depleting neutrophils in various immunological settings. PMID:26870635

  16. Transient absorption in water-micellar solutions of rhodamine 6G with flash lamp excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.B.; Cherkasov, A.S.

    1986-06-01

    This paper studies the kinetics of transient losses in water-micellar solutions of rhodamine 6G by using flash lamp excitation. During the experiments, the laser radiation energy was measured, the time evolution of stimulated emission spectra was recorded; pulse shape was monitored by an oscillograph. The change of generation characteristics of water-micellar solutions of rhodamine 6G as a function of cyclooctatetraene concentration is shown.

  17. Adsorption of Cationic Laser Dye onto Polymer/Surfactant Complex Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Pabitra Kumar; Arshad Hussain, Syed; Bhattacharjee, Debajyoti; Pal, Mrinal

    2011-06-01

    Fabrication of complex molecular films of organic materials is one of the most important issues in modern nanoscience and nanotechnology. Soft materials with flexible properties have been given much attention and can be obtained through bottom up processing from functional molecules, where self-assembly based on supramolecular chemistry and designed assembly have become crucial processes and technologies. In this work, we report the successful incorporation of cationic laser dye rhodamine 6G abbreviated as R6G into the pre-assembled polyelectrolyte/surfactant complex film onto quartz substrate by electrostatic adsorption technique. Poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) was used as polycation and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was used as anionic surfactant. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopic characterization reveals the formation of only H-type aggregates of R6G in their aqueous solution and both H- and J-type aggregates in PAH/SDS/R6G complex layer-by-layber films as well as the adsorption kinetics of R6G onto the complex films. The ratio of the absorbance intensity of two aggregated bands in PAH/SDS/R6G complex films is merely independent of the concentration range of the SDS solution used to fabricate PAH/SDS complex self-assembled films. Atomic force microscopy reveals the formation of R6G aggregates in PAH/SDS/R6G complex films.

  18. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Combined mode locking in a cw rhodamine 6G laser using triphenylmethane dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krindach, D. P.; Yakovlev, A. G.

    1986-06-01

    An experimental study was made of the characteristics of the radiation emitted by a synchronously pumped dye laser utilizing a mixture of rhodamine 6G with crystal violet or malachite green. The pulse duration of 700 fsec was limited by the pass band of a tunable filter. The wavelength tuning range was governed by the condition σab(λ)/σam(λ)>1, where σab and σam are the absorption and amplification cross sections. Introduction of an absorber into the jet of the rhodamine 6G solution increased the permissible mismatch between the resonator lengths from a few microns (for pure rhodamine 6G) to a fraction of a millimeter and also

  19. Enhanced random lasing from a colloidal CdSe quantum dot-Rh6G system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Anju K.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Kailasnath, M.

    2015-02-01

    In this letter, we report random laser action in a system where optical amplification is provided by colloidal CdSe quantum dots (CQDs) triggered by the emission from Rhodamine 6G. The laser emission from CdSe QDs is optically excited by Rh-6G which in turn is photo-pumped by a frequency-doubled Q-switched Nd : YAG laser system at an excitation wavelength of 532 nm. At intensities greater than the threshold value, laser emission is characterized by narrowing peaks.

  20. Spectroscopic insights on selfassembly and excited state interactions between rhodamine and phthalocyanine molecules.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hao; Zhang, Xian-Fu

    2015-03-15

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence lifetimes of tetrasulfonated zinc phthalocyanine ZnPc(SO3Na)4 were measured in the absence and presence of four rhodamine dyes, Rhodamine B (RB), Ethyl rhodamine B (ERB), Rhodamine 6G (R6G), Rhodamine 110 (R110), and Pyronine B (PYB). The ground state complexes of phthalocyanine-(Rhodamine)2 were observed which exhibit new absorption bands. The binding constants are all very large (0.86×10(5)-0.22×10(8) M(-1)), suggesting rhodamine-phthalocyanine pairs are very good combinations for efficient selfassembly. Both the fluorescence intensity and the lifetime values of ZnPc(SO3Na)4 were decreased by the presence of rhodamines. The structural effect of rhodamines on selfassembly is significant. The ground state binding and dynamic quenching capability is PYB>R6G>ERB>RB>R110. The dynamic fluorescence quenching is due to the photoinduced electron transfer (PET). The PET rate constant is very large and in the order of 10(13) M(-1) s(-1), much greater than kf and kic (in the order of 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)), which means that the PET efficiency is almost 100%. Therefore the non-covalent Pc-rhodamine is a very good pair of donor/acceptor for potential efficient solar energy conversion. PMID:25546492

  1. Spectroscopic insights on selfassembly and excited state interactions between rhodamine and phthalocyanine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hao; Zhang, Xian-Fu

    2015-03-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence lifetimes of tetrasulfonated zinc phthalocyanine ZnPc(SO3Na)4 were measured in the absence and presence of four rhodamine dyes, Rhodamine B (RB), Ethyl rhodamine B (ERB), Rhodamine 6G (R6G), Rhodamine 110 (R110), and Pyronine B (PYB). The ground state complexes of phthalocyanine-(Rhodamine)2 were observed which exhibit new absorption bands. The binding constants are all very large (0.86 × 105-0.22 × 108 M-1), suggesting rhodamine-phthalocyanine pairs are very good combinations for efficient selfassembly. Both the fluorescence intensity and the lifetime values of ZnPc(SO3Na)4 were decreased by the presence of rhodamines. The structural effect of rhodamines on selfassembly is significant. The ground state binding and dynamic quenching capability is PYB > R6G > ERB > RB > R110. The dynamic fluorescence quenching is due to the photoinduced electron transfer (PET). The PET rate constant is very large and in the order of 1013 M-1 s-1, much greater than kf and kic (in the order of 108 M-1 s-1), which means that the PET efficiency is almost 100%. Therefore the non-covalent Pc-rhodamine is a very good pair of donor/acceptor for potential efficient solar energy conversion.

  2. Photophysical properties of lasing mixed solutions of oxazine 17 and rhodamine 6G

    SciTech Connect

    Levshin, L.V.; Saletskii, A.M.; Yuzhakov, V.I.

    1985-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the effect of triplet states of the donor component, for which Rhodamine 6G was used, on the lasing characteristics of lamp-pumped solutions of this dye, oxazine. The energy and spectral properties are studied and the results analyzed.

  3. Methods for reducing the divergence of lamp-excited rhodamine 6G solution lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, V.S.

    1980-11-01

    Different methods for reducing the divergence of rhodamine 6G solution lasers with lamp pumping are studied experimentally. A reduction of divergence to 2--4 mrad is achieved. It is shown that some methods provide such low divergence for comparatively low losses of lasing energy.

  4. Homogeneous linewidths of Rhodamine 6G at room temperature from cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Arnold, S.; Ramsey, J.M. )

    1992-11-15

    Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G in levitated micron-sized droplets have been measured using a time-correlated photon counting technique. The coupling of emission into spherical cavity modes of the droplet results in significant emission rate enhancements which allow estimation of the homogeneous linewidth at room temperature.

  5. Fluorescent Ly6G antibodies determine macrophage phagocytosis of neutrophils and alter the retrieval of neutrophils in mice.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Kirsten; Schmitt, Fee; Autenrieth, Stella E; Dillmann, Inken; Nürnberg, Bernd; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Beer-Hammer, Sandra

    2015-09-01

    Fluorescently labeled Ly6G antibodies enable the tracking of neutrophils in mice, whereas purified anti-Ly6G rapidly depletes neutrophils from the circulation. The mechanisms underlying neutrophil depletion are still under debate. Here, we examined how identical Ly6G antibodies coupled to different fluorochromes affect neutrophil fate in vivo. BM cells stained with Ly6G antibodies were injected into mice. The number of retrieved anti-Ly6G-FITC(+) cells was reduced significantly in comparison with anti-Ly6G-APC(+) or anti-Ly6G-PE(+) cells. Flow cytometry and multispectral imaging flow cytometry analyses revealed that anti-Ly6G-FITC(+) neutrophils were preferentially phagocytosed by BMMs in vitro and by splenic, hepatic, and BM macrophages in vivo. Direct antibody injection of anti-Ly6G-FITC but not anti-Ly6G-PE depleted neutrophils to the same degree as purified anti-Ly6G, indicating that the FITC-coupled antibody eliminates neutrophils by a similar mechanism as the uncoupled antibody. With the use of a protein G-binding assay, we demonstrated that APC and PE but not FITC coupling inhibited access to interaction sites on the anti-Ly6G antibody. We conclude the following: 1) that neutrophil phagocytosis by macrophages is a central mechanism in anti-Ly6G-induced neutrophil depletion and 2) that fluorochrome-coupling can affect functional properties of anti-Ly6G antibodies, thereby modifying macrophage uptake of Ly6G-labeled neutrophils and neutrophil retrieval following adoptive cell transfer or injection of fluorescent anti-Ly6G. PMID:26019296

  6. [Fluorescence Determination of Trace Se with the Hydride-K13-Rhodamine 6G System].

    PubMed

    Liang, Ai-hui; Li, Yuan; Huang, Shan-shan; Luo, Yang-he; Wen, Gui-qing; Jiang, Zhi-liang

    2015-05-01

    Se is a necessary trace element for human and animals, but the excess intake of Se caused poison. Thus, it is very important to determination of Se in foods and water. The target of this study is development of a new, sensitive and selective hydride generation-molecular fluorescence method for the determination of Se. In 0. 36 mol . L-1 sulfuric acid, NaBH4 as reducing agent, Se (IV) is reduced to H2 Se. Usin3-g I solution as absorption liquid3, I- is reduced to I- by H2Se. When adding rhodamine 6G, Rhodamine 6G and I3- form association particles, which lead to the fluorescence intensity decreased. When Se(IV) existing, Rhodamine 6G and I3- bind less, And the remaining amount of Rhodamine 6G increase. So the fluorescence intensity is enhanced. The analytical conditions were optimized, a 0. 36 ml . L-1 H2SO4, 21. 6.g . L-1 NaBH4, 23.3 µm . L-1 rhodamine 6G, and 50 µmol . L-1 KI3 were chosen for use. When the excitation wavelength is at 480nm, the Rayleigh scattering peak does not affect the fluorescence recording, and was selected for determination of Se. Under the selected conditions, Se(IV) concentration in the 0. 02~0. 60 µg . mL-1 range and the increase value of the fluorescence intensity (ΔF) at 562 nm linear relationship. The linear regression equation is ΔF562 nm =12. 6c + 20. 9. The detecton limit was 0.01 µ.g . L-1. The influence of coexistence substances on the hydride generatin-molecular fluorescence determination of 5. 07 X10(-6) mol . L-1 Se(IV) was considered in details. Results showed that this new fluorescence method is of high selectivity, that is, 0. 5 mmol. L-1 Ba2+, Ca2+, Zn2+ and Fe3+, 0. 25 mmol . L-1 . Mg2+, 0. 05 mmol . L-1 K+, 0. 2 mmol . L-1 Al3+, 0. 025 mmol . L-1 Te(VI) do not interfere with the determination. The influence of Hg2+, CD2+ and Cu2+ that precipitate with Se(IV), can be eliminated by addition of complex reagent. This hydride generation-molecular fluorescence method has been applied to determination of trace Se in water

  7. Investigation of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Jaba; Datta Roy, Arpan; Dey, Dibyendu; Chakraborty, Santanu; Bhattacharjee, D.; Paul, P. K.; Hussain, Syed Arshad

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between two organic dyes Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G was investigated in aqueous solution in presence and absence of synthetic clay laponite. Spectroscopic studies suggest that both the dyes were present mainly as monomer in solution. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer occurred from Fluorescein to Rhodamine 6G in solutions. Energy transfer efficiency increases in presence of laponite and the maximum efficiency was 72.00% in aqueous laponite dispersion. Energy transfer efficiency was found to be pH sensitive. It has been demonstrated that with proper calibration it is possible to use the present system under investigation to sense pH over a wide range from 1.5 to 8.0.

  8. Random lasing from Rhodamine 6G doped ethanediol solution based on the cicada wing nanocones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Feng, Guoying; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Chao; Yin, Jiajia; Dai, Shenyu; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2016-06-01

    Random lasing from Rhdomaine 6G (Rh6G) doped ethanediol solution based on the cicada wing nanostructures as scatterers has been demonstrated. The optical positive feedback of the random laser is provided by these nanocones on the cicada wing, where the scale of the nanocones and the distance between them is about 150 nm and 200 nm, respectively. Al-coated reflector has been introduced to reduce the loss of the pump energy from the bottom, and moreover lower the laser threshold, which is about 126.0 μJ/pulse. Due to the liquid gain medium, the lifetime of this random laser is longer than conventional random lasers. This random laser shows the potential applications in biological random laser and photonic devices.

  9. Effect of relaxation processes on fluorescence lifetime and polarization characteristics of rhodamine 6G in glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Levshin, L.V.; Struganova, I.A.; Tolevtaev, B.N.

    1986-11-01

    Some new phenomena which can be attributed to the relaxation kinetics of the distribution halfwidth over the 0-0 frequencies for organic dye solutions have been discovered in the present work. The kinetic and polarization characteristics of flourescence from the viscous dipolar solutions of the dyes exhibiting dynamic inhomogeneous broadening upon excitation near the absorption band center have been studied. The objects of the study are rhodamine 6G solutions in glycerol and ethanol at the concentration 10/sup -//sub 6/ mole/liter. It was concluded that the presence of the dip in the flourescence lifetime and the hump in the fluorescence polarization dependences on emission wavelength in the viscous dipolar solution of rhodamine 6G has been detected. The phenomena have been explained by the formation of the excited-state nonequilibrium distribution of the flourescence centers over the 0-0 transition frequencies upon monochromatic excitation and by the subsequent relaxation of the nonequilibrium distribution into the equilibrium one.

  10. Study of photoproducts of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol upon powerful laser pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Batishche, S.A.; Malevich, N.A.; Mostovnikov, V.A.

    1995-04-01

    Absorption spectra of rhodamine 6G in ethanol solution are measured using, the technique of laser probing upon pumping by a doubled Nd {sup 3+}:YAG laser with pulse length{tau}{sub 01}{approx_equal}16ns. It is shown that, at the pumping energy density {ge}1.5 J/cm{sup 2}, short-lived ({tau} < 25 ns) and long-lived photoproducts formed in the dye solution, which absorbed in a wide spectral range, including the lasing region. The estimates show that the probability of rhodamine 6G transformation to the photoproduct upon three-step excitation at 532 nm achieves {approximately}2.5 X 10{sup -3}. It is noted that, in order to obtain reliable spectroscopic information using this technique, one should take into account the intense scattering of probing radiation by thermal noise gratings, which are formed due to self-diffraction of the pumping radiation into noise components.

  11. An assessment of the ICE6G_C(VM5a) glacial isostatic adjustment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, A.; Tregoning, P.; Dehecq, A.

    2016-05-01

    The recent release of the next-generation global ice history model, ICE6G_C(VM5a), is likely to be of interest to a wide range of disciplines including oceanography (sea level studies), space gravity (mass balance studies), glaciology, and, of course, geodynamics (Earth rheology studies). In this paper we make an assessment of some aspects of the ICE6G_C(VM5a) model and show that the published present-day radial uplift rates are too high along the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula (by ˜8.6 mm/yr) and beneath the Ross Ice Shelf (by ˜5 mm/yr). Furthermore, the published spherical harmonic coefficients—which are meant to represent the dimensionless present-day changes due to glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA)—contain excessive power for degree ≥90, do not agree with physical expectations and do not represent accurately the ICE6G_C(VM5a) model. We show that the excessive power in the high-degree terms produces erroneous uplift rates when the empirical relationship of Purcell et al. (2011) is applied, but when correct Stokes coefficients are used, the empirical relationship produces excellent agreement with the fully rigorous computation of the radial velocity field, subject to the caveats first noted by Purcell et al. (2011). Using the Australian National University (ANU) groups CALSEA software package, we recompute the present-day GIA signal for the ice thickness history and Earth rheology used by Peltier et al. (2015) and provide dimensionless Stokes coefficients that can be used to correct satellite altimetry observations for GIA over oceans and by the space gravity community to separate GIA and present-day mass balance change signals. We denote the new data sets as ICE6G_ANU.

  12. Study of laser emission losses in rhodamine 6G solutions under quasilongitudinal laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, A.V.; Eremenko, A.S.; Nikolaev, A.B.

    1986-08-01

    As a result of studies of the reciprocal of the quantum yield of stimulated laser emission as a function of the reciprocal of the useful loss factor, a quantitative dependence of induced losses in the pumping and lasing channels on the volume density of absorbed exciting radiation has been established. It is concluded from quantitative evidence that the margin of an appreciable increase in lasing efficiency for rhodamine 6G solutions consists in a decrease of the pumping-induced light scattering.

  13. Narrow bandwidth tuning of rhodamine 6G dye pumped by a XeCl excimer laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shangguan Cheng; Ling Ying-yi; Wang Yi-man; Dou Ai-rong; Huang Dan-hong

    1986-03-01

    In this paper the experimental study for narrow bandwidth tuning of ethylene glycol solution of rhodamine 6G pumped by a XeCl excimer laser is reported. The tunable range from 572.7 nm to 612.9 nm with linewidth of 0.004 nm has been obtained. The conversion efficiency is 16.0%. The experimental results of seven other dyes are also presented.

  14. Pressure-induced shifts of the fluorescence spectrum of rhodamine 6G in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.; Chandrasekhar, M.; Chandrasekhar, H.R.

    1985-09-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the fluorescence spectrum of rhodamine 6G dye in two different solutions is studied. The peak shifts to longer wavelengths with increasing pressure with a pressure coefficient of -29 and -19 cm/sup -1//kbar for ethanol and 4:1 methanol-ethanol solvents, respectively. Possible applications of increasing the tunability of dye lasers by pressure are discussed.

  15. Evaluating Heat Pipe Performance in 1/6 g Acceleration: Problems and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; McCollum, Timothy A.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sanzi, James L.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Heat pipes composed of titanium and water are being considered for use in the heat rejection system of a fission power system option for lunar exploration. Placed vertically on the lunar surface, the heat pipes would operate as thermosyphons in the 1/6 g environment. The design of thermosyphons for such an application is determined, in part, by the flooding limit. Flooding is composed of two components, the thickness of the fluid film on the walls of the thermosyphon and the interaction of the fluid flow with the concurrent vapor counter flow. Both the fluid thickness contribution and interfacial shear contribution are inversely proportional to gravity. Hence, evaluating the performance of a thermosyphon in a 1 g environment on Earth may inadvertently lead to overestimating the performance of the same thermosyphon as experienced in the 1/6 g environment on the moon. Several concepts of varying complexity have been proposed for evaluating thermosyphon performance in reduced gravity, ranging from tilting the thermosyphons on Earth based on a cosine function, to flying heat pipes on a low-g aircraft. This paper summarizes the problems and prospects for evaluating thermosyphon performance in 1/6 g.

  16. CD11b+Ly6G- myeloid cells mediate mechanical inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ghasemlou, Nader; Chiu, Isaac M; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Woolf, Clifford J

    2015-12-01

    Pain hypersensitivity at the site of inflammation as a result of chronic immune diseases, pathogenic infection, and tissue injury is a common medical condition. However, the specific contributions of the innate and adaptive immune system to the generation of pain during inflammation have not been systematically elucidated. We therefore set out to characterize the cellular and molecular immune response in two widely used preclinical models of inflammatory pain: (i) intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) as a model of adjuvant- and pathogen-based inflammation and (ii) a plantar incisional wound as a model of tissue injury-based inflammation. Our findings reveal differences in temporal patterns of immune cell recruitment and activation states, cytokine production, and pain in these two models, with CFA causing a nonresolving granulomatous inflammatory response whereas tissue incision induced resolving immune and pain responses. These findings highlight the significant differences and potential clinical relevance of the incisional wound model compared with the CFA model. By using various cell-depletion strategies, we find that, whereas lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus G (Ly)6G(+)CD11b(+) neutrophils and T-cell receptor (TCR) β(+) T cells do not contribute to the development of thermal or mechanical pain hypersensitivity in either model, proliferating CD11b(+)Ly6G(-) myeloid cells were necessary for mechanical hypersensitivity during incisional pain, and, to a lesser extent, CFA-induced inflammation. However, inflammatory (CCR2(+)Ly6C(hi)) monocytes were not responsible for these effects. The finding that a population of proliferating CD11b(+)Ly6G(-) myeloid cells contribute to mechanical inflammatory pain provides a potential cellular target for its treatment in wound inflammation. PMID:26598697

  17. TRPC6 G757D Loss-of-Function Mutation Associates with FSGS.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Marc; Büscher, Anja K; Gohlke, Björn-Oliver; Kaßmann, Mario; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Bräsen, Jan H; Nagel, Mato; Becker, Jan U; Winyard, Paul; Hoyer, Peter F; Preissner, Robert; Krautwurst, Dietmar; Gollasch, Maik; Weber, Stefanie; Harteneck, Christian

    2016-09-01

    FSGS is a CKD with heavy proteinuria that eventually progresses to ESRD. Hereditary forms of FSGS have been linked to mutations in the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 6 (TRPC6) gene encoding a nonselective cation channel. Most of these TRPC6 mutations cause a gain-of-function phenotype, leading to calcium-triggered podocyte cell death, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. We studied the molecular effect of disease-related mutations using tridimensional in silico modeling of tetrameric TRPC6. Our results indicated that G757 is localized in a domain forming a TRPC6-TRPC6 interface and predicted that the amino acid exchange G757D causes local steric hindrance and disruption of the channel complex. Notably, functional characterization of model interface domain mutants suggested a loss-of-function phenotype. We then characterized 19 human FSGS-related TRPC6 mutations, the majority of which caused gain-of-function mutations. However, five mutations (N125S, L395A, G757D, L780P, and R895L) caused a loss-of-function phenotype. Coexpression of wild-type TRPC6 and TRPC6 G757D, mimicking heterozygosity observed in patients, revealed a dominant negative effect of TRPC6 G757D. Our comprehensive analysis of human disease-causing TRPC6 mutations reveals loss of TRPC6 function as an additional concept of hereditary FSGS and provides molecular insights into the mechanism responsible for the loss-of-function phenotype of TRPC6 G757D in humans. PMID:26892346

  18. A three-dimensional silver nanoparticles decorated plasmonic paper strip for SERS detection of low-abundance molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixin; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Jingjing; Ji, Ji; Ji, Chang; Liu, Baohong

    2016-01-15

    The fabrication of SERS substrates, which can offer the advantages of strong Raman signal enhancement with good reproducibility and low cost, is still a challenge for practical applications. In this work, a simple three-dimensional (3D) paper-based SERS substrate, which contains plasmonic silver-nanoparticles (AgNPs), has been developed by the silver mirror reaction. This paper strip was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), etc. Pretreatment of the paper as well as the reaction time, temperature, and reagent concentrations for the silver mirror reaction were varied for further studies. With the optimized experimental parameters, the AgNPs synthesized and distributed in-situ on the paper strip could give more favorable SERS performance. The limit of detection (LOD) as low as 10(-11)M for Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 10(-9)M for p-aminothiophenol (p-ATP) plus wide linear range for the log-log plot of Raman intensity versus analyte concentration were achieved. The detection of R6G in rain water was also carried out successfully. The merits of this protocol include low cost, easy operation, high sensitivity and acceptable stability, which make it ideal for the detection of environmental samples in trace amounts. PMID:26592638

  19. Observation of two-photon fluorescence for Rhodamine 6G in microbubble resonators.

    PubMed

    Cohoon, Gregory A; Kieu, Khanh; Norwood, Robert A

    2014-06-01

    We report an observation of multi-photon excitation of organic chromophores in microbubble whispering gallery mode resonators. High-Q microbubble resonators were formed by heating a pressurized fused silica capillary to form a hollow bubble that was then filled with liquid. In this work, the microbubble was filled with a solution of Rhodamine 6G dye. The resonator and dye were excited by evanescently coupling continuous wave (CW) light from a 980 nm laser diode using a tapered optical fiber. The two-photon fluorescence of the dye can be seen with pump powers as low as 700 μW. PMID:24875986

  20. An assessment of the ICE6G_C (VM5A) glacial isostatic adjustment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Anthony; Tregoning, Paul; Dehecq, Amaury

    2016-04-01

    The recent release of the next-generation global ice history model, ICE6G_C(VM5a) [Peltier et al., 2015, Argus et al. 2014] is likely to be of interest to a wide range of disciplines including oceanography (sea level studies), space gravity (mass balance studies), glaciology and, of course, geodynamics (Earth rheology studies). In this presentation I will assess some aspects of the ICE6G_C(VM5a) model and the accompanying published data sets. I will demonstrate that the published present-day radial uplift rates are too high along the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula (by ˜8.6 mm/yr) and beneath the Ross Ice Shelf (by ˜5 mm/yr). Further, the published spherical harmonic coefficients - which are meant to represent the dimensionless present-day changes due to glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) - will be shown to contain excessive power for degree ≥ 90, to be physically implausible and to not represent accurately the ICE6G_C(VM5a) model. The excessive power in the high degree terms produces erroneous uplift rates when the empirical relationship of Purcell et al. [2011] is applied but, when correct Stokes' coefficients are used, the empirical relationship will be shown to produce excellent agreement with the fully rigorous computation of the radial velocity field, subject to the caveats first noted by Purcell et al. [2011]. Finally, a global radial velocity field for the present-day GIA signal, and corresponding Stoke's coefficients will be presented for the ICE6GC ice model history using the VM5a rheology model. These results have been obtained using the ANU group's CALSEA software package and can be used to correct satellite altimetry observations for GIA over oceans and by the space gravity community to separate GIA and present-day mass balance change signals without any of the shortcomings of the previously published data-sets. We denote the new data sets ICE6G_ANU.

  1. Efficient photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine 6G with a quantum dot-metal organic framework nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rajnish; Vellingiri, Kowsalya; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Paul, A K; Deep, Akash

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid structures of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and nanoparticles may offer the realization of effective photocatalytic materials due to combined benefits of the porous and molecular sieving properties of MOF matrix and the functional characteristics of encapsulated nanoparticles. In this study, cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QD) are conjugated with a europium-MOF for the synthesis of a novel nanocomposite material with photocatalytic properties. Successful synthesis of a QD/Eu-MOF nanocomposite was characterized with various spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. This QD/Eu-MOF is found to be an effective catalyst to complete the degradation of Rhodamine 6G dye within 50 min. PMID:27101017

  2. A sensitive fluorescence method for detection of E. Coli using rhodamine 6G dyeing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaohui; Jiang, Caina; Wen, Guiqing; Zhang, Xinghui; Luo, Yanghe; Qin, Aimiao; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2016-06-01

    Negatively charged bacteria combined with positively charged alkaline dye rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in NaH2 PO4 -Na2 HPO4 buffer solution pH 7.4, by electrostatic interaction. The dyed bacteria exhibited a strong fluorescence peak at 552 nm and fluorescence intensity was directly linear to Escherichia coli (E. coli), Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) concentrations in the range of 7.06 × 10(4) to 3.53 × 10(7) , 4.95 × 10(5) to 2.475 × 10(8) and 32.5 to 16250 colony forming unit/mL (cfu/mL) respectively, with detection limits of 3.2 × 10(4) cfu/mL E. coli, 2.3 × 10(5) cfu/mL B. subtilis and 16 cfu/mL S. aureus, respectively. Samples were cultured for 12 h, after which the linear detection range for E. coli was 2 to 88 cfu/mL. This simple, rapid and sensitive method was used for the analysis of water and drinking samples. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26573961

  3. Fluorescence modulation by absorbent on solid surface: an improved approach for designing fluorescent sensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng; Wang, Changyao; Liu, Changhui; Wang, Yijun; Xiao, Yue; Li, Jishan; Li, Yinhui; Yang, Ronghua

    2014-08-01

    Inner filter effect (IFE), a well-known phenomenon of fluorescence quenching resulting from absorption of the excitation or emission light of luminescent species by absorbent, has been used as a smart approach to design fluorescent sensors, which are characterized by the simplicity and flexibility with high sensitivity. However, further application of IFE-based sensors in complex environment is hampered by the insufficient IFE efficiency and low sensitivity resulting from interference of the external environment. In this paper, we report that IFE occurring on a solid substrate surface would solve this problem. As a proof of concept, a fluorescent sensor for intracellular biothiols has been developed on the basis of the absorption of a newly designed thiols-specific chromogenic probe (CP) coupled with the use of a thiols-independent fluorophore, rhodamine 6G (R6G), operative on the IFE on graphene oxide (GO). To construct an efficient IFE system, R6G was covalently attached to GO, and the CP molecules were adsorbed on the surface of R6G-GO via π-π stacking interaction. The reaction of thiols with CP on R6G-GO decreases the absorption of CP, resulting in the increase of the intensity of R6G fluorescence. The results showed that the IFE efficiency, sensitivity, and dynamic response time of R6G-GO/CP for biothiols could be significantly improved compared with R6G/CP, and furthermore, R6G-GO/CP functioned under complex system and could be used for assaying biothiols in living cells and in human serum samples. This new strategy would be general to explore the development of more effective IFE-based sensors for other analytes of interest. PMID:24984204

  4. Band-edge lasing in Rh6G-doped dichromated gelatin at different excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Cui-Feng; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Ye, Qing; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2010-11-01

    One-dimensional photonic crystal band-edge lasing at different excitations was studied experimentally by altering the excitation angle. We considered almost every condition including in-band, out-of-band and near the band edge while keeping the density of states unchanged. Holographic rhodamin 6G-doped dichromated gelatin was used for creating low-threshold photonic band-edge lasing (PBEL). Lasing actions excited near the high-energy and low-energy band edges were observed simultaneously, and their full widths at half maximum were different. The results show that the PBEL intensity and pump efficiency are sensitive to the excitation angle, enhanced obviously at the excitation near the band edge and suppressed distinctly in the band which agreed well with the theoretical prediction. We also demonstrated for the first time that active matters exist not only in the air voids but also in the high-index regions of the gelatin.

  5. Time resolved FRET measurement in various heterogeneous media using merocyanine dye as a donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Niraja; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafast fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a merocyanine dye to a Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecule in micelles formed by the surfactants SDS and DTAB and also in a catanionic vesicle formed by SDS and DTAB has been studied by picosecond time resolved emission spectroscopy. Here the dye acts as a donor molecule and R6G acts as the acceptor molecule. Multiple timescales of FRET have been detected, namely, an ultrafast component of 100-500 ps and relatively long component (1800-3300 ps). The different time scales are attributed to different donor-acceptor distances.

  6. Molecular orientation of submonolayer rhodamine-6G on quartz substrates: A comparative study using reflection and transmission UV-Vis spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Elking, M.D.; He, G.; Xu, Z.

    1996-10-01

    Reflection and transmission UV-Vis spectroscopy have been applied to study the molecular orientation and surface density of rhodamine-6G molecules physisorbed on optically flat quartz (SiO{sub 2}) substrates. Our results have shown that for the {ital s}-polarized excitation, the submonolayer of physisorbed rhodamine-6G dye molecules causes enhanced reflection in the wavelength region from 400 nm to 600 nm where the electronic transition takes place. For the {ital p}-polarized excitation, the reflection is enhanced when the angle of incidence is smaller than Brewster{close_quote}s angle of quartz at 55.6{degree}, and the reflection is reduced when the angle of incidence is larger than Brewster{close_quote}s angle of quartz. An independent method has been established in this paper by which the molecular orientation can be determined accurately by carrying out optical measurements in both the reflection and transmission directions. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Comparative efficacy of G6G and Ovsynch protocols on synchronization and pregnancy rate in Nili-Ravi buffalo.

    PubMed

    Waqas, M; Mehmood, M U; Shahzad, Q; Kausar, R; Sattar, A; Naseer, Z

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of G6G and Ovsynch protocols on synchronization and pregnancy rate in Nili-Ravi buffalo. For this, a total of fifty buffalo were assigned into two treatment groups: (1) G6G (n=25) and (2) Ovsynch (n=25). The blood samples were collected from all the treated buffalo on day (D) 7 (PGF2α injection of Ovsynch) to measure the progesterone (P4). All the buffalo were fixed time inseminated (FTAI) following last GnRH of Ovsynch. Ultrasonography was performed for follicular, corpus luteum (CL) dynamics and pregnancy diagnosis. The results revealed that synchronization rate and response to final PGF2α were significantly (P<0.05) higher in G6G compared to Ovsynch. The ovulation to first GnRH of Ovsynch was higher (P<0.05) in G6G (84%) than Ovsynch (56%). The mean dominant follicle size following last GnRH of Ovsynch showed significantly larger diameter in G6G (11.7±0.2mm) compared to Ovsynch (10.9±0.2mm). Moreover, the higher (P<0.05) P4 concentration was observed in G6G than Ovsynch. The presence of double CL on D 7 was higher (P<0.05) in G6G (64%) than Ovsynch (24%) group. The pregnancy rate (P=0.08) tended to be greater in G6G compared to Ovsynch. In conclusion, G6G treatment showed better ovulatory and luteolytic response to first GnRH and PGF2α compared to Ovsynch treatment. Moreover, the addition of GnRH and PGF2α prior to Ovsynch is helpful to improve synchronization application of Ovsynch protocol in Nili-Ravi buffalo. PMID:26833275

  8. Chitosan, nanoclay and chitosan-nanoclay composite as adsorbents for Rhodamine-6G and the resulting optical properties.

    PubMed

    Vanamudan, Ageetha; Pamidimukkala, Padmaja

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the use of chitosan-clay nanocomposite (CC) as an adsorbent for Rhodamine 6G (Rh-6G). The effects of adsorbent dose, contact time, and concentration on the adsorption process were systematically studied. Isotherm models were applied to the experimental equilibrium data obtained from spectrophotometric measurements of dye adsorption. Various Kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data and evaluate of rate constants. Rh-6G loaded adsorbents were investigated for their optical and photophysical properties. PMID:25526692

  9. microcrystals as an efficient heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst in degradation of rhodamine 6G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhan Jun; Ali, Ghafar; Kim, Hyun Jin; Yoo, Seong Ho; Cho, Sung Oh

    2014-05-01

    We present a novel heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst of LiFePO4 (LFP). LFP has been widely used as an electrode material of a lithium ion battery, but we observed that commercial LFP (LFP-C) could act as a good Fenton-like catalyst to decompose rhodamine 6G. The catalytic activity of LFP-C microparticles was much higher than a popular catalyst, magnetite nanoparticles. Furthermore, we found that the catalytic activity of LFP-C could be further increased by increasing the specific surface area. The reaction rate constant of the hydrothermally synthesized LFP microcrystals (LFP-H) is at least 18 times higher than that of magnetite nanoparticles even though the particle size of LFP is far larger than magnetite nanoparticles. The LFP catalysts also exhibited a good recycling behavior and high stability under an oxidizing environment. The effects of the experimental parameters such as the concentration of the catalysts, pH, and the concentration of hydrogen peroxide on the catalytic activity of LFP were also analyzed.

  10. Tip Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Rhodamine 6G on nanostructured gold substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Manola; Das, Gobind; Torre, Bruno; Allione, Marco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    A new concept based setup for Tip Enhanced Raman Scattering measurement assisted by gold nanostructure is presented, that can provide a platform for gap-mode enhancement of the signal at the single molecule level conjugated with controlled spatial localization of the molecule under investigation and a method to determine the diffraction limit properties of the tip. In essence, this effect is obtained illuminating a gold coated AFM tip which is raster scanned over a nanostructured gold substrate, after chemisorption of a Raman active molecule. We expect that the near-field Raman enhancement would be given by the gap-mode effect of the two facing nano-features. Thanks to the nanostructured substrate, we verify that the resolution of the Raman mapping signal is well below the diffraction limit given by the combination of the optics geometry and the laser wavelength. We show that the gap-mode TERS can generate an estimated field- enhancement (g) of ~20 in localized areas of the sample and we demonstrate the ability to spatially define the molecule position (by Raman mapping) at the tens of nanometers scale.

  11. Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G Additonal Sampling and Monitor Well Installation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1995-02-01

    The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal and incineration of potentially hazardous substances, such as metals and organic solvents.

  12. Comparative laser performances of pyrromethene 567 and rhodamine 6G dyes in copper vapour laser pumped dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A. K.; Kundu, S.; Sasikumar, S.; Rao, C. S.; Mula, S.; Sinha, S.; Dasgupta, K.

    2007-05-01

    Narrowband laser performances and photochemical stability of alcoholic solutions of pyrromethene 567 and rhodamine 6G dyes, under high-repetition rate copper vapour laser (at 510 nm), as well as, high-peak intensity Nd:YAG laser (at 532 nm) excitation have been investigated. We have observed that pyrromethene 567 dye solutions offer higher efficiency, wider tuning range, but lower photochemical stability and higher lasing threshold than that of rhodamine 6G dye solutions. An addition of about 100 mM DABCO, as a singlet oxygen quencher, in pyrromethene 567 dye solutions improved its photochemical stability close to that of rhodamine 6G. The observation of higher slope efficiency, in spite of higher threshold pump energy for pyrromethene 567 dye than that of rhodamine 6G dye solutions, was explained by a predictive model on gain characteristics of both dye solutions as a function of pump energy.

  13. Rh6G released from solid and nanoporous SiO2 spheres prepared by sol-gel route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Macedo, J. A.; Francisco S., P.; Franco, A.

    2015-10-01

    Porous silica nanoparticles are considering good systems for drug cargo and liquid separation. In this work we studied the release of rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) from solid and porous silica nanoparticles. Solid and porous SiO2 spheres were prepared by sol-gel method. Nanoporous channels were produced by using a surfactant that was removed by chemical procedure. Rh6G was incorporated into the channels by impregnation. The hexagonal structure of the pores was detected by XRD and confirmed by HRTEM micrographs. Rh6G released from the particles by stirring them in water at controlled speed was studied as function of time by photoluminescence. Released ratio was faster in the solid nanoparticles than in the porous ones. In the last case, a second release mechanism was observed. It was related with rhodamine coming out from the porous.

  14. Improved galvanic replacement growth of Ag microstructures on Cu micro-grid for enhanced SERS detection of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tian-Long; Li, Ji-Guang; Sun, Xudong; Sakka, Yoshio

    2016-04-01

    Galvanic growth of Ag nano/micro-structures on Cu micro-grid was systematically studied for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. Detailed characterizations via FE-SEM and HR-TEM showed that processing parameters, (reaction time, Ag(+) concentration, and PVP addition) all substantially affect thermodynamics/kinetics of the replacement reaction to yield substrates of significantly different microstructures/homogeneities and thus varied SERS performances (sensitivity, enhancement factor, and reproducibility) of the Ag substrates in the detection of R6G analyte. PVP as an additive was shown to notably alter nucleation/growth behaviors of the Ag crystals and promote the deposition of dense and uniform Ag films of nearly monodisperse polyhedrons/nanoplates through suppressing dendrites crystallization. Under optimized synthesis (50mM of Ag(+), 30s of reaction, and 700 wt.% of PVP), Ag substrates exhibiting a high Raman signal enhancement factor of ~1.1 × 10(6) and a low relative standard deviation of ~0.13 in the repeated detection of 10 μM R6G were obtained. The facile deposition and excellent performance reported in this work may allow the Ag microstructures to find wider SERS applications. Moreover, growth mechanisms of the different Ag nano/micro-structures were discussed based on extensive FE-SEM and HR-TEM analysis. PMID:26838829

  15. Using natural variation to investigate the function of individual amino acids in the sucrose-binding box of fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase (6G-FFT) in product formation.

    PubMed

    Ritsema, Tita; Verhaar, Auke; Vijn, Irma; Smeekens, Sjef

    2005-07-01

    Enzymes of the glycosyl hydrolase family 32 are highly similar with respect to primary sequence but catalyze divergent reactions. Previously, the importance of the conserved sucrose-binding box in determining product specificity of onion fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase (6G-FFT) was established [Ritsema et al., 2004, Plant Mol. Biol. 54: 853-863]. Onion 6G-FFT synthesizes the complex fructan neo-series inulin by transferring fructose residues to either a terminal fructose or a terminal glucose residue. In the present study we have elucidated the molecular determinants of product specificity by substitution of individual amino acids of the sucrose binding box with amino acids that are present on homologous positions in other fructosyltransferases or vacuolar invertases. Substituting the presumed nucleophile Asp85 of the beta-fructosidase motif resulted in an inactive enzyme. 6G-FFT mutants S87N and S87D did not change substrate or product specificities, whereas mutants N84Y and N84G resulted in an inactive enzyme. Most interestingly, mutants N84S, N84A, and N84Q added fructose residues preferably to a terminal fructose and hardly to the terminal glucose. This resulted in the preferential production of inulin-type fructans. Combining mutations showed that amino acid 84 determines product specificity of 6G-FFT irrespective of the amino acid at position 87. PMID:16158237

  16. Comparison of spectroscopic and lasing properties of different types of sol-gel glass matrices containing Rh-6G.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Aparna V; Rane, Jayraj R; Jathar, Laxman V

    2009-11-01

    Rhodamine-6G (Rh-6G) is embedded in sol-gel glass samples which have been prepared by three different methods namely: 1) using HCl as catalyst and glycerol as Drying Control Chemical Additive (DCCA), 2) using HCl as catalyst at 60 degrees C and drying at room temperature and 3) using HCl as catalyst at 60 degrees C and heated at 600 degrees C for 3 h. Comparative studies of spectroscopic and lasing properties of the three types of Rh-6G containing samples were carried out with the lapse of time upto 8 months. Photostability of Rh-6G containing sol-gel samples is measured in terms of half life under Nitrogen laser pumping as number of pulses of N2 laser necessary to reduce the dye laser intensity to 50% of the original value and value is 7500 pulses at 1.67 Hz rate. The best performance of Rh-6G, as far as its spectroscopic and lasing properties are concerned was found in third type of host matrices using HCl as catalyst at 60 degrees C and heated at 600 degrees C for 3 h. PMID:19562470

  17. Characterization of the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) standard Rhodamine 6G and calibration of its diffusion coefficient in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, G.; Melchior, J. P.

    2014-03-07

    Precise diffusion measurements of rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) dissolved in D{sub 2}O at concentrations between 50 and 200 μM were carried out in the temperature range from 280 to 320 K using pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR). The obtained diffusion coefficients can be used as a calibration reference in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Besides measuring the diffusivity of Rh6G, the diffusion coefficient of the solvent in the same system could be determined in parallel by PFG-NMR as the resonances of water and Rh6G are well separated in the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum. To analyze the differences due to the isotope effect of the solvent (D{sub 2}O vs. H{sub 2}O), the correlation time τ{sub D} of Rh6G was measured by FCS in both D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O. The obtained isotopic correction factor, τ{sub D}(D{sub 2}O)/τ{sub D}(H{sub 2}O) = 1.24, reflects the isotope effect of the solvent´s self-diffusion coefficients as determined previously by PFG-NMR.

  18. Fluorescence depolarization of rhodamine 6G in glycerol: a photon-counting test of three-dimensional excitation transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Anfinrud, P.A.; Hart, D.E.; Hedstrom, J.F.; Struve, W.S.

    1986-05-22

    Time-correlated photon counting has been used to measure fluorescence concentration depolarization for rhodamine 6G in glycerol. The excitation transport theory developed by Gochanour, Andersen, and Fayer yields good approximations to the experimental decay profiles over the concentration range 1.7 x 10/sup -4/ to 2.4 x 10/sup -3/ M. Although the differences between optimized theoretical and experimental profiles are fractionally small, they are readily characterized under present counting statistics. They prove to be dominated by experimental artifacts, arising from excitation trapping by rhodamine 6G aggregates and from self-absorption in solution cells thicker than approx. 10 ..mu..m.

  19. A cyclic dodecanuclear cobalt cluster based on a derivative of the rhodamine 6G dye with unusual magnetization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Wang, Qian; Qin, Jian-Hua; Zang, Shuang-Quan; Langley, Stuart K; Murray, Keith S; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Batten, Stuart R; Mak, Thomas C W

    2015-08-18

    A novel cyclic dodecanuclear cobalt cluster which is bridged via a derivative of the rhodamine 6G dye is presented. The work provides a new and effective strategy for the design and development of novel magnetic materials based on high-nuclearity metal clusters decorated by the rhodamine dye. PMID:26165926

  20. Seventeen psec pulses from a nitrogen laser-pumped short-cavity rhodamine 6G dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Liesegang, G.W.

    1983-08-15

    We wish to report the generation of 17-psec pulses of 200-kW intensity from a nitrogen-pumped rhodamine 6G short-cavity dye laser. This dye laser has a cavity length of 120 ..mu..m and is axially pumped by the nitrogen laser. (AIP)

  1. Degradation of a textile dye, Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G), by heterogeneous sonophotoFenton process in the presence of Fe-containing TiO2 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nazlı; Gündüz, Gönül; Dükkancı, Meral

    2015-03-01

    In this study, degradation of Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) was investigated with ultrasound-assisted heterogeneous photoFenton process by iron-containing TiO2 catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method and characterized by XRD, SEM, FT-IR, nitrogen adsorption, and ICP-AES measurements. Almost complete color removal (99.9 %) was achieved after a reaction time of 90 min while chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be removed by 24 % only with the 1 wt% iron-containing TiO2 catalyst. Initial color removal after 15 min of reaction and total COD abatement after 90 min of reaction decreased with increasing calcination temperature of the catalyst from 573 to 973 K. This indicated that the catalytic activity of the catalyst depend on the percentage of anatase phase in the TiO2, which was decreased with increasing calcination temperature. PMID:24756679

  2. Resonant surface enhancement of Raman scattering of Ag nanoparticles on silicon substrates fabricated by dc sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Yingcui; Li Xiaxi; Blinn, Kevin; Mahmoud, Mahmoud A.; Liu Meilin

    2012-09-15

    Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) were deposited onto silicon substrates by direct current (dc) magnetron sputtering. The influences of sputtering power and sputtering time on the AgNP film morphology were studied using atomic force microscopy. The particle size was successfully tuned from 19 nm to 53 nm by varying the sputtering time at a dc power of 10 W. When Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) was used as the probe molecule, the AgNP films showed significant surface enhanced Raman scattering effect. In particular, it is found that larger particles show stronger enhancement for lower concentrations of R6G while smaller particles display stronger enhancement for higher concentrations of R6G.

  3. Postglacial Rebound Model ICE-6G_C (VM5a) Constrained by Geodetic and Geologic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, W. R.; Argus, D. F.; Drummond, R.

    2014-12-01

    We fit the revised global model of glacial isostatic adjustment ICE-6G_C (VM5a) to all available data, consisting of several hundred GPS uplift rates, a similar number of 14C dated relative sea level histories, and 62 geologic estimates of changes in Antarctic ice thickness. The mantle viscosity profile, VM5a is a simple multi-layer fit to prior model VM2 of Peltier (1996, Science). However, the revised deglaciation history, ICE-6G (VM5a), differs significantly from previous models in the Toronto series. (1) In North America, GPS observations of vertical uplift of Earth's surface from the Canadian Base Network require the thickness of the Laurentide ice sheet at Last Glacial Maximum to be significantly revised. At Last Glacial Maximum the new model ICE-6G_C in this region, relative to ICE-5G, roughly 50 percent thicker east of Hudson Bay (in and northern Quebec and Labrador region) and roughly 30 percent thinner west of Hudson Bay (in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and the Northwest Territories).the net change in mass, however, is small. We find that rates of gravity change determined by GRACE when corrected for the predictions of ICE-6G_C (VM5a) are significantly smaller than residuals determined on the basis of earlier models. (2) In Antarctica, we fit GPS uplift rates, geologic estimates of changes in ice thickness, and geologic constraints on the timing of ice loss. The resulting deglaciation history also differs significantly from prior models. The contribution of Antarctic ice loss to global sea level rise since Last Glacial Maximum in ICE-6G_C is 13.6 meters, less than in ICE-5G (17.5 m), but significantly larger than in both the W12A model of Whitehouse et al. [2012] (8 m) and the IJ05 R02 model of Ivins et al. [2013] (7.5 m). In ICE-6G_C rapid ice loss occurs in Antarctica from 11.5 to 8 thousands years ago, with a rapid onset at 11.5 ka thereby contributing significantly to Meltwater Pulse 1B. In ICE-6G_C (VM5a), viscous uplift of Antarctica is increasing

  4. Influence of thiourea on the emission characteristics of a laser based on an aqueous solution of rhodamine 6G

    SciTech Connect

    Viktorova, A.A.; Savikin, A.P.; Tsaregradskii, V.B.

    1983-08-01

    An investigation was made of the spectral (luminescence and lasing) characteristics of an aqueous solution of rhodamine 6G with an addition of thiourea. When the thiourea concentration in the solvent was > or =30%, the absorption and fluorescence spectra changed greatly, the lasing threshold decreased approximately fourfold, and the output power increased by an order of magnitude. The good thermooptical properties of water as a solvent, in combination with the disaggregation properties of thiourea, made it possible to realize (without circulation of the solution) a pulse-periodic lasing regime at a repetition frequency of < or approx. =50 Hz and with output radiation parameters typical of a laser with continuous circulation of an ethanol solution of rhodamine 6G.

  5. Spectral and temporal features of the pumping of rhodamine 6G by radiation from a copper vapor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, A.N.; Sukhanov, V.B.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the influence of the relative delay time tau and of the intensity ratio R/sub 21/ of the spectral components emitted by a copper vapor laser on the energy and spectral characteristics of lasing in rhodamine 6G. For certain values of tau and P/sub 21/, lasing in the dye was disrupted. A clamping effect was discovered between the rhodamine 6G laser emission spectrum and the yellow line of the copper vapor laser. The results obtained were used to determine the parameters of an interference filter for suppressing the yellow line from the copper vapor laser, and this made it possible to raise the efficiency of conversion of the pump radiation into lasing in the dye.

  6. Facile synthesis of gold nanopuncheons with high-index facets and their SERS effects on Rhodamine 6G

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jing Chang, Minmin; Zhou, Xinmu; Li, Dongping; Li, Yongxiu

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Au nanopuncheons with high-index facets have been prepared by seed-mediated growth. • The nanopuncheons are enclosed by 24 planes of (2 5 0), (3 0 1) and 2 (0 1 0) planes. • The nanopuncheons showed high SERS activity toward Rhodamine 6G. - Abstract: Au nanopuncheons with exposed high-index facets have been synthesized in high-yield by employing didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) as surfactant in one-step seed-mediated growth. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization showed that the as-prepared Au nanopuncheons possessed 24 high index facets of (2 5 0), (3 0 1), and 2 (0 1 0) planes. Due to the high density of atomic steps and kinks in the structure, the Au nanopuncheons exhibited high surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity toward Rhodamine 6G.

  7. Rotational reorientation dynamics at high pressures: rhodamine 6G in ethanol from 1 bar to 6 kbar

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, L.A.; Webb, S.P.; Yeh, S.W.; Clark, J.H.

    1985-01-03

    Picosecond, time-resolved fluorescence depolarization spectroscopy has been used to measure the rotational reorientation time (tau/sub or/) of electronically excited rhodamine 6G. When the dependence of tau/sub or/ on solvent viscosity for a series of linear alcohols is compared with that for ethanol as a function of pressure over the range from 1 bar to 6 kbar, substantially different rotational reorientation dynamics are found for identical macroscopic viscosities. 31 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor promotes lung metastasis through mobilization of Ly6G+Ly6C+ granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kowanetz, Marcin; Wu, Xiumin; Lee, John; Tan, Martha; Hagenbeek, Thijs; Qu, Xueping; Yu, Lanlan; Ross, Jed; Korsisaari, Nina; Cao, Tim; Bou-Reslan, Hani; Kallop, Dara; Weimer, Robby; Ludlam, Mary J. C.; Kaminker, Joshua S.; Modrusan, Zora; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Peale, Franklin V.; Carano, Richard; Meng, Y. Gloria; Ferrara, Napoleone

    2010-01-01

    Priming of the organ-specific premetastatic sites is thought to be an important yet incompletely understood step during metastasis. In this study, we show that the metastatic tumors we examined overexpress granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which expands and mobilizes Ly6G+Ly6C+ granulocytes and facilitates their subsequent homing at distant organs even before the arrival of tumor cells. Moreover, G-CSF–mobilized Ly6G+Ly6C+ cells produce the Bv8 protein, which has been implicated in angiogenesis and mobilization of myeloid cells. Anti–G-CSF or anti-Bv8 antibodies significantly reduced lung metastasis. Transplantation of Bv8 null fetal liver cells into lethally irradiated hosts also reduced metastasis. We identified an unexpected role for Bv8: the ability to stimulate tumor cell migration through activation of one of the Bv8 receptors, prokineticin receptor (PKR)-1. Finally, we show that administration of recombinant G-CSF is sufficient to increase the numbers of Ly6G+Ly6C+ cells in organ-specific metastatic sites and results in enhanced metastatic ability of several tumors. PMID:21081700

  9. Alginate stabilized silver nanocube-Rh6G composite as a highly selective mercury sensor in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharmaraj, Vairaperumal; Pitchumani, Kasi

    2011-03-01

    Alginate-stabilized silver nanocubes are synthesized via a reduction method and are characterized by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopies, SEM, AFM and HRTEM analyses. A silver nanocubes (Ag NCbs) based sensor for detecting Hg2+ ions in aqueous solution has been developed using Rh6G as an external spectroscopic probe. Using this system, Hg2+ ions (as low as 1 × 10-10 mol L-1) are recognized in aqueous media via a colorimetric method with very high selectivity and sensitivity over other metal ions namely Fe2+, Zn2+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Sn2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, and Co2+.Alginate-stabilized silver nanocubes are synthesized via a reduction method and are characterized by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopies, SEM, AFM and HRTEM analyses. A silver nanocubes (Ag NCbs) based sensor for detecting Hg2+ ions in aqueous solution has been developed using Rh6G as an external spectroscopic probe. Using this system, Hg2+ ions (as low as 1 × 10-10 mol L-1) are recognized in aqueous media via a colorimetric method with very high selectivity and sensitivity over other metal ions namely Fe2+, Zn2+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Sn2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, and Co2+. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information concerning UV-Vis and emission spectra of alginate-Ag NCbs, 2D and 3D AFM images of alginate-Ag NCbs, 3D AFM image of alginate-Ag NCbs-Rh6G with the absence and presence of Hg2+. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00749h

  10. Non-linear fluorescence excitation of Rhodamine 6G and TRITC labeled IgG in whispering gallery mode microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastells, Carme; Marco, M. Pilar; Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Pasquardini, Laura; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Farnesi, Daniele; Berneschi, Simone; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria Huguet, Silvia

    2015-03-01

    We report the non linear fluorescence real-time detection of labeled IgG covalently bonded to the surface of a microspherical whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR). The immunoreagents have been immobilized onto the surface of the WGMR sensor after being activated with an epoxy silane and an orienting layer. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of immunoreactions. We also tested the potential of microbubbles as nonlinear enhancement platform. The dyes used in these studies are tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate and Rhodamine 6G. All measurements were performed in a modified confocal microscope.

  11. Reciprocal passive mode locking of a rhodamine 6G dye laser and the Ar+ pump laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yasa, Zafer A.; Amer, Nabil M.

    1981-02-01

    We report that a rhodamine 6G dye laser, internally pumped within the extended cavity of an Ar+-ion laser, is mode locked when its cavity length is matched to half that of the pump laser: the 5145-Å argon laser line is passively mode locked by the combination of the saturable absorption and the lasing action of the dye, which is in turn synchronously pumped and mode locked. Tunable (5650–5950-Å) ~10 psec pulses are generated, and the average output power is ~80 mW.

  12. Novel PAMAM Dendron as a Bichromophoric Probe Based on Rhodamine 6G and 1,8-Naphthalimide.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Margarita D; Georgiev, Nikolai I; Bojinov, Vladimir B

    2016-05-01

    A novel PAMAM dendron designed as a wavelength-shifting bichromophore with 1,8-naphthalimide energy "donor" capable of absorbing light and efficiently transferring the energy to a focal Rhodamine 6G "acceptor" was synthesized and investigated. Moreover, the system was configured on the "fluorophore-spacer-receptor" format. Thus, the distinguishing features of FRET systems were successfully combined with the properties of photoinduced electron transfer and classical ring-opening sensor systems. The synthesized compound shows excellent signaling properties towards protons, Hg(2+) and Fe(3+) ions, therefore, the system is able to act as an one-output combinatorial logic circuit with four chemical inputs. PMID:27048224

  13. Reciprocal passive mode locking of a rhodamine 6G dye laser and the Ar/sup +/ pump laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yasa, Z.A.; Amer, N.M.

    1981-02-01

    A rhodamine 6G dye laser, internally pumped within the extended cavity of an Ar/sup +/-ion laser, is mode locked when its cavity length is matched to half that of the pump laser: the 5145-A argon laser line is passively mode locked by the combination of the saturable absorption and the lasing action of the dye, which is in turn synchronously pumped and mode locked. Tunable (5650-5950-A)approx.10 psec pulses are generated, and the average output power is approx.80 mW.

  14. Prospects for single-molecule detection in liquids by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Dovichi, N.J.

    1983-01-01

    A laser-induced fluoresence determination of aqueous solutions of rhodamine 6G resulted in a detection limit of 18 attograms, or 22,000 molecules, of rhodamine 6G. These results allow the projection to single-molecule detection with reasonable improvements in the experimental apparatus.

  15. Par6G suppresses cell proliferation and is targeted by loss-of-function mutations in multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    Marques, E; Englund, J I; Tervonen, T A; Virkunen, E; Laakso, M; Myllynen, M; Mäkelä, A; Ahvenainen, M; Lepikhova, T; Monni, O; Hautaniemi, S; Klefström, J

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated epithelial structure communicates with individual constituent epithelial cells to suppress their proliferation activity. However, the pathways linking epithelial structure to cessation of the cell proliferation machinery or to unscheduled proliferation in the context of tumorigenesis are not well defined. Here we demonstrate the strong impact of compromised epithelial integrity on normal and oncogenic Myc-driven proliferation in three-dimensional mammary epithelial organoid culture. Systematic silencing of 34 human homologs of Drosophila genes, with previously established functions in control of epithelial integrity, demonstrates a role for human genes of apico-basal polarity, Wnt and Hippo pathways and actin dynamics in regulation of the size, integrity and cell proliferation in organoids. Perturbation of these pathways leads to diverse functional interactions with Myc: manifested as a RhoA-dependent synthetic lethality and Par6-dependent effects on the cell cycle. Furthermore, we show a role for Par6G as a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase/phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1/Akt pathway and epithelial cell proliferation and evidence for frequent inactivation of Par6G gene in epithelial cancers. The findings demonstrate that determinants of epithelial structure regulate the cell proliferation activity via conserved and cancer-relevant regulatory circuitries, which are important for epithelial cell cycle restriction and may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26073086

  16. Gas Sensor Using a Rhodamine-6 G Doped TiO2 Film Deposited on an Optical Fiber to Detect Volatile Organic Compounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, S. Muñoz; Hipatl, C. Martínez; Mixcóatl, J. Castillo; Pérez, G. Beltrán; Merino, R. Palomino

    2008-04-01

    The necessity of detection and recognition of different types of gases, such as simple volatile organic compounds or their mixtures, requires the development of different types of sensors and the study of different materials for sensing films. In this work, an application of an optical fiber to the detection of VOC is presented. The sensor was constructed removing a portion of the cladding of approximately 3 cm and depositing instead a sensing titanium dioxide (TiO2) film doped with an organic dye (rhodamine 6 G) by the sol-gel technique. The sensor operation principle is based on the absorption of evanescent wave when the sensing film interacts with the VOC molecules, which attenuates the output optical power. The difference between the output power with and without gas gives a measure of the concentration in the chamber. The results showed that for ethanol concentration from 0 to 10,000 ppm, the response of the sensor was approximately linear. The sensor responses to octane and ethyl acetate were also studied.

  17. Model to explain the effects of halide ions on the increase in surface enhanced Raman spectral intensity over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Michael A.

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the large increase in spectral intensity when molecules are adsorbed to nanoparticle surfaces such as occurs during surface enhanced Raman (SER) spectroscopy will allow scientists to probe ever smaller scales, even allowing single molecule detection. One particular scenario that increased the SER scattering efficiency was the addition of halide ions to Rhodamine 6G (R6G)-ethanol solution. This thesis presents a theoretical model explaining the effects of halide ions on the SER spectral intensity of the Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecule when co-adsorbed to a silver nanoparticle surface. Glaspell et al. 2005, found a linear correlation between the increase in spectral intensities of selected vibrational normal modes of R6G over time and the polarizabilities of co-adsorbed halide ions. When the R6G molecule co-adsorbs to the silver nanoparticle surface with the halide ions, the molecule is exposed to three external electric fields that add vectorially, creating a total external electric field. Modelling the fields from the halide ions and the silver nanoparticles as electric dipole fields introduces the polarizability of the halide ion linearly into the Raman spectral intensity equation. This model also shows that there is a necessary interaction between the halide ions and the silver nanoparticle surface in order to see the effects as described by Glaspell et al. Furthermore, we will present experimental results that show that there is a necessary interaction between the halide ions and the nanoparticle surface. Without this interaction there was no increase in the SER spectral intensity of R6G or pyridine molecules in solution with the halide ions but without the silver nanoparticles.

  18. Single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Shera, E.B.

    1995-09-15

    A novel method for the detection and identification of single molecules in solution has been devised, computer simulated, and experimentally achieved. The technique involves the determination of electrophoretic velocities by measuring the time required for individual molecules to travel a fixed distance between two laser beams. Computer simulations of the process were performed before-hand in order to estimate the experimental feasibility of the method and to determine the optimum values for the various experimental parameters. Examples of the use of the technique for the ultrasensitive detection and identification of rhodamine-6G, a mixture of DNA restriction fragments, and a mixture of proteins in aqueous solution are presented. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Random lasing and coherent back scattering study in rhodamine 6G doped polymer optical fiber (POF) particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    C, Sreechandralijith K.; Peter, Jaison; Thankappan, Aparna; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate coherent back scattering and random lasing from an active random media of Rhodamine 6G doped polymer optical fiber particles on different sizes. Narrow emission modes are observed experimentally over a broad range of scattering strengths without requiring optical cavities. The particle-size dependence of transport mean free path, which measured from coherent backscattering measurements. Since the scattering mean free path is less than the emission wavelength, recurrent light scattering arises and provides coherent feedback for lasing. Laser emission from the sample observed in all directions. This observation also provides direct evidence for the existence of recurrent scattering of light. The lasing threshold intensity depends on the excitation volume, also the decrease of the lasing threshold at large particle size. The feedback for lasing originates mainly from backscattering of particles near the boundaries of the pumped region. Here, the lasing threshold depends strongly on the size distribution, dye concentration and intensity of excitation in the ensemble.

  20. Study of the spectral and angular characteristics of laser action by rhodamine 6G solutions in a short cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, V.S.; Studenov, V.I.; Rozuvanova, V.A.

    1984-05-01

    An experimental and theoretical study has been made of the spectral and angular characteristics of a laser with an ethanol solution of rhodamine 6G, pumped with the second-harmonic radiation of an LTIPCh-6 laser, as a function of the spacing of a Fabry-Perot interferometer used as a cavity laser. It is shown experimentally that when the cavity is short, the radiation of the laser studied has a distinct spectral and angular structure which is determined by the length of the cavity and is independent of the reflectancies of the cavity mirrors, activator concentration, or power of the exciting radiation. Good agreement is shown to exist between the experimental and theoretical results. It is concluded that the character of formation of the spectral and angular radiation characteristics of a dye laser is determined almost entirely by the properties of the Fabry-Perot interferometer used as the cavity.

  1. Giant unilamellar vesicles containing Rhodamine 6G as a marker for immunoassay of bovine serum albumin and lipocalin-2.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Misato; Shoji, Atsushi; Sugawara, Masao

    2016-07-15

    Functionalized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing a fluorescence dye Rhodamine 6G is proposed as a marker in sandwich-type immunoassay for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lipocalin-2 (LCN2). The GUVs were prepared by the electroformation method and functionalized with anti-BSA antibody and anti-LCN2 antibody, respectively. The purification of antibody-modified GUVs was achieved by conventional centrifugation and a washing step in a flow system. To antigen on an antibody slip, antibody-modified GUVs were added as a marker and incubated. After wash-out of excess reagents and lysis of the bound GUVs with Triton X-100, the fluorescence image was captured. The fluorometric immunoassays for BSA and LCN2 exhibited lower detection limits of 4 and 80 fg ml(-)(1), respectively. PMID:27117116

  2. Space geodesy constrains ice age terminal deglaciation: The global ICE-6G_C (VM5a) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, W. R.; Argus, D. F.; Drummond, R.

    2015-01-01

    A new model of the last deglaciation event of the Late Quaternary ice age is here described and denoted as ICE-6G_C (VM5a). It differs from previously published models in this sequence in that it has been explicitly refined by applying all of the available Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of vertical motion of the crust that may be brought to bear to constrain the thickness of local ice cover as well as the timing of its removal. Additional space geodetic constraints have also been applied to specify the reference frame within which the GPS data are described. The focus of the paper is upon the three main regions of Last Glacial Maximum ice cover, namely, North America, Northwestern Europe/Eurasia, and Antarctica, although Greenland and the British Isles will also be included, if peripherally, in the discussion. In each of the three major regions, the model predictions of the time rate of change of the gravitational field are also compared to that being measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellites as an independent means of verifying the improvement of the model achieved by applying the GPS constraints. Several aspects of the global characteristics of this new model are also discussed, including the nature of relative sea level history predictions at far-field locations, in particular the Caribbean island of Barbados, from which especially high-quality records of postglacial sea level change are available but which records were not employed in the development of the model. Although ICE-6G_C (VM5a) is a significant improvement insofar as the most recently available GPS observations are concerned, comparison of model predictions with such far-field relative sea level histories enables us to identify a series of additional improvements that should follow from a further stage of model iteration.

  3. Enhancement of Singlet-Triplet Energy Transfer Between Dyes in a Polymer Film by Surface Plasmons of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsibul'nikova, A. V.; Bryukhanov, V. V.; Slezhkin, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of the plasmon energy generated in Ag citrate hydrosol and ablated Au nanoparticles on the singlettriplet electron energy transfer between rhodamine 6G (R6G) and acriflavine (ACF) molecules incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films is studied. The increased efficiency of non-radiative energy transfer in the presence of Au nanoparticles and the increased lifetime of excited states of molecules are established.

  4. High Raman-to-fluorescence ratio of Rhodamine 6G excited with 532  nm laser wavelength using a closely packed, self-assembled monolayer of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sadegh, N; Khadem, H; Tavassoli, S H

    2016-08-01

    A highly efficient Raman-to-fluorescence ratio of Rhodamine 6G is obtained by means of 532 nm laser wavelength, which is in close proximity of the dye's absorption maximum. Closely packed, gap-filled self-assembled monolayers of silver nanoparticles were produced to observe the Raman signals of Rhodamine 6G. Two mechanisms contribute to detect the Raman signals of the fluorescent sample: surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and nanomaterial surface energy transfer (NSET). Self-assembled monolayers of silver nanoparticles with different coverage densities and also those filled with probe molecules were prepared through variations of the substrate's immersion time in a nanoparticle solution and drying the substrate, respectively. Examination of the effects of these two factors on the plasmonic response and SERS efficiency of the substrate revealed that in a gap-filled dense coverage, near-field interactions dominate, which remarkably increase the Raman-to-fluorescence ratio (RFR). To have a perfect dense coverage, the efficient immersion time was obtained at about 48 h. Drying the substrates also caused further enhancement in RFR through filling interparticle spaces with dye molecules and, accordingly, an increase in NSET efficiency. PMID:27505398

  5. Survival of residual neutrophils and accelerated myelopoiesis limit the efficacy of antibody-mediated depletion of Ly-6G+ cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Moses, Katrin; Klein, Johanna C; Männ, Linda; Klingberg, Anika; Gunzer, Matthias; Brandau, Sven

    2016-06-01

    Expansion of Ly-6G(+) myeloid cells has been reported in most murine cancer models. However, divergent findings exist regarding the role and effect of these cells on host immunity and tumor progression. Antibody-mediated depletion of Ly-6G(+) cells is a common technique to assess the in vivo relevance of these cells. Interpretation of results crucially depends on the efficacy and course of depletion. We established murine head and neck cancer models and analyzed the efficacy of antibody-mediated depletion by flow cytometry, conventional histology, and intravital imaging with a novel Ly-6G-transgenic mouse model. The first phase of depletion was characterized by effective elimination of Ly-6G(+) cells from the peripheral blood. Nevertheless, viable, resistant cells were found to reside in the tumor tissue and spleen. This peripheral depletion phase was associated with high systemic levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and KC and enhanced splenic production of Ly-6G(+) cells. Even under sustained treatment with either αGr-1 or αLy-6G antibodies, peripheral blood depletion ended after approximately 1 wk and was followed by reappearance of immature Ly-6G(+) cells with an immunoregulatory phenotype. Reappearance of these depletion-resistant immature cells was enhanced in tumor-bearing, compared with naïve, control mice. Collectively, our data suggest that depletion of Ly-6G(+) myeloid cells in tumor-bearing mice is counteracted by the persistence of intratumoral cells, enhanced extramedullary granulopoiesis, and accelerated reappearance of immature cells. Hence, extensive monitoring of in vivo kinetics and tissue distribution of Ly-6G(+) cells is required in depletion studies. PMID:26819319

  6. Peripheral serotonin-mediated system suppresses bone development and regeneration via serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin is important in brain functions and involved in neurological diseases. It is also drawn considerable attention in bone disease since it mainly produced by the gut. Serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor (5-HT6R) is clinical targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, 5-HT6R as a therapeutic target in bone has not been reported. Herein, we found that 5-HT6R showed higher expression in bone, and its expression was increased during bone remodeling and osteoblast differentiation. The activation of 5-HT6R by ST1936 caused the inhibition of ALP activity and mineralization in primary osteoblast cultures, which was antagonized by SB258585, an antagonist and by the knockdown of 5-HT6R. Further investigation indicated that 5-HT6R inhibited osteoblast differentiation via Jab1 in BMP2 signaling but not PKA and ERK1/2. In vivo studies showed that the activation of 5-HT6R inhibited bone regeneration in the calvarial defect mice and also delayed bone development in newborn mice; this response was antagonized by SB258585. Therefore, our findings indicate a key role of 5-HT6R in bone formation through serotonin originating in the peripheral system, and suggest that it is a novel therapeutic target for drug development in the bone repair and bone diseases. PMID:27581523

  7. Peripheral serotonin-mediated system suppresses bone development and regeneration via serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin is important in brain functions and involved in neurological diseases. It is also drawn considerable attention in bone disease since it mainly produced by the gut. Serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor (5-HT6R) is clinical targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, 5-HT6R as a therapeutic target in bone has not been reported. Herein, we found that 5-HT6R showed higher expression in bone, and its expression was increased during bone remodeling and osteoblast differentiation. The activation of 5-HT6R by ST1936 caused the inhibition of ALP activity and mineralization in primary osteoblast cultures, which was antagonized by SB258585, an antagonist and by the knockdown of 5-HT6R. Further investigation indicated that 5-HT6R inhibited osteoblast differentiation via Jab1 in BMP2 signaling but not PKA and ERK1/2. In vivo studies showed that the activation of 5-HT6R inhibited bone regeneration in the calvarial defect mice and also delayed bone development in newborn mice; this response was antagonized by SB258585. Therefore, our findings indicate a key role of 5-HT6R in bone formation through serotonin originating in the peripheral system, and suggest that it is a novel therapeutic target for drug development in the bone repair and bone diseases. PMID:27581523

  8. Postglacial Rebound and Current Ice Loss Estimates from Space Geodesy: The New ICE-6G (VM5a) Global Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, W. R.; Argus, D.; Drummond, R.; Moore, A. W.

    2012-12-01

    We compare, on a global basis, estimates of site velocity against predictions of the newly constructed postglacial rebound model ICE-6G (VM5a). This model is fit to observations of North American postglacial rebound thereby demonstrating that the ice sheet at last glacial maximum must have been, relative to ICE-5G,thinner in southern Manitoba, thinner near Yellowknife (northwest Territories), thicker in eastern and southern Quebec, and thicker along the British Columbia-Alberta border. The GPS based estimates of site velocity that we employ are more accurate than were previously available because they are based on GPS estimates of position as a function of time determined by incorporating satellite phase center variations [Desai et al. 2011]. These GPS estimates are constraining postglacial rebound in North America and Europe more tightly than ever before. In particular, given the high density of GPS sites in North America, and the fact that the velocity of the mass center (CM) of Earth is also more tightly constrained, the new model much more strongly constrains both the lateral extent of the proglacial forebulge and the rate at which this peripheral bulge (that was emplaced peripheral to the late Pleistocence Laurentia ice sheet) is presently collapsing. This fact proves to be important to the more accurate inference of the current rate of ice loss from both Greenland and Alaska based upon the time dependent gravity observations being provided by the GRACE satellite system. In West Antarctica we have also been able to significantly revise the previously prevalent ICE-5G deglaciation history so as to enable its predictions to be optimally consistent with GPS site velocities determined by connecting campaign WAGN measurements to those provided by observations from the permanent ANET sites. Ellsworth Land (south of the Antarctic peninsula), is observed to be rising at 6 ±3 mm/yr according to our latest analyses; the Ellsworth mountains themselves are observed to be

  9. Transparent gel and xerogel of thorium phosphate: optical spectroscopy with: Nd3+,Eu3+,Cr3+ and Rhodamine 6G

    SciTech Connect

    Genet, M.; Brandel, V.; Lahalle, M.P.; Simoni, E.

    1992-03-01

    Chemical conditions for thorium phosphate gel preparation have been determined. The transparency is of good optical quality and the gel is very stable for a long time. Under drying condition, this gel can give rise to the xerogel which is still transparent. We can also prepare this xerogel by simple evaporation at room temperature of a very concentrated solution of thorium phosphate. From this viscous medium, the xerogel can be obtained in various kinds of shapes : threads, slabs and blocks. Solidification time depends on the final volume desired and spreads from few minutes to several weeks. Absorption spectrum of pure gel and xerogel have been recorded. Gel and xerogel doped with very well known probes like Nd3+ and Er3+ were examined to compare their optical properties with aqueous medium of the same chemical composition. Eu3+ doped gel and xerogel were also studied using their fluorescence properties. The optical properties of Cr3+ in doped gel and xerogel allowed us to determine the kinetics of hydration sphere modification during the drying period. Finally, as xerogel synthesis takes place at room temperature, fragile organic dye can be used as dopant, so Rhodamine 6G absorption and emission spectra have been studied in these conditions. When, at that time, the xerogel is doped with Coumarin 460 and Tb3+ an energy transfer is observed between dye and Tb3+ ions, which contributes to enhance the fluorescence of Tb3+ ions. Eu3+ behaves similarly. In conclusion, gel and xerogel of thorium phosphate tested with usual probes such as 3d, 4f ions and dyes seem to be very promising matrices.

  10. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  11. Room temperature single molecule microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Enderlein, G.; Semin, D.J.; Keller, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    We have developed three capabilities to image the locations of and interrogate immobilized single fluorescent molecules: near-field scanning optical, confocal scanning optical, and wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy. Each microscopy has its own advantages. Near-field illumination can beat the diffraction limit. Confocal microscopy has high brightness and temporal resolution. Wide-field has the quickest (parallel) imaging capability. With confocal microscopy, we have verified that single fluorescent spots in our images are due to single molecules by observing photon antibunching. Using all three microscopies, we have observed that xanthene molecules dispersed on dry silica curiously exhibit intensity fluctuations on millisecond to minute time scales. We are exploring the connection between the intensity fluctuations and fluctuations in individual photophysical parameters. The fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G on silica fluctuate. The complex nature of the intensity and lifetime fluctuations is consistent with a mechanism that perturbs more than one photophysical parameter.

  12. Dye-capped semiconductor nanoclusters. Excited state and photosensitization aspects of rhodamine 6G H-aggregates bound to SiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr, C. |; Liu, D.; Kamat, P.V.; Hotchandani, S.

    1996-06-27

    SiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} colloids are capped with a cationic dye, rhodamine 6G, by electrostatic interaction. The close packing of these dye molecules on the negatively charged SiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} colloid results in the formation of H-aggregates. These aggregates are nonfluorescent but can inject electrons from the excited state into SnO{sub 2} colloids. The photophysical and photochemical properties of rhodamine-6G-aggregate on SiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} colloids have been investigated using picosecond laser flash photolysis. Charge injection from the excited dye aggregate into SnO{sub 2} nanocrystallites occurs with a rate constant of 5.5 x 10{sup 9} s{sup -1}. The application of these dye aggregates in extending the photoresponse of nanocrystalline SnO{sup 2} film has been demonstrated by constructing a photoelectrochemical cell. A maximum incident photon-to-photocurrent efficiency of nearly 1% was observed for the photosensitized current generation. Fast reverse electron transfer between the injected electron and the cation radical of the dye aggregate is a limiting factor in maximizing the incident photon-to-photocurrent efficiency (IPCE). 65 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Dependence of the activation energy of rhodamine 6G phototransformation into an irreversible photoproduct on the excitation wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, A.V.

    1994-12-01

    The results of our previous studies of the quantum yield {Phi}{sub ip} of irreversible phototransformations in rhodamines in deoxygenated solutions are presented along with the results of a quantum-chemical analysis of the dipole-dipole electronic transitions between different molecular orbitals in the 15000-38000 cm{sup -1} spectral region. A combined analysis of these results gives insight into the features of the singlet-singlet absorption spectrum of xanthene dyes in a broad spectral region from 15000 to 38000 cm{sup -1} and explains a considerable difference in values of {Phi}{sub ip} upon excitations into the isoenergetic states in different parts of the absorption spectrum. The relation between the threshold activation energy of the photodestruction of molecules and molecular orbitals involved in the electronic transitions induced by absorption of photons in different spectral regions is found. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Application of derivative and derivative ratio spectrophotometry to simultaneous trace determination of rhodamine B and rhodamine 6G after dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ni; Deng, Jian; Huang, Kaihui; Ju, Saiqin; Hu, Canhui; Liang, Jun

    2014-07-15

    Two novel methods, first derivative spectrophotometric method ((1)D) and first derivative ratio spectrophotometric method ((1)DR), have been developed for the simultaneous trace determination of rhodamine B (RhB) and rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in food samples after dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). The combination of derivative spectrophotometric techniques and DLLME procedure endows the presented methods with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Under optimum conditions, the linear calibration curves ranged from 5 to 450 ng mL(-1), with the correlation coefficients (r) of 0.9997 for RhB and 0.9977 for Rh6G by (1)D method, and 0.9987 for RhB and 0.9958 for Rh6G by (1)DR method, respectively. The calculated limits of detection (LODs) based on the variability of the blank solutions (S/N = 3 criterion) for 11 measurements were in the range of 0.48-1.93 ng mL(-1). The recoveries ranged from 88.1% to 111.6% (with RSD less than 4.4%) and 91.5-110.5% (with RSD less than 4.7%) for (1)D and (1)DR method, respectively. The influence of interfering substances such as foreign ions and food colorants which might be present in the food samples on the signals of RhB and Rh6G was examined. The developed methods have been successfully applied to the determination of RhB and Rh6G in black tea, red wine and chilli powder samples with the characteristics of simplicity, cost-effectiveness, environmental friendliness, and could be valuable for routine analysis. PMID:24691361

  15. Application of derivative and derivative ratio spectrophotometry to simultaneous trace determination of rhodamine B and rhodamine 6G after dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ni; Deng, Jian; Huang, Kaihui; Ju, Saiqin; Hu, Canhui; Liang, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Two novel methods, first derivative spectrophotometric method (1D) and first derivative ratio spectrophotometric method (1DR), have been developed for the simultaneous trace determination of rhodamine B (RhB) and rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in food samples after dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). The combination of derivative spectrophotometric techniques and DLLME procedure endows the presented methods with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Under optimum conditions, the linear calibration curves ranged from 5 to 450 ng mL-1, with the correlation coefficients (r) of 0.9997 for RhB and 0.9977 for Rh6G by 1D method, and 0.9987 for RhB and 0.9958 for Rh6G by 1DR method, respectively. The calculated limits of detection (LODs) based on the variability of the blank solutions (S/N = 3 criterion) for 11 measurements were in the range of 0.48-1.93 ng mL-1. The recoveries ranged from 88.1% to 111.6% (with RSD less than 4.4%) and 91.5-110.5% (with RSD less than 4.7%) for 1D and 1DR method, respectively. The influence of interfering substances such as foreign ions and food colorants which might be present in the food samples on the signals of RhB and Rh6G was examined. The developed methods have been successfully applied to the determination of RhB and Rh6G in black tea, red wine and chilli powder samples with the characteristics of simplicity, cost-effectiveness, environmental friendliness, and could be valuable for routine analysis.

  16. Ag@SiO2 Core-shell Nanoparticles for Probing Spatial Distribution of Electromagnetic Field Enhancement via Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhipeng; Gu, Baohua; Zhang, Zhenyu; Xu, Hongxing

    2009-01-01

    We show that the spatial distribution of the electromagnetic (EM) field enhancement can be probed directly via dynamic evolution of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules as they diffuse into Ag@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles. The porous silica shell limits the diffusion of R6G molecules towards inner Ag cores, thereby allowing direct observation and quantification of the spatial distribution of SERS enhancement as molecules migrate from the low to high EM fields inside the dielectric silica shell. Our experimental evidence is validated by the generalized Mie theory, and the approach can potentially offer a novel platform for further investigating the site and spatial distribution of the EM fields and the EM versus chemical enhancement of SERS due to molecular confinement within the Ag@SiO2 nanoshell.

  17. Dual optoelectronic visual detection and quantification of spectroscopically silent heavy metal toxins: a multi-measurand sensing strategy based on Rhodamine 6G as chromo or fluoro ionophore.

    PubMed

    Prathish, K P; James, D; Jaisy, J; Prasada Rao, T

    2009-08-01

    A novel colorimetric chemo-sensor for the simultaneous visual detection and quantification of spectroscopically silent heavy metal toxins viz. cadmium, lead and mercury has been developed. This is based on the proposed sequential ligand exchange (SLE) mechanism of iodide from Pb-I(-)-Rhodamine 6G ion associate with citrate (without affecting ion associates of Cd and Hg) and subsequently from Cd-I(-)-Rhodamine 6G ion associate with EDTA (without affecting Hg-I(-)-Rhodamine 6G). Multi-measurand detection and quantification by colorimetry is possible as the individual toxins gives identical bathochromic shifts in aqueous solution, i.e. from 530 to 575 nm on formation of ternary ion associates in singular, binary and ternary mixtures. The visual detection provides a simple, quick and sensitive detection method in addition to quantification via spectrophotometry with Sandell sensitivities of 1.1, 15 and 2.5 microg dm(-2) for cadmium, lead and mercury, respectively. The developed procedure has been successfully tested for the analysis of environmental (cast alkali, lead acid battery and zinc manufacturing industry effluents) samples. Furthermore, the multi-measurand quantification of the above-mentioned heavy metal toxins based on fluorescence quenching and use of Pyronine G as chromo-ionophore instead of Rhodamine 6G is also described. PMID:19576390

  18. Statement of basis/proposed plan for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G). Revision 1, Final

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1996-10-24

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the preferred alternative for addressing the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G (BRP6G) located at SRS, in northwestern Barnwell County, South Carolina and to provide an opportunity for public input into the remedial action selection process. Arsenic, beryllium, iron, and octachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin isomers (OCDD) concentrations in the pit soil are at levels consistent with those found in the background. Therefore, the only contamination attributable to actions in BRP6G is PCB-1254. After the risk contributions of these chemicals are eliminated, the only remaining risk attributable to the pit soil is from PCB-1254 (about 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} via ingestion of vegetables grown on-site). The maximum concentration of PCB-1254 detected in the pit was 0.115 mg/kg, approximately 10% of the residential action level for PCBs of 1 mg/kg. Based on the results of the remedial investigation and the BRA, it is proposed that No Action be performed for the BRP6G. Considering the low levels of residual contamination present principally below 1.2 meters (4 feet) within the pit and the associated risks (about 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}) within the lower level of EPA`s target risk range, action is not warranted for this unit.

  19. Strategies for reducing dye aggregation in luminescent host-guest systems: Rhodamine 6G incorporated in new mesoporous sol-gel hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Queiroz, Thiago B.; Botelho, Moema B. S.; De Boni, Leonardo; Eckert, Hellmut; de Camargo, Andrea S. S.

    2013-03-01

    Aiming at the design of new luminescent host-guest materials with minimized aggregation effects, two classes of sol-gel derived mesoporous materials were explored as hosts for Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) dye: The first consists of pure (SiO2) and phenyl-modified silica (Ph0.17SiO1.915) xerogels, prepared via sol-gel reaction using an ionic liquid as catalytic agent. The second consists of mesoporous sodium aluminosilicate glasses with Si to Al ratio in the range of 6 ≤ Si/Al ≤ 9. Characterization through high resolution solid state NMR proved the successful obtention of the designed host matrices. Following Rh6G-loading in various concentrations, the resulting materials were characterized by their luminescence and excitation spectra, excited state lifetimes, and quantum yields. The dye doped silica xerogels presented high quantum yield values (up to 87%), with no substantial decrease in efficiency with increasing dye concentration. At suitable Rh6G contents, all the final materials presented laser action under 532 nm excitation from a Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. The phenyl silicate sample presents the highest laser photostability with a half-life of 6560 pulses, under 2 mJ/pulse pump power, and 10 Hz repetition rate. The laser experiments provided further insights on the photodegradation mechanisms of such organic species.

  20. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

  1. Tim-3/galectin-9 pathway: regulation of Th1 immunity through promotion of CD11b+Ly-6G+ myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Dardalhon, Valerie; Anderson, Ana C; Karman, Jozsef; Apetoh, Lionel; Chandwaskar, Rucha; Lee, David H; Cornejo, Melanie; Nishi, Nozomu; Yamauchi, Akira; Quintana, Francisco J; Sobel, Raymond A; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2010-08-01

    IFN-gamma plays a central role in antitumor immunity. T cell Ig and mucin domain (Tim-3) is expressed on IFN-gamma-producing Th1 cells; on interaction with its ligand, galectin-9, Th1 immunity is terminated. In this study, we show that transgenic overexpression of Tim-3 on T cells results in an increase in CD11b(+)Ly-6G(+) cells and inhibition of immune responses. Molecular characterization of CD11b(+)Ly-6G(+) cells reveals a phenotype consistent with granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Accordingly, we find that modulation of the Tim-3/galectin-9 (Gal-9) pathway impacts on tumor growth. Similarly, overexpression of Tim-3 ligand, Gal-9, results in an increase in CD11b(+)Ly-6G(+) cells and inhibition of immune responses. Loss of Tim-3 restores normal levels of CD11b(+)Ly-6G(+) cells and normal immune responses in Gal-9 transgenic mice. Our data uncover a novel mechanism by which the Tim-3/Gal-9 pathway regulates immune responses and identifies this pathway as a therapeutic target in diseases where myeloid-derived suppressor cells are disadvantageous. PMID:20574007

  2. Picosecond study of energy transfer between rhodamine 6G and 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide in the premicellar region: förster mechanism with increased local concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Kusumoto, Yoshihumi; Nakashima, Nobuaki; Yoshihara, Keitaro

    1980-04-01

    The mechanism of enhancement in the energy transfer between rhodamine 6G and 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide by sodium lauryl sulfate in the premicellar region was studied by a picosecond laser technique. The Forster mechanism with an increased local concentration suggesting dye-rich induced micelle formation was concluded from the shape of the decay curve.

  3. Pregnancy per AI differences between primiparous and multiparous high-yield dairy cows after using Double Ovsynch or G6G synchronization protocols.

    PubMed

    Astiz, S; Fargas, O

    2013-04-15

    The objective of the present work was to determine the optimal protocol for timed AI on high-yield dairy cows. The pregnancy per AI (pregnancy/AI) arising from 7805 first timed artificial inseminations on 27 dairy farms in eastern Spain was examined after use of the Double Ovsynch (DOv; N = 6783) or G6G (N = 1022) synchronization protocols. Parity number, farm, prostaglandin analogue, and season (hot or cool) were examined for their possible association with postsynchronization fertility (in terms of pregnancy/AI). Mean pregnancy/AI overall was 36.1 ± 8.4%, with no significant differences between the DOv or G6G protocols (36.3 ± 8.3% vs. 34.8 ± 9.1%). However, parity and synchronization treatment resulted in a significant interaction (P = 0.03). When DOv AIs (N = 6783) and G6G AIs (N = 1022) were analyzed separately it was observed that pregnancy/AI was significantly better in primiparous than in multiparous cows after DOv (44.3 ± 11.4% vs. 31.4 ± 8.2%; P < 0.0001), and pregnancy/AI was similar after G6G in primiparous and in multiparous cows (34.7 ± 9.2% vs. 34.8 ± 9.9%). Hot season significantly reduced pregnancy/AI to a similar extent for primiparous and multiparous cows and showed a significant interaction of protocol and season (P = 0.001). These results were similar across all farms, regardless that their overall pregnancy/AI was similar or significantly different from the average. These results indicate that G6G tended to be associated with a higher pregnancy/AI than DOv in multiparous cows, and the opposite was observed in primiparous cows. PMID:23453255

  4. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.

    1987-09-01

    Some 70 different molecular species have so far been detected variously in diffuse interstellar clouds, dense interstellar clouds, and circumstellar shells. Only simple (diatomic and triatomic) species exist in diffuse clouds because of the penetration of destructive UV radiations, whereas more complex (polyatomic) molecules survive in dense clouds as a result of the shielding against this UV radiation provided by dust grains. A current list of interstellar molecules is given together with a few other molecular species that have so far been detected only in circumstellar shells. Also listed are those interstellar species that contain rare isotopes of several elements. The gas phase ion chemistry is outlined via which the observed molecules are synthesized, and the process by which enrichment of the rare isotopes occurs in some interstellar molecules is described.

  5. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  6. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  7. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  8. Second harmonic and sum frequency generation on dye-coated surfaces using collinear and non-collinear excitation geometries. [Rhodamine 6G monolayers on glass

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, R.E.; Nguyen, D.C.; Keller, R.A.; Nogar, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    Doubly resonantly enhanced sum frequency generation from rhodamine 6G monolayers adsorbed on glass substates is compared with resonantly enhanced second harmonic generation using a collinear excitation geometry. Second harmonic and sum frequency generation with a non-collinear excitation geometry is also reported where spatial filtering of the non-collinear output is shown to increase the scattered light rejection by more than 4 orders of magnitude.

  9. Noncovalent binding of xanthene and phthalocyanine dyes with graphene sheets: The effect of the molecular structure revealed by a photophysical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian-Fu; Liu, Su-Ping; Shao, Xiao-Na

    2013-09-01

    The fluorescence and absorption properties of several xanthene and phthalocyanine dyes were measured in the presence and absence of chemically derived graphene (CDG) sheets. The interaction of pyronine Y (PYY) with graphene sheets was compared with that of rhodamine 6G (R6G) to reveal the effect of the molecular structure. Although the presence of the perpendicular benzene moiety in a R6G or phthalocyanine molecule does cause the difficulty for forming dye-CDG complex and make CDG less efficient in quenching the fluorescence intensity and shortening the fluorescence lifetime, it does not affect the band position of charge transfer absorption, suggesting that no molecular shape change occurred in a dye molecule caused by the interaction with CDG sheets. The spectroscopic and thermodynamic data indicated that the dye-CDG binding is of charge transfer nature, while the dynamic fluorescence quenching is due to photoinduced energy and electron transfer.

  10. Noncovalent binding of xanthene and phthalocyanine dyes with graphene sheets: the effect of the molecular structure revealed by a photophysical study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Fu; Liu, Su-Ping; Shao, Xiao-Na

    2013-09-01

    The fluorescence and absorption properties of several xanthene and phthalocyanine dyes were measured in the presence and absence of chemically derived graphene (CDG) sheets. The interaction of pyronine Y (PYY) with graphene sheets was compared with that of rhodamine 6G (R6G) to reveal the effect of the molecular structure. Although the presence of the perpendicular benzene moiety in a R6G or phthalocyanine molecule does cause the difficulty for forming dye-CDG complex and make CDG less efficient in quenching the fluorescence intensity and shortening the fluorescence lifetime, it does not affect the band position of charge transfer absorption, suggesting that no molecular shape change occurred in a dye molecule caused by the interaction with CDG sheets. The spectroscopic and thermodynamic data indicated that the dye-CDG binding is of charge transfer nature, while the dynamic fluorescence quenching is due to photoinduced energy and electron transfer. PMID:23714186

  11. Genomic and Transcriptomic Associations Identify a New Insecticide Resistance Phenotype for the Selective Sweep at the Cyp6g1 Locus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Battlay, Paul; Schmidt, Joshua M; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Robin, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Scans of the Drosophila melanogaster genome have identified organophosphate resistance loci among those with the most pronounced signature of positive selection. In this study, the molecular basis of resistance to the organophosphate insecticide azinphos-methyl was investigated using the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and genome-wide association. Recently released full transcriptome data were used to extend the utility of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel resource beyond traditional genome-wide association studies to allow systems genetics analyses of phenotypes. We found that both genomic and transcriptomic associations independently identified Cyp6g1, a gene involved in resistance to DDT and neonicotinoid insecticides, as the top candidate for azinphos-methyl resistance. This was verified by transgenically overexpressing Cyp6g1 using natural regulatory elements from a resistant allele, resulting in a 6.5-fold increase in resistance. We also identified four novel candidate genes associated with azinphos-methyl resistance, all of which are involved in either regulation of fat storage, or nervous system development. In Cyp6g1, we find a demonstrable resistance locus, a verification that transcriptome data can be used to identify variants associated with insecticide resistance, and an overlap between peaks of a genome-wide association study, and a genome-wide selective sweep analysis. PMID:27317781

  12. Genomic and Transcriptomic Associations Identify a New Insecticide Resistance Phenotype for the Selective Sweep at the Cyp6g1 Locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Battlay, Paul; Schmidt, Joshua M.; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Robin, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Scans of the Drosophila melanogaster genome have identified organophosphate resistance loci among those with the most pronounced signature of positive selection. In this study, the molecular basis of resistance to the organophosphate insecticide azinphos-methyl was investigated using the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and genome-wide association. Recently released full transcriptome data were used to extend the utility of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel resource beyond traditional genome-wide association studies to allow systems genetics analyses of phenotypes. We found that both genomic and transcriptomic associations independently identified Cyp6g1, a gene involved in resistance to DDT and neonicotinoid insecticides, as the top candidate for azinphos-methyl resistance. This was verified by transgenically overexpressing Cyp6g1 using natural regulatory elements from a resistant allele, resulting in a 6.5-fold increase in resistance. We also identified four novel candidate genes associated with azinphos-methyl resistance, all of which are involved in either regulation of fat storage, or nervous system development. In Cyp6g1, we find a demonstrable resistance locus, a verification that transcriptome data can be used to identify variants associated with insecticide resistance, and an overlap between peaks of a genome-wide association study, and a genome-wide selective sweep analysis. PMID:27317781

  13. Single-molecule electrophoresis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Shera, E.B.

    1996-05-22

    A novel method for the detection and identification of single molecules in solution has been devised, computer-simulated, and experimentally achieved. The technique involves the determination of electrophoretic velocities by measuring the time required by individual molecules to travel a fixed distance between two laser beams. Computer simulations of the process were performed beforehand in order to estimate the experimental feasibility of the method, and to determine the optimum values for the various experimental parameters. Examples of the use of the technique for the ultrasensitive detection and identification of rhodamine-6G, a mixture of DNA restriction fragments, and a mixture of proteins in aqueous solution are presented.

  14. Porous Silicon Covered with Silver Nanoparticles as Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Substrate for Ultra-Low Concentration Detection.

    PubMed

    Kosović, Marin; Balarin, Maja; Ivanda, Mile; Đerek, Vedran; Marciuš, Marijan; Ristić, Mira; Gamulin, Ozren

    2015-12-01

    Microporous and macro-mesoporous silicon templates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates were produced by anodization of low doped p-type silicon wafers. By immersion plating in AgNO3, the templates were covered with silver metallic film consisting of different silver nanostructures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs of these SERS substrates showed diverse morphology with significant difference in an average size and size distribution of silver nanoparticles. Ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) reflection spectroscopy showed plasmonic absorption at 398 and 469 nm, which is in accordance with the SEM findings. The activity of the SERS substrates was tested using rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules and 514.5 nm laser excitation. Contrary to the microporous silicon template, the SERS substrate prepared from macro-mesoporous silicon template showed significantly broader size distribution of irregular silver nanoparticles as well as localized surface plasmon resonance closer to excitation laser wavelength. Such silver morphology has high SERS sensitivity that enables ultralow concentration detection of R6G dye molecules up to 10(-15) M. To our knowledge, this is the lowest concentration detected of R6G dye molecules on porous silicon-based SERS substrates, which might even indicate possible single molecule detection. PMID:26556231

  15. Short pulse generation from a flashlamp-pumped rhodamine 6G ring dye laser using the colliding pulse mode-locking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The colliding pulse mode-locking (CPM) technique has been applied to a flashlamp-pumped rhodamine 6G dye laser to reliably generate pulses of <1.5 ps. Pulse evolution in the ring cavity has been studied by examining the pulse characteristics at various parts of the pulse train using a Photochron II streak camera. The measured pulse durations in the ring cavity were found to be detector-limited and were shorter than those generated in a linear cavity. The shortest pulses were observed to evolve toward the end of the --600-ns long mode-locked train.

  16. Low cost, ultra-thin films of reduced graphene oxide-Ag nanoparticle hybrids as SERS based excellent dye sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, C.; Bramhaiah, K.; John, Neena S.; Ramachandran, B. E.

    2015-06-01

    We have employed low cost-thin films of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with Ag nanoparticle hybrids as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. The hybrids are prepared by a simple one step liquid/liquid interface method. These hybrid films offer SERS hotspots to detect Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules till 1 nM concentration with 1 second accumulation time. The enhancement factor is of the order 108. This excellent SERS enhancement is due to coupled mechanism of surface plasmon, charge transfer and molecular resonances of Ag and R6G along with the synergic effect contributed by rGO and Ag nanoparticles in the hybrid thin film.

  17. Unique Gold Nanoparticle Aggregates as a Highly Active SERS Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzberg, A M; Grant, C D; Wolcott, A; Talley, C E; Huser, T R; Bogomolni, R; Zhang, J Z

    2004-04-06

    A unique gold nanoparticle aggregate (GNA) system has been shown to be an excellent substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. Rhodamine 6G (R6G), a common molecule used for testing SERS activity on silver, but generally difficult to detect on gold substrates, has been found to readily bind to the GNA and exhibit strong SERS activity due to the unique surface chemistry afforded by sulfur species on the surface. This GNA system has yielded a large SERS enhancement of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} in bulk solution for R6G, on par with or greater than any previously reported gold SERS substrate. SERS activity has also been successfully demonstrated for several biological molecules including adenine, L-cysteine, L-lysine, and L-histidine for the first time on a gold SERS substrate, showing the potential of this GNA as a convenient and powerful SERS substrate for biomolecular detection. In addition, SERS spectrum of R6G on single aggregates has been measured. We have shown that the special surface properties of the GNA, in conjunction with strong near IR absorption, make it useful for SERS analysis of a wide variety of molecules.

  18. On the diversity of reversible products of phototransformations in ethanol solutions of rhodamines at stepwise quantum excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, A.V.; Kozlovskii, D.A.; Nikolaev, A.B.

    1995-03-01

    The formation of various reversible products of phototransformations (RPP) in rhodamine 6G (R6G), rhodamine C (RC), and unsubstituted rhodamine (UR) solutions at pulsed stepwise quantum excitation is investigated. The dependence of the type of RPP on the specific system of molecular orbitals (MO), within the bounds of which light quanta are absorbed, is revealed. The excitation of molecules in the MO system responsible for absorbing the light with the wavelength {lambda} = 353 nm leads to formation of RPP, mainly as semioxidized forms of R6G, RC, an UR with a lifetime {tau} = 10{sup {minus}10}-10{sup {minus}9} s. The excitation of molecules in another system of orbitals, namely, in the system responsible for absorbing the light with {lambda} = 532 nm, is accompanied by formation of RPP with {tau} = 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}6} s in the form of lactone modifications of RC and UR. Under similar conditions of exciting R6G molecules, the dye is converted not to the lactone form, but to another type of RPP with the same lifetime and with a much larger activation energy for its formation. The prospects of applying RPP in rhodamine solutions for the real-time optical control of spectral properties of these solutions are evaluated. 14 refs.

  19. Dye-sensitized MoS2 photodetector with enhanced spectral photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong Hun; Lee, Youngbin; Jang, Sung Kyu; Kang, Jinyeong; Jeon, Jiwon; Lee, Changgu; Lee, Jun Young; Kim, Hyungjun; Hwang, Euyheon; Lee, Sungjoo; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2014-08-26

    We fabricated dye-sensitized MoS2 photodetectors that utilized a single-layer MoS2 treated with rhodamine 6G (R6G) organic dye molecules (with an optical band gap of 2.38 eV or 521 nm). The proposed photodetector showed an enhanced performance with a broad spectral photoresponse and a high photoresponsivity compared with the properties of the pristine MoS2 photodetectors. The R6G dye molecules deposited onto the MoS2 layer increased the photocurrent by an order of magnitude due to charge transfer of the photoexcited electrons from the R6G molecules to the MoS2 layer. Importantly, the photodetection response extended to the infrared (λ < 980 nm, which corresponded to about half the energy band gap of MoS2), thereby distinguishing the device performance from that of a pristine MoS2 device, in which detection was only possible at wavelengths shorter than the band gap of MoS2, i.e., λ < 681 nm. The resulting device exhibited a maximum photoresponsivity of 1.17 AW(–1), a photodetectivity of 1.5 × 10(7) Jones, and a total effective quantum efficiency (EQE) of 280% at 520 nm. The device design described here presents a significant step toward high-performance 2D nanomaterial-based photodetector. PMID:25062121

  20. Pyrazolone as a recognition site: Rhodamine 6G-based fluorescent probe for the selective recognition of Fe3+ in acetonitrile-aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Sanjay; Boricha, Vinod P; Jadeja, R N

    2015-03-01

    Two novel Rhodamine-pyrazolone-based colorimetric off-on fluorescent chemosensors for Fe(3+) ions were designed and synthesized using pyrazolone as the recognition moiety and Rhodamine 6G as the signalling moiety. The photophysical properties and Fe(3+) -binding properties of sensors L(1) and L(2) in acetonitrile-aqueous solution were also investigated. Both sensors successfully exhibit a remarkably 'turn-on' response, toward Fe(3+) , which was attributed to 1: 2 complex formation between Fe(3+) and L(1) /L(2) . The fluorescent and colorimetric response to Fe(3+) can be detected by the naked eye, which provides a facile method for the visual detection of Fe(3+) . PMID:24898853

  1. Investigation of the effect of the duration of pumping on the spectral and spatial--angular characteristics of lasing by rhodamine 6G solutions in a short resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, V.S.; Studenov, V.I.

    1985-10-01

    An investigation of the spectral and spatial--angular characteristics of radiation of a laser based on an ethanol solution of rhodamine 6G in a short plane-parallel nonselective resonator with longitudinal pumping by laser radiation of nano- and microsecond duration was performed. It was shown that in all cases formation of the characteristics of the radiation investigated is due to the resonator parameters of the Fabry-Perot interferometer used as a resonator. It was noted that on an increase in the duration of excitation a weak short-wave shift of the maximum of the lasing spectrum with a simultaneous blurring of the interference structure of the spectrum and of the radiation field occurs. The indicated facts are explained by the difference of the energy contribution to the lasing volume, which leads both to homogeneous heating of the solution in the lasing zone and to radial inhomogeneity of heat release, degrading the conditions of inteference.

  2. Compression mechanism of subpicosecond pulses by malachite green dye in passively mode-locked rhodamine 6G/DODCI CW dye lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, A.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Takemura, H.; Tanaka, S.

    1983-04-01

    The pulse width compression effect of a malachite green (MG) dye upon subpicosecond pulses has been experimentally investigated in a CW passively mode-locked rhodamine 6G/DODCI dye laser. The pulse width reduces as MG concentration increases, and reaches 0.34 ps at 1.5 X 10/sup -6/ M. By adding the MG dye, good mode locking is achieved in a rather wide pumping-power range. A computer simulation of pulse growth has also been carried out by using simple rate equations, in which the fast-recovery component of loss due to the MG dye is taken into account. The simulated results can explain some experimental results qualitatively such as pulse width compression and pumping-power restriction. The pulse width compression results essentially from the fast recovery of cavity loss caused by the MG dye.

  3. Mind Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific styles vary tremendously. For me, research is largely about the unfettered pursuit of novel ideas and experiments that can test multiple ideas in a day, not a year, an approach that I learned from my mentor Julius “Julie” Axelrod. This focus on creative conceptualizations has been my métier since working in the summers during medical school at the National Institutes of Health, during my two years in the Axelrod laboratory, and throughout my forty-five years at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Equally important has been the “high” that emerges from brainstorming with my students. Nothing can compare with the eureka moments when, together, we sense new insights and, better yet, when high-risk, high-payoff experiments succeed. Although I have studied many different questions over the years, a common theme emerges: simple biochemical approaches to understanding molecular messengers, usually small molecules. Equally important has been identifying, purifying, and cloning the messengers' relevant biosynthetic, degradative, or target proteins, at all times seeking potential therapeutic relevance in the form of drugs. In the interests of brevity, this Reflections article is highly selective, and, with a few exceptions, literature citations are only of findings of our laboratory that illustrate notable themes. PMID:21543333

  4. Imaging biological molecules with single molecule sensitivity using near-field scanning optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.P.; Affleck, R.L.; Goodwin, P.M.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, Ming

    1995-12-01

    We have developed a near-field scanning optical microscope with the sensitivity to detect single fluorescent molecules. Our microscope is based on scanning a sample under a tapered and metal coated fiber optic probe and has an illumination-aperture diameter as small as 100 nm. The microscope simultaneously acquires a shear force image with a height noise of {approximately} 1 nm. We have used this system to demonstrate the detection of single molecules of Rhodamine-6G on silica. In this paper, we explore the use of NSOM for investigations of biological molecules. We have prepared and imaged double-stranded DNA intercalated with thiazole orange homodimer (TOTO); single chromosomes stained with propidium iodide; and {beta}-phycoerythrin proteins on dry, borosilicate-glass surfaces. At very dilute coverages, isolated fluorescent spots are observed for the un-intercalated TOTO dye and for {beta}-phycoerythrin. These fluorescent spots exhibit-emission intensity fluctuations and abrupt bleaching transitions, similar to the intensity behavior observed previously for single Rhodamine 6G molecules on silica.

  5. Presynchronization of lactating dairy cows with PGF2α and GnRH simultaneously, 7 days before Ovsynch have similar outcomes compared to G6G.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Muhammad Rizwan; Martins, João Paulo N; Ahmad, Nasim; Nobis, Kerry; Pursley, J Richard

    2016-10-01

    The overarching objective of this study was to develop an alternative strategy for first and greater services that will improve fertility in lactating dairy cows for dairy operations limited by labor or other logistical constraints that make it difficult to use Presynch-11, G6G, or Double-Ovsynch. Our overall hypothesis was that simplification of a Presynch program through the combination of PGF2α and GnRH on the same day (PG + G), 7 days before the first GnRH of Ovsynch, would allow for similar ovulation and luteolysis rate and pregnancies per AI (P/AI) compared with G6G. Lactating dairy cows 58 to 64 days in milk (first service; n = 114), and cows diagnosed not pregnant 39 days after previous AI (second + service; n = 122) were blocked by parity and service and randomly assigned to control or PG + G. Control cows received G6G (n = 116) that consisted of PGF2α, 2-day GnRH, 6-day GnRH, 7-day PGF2α, 56-hour GnRH, and 16-hour AI. Treated cows (PG + G; n = 121) received PGF2α and GnRH, 7-day GnRH, 7-day PGF2α, 56-hour GnRH, and 16-hour AI. All cows received a second PGF2α 24 hours after the PGF2α of Ovsynch. First service cows received AI between 76 and 82 days in milk and second + service received AI 57 days after previous AI. Pregnancies/AI (n = 230) were similar in controls compared with treated cows on Day 35 (57 vs. 50%; P = 0.27) and Day 49 (54 vs. 47%; P = 0.33), respectively. Percent of cows ovulating after GnRH of the presynchronization was greater (P = 0.002) for controls vs. treated (80 vs. 58%); however, ovulation after first GnRH of Ovsynch was similar (67 vs. 68%; P = 0.86). Serum concentrations of progesterone were similar (P = 0.78) at the time of first GnRH of Ovsynch for control and treated cows (2.22 vs. 2.14 ng/mL). However, serum progesterone at the time of PGF2α of Ovsynch was greater (P = 0.002) for control cows compared with treated cows (5.75 vs. 4.64 ng/mL). In summary, administering both PGF2α and GnRH on the same

  6. Mixed Hemi/Ad-Micelle Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Coated Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for the Efficient Removal and Trace Determination of Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G.

    PubMed

    Ranjbari, Elias; Hadjmohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Kiekens, Filip; De Wael, Karolien

    2015-08-01

    Mixed hemi/ad-micelle sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MHAMS-MIONPs) were used as an efficient adsorbent for both removal and preconcentration of two important carcinogenic xanthine dyes named rhodamine-B (RB) and rhodamine-6G (RG). To gain insight in the configuration of SDS molecules on the surface of MIONPs, zeta potential measurements were performed in different [SDS]/[MIONP] ratios. Zeta potential data indicated that mixed hemi/ad-micelle MHAM was formed in [SDS]/[MIONP] ratios over the range of 1.1 to 7.3. Parameters affecting the adsorption of dyes were optimized as removal efficiency by one variable at-a-time and response surface methodology; the obtained removal efficiencies were ∼100%. Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium studies, under the optimum condition (pH = 2; amount of MIONPs = 87.15 mg; [SDS]/[MIONP] ratio = 2.9), showed that adsorption of both dyes are based on the pseudo-second-order and the Langmuir isotherm models, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacities for RB and RG were 385 and 323 mg g(-1), respectively. MHAMS-MIONPs were also applied for extraction of RB and RG. Under optimum conditions (pH = 2; amount of damped MHAMS-MIONPs = 90 mg; eluent solvent volume = 2.6 mL of 3% acetic acid in acetonitrile), extraction recoveries for 0.5 mg L(-1) of RB and RG were 98% and 99%, with preconcentration factors of 327 and 330, respectively. Limit of detection obtained for rhodamine dyes were <0.7 ng mL(-1). Finally, MHAMS-MIONPs were successfully applied for both removal and trace determination of RB and RG in environmental and wastewater samples. PMID:26154872

  7. Quantitative analysis of trace Pb(II) by a DNAzyme cracking-rhodamine 6G SERRS probe on AucoreAgshell nanosol substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingye; Wei, Yanyan; Luo, Yanghe; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2014-07-01

    In pH 7.2 Tris-HCl buffer solution containing 0.09 mol/L NaCl at 80 °C, the single-stranded substrate DNA hybrids with the enzyme DNA to form double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The substrate chain of dsDNA could be cracked catalytically by Pb2+ to produce a short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that adsorbed on the AucoreAgshell nanoparticle (Au/AgNP) surface to form stable Au/AgNP-ssDNA conjugate to prevent aggregation by NaCl, and it combined with rhodamine 6G (RhG) to form RhG-Au/AgNP-ssDNA probe that exhibited a strong surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) peak at 1510 cm-1. With the increase of Pb2+ concentration, the SERRS peak increased linearly due to the more RhG-Au/AgNP-ssDNA probe forming. Under the selected conditions, the increased SERRS intensity ΔI was linear to Pb2+ concentration in the range of 5.0 × 10-8-7.0 × 10-7 mol/L, with a detection limit of 7 × 10-9 mol/L Pb2+.

  8. Approach to single-molecule detection by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Dovichi, N.J.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    A sheath flow cuvette was evaluated in laser-induced fluorescence determination of aqueous rhodamine 6G. A detection limit of 18 attograms was obtained within a one-second signal integration time. The concentration detection limit was 8.9 x 10/sup -14/ mole per liter. An average of one-half rhodamine 6G molecule was present within the 11 pL excitation volume. However, during the signal integration time a total of 22,000 analyte molecules passed through the excitation in a 0.42 microliter volume.

  9. ICE-6G models of postglacial relative sea-level history applied to Holocene coral reef and mangrove records of the western Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscano, M. A.; Peltier, W. R.; Drummond, R.; Gonzalez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Fossil coral reefs and mangrove peat accumulations at western Caribbean sites along a latitudinal gradient from the Florida Keys through Belize and Panama provide dated and interpreted 8,000 year Holocene sea-level records for comparison with RSL predictions of the ICE-6G (VM5A, VM5B; L90) models of glacio-hydro-isostatic adjustment, with and without rotational feedback. These presumably passive continental margin sites provide the means to establish a N-S spatial trend in the varying influences of GIA, eustatic components of Holocene sea level, extent of forebulge collapse and influence of rotational feedback over a 20° latitudinal range. Previous ICE6G (VM5A) model-coral data comparisons for St Croix, USVI, Antigua, Martinique and Barbados (Toscano, Peltier and Drummond, 2011, QSR) along the eastern Caribbean plate and island arc illustrated the close model-data compatibility, the influence of rotational feedback acting as a significant factor in reducing misfits, and the need for high quality in situ data to confirm the extension of the proglacial forebulge into tropical latitudes. The gradient of western Caribbean continental shelf sites comprises a much more varied range of model-data relationships based on extensive combined Acropora palmata (reef crest coral) and Rhizophora mangle (microtidal mangrove) peat datasets in all cases. Starting at the northernmost region with the Florida Keys, there exist negative model misfits to the data, suggesting the possibility of a positive tectonic overprint upon expectations related to the glacial isostatic adjustment process acting alone, even though this region is normally believed to be tectonically stable. The largest multi-proxy database from Belize supports the likelihood of increasing rates of subsidence from north to south in the Belize Lagoon, which may account for numerous positive GIA model-data misfits. The southernmost site at Panama is most similar to Belize in the possible nature of tectonic influences on

  10. Study of Electro-Cyclonic Filtration and Pneumatic Transfer of Lunar Regolith Simulants under 1/6-g and 1-g Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantovani, James G.; Townsend, Ivan I.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA has built a prototype oxygen production plant to process the lunar regolith using the hydrogen reduction chemical process. This plant is known as "ROxygen - making oxygen from moon rocks". The ROxygen regolith transfer team has identified the flow and transfer characteristics of lunar regolith simulant to be a concern for lunar oxygen production efforts. It is important to ISRU lunar exploration efforts to develop hardware designs that can demonstrate the ability to flow and transfer a given mass of regolith simulant to a desired vertical height under lunar gravity conditions in order to introduce it into a reactor. We will present results obtained under both 1/6-g and 1-g gravity conditions for a system that can pneumatically convey 16.5 kg of lunar regolith simulant (NU-LHT-2M, Mauna Kea Tephra, and JSC-1A) from a flat-bottom supply hopper to a simulated ISRU reactor (dual-chambered receiving hopper) where the granular material is separated from the convey gas (air) using a series of cyclone separators, one of which is an electrically enhanced cyclone separator (electrocyclone). The results of our study include (1) the mass flow rate as a function of input air pressure for lunar regolith simulants that are conveyed pneumatically as a dusty gas in a vertical direction against gravity under lunar gravity conditions (for NU-LHT-2M and Mauna Kea Tephra), and under earth gravity conditions (for NU-LHT-2M, Mauna Kea Tephra and JSC-1A), and (2) the efficiency of the cyclone/electrocyclone filtration system in separating the convey gas (air) from the granular particulates as a function of particle size.

  11. CD11b+Ly6G+ cells inhibit tumor growth by suppressing IL-17 production at early stages of tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuhong; O'Leary, Claire E.; Wang, Liang-Chuan S.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Dai, Ning; Kapoor, Veena; Liu, Peihui; Mei, Junjie; Guo, Lei; Oliver, Paula M.; Albelda, Steven M.; Worthen, G. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are important innate immune cells involved in microbial clearance at the sites of infection. However, their role in cancer development is unclear. We hypothesized that neutrophils mediate antitumor effects in early tumorigenesis. To test this, we first studied the cytotoxic effects of neutrophils in vitro. Neutrophils were cytotoxic against tumor cells, with neutrophils isolated from tumor-bearing mice trending to have increased cytotoxic activities. We then injected an ELR+ CXC chemokine-producing tumor cell line into C57BL/6 and Cxcr2−/− mice, the latter lacking the receptors for neutrophil chemokines. We observed increased tumor growth in Cxcr2−/− mice. As expected, tumors from Cxcr2−/− mice contained fewer neutrophils. Surprisingly, these tumors also contained fewer CD8+ T cells, but more IL-17-producing cells. Replenishment of functional neutrophils was correlated with decreased IL-17-producing cells, increased CD8+ T cells, and decreased tumor size in Cxcr2−/− mice, while depletion of neutrophils in C57BL/6 mice showed the opposite effects. Results from a non-ELR+ CXC chemokine producing tumor further supported that functional neutrophils indirectly mediate tumor control by suppressing IL-17A production. We further studied the correlation of IL-17A and CD8+ T cells in vitro. IL-17A suppressed proliferation and IFNγ production of CD8+ T cells, while CD11b+Ly6G+ neutrophils did not suppress CD8+ T cell function. Taken together, these data demonstrate that, while neutrophils could control tumor growth by direct cytotoxic effects, the primary mechanism by which neutrophils exert antitumor effects is to regulate IL-17 production, through which they indirectly promote CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:26942073

  12. Achieving the salt intake target of 6 g/day in the current food supply in free-living adults using two dietary education strategies.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Dani-Maree; Clifton, Peter M; Keogh, Jennifer B

    2010-05-01

    There are national targets for salt intake of 6 g salt/day in Australia and the United States. Despite this, there is limited knowledge about the effectiveness of dietary education in reducing salt intake to this level. The objective of this study was to investigate whether dietary education enabled a reduction in salt consumption. In an 8-week parallel study, 49 healthy free-living adults were recruited from the Adelaide community by newspaper advertisement. In a randomized parallel design, participants received dietary education to choose foods identified by either Australia's National Heart Foundation Tick symbol or by the Food Standards Australia and New Zealand's low-salt guideline of 120 mg sodium/100 g food. Sodium excretion was assessed by 24-hour urinary sodium collections at baseline and weeks 4 and 8. Participants' experiences of following the education strategies were recorded by self-administered questionnaire. These data were collected between August and October 2008. Forty-three participants completed the study. After 8 weeks, urinary sodium excretion decreased from 121+/-50 to 106+/-47 mmol/24 hours (7.3+/-3.0 to 6.4+/-2.8 g salt/24 hours) in the Tick group and from 132+/-44 to 98+/-50 mmol/24 hours (7.9+/-2.6 to 6.0+/-3.0 g salt/24 hours) in the Food Standards Australia New Zealand group (P<0.05, with no between-group difference). Barriers to salt reduction were limited variety and food choice, difficulty when eating out, and increased time associated with identifying foods. In conclusion, dietary sodium reduction is possible among free-living individuals who received dietary advice. PMID:20430138

  13. Recyclable three-dimensional Ag nanoparticle-decorated TiO2 nanorod arrays for surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui; Zhang, Chang Xing; Liu, Luo; Zhao, Yong Mei; Xu, Hai Jun

    2015-02-15

    Multifunctional Ag nanoparticle-decorated TiO2 nanorod arrays were prepared by two simple processes. TiO2 nanorod arrays were first fabricated by the hydrothermal route and then Ag nanoparticles were decorated on the nanorods by the chemical reduction impregnation method. Three-dimensional Ag/TiO2 arrays were used as an active substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The results show that the detection limit for rhodamine 6G (R6G) was as low as 10(-7)M and the Raman enhancement factor was as large as 10(5). After calibrating the Raman peak intensities of R6G, it could be quantitatively detected. More importantly, the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 provides a self-cleaning capability to the SERS substrate, which can be recycled and used to degrade many Ag surface adsorbates such as R6G, methyl orange, Congo red, and methylene blue after exposure to visible light. The absorbed small molecules can all be rapidly and completely removed from the SERS substrate, which has been successfully reused four times without a decrease in accuracy or sensitivity. Our results reveal that the unique recyclable property not only paves a new way to solve the single-use problem of traditional SERS substrates but also provides more SERS platforms for multiple detections of other organic molecular species. PMID:25282397

  14. Functionalized nanoparticles for measurement of biomarkers using a SERS nanochannel platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, Melodie; Wang, Miao; Kameoka, Jun; Good, Theresa; Cote, Gerard

    2010-02-01

    The overall goal of this research is to develop a new point-of-care system for early detection and characterization of cardiac markers to aid in diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. The envisioned final technology platform incorporates functionalized gold colloidal nanoparticles trapped at the entrance to a nanofluidic device providing a robust means for analyte detection at trace levels using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). To discriminate a specific biomarker, we designed an assay format analogous to a competitive ELISA. Notably, the biomarker would be captured by an antibody and in turn displace a peptide fragment, containing the binding epitope of the antibody labeled with a Raman reporter molecule that would not interfere with blood serum proteins. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, we used C-reactive protein (CRP) as a surrogate biomarker. We functionalized agarose beads with anti-CRP that were placed outside the nanochannel, then added either Rhodamine-6-G (R6G) labeled-CRP and gold (as a surrogate of a sample without analyte present), or R6G labeled CRP, gold, and unlabeled CRP (as a surrogate of a sample with analyte present). Analyzing the spectra we see an increase in peak intensity in the presence of analyte at characteristic peaks for R6G specifically, 1284 and1567 cm- 1. Further, our results illustrate the reproducibility of the Raman spectra collected for R6G-labeled CRP in the nanochannel. Overall, we believe that this method will provide the advantage of sensitivity and narrow line widths characteristic of SERS as well as the specificity toward the biomarker of interest.

  15. Physics of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Many varieties of molecule have been detected in the Milky Way and in other galaxies. The processes by which these molecules are formed and destroyed are now broadly understood (see INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY). These molecules are important components of galaxies in two ways. Firstly, radiation emitted by molecules enables us to trace the presence of diffuse gas, to infer its physical properties and ...

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence of flowing samples as an approach to single-molecule detection in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dovichi, N.J.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.

    1984-03-01

    A flow cytometer system was used to detect aqueous rhodamine 6G by laser-induced fluorescence. Best results were obtained with careful spectral and spatial filtering. At the detection limit, the probability of a rhodamine 6G molecule being present in the detector's probed volume of 11 pL is about 0.6 . With a flow rate of 0.42 ..mu..L/s, a detection limit of 8.9 x 10/sup -14/ M was obtained for a 1-s time constant. At the detection limit, 18 ag or 22,000 molecules of rhodamine 6G flowed through the probed volume during the signal integration period. Signal linearity extends over greater than 5 orders of magnitude limited only by saturation of the detection electronics at high concentration. The results presented here allow a projection to single-molecule detection with reasonable improvements to the apparatus. 25 references, 5 figures, 7 tables.

  17. Highly sensitive turn-on biosensors by regulating fluorescent dye assembly on liposome surfaces.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sungbaek; Kwon, Min Sang; Phillips, Andrew W; Seo, Deokwon; Kim, Jinsang

    2015-06-25

    We developed a new self-signaling sensory system built on phospholipid liposomes having H-aggregated R6G dyes on their surface. Selective molecular recognition of a target by the phospholipid displaces R6G from the liposome surface to turn on fluorescence signal. Selective and sensitive detection of neomycin down to 2.3 nM is demonstrated. PMID:26022090

  18. Fluorescence detection of single molecules using pulsed near-field optical excitation and time correlated photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Martin, J.C.; Keller, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    Pulsed excitation, time correlated single photon counting and time gated detection are used in near-field optical microscopy to enhance fluorescence images and measure the fluorescence lifetimes of single molecules of Rhodamine 6G on silica surfaces. Time gated detection is used to reject prompt scattered background and to improve the image signal to noise ratio. The excited state lifetime of a single Rhodamine 6G molecule is found to depend on the position of the near-field probe. We attribute the lifetime variations to spontaneous emission rate alterations by the fluorescence reflected from and quenching by the aluminum coated probe.

  19. Computational design and fabrication of core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of rhodamine 6G.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jin; Xie, Jie; Deng, Jian; Fang, Xiangfang; Zhao, Haiqing; Qian, Duo; Wang, Hongjuan

    2016-06-01

    A novel core-shell magnetic nano-adsorbent with surface molecularly imprinted polymer coating was fabricated and then applied to dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction followed by determination of rhodamine 6G using high-performance liquid chromatography. The molecularly imprinted polymer coating was prepared by copolymerization of dopamine and m-aminophenylboronic acid (functional monomers), in the presence of rhodamine 6G (template). The selection of the suitable functional monomers was based on the interaction between different monomers and the template using the density functional theory. The ratios of the monomers to template were further optimized by an OA9 (3(4) ) orthogonal array design. The binding performances of the adsorbent were evaluated by static, kinetic, and selective adsorption experiments. The results reveal that the adsorbent possesses remarkable affinity and binding specificity for rhodamine 6G because of the enhanced Lewis acid-base interaction between the B(Ш) embedded in the imprinted cavities and the template. The nano-adsorbent was successfully applied to dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography for the trace determination of rhodamine 6G in samples with a detection limit of 2.7 nmol/L. Spiked recoveries ranged from 93.0-99.1, 89.5-92.7, and 86.9-105% in river water, matrimony vine and paprika samples, respectively, with relative standard deviations of less than 4.3%. PMID:27120290

  20. Alterations of single molecule fluorescence lifetimes in near-field optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C. )

    1994-07-15

    Fluorescence lifetimes of single Rhodamine 6G molecules on silica surfaces were measured with pulsed laser excitation, time-correlated single photon counting, and near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). The fluorescence lifetime varies with the position of a molecule relative to a near-field probe. Qualitative features of lifetime decreases are consistent with molecular excited state quenching effects near metal surfaces. The technique of NSOM provides a means of altering the environment of a single fluorescent molecule and its decay kinetics in a repeatable fashion.

  1. Optical devices based on dye-coated superconductor junctions: An example of a composite molecule-superconductor device

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Jurbergs, D.; Yamazi, B.; McDevitt, J.T.

    1992-03-25

    High-temperature superconductors provide new opportunities as materials used in the construction of hybrid molecule-superconductor components. Here, the authors describe fabrication methods for and operation of optical sensors based on molecular dye-coated superconductor junctions. Devices prepared from yttrium barium cuprates and using octaethylporphyrin, phthalocyanine, and rhodamine 6G as dyes have been prepared. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  3. Adhesion molecules and receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adhesion molecules are necessary for leukocyte trafficking and differentiation. They serve to initiate cell-cell interactions under conditions of shear, and they sustain the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions needed for cellular locomotion. They also can serve directly as signaling molecules act...

  4. Molecules between the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a listing of molecules discovered to date in the vast interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Emphasizes the recent discoveries of organic molecules. Discusses molecular spectral lines, MASERs (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), molecular clouds, and star birth. (TW)

  5. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tung S; Dao, Thang D; Dang, Luu H; Vu, Lam D; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V

    2016-01-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes. PMID:27555217

  6. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Tung S.; Dao, Thang D.; Dang, Luu H.; Vu, Lam D.; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V.

    2016-01-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3′-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes. PMID:27555217

  7. Liposomal nanoformulations of rhodamine for targeted photodynamic inactivation of multidrug resistant gram negative bacteria in sewage treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Vimaladevi, Mohan; Divya, Kurunchi Chellapathi; Girigoswami, Agnishwar

    2016-09-01

    The antimicrobial photodynamic therapy is an alternative method for killing bacterial cells in view of the rising problem of antibiotic resistance microorganisms. The present study examined the effect of a water soluble photosensitizer, Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in stealth liposomes on multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of visible light. Liposomes were prepared with cholesterol and phospholipids that extracted from hen eggs in a cost effective way and characterized by light microscopy, particle size analyzer, electron microscopy, steady state spectrophotometry and spectrofluorometry. The photoefficacies of R6G in polymer encapsulated liposomes and positively charged liposomes are much higher compared to the free R6G (R6G in water) in terms of singlet oxygen quantum yield. This high potential of producing more reactive oxygen species (ROS) by liposomal nanoformulated R6G leads to efficient photodynamic inactivation of multidrug resistant gram negative bacteria in waste water. Though the singlet oxygen quantum yield of polymer coated liposomal R6G was higher than the cationic liposomal formulation, a faster decrease in bacterial survival was observed for positively charged liposomal R6G treated bacteria due to electrostatic charge interactions. Therefore, it can be concluded that the positively charged liposomal nanoformulations of laser dyes are efficient for photodynamic inactivation of multiple drug resistant gram negative microorganisms. PMID:27371913

  8. The Antarctica component of postglacial rebound model ICE-6G_C (VM5a) based on GPS positioning, exposure age dating of ice thicknesses, and relative sea level histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Peltier, W. R.; Drummond, R.; Moore, Angelyn W.

    2014-07-01

    A new model of the deglaciation history of Antarctica over the past 25 kyr has been developed, which we refer to herein as ICE-6G_C (VM5a). This revision of its predecessor ICE-5G (VM2) has been constrained to fit all available geological and geodetic observations, consisting of: (1) the present day uplift rates at 42 sites estimated from GPS measurements, (2) ice thickness change at 62 locations estimated from exposure-age dating, (3) Holocene relative sea level histories from 12 locations estimated on the basis of radiocarbon dating and (4) age of the onset of marine sedimentation at nine locations along the Antarctic shelf also estimated on the basis of 14C dating. Our new model fits the totality of these data well. An additional nine GPS-determined site velocities are also estimated for locations known to be influenced by modern ice loss from the Pine Island Bay and Northern Antarctic Peninsula regions. At the 42 locations not influenced by modern ice loss, the quality of the fit of postglacial rebound model ICE-6G_C (VM5A) is characterized by a weighted root mean square residual of 0.9 mm yr-1. The Southern Antarctic Peninsula is inferred to be rising at 2 mm yr-1, requiring there to be less Holocene ice loss there than in the prior model ICE-5G (VM2). The East Antarctica coast is rising at approximately 1 mm yr-1, requiring ice loss from this region to have been small since Last Glacial Maximum. The Ellsworth Mountains, at the base of the Antarctic Peninsula, are inferred to be rising at 5-8 mm yr-1, indicating large ice loss from this area during deglaciation that is poorly sampled by geological data. Horizontal deformation of the Antarctic Plate is minor with two exceptions. First, O'Higgins, at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, is moving southeast at a significant 2 mm yr-1 relative to the Antarctic Plate. Secondly, the margins of the Ronne and Ross Ice Shelves are moving horizontally away from the shelf centres at an approximate rate of 0.8 mm yr-1, in

  9. Removal of rhodamine 6G dye contaminant by visible light driven immobilized Ca1-xLnxMnO3 (Ln = Sm, Ho; 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.4) photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrocas, B.; Sério, S.; Rovisco, A.; Nunes, Y.; Jorge, M. E. Melo

    2016-01-01

    Visible-light-driven Ca1-xLnxMnO3 (Ln = Sm, Ho; 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.4) films were grown by RF-magnetron sputtering onto fused silica substrates. The effects of Ca2+ substitution for Ho3+ or Sm3+ in Ca1-xLnxMnO3 on the structural, morphological and photocatalytic properties for rhodamine 6G dye degradation under visible light irradiation were investigated. XRD showed a pure typical perovskite phase for all the prepared films, except for Ca0.9Ho0.1MnO3 and a decrease of the crystallite size with the increase of the amount of ion substituted. SEM and AFM revealed that the films surface is dense, with low roughness. UV-vis spectroscopy indicated for the two series band gaps in the range of 1.6-2.8 eV, being lower for the films containing holmium. The results showed that some Ca1-xHoxMnO3 and Ca1-xSmxMnO3 films present higher photocatalytic activity for Rh6G degradation in comparison with TiO2 films and for the same x value the Ho-films exhibited higher photocatalytic activity. For both films series the maximal degradation rate was obtained for x = 0.2; above this content the degradation percentage exhibits a decreasing trend with the increase of Ho or Sm substitution, except for x = 0.4 in the case of Ho system, which is observed again an increase in the degradation rate. The Rh6G photocatalytic degradation followed a pseudo first-order reaction kinetics. XRD and SEM of the used photocatalysts evidenced high photochemical stability.

  10. Ultracold polar KRb molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyenhuis, Brian; Chotia, Amodsen; Moses, Steven; Ye, Jun; Jin, Deborah

    2011-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules in the quantum degenerate regime open the possibility of realizing quantum gases with long-range, and spatially anisotropic, interparticle interactions. Currently, we can create a gas of ultracold fermionic ground-state KRb molecules in with a peak density of 1012 cm-3 and a temperature just 1.4 times the Fermi temperature. We will report on efforts to further cool this gas of molecules. One possibility is to evaporatively cool a spin-polarized molecular Fermi gas confined in quasi-2D, where we would rely on dipole-dipole interactions for rethermalization. We acknowledge funding from NIST, NSF, and AFOSR-MURI.

  11. Poisson's spot with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Reisinger, Thomas; Holst, Bodil; Patel, Amil A.; Smith, Henry I.; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo

    2009-05-15

    In the Poisson-spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson's spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson's spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large molecule diffraction to patterning with molecules.

  12. Poisson's spot with molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Thomas; Patel, Amil A.; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo; Smith, Henry I.; Holst, Bodil

    2009-05-01

    In the Poisson-spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson’s spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson’s spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large molecule diffraction to patterning with molecules.

  13. Study of silica sol-gel materials for sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Qiong

    Silica sol-gel is a transparent, highly porous silicon oxide glass made at room temperature by sol-gel process. The name of silica sol-gel comes from the observable physical phase transition from liquid sol to solid gel during its preparation. Silica sol-gel is chemically inert, thermally stable, and photostable, it can be fabricated into different desired shapes during or after gelation, and its porous structure allows encapsulation of guest molecules either before or after gelation while still retaining their functions and sensitivities to surrounding environments. All those distinctive features make silica sol-gel ideal for sensor development. Study of guest-host interactions in silica sol-gel is important for silica-based sensor development, because it helps to tailor local environments inside sol-gel matrix so that higher guest loading, longer shelf-life, higher sensitivity and faster response of silica gel based sensors could be achieved. We focused on pore surface modification of two different types of silica sol-gel by post-grafting method, and construction of stable silica hydrogel-like thin films for sensor development. By monitoring the mobility and photostability of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules in silica alcogel thin films through single molecule spectroscopy (SMS), the guest-host interactions altered by post-synthesis grafting were examined. While physical confinement remains the major factor that controls mobility in modified alcogels, both R6G mobility and photostability register discernable changes after surface charges are respectively reversed and neutralized by aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) and methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) grafting. The change in R6G photostability was found to be more sensitive to surface grafting than that of mobility. In addition, silica film modification by 0.4% APTS is as efficient as that by pure MTES in lowering R6G photostability, which suggests that surface charge reversal is more effective than charge neutralization

  14. Single-Molecule Enzymology

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoliang; Lu, H PETER.

    1999-06-04

    Viewing a movie of an enzyme molecule made from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we see incredible details of molecular motions, be it a change of the conformation or the action of a chemical reaction.

  15. Of Molecules and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinner, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which models help students visualize both the DNA process and transcription. After constructing DNA, RNA messenger, and RNA transfer molecules; students model cells, protein synthesis, codons, and RNA movement. (MDH)

  16. Polyatomic molecule vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Polyatomic molecule vibrations are analyzed as harmonic vibrations along normal coordinates. The energy eigenvalues are found for linear and nonlinear symmetric triatomic molecules for valence bond models of the potential function with arbitrary coupling coefficients; such models can usually be fitted to observed energy levels with reasonably good accuracy. Approximate normal coordinates for the H2O molecule are discussed. Degenerate vibrational modes such as occur in CO2 are analyzed and expressions for Fermi resonance between close-lying states of the same symmetry are developed. The bending modes of linear triatomic molecules are expressed in terms of Laguerre polynomials in cylindrical coordinates as well as in terms of Hermite polynomials in Cartesian coordinates. The effects of large-amplitude bending such as occur in the C3 molecule are analyzed, along with anharmonic effects, which split the usually degenerate bending mode energy levels. Finally, the vibrational frequencies, degeneracies, and symmetry properties of XY3, X2Y2, and XY4 type molecules are discussed.

  17. Simple and sensitive fluorimetric method for determination of environmental hormone bisphenol A based on its inhibitory effect on the redox reaction between hydroxy radical and rhodamine 6G [corrected].

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Guo, Huiqin; Liu, Guoguang; Peng, Pingan

    2007-02-28

    Peroxyl radical produced by Fenton-like reagent (Fe(III)+H(2)O(2)) oxidizes Rhodamine 6G and produces the quenching of its fluorescence. It is also found that bisphenol A has an inhibitory effect on the redox reaction. Based on this observation, an inhibitory kinetic fluorimetric method is reported for the determination of trace bisphenol A. The fluorescent inhibition of rhodamine 6G is measured by fix-time method. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limit and the quantification limit for bisphenol A is 2.0 and 6.7 ng mL(-1), respectively; and the linear range of the determination is 0.024-0.4 microg mL(-1). The proposed method has been used for the determination of bisphenol A in environmental waters, river bottom sediment, generic soil, polycarbonate products and teeth filling samples with recoveries of 92.5-110.0%. The possible mechanism of the reaction has also been discussed. PMID:17386657

  18. Anti-CD155 and anti-CD112 monoclonal antibodies conjugated to a fluorescent mesoporous silica nanosensor encapsulating rhodamine 6G and fluorescein for sensitive detection of liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Liang; Song, Chaojun; Huo, Chenyang; Sun, Yuanjie; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Xiaohua; Yu, Shaojuan; Sun, Mingyu; Jin, Boquan; Zhang, Zhujun; Yang, Kun

    2016-08-01

    A novel method for sensitive detection of liver cancer cells using anti-CD155 and anti-CD112 monoclonal antibodies conjugated to ultrabright fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) encapsulating Rhodamine 6G and fluorescein was developed. The diameter of the obtained nanoparticles was 90 nm, and the quantum yield was 69%. Because the emission of fluorescein has a high degree of overlap with the excitation of Rhodamine 6G, and these two dyes were sufficiently close to each other on the nanoparticles, fluorescence resonance energy transfer can occur between these two dyes. This transfer not only maintains the original feature of the nanochannels and the skeletal network of the silica weakening the inner filtering of the dye, but also makes the excitation peak of the nanoparticles wider and increases the useful load amount of the dye. Because the wider Stokes shifts weaken the interference of excitation, the detection sensitivity is enhanced at the same time. The NaIO4 oxidation method does not use a cross-linker but rather uses covalent immobilization of the monoclonal antibodies on the FMSNs. This method can maintain the activity of the monoclonal antibodies more easily than the glutaraldehyde method. These advantages ensure that the nanosensor has high sensitivity and specificity for detecting liver cancer SMMC-7721 and HHCC cells. The in vivo imaging experiment also ensured that the biosensor can target tumor tissue in mice. PMID:27301350

  19. Positron binding to molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    While there is theoretical evidence that positrons can bind to atoms, calculations for molecules are much less precise. Unfortunately, there have been no measurements of positron-atom binding, due primarily to the difficulty in forming positron-atom bound states in two-body collisions. In contrast, positrons attach to molecules via Feshbach resonances (VFR) in which a vibrational mode absorbs the excess energy. Using a high-resolution positron beam, this VFR process has been studied to measure binding energies for more than 40 molecules. New measurements will be described in two areas: positron binding to relatively simple molecules, for which theoretical calculations appear to be possible; and positron binding to molecules with large permanent dipole moments, which can be compared to analogous, weakly bound electron-molecule (negative-ion) states. Binding energies range from 75 meV for CS2 (no dipole moment) to 180 meV for acetonitrile (CH3CN). Other species studied include aldehydes and ketones, which have permanent dipole moments in the range 2.5 - 3.0 debye. The measured binding energies are surprisingly large (by a factor of 10 to 100) compared to those for the analogous negative ions, and these differences will be discussed. New theoretical calculations for positron-molecule binding are in progress, and a recent result for acetonitrile will be discussed. This ability to compare theory and experiment represents a significant step in attempts to understand positron binding to matter. In collaboration with A. C. L. Jones, J. J. Gosselin, and C. M. Surko, and supported by NSF grant PHY 07-55809.

  20. 5-Methyl Salicylic Acid-Induced Thermo Responsive Reversible Transition in Surface Active Ionic Liquid Assemblies: A Spectroscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arpita; Dutta, Rupam; Banerjee, Pavel; Kundu, Sangita; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-07-19

    This article describes the formation of stable unilamellar vesicles involving surface active ionic liquid (SAIL), 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16mimCl), and 5-methyl salicylic acid (5mS). Turbidity, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and viscosity measurements suggest that C16mimCl containing micellar aggregates are transformed to elongated micelle and finally into vesicular aggregates with the addition of 5mS. Besides, we have also investigated the photophysical aspects of a hydrophobic (coumarin 153, C153) and a hydrophilic molecule (rhodamine 6G (R6G) perchlorate) during 5mS-induced micelle to vesicle transition. The rotational motion of C153 becomes slower, whereas faster motion is observed for R6G during micelle to vesicle transition. Moreover, the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements suggest that the translational diffusion of hydrophobic probe becomes slower in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates in comparison to C16mimCl micelle. However, a reverse trend in translational diffusion motion of hydrophilic molecule has been observed in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates. Moreover, we have also found that the C16mimCl-5mS containing vesicles are transformed into micelles upon enhanced temperature, and it is further confirmed by turbidity, DLS measurements that this transition is a reversible one. Finally, temperature-induced rotational motion of C153 and R6G has been monitored in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates to get a complete scenario regarding the temperature-induced vesicle to micelle transition. PMID:27345738

  1. Understanding ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, Paul

    2009-05-01

    The successful production of a dense sample of ultracold ground state KRb polar molecules [1] opens the door to a new era of research with dipolar gases and lattices of such species. This feat was achieved by first associating a K and a Rb atom to make a weakly bound Feshbach molecule and then coherently transferring the population to the ground vibrational level of the molecule. This talk focuses on theoretical issues associated with making and using ultracold polar molecules, using KRb as an example [2]. Full understanding of this species and the processes by which it is made requires taking advantage of accurate molecular potentials [3], ab initio calculations [4], and the properties of the long-range potential. A highly accurate model is available for KRb for all bound states below the ground state separated atom limit and could be constructed for other species. The next step is to develop an understanding of the interactions between polar molecules, and their control in the ultracold domain. Understanding long-range interactions and threshold resonances will be crucial for future work. [1] K.-K. Ni, et al, Science 322, 231(2008). [2] P. S. Julienne, arXiv:0812:1233. [3] Pashov et al., Phys. Rev. A76, 022511 (2007). [4] S. Kotochigova, et al., arXiv:0901.1486.

  2. Enhanced light-matter interactions in graphene-covered gold nanovoid arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Shi, Lei; Schmidt, Michael S; Boisen, Anja; Hansen, Ole; Zi, Jian; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N Asger

    2013-10-01

    The combination of graphene with noble-metal nanostructures is currently being explored for strong light-graphene interactions enhanced by plasmons. We introduce a novel hybrid graphene-metal system for studying light-matter interactions with gold-void nanostructures exhibiting resonances in the visible range. Enhanced coupling of graphene to the plasmon modes of the nanovoid arrays results in significant frequency shifts of the underlying plasmon resonances, enabling 30% enhanced absolute light absorption by adding a monolayer graphene and up to 700-fold enhancement of the Raman response of the graphene. These new perspectives enable us to verify the presence of graphene on gold-void arrays, and the enhancement even allows us to accurately quantify the number of layers. Experimental observations are further supported by numerical simulations and perturbation-theory analysis. The graphene gold-void platform is beneficial for sensing of molecules and placing Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules on top of the graphene; we observe a strong enhancement of the R6G Raman fingerprints. These results pave the way toward advanced substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with potential for unambiguous single-molecule detection on the atomically well-defined layer of graphene. PMID:24010940

  3. Molecules on ice

    SciTech Connect

    Clary, D.C.

    1996-03-15

    The ozone hole that forms in the spring months over the Antarctic is thought to be produced through a network of chemical reactions catalyzed by the surfaces of ice crystals in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). A reaction between chlorine reservoir molecules, such as HCl + ClONO{sub 2} > HNO{sub 3} + Cl{sub 2}, is kinetically forbidden in the gas phase but proceeds quickly on the surface of ice and produces Cl{sub 2} molecules that are photodissociated by sunlight to yield the Cl atoms that destroy ozone. This destructive chain of events begins when HCl molecules stick to the ice crystals, and the mechanism for this crucial sticking process has been the subject of much debate. Recent work describes a mechanism that explains how HCl sticks to ice. This article goes on to detail research focusing surface reactions in stratospheric chemistry. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Positronium ions and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.

    1990-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies on positronium ions and molecules are discussed. A positronium ion is a three particle system consisting of two electrons in singlet spin state, and a positron. Recent studies include calculations of its binding energy, positron annihilation rate, and investigations of its doubly excited resonant states. A positronium molecule is a four body system consisting of two positrons and two electrons in an overall singlet spin state. The recent calculations of its binding energy against the dissociation into two positronium atoms, and studies of auto-detaching states in positronium molecules are discussed. These auto-dissociating states, which are believed to be part of the Rydberg series as a result of a positron attaching to a negatively charged positronium ion, Ps-, would appear as resonances in Ps-Ps scattering.

  5. Atomic branching in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Juan A.; Randić, Milan

    A graph theoretic measure of extended atomic branching is defined that accounts for the effects of all atoms in the molecule, giving higher weight to the nearest neighbors. It is based on the counting of all substructures in which an atom takes part in a molecule. We prove a theorem that permits the exact calculation of this measure based on the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix of the graph representing a molecule. The definition of this measure within the context of the Hückel molecular orbital (HMO) and its calculation for benzenoid hydrocarbons are also studied. We show that the extended atomic branching can be defined using any real symmetric matrix, as well as any Hermitian (self-adjoint) matrix, which permits its calculation in topological, geometrical, and quantum chemical contexts.

  6. Single-Molecule Bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Lemay, Serge G.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental techniques which interface single biomolecules directly with microelectronic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of powerful applications, from fundamental studies of biomolecules to ultra-sensitive assays. Here we review several technologies which can perform electronic measurements of single molecules in solution: ion channels, nanopore sensors, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, electron tunneling gaps, and redox cycling. We discuss the shared features among these techniques that enable them to resolve individual molecules, and discuss their limitations. Recordings from each of these methods all rely on similar electronic instrumentation, and we discuss the relevant circuit implementations and potential for scaling these single-molecule bioelectronic interfaces to high-throughput arrayed sensing platforms. PMID:25529538

  7. Single-molecule bioelectronics.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Jacob K; Lemay, Serge G; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    Experimental techniques that interface single biomolecules directly with microelectronic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of powerful applications, from fundamental studies of biomolecules to ultra-sensitive assays. In this study, we review several technologies that can perform electronic measurements of single molecules in solution: ion channels, nanopore sensors, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, electron tunneling gaps, and redox cycling. We discuss the shared features among these techniques that enable them to resolve individual molecules, and discuss their limitations. Recordings from each of these methods all rely on similar electronic instrumentation, and we discuss the relevant circuit implementations and potential for scaling these single-molecule bioelectronic interfaces to high-throughput arrayed sensing platforms. PMID:25529538

  8. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  9. Molecules in η Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO+, HCN, HNC, and N2H+, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13CO and H13CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (~100 km s-1), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO+ do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  10. Poisson's Spot with Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Thomas; Patel, Amil; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo; Smith, Henry I.; Holst, Bodil

    2009-03-01

    In the Poisson-Spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. The Poisson spot is the last of the classical optics experiments to be realized with neutral matter waves. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson's Spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength-independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson's spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large-molecule diffraction and coherence in atom-lasers to patterning with large molecules.

  11. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  12. Towards single molecule switches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Lin, Jia Dan; Hu, Wen Ping; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Wee, Andrew T S; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The concept of using single molecules as key building blocks for logic gates, diodes and transistors to perform basic functions of digital electronic devices at the molecular scale has been explored over the past decades. However, in addition to mimicking the basic functions of current silicon devices, molecules often possess unique properties that have no parallel in conventional materials and promise new hybrid devices with novel functions that cannot be achieved with equivalent solid-state devices. The most appealing example is the molecular switch. Over the past decade, molecular switches on surfaces have been intensely investigated. A variety of external stimuli such as light, electric field, temperature, tunneling electrons and even chemical stimulus have been used to activate these molecular switches between bistable or even multiple states by manipulating molecular conformations, dipole orientations, spin states, charge states and even chemical bond formation. The switching event can occur either on surfaces or in break junctions. The aim of this review is to highlight recent advances in molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli, as investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) and the break junction technique. We begin by presenting the molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli that do not provide single molecule selectivity, referred to as non-selective switching. Special focus is then given to selective single molecule switching realized using the LT-STM tip on surfaces. Single molecule switches operated by different mechanisms are reviewed and discussed. Finally, molecular switches embedded in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and single molecule junctions are addressed. PMID:25757483

  13. Plasmonic nanostructures: artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Brandl, Daniel W; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for the relationship between the geometry of metallic nanostructures and their optical properties. While the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles is determined by their collective electronic or plasmon response, a compelling analogy exists between plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles and wave functions of simple atoms and molecules. Based on this insight, an entire family of plasmonic nanostructures, artificial molecules, has been developed whose optical properties can be understood within this picture: nanoparticles (nanoshells, nanoeggs, nanomatryushkas, nanorice), multi-nanoparticle assemblies (dimers, trimers, quadrumers), and a nanoparticle-over-metallic film, an electromagnetic analog of the spinless Anderson model. PMID:17226945

  14. Real-time observation of single-molecule fluorescence in microdroplet streams

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Lermer, N.; Kung, C.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.; Hill, S.C.

    1997-08-01

    We report real-time observation of fluorescence bursts from individual Rhodamine 6G molecules in streams of microdroplets (peak signal-to-noise ratios, {approx}30) whose trajectories are constrained with a linear electric quadrupole. This approach offers a reasonable dynamic range in droplet size (3{endash}12{minus}{mu}m diameter) with {lt}1{percent} shot-to-shot size fluctuations and sensitivity comparable with that of droplet levitation techniques with at least 10{sup 3} higher analysis rates. Applications to the study of single-molecule microcavity effects and stimulated emission are discussed.

  15. Note: A method to isolate and detect a large number of single molecules by microdroplet fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ng, K C; Heredia, K H; Kliewer, D

    2012-03-01

    A laser induced fluorescence system, in combination with a glass-frit nebulizer and a photo-voltaic cell detector, is described for single molecule detection. The glass-frit nebulizer continuously generates a large number of droplets with an average droplet size of three micrometers in diameter. Rhodamine 6G molecules were detected at the 10(-12) M level. Concentrations 10(-12)-10(-10) M would provide mostly single molecules (0, 1, 2, 3, ...) in the individual droplets, as determined by Poisson distribution. PMID:22462973

  16. Note: A method to isolate and detect a large number of single molecules by microdroplet fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, K. C.; Heredia, K. H.; Kliewer, D.

    2012-03-01

    A laser induced fluorescence system, in combination with a glass-frit nebulizer and a photo-voltaic cell detector, is described for single molecule detection. The glass-frit nebulizer continuously generates a large number of droplets with an average droplet size of three micrometers in diameter. Rhodamine 6G molecules were detected at the 10-12 M level. Concentrations 10-12-10-10 M would provide mostly single molecules (0, 1, 2, 3, …) in the individual droplets, as determined by Poisson distribution.

  17. Prebiologically Important Interstellar Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Y.-J.; Huang, H.-C.; Charnley, S. B.; Tseng, W.-L.; Snyder, L. E.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Kisiel, Z.; Thorwirth, S.; Bohn, R. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2004-06-01

    Understanding the organic chemistry of molecular clouds, particularly the formation of biologically important molecules, is fundamental to the study of the processes which lead to the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the Galaxy. Determining the level of molecular complexity attainable in the clouds, and the nature of the complex organic material available to protostellar disks and the planetary systems that form from them, requires an understanding of the possible chemical pathways and is therefore a central question in astrochemistry. We have thus searched for prebiologically important molecules in the hot molecular cloud cores: Sgr B2(N-LMH), W51 e1/e2 and Orion-KL. Among the molecules searched: Pyrimidine is the unsubstituted ring analogue for three of the DNA and RNA bases. 2H-Azirine and Aziridine are azaheterocyclic compounds. And Glycine is the simplest amino acid. Detections of these interstellar organic molecular species will thus have important implications for Astrobiology. Our preliminary results indicate a tentative detection of interstellar glycine. If confirmed, this will be the first detection of an amino acid in interstellar space and will greatly strengthen the thesis that interstellar organic molecules could have played a pivotal role in the prebiotic chemistry of the early Earth.

  18. Algebraic theory of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iachello, Franco

    1995-01-01

    An algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics is presented. In this formulation, operators of interest are expanded onto elements of an algebra, G. For bound state problems in nu dimensions the algebra G is taken to be U(nu + 1). Applications to the structure of molecules are presented.

  19. Mighty Molecule Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Rushton, Greg; Bencomo, Marie

    2008-01-01

    As part of the SMATHematics Project: The Wonder of Science, The Power of Mathematics--a collaborative partnership between Kennesaw State University and two local school districts, fifth graders had the opportunity to puzzle out chemical formulas of propane, methanol, and other important molecules. In addition, they explored properties that…

  20. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  1. The Science of Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flory, Paul J.

    1974-01-01

    The author maintains that chemistry has a key role as the science of molecules and rejects the concept of chemistry as a branch of physics. The scope of chemistry, the philosophies underlying its practice, and the teaching of the subject also are discussed. (DT)

  2. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  3. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  4. Electro-optical characterization of nanoGUMBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, A.; Kanakamedala, K.; Rajathadripura, M. D.; Jagadish, N. N.; Magut, P. K. S.; de Rooy, S.; Das, S.; El-Zahab, B.; Warner, I. M.; Daniels-Race, T.

    2014-07-01

    Molecular electronics, where nanoscale organic species are utilized as active electronic components, offers a promising approach towards ultimate miniaturization and integration of hybrid electronic materials (HEMs) with traditional silicon based complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) technology. Toward this end, fundamental research studies to understand the electronic and optical properties of these molecules are of paramount importance. In this work, conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) and Raman spectroscopy have been performed on ionic liquid based unique organic nanoparticles derived from a Group of Uniform Materials Based on Organic Salts (GUMBOS). Aptly named as nanoGUMBOS, the material investigated in this report is Rhodamine6G tetraphenylborate ([R6G][TPB]) as has been synthesized by a room temperature facile metathesis reaction between Rhodamine 6G chloride (R6GCl) and sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) followed by an ultrasonication-assisted, additive-free, re-precipitation reaction. To the best of our knowledge, the results reported herein are first-time evidence of electrical performance exhibited by [R6G][TPB] nanoGUMBOS. In conjunction with the supportive results of Raman spectra, the current-voltage ( I- V) characteristics obtained are indicative of the potential incorporation of this unique compound in hybrid electronics with respect to potential applications in optoelectronics and chemical sensing.

  5. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the point of

  6. Direct measurement of single-molecule dynamics in free solution

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, E.S.; Xu, Xiao-Hong |

    1997-12-31

    Continuous monitoring of the solution dynamics of individual rhodamine-6G molecules and 30-base-ss-DNA tagged with rhodamine is achieved by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. A small observation depth is defined by exciting the molecules either through the evanescent wave at the quartz-liquid interface, or by using micron-size wires to form a thin layer of solution. A microscope thus affords diffraction-limited resolution of interconnected volume elements that are 13 aL, to 360 aL, respectively. An intensified CCD camera repeatedly records fluorescence from the same set of molecules to provide rate information on each as they diffuse and photobleach. With a special detection arrangement, time resolution down to 0.37 ms was achieved. The present technical limit is 10 ps for direct clocking of events. Statistical variations in molecular diffusion coefficients and in photobleaching rates are found. The average diffusion coefficients are smaller and the average photobleaching lifetimes are longer for the dye-DNA covalent complex compared to the molecule by itself.

  7. Direct measurement of single-molecule diffusion and photodecomposition in free solution

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiao-Hong; Yeung, E.S.

    1997-02-21

    Continuous monitoring of submillisecond free-solution dynamics of individual rhodamine-6G molecules and 30-base single-stranded DNA tagged with rhodamine was achieved. Fluorescence images were recorded from the same set of isolated molecules excited either through the evanescent field at the quartz-liquid interface or as a thin layer of solution defined by micron-sized wires, giving diffraction-limited resolution of interconnected attoliter volume elements. The single-molecule diffusion coefficients were smaller and the unimolecular photodecomposition lifetimes were longer for the dye-DNA covalent complex as compared with those of the dye molecular itself. Unlike bulk studies, stochastic behavior was found for individual molecules of each type, and smaller diffusion coefficients were observed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Strange skyrmion molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-01

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  9. Strange skyrmion molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-20

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  10. Structures of BmrR-Drug Complexes Reveal a Rigid Multidrug Binding Pocket And Transcription Activation Through Tyrosine Expulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Newberry, K.J.; Huffman, J.L.; Miller, M.C.; Vazquez-Laslop, N.; Neyfakh, A.A.; Brennan, R.G.

    2009-05-22

    BmrR is a member of the MerR family and a multidrug binding transcription factor that up-regulates the expression of the bmr multidrug efflux transporter gene in response to myriad lipophilic cationic compounds. The structural mechanism by which BmrR binds these chemically and structurally different drugs and subsequently activates transcription is poorly understood. Here, we describe the crystal structures of BmrR bound to rhodamine 6G (R6G) or berberine (Ber) and cognate DNA. These structures reveal each drug stacks against multiple aromatic residues with their positive charges most proximal to the carboxylate group of Glu-253 and that, unlike other multidrug binding pockets, that of BmrR is rigid. Substitution of Glu-253 with either alanine (E253A) or glutamine (E253Q) results in unpredictable binding affinities for R6G, Ber, and tetraphenylphosphonium. Moreover, these drug binding studies reveal that the negative charge of Glu-253 is not important for high affinity binding to Ber and tetraphenylphosphonium but plays a more significant, but unpredictable, role in R6G binding. In vitro transcription data show that E253A and E253Q are constitutively active, and structures of the drug-free E253A-DNA and E253Q-DNA complexes support a transcription activation mechanism requiring the expulsion of Tyr-152 from the multidrug binding pocket. In sum, these data delineate the mechanism by which BmrR binds lipophilic, monovalent cationic compounds and suggest the importance of the redundant negative electrostatic nature of this rigid drug binding pocket that can be used to discriminate against molecules that are not substrates of the Bmr multidrug efflux pump.

  11. Single Molecule Mechanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Yanxing; Ho, Wilson; Wu, Ruqian; Ruqian Wu, Yanxing Zhang Team; Wilson Ho, Shaowei Li Team

    Mechanical forces can be used to trigger chemical reactions through bending and stretching of chemical bonds. Using the reciprocating movement of the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), mechanical energy can be provided to a single molecule sandwiched between the tip and substrate. When the mechanical pulse center was moved to the outer ring feature of a CO molecule, the reaction rate was significantly increased compared with bare Cu surface and over Au atoms. First, DFT calculations show that the presence of CO makes the Cu cavity more attractive toward H2 Second, H2 prefers the horizontal adsorption geometry in the Cu-Cu and Au-Cu cavities and no hybridization occurs between the antibonding states of H2 and states of Cu atoms. While H2 loses electrons from its bonding state in all three cavities, the filling of its anti-bonding state only occurs in the CO-Cu cavity. Both make the CO-Cu cavity much more effectively to chop the H2 molecule. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation on Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit (CaSTL) under Grant No. CHE-1414466.

  12. Model molecules mimicking asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Sjöblom, Johan; Simon, Sébastien; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-04-01

    Asphalthenes are typically defined as the fraction of petroleum insoluble in n-alkanes (typically heptane, but also hexane or pentane) but soluble in toluene. This fraction causes problems of emulsion formation and deposition/precipitation during crude oil production, processing and transport. From the definition it follows that asphaltenes are not a homogeneous fraction but is composed of molecules polydisperse in molecular weight, structure and functionalities. Their complexity makes the understanding of their properties difficult. Proper model molecules with well-defined structures which can resemble the properties of real asphaltenes can help to improve this understanding. Over the last ten years different research groups have proposed different asphaltene model molecules and studied them to determine how well they can mimic the properties of asphaltenes and determine the mechanisms behind the properties of asphaltenes. This article reviews the properties of the different classes of model compounds proposed and present their properties by comparison with fractionated asphaltenes. After presenting the interest of developing model asphaltenes, the composition and properties of asphaltenes are presented, followed by the presentation of approaches and accomplishments of different schools working on asphaltene model compounds. The presentation of bulk and interfacial properties of perylene-based model asphaltene compounds developed by Sjöblom et al. is the subject of the next part. Finally the emulsion-stabilization properties of fractionated asphaltenes and model asphaltene compounds is presented and discussed. PMID:25638443

  13. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  14. Molecules in interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Hjalmarson, A.; Rydbeck, O. E. H.

    The physical conditions and chemical compositions of the gas in interstellar clouds are reviewed in light of the importance of interstellar clouds for star formation and the origin of life. The Orion A region is discussed as an example of a giant molecular cloud where massive stars are being formed, and it is pointed out that conditions in the core of the cloud, with a kinetic temperature of about 75 K and a density of 100,000-1,000,000 molecules/cu cm, may support gas phase ion-molecule chemistry. The Taurus Molecular Clouds are then considered as examples of cold, dark, relatively dense interstellar clouds which may be the birthplaces of solar-type stars and which have been found to contain the heaviest interstellar molecules yet discovered. The molecular species identified in each of these regions are tabulated, including such building blocks of biological monomers as H2O, NH3, H2CO, CO, H2S, CH3CN and H2, and more complex species such as HCOOCH3 and CH3CH2CN.

  15. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Trzpis, Monika; McLaughlin, Pamela M.J.; de Leij, Lou M.F.H.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, CD326) is a glycoprotein of ∼40 kd that was originally identified as a marker for carcinoma, attributable to its high expression on rapidly proliferating tumors of epithelial origin. Normal epithelia express EpCAM at a variable but generally lower level than carcinoma cells. In early studies, EpCAM was proposed to be a cell-cell adhesion molecule. However, recent insights revealed a more versatile role for EpCAM that is not limited only to cell adhesion but includes diverse processes such as signaling, cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Cell surface expression of EpCAM may actually prevent cell-cell adhesion. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on EpCAM biology in relation to other cell adhesion molecules. We discuss the implications of the newly identified functions of EpCAM in view of its prognostic relevance in carcinoma, inflammatory pathophysiology, and tissue development and regeneration as well as its role in normal epithelial homeostasis. PMID:17600130

  16. Silver coated gold nanocolloids entrapped in organized Langmuir-Blodgett Film of stearic acid: Potential evidence of a new SERS active substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Somsubhra; Ghosh, Manash; Dutta, Bipan; Chowdhury, Joydeep

    2016-01-01

    SERS active substrate containing silver coated gold (Au@Ag) nanocolloids entrapped in the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film matrix of stearic acid (SA) has been reported. The SERS efficacy of the as prepared substrate has been tested with trace concentrations of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules. Enhancement factors ranging from 104-1013 orders of magnitude have been estimated for the characteristic vibrational signatures of R6G molecule. The colossal enhancement factors also signify the superiority of the as prepared substrate in comparison to Au@Ag nanocolloids. The optical responses and the morphological features of the substrates are estimated with aid of UV-vis absorption spectra and FESEM, AFM images respectively. Correlations between the surface morphologies, fractal dimensions and roughness features of the as prepared substrates are also drawn. The electric field distributions around the aggregated nanocolloids entrapped in the SA matrix have been envisaged with the aid of three dimensional finite difference time domain (3D-FDTD) simulations. Tuning the interparticle localized surface plasmon (LSP) coupling between the aggregated nanocolloids may be achieved by lifting the LB film of SA at different surface pressures.

  17. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies. PMID:7428744

  18. Watching single molecules dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  19. Leucocyte cellular adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Yong, K; Khwaja, A

    1990-12-01

    Leucocytes express adhesion promoting receptors which mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These adhesive interactions are crucial to the regulation of haemopoiesis and thymocyte maturation, the direction and control of leucocyte traffic and migration through tissues, and in the development of immune and non-immune inflammatory responses. Several families of adhesion receptors have been identified (Table). The leucocyte integrin family comprises 3 alpha beta heterodimeric membrane glycoproteins which share a common beta subunit, designated CD18. The alpha subunits of each of the 3 members, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1) and p150,95 are designated CD11a, b and c respectively. These adhesion molecules play a critical part in the immune and inflammatory responses of leucocytes. The leucocyte integrin family is, in turn, part of the integrin superfamily, members of which are evolutionally, structurally and functionally related. Another Integrin subfamily found on leucocytes is the VLA group, so-called because the 'very late activation antigens' VLA-1 and VLA-2 were originally found to appear late in T-cell activation. Members of this family function mainly as extracellular matrix adhesion receptors and are found both on haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. They play a part in diverse cellular functions including tissue organisation, lymphocyte recirculation and T-cell immune responses. A third integrin subfamily, the cytoadhesins, are receptors on platelets and endothelial cells which bind extracellular matrix proteins. A second family of adhesion receptors is the immunoglobulin superfamily, members of which include CD2, LFA-3 and ICAM-1, which participate in T-cell adhesive interactions, and the antigen-specific receptors of T and B cells, CD4, CD8 and the MHC Class I and II molecules. A recently recognised family of adhesion receptors is the selectins, characterised by a common lectin domain. Leucocyte

  20. Single Molecule Transcription Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Galburt, Eric A.; Grill, Stephan W.; Bustamante, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Single molecule optical trapping assays have now been applied to a great number of macromolecular systems including DNA, RNA, cargo motors, restriction enzymes, DNA helicases, chromosome remodelers, DNA polymerases and both viral and bacterial RNA polymerases. The advantages of the technique are the ability to observe dynamic, unsynchronized molecular processes, to determine the distributions of experimental quantities and to apply force to the system while monitoring the response over time. Here, we describe the application of these powerful techniques to study the dynamics of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19426807

  1. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  2. Functionalized mesoporous materials for adsorption and release of different drug molecules: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Gang; Otuonye, Amy N.; Blair, Elizabeth A.; Denton, Kelley; Tao Zhimin; Asefa, Tewodros

    2009-07-15

    The adsorption capacity and release properties of mesoporous materials for drug molecules can be improved by functionalizing their surfaces with judiciously chosen organic groups. Functionalized ordered mesoporous materials containing various types of organic groups via a co-condensation synthetic method from 15% organosilane and by post-grafting organosilanes onto a pre-made mesoporous silica were synthesized. Comparative studies of their adsorption and release properties for various model drug molecules were then conducted. Functional groups including 3-aminopropyl, 3-mercaptopropyl, vinyl, and secondary amine groups were used to functionalize the mesoporous materials while rhodamine 6G and ibuprofen were utilized to investigate the materials' relative adsorption and release properties. The self-assembly of the mesoporous materials was carried out in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant, which produced MCM-41 type materials with pore diameters of {approx}2.7-3.3 nm and moderate to high surface areas up to {approx}1000 m{sup 2}/g. The different functional groups introduced into the materials dictated their adsorption capacity and release properties. While mercaptopropyl and vinyl functionalized samples showed high adsorption capacity for rhodamine 6G, amine functionalized samples exhibited higher adsorption capacity for ibuprofen. While the diffusional release of ibuprofen was fitted on the Fickian diffusion model, the release of rhodamine 6G followed Super Case-II transport model. - Graphical abstract: The adsorption capacity and release properties of mesoporous materials for various drug molecules are tuned by functionalizing the surfaces of the materials with judiciously chosen organic groups. This work reports comparative studies of the adsorption and release properties of functionalized ordered mesoporous materials containing different hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups that are synthesized via a co-condensation and post

  3. Covalent Chemistry beyond Molecules.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Juncong; Zhao, Yingbo; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-03-16

    Linking molecular building units by covalent bonds to make crystalline extended structures has given rise to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), thus bringing the precision and versatility of covalent chemistry beyond discrete molecules to extended structures. The key advance in this regard has been the development of strategies to overcome the "crystallization problem", which is usually encountered when attempting to link molecular building units into covalent solids. Currently, numerous MOFs and COFs are made as crystalline materials in which the large size of the constituent units provides for open frameworks. The molecular units thus reticulated become part of a new environment where they have (a) lower degrees of freedom because they are fixed into position within the framework; (b) well-defined spatial arrangements where their properties are influenced by the intricacies of the pores; and (c) ordered patterns onto which functional groups can be covalently attached to produce chemical complexity. The notion of covalent chemistry beyond molecules is further strengthened by the fact that covalent reactions can be carried out on such frameworks, with full retention of their crystallinity and porosity. MOFs are exemplars of how this chemistry has led to porosity with designed metrics and functionality, chemically-rich sequences of information within their frameworks, and well-defined mesoscopic constructs in which nanoMOFs enclose inorganic nanocrystals and give them new levels of spatial definition, stability, and functionality. PMID:26863450

  4. Photophysics of Fluorescent Probes Under 1-10 GPa Shock Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weilong; Christensen, James; Bassett, William; Dlott, Dana D.

    2015-06-01

    The use of fluorescent probes in shocked microstructured media can permit measurements of local pressures and temperatures with high time and space resolution. Here we focus on the use of a highly-emissive dye, rhodamine 6G (R6G). In order to understand the fundamental mechanisms of R6G photophysics under extreme conditions, we synchronized a femtosecond laser and streak camera with a laser-driven flyer plate shock compression system. We studied R6G emission lifetimes and spectra under shock conditions and under static high pressure when the dye was dissolved in poly-methylacryate (PMMA) or when the dye was encapsulated in silica microspheres, where R6G is superemissive. Under shock compression, the emission spectra of R6G redshifts. It is difficult to measure local pressures using the redshift, because one would have to spectrally resolve the emission from every spot in the shocked material. It would be much easier to measure the emission intensity at each location. We have found that the R6G emission intensity also changes in a shock, so it is useful to relate the intensity changes to local shock conditions. Our measurements show the intensity changes in a shock because the fluorescence lifetime drops from about 3.5 ns at ambient pressure to about 1 ns at 10 GPa. Present address: Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001, China.

  5. Comparison of cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters of supine lower body negative pressure and upright lower body positive pressure to simulate activity in 1/6 G and 3/8 G

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Velderrain, Armando; Ruckstuhl, Heidi; Stahn, Alexander C.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    For future space exploration missions, it is important to determine the best method of simulating on Earth cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions for lunar and Martian gravities. For this purpose, we compared exercise performed within a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and a lower body positive pressure (LBPP) chamber. Twelve subjects underwent a protocol of resting and walking (0.25 Froude) within supine LBNP and upright LBPP simulation. Each protocol was performed in simulated 1/6 G and 3/8 G. We assessed heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure, oxygen consumption (V̇o2), normalized stride length, normalized vertical peak ground reaction force, duty factor, cadence, perceived exertion (Borg), and comfort of the subject. A mixed linear model was employed to determine effects of the simulation on the respective parameters. Furthermore, parameters were compared with predicted values for lunar and Martian gravities to determine the method that showed the best agreement. During walking, all cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters were unaffected by the simulation used for lunar and Martian gravities. During rest, HR and V̇o2 were lower in supine LBNP compared with upright LBPP. HR, V̇o2, and normalized vertical peak ground reaction force obtained with supine LBNP and upright LBPP showed good agreement with predicted values. Since supine LBNP and upright LBPP are lacking significant differences, we conclude that both simulations are suited to simulate the cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions during activity in lunar and Martian gravities. Operational characteristics and the intended application should be considered when choosing either supine LBNP or upright LBPP to simulate partial gravities on Earth. PMID:23640597

  6. Optimization of magnetic stirring assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of rhodamine B and rhodamine 6G by response surface methodology: Application in water samples, soft drink, and cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Ranjbari, Elias; Hadjmohammadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-07-01

    An exact, rapid and efficient method for the extraction of rhodamine B (RB) and rhodamine 6G (RG) as well as their determination in three different matrices was developed using magnetic stirring assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (MSA-DLLME) and HPLC-Vis. 1-Octanol and acetone were selected as the extraction and dispersing solvents, respectively. The potentially variables were the volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH of sample solution, salt effect, temperature, stirring rate and vortex time in the optimization process. A methodology based on fractional factorial design (2(7)(-2)) was carried out to choose the significant variables for the optimization. Then, the significant factors (extraction solvent volume, pH of sample solution, temperature, stirring rate) were optimized using a central composite design (CCD). A quadratic model between dependent and independent variables was built. Under the optimum conditions (extraction solvent volume=1050µL, pH=2, temperature=35°C and stirring rate=1500rpm), the calibration curves showed high levels of linearity (R(2)=0.9999) for RB and RG in the ranges of 5-1000ngmL(-1) and 7.5-1000ngmL(-1), respectively. The obtained extraction recoveries for 100ngmL(-1) of RB and RG standard solutions were 100% and 97%, and preconcentration factors were 48 and 46, respectively. While the limit of detection was 1.15ngmL(-1) for RB, it was 1.23ngmL(-1) for RG. Finally, the MSA-DLLME method was successfully applied for preconcentration and trace determination of RB and RG in different matrices of environmental waters, soft drink and cosmetic products. PMID:25882429

  7. Comparison of cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters of supine lower body negative pressure and upright lower body positive pressure to simulate activity in 1/6 G and 3/8 G.

    PubMed

    Schlabs, Thomas; Rosales-Velderrain, Armando; Ruckstuhl, Heidi; Stahn, Alexander C; Hargens, Alan R

    2013-07-15

    For future space exploration missions, it is important to determine the best method of simulating on Earth cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions for lunar and Martian gravities. For this purpose, we compared exercise performed within a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and a lower body positive pressure (LBPP) chamber. Twelve subjects underwent a protocol of resting and walking (0.25 Froude) within supine LBNP and upright LBPP simulation. Each protocol was performed in simulated 1/6 G and 3/8 G. We assessed heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure, oxygen consumption (Vo2), normalized stride length, normalized vertical peak ground reaction force, duty factor, cadence, perceived exertion (Borg), and comfort of the subject. A mixed linear model was employed to determine effects of the simulation on the respective parameters. Furthermore, parameters were compared with predicted values for lunar and Martian gravities to determine the method that showed the best agreement. During walking, all cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters were unaffected by the simulation used for lunar and Martian gravities. During rest, HR and Vo2 were lower in supine LBNP compared with upright LBPP. HR, Vo2, and normalized vertical peak ground reaction force obtained with supine LBNP and upright LBPP showed good agreement with predicted values. Since supine LBNP and upright LBPP are lacking significant differences, we conclude that both simulations are suited to simulate the cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions during activity in lunar and Martian gravities. Operational characteristics and the intended application should be considered when choosing either supine LBNP or upright LBPP to simulate partial gravities on Earth. PMID:23640597

  8. Molecules in the Spotlight

    SciTech Connect

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  9. Emerging small molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Staels, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidaemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Pharmacological lowering of LDL-C levels using statins reduces cardiovascular risk. However, a substantial residual risk persists especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Because of the inverse association observed in epidemiological studies of HDL-C with the risk for cardiovascular diseases, novel therapeutic strategies to raise HDL-C levels or improve HDL functionality are developed as complementary therapy for cardiovascular diseases. However, until now most therapies targeting HDL-C levels failed in clinical trials because of side effects or absence of clinical benefits. This chapter will highlight the emerging small molecules currently developed and tested in clinical trials to pharmacologically modulate HDL-C and functionality including new CETP inhibitors (anacetrapib, evacetrapib), novel PPAR agonists (K-877, CER-002, DSP-8658, INT131 and GFT505), LXR agonists (ATI-111, LXR-623, XL-652) and RVX-208. PMID:25523004

  10. Biochips - Can molecules compute?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, J. B.

    1984-02-01

    In recent years the possibility has been considered to build 'biochip' computers, in which the silicon transistors of present machines would be replaced by large organic molecules or genetically engineered proteins. Two major advantages of such biochips over current devices would be related to vastly increased densities of computing elements, and entirely new styles of data processing, suited to such high-level tasks as pattern recognition and context-dependent analysis. The limitations of the semiconductor chip with respect to the density of elementary units due to size considerations and heat development could be overcome by making use of molecular switches. Attention is given to soliton switching, soliton logic, bulk molecular devices, analog biochips, 'intelligent' switches based on the employment of enzymes, robot vision, questions of biochip fabrication, protein engineering, and a strategy for the development of biochips.

  11. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  12. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  13. Facile preparation of silver nanoparticle films as an efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yujing; Zhang, Yue; Shi, Yan; Xiao, Xianping; Dai, Haichao; Hu, Jingting; Ni, Pengjuan; Li, Zhuang

    2013-10-01

    Here, we report a new and facile method to prepare silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) film for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensing. The porous Ni foam was used as a template to generate high quality of Ag NPs by seed-mediated growth of metallic nanoparticles. The preparation process is very economic and environment-friendly, can achieve the recovery of the raw materials. We found that the type of silver-plating solution and the growth time are two key factors to determine the magnitude of SERS signal enhancement. Using rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 4-animothiophenol (4-ATP) as probe molecules, the created Ag NP films exhibited relatively high enhancement ability, good stability, and well reproducibility. The synthesized SERS-active substrate was further used to detect melamine molecules, an illegal additive in infant milk powder, and the limitation of detection can reach 1 μM.

  14. Self-assembly of mildly reduced graphene oxide monolayer for enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Fenping; Wu, Shang; Wang, Yanbin; Wu, Lan; Yuan, Peilin; Wang, Xia

    2016-05-01

    Graphene-enhanced Raman scattering (GERS) has attracted much attention recently. In present study, monolayer of chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets was chemically bonded on Si substrates and their possible applications in Raman scattering were investigated. In comparison with the mechanically exfoliated graphene, mildly reduced graphene oxide (MR-GO) monolayer is a better substrate to quench the fluorescence (FL) signals and simultaneously enhance the Raman signals of adsorbed Rhodamin 6G (R6G) molecules. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate that π-π stacking and the residual polarized oxygen groups on MRGO surface, which can produce a strong local electric field under laser excitation, are mainly responsible for the excellent GERS effect of MR-GO substrate, while the charge transfer between R6G and MR-GO has a relatively low contribution for GERS effect. Our results not only provide a new approach to realize sensitive GERS substrate, but also are helpful for improving the fundamental understanding of GERS effect on RGO substrate.

  15. Novel ferroferric oxide/polystyrene/silver core-shell magnetic nanocomposite microspheres as regenerable substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Bai, Chong; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Wei-Liang; Ren, Man-Man; Liu, Qin-Ze; Yang, Zhi-Zhou; Wang, Xin-Qiang; Duan, Xiu-Lan

    2016-02-01

    A novel Ag-coated Fe3O4@Polystyrene core-shell microsphere has been designed via fabrication of Fe3O4@Polystyrene core-shell magnetic microsphere through a seed emulsion polymerization, followed by deposition of Ag nanoparticles using in-situ reduction method. Such magnetic microspheres can be utilized as sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates, using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a probe molecule, with both stable and reproducible performances. The SERS detection limit of R6G decreased to 1 × 10-10 M and the enhancement factor of this substrate on the order of 106 was obtained. In addition, owing to possessing excellent magnetic properties, the resultant microspheres could be separated rapidly by an external magnetic field and utilized repeatedly for three times at least. Therefore, the unique renewable property suggests a new route to eliminate the single-use problem of traditional SERS substrates and will be promising for the practical application.

  16. [Synthesis of Ultra-Uniform Gold Spherical Nanoparticles with Different Sizes and Their SERS Effects Study].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Si-wen; Li, Xia; Zhang, Yue-jiao; Zhu, Gen-song; Li, Jian-feng

    2016-01-01

    A series of ultra-uniform gold spherical nanoparticles with different sizes were synthesized using gold chloride acid as precursor, ascorbic acid as reductant and sodium citrate hydrate as surfactant. The prepared Au nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy. The results showed that the absorption peak of UV-Vis spectroscopy red-shifted along with size increasing of the nanoparticles and finally appeared a quadrupole peak. To further explore the mechanism of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) effect and optimize the sensitivity, SERS on Au nanoparticles with different sizes were measured using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as probe molecule. We found the SERS signals of R6G on the Au nanoaprtciles were highly size dependent. When the particles sizes are close to -120 nm, it will generate the highest enhancement, the enhancement factor is about 1.1 x 10(7). The 3D-FDTD simulation results correlated with the experimental data very well. PMID:27228749

  17. [Three-dimensional vertically aligned CNTs coated by Ag nanoparticles for surface-enhanced Raman scattering].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Jie; Fan, Tuo; Ren, Wen-Jie; Lai, Chun-Hong

    2014-09-01

    In order to make surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates contained more "hot spots" in a three-dimensional (3D) focal volume, and can be adsorbed more probe molecules and metal nanoparticles, to obtain stronger Raman spectral signal, a new structure based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated by Ag nanoparticles for surface Raman enhancement is presented. The vertically aligned CNTs are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A silver film is first deposited on the vertically aligned CNTs by magnetron sputtering. The samples are then annealed at different temperature to cause the different size silver nanoparticles to coat on the surface and sidewalls of vertically aligned CNTs. The result of scanning electron microscopy(SEM) shows that Ag nanoparticles are attached onto the sidewalls and tips of the vertically aligned CNTs, as the annealing temperature is different , pitch size, morphology and space between the silver nanoparticles is vary. Rhodamine 6G is served as the probe analyte. Raman spectrum measurement indicates that: the higher the concentration of R6G, the stronger the Raman intensity, but R6G concentration increase with the enhanced Raman intensity varies nonlinearly; when annealing temperature is 450 °C, the average size of silver nanoparticles is about 100 to 120 nm, while annealing temperature is 400 °C, the average size is about 70 nm, and the Raman intensity of 450 °C is superior to the annealing temperature that of 400 °C and 350 °C. PMID:25532342

  18. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (<30%) consists of a rich organic inventory of soluble organic compounds, including key compounds important in terrestrial biochemistry [2-4]. Different carbonaceous meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10

  19. Whole genomic analyses of asymptomatic human G1P[6], G2P[6] and G3P[6] rotavirus strains reveal intergenogroup reassortment events and genome segments of artiodactyl origin.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Urushibara, Noriko; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta; Krishnan, Triveni; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-06-01

    Although P[6] group A rotaviruses (RVA) cause diarrhoea in humans, they have been also associated with endemics of predominantly asymptomatic neonatal infections. Interestingly, strains representing the endemic and asymptomatic P[6] RVAs were found to possess one of the four common human VP7 serotypes (G1-G4), and exhibited little antigenic/genetic differences with the VP4 proteins/VP4 encoding genome segments of P[6] RVAs recovered from diarrhoeic children, raising interest on their complete genetic constellations. In the present study, we report the overall genetic makeup and possible origin of three such asymptomatic human P[6] RVA strains, RVA/Human-tc/VEN/M37/1982/G1P2A[6], RVA/Human-tc/SWE/1076/1983/G2P2A[6] and RVA/Human-tc/AUS/McN13/1980/G3P2A[6]. G1P[6] strain M37 exhibited an unusual genotype constellation (G1-P[6]-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T2-E1-H1), not reported previously, and was found to originate from possible intergenogroup reassortment events involving acquisition of a DS-1-like NSP3 encoding genome segment by a human Wa-like RVA strain. On the other hand, G2P[6] strain 1076 exhibited a DS-1-like genotype constellation, and was found to possess several genome segments (those encoding VP1, VP3, VP6 and NSP4) of possible artiodactyl (ruminants) origin on a human RVA genetic backbone. The whole genome of G3P[6] strain McN13 was closely related to that of asymptomatic human Wa-like G3P[6] strain RV3, and both strains shared unique amino acid changes, which might have contributed to their attenuation. Taken together, the present study provided insights into the origin and complex genetic diversity of P[6] RVAs possessing the common human VP7 genotypes. This is the first report on the whole genomic analysis of a G1P[6] RVA strain. PMID:23347969

  20. Electrochromic graphene molecules.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K; Sykora, Milan

    2015-04-28

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystalline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes and their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current, but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using a modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here, these were found to be E1,ox(0) = 0.77 ± 0.01 V and E2,ox(0) = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red(0) = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be nonideal. The nonideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes are attributed to strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling, GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component. PMID:25768313

  1. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were foundmore » to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.« less

  2. Reactions of oriented molecules.

    PubMed

    Brooks, P R

    1976-07-01

    Beams of oriented molecules have been used to directly study geometrical requirements in chemical reactions. These studies have shown that reactivity is much greater in some orientations than others and demonstrated the existence of steric effects. For some reactions portions of the orientation results are in good accord with traditional views of steric hindrance, but for others it is clear that our chemical intuition needs recalibrating. Indeed, the information gained from simultaneously orienting the reactants and observing the scattering angle of the products may lead to new insights about the detailed mechanism of certain reactions. Further work must be done to extend the scope and detail of the studies described here. More detailed information is needed on the CH(3)I reaction and the CF(3)I reaction. The effects of alkyl groups of various sizes and alkali metals of various sizes are of interest. In addition, reactions where a long-lived complex is formed should be studied to see if orientation is important. Finally, it would be of interest to apply the technique to the sort of reactions that led to our interest in the first place: the S(N)2 displacements in alkyl halides where the fascinating Walden inversion occurs. PMID:17793988

  3. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  4. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1987-10-07

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photons are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions. 3 figs.

  5. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadway, Bryce; Yan, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole–dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  6. Adsorption kinetics of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Burde, Jared T; Calbi, M Mercedes

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption dynamics of diatomic molecules on solid surfaces is examined by using a Kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm. Equilibration times at increasing loadings are obtained, and explained based on the elementary processes that lead to the formation of the adsorbed film. The ability of the molecules to change their orientation accelerates the overall uptake and leads to competitive kinetic behaviour between the different orientations. The dependence of the equilibration time on coverage follows the same decreasing trend obtained experimentally for ethane adsorption on closed-end carbon nanotube bundles. The exploration of molecule-molecule interaction effects on this trend provides relevant insights to understand the kinetic behaviour of other species, from simpler molecules to larger polyatomic molecules, adsorbing on surfaces with different binding strength. PMID:24654004

  7. Comparison of upright LBPP and supine LBNP in terms of cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters to simulate 1/6-G (lunar gravity) and 3/8-G (Martian gravity) activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlabs, Thomas; Rosales-Velderrain, Armando; Ruckstuhl, Heidi; Richardson, Sara E.; Hargens, Alan

    Background: Missions of astronauts to Moon and Mars may be planned in the future. From over 40 years of manned spaceflight it is known that the human body experiences cardiovascular and musculoskeletal losses and a decrease in aerobic fitness while exposed to reduced gravity. Because future missions will be much longer than before, further research is needed to improve Earth-based simulations of reduced gravity. Among others, two methods are capable of simu-lating fractional gravity on Earth: upright Lower Body Positive Pressure (LBPP) and supine Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP). No previous study has directly compared these two methods to determine which method is better suited to simulate both the biomechanical and cardiovascular responses of performing activity in lunar (1/6-G) and Martian (3/8-G) gravities. Taken previous studies into account and considering the fact that supine posture is closer to the established 10 head-up-tilt lunar simulation, we hypothesized that exercise performed in supine LBNP better simulates the cardiovascular conditions that occur in lunar and Martian gravities. Methods: 12 healthy normal subjects underwent a protocol consisting of resting and walking (0.25 Froude) with LBNP and LBPP. Each protocol was performed in simulated 1/6-G and 3/8-G. Heart-rate (HR), blood pressure, oxygen consumption (VO2), vertical component of the ground reaction force, comfort of the subject and perceived exertion of the subject (Borg Scale) were assessed. The obtained parameters were compared to predicted values for lunar and Martian gravity conditions in order to determine the method that shows the best level of agreement. Results: There was no difference in gait parameters between LBPP and LBNP simulation of lunar and Martian gravity (cadence: P=0.427, normalized stride length: P=0.373, duty fac-tor: P=0.302, and normalized vertical peak force (P=0.064). Mean blood pressure (P=0.398), comfort (P=0.832) and BORG rating (P=0.186) did not differ

  8. Trapping Single Molecules by Dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölzel, Ralph; Calander, Nils; Chiragwandi, Zackary; Willander, Magnus; Bier, Frank F.

    2005-09-01

    We have trapped single protein molecules of R-phycoerythrin in an aqueous solution by an alternating electric field. A radio frequency voltage is applied to sharp nanoelectrodes and hence produces a strong electric field gradient. The resulting dielectrophoretic forces attract freely diffusing protein molecules. Trapping takes place at the electrode tips. Switching off the field immediately releases the molecules. The electric field distribution is computed, and from this the dielectrophoretic response of the molecules is calculated using a standard polarization model. The resulting forces are compared to the impact of Brownian motion. Finally, we discuss the experimental observations on the basis of the model calculations.

  9. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Orellana, P. A.; Laroze, D.

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  10. Electrical Transport through Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, C. N.; Chang, Shun-Chi; Williams, Stan

    2003-03-01

    We investigate electrical transport properties of single organic molecules using electromigration break junctions[1]. A self-assembled monolayer of various organic molecules such as 1,4-di(phenylethynyl-4'-methanethiol)benzene was grown on narrow metal wires, and single or a few molecules were incorporated into the junctions which were created by applying a large voltage and breaking the wires. The transport properties of these molecules were then measured at low temperatures. Latest experimental results will be discussed. [1] Park, J. et al, Nature, 417, 722 (2002); Liang W. et al, Nature, 417, 725 (2002).

  11. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were found to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.

  12. Adhesion molecules in cutaneous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barker, J N

    1995-01-01

    As in other organs, leukocyte adhesion molecules and their ligands play a major role in cutaneous inflammatory events both by directing leukocyte trafficking and by their effects on antigen presentation. Skin biopsies of inflamed skin from patients with diseases such as as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis reveal up-regulation of endothelial cell expression of P- and E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Studies of evolving lesions following UVB irradiation, Mantoux reaction or application of contact allergen, demonstrate that expression of these adhesion molecules parallels leukocyte infiltration into skin. When cutaneous inflammation is widespread (e.g. in erythroderma), soluble forms of these molecules are detectable in serum. In vitro studies predict that peptide mediators are important regulatory factors for endothelial adhesion molecules. Intradermal injection of the cytokines interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma into normal human skin leads to induction of endothelial adhesion molecules with concomitant infiltration of leukocytes. In addition, neuropeptides rapidly induce P-selectin translocation to the cell membrane and expression of E-selectin. Adhesion molecules also play a crucial role as accessory molecules in the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by Langerhans' cells. Expression of selectin ligands by Langerhans' cells is up-regulated by various inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that adhesion molecules may be important in Langerhans' cell migration. The skin, because of its accessibility, is an ideal organ in which to study expression of adhesion molecules and their relationship to inflammatory events. Inflammatory skin diseases are common and inhibition of lymphocyte accumulation in skin is likely to prove of great therapeutic benefit. PMID:7587640

  13. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  14. Featured Molecules: Sucrose and Vanillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-04-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for April relate to the sense of taste. Apple Fool, the JCE Classroom Activity, mentions sucrose and vanillin and their use as flavorings. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  15. Proregenerative Properties of ECM Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Plantman, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    After traumatic injuries to the nervous system, regrowing axons encounter a complex microenvironment where mechanisms that promote regeneration compete with inhibitory processes. Sprouting and axonal regrowth are key components of functional recovery but are often counteracted by inhibitory molecules. This review covers extracellular matrix molecules that support neuron axonal outgrowth. PMID:24195084

  16. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  17. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities. PMID:25221867

  18. Magnetoassociation of KRb Feshbach molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumby, Tyler; Perreault, John; Shewmon, Ruth; Jin, Deborah

    2010-03-01

    I will discuss experiments in which we study the creation of ^40K^87Rb Feshbach molecules via magnetoassociation. We measure the molecule number as a function of the magnetic-field sweep rate through the interspecies Feshbach resonance and explore the dependence of association on the initial atom gas conditions. This study of the Feshbach molecule creation process may be relevant to the production of ultracold polar molecules, where magnetoassociated Feshbach molecules can be a crucial first step [1].[4pt] [1] K.-K. Ni, S. Ospelkaus, M. H. G. de Miranda, A. Peer, B. Neyenhuis, J. J. Zirbel, S. Kotochigova, P. S. Julienne, D. S. Jin, and J. Ye, Science, 2008, 322, 231- 235.

  19. Magnetoassociation of KRb Feshbach molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumby, Tyler; Perreault, John; Shewmon, Ruth; Jin, Deborah

    2010-03-01

    I will discuss experiments in which we study the creation of ^40K^87Rb Feshbach molecules via magnetoassociation. We measure the molecule number as a function of the magnetic-field sweep rate through the interspecies Feshbach resonance and explore the dependence of association on the initial atom gas conditions. This study of the Feshbach molecule creation process may be relevant to the production of ultracold polar molecules, where magnetoassociated Feshbach molecules can be a crucial first step [1].[4pt] [1] K.-K. Ni, S. Ospelkaus, M. H. G. de Miranda, A. Peer, B. Neyenhuis, J. J. Zirbel, S. Kotochigova, P. S. Julienne, D. S. Jin, and J. Ye, Science, 2008, 322, 231-235.

  20. Molecule-hugging graphene nanopores.

    PubMed

    Garaj, Slaven; Liu, Song; Golovchenko, Jene A; Branton, Daniel

    2013-07-23

    It has recently been recognized that solid-state nanopores in single-atomic-layer graphene membranes can be used to electronically detect and characterize single long charged polymer molecules. We have now fabricated nanopores in single-layer graphene that are closely matched to the diameter of a double-stranded DNA molecule. Ionic current signals during electrophoretically driven translocation of DNA through these nanopores were experimentally explored and theoretically modeled. Our experiments show that these nanopores have unusually high sensitivity (0.65 nA/Å) to extremely small changes in the translocating molecule's outer diameter. Such atomically short graphene nanopores can also resolve nanoscale-spaced molecular structures along the length of a polymer, but do so with greatest sensitivity only when the pore and molecule diameters are closely matched. Modeling confirms that our most closely matched pores have an inherent resolution of ≤ 0.6 nm along the length of the molecule. PMID:23836648

  1. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  2. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  3. Relative Sizes of Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This computer graphic depicts the relative complexity of crystallizing large proteins in order to study their structures through x-ray crystallography. Insulin is a vital protein whose structure has several subtle points that scientists are still trying to determine. Large molecules such as insuline are complex with structures that are comparatively difficult to understand. For comparison, a sugar molecule (which many people have grown as hard crystals in science glass) and a water molecule are shown. These images were produced with the Macmolecule program. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  4. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-González, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  5. Organic heterocyclic molecules become superalkalis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Naaresh; Giri, Santanab

    2016-09-21

    An organic molecule which behaves like a superalkali has been designed from an aromatic heterocyclic molecule, pyrrole. Using first-principles calculation and a systematic two-step approach, we can have superalkali molecules with a low ionization energy, even lower than that of Cs. Couple cluster (CCSD) calculation reveals that a new heterocycle, C3N2(CH3)5 derived from a well-known aromatic heterocycle, pyrrole (C4H5N) has an ionization energy close to 3.0 eV. A molecular dynamics calculation on C3N2(CH3)5 reveals that the structure is dynamically stable. PMID:27530344

  6. Nonsequential double ionization of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2005-03-01

    Double ionization of diatomic molecules by short linearly polarized laser pulses is analyzed. We consider the final stage of the ionization process, that is the decay of a highly excited two electron molecule, which is formed after rescattering. The saddles of the effective adiabatic potential energy close to which simultaneous escape of electrons takes place are identified. Numerical simulations of the ionization of molecules show that the process can be dominated by either sequential or nonsequential events. In order to increase the ratio of nonsequential to sequential ionizations very short laser pulses should be applied.

  7. Resolving metal-molecule interfaces at single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nakamura, Hisao; Tada, Tomofumi; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Electronic and structural detail at the electrode-molecule interface have a significant influence on charge transport across molecular junctions. Despite the decisive role of the metal-molecule interface, a complete electronic and structural characterization of the interface remains a challenge. This is in no small part due to current experimental limitations. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Contrary to conventional conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the energy alignment between the conduction orbital and the Fermi level of the electrode. This exhaustive statistical approach was employed to study single-molecule junctions of 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), 1,4-butanediamine (C4DA), and 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). A single interfacial configuration was observed for both BDA and C4DA junctions, while three different interfacial arrangements were resolved for BDT. This multiplicity is due to different molecular adsorption sites on the Au surface namely on-top, hollow, and bridge. Furthermore, C4DA junctions present a fluctuating I-V curve arising from the greater conformational freedom of the saturated alkyl chain, in sharp contrast with the rigid aromatic backbone of both BDA and BDT. PMID:27221947

  8. Resolving metal-molecule interfaces at single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nakamura, Hisao; Tada, Tomofumi; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-05-01

    Electronic and structural detail at the electrode-molecule interface have a significant influence on charge transport across molecular junctions. Despite the decisive role of the metal-molecule interface, a complete electronic and structural characterization of the interface remains a challenge. This is in no small part due to current experimental limitations. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Contrary to conventional conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the energy alignment between the conduction orbital and the Fermi level of the electrode. This exhaustive statistical approach was employed to study single-molecule junctions of 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), 1,4-butanediamine (C4DA), and 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). A single interfacial configuration was observed for both BDA and C4DA junctions, while three different interfacial arrangements were resolved for BDT. This multiplicity is due to different molecular adsorption sites on the Au surface namely on-top, hollow, and bridge. Furthermore, C4DA junctions present a fluctuating I-V curve arising from the greater conformational freedom of the saturated alkyl chain, in sharp contrast with the rigid aromatic backbone of both BDA and BDT.

  9. Moving Molecules and Mothball Madness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strain, John

    1993-01-01

    Describes concrete demonstrations on the states of matter. In the first demonstration, students represent molecules; and, in the second demonstration, moth balls are heated to produce a change of state. (PR)

  10. Surface chemistry of deuterated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1983-03-01

    The chemical composition of grain mantles is calculated in order to determine the concentration of deuterated molecules relative to their hydrogenated counterparts in grain mantles. The computation takes into account reactions involving deuterium in the gas phase and on grain surfaces. The results show that the abundance of deuterium molecules in grain mantles is much higher than expected on the basis of the cosmic abundance ratio of D to H. HDCO has a relatively high abundance in grain mantles as compared to other deuterated molecules, due to the fact that H abstraction from HDCO has a lower activation barrier than D abstraction. The infrared characteristics of the calculated grain mantles are discussed and observational tests of the model calcultions are suggested. The contribution of grain surface chemistry to the concentration of molecules in the gas phase is briefly considered.

  11. Cobalt single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, En-Che; Hendrickson, David N.; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Nakano, Motohiro; Zakharov, Lev N.; Sommer, Roger D.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Ledezma-Gairaud, Marisol; Christou, George

    2002-05-01

    A cobalt molecule that functions as a single-molecule magnet, [Co4(hmp)4(MeOH)4Cl4], where hmp- is the anion of hydroxymethylpyridine, is reported. The core of the molecule consists of four Co(II) cations and four hmp- oxygen atom ions at the corners of a cube. Variable-field and variable-temperature magnetization data have been analyzed to establish that the molecule has a S=6 ground state with considerable negative magnetoanisotropy. Single-ion zero-field interactions (DSz2) at each cobalt ion are the origin of the negative magnetoanisotropy. A single crystal of the compound was studied by means of a micro-superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer in the range of 0.040-1.0 K. Hysteresis was found in the magnetization versus magnetic field response of this single crystal.

  12. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  13. Molecule-hugging graphene nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Liu, Song; Golovchenko, Jene A.; Branton, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that solid-state nanopores in single-atomic-layer graphene membranes can be used to electronically detect and characterize single long charged polymer molecules. We have now fabricated nanopores in single-layer graphene that are closely matched to the diameter of a double-stranded DNA molecule. Ionic current signals during electrophoretically driven translocation of DNA through these nanopores were experimentally explored and theoretically modeled. Our experiments show that these nanopores have unusually high sensitivity (0.65 nA/Å) to extremely small changes in the translocating molecule’s outer diameter. Such atomically short graphene nanopores can also resolve nanoscale-spaced molecular structures along the length of a polymer, but do so with greatest sensitivity only when the pore and molecule diameters are closely matched. Modeling confirms that our most closely matched pores have an inherent resolution of ≤0.6 nm along the length of the molecule. PMID:23836648

  14. Single-Molecule DNA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efcavitch, J. William; Thompson, John F.

    2010-07-01

    The ability to detect single molecules of DNA or RNA has led to an extremely rich area of exploration of the single most important biomolecule in nature. In cases in which the nucleic acid molecules are tethered to a solid support, confined to a channel, or simply allowed to diffuse into a detection volume, novel techniques have been developed to manipulate the DNA and to examine properties such as structural dynamics and protein-DNA interactions. Beyond the analysis of the properties of nucleic acids themselves, single-molecule detection has enabled dramatic improvements in the throughput of DNA sequencing and holds promise for continuing progress. Both optical and nonoptical detection methods that use surfaces, nanopores, and zero-mode waveguides have been attempted, and one optically based instrument is already commercially available. The breadth of literature related to single-molecule DNA analysis is vast; this review focuses on a survey of efforts in molecular dynamics and nucleic acid sequencing.

  15. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  16. Collisional decoherence of polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Kai; Stickler, Benjamin A.; Hornberger, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    The quantum state of motion of a large and rotating polar molecule can lose coherence through the collisions with gas atoms. We show how the associated quantum master equation for the center of mass can be expressed in terms of the orientationally averaged differential and total scattering cross sections, for which we provide approximate analytic expressions. The master equation is then utilized to quantify collisional decoherence in a interference experiment with polar molecules.

  17. Nanochannel Based Single Molecule Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Lesoine, John F.; Venkataraman, Prahnesh A.; Maloney, Peter C.; Dumont, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the fluorescence from a single molecule hundreds of times without surface immobilization. The approach is based on the use of electroosmosis to repeatedly drive a single target molecule in a fused silica nanochannel through a stationary laser focus. Single molecule fluorescence detected during the transit time through the laser focus is used to repeatedly reverse the electrical potential controlling the flow direction. Our method does not rely on continuous observation and therefore is less susceptible to fluorescence blinking than existing fluorescence-based trapping schemes. The variation in the turnaround times can be used to measure the diffusion coefficient on a single molecule level. We demonstrate the ability to recycle both proteins and DNA in nanochannels and show that the procedure can be combined with single-pair Förster energy transfer. Nanochannel-based single molecule recycling holds promise for studying conformational dynamics on the same single molecule in solution and without surface tethering. PMID:22662745

  18. Electrostatic Interactions of Fluorescent Molecules with Dielectric Interfaces Studied by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Hans; Hassler, Kai; Chmyrov, Andriy; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions between dielectric surfaces and different fluorophores used in ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy are investigated using objective-based Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (TIR-FCS). The interfacial dynamics of cationic rhodamine 123 and rhodamine 6G, anionic/dianionic fluorescein, zwitterionic rhodamine 110 and neutral ATTO 488 are monitored at various ionic strengths at physiological pH. As analyzed by means of the amplitude and time-evolution of the autocorrelation function, the fluorescent molecules experience electrostatic attraction or repulsion at the glass surface depending on their charges. Influences of the electrostatic interactions are also monitored through the triplet-state population and triplet relaxation time, including the amount of detected fluorescence or the count-rate-per-molecule parameter. These TIR-FCS results provide an increased understanding of how fluorophores are influenced by the microenvironment of a glass surface, and show a promising approach for characterizing electrostatic interactions at interfaces. PMID:20386645

  19. High-efficiency molecular counting in solution: Single-molecule detection in electrodynamically focused microdroplet streams

    SciTech Connect

    Lermer, N.; Barnes, M.D.; Kung, C.Y.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1997-06-01

    We report fluorescence detection of individual rhodamine 6G molecules using a linear quadrupole to focus streams of microdroplets through the waist of a counterpropagating cw Ar{sup +} laser. Since the terminal velocity scales as the square of the droplet diameter, the droplet-laser interaction time was `tunable` between 5 and 200 ms by using water samples spiked with a small, variable (2-5% v/v) amount of glycerol. Fluorescence bursts from droplets containing single molecules were clearly distinguished from the blanks in real time with an average signal-to-noise ratio of about 10, limited primarily by photobleaching and droplet size fluctuations (<1%). The volume throughput rates associated with this approach (approx. 10 pL/s) are roughly 10{sup 3} higher than those associated with particle levitation techniques, with minimal sacrifice in sensitivity. Total molecular detection efficiencies of about 80% (at >99% confidence) were obtained for 100 and 15 fM rhodamine 6G solutions, in good agreement with detailed theoretical calculations and statistical limitations. 39 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The role of host environment on the aggregative properties of some ionic dye materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanadzadeh, A.; Zanjanchi, M. A.; Tirbandpay, R.

    2002-10-01

    The aggregation of methylene blue (MB), rhodamine 6G (R6G), and rhodamine B (RB) in liquid crystalline solution (anisotropic host) was studied using polarised spectroscopy and in a guest-host system. The self-association of the ionic dyes was investigated in molecular sieves of type zeolite-β and SAPO-11 (microporous solid hosts) using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The aggregation of the dyes in the aqueous solution (isotropic host) was studied using absorption spectroscopy in the visible region for comparison. Therefore, the influence of host nature in the different phases on the molecular interaction of the guest molecules was investigated and compared. The nature of the interacting pairs in these dyes was discussed using the exciton theory.

  1. Ordered array of Ag semishells on different diameter monolayer polystyrene colloidal crystals: An ultrasensitive and reproducible SERS substrate

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zao; Niu, Gao; Luo, Jiangshan; Kang, Xiaoli; Yao, Weitang; Zhang, Weibin; Yi, Yougen; Yi, Yong; Ye, Xin; Duan, Tao; Tang, Yongjian

    2016-01-01

    Ag semishells (AgSS) ordered arrays for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been prepared by depositing Ag film onto polystyrene colloidal particle (PSCP) monolayer templates array. The diversified activity for SERS activity with the ordered AgSS arrays mainly depends on the PSCP diameter and Ag film thickness. The high SERS sensitivity and reproducibility are proved by the detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) molecules. The prominent enhancements of SERS are mainly from the “V”-shaped or “U”-shaped nanogaps on AgSS, which are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The higher SERS activity, stability and reproducibility make the ordered AgSS a promising choice for practical SERS low concentration detection applications. PMID:27586562

  2. Enhanced fluorescence yields through cavity quantum-electrodynamic effects in microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M. )

    1994-07-01

    Measurements of the integrated fluorescence yield per molecule of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in 4--16-[mu]m-diameter levitated microdroplets show a size dependence that is attributed to a net increase in the fluorescence decay rate for the smaller (4--5-[mu]m) droplets. The average fluorescence yield in 4-[mu]m droplets (for which we have previously observed emission-rate enhancement) is approximately a factor of 2 larger than the yield measured for larger droplets for which emission-rate enhancement does not occur. These results suggest that there is little emission-rate inhibition in this system, even though the fluorescence emission spectrum overlaps several cavity resonances. A mechanism based on spectral diffusion is postulated for the apparent absence of cavity-inhibited emission and is illustrated by Monte Carlo calculations using time-dependent line-shape functions.

  3. Cavity-QED enhancement of fluorescence yields in microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1993-12-31

    Measurements of the integrated fluorescence yield of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in levitated microdroplets (4 to 16 {mu}m diameter) display a size dependence which is attributed to a decreased probability per excitation cycle of photochemical bleaching as a result of cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates. The average number of fluorescence photons detected per molecule in 4 {mu}m droplets (where emission rate enhancement has been previously demonstrated) is shown to be approximately a factor of 2 larger than the yield measured for larger droplets where emission rate enhancement does not occur. Within some simple approximations, these results suggest that essentially no emission rate inhibition occurs in this system. A mechanism based on spectral diffusion is postulated for the apparent absence of cavity-inhibited emission and is illustrated by Monte Carlo calculations using time-dependent lineshape functions.

  4. Ordered array of Ag semishells on different diameter monolayer polystyrene colloidal crystals: An ultrasensitive and reproducible SERS substrate.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zao; Niu, Gao; Luo, Jiangshan; Kang, Xiaoli; Yao, Weitang; Zhang, Weibin; Yi, Yougen; Yi, Yong; Ye, Xin; Duan, Tao; Tang, Yongjian

    2016-01-01

    Ag semishells (AgSS) ordered arrays for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been prepared by depositing Ag film onto polystyrene colloidal particle (PSCP) monolayer templates array. The diversified activity for SERS activity with the ordered AgSS arrays mainly depends on the PSCP diameter and Ag film thickness. The high SERS sensitivity and reproducibility are proved by the detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) molecules. The prominent enhancements of SERS are mainly from the "V"-shaped or "U"-shaped nanogaps on AgSS, which are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The higher SERS activity, stability and reproducibility make the ordered AgSS a promising choice for practical SERS low concentration detection applications. PMID:27586562

  5. Combining single-molecule manipulation and single-molecule detection.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Juan Carlos; Das, Dibyendu Kumar; Manning, Harris W; Lang, Matthew J

    2014-10-01

    Single molecule force manipulation combined with fluorescence techniques offers much promise in revealing mechanistic details of biomolecular machinery. Here, we review force-fluorescence microscopy, which combines the best features of manipulation and detection techniques. Three of the mainstay manipulation methods (optical traps, magnetic traps and atomic force microscopy) are discussed with respect to milestones in combination developments, in addition to highlight recent contributions to the field. An overview of additional strategies is discussed, including fluorescence based force sensors for force measurement in vivo. Armed with recent exciting demonstrations of this technology, the field of combined single-molecule manipulation and single-molecule detection is poised to provide unprecedented views of molecular machinery. PMID:25255052

  6. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules. PMID:26760444

  7. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  8. Ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection in common fluids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shikuan; Dai, Xianming; Stogin, Birgitt Boschitsch; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Detecting target analytes with high specificity and sensitivity in any fluid is of fundamental importance to analytical science and technology. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has proven to be capable of detecting single molecules with high specificity, but achieving single-molecule sensitivity in any highly diluted solutions remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate a universal platform that allows for the enrichment and delivery of analytes into the SERS-sensitive sites in both aqueous and nonaqueous fluids, and its subsequent quantitative detection of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) down to ∼75 fM level (10−15 mol⋅L−1). Our platform, termed slippery liquid-infused porous surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SLIPSERS), is based on a slippery, omniphobic substrate that enables the complete concentration of analytes and SERS substrates (e.g., Au nanoparticles) within an evaporating liquid droplet. Combining our SLIPSERS platform with a SERS mapping technique, we have systematically quantified the probability, p(c), of detecting R6G molecules at concentrations c ranging from 750 fM (p > 90%) down to 75 aM (10−18 mol⋅L−1) levels (p ≤ 1.4%). The ability to detect analytes down to attomolar level is the lowest limit of detection for any SERS-based detection reported thus far. We have shown that analytes present in liquid, solid, or air phases can be extracted using a suitable liquid solvent and subsequently detected through SLIPSERS. Based on this platform, we have further demonstrated ultrasensitive detection of chemical and biological molecules as well as environmental contaminants within a broad range of common fluids for potential applications related to analytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and national security. PMID:26719413

  9. Ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection in common fluids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shikuan; Dai, Xianming; Stogin, Birgitt Boschitsch; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2016-01-12

    Detecting target analytes with high specificity and sensitivity in any fluid is of fundamental importance to analytical science and technology. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has proven to be capable of detecting single molecules with high specificity, but achieving single-molecule sensitivity in any highly diluted solutions remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate a universal platform that allows for the enrichment and delivery of analytes into the SERS-sensitive sites in both aqueous and nonaqueous fluids, and its subsequent quantitative detection of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) down to ∼75 fM level (10(-15) mol⋅L(-1)). Our platform, termed slippery liquid-infused porous surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SLIPSERS), is based on a slippery, omniphobic substrate that enables the complete concentration of analytes and SERS substrates (e.g., Au nanoparticles) within an evaporating liquid droplet. Combining our SLIPSERS platform with a SERS mapping technique, we have systematically quantified the probability, p(c), of detecting R6G molecules at concentrations c ranging from 750 fM (p > 90%) down to 75 aM (10(-18) mol⋅L(-1)) levels (p ≤ 1.4%). The ability to detect analytes down to attomolar level is the lowest limit of detection for any SERS-based detection reported thus far. We have shown that analytes present in liquid, solid, or air phases can be extracted using a suitable liquid solvent and subsequently detected through SLIPSERS. Based on this platform, we have further demonstrated ultrasensitive detection of chemical and biological molecules as well as environmental contaminants within a broad range of common fluids for potential applications related to analytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and national security. PMID:26719413

  10. Electron Collisions with Large Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKoy, Vincent

    2006-10-01

    In recent years, interest in electron-molecule collisions has increasingly shifted to large molecules. Applications within the semiconductor industry, for example, require electron collision data for molecules such as perfluorocyclobutane, while almost all biological applications involve macromolecules such as DNA. A significant development in recent years has been the realization that slow electrons can directly damage DNA. This discovery has spurred studies of low-energy collisions with the constituents of DNA, including the bases, deoxyribose, the phosphate, and larger moieties assembled from them. In semiconductor applications, a key goal is development of electron cross section sets for plasma chemistry modeling, while biological studies are largely focused on understanding the role of localized resonances in inducing DNA strand breaks. Accurate calculations of low-energy electron collisions with polyatomic molecules are computationally demanding because of the low symmetry and inherent many-electron nature of the problem; moreover, the computational requirements scale rapidly with the size of the molecule. To pursue such studies, we have adapted our computational procedure, known as the Schwinger multichannel method, to run efficiently on highly parallel computers. In this talk, we will present some of our recent results for fluorocarbon etchants used in the semiconductor industry and for constituents of DNA and RNA. In collaboration with Carl Winstead, California Institute of Technology.

  11. Spectroscopic modeling of water molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylo, R. I.; Okhrimenko, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    This research is devoted to the vibrational spectroscopy inverse problem solution that gives a possibility to design a molecule and make conclusions about its geometry. The valence angle finding based on the usage of inverse spectral vibrational spectroscopy problem is a well-known task. 3N-matrix method was chosen to solve the proposed task. The usage of this method permits to make no assumptions about the molecule force field, besides it can be applied to molecules of matter in liquid state. Anharmonicity constants assessment is an important part of the valence angle finding. The reduction to zero vibrations is necessary because used matrix analytical expression were found in the harmonic approach. In order to find the single-valued inverse spectral problem of vibrational spectroscopy solution a shape parameter characterizing "mixing" of ω1 and ω2 vibrations forms must be found. The minimum of such a function Υ called a divergence parameter was found. This function characterizes method's accuracy. The valence angle assessment was reduced to the divergence parameter minimization. The β value concerning divergence parameter minimum was interpreted as the desired valence angle. The proposed method was applied for water molecule in liquid state: β = (88,8 ±1,7)° . The found angle fits the water molecule nearest surrounding tetrahedral model including hydrogen bond curvature in the first approximation.

  12. Single-molecule analysis of ultradilute solutions with guided streams of 1-{mu}m water droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, C.; Barnes, M.D.; Lermer, N.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1999-03-01

    We describe instrumentation for real-time detection of single-molecule fluorescence in guided streams of 1-{mu}m (nominal) water droplets. In this technique, target molecules were confined to droplets whose volumes were comparable with illumination volumes in diffraction-limited fluorescence microscopy and guided to the waist of a cw probe laser with an electrostatic potential. Concentration detection limits for Rhodamine 6G in water were determined to be {approximately}1 fM, roughly 3 orders of magnitude lower than corresponding limits determined recently with diffraction-limited microscopy techniques for a chemical separation of similar dyes. In addition to its utility as a vehicle for probing single molecules, instrumentation for producing and focusing stable streams of 1{endash}2-{mu}m-diameter droplets may have other important analytical applications as well. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  13. Photothermal light harvesting and light-gated molecular release by nanoporous gold disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Greggy M.; Zhao, Fusheng; Zeng, Jianbo; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Photothermal heating has been an effective mechanism for harvesting light energy by plasmonic resonance. Photothermally generated hyperthermia can alter cell behavior, change cell microenvironment, and promote or suppress cell growth. In the past, colloidal nanoparticles such as gold nanospheres, nanoshells, nanorods, and nanocages have been developed for various applications. Here, we show that nanoporous gold disks (NPGDs) with 400 nm diameter, 75 nm thickness, and 13 nm pores exhibit large specific surface area and effective photothermal light harvesting capability. Another potential application is demonstrated by light-gated, multi-step molecular release of pre-adsorbed R6G fluorescent dye on arrayed NPGDs. Through the use of time-resolved temperature mapping, the spatial and temporal characteristics of photothermal heating in NPGD arrays is successfully demonstrated for both aqueous and air ambient environments. By applying a thermodynamic model to our experimental data, we determined the photothermal conversion efficiency at 56% for NPGD arrays. As a potential application, light-gated, multi-stage release of pre-adsorbed R6G dye molecules from NPGD arrays has been demonstrated. The results establish the foundation that NPGDs can be employed for photothermal light harvesting and light-gated molecular release.

  14. Guidance molecules in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nasarre, Patrick; Potiron, Vincent; Drabkin, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Guidance molecules were first described in the nervous system to control axon outgrowth direction. They are also widely expressed outside the nervous system where they control cell migration, tissue development and establishment of the vascular network. In addition, they are involved in cancer development, tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. This review is primarily focused on their functions in lung cancer and their involvement in lung development is also presented. Five guidance molecule families and their corresponding receptors are described, including the semaphorins/neuropilins/plexins, ephrins and Eph receptors, netrin/DCC/UNC5, Slit/Robo and Notch/Delta. In addition, the possibility to target these molecules as a therapeutic approach in cancer is discussed. PMID:20139699

  15. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Boehm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-15

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E-fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  16. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Böhm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-01

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E -fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  17. Orbital molecules in electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Attfield, J. Paul

    2015-04-01

    Orbital molecules are made up of coupled orbital states on several metal ions within an orbitally ordered (and sometimes also charge-ordered) solid such as a transition metal oxide. Spin-singlet dimers are known in many materials, but recent discoveries of more exotic species such as 18-electron heptamers in AlV{sub 2}O{sub 4} and magnetic 3-atom trimerons in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) have shown that orbital molecules constitute a general new class of quantum electronic states in solids.

  18. Dipolar molecules in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Sowiński, Tomasz; Dutta, Omjyoti; Hauke, Philipp; Tagliacozzo, Luca; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2012-03-16

    We study the extended Bose-Hubbard model describing an ultracold gas of dipolar molecules in an optical lattice, taking into account all on-site and nearest-neighbor interactions, including occupation-dependent tunneling and pair tunneling terms. Using exact diagonalization and the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz, we show that these terms can destroy insulating phases and lead to novel quantum phases. These considerable changes of the phase diagram have to be taken into account in upcoming experiments with dipolar molecules. PMID:22540482

  19. Nonadiabatic reaction of energetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Guo, Yuanqing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-12-21

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy that can be readily converted into mechanical energy via decomposition. A number of different ignition processes such as sparks, shocks, heat, or arcs can initiate the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic materials. Experiments have demonstrated the essential role of excited electronic state decomposition in the energy conversion process. A full understanding of the mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials from excited electronic states will require the investigation and analysis of the specific topography of the excited electronic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these molecules. The crossing of multidimensional electronic PESs creates a funnel-like topography, known as conical intersections (CIs). CIs are well established as a controlling factor in the excited electronic state decomposition of polyatomic molecules. This Account summarizes our current understanding of the nonadiabatic unimolecular chemistry of energetic materials through CIs and presents the essential role of CIs in the determination of decomposition pathways of these energetic systems. Because of the involvement of more than one PES, a decomposition process involving CIs is an electronically nonadiabatic mechanism. Based on our experimental observations and theoretical calculations, we find that a nonadiabatic reaction through CIs dominates the initial decomposition process of energetic materials from excited electronic states. Although the nonadiabatic behavior of some polyatomic molecules has been well studied, the role of nonadiabatic reactions in the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic molecules has not been well investigated. We use both nanosecond energy-resolved and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to determine the decomposition mechanism and dynamics of energetic species experimentally. Subsequently, we employ multiconfigurational methodologies (such as, CASSCF

  20. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L.; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π–π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes. PMID:26337293

  1. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L.; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-09-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π-π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes.

  2. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π-π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes. PMID:26337293

  3. Placement and characterization of pairs of luminescent molecules in spatially separated regions of nanostructured thin films.

    PubMed

    Minoofar, Payam N; Hernandez, Raquel; Chia, Shinye; Dunn, Bruce; Zink, Jeffrey I; Franville, Anne-Christine

    2002-12-01

    Methods of making mesostructured sol-gel silicate thin films containing two different molecules deliberately placed in two different spatially separated regions in a one-step, one-pot preparation are developed and demonstrated. When the structure-directing agent is the surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, the structure is 2-D hexagonal with lattice spacings between 31.6 and 42.1 angstroms depending on the dopant molecules and their concentrations. The three general strategies that are used to place the molecules are philicity (like dissolves like), bonding, and bifunctionality. These strategies take advantage of the different chemical and physical properties of the regions of the films. These regions are the inorganic silicate framework, the hydrophobic organic interior of the micelles, and the ionic interface between them. Luminescent molecules that possess the physical and chemical properties appropriate for the desired strategies are chosen. Lanthanide and ruthenium complexes with condensable trialkoxysilane groups are incorporated into the silicate framework. 1,4-Naphthoquinone, pyrene, rhodamine 6G and coumarin 540A, and lanthanides with no condensable trialkoxysilanes occupy the hydrophobic core of micelles by virtue of their hydrophobicity. The locations of the molecules are determined by luminescence spectroscopy and by luminescence lifetime measurements. In all cases, the long-range order templated into the thin film is verified by X-ray diffraction. The simultaneous placement of two molecules in the structured film and the maintenance of long-range order require a delicate balance among film preparation methodology, design of the molecules to be incorporated in specific regions, and concentrations of all of the species. PMID:12452713

  4. Monitoring Molecules: Insights and Progress

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In August, 2014, neuroscientists and physical scientists gathered together on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles to discuss how to monitor molecules in neuroscience. This field has seen significant growth since its inception in the 1970s. Here, the advances in this field are documented, including its advance into understanding the actions that specific neurotransmitters mediate during behavior. PMID:25514501

  5. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  6. Nanodevices for Single Molecule Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craighead, H. G.; Stavis, S. M.; Samiee, K. T.

    During the last two decades, biotechnology research has resulted in progress in fields as diverse as the life sciences, agriculture and healthcare. While existing technology enables the analysis of a variety of biological systems, new tools are needed for increasing the efficiency of current methods, and for developing new ones altogether. Interest has grown in single molecule analysis for these reasons.

  7. Dialkylresorcinols as bacterial signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Brameyer, Sophie; Kresovic, Darko; Bode, Helge B.; Heermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that bacteria communicate via small diffusible molecules, a process termed quorum sensing. The best understood quorum sensing systems are those that use acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) for communication. The prototype of those systems consists of a LuxI-like AHL synthase and a cognate LuxR receptor that detects the signal. However, many proteobacteria possess LuxR receptors, yet lack any LuxI-type synthase, and thus these receptors are referred to as LuxR orphans or solos. In addition to the well-known AHLs, little is known about the signaling molecules that are sensed by LuxR solos. Here, we describe a novel cell–cell communication system in the insect and human pathogen Photorhabdus asymbiotica. We identified the LuxR homolog PauR to sense dialkylresorcinols (DARs) and cyclohexanediones (CHDs) instead of AHLs as signals. The DarABC synthesis pathway produces the molecules, and the entire system emerged as important for virulence. Moreover, we have analyzed more than 90 different Photorhabdus strains by HPLC/MS and showed that these DARs and CHDs are specific to the human pathogen P. asymbiotica. On the basis of genomic evidence, 116 other bacterial species are putative DAR producers, among them many human pathogens. Therefore, we discuss the possibility of DARs as novel and widespread bacterial signaling molecules and show that bacterial cell–cell communication goes far beyond AHL signaling in nature. PMID:25550519

  8. Engineering crystals of dendritic molecules.

    PubMed

    Lukin, Oleg; Schubert, Dirk; Müller, Claudia M; Schweizer, W Bernd; Gramlich, Volker; Schneider, Julian; Dolgonos, Grygoriy; Shivanyuk, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    A detailed single-crystal X-ray study of conformationally flexible sulfonimide-based dendritic molecules with systematically varied molecular architectures was undertaken. Thirteen crystal structures reported in this work include 9 structures of the second-generation dendritic sulfonimides decorated with different aryl groups, 2 compounds bearing branches of both second and first generation, and 2 representatives of the first generation. Analysis of the packing patterns of 9 compounds bearing second-generation branches shows that despite their lack of strong directive functional groups there is a repeatedly reproduced intermolecular interaction mode consisting in an anchor-type packing of complementary second-generation branches of neighbouring molecules. The observed interaction tolerates a wide range of substituents in meta- and para-positions of the peripheral arylsulfonyl rings. Quantum chemical calculations of the molecule-molecule interaction energies agree at the qualitative level with the packing preferences found in the crystalline state. The calculations can therefore be used as a tool to rationalize and predict molecular structures with commensurate and non-commensurate branches for programming of different packing modes in crystal. PMID:19549870

  9. Engineering crystals of dendritic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lukin, Oleg; Schubert, Dirk; Müller, Claudia M.; Schweizer, W. Bernd; Gramlich, Volker; Schneider, Julian; Dolgonos, Grygoriy; Shivanyuk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    A detailed single-crystal X-ray study of conformationally flexible sulfonimide-based dendritic molecules with systematically varied molecular architectures was undertaken. Thirteen crystal structures reported in this work include 9 structures of the second-generation dendritic sulfonimides decorated with different aryl groups, 2 compounds bearing branches of both second and first generation, and 2 representatives of the first generation. Analysis of the packing patterns of 9 compounds bearing second-generation branches shows that despite their lack of strong directive functional groups there is a repeatedly reproduced intermolecular interaction mode consisting in an anchor-type packing of complementary second-generation branches of neighbouring molecules. The observed interaction tolerates a wide range of substituents in meta- and para-positions of the peripheral arylsulfonyl rings. Quantum chemical calculations of the molecule-molecule interaction energies agree at the qualitative level with the packing preferences found in the crystalline state. The calculations can therefore be used as a tool to rationalize and predict molecular structures with commensurate and non-commensurate branches for programming of different packing modes in crystal. PMID:19549870

  10. Photophysics of rhodamine dimers in Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorimaa, E.; Ikonen, M.; Lemmetyinen, H.

    1994-11-01

    Temperature dependent dimerization processes of octadecylrhodamine B (RB) and octadecylrhodamine 6G (R6G) in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods. The geometry of the dimers in LB films is equal for both dyes, but different to the geometry of the dimers found in solutions. The sandwich-type dimers with lifetimes of 710 ps for RB and 620 ps for R6G have their fluorescence maxima at 635 and 620 nm for RB and R6G, respectively. The dimer with an oblique geometry has its fluorescence maximum at 675 nm for both dyes, and its fluorescence lifetime is 4.6 ns for RB and 4.9 ns for R6G. The proportion of fluorescent dimers increases with decreasing temperature, when the nonfluorescent H dimers reorganize to fluorescent J dimers. The activation energy for this temperature induced process is 1.4 and 2.6 kJ mol -1 for RB and R6G, respectively.

  11. Photophysics of rhodamine dimers in Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorimaa, E.; Ikonen, M.; Lemmetyinen, H.

    1994-11-01

    Temperature dependent dimerization processes of octadecylrhodamine B (RB) and octadecylrhodamine 6G (R6G) in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods. The geometry of the dimers in LB films is equal for both dyes, but different to the geometry of the dimers found in solutions. The sandwich-type dimers with lifetimes of 710 ps for RB and 620 ps for R6G have their fluorescence maxima at 635 and 620 nm for RB and R6G, respectively. The dimer with an oblique geometry has its fluorescence maximum at 675 nm for both dyes, and its fluorescence lifetime is 4.6 ns for RB and 4.9 ns for R6G. The proportion of fluorescent dimers increases with decreasing temperature, when the nonfluorescent H dimers reorganize to fluorescent J dimers. The activation energy for this temperature induced process is 1.4 and 2.6 kJ/mol for RB and R6G, respectively.

  12. Investigation of Changes in the Microscopic Structure of Anionic Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-Acrylic acid) Microgels in the Presence of Cationic Organic Dyes toward Precisely Controlled Uptake/Release of Low-Molecular-Weight Chemical Compound.

    PubMed

    Kureha, Takuma; Shibamoto, Takahisa; Matsui, Shusuke; Sato, Takaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke

    2016-05-10

    Changes in a microscopic structure of an anionic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) microgel were investigated using small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS). The scattering profiles of the microgels were analyzed in a wide scattering vector (q) range of 0.07 ≤ q/nm(-1) ≤ 20. In particular, the microscopic structure of the microgel in the presence of a cationic dye rhodamine 6G (R6G) was characterized in terms of its correlation length (ξ), which represents the length scale of the spatial correlation of the network density fluctuations, and characteristic distance (d*), which originated from the local packing of isopropyl groups of two neighboring chains. In the presence of cationic R6G, ξ exhibited a divergent-like behavior, which was not seen in the absence of R6G, and d* was decreased with decreasing the volume of the microgel upon increasing temperature. At the same time, the amount of R6G adsorbed per unit mass of the microgel increased upon heating. These results suggested that a coil-to-globule transition of the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) chains in the present anionic microgel occurred because of efficiently screened, thus, short ranged electrostatic repulsion between the charged groups, and hydrophobic interaction between the isopropyl groups in the presence of cationic R6G. The combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the cationic dye and the microgel affected the separation and volume transition behavior of the microgel. PMID:27101468

  13. Contribution of oligomer/carbon dots hybrid semiconductor nanoribbon to surface-enhanced Raman scattering property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guiyang; Hu, Lin; Zhu, Kerong; Yan, Manqing; Liu, Jian; Yang, Jiaxiang; Bi, Hong

    2016-02-01

    The hybrid Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots nanobelts (NBs) have been prepared by decorating Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on surface of the ultra-long, semiconducting (PS-PSS)/C-dots nanoribbons (NRs) via an electroless plating method. The as-prepared Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots NB has been demonstrated to be an excellent substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with a detection limit of 10-14 M and an enhancement factor of 3.35 × 108 while using rhodamine 6G as probe molecules. Moreover, we have investigated the application of Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots NBs as SERS substrate for detection of coumarins. Further, the Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots NB could be used as a sacrificial template to form a novel kind of hollow porous Ag nanotubes (NTs) by simply removing the inner NR in tetrahydrofuran. However, the obtained Ag NTs show a weaker SERS effect compared to that of the Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots NBs, which indicates that the inner organic/C-dots NR plays an essential role in SERS property of the Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots NBs. Here the organic (PS-PSS)/C-dots NR not only acts as a dielectric support for Ag NPs to reduce the surface plasmon damping at the Ag-NR interface due to the high electrical conductivity but also their large surface area are favorable for creating more "hot-spots". In addition, the embedded sp2-hybridized C-dots in NR can adsorb more aromatic R6G molecules via π-π interaction, which also drives R6G molecules approaching to the "hot-spots", thus enhancing the SERS signals. Based on our results, it is believed that the employment of semiconducting organic (PS-PSS)/C-dots ribbon-like structures to fabricate sensitive SERS substrates is an interesting new approach.

  14. Cold collisions between boson or fermion molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    We theoretically investigate collisions between electrostatically trapped cold polar molecules and compare boson and fermion isotopes. Evaporative cooling seems possible for fermion molecules as the ratio of the collision loss cross section to the elastic collision cross section (R) gets smaller as the molecular temperature T lowers. With boson molecules, R gets larger as T lowers, which makes evaporative cooling difficult. The elastic collision cross section between fermion molecules can be larger than that for boson molecules with certain conditions.

  15. Dissociation energy of molecules in dense gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A general approach is presented for calculating the reduction of the dissociation energy of diatomic molecules immersed in a dense (n = less than 10 exp 22/cu cm) gas of molecules and atoms. The dissociation energy of a molecule in a dense gas differs from that of the molecule in vacuum because the intermolecular forces change the intramolecular dynamics of the molecule, and, consequently, the energy of the molecular bond.

  16. X(3872): charmonium or molecule?

    SciTech Connect

    Nefediev, A. V.

    2011-05-23

    A theoretical analysis of the recent experimental data from the Belle and BABAR Collaborations on the charmonium state X(3872) is performed. The analysis takes into account the proximity of an S-wave mesonic threshold and a possible presence of molecule component in the resonance wave function, finite width of the molecule constituents, and a possible interference in the final state. In particular, a model-independent approach is formulated, based on the Flatte parametrisation of near-threshold observables as well as on the Weinberg analysis of the nature of weakly bound systems generalised to the case of unstable constituents. Conclusion is made that the X(3872) is generated dynamically by a strong coupling of the bare {chi}{sub c1} charmonium to the DD-bar* hadronic channel, with a large admixture of the DD-bar* molecular component.

  17. Electrochemical detection of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Fan, F R; Bard, A J

    1995-02-10

    The electrochemical behavior of a single molecule can be observed by trapping a small volume of a dilute solution of the electroactive species between an ultramicroelectrode tip with a diameter of approximately 15 nanometers and a conductive substrate. A scanning electrochemical microscope was used to adjust the tip-substrate distance ( approximately 10 nanometers), and the oxidation of [(trimethylammonio)methyl] ferrocene (Cp(2)FeTMA(+)) to Cp(2)FeTMA(2+) was carried out. The response was stochastic, and anodic current peaks were observed as the molecule moved into and out of the electrode-substrate gap. Similar experiments were performed with a solution containing two redox species, ferrocene carboxylate (Cp(2)FeCOO(-)) and Os(bpy)(3)(2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridyl). PMID:17813918

  18. Bioactive molecules from sea hares.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, H; Sakai, R; Jimbo, M

    2006-01-01

    Sea hares, belonging to the order Opisthobranchia, subclass Gastropoda, are mollusks that have attracted many researchers who are interested in the chemical defense mechanisms of these soft and "shell-less" snails. Numbers of small molecules of dietary origin have been isolated from sea hares and some have ecologically relevant activities, such as fish deterrent activity or toxicity. Recently, however, greater attention has been paid to biomedically interesting sea hare isolates such as dolastatins, a series of antitumor peptide/macrolides isolated from Dolabella auricularia. Another series of bioactive peptide/macrolides, as represented by aplyronines, have been isolated from sea hares in Japanese waters. Although earlier studies indicated the potent antitumor activity of aplyronines, their clinical development has never been conducted because of the minute amount of compound available from the natural source. Recent synthetic studies, however, have made it possible to prepare these compounds and analogs for a structure-activity relationship study, and started to uncover their unique action mechanism towards their putative targets, microfilaments. Here, recent findings of small antitumor molecules isolated from Japanese sea hares are reviewed. Sea hares are also known to produce cytotoxic and antimicrobial proteins. In contrast to the small molecules of dietary origin, proteins are the genetic products of sea hares and they are likely to have some primary physiological functions in addition to ecological roles in the sea hare. Based on the biochemical properties and phylogenetic analysis of these proteins, we propose that they belong to one family of molecule, the "Aplysianin A family," although their molecular weights are apparently divided into two groups. Interestingly, the active principles in Aplysia species and Dolabella auricularia were shown to be L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), a flavin enzyme that oxidizes an alpha-amino group of the substrate with

  19. Intensification of surface enhanced Raman scattering of thiol-containing molecules using Ag@Au core@shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prerna; Thuy, Nguyen T. B.; Aoki, Yoshiya; Mott, Derrick; Maenosono, Shinya

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we study the relationship between nanoparticles' structure/composition and the chemical nature of the molecules to be identified in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. Three types of nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized, including Ag, Au, and silver coated by gold (Ag@Au), in order to study the resulting enhancement effects. When a rhodamine 6G dye molecule was used to assemble the NPs, it was found that Ag NPs exhibited the highest enhancement activity. However, when a thiol containing 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-thiol molecule was used to assemble the NPs, it was found that the Ag@Au NPs exhibited high Raman activity as well as the Ag NPs. The results give insight into how the chemical properties of the molecules to be analyzed play an important role in the SERS detection. An additional parameter of the analysis reveals the relative stability of the three types of NP probes synthesized with regard to oxidation in the presence of different mediating molecules and varying salt concentrations. The results are of interest in designing and employing NP probes to detect biological molecules using colorimetric and SERS based approaches.

  20. Simple molecules as complex systems.

    PubMed

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Arendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H2(16)O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an "ultra-small-world" property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra. PMID:24722221

  1. Molecules in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, S.; Shull, J.M.

    1984-05-15

    We present calculations of the formation of astrophysically interesting molecules (H/sub 2/, HD, LiH, and HeH/sup +/) by gas-phase reactions during the postrecombination epoch (redshifts z = 300-30). In standard Friedmann cosmological models, H/sub 2//Hroughly-equal10/sup -6/, HD/H/sub 2/roughly-equal10/sup -4.5/, and LiH/H/sub 2/roughly-equal10/sup -6.5/. These molecules may dominate the cooling and trigger the collapse of primordial gas clouds. The dipole rotational transitions of HD and LiH are particularly important at high density and low temperature. Additional molecules form during spherical collapse of these clouds, their rotational cooling keeps the gas temperature between 400 and 1500 K over 12 decades of density increase until the H/sub 2/ lines become optically thick. The existence of molecular coolants at high redshift has significant implications for the first generation of stars and for thermal instabilities in intergalactic matter.

  2. Simple molecules as complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Árendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G.

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H216O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an “ultra-small-world” property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra. PMID:24722221

  3. A single-molecule diode

    PubMed Central

    Elbing, Mark; Ochs, Rolf; Koentopp, Max; Fischer, Matthias; von Hänisch, Carsten; Weigend, Florian; Evers, Ferdinand; Weber, Heiko B.; Mayor, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a molecular rod that consists of two weakly coupled electronic π -systems with mutually shifted energy levels. The asymmetry thus implied manifests itself in a current–voltage characteristic with pronounced dependence on the sign of the bias voltage, which makes the molecule a prototype for a molecular diode. The individual molecules were immobilized by sulfur–gold bonds between both electrodes of a mechanically controlled break junction, and their electronic transport properties have been investigated. The results indeed show diode-like current–voltage characteristics. In contrast to that, control experiments with symmetric molecular rods consisting of two identical π -systems did not show significant asymmetries in the transport properties. To investigate the underlying transport mechanism, phenomenological arguments are combined with calculations based on density functional theory. The theoretical analysis suggests that the bias dependence of the polarizability of the molecule feeds back into the current leading to an asymmetric shape of the current–voltage characteristics, similar to the phenomena in a semiconductor diode. PMID:15956208

  4. Functional molecules in electronic circuits.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Nicolas; Grunder, Sergio; Mayor, Marcel

    2007-08-01

    Molecular electronics is a fascinating field of research contributing to both fundamental science and future technological achievements. A promising starting point for molecular devices is to mimic existing electronic functions to investigate the potential of molecules to enrich and complement existing electronic strategies. Molecules designed and synthesized to be integrated into electronic circuits and to perform an electronic function are presented in this article. The focus is set in particular on rectification and switching based on molecular devices, since the control over these two parameters enables the assembly of memory units, likely the most interesting and economic application of molecular based electronics. Both historical and contemporary solutions to molecular rectification are discussed, although not exhaustively. Several examples of integrated molecular switches that respond to light are presented. Molecular switches responding to an electrochemical signal are also discussed. Finally, supramolecular and molecular systems with intuitive application potential as memory units due to their hysteretic switching are highlighted. Although a particularly attractive feature of molecular electronics is its close cooperation with neighbouring disciplines, this article is written from the point of view of a chemist. Although the focus here is largely on molecular considerations, innovative contributions from physics, electro engineering, nanotechnology and other scientific disciplines are equally important. However, the ability of the chemist to correlate function with structure, to design and to provide tailor-made functional molecules is central to molecular electronics. PMID:17637951

  5. Hyper-Rayleigh scattering and hyper-Raman scattering of dye-adsorbed silver nanoparticles induced by a focused continuous-wave near-infrared laser

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Tamitake; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Ihama, Takashi; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2006-02-20

    We report that hyper-Rayleigh scattering, surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering, and two-photon excited luminescence occur intermittently by focusing a continuous-wave near-infrared (cw-NIR) laser into a colloidal silver solution including rhodamine 6G (R6G) and sodium chloride (NaCl). On the other hand, continuous hyper-Rayleigh scattering is observed from colloidal silver free from R6G and NaCl, demonstrating that hyper-Raman scattering and two-photon excited luminescence are attributed to R6G and their intermittent features are dependent on the colloidal dispersion. These results suggest that the cw-NIR laser has three roles; the source of the nonlinear response, optical trapping of nanoparticles, and making nanoparticle aggregates possessing the high activity for the nonlinear response.

  6. Optical techniques for nanoscale probing and chemical detection in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pristinski, Denis

    substrates from aqueous solution. We have shown that the coverage density of Ag nanoparticles on the glass substrates correlates with the amount of adsorbed PAH. The SERS-active substrates were robust and stable in 0.5 M NaCl solutions, as well in extreme acidic and basic conditions. Rhodamine 6G dye (R6G) was chosen as a model molecule for SERS spectra acquisition. The glass substrates with immobilized non-aggregated Ag nanoparticles exhibited SERS enhancement and provided in situ detection sensitivity of R6G at 5 ppt level, with estimated surface coverage of 2 to 4 R6G molecules per silver particle. The results will improve the design of SERS-active photonic crystal fibers for highly sensitive chemical and biological detection.

  7. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  8. L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE SIGNALING IS INHIBITED BY ETHANOL IN VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Littner, Yoav; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is an immense public health problem. In vitro studies support the hypothesis that L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1) is a target for ethanol developmental neurotoxicity. L1 is critical for the development of the central nervous system. It functions through signal transduction leading to phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of tyrosines on its cytoplasmic domain. The function of L1 is also dependent on trafficking through lipid rafts. Our hypothesis is that L1 is a target for ethanol neurotoxicity in vivo. Our objective is to demonstrate changes in L1 phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and lipid raft association in vivo. Methods Rat pups on postnatal day 6 are administered 4.5, 5.25 and 6 g/kg of ethanol divided into 2 doses 2 hours apart, then sacrificed. Cerebella are rapidly frozen for assay. Blood is analyzed for blood ethanol concentration. L1 tyrosine phosphorylation is determined by immunoprecipitation and dephosphorylation of tyrosine 1176 determined by immunoblot. Lipid rafts are isolated by sucrose density gradient and the distribution of L1 in lipid rafts is determined. Results Ethanol at all doses reduced the relative amount of Y1176 dephosphorylation as well as the relative amount of L1 phosphorylated on other tyrosines. The proportion of L1 present in lipid rafts is significantly increased in pups who received 6 g/kg ethanol compared to intubated controls. Conclusions L1 is a target for ethanol developmental neurotoxicity in vivo. PMID:23050935

  9. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin–orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin–spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born–Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  10. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  11. Nanoelectronics of a DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Freire, V. N.; Lyra, M. L.; Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the nanoelectronic properties of a double-strand quasiperiodic DNA molecule, modeled by a tight-binding effective Hamiltonian, which includes contributions from the nucleobasis system as well as the sugar-phosphate backbone. Our theoretical approach makes use of Dyson's equation together with a transfer-matrix treatment, to investigate the electronic density of states, the electronic transmissivity, and the current-voltage characteristic curves of sequences of a DNA finite segment.We compared the electronic transport found for the quasiperiodic structure to those using a sequence of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22.

  12. Comparative Fluorescence Resonance Energy-Transfer Study in Pluronic Triblock Copolymer Micelle and Niosome Composed of Biological Component Cholesterol: An Investigation of Effect of Cholesterol and Sucrose on the FRET Parameters.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arpita; Kundu, Niloy; Banik, Debasis; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-01-14

    The formation of pluronic triblock copolymer (F127)-cholesterol-based niosome and its interaction with sugar (sucrose) molecules have been investigated. The morphology of F127-cholesterol -based niosome in the presence of sucrose has been successfully demonstrated using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. The DLS profiles and TEM images clearly suggest that the size of the niosome aggregates increases significantly in the presence of sucrose. In addition to structural characterization, a detailed comparative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study has been carried out in these F127-containing aggregates, involving coumarin 153 (C153) as donor (D) and rhodamine 6G (R6G) as an acceptor (A) to monitor the dynamic heterogeneity of the systems. Besides, time-resolved anisotropy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements have been carried out to monitor the rotational and lateral diffusion motion in these F127-cholesterol-based aggregates using C153 and R6G, respectively. During the course of FRET study, we have observed multiple time constants of FRET inside the F127-cholesterol-based niosomes in contrast with the F127 micelle. This corresponds to the presence of more than one preferential donor-acceptor (D-A) distance in niosomes than in F127 micelle. FRET has also been successfully used to probe the effect of sucrose on the morphology of F127-cholesterol-based niosome. In the presence of sucrose, the time constant of FRET further increases as the D-A distances increase in sucrose-decorated niosome. Finally, the excitation-wavelength-dependent FRET studies have indicated that as the excitation of donor molecules varies from 408 to 440 nm the contribution of the faster rise component of the acceptor enhances considerably, which clearly establishes the dynamics heterogeneity of both systems. Our findings also indicate that FRET is completely intravesicular in nature in these block copolymer

  13. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  14. Spin squeezing a cold molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we present a concrete proposal for spin squeezing the cold ground-state polar paramagnetic molecule OH, a system currently under fine control in the laboratory. In contrast to existing work, we consider a single, noninteracting molecule with angular momentum greater than 1 /2 . Starting from an experimentally relevant effective Hamiltonian, we identify an adiabatic regime where different combinations of static electric and magnetic fields can be used to realize the single-axis twisting Hamiltonian of Kitagawa and Ueda [M. Kitagawa and M. Ueda, Phys. Rev. A 47, 5138 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevA.47.5138], the uniform field Hamiltonian proposed by Law et al. [C. K. Law, H. T. Ng, and P. T. Leung, Phys. Rev. A 63, 055601 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevA.63.055601], and a model of field propagation in a Kerr medium considered by Agarwal and Puri [G. S. Agarwal and R. R. Puri, Phys. Rev. A 39, 2969 (1989), 10.1103/PhysRevA.39.2969]. We then consider the situation in which nonadiabatic effects are quite large and show that the effective Hamiltonian supports spin squeezing even in this case. We provide analytical expressions as well as numerical calculations, including optimization of field strengths and accounting for the effects of field misalignment. Our results have consequences for applications such as precision spectroscopy, techniques such as magnetometry, and stereochemical effects such as the orientation-to-alignment transition.

  15. Electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the principal computational approaches and their accuracy for the study of electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules. We include a number of examples from our work that illustrate the range of application. We show how full configuration interaction benchmark calculations were instrumental in improving the understanding of the computational requirements for obtaining accurate results for diatomic spectroscopy. With this understanding it is now possible to compute radiative lifetimes accurate to within 10% for systems involving first- and second-row atoms. We consider the determination of the infrared vibrational transition probabilities for the ground states of SiO and NO, based on a globally accurate dipole moment function. We show how we were able to assign the a(sup "5)II state of CO as the upper state in the recently observed emission bands of CO in an Ar matrix. We next discuss the assignment of the photoelectron detachment spectra of NO and the alkali oxide negative ions. We then present several examples illustrating the state-of-the-art in determining radiative lifetimes for valence-valence and valence-Rydberg transitions. We next compare the molecular spectroscopy of the valence isoelectronic B2, Al2, and AlB molecules. The final examples consider systems involving transition metal atoms, which illustrate the difficulty in describing states with different numbers of d electrons.

  16. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gencaga, Deniz; Knuth, Kevin H.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2008-11-06

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  17. Extending single molecule fluorescence observation time by amplitude-modulated excitation

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chang, Wei-Shun; Cooper, David; Mansur, Andrea P; Landes, Christy F

    2014-01-01

    We present a hardware-based method that can improve single molecule fluorophore observation time by up to 1500% and super-localization by 47% for the experimental conditions used. The excitation was modulated using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) synchronized to the data acquisition and inherent data conversion time of the detector. The observation time and precision in super-localization of four commonly used fluorophores were compared under modulated and traditional continuous excitation, including direct total internal reflectance excitation of Alexa 555 and Cy3, non-radiative Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) excited Cy5, and direct epi-fluorescence wide field excitation of Rhodamine 6G. The proposed amplitude-modulated excitation does not perturb the chemical makeup of the system or sacrifice signal and is compatible with multiple types of fluorophores. Amplitude-modulated excitation has practical applications for any fluorescent study utilizing an instrumental setup with time-delayed detectors. PMID:24587894

  18. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  19. Ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin

    2015-08-17

    The aim of this project was to record time-resolved electron diffraction patterns of aligned molecules and to reconstruct the 3D molecular structure. The molecules are aligned non-adiabatically using a femtosecond laser pulse. A femtosecond electron pulse then records a diffraction pattern while the molecules are aligned. The diffraction patterns are then be processed to obtain the molecular structure.

  20. Mechanical studies on single molecules: general considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Elements of molecular biology * Advantages and drawbacks of single molecule studies * Order of magnitude of the relevant parameters at the single molecule level * Single molecule manipulation techniques * Comparison of the different techniques * DNA mechanical properties * Conclusion * Bibliography

  1. House dust mite extracts activate cultured human dermal endothelial cells to express adhesion molecules and secrete cytokines.

    PubMed

    Arlian, Larry G; Elder, B Laurel; Morgan, Marjorie S

    2009-05-01

    The human skin contacts molecules from house dust mites that are ubiquitous in many environments. These mite-derived molecules may penetrate the skin epidermis and dermis and contact microvascular endothelial cells and influence their function. The purpose of this study was to determine the response of normal human dermal microvascular endothelial cells to extracts of the dust mites, Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and Euroglyphus maynei with and without endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide). Endothelial cells were stimulated with mite extracts and the expression of surface molecules and the secretion of cytokines were measured in the absence and presence of polymyxin B to bind endotoxin. All three mite extracts stimulated endothelial cells to express intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and E-selectin and to secrete interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), and granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Euroglyphus maynei-induced expression of all the cell surface molecules was not inhibited when the endotoxin activity in the mite extract was inhibited. In contrast, endothelial cells challenged with D. farinae or D. pteronyssinus extract depleted of endotoxin activity expressed only constitutive levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. D. farinae and E. maynei extracts depleted of endotoxin activity still induced secretion of IL-8 and MCP-1 but at reduced levels. Only constitutive amounts of IL-6, G-CSF, and GM-CSF were secreted in response to any of the endotoxin-depleted mite extracts. Extracts of D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and E. maynei contain both endotoxins and other molecules that can stimulate expression of cell adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors and the secretion of cytokines by normal human microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:19496432

  2. Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya

    2010-04-02

    The fluorescence intensity of single molecules can change dramatically even under constant laser excitation. The phenomenon is frequently called "blinking" and involves molecules switching between high and low intensity states.[1-3] In additional to spontaneous blinking, the fluorescence of some special fluorophores, such as cyanine dyes and photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, can be switched on and off by choice using a second laser. Recent single-molecule spectroscopy investigations have shed light on mechanisms of single molecule blinking and photoswitching. This ability to controllably switch single molecules led to the invention of a novel fluorescence microscopy with nanometer spatial resolution well beyond the diffraction limit.

  3. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  4. Photoluminescence of a Plasmonic Molecule.

    PubMed

    Huang, Da; Byers, Chad P; Wang, Lin-Yung; Hoggard, Anneli; Hoener, Ben; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Chen, Sishan; Chang, Wei-Shun; Landes, Christy F; Link, Stephan

    2015-07-28

    Photoluminescent Au nanoparticles are appealing for biosensing and bioimaging applications because of their non-photobleaching and non-photoblinking emission. The mechanism of one-photon photoluminescence from plasmonic nanostructures is still heavily debated though. Here, we report on the one-photon photoluminescence of strongly coupled 50 nm Au nanosphere dimers, the simplest plasmonic molecule. We observe emission from coupled plasmonic modes as revealed by single-particle photoluminescence spectra in comparison to correlated dark-field scattering spectroscopy. The photoluminescence quantum yield of the dimers is found to be surprisingly similar to the constituent monomers, suggesting that the increased local electric field of the dimer plays a minor role, in contradiction to several proposed mechanisms. Aided by electromagnetic simulations of scattering and absorption spectra, we conclude that our data are instead consistent with a multistep mechanism that involves the emission due to radiative decay of surface plasmons generated from excited electron-hole pairs following interband absorption. PMID:26165983

  5. Diamond Molecules Found in Petroleum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, R. M. K.; Dahl, J. E. P.; Liu, S. G.; Olmstead, M. M.; Buerki, P. R.; Gat, R.

    We recently reported [1,2] the discovery and isolation of new members of the hydrogen-terminated diamond series, ˜1 to ˜2 nm sized higher diamondoids from petroleum. Crystallographic studies [1,2] revealed a wealth of diamond molecules that are nanometer-sized rods, helices, discs, pyramids, etc. Highly rigid, well-defined, readily derivatizable structures make them valuable molecular building blocks for nanotechnology. We now produce certain higher diamondoids in gram quantities. Although more stable than graphite particles of comparable size, higher diamondoids are extraordinarily difficult to synthesize. Attempts to synthesize them were abandoned in the 1980's. We examined extracts of diamond-containing materials synthesized by CO2 laser-induced gas-phase synthesis [3] and commercial CVD in an attempt to detect diamantane to undecamantane. However, high-sensitivity GCMS detected no diamondoids in these materials.

  6. Nonadiabatic calculations on hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komasa, Jacek; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Since its infancy quantum mechanics has treated hydrogen molecule as a test bed. Contemporary spectroscopy is able to supply the dissociation energy (D0) of H2 with the accuracy of 3 . 7 .10-4cm-1 , while current theoretical predictions are 10-3cm-1 in error. Both the uncertainties are already smaller than the quantum electrodynamic (QED) effects contributing to D0, which poses a particular challenge to theoreticians. Undoubtedly, in order to increase the predictive power of theory one has to not only account for the multitude of the tiny relativistic and QED effects but, especially, significantly increase precision of the largest component of D0--the nonrelativistic contribution. We approach the problem of solving the Schroedinger equation, equipped with new methodology, with the target precision of D0 set at the level of 10-7cm-1 .

  7. New molecules for hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Skutella, T; Nitsch, R

    2001-02-01

    Pathfinding by developing axons towards their proper targets is an essential step in establishing appropriate neuronal connections. Recent work involving cell culture assays and molecular biology strategies, including knockout animals, strongly indicates that a complex network of guidance signals regulates the formation of hippocampal connections during development. Outgrowing axons are routed towards the hippocampal formation by specific expression of long-range cues, which include secreted class 3 semaphorins, netrin 1 and Slit proteins. Local membrane- or substrate-anchored molecules, such as ligands of the ephrin A subclass, provide layer-specific positional information. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie axonal guidance during hippocampal development might be of importance in making therapeutic use of sprouting fibers, which are produced following the loss of afferents in CNS lesion. PMID:11164941

  8. Energy transfer mechanisms between molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    Reliable rate coefficients for energy transfer and relaxation phenomena are needed in order to do the theoretical modeling which is necessary for accomplishing the following objectives: understanding and justifying proposed laser systems, determining limitations, identifying control parameters, and scaling to space-power requirements. Modeling also establishes the criteria to be followed for lasant selection. Lack of knowledge of rate coefficients is invariably the biggest obstacle to successful modeling. Existing theoretical methods are discussed, sources of error are identified, and transfer laser criteria suggested by the theory are listed. The emphasis is on vibrational-vibrational (V-V) energy transfer caused by both short range and long range interactions between molecules. Special attention is given to the importance of near-resonant collisional and dipole-dipole transfer. A technique is proposed for significantly improving the theoretical predictions of rate coefficients.

  9. Electrorheological crystallization of proteins and other molecules

    DOEpatents

    Craig, G.D.; Rupp, B.

    1996-06-11

    An electrorheological crystalline mass of a molecule is formed by dispersing the molecule in a dispersion fluid and subjecting the molecule dispersion to a uniform electrical field for a period of time during which time an electrorheological crystalline mass is formed. Molecules that may be used to form an electrorheological crystalline mass include any organic or inorganic molecule which has a permanent dipole and/or which is capable of becoming an induced dipole in the presence of an electric field. The molecules used to form the electrorheological crystalline mass are preferably macromolecules, such as biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipoproteins and viruses. Molecules are crystallized by a method in which an electric field is maintained for a period of time after the electrorheological crystalline mass has formed during which time at least some of the molecules making up the electrorheological crystalline mass form a crystal lattice. The three dimensional structure of a molecule is determined by a method in which an electrorheological crystalline mass of the molecule is formed, an X-ray diffraction pattern of the electrorheological crystalline mass is obtained and the three dimensional structure of the molecule is calculated from the X-ray diffraction pattern. 4 figs.

  10. Electrorheological crystallization of proteins and other molecules

    DOEpatents

    Craig, George D.; Rupp, Bernhard

    1996-01-01

    An electrorheological crystalline mass of a molecule is formed by dispersing the molecule in a dispersion fluid and subjecting the molecule dispersion to a uniform electrical field for a period of time during which time an electrorheological crystalline mass is formed. Molecules that may be used to form an electrorheological crystalline mass include any organic or inorganic molecule which has a permanent dipole and/or which is capable of becoming an induced dipole in the presence of an electric field. The molecules used to form the electrorheological crystalline mass are preferably macromolecules, such as biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipoproteins and viruses. Molecules are crystallized by a method in which an electric field is maintained for a period of time after the electrorheological crystalline mass has formed during which time at least some of the molecules making up the electrorheological crystalline mass form a crystal lattice. The three dimensional structure of a molecule is determined by a method in which an electrorheological crystalline mass of the molecule is formed, an x-ray diffraction pattern of the electrorheological crystalline mass is obtained and the three dimensional structure of the molecule is calculated from the x-ray diffraction pattern.

  11. Deformation of DNA molecules by hydrodynamic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Pak Kin; Lee, Yi-Kuen; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2003-12-01

    The motion of a DNA molecule in a solvent flow reflects the deformation of a nano/microscale flexible mass spring structure by the forces exerted by the fluid molecules. The dynamics of individual molecules can reveal both fundamental properties of the DNA and basic understanding of the complex rheological properties of long-chain molecules. In this study, we report the dynamics of isolated DNA molecules under homogeneous extensional flow. Hydrodynamic focusing generates homogeneous extensional flow with uniform velocity in the transverse direction. The deformation of individual DNA molecules in the flow was visualized with video fluorescence microscopy. A coil stretch transition was observed when the Deborah number (De) is larger than 0.8. With a sudden stopping of the flow, the DNA molecule relaxes and recoils. The longest relaxation time of T2 DNA was determined to be 0.63 s when scaling viscosity to 0.9 cP.

  12. Single-molecule imaging by optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebrano, Michele; Kukura, Philipp; Renn, Alois; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    To date, optical studies of single molecules at room temperature have relied on the use of materials with high fluorescence quantum yield combined with efficient spectral rejection of background light. To extend single-molecule studies to a much larger pallet of substances that absorb but do not fluoresce, scientists have explored the photothermal effect, interferometry, direct attenuation and stimulated emission. Indeed, very recently, three groups have succeeded in achieving single-molecule sensitivity in absorption. Here, we apply modulation-free transmission measurements known from absorption spectrometers to image single molecules under ambient conditions both in the emissive and strongly quenched states. We arrive at quantitative values for the absorption cross-section of single molecules at different wavelengths and thereby set the ground for single-molecule absorption spectroscopy. Our work has important implications for research ranging from absorption and infrared spectroscopy to sensing of unlabelled proteins at the single-molecule level.

  13. A High-Sensitivity and Low-Power Theranostic Nanosystem for Cell SERS Imaging and Selectively Photothermal Therapy Using Anti-EGFR-Conjugated Reduced Graphene Oxide/Mesoporous Silica/AuNPs Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Liu, Ting-Yu; Chen, Po-Jung; Chang, Po-Hsueh; Chen, San-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    A high-sensitivity and low-power theranostic nanosystem that combines with synergistic photothermal therapy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mapping is constructed by mesoporous silica self-assembly on the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets with nanogap-aligned gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) encapsulated and arranged inside the nanochannels of the mesoporous silica layer. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a Raman reporter is then encapsulated into the nanochannels and anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is conjugated on the nanocomposite surface, defined as anti-EGFR-PEG-rGO@CPSS-Au-R6G, where PEG is polyethylene glycol and CPSS is carbon porous silica nanosheets. SERS spectra results show that rGO@CPSS-Au-R6G enhances 5 × 10(6) magnification of the Raman signals and thus can be applied in the noninvasive cell tracking. Furthermore, it displays high sensitivity (detection limits: 10(-8) m R6G solution) due to the "hot spots" effects by the arrangements of AuNPs in the nanochannels of mesoporous silica. The highly selective targeting of overexpressing EGFR lung cancer cells (A549) is observed in the anti-EGFR-PEG-rGO@CPSS-Au-R6G, in contrast to normal cells (MRC-5). High photothermal therapy efficiency with a low power density (0.5 W cm(-2) ) of near-infrared laser can be achieved because of the synergistic effect by conjugated AuNPs and rGO nanosheets. These results demonstrate that the anti-EGFR-PEG-rGO@CPSS-Au-R6G is an excellent new theranostic nanosystem with cell targeting, cell tracking, and photothermal therapy capabilities. PMID:26814978

  14. The mutual influence of two different dyes on their sensitized fluorescence (cofluorescence) in nanoparticles from complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, L. Yu.; Sveshnikova, E. B.; Ermolaev, V. L.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the fluorescence sensitization and quenching for pairs of different dyes simultaneously incorporated into nanoparticles from complexes M(diketone)3phen, where M(III) is La(III), Lu(III), or Sc(III); diketone is p-phenylbenzoyltrifluoroacetone (PhBTA) or naphthoyltrifluoroacetone (NTA); and phen is 1,10-phenanthroline. We have shown that, upon formation of nanoparticles in the solution in the presence of two dyes the concentrations of which are either comparable with or lower than the concentration of nanoparticles (<20 nM), the intensities of the sensitized fluorescence of dyes in nanoparticles in binary solutions and in solutions of either of the dyes coincide. We have found that the intensity of sensitized fluorescence of small (<20 nM) concentrations of rhodamine 6G (R6G) or Nile blue (NB) increases by an order of magnitude upon simultaneous introduction into nanoparticles of 1 μM of coumarin 30 (C30), while the intensity of fluorescence of C30 sensitized by complexes decreases by an order of magnitude. The same effect is observed as 1 μM of R6G are introduced into nanoparticles with NB ([NB] ≤ 20 nM). The increase in the fluorescence of dye molecules upon their incorporation from the solution into nanoparticles from complexes is noticeably lower than that expected from the proposed ratio of concentrations of complexes and dyes in nanoparticles. Analysis of the obtained data indicates that the introduction of large concentrations of C30 or R6G dyes into nanoparticles makes it possible to prevent large energy losses due to impurities or upon transition to a triplet state that arises during the migration of the excitation energy over S 1 levels of complexes. Energy accumulated by these dyes is efficiently transferred to another dye that is present in the solution at lower concentrations and that has a lower-lying S 1 level, which makes it possible to increase its fluorescence by an order of magnitude upon its incorporation into nanoparticles.

  15. Geochemical Origin of Biological Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2013-04-01

    A model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules is presented. Rocks such as peridotites and basalts, which contain ferromagnesian minerals, evolve in the presence of water. Their hydrolysis is an exothermic reaction which generates heat and a release of H2 and of minerals with modified structures. The hydrogen reacts with the CO2 embedded inside the rock or with the CO2 of the environment to form CO in an hydrothermal process. With the N2 of the environment, and with an activation source arising from cosmic radiation, ferromagnesian rocks might evolve towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules, such as peptide like macromolecules which produce amino acids after acid hydrolysis. The reactions concerned are described. The production of hydrothermal CO is discussed in geological sites containing ferromagnesian silicate minerals and the low intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during Paleoarchaean Era is also discussed. It is concluded that excitation sources arising from cosmic radiation were much more abundant during Paleoarchaean Era and that macromolecular structures of biological relevance might consequently form during Archaean Eon, as a product of the chemical evolution of the rocks and of their mineral contents. This synthesis of abiotically formed biological molecules is consecutively discussed for meteorites and other planets such as Mars. This model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules has first been proposed in 2008 in the context of reactions involving catalysers such as kaolinite [Bassez 2008a] and then presented in conferences and articles [Bassez 2008b, 2009, 2012; Bassez et al. 2009a to 2012b]. BASSEZ M.P. 2008a Synthèse prébiotique dans les conditions hydrothermales, CNRIUT'08, Lyon 29-30/05/2008, Conf. and open access article:http://liris.cnrs.fr/~cnriut08/actes/ 29 mai 11h-12h40. BASSEZ M.P. 2008b Prebiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions, ISSOL'08, P2-6, Firenze-Italy, 24-29/08/2008. Poster at the

  16. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  17. Coordination programming of photofunctional molecules.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Kusaka, Shinpei; Hayashi, Mikihiro; Nishikawa, Michihiro; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Our recent achievements relating to photofunctional molecules are addressed. Section 1 discloses a new concept of photoisomerization. Pyridylpyrimidine-copper complexes undergo a ring inversion that can be modulated by the redox state of the copper center. In combination with an intermolecular photoelectron transfer (PET) initiated by the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition of the Cu(I) state, we realize photonic regulation of the ring inversion. Section 2 reports on the first examples of heteroleptic bis(dipyrrinato)zinc(II) complexes. Conventional homoleptic bis(dipyrrinato)zinc(II) complexes suffered from low fluorescence quantum yields, whereas the heteroleptic ones feature bright fluorescence even in polar solvents. Section 3 describes our new findings on Pechmann dye, which was first synthesized in 1882. New synthetic procedures for Pechmann dye using dimethyl bis(arylethynyl)fumarate as a starting material gives rise to its new structural isomer. We also demonstrate potentiality of a donor-acceptor-donor type of Pechmann dye in organic electronics. PMID:23563859

  18. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  19. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:26794035

  20. Rotational Cooling of Trapped Polyatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glöckner, Rosa; Prehn, Alexander; Englert, Barbara G. U.; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the internal degrees of freedom is a key challenge for applications of cold and ultracold molecules. Here, we demonstrate rotational-state cooling of trapped methyl fluoride molecules (CH3F ) by optically pumping the population of 16 M sublevels in the rotational states J =3 , 4, 5 and 6 into a single level. By combining rotational-state cooling with motional cooling, we increase the relative number of molecules in the state J =4 , K =3 , M =4 from a few percent to over 70%, thereby generating a translationally cold (≈30 mK ) and nearly pure state ensemble of about 106 molecules. Our scheme is extendable to larger sets of initial states, other final states, and a variety of molecule species, thus paving the way for internal-state control of ever-larger molecules.

  1. Aggregated Gas Molecules: Toxic to Protein?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zuo, Guanghong; Chen, Jixiu; Gao, Yi; Fang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    The biological toxicity of high levels of breathing gases has been known for centuries, but the mechanism remains elusive. Earlier work mainly focused on the influences of dispersed gas molecules dissolved in water on biomolecules. However, recent studies confirmed the existence of aggregated gas molecules at the water-solid interface. In this paper, we have investigated the binding preference of aggregated gas molecules on proteins with molecular dynamics simulations, using nitrogen (N2) gas and the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain as the model system. Aggregated N2 molecules were strongly bound by the active sites of the SH3 domain, which could impair the activity of the protein. In contrast, dispersed N2 molecules did not specifically interact with the SH3 domain. These observations extend our understanding of the possible toxicity of aggregates of gas molecules in the function of proteins. PMID:23588597

  2. Rotational Cooling of Trapped Polyatomic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Rosa; Prehn, Alexander; Englert, Barbara G U; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the internal degrees of freedom is a key challenge for applications of cold and ultracold molecules. Here, we demonstrate rotational-state cooling of trapped methyl fluoride molecules (CH_{3}F) by optically pumping the population of 16 M sublevels in the rotational states J=3, 4, 5 and 6 into a single level. By combining rotational-state cooling with motional cooling, we increase the relative number of molecules in the state J=4, K=3, M=4 from a few percent to over 70%, thereby generating a translationally cold (≈30  mK) and nearly pure state ensemble of about 10^{6} molecules. Our scheme is extendable to larger sets of initial states, other final states, and a variety of molecule species, thus paving the way for internal-state control of ever-larger molecules. PMID:26684114

  3. Single molecule nanometry for biological physics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hajin; Ha, Taekjip

    2013-01-01

    Precision measurement is a hallmark of physics but the small length scale (~ nanometer) of elementary biological components and thermal fluctuations surrounding them challenge our ability to visualize their action. Here, we highlight the recent developments in single molecule nanometry where the position of a single fluorescent molecule can be determined with nanometer precision, reaching the limit imposed by the shot noise, and the relative motion between two molecules can be determined with ~ 0.3 nm precision at ~ 1 millisecond time resolution, and how these new tools are providing fundamental insights on how motor proteins move on cellular highways. We will also discuss how interactions between three and four fluorescent molecules can be used to measure three and six coordinates, respectively, allowing us to correlate movements of multiple components. Finally, we will discuss recent progress in combining angstrom precision optical tweezers with single molecule fluorescent detection, opening new windows for multi-dimensional single molecule nanometry for biological physics. PMID:23249673

  4. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  5. A 3-terminal single molecule nanoscale amperometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hliwa, M.; Ami, S.; Joachim, C.

    2006-07-01

    A 3-terminal single molecule transducer is presented which is able to measure tunnel current intensities. The conformation of a pyrene-phenyl molecule is changed under an intramolecular inelastic current effect. This conformation change is detected by a third lateral electrode interacting also with the molecule. The full multi-channel electronic scattering matrix of the device is calculated taking into account the chemisorption of the molecule at one end and the details mechanics of the conformation change of this molecule. A semi-classical model is used to describe the intramolecular transduction effect between the electrons transferred through the molecule and its conformation change. It results a linear transduction curve between the input and the detection currents of the device for a range of tunnel current of interest for mono-molecular electronics.

  6. Formation of quantum-degenerate sodium molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, K; Mukaiyama, T; Abo-Shaeer, J R; Chin, J K; Miller, D E; Ketterle, W

    2003-11-21

    Ultracold sodium molecules were produced from an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate by ramping an applied magnetic field across a Feshbach resonance. More than 10(5) molecules were generated with a conversion efficiency of approximately 4%. Using laser light resonant with an atomic transition, the remaining atoms could be selectively removed, preventing fast collisional relaxation of the molecules. Time-of-flight analysis of the pure molecular sample yielded an instantaneous phase-space density greater than 20. PMID:14683282

  7. Circular DNA Molecules in the Genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini, E. C.; Schultz, J.

    1972-01-01

    The satellite DNA's from the embryos of five species of Drosophila (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. nasuta, D. virilis and D. hydei) have been analyzed for the presence of closed circular duplex DNA molecules, as determined by CsCl-EBr gradients. Circular DNA molecules were found in every species but D. melanogaster. Analyses of cell fractions from adult Drosophila and organ fractions from Drosophila larvae show that fractions containing mitochondria are highly enriched in these molecules. PMID:4643820

  8. A new interstellar molecule - Tricarbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, H. E.; Irvine, W. M.; Friberg, P.; Brown, R. D.; Godfrey, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    The C3O molecule, whose pure rotational spectrum has only recently been studied in the laboratory, has been detected in the cold, dark interstellar Taurus Molecular Cloud 1. Since C3O is the first interstelar carbon chain molecule to contain oxygen, its existence places an important new constraint on chemical schemes for cold interstellar clouds. The abundance of C3O can be understood in terms of purely gas-phase ion-molecule chemistry.

  9. Ultrasensitive SERS Flow Detector Using Hydrodynamic Focusing

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Pierre; Jacobs, Kevin T.; Dada, Oluwatosin O.; Schultz, Zachary D.

    2013-01-01

    Label-free, chemical specific detection in flow is important for high throughput characterization of analytes in applications such as flow injection analysis, electrophoresis, and chromatography. We have developed a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) flow detector capable of ultrasensitive optical detection on the millisecond time scale. The device employs hydrodynamic focusing to improve SERS detection in a flow channel where a sheath flow confines analyte molecules eluted from a fused silica capillary over a planar SERS-active substrate. Increased analyte interactions with the SERS substrate significantly improve detection sensitivity. The performance of this flow detector was investigated using a combination of finite element simulations, fluorescence imaging, and Raman experiments. Computational fluid dynamics based on finite element analysis was used to optimize the flow conditions. The modeling indicates that a number of factors, such as the capillary dimensions and the ratio of the sheath flow to analyte flow rates, are critical for obtaining optimal results. Sample confinement resulting from the flow dynamics was confirmed using wide-field fluorescence imaging of rhodamine 6G (R6G). Raman experiments at different sheath flow rates showed increased sensitivity compared with the modeling predictions, suggesting increased adsorption. Using a 50-millisecond acquisitions, a sheath flow rate of 180 μL/min, and a sample flow rate of 5 μL/min, a linear dynamic range from nanomolar to micromolar concentrations of R6G with a LOD of 1 nM is observed. At low analyte concentrations, rapid analyte desorption is observed, enabling repeated and high-throughput SERS detection. The flow detector offers substantial advantages over conventional SERS-based assays such as minimal sample volumes and high detection efficiency. PMID:24074461

  10. Voltage-responsive reversible self-assembly and controlled drug release of ferrocene-containing polymeric superamphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xueyi; Cheng, Zhiyu; Ren, Biye; Dong, Renfeng; Peng, Jun; Fu, Shiyu; Tong, Zhen

    2015-10-14

    A new type of voltage-responsive comb-like superamphiphilic block polymer PEG113-b-PAA30/FTMA was prepared by the electrostatic interactions of an ionic ferrocenyl surfactant (FTMA) and an oppositely charged double-hydrophilic block polyelectrolyte poly-(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(acrylic acid) (PEG113-b-PAA30) in aqueous solution. An in situ electrochemical redox system was designed to research its electrochemical activity in aqueous solution. The polymeric superamphiphile PEG113-b-PAA30/FTMA could reversibly aggregate to form spherical micelles of 20-30 nm diameter in aqueous solution, and also disaggregate into irregular fragments by an electrochemical redox reaction when its concentration is in the range of the critical aggregation concentration (cacred) of the reduction state to its cacox of the oxidation state. Interestingly, above cacox, the superamphiphile can aggregate into spherical micelles of 20-30 nm diameter, which can be transformed into larger spherical micelles of 40-120 nm diameter after electrochemical oxidation, and reversibly recover initial sizes after electrochemical reduction. Moreover, this reversible self-assembly process can be electrochemically controlled just by changing its electrochemical redox extent without adding any other chemical reagent. Further, rhodamine 6G (R6G)-loaded polymeric superamphiphile aggregates have been successfully used for the voltage-controlled release of loaded molecules based on their voltage-responsive self-assembly, and the release rate of R6G could be mediated by changing electrochemical redox potentials and the concentrations of polymeric superamphiphiles. Our observations witness a new strategy to construct a voltage-responsive reversible self-assembly system. PMID:26268718

  11. Production and Trapping of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    David, DeMille

    2015-04-21

    We report a set of experiments aimed at the production and trapping of ultracold polar molecules. We begin with samples of laser-cooled and trapped Rb and Cs atoms, and bind them together to form polar RbCs molecules. The binding is accomplished via photoassociation, which uses a laser to catalyze the sticking process. We report results from investigation of a new pathway for photoassociation that can produce molecules in their absolute ground state of vibrational and rotational motion. We also report preliminary observations of collisions between these ground-state molecules and co-trapped atoms.

  12. Small Molecule based Musculoskeletal Regenerative Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kevin W.-H.; Jiang, Tao; Gagnon, Keith A.; Nelson, Clarke; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians and scientists working in the field of regenerative engineering are actively investigating a wide range of methods to promote musculoskeletal tissue regeneration. Small molecule-mediated tissue regeneration is emerging as a promising strategy for regenerating various musculoskeletal tissues and a large number of small molecule compounds have been recently discovered as potential bioactive molecules for musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration. In this review, we summarize the recent literature encompassing the past four years in the area of small bioactive molecule for promoting repair and regeneration of various musculoskeletal tissues including bone, muscle, cartilage, tendon, and nerve. PMID:24405851

  13. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Simple Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Muller, Gilles; Ortiz, María J; de la Moya, Santiago

    2015-09-21

    This article aims to show the identity of "circularly polarized luminescent active simple organic molecules" as a new concept in organic chemistry due to the potential interest of these molecules, as availed by the exponentially growing number of research articles related to them. In particular, it describes and highlights the interest and difficulty in developing chiral simple (small and non-aggregated) organic molecules able to emit left- or right-circularly polarized light efficiently, the efforts realized up to now to reach this challenging objective, and the most significant milestones achieved to date. General guidelines for the preparation of these interesting molecules are also presented. PMID:26136234

  14. Electron microscopy of low iodinated thyroglobulin molecules.

    PubMed

    Berg, G; Ekholm, R

    1975-04-29

    Thyroglobulin molecules were studied in the electron microscope with negative staining technique. In a first series of experiments samples of thyroglobulin varying in iodine content from 0.5 to 0.03% were prepared from the thyroids of mice and rats kept on iodine-poor diets. All samples contained thyroglobulin molecules of the normal ovoid shape, not deviating in size or shape from molecules obtained from normal thyroids. However, in addition, another type of molecule having a cylindrical shape was observed in all samples. The proportion of these cylindrical molecules increased from a few per cent in the moderately iodine-poor thyroglobulin samples to more than 80% in the highly iodine-deficient thyroglobulin (0.03%). In a second series of experiments extremely iodine-poor thyroglobulin (smaller than 0.005%) was obtained from propylthiouracil-treated rats. In these preparations practically all molecules had a cylindrical shape. These samples also contained smaller particles interpreted to be dissociation products. The cylindrical molecules were of two types, one appearing compact and measuring 250 times 135 A (length times diameter) and the other appearing porous and having a length of 145 and a diameter of 205 A. It is concluded that the cylindrical molecules represent non- or low-iodinated thyroglobulin and it is suggested that the porous cylindrical molecule is an unfolded form of the compact cylinder. PMID:1138879

  15. Design of water molecule and its surrounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylo, R. I.; Okhrimenko, B. A.; Yablochkova, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen bonds and their fluctuations are one of the factors that determine the unique properties of water [1]. Building models of formation and rupture of hydrogen bonds due to non-eigen vibrations of a molecule of water is to a large extent determined by the availability of accurate information on the geometric structure of the water molecule. Geometric parameters of the water molecule have been well studied for the gaseous state. This was aided by the possibility of an experimental study of the regularities in the rotational spectra of molecules. However, some questions about the geometry of the water molecule in the liquid state remain unanswered. For example, many sources state that the valence angle of the water molecule decreases during the transition into the liquid state [2]. Based on the experimental data of molecular vibration spectra in D2O and H2O molecules [3], the authors have estimated valence angle of water in the liquid state. Consequently, the value of the valence angle of water in liquid state was determined to be (89 +/-2)°. A question of determination of libration vibrations of water molecule, as well as the analysis of its consequent inversion doubling, based on the new information on the equilibrium angle of the water molecules in the liquid state, constitutes an interest and is discussed in the present paper.

  16. Halogen bonds in biological molecules

    PubMed Central

    Auffinger, Pascal; Hays, Franklin A.; Westhof, Eric; Ho, P. Shing

    2004-01-01

    Short oxygen–halogen interactions have been known in organic chemistry since the 1950s and recently have been exploited in the design of supramolecular assemblies. The present survey of protein and nucleic acid structures reveals similar halogen bonds as potentially stabilizing inter- and intramolecular interactions that can affect ligand binding and molecular folding. A halogen bond in biomolecules can be defined as a short CX···OY interaction (CX is a carbon-bonded chlorine, bromine, or iodine, and OY is a carbonyl, hydroxyl, charged carboxylate, or phosphate group), where the X···O distance is less than or equal to the sums of the respective van der Waals radii (3.27 Å for Cl···O, 3.37Å for Br···O, and 3.50 Å for I···O) and can conform to the geometry seen in small molecules, with the CX···O angle ≈165° (consistent with a strong directional polarization of the halogen) and the X···OY angle ≈120°. Alternative geometries can be imposed by the more complex environment found in biomolecules, depending on which of the two types of donor systems are involved in the interaction: (i) the lone pair electrons of oxygen (and, to a lesser extent, nitrogen and sulfur) atoms or (ii) the delocalized π -electrons of peptide bonds or carboxylate or amide groups. Thus, the specific geometry and diversity of the interacting partners of halogen bonds offer new and versatile tools for the design of ligands as drugs and materials in nanotechnology. PMID:15557000

  17. Halogen bonds in biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Auffinger, Pascal; Hays, Franklin A; Westhof, Eric; Ho, P Shing

    2004-11-30

    Short oxygen-halogen interactions have been known in organic chemistry since the 1950s and recently have been exploited in the design of supramolecular assemblies. The present survey of protein and nucleic acid structures reveals similar halogen bonds as potentially stabilizing inter- and intramolecular interactions that can affect ligand binding and molecular folding. A halogen bond in biomolecules can be defined as a short C-X...O-Y interaction (C-X is a carbon-bonded chlorine, bromine, or iodine, and O-Y is a carbonyl, hydroxyl, charged carboxylate, or phosphate group), where the X...O distance is less than or equal to the sums of the respective van der Waals radii (3.27 A for Cl...O, 3.37 A for Br...O, and 3.50 A for I...O) and can conform to the geometry seen in small molecules, with the C-X...O angle approximately 165 degrees (consistent with a strong directional polarization of the halogen) and the X...O-Y angle approximately 120 degrees . Alternative geometries can be imposed by the more complex environment found in biomolecules, depending on which of the two types of donor systems are involved in the interaction: (i) the lone pair electrons of oxygen (and, to a lesser extent, nitrogen and sulfur) atoms or (ii) the delocalized pi -electrons of peptide bonds or carboxylate or amide groups. Thus, the specific geometry and diversity of the interacting partners of halogen bonds offer new and versatile tools for the design of ligands as drugs and materials in nanotechnology. PMID:15557000

  18. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  19. Label-free, multiplexed, molecular sensing and imaging by stamping SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Zhao, Fusheng; Zeng, Jianbo; Santos, Greggy M.; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a spectroscopic technique, where Raman scattering is boosted primarily by enhanced electric field due to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). With advances in nanofabrication techniques, SERS has attracted great attention for label-free molecular sensing and imaging. However, the practical use of SERS has often encountered an inherent issues regarding a molecule transfer step where target molecules need to be within the close proximity of a SERS-active surface by either mixing with nanoparticles or coating onto surface-bound nanostructures. To address this issue, we have developed stamping surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (S-SERS) for label-free, multiplexed, molecular sensing and large-area, high-resolution molecular imaging on a flexible, non-plasmonic surface without solution-phase molecule transfer. In this technique, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) thin film and nanoporous gold disk SERS substrate play the roles as molecule carrier and Raman signal enhancer, respectively. After stamping the SERS substrate onto the PDMS film, SERS measurements can be directly taken from the "sandwiched" target molecules. The performance of S-SERS is evaluated by the detection of Rhodamine 6G (R6G), urea, and its mixture with acetaminophen (APAP), in physiologically relevant concentration range, along with corresponding SERS spectroscopic maps. S-SERS features simple sample preparation, low cost, and high reproducibility, which could lead to SERS-based sensing and imaging for point-of-care and forensics applications.

  20. Spin polarization effect for Fe2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shi-Ying; Zhu, Zheng-He

    2006-07-01

    This paper uses the density functional theory (DFT)(B3p86) of Gaussian03 to optimize the structure of Fe2 molecule. The result shows that the ground state for Fe2 molecule is a 9-multiple state, which shows spin polarization effect of Fe2 molecule of transition metal elements for the first time. Meanwhile, we have not found any spin pollution because the wavefunction of the ground state does not mingle with wavefunctions with higher energy states. So, that the ground state for Fe2 molecule is a 9-multiple state is indicative of the spin polarization effect of Fe2 molecule of transition metal elements. That is, there exist 8 parallel spin electrons. The non-conjugated electron is greatest in number. These electrons occupy different spacious tracks, so that the energy of the Fe2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin of the Fe2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule, which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization. In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state and other states of Fe2 molecule are derived. Dissociation energy De for the ground state of Fe2 molecule is 2.8586ev, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2124nm, vibration frequency ωe is 336.38 cm-1. Its force constants f2, f3, and f4 are 1.8615aJ.nm-2, -8.6704aJ.nm-3, 29.1676aJ.nm-4 respectively. The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of Fe2 molecule ωeχe,Be, αe are 1.5461 cm-1, 0.1339 cm-1, 7.3428×10-4 cm-1 respectively.

  1. Highly Sensitive and Reproducible SERS Performance from Uniform Film Assembled by Magnetic Noble Metal Composite Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chunyu; Zou, Bingfang; Wang, Yongqiang; Cheng, Lin; Zheng, Haihong; Zhou, Shaomin

    2016-01-26

    To realize highly sensitive and reproducible SERS performance, a new route was put forward to construct uniform SERS film by using magnetic composite microspheres. In the experiment, monodisperse Fe3O4@SiO2@Ag microspheres with hierarchical surface were developed and used as building block of SERS substrate, which not only realized fast capturing analyte through dispersion and collection under external magnet but also could be built into uniform film through magnetically induced self-assembly. By using R6G as probe molecule, the as-obtained uniform film exhibited great improvement on SERS performance in both sensitivity and reproducibility when compared with nonuniform film, demonstrating the perfect integration of high sensitivity of hierarchal noble metal microspheres and high reproducibility of ordered microspheres array. Furthermore, the as-obtained product was used to detect pesticide thiram and also exhibited excellent SERS performance for trace detection. PMID:26731200

  2. Tunable fluorescence enhancement based on bandgap-adjustable 3D Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fei; Gao, Suning; Zhu, Lili; Liao, Fan; Yang, Lulu; Shao, Mingwang

    2016-06-01

    Great progress has been made in fluorescence-based detection utilizing solid state enhanced substrates in recent years. However, it is still difficult to achieve reliable substrates with tunable enhancement factors. The present work shows liquid fluorescence enhanced substrates consisting of suspensions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs), which can assemble 3D photonic crystal under the external magnetic field. The photonic bandgap induced by the equilibrium of attractive magnetic force and repulsive electrostatic force between adjacent Fe3O4 NPs is utilized to enhance fluorescence intensity of dye molecules (including R6G, RB, Cy5, DMTPS-DCV) in a reversible and controllable manner. The results show that a maximum of 12.3-fold fluorescence enhancement is realized in the 3D Fe3O4 NP substrates without the utilization of metal particles for PCs/DMTPS-DCV (1.0 × 10‑7 M, water fraction (f w) = 90%).

  3. Tunable fluorescence enhancement based on bandgap-adjustable 3D Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fei; Gao, Suning; Zhu, Lili; Liao, Fan; Yang, Lulu; Shao, Mingwang

    2016-06-17

    Great progress has been made in fluorescence-based detection utilizing solid state enhanced substrates in recent years. However, it is still difficult to achieve reliable substrates with tunable enhancement factors. The present work shows liquid fluorescence enhanced substrates consisting of suspensions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs), which can assemble 3D photonic crystal under the external magnetic field. The photonic bandgap induced by the equilibrium of attractive magnetic force and repulsive electrostatic force between adjacent Fe3O4 NPs is utilized to enhance fluorescence intensity of dye molecules (including R6G, RB, Cy5, DMTPS-DCV) in a reversible and controllable manner. The results show that a maximum of 12.3-fold fluorescence enhancement is realized in the 3D Fe3O4 NP substrates without the utilization of metal particles for PCs/DMTPS-DCV (1.0 × 10(-7) M, water fraction (f w) = 90%). PMID:27171125

  4. Gold@silver bimetal nanoparticles/pyramidal silicon 3D substrate with high reproducibility for high-performance SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Shou Zhen; Yang, Cheng; Li, Chong Hui; Huo, Yan Yan; Liu, Xiao Yun; Liu, Ai Hua; Wei, Qin; Gao, Sai Sai; Gao, Xing Guo; Man, Bao Yuan

    2016-05-01

    A novel and efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate has been presented based on Gold@silver/pyramidal silicon 3D substrate (Au@Ag/3D-Si). By combining the SERS activity of Ag, the chemical stability of Au and the large field enhancement of 3D-Si, the Au@Ag/3D-Si substrate possesses perfect sensitivity, homogeneity, reproducibility and chemical stability. Using R6G as probe molecule, the SERS results imply that the Au@Ag/3D-Si substrate is superior to the 3D-Si, Ag/3D-Si and Au/3D-Si substrate. We also confirmed these excellent behaviors in theory via a commercial COMSOL software. The corresponding experimental and theoretical results indicate that our proposed Au@Ag/3D-Si substrate is expected to develop new opportunities for label-free SERS detections in biological sensors, biomedical diagnostics and food safety.

  5. Gold@silver bimetal nanoparticles/pyramidal silicon 3D substrate with high reproducibility for high-performance SERS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Shou Zhen; Yang, Cheng; Li, Chong Hui; Huo, Yan Yan; Liu, Xiao Yun; Liu, Ai Hua; Wei, Qin; Gao, Sai Sai; Gao, Xing Guo; Man, Bao Yuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel and efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate has been presented based on Gold@silver/pyramidal silicon 3D substrate (Au@Ag/3D-Si). By combining the SERS activity of Ag, the chemical stability of Au and the large field enhancement of 3D-Si, the Au@Ag/3D-Si substrate possesses perfect sensitivity, homogeneity, reproducibility and chemical stability. Using R6G as probe molecule, the SERS results imply that the Au@Ag/3D-Si substrate is superior to the 3D-Si, Ag/3D-Si and Au/3D-Si substrate. We also confirmed these excellent behaviors in theory via a commercial COMSOL software. The corresponding experimental and theoretical results indicate that our proposed Au@Ag/3D-Si substrate is expected to develop new opportunities for label-free SERS detections in biological sensors, biomedical diagnostics and food safety. PMID:27143507

  6. Gold@silver bimetal nanoparticles/pyramidal silicon 3D substrate with high reproducibility for high-performance SERS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Shou Zhen; Yang, Cheng; Li, Chong Hui; Huo, Yan Yan; Liu, Xiao Yun; Liu, Ai Hua; Wei, Qin; Gao, Sai Sai; Gao, Xing Guo; Man, Bao Yuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel and efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate has been presented based on Gold@silver/pyramidal silicon 3D substrate (Au@Ag/3D-Si). By combining the SERS activity of Ag, the chemical stability of Au and the large field enhancement of 3D-Si, the Au@Ag/3D-Si substrate possesses perfect sensitivity, homogeneity, reproducibility and chemical stability. Using R6G as probe molecule, the SERS results imply that the Au@Ag/3D-Si substrate is superior to the 3D-Si, Ag/3D-Si and Au/3D-Si substrate. We also confirmed these excellent behaviors in theory via a commercial COMSOL software. The corresponding experimental and theoretical results indicate that our proposed Au@Ag/3D-Si substrate is expected to develop new opportunities for label-free SERS detections in biological sensors, biomedical diagnostics and food safety. PMID:27143507

  7. The Distribution of Solubilized Molecules among Micelles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dennis J.

    1978-01-01

    Conflicting views have been put forward on the derivation of the distribution of solubilized molecules among micelles. This stems from failure to consider the arrangement of the solubilized molecules in the micelles. In the treatment presented enthalpy effects are ignored as they are not amenable to a simple general theory. (Author/BB)

  8. Small Molecules in the Cone Snail Arsenal.

    PubMed

    Neves, Jorge L B; Lin, Zhenjian; Imperial, Julita S; Antunes, Agostinho; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Olivera, Baldomero M; Schmidt, Eric W

    2015-10-16

    Cone snails are renowned for producing peptide-based venom, containing conopeptides and conotoxins, to capture their prey. A novel small-molecule guanine derivative with unprecedented features, genuanine, was isolated from the venom of two cone snail species. Genuanine causes paralysis in mice, indicating that small molecules and not just polypeptides may contribute to the activity of cone snail venom. PMID:26421741

  9. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  10. Energy Transfer Involving Diatomic Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, John Paul

    three colliding pairs, the experimental results lie between the results calculated for the same two sets of potential parameters. These parameters were those calculated to match the short range Lennard-Jones potential and a set obtained by a theoretical Thomas-Fermi treatment of the molecules.

  11. Detection of reactive oxygen species in mainstream cigarette smoke by a fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Xu, Shi-jie; Li, Song-zhan

    2009-07-01

    A mass of reactive oxygen species(ROS) are produced in the process of smoking. Superfluous ROS can induce the oxidative stress in organism, which will cause irreversible damage to cells. Fluorescent probe is taken as a marker of oxidative stress in biology and has been applied to ROS detection in the field of biology and chemistry for high sensitivity, high simplicity of data collection and high resolution. As one type of fluorescent probe, dihydrorhodamine 6G (dR6G) will be oxidized to the fluorescent rhodamine 6G, which could be used to detect ROS in mainstream cigarette smoke. We investigated the action mechanism of ROS on dR6G, built up the standard curve of R6G fluorescence intensity with its content, achieved the variation pattern of R6G fluorescence intensity with ROS content in mainstream cigarette smoke and detected the contents of ROS from the 4 types of cigarettes purchased in market. The result shows that the amount of ROS has close relationship with the types of tobacco and cigarette production technology. Compared with other detecting methods such as electronic spin resonance(ESR), chromatography and mass spectrometry, this detection method by the fluorescent probe has higher efficiency and sensitivity and will have wide applications in the ROS detection field.

  12. Chemical principles of single-molecule electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Neupane, Madhav; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2016-03-01

    The field of single-molecule electronics harnesses expertise from engineering, physics and chemistry to realize circuit elements at the limit of miniaturization; it is a subfield of nanoelectronics in which the electronic components are single molecules. In this Review, we survey the field from a chemical perspective and discuss the structure-property relationships of the three components that form a single-molecule junction: the anchor, the electrode and the molecular bridge. The spatial orientation and electronic coupling between each component profoundly affect the conductance properties and functions of the single-molecule device. We describe the design principles of the anchor group, the influence of the electronic configuration of the electrode and the effect of manipulating the structure of the molecular backbone and of its substituent groups. We discuss single-molecule conductance switches as well as the phenomenon of quantum interference and then trace their fundamental roots back to chemical principles.

  13. Relationships between dipole moments of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shilin; Bernath, Peter F

    2015-02-14

    The dipole moment is one of the most important physical properties of a molecule. We present a combination rule for the dipole moments of related diatomic molecules. For molecules AB, AX, BY, and XY from two different element groups in the periodic table, if their elements make a small parallelogram, reliable predictions can be obtained. Our approach is particularly useful for systems with heavy atoms. For a large set of molecules tested, the average difference of the prediction from experimental data is less than 0.2 debye (D). The dipole moments for heavy molecules such as GaCl, InBr, SrCl, and SrS, for which no experimental data are available at present, are predicted to be 3.17, 3.76, 3.85 and 11.54 D, respectively. PMID:25588998

  14. Extracting Models in Single Molecule Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presse, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Single molecule experiments can now monitor the journey of a protein from its assembly near a ribosome to its proteolytic demise. Ideally all single molecule data should be self-explanatory. However data originating from single molecule experiments is particularly challenging to interpret on account of fluctuations and noise at such small scales. Realistically, basic understanding comes from models carefully extracted from the noisy data. Statistical mechanics, and maximum entropy in particular, provide a powerful framework for accomplishing this task in a principled fashion. Here I will discuss our work in extracting conformational memory from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments on large biomolecules. One clear advantage of this method is that we let the data tend towards the correct model, we do not fit the data. I will show that the dynamical model of the single molecule dynamics which emerges from this analysis is often more textured and complex than could otherwise come from fitting the data to a pre-conceived model.

  15. Small-molecule-dependent split aptamer ligation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashwani K; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2011-08-17

    Here we describe the first use of small-molecule binding to direct a chemical reaction between two nucleic acid strands. The reported reaction is a ligation between two fragments of a DNA split aptamer using strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Utilizing the split aptamer for cocaine, we demonstrate small-molecule-dependent ligation that is dose-dependent over a wide range of cocaine concentrations and is compatible with complex biological fluids such as human blood serum. Moreover, studies of split aptamer ligation at varying salt concentrations and using structurally similar analogues of cocaine have revealed new insight into the assembly and small-molecule binding properties of the cocaine split aptamer. The ability to translate the presence of a small-molecule target into the output of DNA ligation is anticipated to enable the development of new, broadly applicable small-molecule detection assays. PMID:21761903

  16. Single-Molecule Solvation-Shell Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, E.; Höbenreich, H.; Higgins, S. J.; van Zalinge, H.; Haiss, W.; Nichols, R. J.; Finch, C. M.; Grace, I.; Lambert, C. J.; McGrath, R.; Smerdon, J.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new route to single-molecule sensing via solvation shells surrounding a current-carrying backbone molecule. As an example, we show that the presence of a water solvation shell “gates” the conductance of a family of oligothiophene-containing molecular wires, and that the longer the oligothiophene, the larger is the effect. For the longest example studied, the molecular conductance is over 2 orders of magnitude larger in the presence of a shell comprising just 10 water molecules. A first principles theoretical investigation of electron transport through the molecules, using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method, shows that water molecules interact directly with the thiophene rings, significantly shifting transport resonances and greatly increasing the conductance. This reversible effect is confirmed experimentally through conductance measurements performed in the presence of moist air and dry argon.

  17. The symmetry of single-molecule conduction.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-14

    We introduce the conductance point group which defines the symmetry of single-molecule conduction within the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. It is shown, either rigorously or to within a very good approximation, to correspond to a molecular-conductance point group defined purely in terms of the properties of the conducting molecule. This enables single-molecule conductivity to be described in terms of key qualitative chemical descriptors that are independent of the nature of the molecule-conductor interfaces. We apply this to demonstrate how symmetry controls the conduction through 1,4-benzenedithiol chemisorbed to gold electrodes as an example system, listing also the molecular-conductance point groups for a range of molecules commonly used in molecular electronics research. PMID:17115774

  18. Electronic and thermal properties of Biphenyl molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, F. G.; Ojeda, J. H.; Duque, C. A.; Laroze, D.

    2015-11-01

    Transport properties of a single Biphenyl molecule coupled to two contacts are studied. We characterise this system by a tight-binding Hamiltonian. Based on the non-equilibrium Green's functions technique with a Landauer-Büttiker formalism the transmission probability, current and thermoelectrical power are obtained. We show that the Biphenyl molecule may have semiconductor behavior for certain values of the electrode-molecule-electrode junctions and different values of the angle between the two rings of the molecule. In addition, the density of states (DOS) is calculated to compare the bandwidths with the profile of the transmission probability. DOS allows us to explain the asymmetric shape with respect to the molecule's Fermi energy.

  19. Superresolution Imaging using Single-Molecule Localization

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, George; Davidson, Michael; Manley, Suliana; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Superresolution imaging is a rapidly emerging new field of microscopy that dramatically improves the spatial resolution of light microscopy by over an order of magnitude (∼10–20-nm resolution), allowing biological processes to be described at the molecular scale. Here, we discuss a form of superresolution microscopy based on the controlled activation and sampling of sparse subsets of photoconvertible fluorescent molecules. In this single-molecule based imaging approach, a wide variety of probes have proved valuable, ranging from genetically encodable photoactivatable fluorescent proteins to photoswitchable cyanine dyes. These have been used in diverse applications of superresolution imaging: from three-dimensional, multicolor molecule localization to tracking of nanometric structures and molecules in living cells. Single-molecule-based superresolution imaging thus offers exciting possibilities for obtaining molecular-scale information on biological events occurring at variable timescales. PMID:20055680

  20. Attachment of second harmonic-active moiety to molecules for detection of molecules at interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Salafsky, Joshua S.; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.

    2005-10-11

    This invention provides methods of detecting molecules at an interface, which comprise labeling the molecules with a second harmonic-active moiety and detecting the labeled molecules at the interface using a surface selective technique. The invention also provides methods for detecting a molecule in a medium and for determining the orientation of a molecular species within a planar surface using a second harmonic-active moiety and a surface selective technique.

  1. Photophysics of new photostable rylene derivatives: applications in single-molecule studies and membrane labelling.

    PubMed

    Davies, Melari; Jung, Christophe; Wallis, Philipp; Schnitzler, Tobias; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2011-06-01

    Three new photostable rylene dyes for applications in single molecule studies and membrane labelling have been synthesized and their photophysical properties were characterized. These dyes differ in the number of polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains attached to the core structure which is either a perylene derivate or a terrylene derivate. One perylene and one terrylene dye is modified with two PEG chains, and another terrylene derivate has four PEG chains. The results show that the terrylene dye with four PEG chains (4-PEG-TDI) forms soluble nonfluorescing H-aggregates in water, so that the absorption bands are blue-shifted with respect to those of the fluorescing monomeric form. The presence of a surfactant such as Pluronic P123 leads to the disruption of the aggregates due to the formation of monomers in micelles and a strong increase in fluorescence. Application for labelling cell membranes can be considered for this dye since it adsorbs in a similar way as monomer to a lipid bilayer. Furthermore a single-molecule study of all three rylene dyes in polymeric films of PMMA showed excellent photostability with respect to photobleaching, far above the photostability of other common water-soluble dyes, such as Oxazine-1, Atto647N, Cy5, Alexa647 and Rhodamin6G. Especially 4-PEG-TDI seems to be a promising dye for membrane labelling with its high photostability. PMID:21154947

  2. High Harmonic Generation from Rotationally Excited Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, Robynne M.

    2011-12-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is understood through a three-step model. A strong laser field ionizes an atom or molecule. The free electron propagates in the laser field and may recombine with the atom or molecule leading to the generation of extreme ultraviolet or soft x-ray light at odd harmonics of the fundamental. Since the wavelength of the recombining electron is on the order of internuclear distances in molecules, HHG acts as a probe of molecular structure and dynamics. Conversely, control of the molecules leads to control of the properties (intensity, phase, and polarization) of the harmonic emission. Rotationally exciting molecules provides field-free molecular alignment at time intervals corresponding to fractions of the rotational period of the molecule. Alignment is necessary for understanding how the harmonic emission depends on molecular structure and alignment. Additionally, HHG acts as a probe of the rotational wavepackets. This thesis reports three experiments on HHG from rotationally excited molecules. Before we can use HHG as a probe of complex molecular dynamics or control harmonic properties through molecules, the harmonic emission from aligned, linear molecules must first be understood. To that end, the first experiment measures the intensity and phase of harmonics generated from N 2O and N2 near times of strong alignment revealing interferences during recombination. The second experiment demonstrates HHG as a sensitive probe of rotational wavepacket dynamics in CO2 and N2O, revealing new revival features not detected by any other probe. The final experiment focuses on understanding and controlling the polarization state of the harmonic emission. Generating elliptically polarized harmonics would be very useful for probing molecular and materials systems. We observe an elliptical dichroism in polarization-resolved measurements of the harmonic emission from aligned N2 and CO2 molecules, revealing evidence for electron-hole dynamics between the

  3. Search for complex organic molecules in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohishi, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    It was 1969 when the first organic molecule in space, H2CO, was discovered. Since then many organic molecules were discovered by using the NRAO 11 m (upgraded later to 12 m), Nobeyama 45 m, IRAM 30 m, and other highly sensitive radio telescopes as a result of close collaboration between radio astronomers and microwave spectroscopists. It is noteworthy that many famous organic molecules such as CH3OH, C2H5OH, (CH3)2O and CH3NH2 were detected by 1975. Organic molecules were found in so-called hot cores where molecules were thought to form on cold dust surfaces and then to evaporate by the UV photons emitted from the central star. These days organic molecules are known to exist not only in hot cores but in hot corinos (a warm, compact molecular clump found in the inner envelope of a class 0 protostar) and even protoplanetary disks. As was described above, major organic molecules were known since 1970s. It was very natural that astronomers considered a relationship between organic molecules in space and the origin of life. Several astronomers challenged to detect glycine and other prebiotic molecules without success. ALMA is expected to detect such important materials to further consider the gexogenous deliveryh hypothesis. In this paper I summarize the history in searching for complex organic molecules together with difficulties in observing very weak signals from larger species. The awfully long list of references at the end of this article may be the most useful part for readers who want to feel the exciting discovery stories.

  4. Low energy positron interactions with biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanniarachchi, Indika L.

    Calculations of the positron density distribution which can be used for positrons bound to midsize and larger molecules have been tested for smaller molecules and subsequently applied to investigate the most likely e +e-- annihilation sites for positrons interacting with biological molecules containing C, H, O, and N. In order to allow consideration of positrons bound to extended molecules with regions of different character and no particular symmetry, atom-centered positron basis sets of Gaussian-type functions were developed for positrons bound to molecules containing O, N, C, H, Li, Na, and Be. Testing shows that there is no need to scale the positron basis functions to take into account different effective charges on the atoms in different molecules. Even at the HF level of theory the calculated positron and the contact density of e+LiH system is in qualitative agreement with the most accurate calculation was done in ECG method. Also it has been found that for larger biological molecules such as derivation of formaldehyde can leave out positron basis sets centered on H atoms and still get qualitatively acceptable contact density distribution. According to our results, the electronic and positronic wavefunctions have the most overlap in the regions of most negative electrostatic potential in the parent molecule, and we can expect that a positron bound to the molecule will be more likely to annihilate with one of the electrons in these regions. Also we find that the highest energy occupied electronic orbital often does not make the largest contribution to e+e -- annihilation, and that the energy liberated by subsequent electronic relaxation is sufficient to break the backbone in several places in di-peptides and other organic molecules.

  5. Cylindrical posts of Ag/SiO₂/Au multi-segment layer patterns for highly efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Hwan; Baek, Youn-Kyoung; Jeon, Hwan-Jin; Srinivasarao, Mohan; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2012-08-10

    We fabricated a regular array of Ag/SiO₂/Au multi-segment cylindrical nanopatterns to create a highly efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrate using an advanced soft-nanoimprint lithographic technique. The SERS spectra results for Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules on the Ag/SiO₂/Au multi-segment nanopatterns show that the highly ordered patterns and interlayer thickness are responsible for enhancing the sensitivity and reproducibility, respectively, The multi-segment nanopattern with a silica interlayer generates significant SERS enhancement (~EF = 1.2 x 10⁶) as compared to that of the bimetallic (Ag/Au) nanopatterns without a dielectric gap (~EF = 1.0 x 10⁴). Further precise control of the interlayer distances between the two metals plays an essential role in enhancing SERS performance for detecting low concentrations of analytes such as fluorescent (Rhodamine 6G) and DNA molecules. Therefore, the highly ordered multi-segment patterns provide great sensitivity and reproducibility of SERS based detection, resulting in a high performance of the SERS substrate. PMID:22802161

  6. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Holman; Ling Zang; Ruchuan Liu; David M. Adams

    2009-10-20

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  7. Single-molecule junctions beyond electronic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V.; Venkataraman, Latha

    2013-06-01

    The idea of using individual molecules as active electronic components provided the impetus to develop a variety of experimental platforms to probe their electronic transport properties. Among these, single-molecule junctions in a metal-molecule-metal motif have contributed significantly to our fundamental understanding of the principles required to realize molecular-scale electronic components from resistive wires to reversible switches. The success of these techniques and the growing interest of other disciplines in single-molecule-level characterization are prompting new approaches to investigate metal-molecule-metal junctions with multiple probes. Going beyond electronic transport characterization, these new studies are highlighting both the fundamental and applied aspects of mechanical, optical and thermoelectric properties at the atomic and molecular scales. Furthermore, experimental demonstrations of quantum interference and manipulation of electronic and nuclear spins in single-molecule circuits are heralding new device concepts with no classical analogues. In this Review, we present the emerging methods being used to interrogate multiple properties in single molecule-based devices, detail how these measurements have advanced our understanding of the structure-function relationships in molecular junctions, and discuss the potential for future research and applications.

  8. Tuning the Magnetic Anisotropy of Single Molecules.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Benjamin W; Braun, Lukas; Pascual, Jose I; Franke, Katharina J

    2015-06-10

    The magnetism of single atoms and molecules is governed by the atomic scale environment. In general, the reduced symmetry of the surrounding splits the d states and aligns the magnetic moment along certain favorable directions. Here, we show that we can reversibly modify the magnetocrystalline anisotropy by manipulating the environment of single iron(II) porphyrin molecules adsorbed on Pb(111) with the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. When we decrease the tip-molecule distance, we first observe a small increase followed by an exponential decrease of the axial anisotropy on the molecules. This is in contrast to the monotonous increase observed earlier for the same molecule with an additional axial Cl ligand ( Nat. Phys. 2013 , 9 , 765 ). We ascribe the changes in the anisotropy of both species to a deformation of the molecules in the presence of the attractive force of the tip, which leads to a change in the d level alignment. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of a precise tuning of the magnetic anisotropy of an individual molecule by mechanical control. PMID:25942560

  9. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  10. Ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ferez, Rosario

    2016-05-01

    Ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecules are formed when a ground-state atom is bound to a Rydberg atom. The binding mechanism of these Rydberg molecules is based on the low-energy collisions between a Rydberg electron and a ground-state atom and leads to the unusual oscillatory behavior of the adiabatic potential energy curves. If the ground-state atom immersed into the Rydberg wave function is replaced by a heteronuclear diatomic molecule another type of polyatomic Rydberg molecules can form. In this case, the Rydberg electron is coupled to the internal states of the polar ground-state molecule. In this talk, we will explore the electronic structure and rovibrational properties of these ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecule. For the second type of Rydberg molecules, the polar dimer is allowed to rotate in the electric fields generated by the Rydberg electron and Rydberg core as well as an additional external field. We will investigate the metamorphosis of the Born-Oppenheimer potential curves, essential for the binding mechanism, with varying electric field and analyze the resulting properties such as the vibrational structure and the alignment and orientation of the polar dimer.

  11. Giant molecules composed of polar molecules and atoms in mixed dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ran; Tan, Shina

    2014-05-01

    Two or three polar molecules, confined to one or two dimensions, can form stable bound states with a single atom living in three dimensions, if the molecule and the atom can interact resonantly such that their mixed dimensional scattering length is large. We call these bound states ``giant molecules'' since it's a molecule composed of smaller molecules and atoms. We study their properties using techniques including exact numerical solution, exact qunatum diffusion Monte Carlo (QMC), Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), and semiclassical approximation. These bound states have a hierarchical structure reminiscent of the celestial systems.

  12. Molecules-in-Molecules: An Extrapolated Fragment-Based Approach for Accurate Calculations on Large Molecules and Materials.

    PubMed

    Mayhall, Nicholas J; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2011-05-10

    We present a new extrapolated fragment-based approach, termed molecules-in-molecules (MIM), for accurate energy calculations on large molecules. In this method, we use a multilevel partitioning approach coupled with electronic structure studies at multiple levels of theory to provide a hierarchical strategy for systematically improving the computed results. In particular, we use a generalized hybrid energy expression, similar in spirit to that in the popular ONIOM methodology, that can be combined easily with any fragmentation procedure. In the current work, we explore a MIM scheme which first partitions a molecule into nonoverlapping fragments and then recombines the interacting fragments to form overlapping subsystems. By including all interactions with a cheaper level of theory, the MIM approach is shown to significantly reduce the errors arising from a single level fragmentation procedure. We report the implementation of energies and gradients and the initial assessment of the MIM method using both biological and materials systems as test cases. PMID:26610128

  13. Line broadening of confined CO gas: from molecule-wall to molecule-molecule collisions with pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, J-M; Boulet, C; Auwera, J Vander; El Hamzaoui, H; Capoen, B; Bouazaoui, M

    2014-02-14

    The infrared absorption in the fundamental band of CO gas confined in porous silica xerogel has been recorded at room temperature for pressures between about 5 and 920 hPa using a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. The widths of individual lines are determined from fits of measured spectra and compared with ab initio predictions obtained from requantized classical molecular dynamics simulations. Good agreement is obtained from the low pressure regime where the line shapes are governed by molecule-wall collisions to high pressures where the influence of molecule-molecule interactions dominates. These results, together with those obtained with a simple analytical model, indicate that both mechanisms contribute in a practically additive way to the observed linewidths. They also confirm that a single collision of a molecule with a wall changes its rotational state. These results are of interest for the determination of some characteristics of the opened porosity of porous materials through optical soundings. PMID:24527910

  14. Understanding Polymer Properties through Imaging of Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei

    2008-03-01

    The unique advantage of Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is that it allows imaging of flexible polymer molecules, whose overall size and local curvature are below the optical resolution limit. The role of molecular visualization has grown to be especially profound with the synthesis of complex macromolecules whose structure is difficult to confirm using conventional techniques such as NMR and light scattering. This is especially true for molecules that are branched, heterogeneous, and polydisperse. Here, SPM images provide unambiguous proof of the molecular architecture along with accurate analysis of size, conformation, and ordering of molecules on surfaces. The unique advantage of SPM is that one obtains molecular dimensions in direct space. This offers more opportunities for statistical analysis including fractionation of molecules by size, branching topology, and chemical composition as well as sorting out the irrelevant species. Unlike molecular characterization of static molecules, it remains challenging to study molecules as they move and react on surfaces. We will discuss pioneering AFM studies of flowing monolayers one molecule at a time. Through use of AFM, the flow process was monitored over a broad range of length scales from the millimeter long precursor film all the way down to the movements of individual molecules within the film. Molecular imaging enabled independent measurements both the driving and frictional forces that control spreading rate. In these studies, one also discovered a new type of flow instability in polymer monolayers caused by flow-induced conformational transitions. Recently, molecular imaging has been successfully used to monitor adsorption-induced degradation of branched molecules. These experiments open an entirely new perspective in chemistry wherein the chemical bonds can be mechanically activated upon the physical contact of a macromolecule with a substrate. This research directly impacts coatings, lubrication, heterogeneous

  15. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    PubMed

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives. PMID:26606461

  16. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom-molecule collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-04-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom-molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X1Σ+g ground state 85Rb2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom-molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85Rb2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 1011 cm-3.

  17. Phononic Molecules Studied by Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzillotti-Kimura, N. D.; Fainstein, A.; Jusserand, B.; Lemaitre, A.

    2010-01-04

    An acoustic nanocavity can confine phonons in such a way that they act like electrons in an atom. By combining two of these phononic-atoms, it is possible to form a phononic 'molecule', with acoustic modes that are similar to the electronic states in a hydrogen molecule. We report Raman scattering experiments performed in a monolithic structure formed by a phononic molecule embedded in an optical cavity. The acoustic mode splitting becomes evident through both the amplification and change of selection rules induced by the optical cavity confinement. The results are in perfect agreement with photoelastic model simulations.

  18. Electron-impact-induced tryptophan molecule fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamuliene, Jelena; Romanova, Liudmila G.; Vukstich, Vasyl S.; Papp, Alexander V.; Snegursky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation of a gas-phase tryptophan molecule by a low-energy (<70 eV) electron impact was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Various positively charged fragments were observed and analyzed. A special attention was paid to the energy characteristics of the ionic fragment yield. The geometrical parameters of the initial molecule rearrangement were also analyzed. The fragmentation observed was due to either a simple bond cleavage or more complex reactions involving molecular rearrangements. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Elementary Processes with Atoms and Molecules in Isolated and Aggregated States", edited by Friedrich Aumayr, Bratislav Marinkovic, Stefan Matejcik, John Tanis and Kurt H. Becker.

  19. H2 molecules and the intercloud medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. K.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses expected column densities of H2 in the intercloud medium and the possible use of molecules as indicators of intercloud physical conditions. Molecule formation by the H(-) process and on graphite grains is treated, and it is shown that the Barlow-Silk hypothesis of a 1-eV semichemical hydrogen-graphite bond leads to a large enhancement of the intercloud molecule-formation rate. Rotational-excitation calculations are presented for both cloud and intercloud conditions which show, in agreement with Jura (1975), that the presently observed optically thin H2 absorption components are more likely to originate in cold clouds than in the intercloud medium.

  20. Engineering biological systems with synthetic RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Joe C.; Bloom, Ryan J.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2011-01-01

    RNA molecules play diverse functional roles in natural biological systems. There has been growing interest in designing synthetic RNA counterparts for programming biological function. The design of synthetic RNA molecules that exhibit diverse activities, including sensing, regulatory, information processing, and scaffolding activities, has highlighted the advantages of RNA as a programmable design substrate. Recent advances in implementing these engineered RNA molecules as key control elements in synthetic genetic networks are highlighting the functional relevance of this class of synthetic elements in programming cellular behaviors. PMID:21925380

  1. Stereoelectronic switching in single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Li, Haixing; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-03-01

    A new intersection between reaction chemistry and electronic circuitry is emerging from the ultraminiaturization of electronic devices. Over decades chemists have developed a nuanced understanding of stereoelectronics to establish how the electronic properties of molecules relate to their conformation; the recent advent of single-molecule break-junction techniques provides the means to alter this conformation with a level of control previously unimagined. Here we unite these ideas by demonstrating the first single-molecule switch that operates through a stereoelectronic effect. We demonstrate this behaviour in permethyloligosilanes with methylthiomethyl electrode linkers. The strong σ conjugation in the oligosilane backbone couples the stereoelectronic properties of the sulfur-methylene σ bonds that terminate the molecule. Theoretical calculations support the existence of three distinct dihedral conformations that differ drastically in their electronic character. We can shift between these three species by simply lengthening or compressing the molecular junction, and, in doing so, we can switch conductance digitally between two states.

  2. Dynamics of molecules in extreme rotational states

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liwei; Teitelbaum, Samuel W.; Robinson, Allison; Mullin, Amy S.

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed an optical centrifuge with a pulse energy that is more than 2 orders of magnitude larger than previously reported instruments. This high pulse energy enables us to create large enough number densities of molecules in extreme rotational states to perform high-resolution state-resolved transient IR absorption measurements. Here we report the first studies of energy transfer dynamics involving molecules in extreme rotational states. In these studies, the optical centrifuge drives CO2 molecules into states with J ∼ 220 and we use transient IR probing to monitor the subsequent rotational, translational, and vibrational energy flow dynamics. The results reported here provide the first molecular insights into the relaxation of molecules with rotational energy that is comparable to that of a chemical bond.

  3. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  4. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-27

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies. PMID:27070321

  5. Large molecules in diffuse interstellar clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.; Van Dishoeck, E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of the presence of a substantial component of large molecules on the chemistry of diffuse molecular clouds are explored, and detailed models of the zeta Persei and zeta Ophiuchi clouds are constructed. The major consequence is a reduction in the abundances of singly charged atomic species. The long-standing discrepancy between cloud densities inferred from rotational and fine-structure level populations and from the ionization balance can be resolved by postulating a fractional abundance of large molecules of 1 x 10 to the -7th for zeta Persei and 6 x 10 to the -7th for zeta Ophiuchi. If the large molecules are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) containing about 50 carbon atoms, they contain 1 percent of the carbon in zeta Persei and 7 percent in zeta Ophiuchi. Other consequences of the possible presence of PAH molecules are discussed. 23 references.

  6. Molecular junctions: Single-molecule contacts exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-05-01

    Using a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based method it is now possible to get an atomistic-level description of the most probable binding and contact configuration for single-molecule electrical junctions.

  7. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  8. Macronuclear gene-sized molecules of hypotrichs.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, D C; Anderson, R C; DuBois, M L; Prescott, D M

    1995-01-01

    The macronuclear genome of hypotrichous ciliates consists of DNA molecules of gene-sized length. A macronuclear DNA molecule contains a single coding region. We have analyzed the many hypotrich macronuclear DNA sequences sequenced by us and others. No highly conserved promoter sequences nor replication initiation sequences have been identified in the 5' nor in the 3' non-translated regions, suggesting that promoter function in hypotrichs may differ from other eukaryotes. The macronuclear genes are intron-poor; approximately 19% of the genes sequenced to date have one to three introns. Not all macronuclear DNA molecules may be transcribed; some macronuclear molecules may not have any coding function. Codon bias in hypotrichs is different in many respects from other ciliates and from other eukaryotes. PMID:7753617

  9. Final Report: Cooling Molecules with Laser Light

    SciTech Connect

    Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2012-05-08

    Certain diatomic molecules are disposed to laser cooling in the way successfully applied to certain atoms and that ushered in a revolution in ultracold atomic physics, an identification first made at Los Alamos and which took root during this program. Despite their manipulation into numerous achievements, atoms are nonetheless mundane denizens of the quantum world. Molecules, on the other hand, with their internal degrees of freedom and rich dynamical interplay, provide considerably more complexity. Two main goals of this program were to demonstrate the feasibility of laser-cooling molecules to the same temperatures as laser-cooled atoms and introduce a means for collecting laser-cooled molecules into dense ensembles, a foundational start of studies and applications of ultracold matter without equivalence in atomic systems.

  10. Laser Spectroscopy of Atoms and Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schawlow, Arthur L.

    1978-01-01

    Surveys new laser techniques and a variety of spectroscopic experiments that can be used to detect, measure and study very small numbers of atoms on molecules. The range of applicability of these techniques is also included. (HM)

  11. Small Molecules from the Human Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Donia, Mohamed S.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Developments in the use of genomics to guide natural product discovery and a recent emphasis on understanding the molecular mechanisms of microbiota-host interactions have converged on the discovery of natural products from the human microbiome. Here, we review what is known about small molecules produced by the human microbiota. Numerous molecules representing each of the major metabolite classes have been found that have a variety of biological activities, including immune modulation and antibiosis. We discuss technologies that will affect how microbiota-derived molecules are discovered in the future, and consider the challenges inherent in finding specific molecules that are critical for driving microbe-host and microbe-microbe interactions and their biological relevance. PMID:26206939

  12. Biological mechanisms, one molecule at a time

    PubMed Central

    Tinoco, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Ruben L.

    2011-01-01

    The last 15 years have witnessed the development of tools that allow the observation and manipulation of single molecules. The rapidly expanding application of these technologies for investigating biological systems of ever-increasing complexity is revolutionizing our ability to probe the mechanisms of biological reactions. Here, we compare the mechanistic information available from single-molecule experiments with the information typically obtained from ensemble studies and show how these two experimental approaches interface with each other. We next present a basic overview of the toolkit for observing and manipulating biology one molecule at a time. We close by presenting a case study demonstrating the impact that single-molecule approaches have had on our understanding of one of life's most fundamental biochemical reactions: the translation of a messenger RNA into its encoded protein by the ribosome. PMID:21685361

  13. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies.

  14. Water molecule conformation outside a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, F.; Gabbay, I.; March, N. H.

    1981-05-01

    The effect of a metal surface on the conformation of a water molecule has been analyzed by discussing two independent effects: (i) the screening of the proton-proton repulsion, (ii) the interaction of the lone-pair orbitals with the surface. Both effects tend to increase the HOH angle. However, the interaction between the lone-pairs with the surface is the dominant effect for a water molecule approaching the surface. In particular, for a chemisorbed state this interaction is responsible for the major part of the molecule deformation. We have estimated that for H 2O chemisorbed on Ru, the HOH angle must increase from the free molecule value of 104.5° by 3.1 ± 0.5° in good agreement with the experimental evidence.

  15. Polyatomic molecules under intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Shu, Yinan; Lozovoy, Vadim V; Jackson, James E; Levine, Benjamin G; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-12-11

    Interaction of intense laser pulses with atoms and molecules is at the forefront of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. It is the gateway to powerful new tools that include above threshold ionization, high harmonic generation, electron diffraction, molecular tomography, and attosecond pulse generation. Intense laser pulses are ideal for probing and manipulating chemical bonding. Though the behavior of atoms in strong fields has been well studied, molecules under intense fields are not as well understood and current models have failed in certain important aspects. Molecules, as opposed to atoms, present confounding possibilities of nuclear and electronic motion upon excitation. The dynamics and fragmentation patterns in response to the laser field are structure sensitive; therefore, a molecule cannot simply be treated as a "bag of atoms" during field induced ionization. In this article we present a set of experiments and theoretical calculations exploring the behavior of a large collection of aryl alkyl ketones when irradiated with intense femtosecond pulses. Specifically, we consider to what extent molecules retain their molecular identity and properties under strong laser fields. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with pump-probe techniques we study the dynamical behavior of these molecules, monitoring ion yield modulation caused by intramolecular motions post ionization. The set of molecules studied is further divided into smaller sets, sorted by type and position of functional groups. The pump-probe time-delay scans show that among positional isomers the variations in relative energies, which amount to only a few hundred millielectronvolts, influence the dynamical behavior of the molecules despite their having experienced such high fields (V/Å). High level ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed to predict molecular dynamics along with single and multiphoton resonances in the neutral and ionic states. We propose the

  16. High-speed low-cost correlator for single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsu-Yang; Lin, Hsin-Yu; White, Jonathon D.; Fann, Wunshain

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been extensively applied to study the kinetics and photophysics of molecules as well as interactions between molecules by extracting information from the fluctuation of signals. In particular, single molecule applications of FCS promise the greatest amounts of information. Ideally, one would like to carry out FCS in real-time; however, due to the time-consuming nature of the correlation process, performing the correlation in real-time is totally nontrivial. Generally an expensive hardware correlator or a TCSPC board is required for this purpose. Recently highly-efficient algorithms based on multi-tau method have been proposed to build up a software correlator. In this work, we set forth an innovative algorithm capable of realizing the real-time correlation, without turning to the multi-tau method. This algorithm takes advantage of the low count rate generally existing in the FCS experiments, directly using the time interval between each photon its adjacent photon to efficiently update the correlation function. Based on this efficiency, it is possible to build a low-cost software correlator with just an ordinary counter board. We practically demonstrate the feasibility by setting up this correlator to measure the diffusion motion of rhodamine 6G in water using FCS. The algorithm was validated by duplicating the signal from the photon detector and sending it to both the ordinary counter board with our software correlator and a commercial correlator simultaneously. The perfect coincidence of the correlation curves from these two correlators and the real-time display of the correlation function indicate the validity and practicability of our approach.

  17. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(- D-Ala- L-Ala)_4-] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy of polar molecules with superradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne F.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate cooperative phenomena and superradiance for vibrational transitions in polar molecule spectroscopy of high optical-depth samples. Such cooperativity comes from the build-up of inter-particle coherence through dipole-dipole interactions and leads to speed-up of decay processes. We compare our calculation to recent work and find very good agreement, suggesting that superradiant effects need to be taken into account in a wide variety of ultracold molecule experiments, including vibrational and rotational states.

  19. Entropy bottlenecks in ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, J. A.; Brauman, J. I.; Golden, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The significance of entropy bottlenecks in dissociation and recombination pathways in the prototype ionic system CH3 + CH3(+) has been investigated. Ion-molecule systems are shown to react through an entirely different dynamics than neutral systems, due to intrinsic differences in the shapes of the relevant potential surfaces. Consequences with regard to the interpretation of experimental rate parameters in the ion-molecule area are discussed.

  20. Do triatomic molecules echo atomic periodicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Hefferlin, R. Barrow, J.

    2015-03-30

    Demonstrations of periodicity among triatomic-molecular spectroscopic constants underscore the role of the periodic law as a foundation of chemistry. The objective of this work is to prepare for another test using vibration frequencies ν{sub 1} of free, ground-state, main-group triatomic molecules. Using data from four data bases and from computation, we have collected ν{sub 1} data for molecules formed from second period atoms.

  1. Spin-split states in aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsh, J.E. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-06-01

    A state where spin currents exist in the absence of external fields has recently been proposed to describe the low-temperature phase of chromium. It is proposed here that such a state may also describe the ground of aromatic molecules. It is argued that this point of view provides a more natural explanation for the large diamagnetic susceptibilities and NMR shifts observed in these molecules than the conventional viewpoint. The authors model suggests a new memory mechanism.

  2. Recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules

    DOEpatents

    Swansiger, W.A.

    1984-10-17

    This invention relates to the recovery of tritium from various tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium. More particularly, the invention relates to the recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium wherein the reaction is conducted in a reactor which permits the reaction to occur as a moving front reaction from the point where the tritium enters the reactor charged with uranium down the reactor until the uranium is exhausted.

  3. Feshbach molecules from an atomic Mott insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volz, Thomas; Syassen, Niels; Bauer, Dominik; Hansis, Eberhard; Duerr, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2006-05-01

    Feshbach molecules from bosonic atomic species have proven to be very unstable with respect to inelastic collisions [1]. As a result, the typical lifetime observed for a cloud of ultracold ^87Rb2 molecules stored in an optical dipole trap is limited to a few ms.Here, we report on the observation of long-lived Feshbach molecules in an optical lattice. A BEC of ^87Rb atoms is loaded into the lowest Bloch band of a 3D optical lattice operated at a wavelength of 830 nm. By ramping up the lattice depth, the atomic gas enters the Mott insulator regime. A magnetic-field ramp through the Feshbach resonance at 1007 G creates molecules [2]. Lattice sites initially occupied with more than 2 atoms experience fast inelastic collisional losses. The observed lifetime of the remaining molecules is ˜100 ms, which is much longer than for a pure molecular sample in an optical dipole trap. Similar results have recently been reported in Ref.[3]. The increased lifetime is an important step on the route to a BEC of molecules in the vibrational ground state [4].[1] T. Mukaiyama et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 180402 (2004) [2] S. D"urr et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 020406 (2004) [3] G. Thalhammer et al., cond-mat/0510755 [4] D. Jaksch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 040402 (2002)

  4. Sol-gel method for encapsulating molecules

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashley, Carol S.; Bhatia, Rimple; Singh, Anup K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for encapsulating organic molecules, and in particular, biomolecules using sol-gel chemistry. A silica sol is prepared from an aqueous alkali metal silicate solution, such as a mixture of silicon dioxide and sodium or potassium oxide in water. The pH is adjusted to a suitably low value to stabilize the sol by minimizing the rate of siloxane condensation, thereby allowing storage stability of the sol prior to gelation. The organic molecules, generally in solution, is then added with the organic molecules being encapsulated in the sol matrix. After aging, either a thin film can be prepared or a gel can be formed with the encapsulated molecules. Depending upon the acid used, pH, and other processing conditions, the gelation time can be from one minute up to several days. In the method of the present invention, no alcohols are generated as by-products during the sol-gel and encapsulation steps. The organic molecules can be added at any desired pH value, where the pH value is generally chosen to achieve the desired reactivity of the organic molecules. The method of the present invention thereby presents a sufficiently mild encapsulation method to retain a significant portion of the activity of the biomolecules, compared with the activity of the biomolecules in free solution.

  5. Quantum-classical lifetimes of Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junginger, Andrej; Main, Jörg; Wunner, Günter

    2013-04-01

    A remarkable property of Rydberg atoms is the possibility of creating molecules formed by one highly excited atom and another atom in the ground state. The first realization of such a Rydberg molecule has opened an active field of physical investigations, and showed that its basic properties can be described within a simple model regarding the ground state atom as a small perturber that is bound by a low-energy scattering process with the Rydberg electron (Greene et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 2458). Besides the good agreement between theory and the experiment concerning the vibrational states of the molecule, the experimental observations yield the astonishing feature that the lifetime of the molecule is clearly reduced as compared to the bare Rydberg atom (Butscher et al 2011 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44 184004). With focus on this yet unexplained observation, we investigate in this paper the vibrational ground state of the molecule in a quantum-classical framework. We show that the Rydberg wavefunction is continuously detuned by the presence of the moving ground state atom and that the timescale on which the detuning significantly exceeds the natural linewidth is in good agreement with the observed reduced lifetimes of the Rydberg molecule.

  6. Laser-Assisted Single Molecule Refolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Marshall, Myles; Aleman, Elvin; Lamichhane, Rajan; Rueda, David

    2010-03-01

    In vivo, many RNA molecules can adopt multiple conformations depending on their biological context such as the HIV Dimerization Initiation Sequence (DIS) or the DsrA RNA in bacteria. It is quite common that the initial interaction between the two RNAs takes place via complementary unpaired regions, thus forming a so-called kissing complex. However, the exact kinetic mechanism by which the two RNA molecules reach the dimerized state is still not well understood. To investigate the refolding energy surface of RNA molecules, we have developed new technology based on the combination of single molecule spectroscopy with laser induced temperature jump kinetics, called Laser Assisted Single-molecule Refolding (LASR). LASR enables us to induce folding reactions of otherwise kinetically trapped RNAs at the single molecule level, and to characterize their folding landscape. LASR provides an exciting new approach to study molecular memory effects and kinetically trapped RNAs in general. LASR should be readily applicable to study DNA and protein folding as well.

  7. Building Diatomic and Triatomic Superatom Molecules.

    PubMed

    Champsaur, Anouck M; Velian, Alexandra; Paley, Daniel W; Choi, Bonnie; Roy, Xavier; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin

    2016-08-10

    In this study, we have developed a method to create Co6Se8 superatoms in which we program the metal-ligand bonds. We exclusively form the Co6Se8 core under simple reaction conditions with a facile separation of products that contain differential substitution of the core. The combination of Co2(CO)8 and PR3 with excess Se gives the differentially and directionally substituted superatoms, Co6Se8(CO)x(PR3)(6-x). The CO groups on the superatom can be exchanged quantitatively with phosphines and isonitriles. Substitution of the CO allows us to manipulate the type and length of chemical bridge between two redox-active superatomic centers in order to modulate intersuperatomic coupling. Linking two superatoms together allows us to form the simplest superatom molecule: a diatomic molecule. We extend the superatom molecule concept to link three superatoms together in a linear arrangement to form acyclic triatomic molecules. These superatom molecules have a rich electrochemical profile and chart a clear path to a whole family of superatom molecules with new and unusual collective properties. PMID:27410225

  8. Auxin biology revealed by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qian; Robert, Stéphanie

    2014-05-01

    The plant hormone auxin regulates virtually every aspect of plant growth and development and unraveling its molecular and cellular modes of action is fundamental for plant biology research. Chemical genomics is the use of small molecules to modify protein functions. This approach currently rises as a powerful technology for basic research. Small compounds with auxin-like activities or affecting auxin-mediated biological processes have been widely used in auxin research. They can serve as a tool complementary to genetic and genomic methods, facilitating the identification of an array of components modulating auxin metabolism, transport and signaling. The employment of high-throughput screening technologies combined with informatics-based chemical design and organic chemical synthesis has since yielded many novel small molecules with more instantaneous, precise and specific functionalities. By applying those small molecules, novel molecular targets can be isolated to further understand and dissect auxin-related pathways and networks that otherwise are too complex to be elucidated only by gene-based methods. Here, we will review examples of recently characterized molecules used in auxin research, highlight the strategies of unraveling the mechanisms of these small molecules and discuss future perspectives of small molecule applications in auxin biology. PMID:24252105

  9. Vibrational Cooling of Photoassociated Homonuclear Cold Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passagem, Henry; Ventura, Paulo; Tallant, Jonathan; Marcassa, Luis

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we produce vibrationally cold homonuclear Rb molecules using spontaneous optical pumping. The vibrationally cooled molecules are produced in three steps. In the first step, we use a photoassociation laser to produce molecules in high vibrational levels of the singlet ground state. Then in a second step, a 50 W broadband laser at 1071 nm, which bandwidth is about 2 nm, is used to transfer the molecules to lower vibrational levels via optical pumping through the excited state. This process transfers the molecules from vibrational levels around ν ~= 113 to a distribution of levels below ν = 35 . The molecules can be further cooled using a broadband light source near 685 nm. In order to obtain such broadband source, we have used a 5 mW superluminescent diode, which is amplified in a tapered amplifier using a double pass configuration. After the amplification, the spectrum is properly shaped and we end up with about 90 mW distributed in the 682-689 nm range. The final vibrational distribution is probed using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization with a pulsed dye laser near 670 nm operating at 4KHz. The results are presented and compared with theoretical simulations. This work was supported by Fapesp and INCT-IQ.

  10. Quantitative Aspects of Single Molecule Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Raimund J.; Tahmasbi, Amir; Ram, Sripad; Lin, Zhiping; Ward, E. Sally

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule microscopy is a relatively new optical microscopy technique that allows the detection of individual molecules such as proteins in a cellular context. This technique has generated significant interest among biologists, biophysicists and biochemists, as it holds the promise to provide novel insights into subcellular processes and structures that otherwise cannot be gained through traditional experimental approaches. Single molecule experiments place stringent demands on experimental and algorithmic tools due to the low signal levels and the presence of significant extraneous noise sources. Consequently, this has necessitated the use of advanced statistical signal and image processing techniques for the design and analysis of single molecule experiments. In this tutorial paper, we provide an overview of single molecule microscopy from early works to current applications and challenges. Specific emphasis will be on the quantitative aspects of this imaging modality, in particular single molecule localization and resolvability, which will be discussed from an information theoretic perspective. We review the stochastic framework for image formation, different types of estimation techniques and expressions for the Fisher information matrix. We also discuss several open problems in the field that demand highly non-trivial signal processing algorithms. PMID:26167102

  11. Chapter 3: Small Molecules and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, David S.

    2012-01-01

    “Big” molecules such as proteins and genes still continue to capture the imagination of most biologists, biochemists and bioinformaticians. “Small” molecules, on the other hand, are the molecules that most biologists, biochemists and bioinformaticians prefer to ignore. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that small molecules such as amino acids, lipids and sugars play a far more important role in all aspects of disease etiology and disease treatment than we realized. This particular chapter focuses on an emerging field of bioinformatics called “chemical bioinformatics” – a discipline that has evolved to help address the blended chemical and molecular biological needs of toxicogenomics, pharmacogenomics, metabolomics and systems biology. In the following pages we will cover several topics related to chemical bioinformatics. First, a brief overview of some of the most important or useful chemical bioinformatic resources will be given. Second, a more detailed overview will be given on those particular resources that allow researchers to connect small molecules to diseases. This section will focus on describing a number of recently developed databases or knowledgebases that explicitly relate small molecules – either as the treatment, symptom or cause – to disease. Finally a short discussion will be provided on newly emerging software tools that exploit these databases as a means to discover new biomarkers or even new treatments for disease. PMID:23300405

  12. Chemical Recycling of Molecules in Cometary Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Kawakita, Hideyo; Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Hitomi

    2015-08-01

    Modeling is essential to understand the important physical and chemical processes that occur in cometary comae, especially the relationship between native and sibling molecules, such as, HCN and CN. Photochemistry is a major source of ions and electrons that further initiate key gas-phase reactions, leading to the plethora of molecules and atoms observed in comets. The effects of photoelectrons that react via impacts are important to the overall ionization in the inner coma. We have found that many molecules undergo protonation reactions with primarily water, followed by electron recombination resulting in the original molecules in a vibrationally excited state. These excited molecules spontaneously emit photons back to the ground state. We identify this series of reactions as chemical “recycling.” We discuss the importance of this mechanism for HCN, NH3, and water in comets. We also identify other relevant processes in the collision-dominated, inner coma of a comet within a global modeling framework to better understand observations and in situ measurements of cometary species, especially relationships between native and sibling molecules for the Rosetta Mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.Acknowledgements: We appreciate support from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under Grant No. 0908529. This program is partially supported by the MEXT Supported Program for the Strategic Research Foundation at Private Universities, 2014-2018.

  13. Bipolar Conductance Switching of Single Anthradithiophene Molecules.

    PubMed

    Borca, Bogdana; Schendel, Verena; Pétuya, Rémi; Pentegov, Ivan; Michnowicz, Tomasz; Kraft, Ulrike; Klauk, Hagen; Arnau, Andrés; Wahl, Peter; Schlickum, Uta; Kern, Klaus

    2015-12-22

    Single molecular switches are basic device elements in organic electronics. The pentacene analogue anthradithiophene (ADT) shows a fully reversible binary switching between different adsorption conformations on a metallic surface accompanied by a charge transfer. These transitions are activated locally in single molecules in a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope . The switching induces changes between bistable orbital structures and energy level alignment at the interface. The most stable geometry, the "off" state, which all molecules adopt upon evaporation, corresponds to a short adsorption distance at which the electronic interactions of the acene rings bend the central part of the molecule toward the surface accompanied by a significant charge transfer from the metallic surface to the ADT molecules. This leads to a shift of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital down to the Fermi level (EF). In the "on" state the molecule has a flat geometry at a larger distance from the surface; consequently the interaction is weaker, resulting in a negligible charge transfer with an orbital structure resembling the highest occupied molecular orbital when imaged close to EF. The potential barrier between these two states can be overcome reversibly by injecting charge carriers locally into individual molecules. Voltage-controlled current traces show a hysteresis characteristic of a bipolar switching behavior. The interpretation is supported by first-principles calculations. PMID:26580569

  14. Nonlinear Dynamics of Atom-Molecule Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Li-Bin; Liu, Jie

    2014-03-01

    The creation of ultracold molecules has opened up new possibilities for studies on molecular matter waves, strongly interacting superfluids, high-precision molecular spectroscopy and coherent molecular optics. In an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and a degenerate Fermi-Fermi or Fermi-Bose mixture, magnetic Feshbach resonance or optical photoassociation (PA) technique has been used to create not only diatomic molecules but also more complex molecules. In this chapter, we focus on many issues of nonlinear dynamics of atom-molecule systems. In Sec. 1, on the basis of the two-channelmean-field approach, we study the manybody effects on the Landau-Zener(LZ) picture of two-body molecular production through dramatically distorting the energy levels near the Feshbach resonance. In Sec. 2, we investigate the Feshbach resonance with modulation of an oscillating magnetic field. In Sec. 3, we include the nonlinear interparticle collisions and focus on the linear instability induced by the collisions and the adiabatic fidelity of the atom-trimer dark state in a stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). In Sec. 4, we theoretically investigate conversion problem from atom to N-body polyatomic molecule in an ultracold bosonic system by implementing the generalized STIRAP. In the last section, we discuss role of two-body interactions in the Feshbach conversion of fermionic atoms to bosonic molecules.

  15. Self-Assemblies of novel molecules, VECAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bijay; Kim, Hye-Young; Lee, Soojin; Novak, Brian; Moldovan, Dorel

    2015-03-01

    VECAR is a newly synthesized molecule, which is an amphiphilic antioxidant molecule that consists of two molecular groups, vitamin-E and Carnosine, linked by a hydrocarbon chain. The hydrocarbon chain is hydrophobic and both vitamin-E and Carnosine ends are hydrophilic. In the synthesis process, the length of the hydrophobic chain of VECAR molecules can vary from the shortest (n =0) to the longest (n =18), where n indicates the number of carbon atoms in the chain. We conducted MD simulation studies of self-assembly of VECAR molecules in water using GROMACS on LONI HPC resources. Our study shows that there is a strong correlation between the shape and atomistic structure of the self-assembled nano-structures (SANs) and the chain-length (n) of VECAR molecules. We will report the results of data analyses including the atomistic structure of each SANs and the dynamic and energetic mechanisms of their formation as function of time. In summary, both VECAR molecules of chain-length n =18 and 9 form worm-like micelles, which may be used as a drug delivery system. This research is supported by the Louisiana Board of Regents-RCS Grant (LEQSF(2012-15)-RD-A-19).

  16. Soft Landing of Complex Molecules on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Hu, Qichi; Laskin, Julia

    2011-07-01

    Mass spectrometry is a versatile technique for identification and structural characterization of large molecules. The advent of soft ionization techniques such as electrospray (ESI) (1-2) has enabled ionization of a wide variety of complex molecules without significant \\fragmentation while non-thermal ion sources such as laser vaporization (3-4) and magnetron sputtering (5-6) have provided access to materials that cannot, currently, be produced through conventional techniques. Most mass spectrometry studies rely on ionization of a molecule of interest or a complex mixture followed by mass analysis. Alternatively, mass spectrometry may be used as a preparatory technique, in which mass-selected ions are deposited onto solid supports or into liquid materials (7-18). Preparatory mass spectrometry offers several unique advantages for deposition of complex molecules on substrates including the ability to generate high-purity uniform films (19-20), unprecedented selectivity and specificity of preparation of deposited species (11, 21-22), the ability to focus and pattern an ion beam (23-24), and flexibility in both ion formation (1, 3, 25-26) and mass selection (27-32) processes. This review will highlight applications of mass-selected deposition of complex molecules for selective immobilization of biological molecules and catalytically active complexes on substrates.

  17. Small molecule TSHR agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Gershengorn, M C

    2011-04-01

    TSH activates the TSH receptor (TSHR) thereby stimulating the function of thyroid follicular cells (thyrocytes) leading to biosynthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones. Because TSHR is involved in several thyroid pathologies, there is a strong rationale for the design of small molecule "drug-like" ligands. Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH, Thyrogen(®)) has been used in the follow-up of patients with thyroid cancer to increase the sensitivity for detection of recurrence or metastasis. rhTSH is difficult to produce and must be administered by injection. A small molecule TSHR agonist could produce the same beneficial effects as rhTSH but with greater ease of oral administration. We developed a small molecule ligand that is a full agonist at TSHR. Importantly for its clinical potential, this agonist elevated serum thyroxine and stimulated thyroidal radioiodide uptake in mice after its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract following oral administration. Graves' disease (GD) is caused by persistent, unregulated stimulation of thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSAbs) that activate TSHR. We identified the first small molecule TSHR antagonists that inhibited TSH- and TSAb-stimulated signalling in primary cultures of human thyrocytes. Our results provide proof-of-principle for effectiveness of small molecule agonists and antagonists for TSHR. We suggest that these small molecule ligands are lead compounds for the development of higher potency ligands that can be used as probes of TSHR biology with therapeutic potential. PMID:21511239

  18. Single Molecule Conductance of Oligothiophene Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Emma J.

    This thesis studies the electronic properties of small organic molecules based on the thiophene motif. If we are to build next-generation devices, advanced materials must be designed which possess requisite electronic functionality. Molecules present attractive candidates for these ad- vanced materials since nanoscale devices are particularly sought after. However, selecting a molecule that is suited to a certain electronic function remains a challenge, and characterization of electronic behavior is therefore critical. Single molecule conductance measurements are a powerful tool to determine properties on the nanoscale and, as such, can be used to investigate novel building blocks that may fulfill the design requirements of next-generation devices. Combining these conductance results with strategic chemical synthesis allows for the development of new families of molecules that show attractive properties for future electronic devices. Since thiophene rings are the fruitflies of organic semiconductors on the bulk scale, they present an intriguing starting point for building functional materials on the nanoscale, and therefore form the structural basis of all molecules studied herein. First, the single-molecule conductance of a family of bithiophene derivatives was measured. A broad distribution in the single-molecule conductance of bithiophene was found compared with that of a biphenyl. This increased breadth in the conductance distribution was shown to be explained by the difference in 5-fold symmetry of thiophene rings as compared to the 6-fold symmetry of benzene rings. The reduced symmetry of thiophene rings results in a restriction on the torsion angle space available to these molecules when bound between two metal electrodes in a junction, causing each molecular junction to sample a different set of conformers in the conductance measurements. By contrast, the rotations of biphenyl are essentially unimpeded by junction binding, allowing each molecular junction

  19. Manipulating fluorescence intensity with mechanical strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weiwei; Bi, Kedong; Zhang, Hongze; Guo, Xitao; Ni, Zhenhua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we show that the fluorescence of rhodamine 6G (R6G) can be manipulated by applying mechanical strains to gold nanoparticles (GNs) sandwiched in graphene/GNs/polydimethylsiloxane (graphene/GNs/PDMS) structure. The fluorescence intensity of R6G on the graphene/GNs/PDMS sample shows a gradual increase with the mechanical strain. However, the fluorescence intensity of R6G on the graphene/PDMS structure without the GNs buried in between is almost unchanged under the action of the external mechanical strain. Experiment results indicate that the gap distance change between the GNs is the main cause of the fluorescence intensity increase and graphene, as a passivation layer, does not block the energy transfer from R6G to GNs. Compared with that tuning the gap distance between GNs by preparing various GNs samples, applying macroscopic mechanical strain on GNs is a simple way to manipulate the fluorescence intensity of a specific material and brings a new perspective for optoelectronic applications.

  20. Shock wave diagnostics using fluorescent dye probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent probes are highly developed, and have found increasing use in a wide variety of applications. We have studied shock compression of various materials with embedded dye probes used as high speed probes of pressure and temperature. Under the right conditions, dye emission can be used to make a map of the pressure distribution in shocked microstructured materials with high time (1 ns) and space (1 micrometer) resolution. In order to accomplish this goal, we started by studying shock compression of PMMA polymer with rhodamine 6G dye (R6G), as a function of shock pressure and shock duration. We observed the shock-induced spectral redshift and the shock-induced intensity loss. We investigated the fundamental mechanisms of R6G response to pressure. We showed that the time response of a dye probe is limited by its photophysical behavior under shock. We developed superemissive ultrafast dye probes by embedding R6G in a silica nanoparticle. More recently, we have searched for dye probes that have better responses. For instance, we have found that the dye Nile Red embedded in the right polymer matrix has 1.7 times larger pressure-induced redshift than R6G.