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Sample records for 6q 8p 9p

  1. Distinct Domains of Yeast Cortical Tag Proteins Bud8p and Bud9p Confer Polar Localization and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Krappmann, Anne-Brit; Taheri, Naimeh; Heinrich, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, diploid yeast cells follow a bipolar budding program, which depends on the two transmembrane glycoproteins Bud8p and Bud9p that potentially act as cortical tags to mark the cell poles. Here, we have performed systematic structure-function analyses of Bud8p and Bud9p to identify functional domains. We find that polar transport of Bud8p and Bud9p does not depend on N-terminal sequences but instead on sequences in the median part of the proteins and on the C-terminal parts that contain the transmembrane domains. We show that the guanosine diphosphate (GDP)/guanosine triphosphate (GTP) exchange factor Bud5p, which is essential for bud site selection and physically interacts with Bud8p, also interacts with Bud9p. Regions of Bud8p and Bud9p predicted to reside in the extracellular space are likely to confer interaction with the N-terminal region of Bud5p, implicating indirect interactions between the cortical tags and the GDP/GTP exchange factor. Finally, we have identified regions of Bud8p and Bud9p that are required for interaction with the cortical tag protein Rax1p. In summary, our study suggests that Bud8p and Bud9p carry distinct domains for delivery of the proteins to the cell poles, for interaction with the general budding machinery and for association with other cortical tag proteins. PMID:17581861

  2. Loss of 6q or 8p23 is associated with the total number of DNA copy number aberrations in adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oga, Atsunori; Uchida, Kenichiro; Nakao, Motonao; Kawauchi, Shigeto; Furuya, Tomoko; Chochi, Yasuyo; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Okada, Takae; Ueyama, Yoshiya; Sasaki, Kohsuke; Yousefpour, Fatemeh

    2011-12-01

    We analyzed 10 adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs) of the salivary glands by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) using DNA chips spotted with 4,030 bacterial artificial chromosome clones. After the data smoothing procedure was applied, a total of 88 DNA copy number aberrations (DCNAs) were detected. The frequent (≥30%) DCNAs were loss of 6q23-27 and 8p23, and gains of 6p, 6q23, 8p23 and 22q13. High-level gains were detected on 12q15, including MDM2 in two cases. These two cases showed an immunohistochemically high-level (>50%) expression of MDM2 and a low-level expression of p53 (<20%). Furthermore, the total number of DCNAs was significantly greater in ACCs with loss of 6q compared to other ACCs, and in ACCs without the loss of 8p23 compared to other ACCs, respectively. Although limitations exist, a-CGH detected several candidate chromosomal imbalances associated with accumulation of DCNAs in ACCs.

  3. Bud8p and Bud9p, Proteins That May Mark the Sites for Bipolar Budding in YeastV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Harkins, Heidi A.; Pagé, Nicolas; Schenkman, Laura R.; De Virgilio, Claudio; Shaw, Sidney; Bussey, Howard; Pringle, John R.

    2001-01-01

    The bipolar budding pattern of a/α Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells appears to depend on persistent spatial markers in the cell cortex at the two poles of the cell. Previous analysis of mutants with specific defects in bipolar budding identified BUD8 and BUD9 as potentially encoding components of the markers at the poles distal and proximal to the birth scar, respectively. Further genetic analysis reported here supports this hypothesis. Mutants deleted for BUD8 or BUD9 grow normally but bud exclusively from the proximal and distal poles, respectively, and the double-mutant phenotype suggests that the bipolar budding pathway has been totally disabled. Moreover, overexpression of these genes can cause either an increased bias for budding at the distal (BUD8) or proximal (BUD9) pole or a randomization of bud position, depending on the level of expression. The structures and localizations of Bud8p and Bud9p are also consistent with their postulated roles as cortical markers. Both proteins appear to be integral membrane proteins of the plasma membrane, and they have very similar overall structures, with long N-terminal domains that are both N- and O-glycosylated followed by a pair of putative transmembrane domains surrounding a short hydrophilic domain that is presumably cytoplasmic. The putative transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the two proteins are very similar in sequence. When Bud8p and Bud9p were localized by immunofluorescence and tagging with GFP, each protein was found predominantly in the expected location, with Bud8p at presumptive bud sites, bud tips, and the distal poles of daughter cells and Bud9p at the necks of large-budded cells and the proximal poles of daughter cells. Bud8p localized approximately normally in several mutants in which daughter cells are competent to form their first buds at the distal pole, but it was not detected in a bni1 mutant, in which such distal-pole budding is lost. Surprisingly, Bud8p localization to the presumptive bud

  4. West syndrome associated with a novel chromosomal anomaly; partial trisomy 8P together with partial monosomy 9P, resulting from a familial unbalanced reciprocal translocation

    PubMed Central

    Erol, Ilknur; Saygı, Semra; Demir, Şenay; Alehan, Fusun; Sahin, Feride Iffet

    2015-01-01

    West syndrome is classified according to the underlying etiology into an acquired West syndrome, a congenital/developmental West syndrome, and West syndrome of unknown etiology. Causes of a congenital/developmental West syndrome are extensive and include chromosomal anomalies. We report on a patient carrying a derivative chromosome originating from the reciprocal unbalanced translocation t (8;9) (p11.2;p22) and presenting with macrocephaly, West syndrome, severe mental motor retardation and hypotonia. As far as we know, this is a new chromosomal anomaly associated with West syndrome. PMID:25878738

  5. Stage 2 of the Wellcome Trust UK-Irish bipolar affective disorder sibling-pair genome screen: evidence for linkage on chromosomes 6q16-q21, 4q12-q21, 9p21, 10p14-p12 and 18q22.

    PubMed

    Lambert, D; Middle, F; Hamshere, M L; Segurado, R; Raybould, R; Corvin, A; Green, E; O'Mahony, E; Nikolov, I; Mulcahy, T; Haque, S; Bort, S; Bennett, P; Norton, N; Owen, M J; Kirov, G; Lendon, C; Jones, L; Jones, I; Holmans, P; Gill, M; Craddock, N

    2005-09-01

    Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) is a common psychiatric disorder with complex genetic aetiology. We have undertaken a genome-wide scan in one of the largest samples of bipolar affected sibling pairs (ASPs) using a two-stage approach combining sample splitting and marker grid tightening. In this second stage analysis, we have examined 17 regions that achieved a nominally significant maximum likelihood LOD score (MLS) threshold of 0.74 (or 1.18 for the X-chromosome) in stage one. The second stage has added 135 ASP families to bring the total stage 2 sample to 395 ASPs. In total, 494 microsatellite markers have been used to screen the human genome at a density of 10 cM in the first stage sample (260 ASPs) and 5 cM in the second stage. Under the broad diagnostic model, two markers gave LOD scores exceeding 3 with two-point analysis: D4S392 (LOD=3.30) and D10S197 (LOD=3.18). Multipoint analysis demonstrated suggestive evidence of linkage between BPAD and chromosomal regions 6q16-q21 (MLS=2.61) and 4q12-q21 (MLS=2.38). 6q16-q21 is of particular interest because our data, together with those from two recent genome scans, make this the best supported linkage region in BPAD. Further, our data show evidence of a gender effect at this locus with increased sharing predominantly within the male-male pairs. Our scan also provides support for linkage (MLS> or =1.5) at several other regions that have been implicated in meta-analyses of bipolar disorder and/or schizophrenia including 9p21, 10p14-p12 and 18q22.

  6. The 9p- syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alfi, O S; Donnell, G N; Allderdice, P W; Derencsenyi, A

    1976-03-01

    Six patients (4 females and 2 males) with terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 distal to band p22 are described. The disorder constitutes a clinically identifiable syndrome consisting of mental retardation, sociable personality, trigonocephaly, mongoloid eyes, wide flat nasal bridge, anteverted nostrils, long upper lip, short neck, long digits mostly secondary to long middle phalanges, and predominance of whorls on fingers. The findings suggest that the clinical features are antithetical to the trisomy 9p syndrome. The deleted chromosome segment is relatively small and could be easily overlooked. It is hoped that this delineation of clinical features seen in 9,p- patients may help in focusing attention on the small deletion.

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis association at 6q23.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Wendy; Barton, Anne; Ke, Xiayi; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Donn, Rachelle; Symmons, Deborah; Hider, Samantha; Bruce, Ian N; Wilson, Anthony G; Marinou, Ioanna; Morgan, Ann; Emery, Paul; Carter, Angela; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Strachan, David; Worthington, Jane

    2007-12-01

    The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) identified nine single SNPs putatively associated with rheumatoid arthritis at P = 1 x 10(-5) - 5 x 10(-7) in a genome-wide association screen. One, rs6920220, was unequivocally replicated (trend P = 1.1 x 10(-8)) in a validation study, as described here. This SNP maps to 6q23, between the genes oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 3 (OLIG3) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3).

  8. The 9p-syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Funderburk, S J; Sparkes, R S; Klisak, I

    1979-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy with 9p- (p22 leads to pter) is reported. He had many features in common with previous 9p- cases, as well as several distinctive features including polydactyly and precocious puberty. Cytogenetic studies revealed a de novo deletion distal to ban 9p22, which was the reported site of chromosome break in 9 of the 10 previous 9p- cases. Evaluation of the human GALT enzyme suggests that its locus is not on the deleted segment. Images PMID:469892

  9. Characterization of frequently deleted 6q locus in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Srikantan, Vasantha; Ma, Lanfeng; Li, Jia; Zhang, Wei; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Makarem, Mazen; Strovel, Jeffrey W; Horrigan, Stephen G; Augustus, Meena; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Moul, Judd W; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Zou, Zhiqiang; Srivastava, Shiv

    2006-11-01

    The long arm of chromosome 6 is frequently deleted in diverse human neoplasms. Our previous study showed a minimum deletion region between markers D6S1056 and D6S300 on chromosome 6q in primary prostate cancer (CaP). In this study, we further refined a 200-kb minimal region of deletion (6qTSG1) centered around D6S1013 marker. The 6qTSG1 transcripts contained complex multiple splicing variants with low or absent expression in CaP cells. None of the transcripts identified contained open reading frames that code for a protein in the NCBI database. The expression of 6qTSG transcripts revealed interesting hormonal regulation relevant to CaP biology. Expression of 6q TSG transcript was induced in LNCaP cells that were cultured in charcoal-stripped serum medium suggesting an upregulation of 6qTSG transcript by androgen ablation and cell growth inhibition/apoptosis. Induction of 6qTSG1 expression in response to androgen ablation was abrogated in androgen-independent derivatives of LNCaP cells. In summary, we have defined a candidate CaP suppressor locus on chromosome 6q16.1, and deletions of this locus are frequently associated with prostate tumorigenesis. In the light of emerging role of noncoding RNAs in cancer biology including CaP, future investigations of 6qTSG11 locus is warranted.

  10. Familial complex chromosomal rearrangement resulting in duplication/deletion of 6q14 to 6q16.

    PubMed

    Roland, B; Lowry, R B; Cox, D M; Ferreira, P; Lin, C C

    1993-03-01

    A familial complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR) was ascertained through a mentally retarded, dysmorphic individual. Carriers of the CCR have the karyotype 46,XX or XY, t(6;15)(q16;q21), ins(3;6)(q12;q14q16), and malsegregation of the CCR resulted in loss of the segment 6q14 to 6q16 in the proband, and in an additional copy of the same segment in three members of the extended family. The proband has features similar to other reported cases with deletion of 6q1. The individuals with duplication of 6q14 to 6q16 have moderate mental retardation, short stature, obesity, microcephaly, brachycephaly, a short smooth philtrum, central hair whorl, simian creases, 5th finger brachydactyly and skeletal disproportion. In the 4-generation family, CCR carriers have a 20% empiric risk of phenotypically abnormal livebirths.

  11. Allelic loss of chromosome 6q in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Brenda C Y; Chan, Wing Y; Li, Christine Y S; Chow, Chit; Ng, Enders K W; Chung, S C Sydney

    2003-12-01

    Loss of the long arm of chromosome 6 (6q) has frequently been reported in gastric carcinoma, and most gastric cancer patients have evidence of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach. However, the relationship between loss of chromosome 6q and intestinal metaplasia has not been studied. In the first part of the study, we define the critical deletion region of chromosome 6q using loss of heterozygosity technique (LOH). Seventeen microsatellite markers were used to detect loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 37 microdissected gastric tumors. We also examined intestinal metaplasia (IM) foci of the stomach in the same cancer patient (17 cases). Losses on chromosome 6q were detected in high frequency (51%) by LOH. Two distinct regions of common allelic loss were identified: one centered on the marker D6S300 (at 6q16.1) and the second on D6S446 (at 6q27), with LOH frequency of 36% and 31.3%, respectively. The deletions fall into 2 discrete regions, suggesting the existence of at least 2 tumor suppressor genes in 6q. The losses at 6q27 were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization study (FISH). In the cases with LOH in the tumor, no LOH were detected in the autologous IM areas, but losses were detected by FISH. In some cases, these genetic changes may be acquired in the transition from normal gastric mucosa to intestinal metaplasia.

  12. Highly frequent allelic loss of chromosome 6q16-23 in osteosarcoma: involvement of cyclin C in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Norihide; Ito, Sachio; Yoshida, Aki; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Numoto, Kunihiko; Jitsumori, Yoshimi; Kanzaki, Hirotaka; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Shimizu, Kenji; Ouchida, Mamoru

    2006-12-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of osteosarcoma is very complicated and associated with chaotic abnormalities on many chromosomal arms. We analyzed 12 cases of osteosarcomas with comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to identify chromosomal imbalances, and detected highly frequent chromosomal alterations in chromosome 6q, 8p, 10p and 10q. To define the narrow rearranged region on chromosome 6 with higher resolution, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis was performed with 21 microsatellite markers. Out of 31 cases, 23 cases (74%) showed allelic loss at least with one marker on chromosome 6q. We identified two distinct commonly deleted regions on chromosome 6 using markers D6S1565 located at 6q16 and 6q23MS1 at 6q23. The expression analysis of genes located at the deleted region was performed, and the decreased mRNA expression of the CCNC gene, one of the regulators of cell cycle, was detected. Growth of osteosarcoma cell line was significantly suppressed after the CCNC cDNA transfection. Fine mapping of the deleted region containing a possible tumor suppressor gene and the transfection assay suggest that the CCNC is a candidate tumor suppressor gene.

  13. The human c-ros gene (ROS) is located at chromosome region 6q16----6q22.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, L; Louie, E; Tsujimoto, Y; Balduzzi, P C; Huebner, K; Croce, C M

    1986-09-01

    The human homolog, c-ros, of the transforming gene, v-ros, of the avian sarcoma virus, UR2, has been isolated from a human genomic library. A single-copy fragment from the human c-ros genomic clone has been used to map the human c-ros homolog (ROS) to human chromosome region 6q16----6q22 by somatic cell hybrid analysis and chromosomal in situ hybridization. Thus, the c-ros gene joins the c-myb oncogene, which is distal to the c-ros gene on the long arm of human chromosome 6, as a candidate for involvement in chromosome 6q deletions and rearrangements seen in various malignancies.

  14. Congenital hydrocephalus and hemivertebrae associated with de novo partial monosomy 6q (6q25.3→qter)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y; Choy, K-W; Xie, H-N; Chen, M; He, W-Y; Gong, Y-F; Liu, H-Y; Song, Y-Q; Xian, Y-X; Sun, X-F; Chen, X-J

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to describe a prenatal case of congenital hydrocephalus and hemivertebrae with a 6q terminal deletion and to investigate the possible correlation between the genotype and phenotype of the proband. We performed an array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis on a fetus diagnosed with congenital hydrocephalus and hemivertebrae. The deletion, spanning 10.06 Mb from 6q25.3 to 6qter, was detected in this fetus. The results of aCGH, karyotype and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses in the healthy parents were normal, which confirmed that the proband’s copy-number variant (CNV) was de novo. This deleted region encompassed 97 genes, including 28 OMIM genes. We discussed four genes (TBP, PSMB1, QKI and Pacrg) that may be responsible for hydrocephalus while the T gene may have a role in hemivertebra. We speculate that five genes in the 6q terminal deletion region were potentially associated with hemivertebrae and hydrocephalus in the proband. PMID:26929909

  15. Transcriptional map of chromosome region 6q16-->q21.

    PubMed

    Karayianni, E; Magnanini, C; Orphanos, V; Negrini, M; Maniatis, G M; Spathas, D H; Barbanti-Brodano, G; Morelli, C

    1999-01-01

    We present the transcription map of chromosome region 6q16-->q21 by mapping fifteen known genes within this region. Five genes lay in the subregion containing a tumor suppressor gene, eight genes are located in the subregion harboring a senescence gene, and two genes are distal to the latter region. The precise location of the genes was obtained using a previously described translocation and deletion mouse/human hybrid panel. An even more accurate definition was possible for the genes spanning the senescence gene region, since a previously described YAC contig with its restriction map was available. From this transcription map it is possible to derive a large region of synteny with mouse chromosome 10.

  16. Putative tumor suppressor loci at 6q22 and 6q23-q24 are involved in the malignant progression of sporadic endocrine pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Barghorn, A; Speel, E J; Farspour, B; Saremaslani, P; Schmid, S; Perren, A; Roth, J; Heitz, P U; Komminoth, P

    2001-06-01

    Our previous comparative genomic hybridization study on sporadic endocrine pancreatic tumors (EPTs) revealed frequent losses on chromosomes 11q, 3p, and 6q. The aim of this study was to evaluate the importance of 6q losses in the oncogenesis of sporadic EPTs and to narrow down the smallest regions of allelic deletion. A multimodal approach combining polymerase chain reaction-based allelotyping, double-target fluorescence in situ hybridization, and comparative genomic hybridization was used in a collection of 109 sporadic EPTs from 93 patients. Nine polymorphic microsatellite markers (6q13 to 6q25-q27) were investigated, demonstrating a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 62.2% of the patients. A LOH was significantly more common in tumors >2 cm in diameter than below this threshold as well as in malignant than in benign tumors. We were able to narrow down the smallest regions of allelic deletion at 6q22.1 (D6S262) and 6q23-q24 (D6S310-UTRN) with LOH-frequencies of 50.0% and 41.2 to 56.3%, respectively. Several promising tumor suppressor candidates are located in these regions. Additional fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on 46 EPTs using three locus-specific probes (6q21, 6q22, and 6q27) as well as a centromere 6-specific probe revealed complete loss of chromosome 6 especially in metastatic disease. We conclude that the two hot spots found on 6q may harbor putative tumor suppressor genes involved not only in the oncogenesis but maybe also in the malignant and metastatic progression of sporadic EPTs.

  17. Duplication/deletion of chromosome 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, J.H.

    1995-09-11

    The article by Guo et al. provides evidence for deletion of D8S596 loci (assigned to 8p23) in at least some patients with inverted duplications of 8p. Cytogenetic break points forming the inverted duplication are remarkably similar among most of their patients and those reported previously, suggesting a common mechanism for this interesting rearrangement. Why should similar breaks occur in 8p and why is a FISH signal absent in the distal short arm when the ONCOR digoxigenin-labeled probe for loci D8S596 is used? Other studies also indicate that duplication for the region 8p12-p22 is associated with a deletion distal to the duplication itself. 4 refs.

  18. Dermatoglyphic Patterns in 9p Trisomy Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loesch, Danuta; Czyzewska, Jadwiga

    1978-01-01

    Thirty-seven palm prints and 30 sole prints of people with 9p trisomy (a chromosomal anomaly associated with abnormal limb development) were analysed with respect to frequency distribution of loops and triradii on palms, soles, and fingertips, as well as of the total pattern types. (Author)

  19. Interstitial deletion of 6q21-q23 associated with split hand

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Masato; Yoneda, Junko; Azuma, Reiko

    1997-03-31

    We report on a 7-month-old boy with interstitial deletion of 6q21-q23 and split-hand defect. He died at 7 months. This is the fifth patient with distal limb anomaly associated with a rearrangement of 6q21 region, and supports previous suggestions that there may be candidate gene(s) for distal limb development in the 6q21 region. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. 18 CFR 357.4 - FERC Form No. 6-Q, Quarterly report of oil pipeline companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Quarterly report of oil pipeline companies. 357.4 Section 357.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... No. 6-Q, Quarterly report of oil pipeline companies. (a) Prescription. The quarterly financial report form of oil pipeline companies, designated as FERC Form No. 6-Q, is prescribed for the...

  1. 18 CFR 357.4 - FERC Form No. 6-Q, Quarterly report of oil pipeline companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Quarterly report of oil pipeline companies. 357.4 Section 357.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... No. 6-Q, Quarterly report of oil pipeline companies. (a) Prescription. The quarterly financial report form of oil pipeline companies, designated as FERC Form No. 6-Q, is prescribed for the...

  2. Heterogeneity and chronology of 6q15 deletion and ERG-fusion in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, Antje; Freudenthaler, Fabian; Bauer, Melanie; Salomon, Georg; Heinzer, Hans; Michl, Uwe; Steurer, Stefan; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Schlomm, Thorsten; Minner, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is notorious for its heterogeneity, which poses a problem for the applicability of diagnostic molecular markers. However, heterogeneity analysis can provide valuable information on the chronology in which molecular alterations arise. Here, we constructed a heterogeneity tissue microarray (TMA) comprising samples from 10 different tumor areas of 189 prostate cancers each in order to study the sequence of two frequent molecular alterations, i.e. 6q15 deletion and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion. Previous work shows a marked inverse relationship between these alterations, suggesting that presence of one of these alterations might impact development of the other. 6q15 deletion was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and ERG-expression by immunohistochemistry. Only 6.6% of 334 ERG-positive but 28.4% of 440 ERG-negative TMA spots showed 6q15 deletions (p < 0.0001). A breakdown of these data to the level of tumor foci revealed 6q deletions in 138 tumor foci that were large enough to have at least 3 analyzable TMA spots. These included 42 tumor foci with homogeneous ERG positivity and 16 with homogeneous 6q15 deletions. Remarkably, six of the 42 homogeneously ERG-positive tumor foci (14.3%) harbored small 6q15-deleted areas, but none of the 34 6q15-deleted foci showed areas of ERG positivity (p = 0.022). In conclusion, our data suggest that ERG-fusion can precede 6q15 deletion, but not vice versa. The complete absence of ERG-positive tumor areas in 6q15-deleted tumor foci further suggest that the functional consequences of 6q15 deletions may prevent the development of TMPRSS2:ERG fusions. PMID:26684029

  3. Genotype-phenotype correlation in interstitial 6q deletions: a report of 12 new cases.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Veilleux, Martin; Curry, Cynthia; Fisher, Jamie; Deputy, Stephen; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Powell, Cynthia M; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Heese, Bryce; Maisenbacher, Melissa; Stevens, Cathy; Ellison, Jay W; Upton, Sheila; Moeschler, John; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Stevens, Abby; Marion, Robert; Pereira, Elaine Maria; Babcock, Melanie; Morrow, Bernice; Sahoo, Trilochan; Lamb, Allen N; Ballif, Blake C; Paciorkowski, Alex R; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2012-02-01

    Interstitial deletions of 6q are associated with variable phenotypes, including growth retardation, dysmorphic features, upper limb malformations, and Prader-Willi (PW)-like features. Only a minority of cases in the literature have been characterized with high resolution techniques, making genotype-phenotype correlations difficult. We report 12 individuals with overlapping, 200-kb to 16.4-Mb interstitial deletions within 6q15q22.33 characterized by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization to better correlate deletion regions with specific phenotypes. Four individuals have a PW-like phenotype, though only two have deletion of SIM1, the candidate gene for this feature. Therefore, other genes on 6q may contribute to this phenotype including multiple genes on 6q16 and our newly proposed candidate, the transcription cofactor gene VGLL2 on 6q22.2. Two individuals present with movement disorders as a major feature, and ataxia is present in a third. The 4.1-Mb 6q22.1q22.2 critical region for movement disorders includes the cerebellar-expressed candidate gene GOPC. Observed brain malformations include thick corpus callosum in two subjects, cerebellar vermal hypoplasia in two subjects, and cerebellar atrophy in one subject. Seven subjects' deletions overlap a ~250-kb cluster of four genes on 6q22.1 including MARCKS, HDAC2, and HS3ST5, which are involved in neural development. Two subjects have only this gene cluster deleted, and one deletion was apparently de novo, suggesting at least one of these genes plays an important role in development. Although the phenotypes associated with 6q deletions can vary, using overlapping deletions to delineate critical regions improves genotype-phenotype correlation for interstitial 6q deletions.

  4. 78 FR 24187 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 6-Q); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 6-Q); Comment... Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission or FERC) is submitting the information collection FERC Form...

  5. Deletion of 6q16-q21 in human lymphoid malignancies: a mapping and deletion analysis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A; Carrara, P; Duke, V; Sinclair, P; Papaioannou, M; Harrison, C J; Foroni, L

    2000-06-01

    Two distinct regions of minimal deletion (RMD) have been identified at 6q25-q27 in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (RMD-1), and at 6q21-q23 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; RMD-2) by loss of heterozygosity and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies. In this study, 30 overlapping yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs), 1 expressed sequence tag, and 11 novel YAC ends were identified using bidirectional YAC walks between markers D6S447 (proximal) and D6S246 (distal) in RMD-2. The genes AF6q21, human homologue of the Drosophila tailless (HTLX), CD24 antigen, the Kruppel-like zinc finger BLIMP1, and cyclin C (CCNC), previously mapped to 6q21, were accurately positioned in a telomere-to-centromere orientation. Approximately 3.5 Mb were found to separate the BLIMP1 (adjacent to D6S447) and AF6q21 genes (telomeric to D6S246). Deletions of 6q were investigated in 21 cases of ALL using the newly characterized YAC clones in dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization studies. A region centromeric to D6S447 (containing marker D6S283) and a region telomeric to marker CHLC.GGAT16CO2 (and containing marker D6S268) were identified as distinct and nonoverlapping regions of deletion in ALL.

  6. EPHA7, a new target gene for 6q deletion in T-cell lymphoblastic lymphomas.

    PubMed

    López-Nieva, Pilar; Vaquero, Concepción; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; González-Sánchez, Laura; Villa-Morales, María; Santos, Javier; Esteller, Manel; Fernández-Piqueras, José

    2012-02-01

    Cryptic deletions at chromosome 6q are common cytogenetic abnormalities in T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-LBL), but the target genes have not been formally identified. Our results build on detection of specific chromosomal losses in a mouse model of γ-radiation-induced T-LBLs and provide interesting clues for new putative susceptibility genes in a region orthologous to human 6q15-6q16.3. Among these, Epha7 emerges as a bona fide candidate tumor suppressor gene because it is inactivated in practically all the T-LBLs analyzed (100% in mouse and 95.23% in human). We provide evidence showing that Epha7 downregulation may occur, at least in part, by loss of heterozygosity (19.35% in mouse and 12.5% in human) or promoter hypermethylation (51.61% in mouse and 43.75% in human) or a combination of both mechanisms (12.90% in mouse and 6.25% in human). These results indicate that EPHA7 might be considered a new tumor suppressor gene for 6q deletions in T-LBLs. Notably, this gene is located in 6q16.1 proximal to GRIK2 and CASP8AP2, other candidate genes identified in this region. Thus, del6q seems to be a complex region where inactivation of multiple genes may cooperatively contribute to the onset of T-cell lymphomas.

  7. Interstitial deletions of chromosome 6q: genotype-phenotype correlation utilizing array CGH.

    PubMed

    Klein, O D; Cotter, P D; Moore, M W; Zanko, A; Gilats, M; Epstein, C J; Conte, F; Rauen, K A

    2007-03-01

    Interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are relatively rare, with fewer than 100 cases reported. Phenotypic variation is in large part due to differences in size and location of the segmental aneuploidy. We report three new patients with interstitial deletions of chromosome 6q defined at the molecular level by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). In two of three cases, the molecular breakpoints differed from those indicated by conventional karyotyping, demonstrating the enhanced resolution of array CGH. Two patients had minimal deletions of 6 and 8.8 Mb involving 6q16.2-->q21, and the third patient had a deletion of 11.3 Mb spanning 6q15-->q21. All three had developmental delay, craniofacial dysmorphology, and functional eye disorders, suggesting that genes affecting brain and craniofacial development are located in 6q16.2-->q21, the deleted region common to all three patients. Furthermore, gene(s) for discordant phenotypic features, such as central diabetes insipidus, may reside at 6q15, the monosomic region unique to patient 3. All three cases described here showed loss of paternal alleles within the deleted segment, providing further evidence of the predominantly paternal origin for 6q deletions and rearrangements.

  8. 6q deletion in Waldenström macroglobulinemia is associated with features of adverse prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ocio, E M; Schop, R F J; Gonzalez, B; Van Wier, S A; Hernandez-Rivas, J M; Gutierrez, N C; Garcia-Sanz, R; Moro, M J; Aguilera, C; Hernandez, J; Xu, R; Greipp, P R; Dispenzieri, A; Jalal, S M; Lacy, M Q; Gonzalez-Paz, N; Gertz, M A; San Miguel, J F; Fonseca, R

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is an effective technique for the cytogenetic analysis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), but the potential impact of molecular cytogenetics on disease evolution and as a prognostic marker is still unknown. Deletion of the long arm of chromosome 6 (6q-) is the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality in WM. This study analysed the prevalence of this aberration in 102 WM patients, and correlated it with disease characteristics. The incidence of 6q21 deletion was 7% by conventional cytogenetics and 34% when analysed by FISH (54% when cytoplasmic immunoglobulin M-FISH was used). Patients with deletion of 6q displayed features of adverse prognosis, such as higher levels of beta2-microglobulin and monoclonal paraprotein and a greater tendency to display anaemia and hypoalbuminemia. Interestingly, there was a correlation between the presence of 6q deletion and the International Staging System prognostic index (incidence of 6q- among patients stratified in stages 1, 2 and 3 was 24%, 42% and 67% respectively). Those patients diagnosed with smouldering WM who displayed the abnormality showed a trend to an earlier requirement of treatment. Finally, the survival analysis did not show differences between the two groups of patients, probably due to the short follow up of our series.

  9. 6q22.1 microdeletion and susceptibility to pediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Von Allmen, Gretchen K; Graham, Brett H; Wilfong, Angus A; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Ferreira, Jose A; Upton, Sheila J; Moeschler, John B; Bi, Weimin; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaffer, Lisa G; Wai Cheung, Sau; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lalani, Seema R

    2015-02-01

    Genomic copy-number variations (CNVs) constitute an important cause of epilepsies and other human neurological disorders. Recent advancement of technologies integrating genome-wide CNV mapping and sequencing is rapidly expanding the molecular field of pediatric neurodevelopmental disorders. In a previous study, a novel epilepsy locus was identified on 6q16.3q22.31 by linkage analysis in a large pedigree. Subsequent array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) analysis of four unrelated cases narrowed this region to ∼5 Mb on 6q22.1q22.31. We sought to further narrow the critical region on chromosome 6q22. Array CGH analysis was used in genome-wide screen for CNVs of a large cohort of patients with neurological abnormalities. Long-range PCR and DNA sequencing were applied to precisely map chromosomal deletion breakpoints. Finally, real-time qPCR was used to estimate relative expression in the brain of the candidate genes. We identified six unrelated patients with overlapping microdeletions within 6q22.1q22.31 region, three of whom manifested seizures. Deletions were found to be de novo in 5/6 cases, including all subjects presenting with seizures. We sequenced the deletion breakpoints in four patients and narrowed the critical region to a ∼250-kb segment at 6q22.1 that includes NUS1, several expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that are highly expressed in the brain, and putative regulatory sequences of SLC35F1. Our findings indicate that dosage alteration in particular, of NUS1, EST AI858607, or SLC35F1 are important contributors to the neurodevelopmental phenotype associated with 6q22 deletion, including epilepsy and tremors.

  10. Delineation of a minimal region of deletion at 6q16.3 in follicular lymphoma and construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome contig spanning a 6-megabase region of 6q16-q21.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Laura-Jane; Okamoto, Ichiro; Lestou, Valia S; Ludkovski, Olga; Robichaud, Marc; Chhanabhai, Mukesh; Gascoyne, Randy D; Klasa, Richard J; Connors, Joseph M; Marra, Marco A; Horsman, Douglas E; Lam, Wan L

    2004-05-01

    Regional deletions of 6q are frequent karyotypic alterations in malignant lymphoma and are associated with an adverse clinical outcome. One such region of recurrent deletion is 6q16-q21; however, the specific genes affected have not been identified. Our objective in this study was to identify cases with deletion of 6q16-q21 in follicular lymphoma and to define a minimal region of deletion. A physical map of 6q16.2-q21 was constructed using map information from both sequence-based and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) fingerprint-based maps. Forty-three BAC clones spanning a 6-Mb region of 6q16.2-q21 were identified and obtained from the RP-11 library. Selected BACs were fluorescence-labeled and hybridized to a series of 34 follicular lymphomas with a regional 6q deletion detected by G banding. Twenty-four cases with deletion of the 6q16.3 region were detected. A minimal deletion of 2.3 Mb was defined. Our study has identified a limited region of deletion of 6q16.3 that may implicate four known genes in follicular lymphoma and possibly in other cancers. A BAC contig spanning a 6-Mb region has been anchored to the 6q16.2-q21 region. This map represents a useful resource for gene identification in this region, not only in lymphoma but also in other neoplasms with 6q alterations.

  11. 6q deletion detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization using bacterial artificial chromosome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dalsass, Alessia; Mestichelli, Francesca; Ruggieri, Miriana; Gaspari, Paola; Pezzoni, Valerio; Vagnoni, Davide; Angelini, Mario; Angelini, Stefano; Bigazzi, Catia; Falcioni, Sadia; Troiani, Emanuela; Alesiani, Francesco; Catarini, Massimo; Attolico, Immacolata; Scortechini, Ilaria; Discepoli, Giancarlo; Galieni, Piero

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are known to occur at relatively low frequency (3-6%) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and they are more frequently observed in 6q21. Few data have been reported regarding other bands on 6q involved by cytogenetic alterations in CLL. The cytogenetic study was performed in nuclei and metaphases obtained after stimulation with a combination of CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30 and interleukin-2. Four bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones mapping regions in bands 6q16, 6q23, 6q25, 6q27 were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization in 107 CLL cases in order to analyze the occurrence and localization of 6q aberrations. We identified 11 cases (10.2%) with 6q deletion of 107 patients studied with CLL. The trends of survival curves and the treatment-free intervals (TFI) of patients with deletion suggest a better outcome than the other cytogenetic risk groups. We observed two subgroups with 6q deletion as the sole anomaly: two cases with 6q16 deletion, and three cases with 6q25.2-27 deletion. There were differences of age, stage, and TFI between both subgroups. By using BAC probes, we observed that 6q deletion has a higher frequency in CLL and is linked with a good prognosis. In addition, it was observed that the deletion in 6q16 appears to be the most frequent and, if present as the only abnormality, it could be associated with a most widespread disease.

  12. Incomplete penetrance and phenotypic variability of 6q16 deletions including SIM1

    PubMed Central

    El Khattabi, Laïla; Guimiot, Fabien; Pipiras, Eva; Andrieux, Joris; Baumann, Clarisse; Bouquillon, Sonia; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Delobel, Bruno; Demurger, Florence; Dessuant, Hélène; Drunat, Séverine; Dubourg, Christelle; Dupont, Céline; Faivre, Laurence; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Jaillard, Sylvie; Journel, Hubert; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Malan, Valérie; Masurel, Alice; Marle, Nathalie; Missirian, Chantal; Moerman, Alexandre; Moncla, Anne; Odent, Sylvie; Palumbo, Orazio; Palumbo, Pietro; Ravel, Aimé; Romana, Serge; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Valduga, Mylène; Vermelle, Marie; Carella, Massimo; Dupont, Jean-Michel; Verloes, Alain; Benzacken, Brigitte; Delahaye, Andrée

    2015-01-01

    6q16 deletions have been described in patients with a Prader–Willi-like (PWS-like) phenotype. Recent studies have shown that certain rare single-minded 1 (SIM1) loss-of-function variants were associated with a high intra-familial risk for obesity with or without features of PWS-like syndrome. Although SIM1 seems to have a key role in the phenotype of patients carrying 6q16 deletions, some data support a contribution of other genes, such as GRIK2, to explain associated behavioural problems. We describe 15 new patients in whom de novo 6q16 deletions were characterised by comparative genomic hybridisation or single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis, including the first patient with fetopathological data. This fetus showed dysmorphic facial features, cerebellar and cerebral migration defects with neuronal heterotopias, and fusion of brain nuclei. The size of the deletion in the 14 living patients ranged from 1.73 to 7.84 Mb, and the fetus had the largest deletion (14 Mb). Genotype–phenotype correlations confirmed the major role for SIM1 haploinsufficiency in obesity and the PWS-like phenotype. Nevertheless, only 8 of 13 patients with SIM1 deletion exhibited obesity, in agreement with incomplete penetrance of SIM1 haploinsufficiency. This study in the largest series reported to date confirms that the PWS-like phenotype is strongly linked to 6q16.2q16.3 deletions and varies considerably in its clinical expression. The possible involvement of other genes in the 6q16.2q16.3-deletion phenotype is discussed. PMID:25351778

  13. Incomplete penetrance and phenotypic variability of 6q16 deletions including SIM1.

    PubMed

    El Khattabi, Laïla; Guimiot, Fabien; Pipiras, Eva; Andrieux, Joris; Baumann, Clarisse; Bouquillon, Sonia; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Delobel, Bruno; Demurger, Florence; Dessuant, Hélène; Drunat, Séverine; Dubourg, Christelle; Dupont, Céline; Faivre, Laurence; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Jaillard, Sylvie; Journel, Hubert; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Malan, Valérie; Masurel, Alice; Marle, Nathalie; Missirian, Chantal; Moerman, Alexandre; Moncla, Anne; Odent, Sylvie; Palumbo, Orazio; Palumbo, Pietro; Ravel, Aimé; Romana, Serge; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Valduga, Mylène; Vermelle, Marie; Carella, Massimo; Dupont, Jean-Michel; Verloes, Alain; Benzacken, Brigitte; Delahaye, Andrée

    2015-08-01

    6q16 deletions have been described in patients with a Prader-Willi-like (PWS-like) phenotype. Recent studies have shown that certain rare single-minded 1 (SIM1) loss-of-function variants were associated with a high intra-familial risk for obesity with or without features of PWS-like syndrome. Although SIM1 seems to have a key role in the phenotype of patients carrying 6q16 deletions, some data support a contribution of other genes, such as GRIK2, to explain associated behavioural problems. We describe 15 new patients in whom de novo 6q16 deletions were characterised by comparative genomic hybridisation or single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis, including the first patient with fetopathological data. This fetus showed dysmorphic facial features, cerebellar and cerebral migration defects with neuronal heterotopias, and fusion of brain nuclei. The size of the deletion in the 14 living patients ranged from 1.73 to 7.84 Mb, and the fetus had the largest deletion (14 Mb). Genotype-phenotype correlations confirmed the major role for SIM1 haploinsufficiency in obesity and the PWS-like phenotype. Nevertheless, only 8 of 13 patients with SIM1 deletion exhibited obesity, in agreement with incomplete penetrance of SIM1 haploinsufficiency. This study in the largest series reported to date confirms that the PWS-like phenotype is strongly linked to 6q16.2q16.3 deletions and varies considerably in its clinical expression. The possible involvement of other genes in the 6q16.2q16.3-deletion phenotype is discussed.

  14. 6q22.33 microdeletion in a family with intellectual disability, variable major anomalies, and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Hackmann, Karl; Beyer, Anke; Schallner, Jens; Novotna, Barbara; Klink, Barbara; Schröck, Evelin; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2015-11-01

    Interstitial deletions on the long arm of chromosome six have been described for several regions including 6q16, 6q22.1, and 6q21q22.1, and with variable phenotypes such as intellectual disability/developmental delay, growth retardation, major and minor facial anomalies. However, an isolated microdeletion of the sub-band 6q22.33 has not been reported so far and thus, no information about the specific phenotype associated with such a copy number variant is available. Here, we define the clinical picture of an isolated 6q22.33 microdeletion based on the phenotype of six members of one family with loss of approximately 1 Mb in this region. Main clinical features include mild intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities as well as microcephaly, heart defect, and cleft lip and palate.

  15. Mapping of 22 new ESTs around a tumor suppressor gene and a senescence gene at 6q16-->q21.

    PubMed

    Morelli, C; Cardona, F; Boyle, J M; Negrini, M; Barbanti-Brodano, G

    1997-01-01

    Twenty two expressed sequence tags (ESTs) have been mapped at the border of 6q16-->q21 and at the proximal end of 6q21, a candidate for two tumor suppressor genes and a senescence gene. Use of a translocation and deletion hybrid panel together with a 4-Mb YAC contig allowed us to precisely define the position of the ESTs. Thirteen ESTs were placed within the 4-Mb interval at the proximal portion of 6q21 using a restriction map of the YAC contig, seven ESTs span a 2-Mb region on the 6q16-->q21 border, and two are distal to the contig. Refinement of the localization of these ESTs will provide substantial assistance in identifying new genes within the region 6q16-->q21.

  16. Acquired uniparental disomy of chromosome 9p in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linghua; Wheeler, David A; Prchal, Josef T

    2016-08-01

    Acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) is a common and recurrent molecular event in human cancers that leads to homozygosity for tumor suppressor genes as well as oncogenes, while retaining the diploid chromosomal complement. Because of the lack of copy number change, aUPD is undetectable by comparative genome hybridization, so the magnitude of this genetic change was underappreciated in the past. 9p aUPD was first described in 2002 in patients with polycythemia vera (PV). Since then, systematic application of genomewide single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays has indicated that 9p aUPD is the most common chromosomal aberration in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), contributing to discovery of the PV-defining mutation JAK2V617F21. It was also found in other myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, though at a relatively lower frequency. By leading to JAK2V617F 23 homozygosity, 9p aUPD plays a causal role in the development of PV and is also associated with less favorable clinical outcomes. It is also possible that new targets other than JAK2V617F 25 are present within 9p aUPD that may contribute to diversity of PV outcome and phenotype. This review summarizes recent discoveries on 9p aUPD in hematologic malignancies and discusses possible underlying mechanisms and potential roles of 9p aUPD in the pathogenesis of PV, the relationship between 9p aUPD and JAK2V617F29, and possible new cancer-related targets within the 9p aUPD region.

  17. Interstitial deletion 6q16.2q22.2 in a child with ectrodactyly.

    PubMed

    Correa-Cerro, L; Garcíaz-Cruz, D; Díaz-Castaños, L; Figuera, L E; Sanchez-Corona, J

    1996-01-01

    A boy of 16 months of age with psychomotor retardation, short stature, microbrachycephaly, triangular face, microphthalmia, palpebral fissures slanted downward, cardiopathy, simian crease on left hand, agenesis of fourth finger on the right hand and of the nail in the second finger on the right one was studied. The karyotype showed a complement of 46, XY, del(6) (q16.2q22.2). The clinical and cytogenetic analysis with other previous cases described in the literature led us to identificate other patients with ectrodactyly. Therefore as other authors we suggest the possible localization of gene(s) that could have involvement with the development of extremities in this segment.

  18. Substantial reduction of the gastric carcinoma critical region at 6q16.3-q23.1.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, B; Seruca, R; Carneiro, F; Buys, C H; Kok, K

    1999-09-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are a common event in gastric carcinomas. In a previous study, deletion mapping of 6q identified two smallest regions of overlap (SROs) of heterozygous deletions: one interstitial, spanning 12-16 cM, bordered by D6S268 (6q16.3-q21) and ARG1 (6q22.3-q23.1), and one distal to IFNGR1 (6q23-q24), spanning more than 30 cM. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the interstitial SRO was detected in 50% of informative tumors. We analyzed 60 primary gastric tumors with 19 highly polymorphic markers from 6q16.3-q23.3 to delimit the interstitial SRO further. Of the 50 tumors that were informative for at least one locus, 18 (36%) showed allelic imbalance (AI). The overlap of these cases allowed us to define an SRO of approximately 3 Mb flanked by D6S278 and D6S404. AI or LOH of this region occurs in all histologic types of gastric carcinoma and in early stages of development, indicating that loss of a gene from this region of 6q is a crucial step in a main route of gastric carcinogenesis. For cases with retention of 6q, alternative routes of gastric carcinogenesis may exist. Genes Chromosomes Cancer 26:29-34, 1999.

  19. A pure familial 6q15q21 split duplication associated with obesity and transmitted with partial reduction.

    PubMed

    Landais, Emilie; Leroy, Camille; Kleinfinger, Pascale; Brunet, Stéphanie; Koubi, Valérie; Pietrement, Christine; Poli-Mérol, Marie-Laurence; Fiquet, Caroline; Souchon, Pierre-François; Beri, Mylène; Jonveaux, Philippe; Garnotel, Roselyne; Gaillard, Dominique; Doco-Fenzy, Martine

    2015-06-01

    Familial transmission of chromosome 6 duplications is rare. We report on the first observation of a maternally-inherited pure segmental 6q duplication split into two segments, 6q15q16.3 and 6q16.3q21, and associated with obesity. Obesity has previously been correlated to chromosome 6 q-arm deletion but has not yet been assessed in duplications. The aim of this study was to characterize the structure of these intrachromosomal insertional translocations by classic cytogenetic banding, array-CGH, FISH, M-banding and genotyping using microsatellites and SNP array analysis, in a mother and four offspring. The duplicated 6q segments, 9.75 Mb (dup 1) and 7.05 Mb (dup 2) in size in the mother, were inserted distally into two distinct chromosome 6q regions. They were transmitted to four offspring. A son and a daughter inherited the two unbalanced insertions and displayed, like the mother, an abnormal phenotype with facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and morbid obesity. Curiously, two daughters with a normal phenotype inherited only the smaller segment, 6q16.3q21. The abnormal phenotype was associated with the larger proximal 6q15q16.3 duplication. We hypothesize a mechanism for this exceptional phenomenon of recurrent reduction and transmission of the duplication during meiosis in a family. We expect the interpretation of our findings to be useful for genetic counseling and for understanding the mechanisms underlying these large segmental 6q duplications and their evolution.

  20. Common variants at 6q22 and 17q21 are associated with intracranial volume

    PubMed Central

    Ikram, M. Arfan; Fornage, Myriam; Smith, Albert V.; Seshadri, Sudha; Schmidt, Reinhold; Debette, Stéphanie; Vrooman, Henri A.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Ropele, Stefan; Taal, H. Rob; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Coker, Laura H.; Longstreth, W.T.; Niessen, Wiro J.; DeStefano, Anita L.; Beiser, Alexa; Zijdenbos, Alex P.; Struchalin, Maksim; Jack, Clifford R.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Knopman, David S.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pennell, Craig E.; Thiering, Elisabeth; Steegers, Eric A.P.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heinrich, Joachim; Palmer, Lyle J; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; McCarthy, Mark I.; Grant, Struan F.A.; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Sovio, Ulla; Nalls, Mike A.; Au, Rhoda; Hofman, Albert; Gudnason, Haukur; van der Lugt, Aad; Harris, Tamara B.; Meeks, William M.; Vernooij, Meike W.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Catellier, Diane; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Windham, B. Gwen; Wolf, Philip A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Schmidt, Helena; Launer, Lenore J.; Breteler, Monique M.B.; DeCarli, Charles

    2012-01-01

    During aging, intracranial volume remains unchanged and represents maximally attained brain size, while various interacting biological phenomena lead to brain volume loss. Consequently, intracranial volume and brain volume in late life reflect different genetic influences. Our genome-wide association study in 8,175 community-dwelling elderly did not reveal any genome-wide significant associations (p<5*10−8) for brain volume. In contrast, intracranial volume was significantly associated with two loci: rs4273712 (p=3.4*10−11), a known height locus on chromosome 6q22, and rs9915547, tagging the inversion on chromosome 17q21 (p=1.5*10−12). We replicated the associations of these loci with intracranial volume in a separate sample of 1,752 older persons (p=1.1*10−3 for 6q22 and p=1.2*10−3 for 17q21). Furthermore, we also found suggestive associations of the 17q21 locus with head circumference in 10,768 children (mean age 14.5 months). Our data identify two loci associated with head size, with the inversion on 17q21 also likely involved in attaining maximal brain size. PMID:22504418

  1. 75 FR 5061 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form Nos. 6 and 6-Q); Comment Request; Extensions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... information reported on the annual FERC Form 6 and quarterly FERC Form 6-Q provides FERC, as well as customers... jurisdictional entities assists the Commission in its analysis of profitability, efficiency, risk and in...

  2. Defining the region(s) of deletion at 6q16-q22 in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hyytinen, Eija-Riitta; Saadut, Rega; Chen, Ceshi; Paull, Lindsay; Koivisto, Pasi A; Vessella, Robert L; Frierson, Henry F; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2002-07-01

    Deletion of the long arm of chromosome 6 (6q) frequently occurs in many neoplasms, including carcinomas of the prostate and breast and melanoma, suggesting the location of a tumor-suppressor gene or genes at 6q. At present, however, the region of deletion has not been well defined, and the target gene of deletion remains to be identified. In this study, we analyzed 44 primary prostate cancers with 16 polymorphic markers for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) by using PCR-based techniques. We also examined 23 cell lines/xenografts of prostate cancer with 38 markers for LOH by the method of homozygosity mapping of deletion. LOH at 6q16 - q22 was detected in 21 of 44 (48%) primary tumors and in 12 of 23 (52%) cell lines/xenografts. Two regions of LOH were defined. One was 7.5 cM at 6q16 - q21 between markers D6S1716 and D6S1580, and the other was 4.3 cM at 6q22 between D6S261 and D6S1702. Whereas no correlation was found between LOH at 6q16-q22 and patient age at diagnosis or Gleason score, tumors at higher stage appear to have more frequent LOH. These findings suggest that deletion of 6q16 - q22 is a frequent event in prostate cancer, and that the deletion originates from two distinct regions. These results should be useful in identifying the target gene(s) of deletion at 6q.

  3. Characterizations of 9p21 candidate genes in familial melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.J.; Flores, J.F.; Glendening, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    We have previously collected and characterized 16 melanoma families for the inheritance of a familial melanoma predisposition gene on 9p21. Clear evidence for genetic linkage has been detected in 8 of these families with the 9p21 markers D9S126 and 1FNA, while linkage of the remaining families to this region is less certain. A candidate for the 9p21 familial melanoma gene, the cyclin kinase inhibitor gene p16 (also known as the multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1) gene), has been recently indentified. Notably, a nonsense mutation within the p16 gene has been detected in the lymphoblastoid cell line DNA from a dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS), or familial melanoma, patient. The p16 gene is also known to be frequently deleted or mutated in a variety of tumor cell lines (including melanoma) and resides within a region that has been defined as harboring the 9p21 melanoma predisposition locus. This region is delineated on the distal side by the marker D9S736 (which resides just distal to the p16 gene) and extends in a proximal direction to the marker D9S171. Overall, the entire distance between these two loci is estimated at 3-5Mb. Preliminary analysis of our two largest 9p21-linked melanoma kindreds (by direct sequencing of PCR products) has not yet revealed mutations within the coding region of the p16 gene. Others have reported that 8/11 unrelated 9p21-linked melanoma families do not appear to carry p16 mutations; thus the possibility exists that p16 is not a melanoma susceptibility gene per se, although it appears to play some role in melanoma tumor progression. Our melanoma kindred DNAs are currently being analyzed by SSCP using primers that amplify exons of other candidate genes from the 9p21 region implicated in familial melanoma. These novel genes reside within a distinct critical region of homozygous loss in melanoma which is located >2 Mb from the p16 gene on 9p21.

  4. A locus for bilateral occipital polymicrogyria maps to chromosome 6q16-q22.

    PubMed

    Ben Cheikh, Bouchra Ouled Amar; Baulac, Stéphanie; Lahjouji, Fatiha; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Couarch, Philippe; Khalili, Naima; Regragui, Wafae; Lehericy, Stéphane; Ruberg, Merle; Benomar, Ali; Heath, Simon; Chkili, Taib; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Jiddane, Mohamed; Ouazzani, Reda; LeGuern, Eric

    2009-02-01

    We describe the clinical, radiographic, and genetic features of a large consanguineous Moroccan family in which bilateral occipital polymicrogyria segregated as an autosomal recessive trait. Six affected members of the family had partial complex seizures often associated with behavioral abnormalities. On MRI, three patients had a thickened irregular cortex in the lateral occipital lobes with small gyri. A high-density genome-wide scan with 10,000 SNPs established linkage by homozygosity mapping to a 14-Mb region on chromosome 6q16-q22. Candidate genes by function (TUBE1, GRIK2, GPRC6A, GPR6, NR2E1, MICAL1, and MARCKS) in this locus were screened for mutations.

  5. Localization of an epithelial-specific receptor kinase (EDDR1) to chromosome 6q16.

    PubMed

    Shelling, A N; Butler, R; Jones, T; Laval, S; Boyle, J M; Ganesan, T S

    1995-01-20

    A protein receptor tyrosine kinase (EDDR1) has been isolated from a complementary DNA library of SKOV-3, an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line. The primary structure of the predicted amino acid sequence of the protein shows a novel N-terminal region that has homology to a factor VIII-like domain. The C-terminal catalytic domain has all of the canonical sequence motifs of a receptor tyrosine kinase with homology to the TRK-2H protein (49%), which suggests that it is a type II receptor. It is expressed in epithelial cells of several tissues. To determine the chromosomal localization of the gene, somatic cell hybrids were analyzed by PCR amplification using oligonucleotide primers specific for EDDR1. Segregation was observed to a hybrid containing human chromosome 6. Cosmids for EDDR1 were isolated from a human chromosome 6 cosmid library and were shown by fluorescence in situ hybridization to map to 6q16.

  6. Localization of an epithelial-specific receptor kinase (EDDR1) to chromosome 6q16

    SciTech Connect

    Shelling, A.N.; Butler, R.; Laval, S.

    1995-01-20

    A protein receptor tyrosine kinase (EDDR1) has been isolated from a complementary DNA library of SROV-3, an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line. The primary structure of the predicted amino acid sequence of the protein shows a novel N-terminal region that has homology to a factor VIII-like domain. The C-terminal catalytic domain has all of the canonical sequence motifs of a receptor tyrosine kinase with homology to the TRK-2H protein (49%), which suggests that it is a type II receptor. It is expressed in epithelial cells of several tissues. To determine the chromosomal localization of the gene, somatic cell hybrids were analyzed by PCR amplification using oligonucleotide primers specific for EDDR1. Segregation was observed to a hybrid containing human chromosome 6. Cosmids for EDDR1 were isolated from a human chromosome 6 cosmid library and were shown by fluorescence in situ hybridization to map to 6q16. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Coexistence of 9p Deletion Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Günes, Serkan; Ekinci, Özalp; Ekinci, Nuran; Toros, Fevziye

    2017-01-01

    Deletion or duplication of the short arm of chromosome 9 may lead to a variety of clinical conditions including craniofacial and limb abnormalities, skeletal malformations, mental retardation, and autism spectrum disorder. Here, we present a case report of 5-year-old boy with 9p deletion syndrome and autism spectrum disorder.

  8. Common Genetic Variants on 6q24 Associated With Exceptional Episodic Memory Performance in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Barral, Sandra; Cosentino, Stephanie; Christensen, Kaare; Newman, Anne B.; Perls, Thomas T.; Province, Michael A.; Mayeux, Richard

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE There aregenetic influences on memory ability as we age. but no specific genes have been identified. OBJECTIVE To use a cognitive endophenotype. exceptional episodic memory(EEM) performance. derived from nondemented offspring from the Long Life FamilyStudy(LLFS) to identify genetic variants that may be responsible for the high cognitive performance of LLFS participants and further replicate these variants using an additional 4006 nondemented individuals from 4 independent elderly cohorts DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A total of 467 LLFS participants from 18 families with 2 or more offspring that exhibited exceptional memory performance were used for genome-wide linkage analysis Adjusted multivariate linear analyses in the 40-megabase region encompassing the linkage peak were conducted using 4 independent replication data sets that included 4006 nondemented elderly individuals. Results of the individual replication cohorts were combined by meta-analysis MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Episodic memory scores computed as the mean of the 2 standardized measures of Logical Memory IA and IIA RESULTS Heritability estimates indicated a significant genetic component for E EM (h2 = 0.21; SE = 0.09) Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed that EEM was linked to the 6q24 region (maximum logarithm of odds score, 3.64) Association analysis in LLFS families identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) nominally associated with EEM in the 40-megabase window encompassing the linkage peak Replication in one cohort identified a set of 26 SNPs associated with episodic memory (P ≤ 05) Meta-analysis of the 26 SNPs using the 4 independent replication cohorts found SN Ps rs9321334 and rs6902875 to be nominally significantly associated with episodic memory (P= .009 and P = .013. respectively). With meta-analysis restricted to individuals lacking an APOE ε4 allele. SNP rs6902875 became statistically significant (meta-analysis. P = 6.7 × 10−5) Haplotypeanalysis incorporating the

  9. Phenotypic variability in patients with interstitial 6q21-q22 microdeletion and Acro-Cardio-Facial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anju; Hebbar, Malavika; Harms, Frederike L; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Girisha, Katta M; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2016-11-01

    Deletions of 6q are known to be associated with variable clinical phenotypes including facial dysmorphism, hand malformations, heart defects, microcephaly, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a 7-year-old boy evaluated for facial dysmorphism, trigonocephaly, microcephaly, global developmental delay, and behavioral abnormalities. Molecular karyotyping revealed a 13-Mb deletion within 6q21-q22.31, (chr6:105,771,520-119,130,805; hg19, GRch37) comprising 81 genes. Review of 15 cases with interstitial 6q21-q22.3 deletion from the literature showed that facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and corpus callosum abnormalities are the most consistent clinical features in these individuals. Deleted genes and breakpoints in the 6q21-q22 region of the patient reported here are similar to two earlier reported cases with the clinical diagnosis of Acro-Cardio-Facial syndrome. However, the present case lacks characteristic clinical findings of Acro-Cardio-Facial syndrome. We discuss, the considerable phenotypic variability seen in individuals with 6q21-q22 microdeletion and emphasize the need for further scrutiny into the hypothesis of Acro-Cardio-Facial syndrome being a microdeletion syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A malformed newborn with 9p and 4q trisomy.

    PubMed

    Fryns, J P; Azou, M; Devliegher, H; Eggermont, E; van den Berghe, H

    1981-01-01

    A malformed male newborn with partial trisomy 9p (qter-9q13) and distal 4q trisomy (4qter-4q31), being the unbalanced product of a balanced reciprocal translocation in the mother karyotype: 46,XX,t(4;9)(q31;q13) is reported. Besides the typical craniofacial stigmata of pure 9q trisomy the child presented with poor neurological condition and failure to thrive.

  11. A human melanoma metastasis-suppressor locus maps to 6q16.3-q23.

    PubMed

    Miele, M E; Jewett, M D; Goldberg, S F; Hyatt, D L; Morelli, C; Gualandi, F; Rimessi, P; Hicks, D J; Weissman, B E; Barbanti-Brodano, G; Welch, D R

    2000-05-15

    Loss, deletion or rearrangement along large portions of the long arm (q-arm) of chromosome 6 occurs in >80% of late-stage human melanomas, suggesting that genes controlling malignant characteristics are encoded there. Metastasis, but not tumorigenicity, was completely suppressed in the human melanoma cell line C8161 into which an additional intact chromosome 6 had been introduced by microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Our objective was to refine the location of a putative metastasis suppressor gene. To do this, we transferred an intact (neo6) and a deletion variant [neo6qdel; neo6(del)(q16.3-q23)] of neomycin-tagged human chromosome 6 into metastatic C8161 subclone 9 (C8161.9) by MMCT. Single cell hybrid clones were selected in G-418 and isolated. Following verification that the hybrids retained the expected regions of chromosome 6 using a panel of polymorphic sequence-tagged sites, the hybrids were tested for tumorigenicity and metastasis in athymic mice. As reported previously, intact, normal chromosome 6 suppressed metastasis whether tumor cells were injected i.v. or into an orthotopic (i.e., intradermal) site. In contrast, metastasis was not suppressed in the neo6qdel hybrids. Tumorigenicity was unaffected in hybrids prepared with either chromosome 6 donor. These data strongly suggest that a human melanoma metastasis suppressor locus maps between 6q16.3-q23 ( approximately 40 cM).

  12. Delineation of candidate genes responsible for structural brain abnormalities in patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q27

    PubMed Central

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Nagamani, Sandesh CS; Erez, Ayelet; Hunter, Jill V; Holder Jr, J Lloyd; Carlin, Mary E; Bader, Patricia I; Perras, Helene MF; Allanson, Judith E; Newman, Leslie; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna; Powell, Erin; Mohanty, Aaron; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2015-01-01

    Patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q present with structural brain abnormalities including agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and cerebellar malformations. The 6q27 region harbors genes that are important for the normal development of brain and delineation of a critical deletion region for structural brain abnormalities may lead to a better genotype–phenotype correlation. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven unrelated patients with deletions involving chromosome 6q27. All patients had structural brain abnormalities. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. The smallest region of overlap spans 1.7 Mb and contains DLL1, THBS2, PHF10, and C6orf70 (ERMARD) that are plausible candidates for the causation of structural brain abnormalities. Our study reiterates the importance of 6q27 region in normal development of brain and helps identify putative genes in causation of structural brain anomalies. PMID:24736736

  13. A defined chromosome 6q fragment (at D6S310) harbors a putative tumor suppressor gene for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Theile, M; Seitz, S; Arnold, W; Jandrig, B; Frege, R; Schlag, P M; Haensch, W; Guski, H; Winzer, K J; Barrett, J C; Scherneck, S

    1996-08-15

    Recent evidence obtained by cytogenetic and molecular studies indicates that in breast cancer chromosome 6q is often affected by genetic changes suggesting the existence of putative tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). However the function of gene(s) on this chromosome in breast cancer suppression is not understood. To substantiate further the presence of breast cancer related TSGs at 6q and to define their location, we first performed microcell-mediated transfer of chromosome 6 to CAL51 breast cancer cells for studying possible suppression of malignant phenotype and secondly, we analysed DNAs from 46 primary breast cancers for loss of constitutive heterozygosity (LOH) using 24 poly-morphic microsatellite markers. The chromosome transfer resulted in loss of tumorigenicity and reversion of other neoplastic properties of the microcell hybrids. Polymorphism analysis of single hybrids revealed that they harbored only a small donor chromosome fragment defined by the marker D6S310 (6q23.3-q25) and flanked by D6S292 and D6S311. The LOH data suggest that four tumor suppressor gene loci mapped to the central and distal portion of 6q may be independently deleted in breast cancer. One of these regions corresponds to the region identified by chromosome transfer.

  14. Comet 9P/Tempel 1: Evolution of the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossacki, Konrad J.

    2015-01-01

    Comet 9P/Tempel 1 was imaged during two consecutive perihelion passages. According to Thomas et al. (Thomas, et al. [2013]. Icarus 222, 453-466) one scarp located at 40°S receded up to 50 m. I attempted to use this observation to constrain local material properties of the nucleus. For this purpose I simulated recession of a model scarp due to sub-dust sublimation of ice. I have found, that the observed recession of the scarp can be reproduced when the dust mantle has high porosity about 0.8 and low thermal conductivity about 10 mW m-1 K-1, as found for artificial dust layers (Krause, M., Blum, J., Skorov, Yu.V., Trieloff, M. [2011]. Icarus 214, 286-296). Taking into account the temperature dependence of the sublimation coefficient of ice reduces the calculated recession rate of the scarp by about 40%.

  15. Ulnar ray defect in an infant with a 6q21;7q31.2 translocation: Further evidence of the existence of a limb defect gene in 6q21

    SciTech Connect

    Gurrieri, F.; Genuardi, M.; Pomponi, M.G.

    1995-01-30

    Ectrodactyly is a developmental defect of the distal limbs characterized by marked clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity, also reflected in the observation of different chromosome abnormalities nonrandomly associated with longitudinal postaxial limb deficiencies. The one most frequently found in patients with split hand-split foot (SHSF) involves chromosome band 7q22. Recently, structural anomalies of chromosome 6q21 have been reported in 2 unrelated patients with SHSF, suggesting that this region may also contain genes responsible for limb development. We report on a third patient who had a de novo, apparently balanced t(6;7)(q21;q31.2) translocation and bilateral ulnar aplasia with postaxial oligodactyly. In spite of the different phenotypic effects observed in these 3 patients, we consider our case as further evidence that genes in 6q21 may play a role in distal limb development. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Physical and transcriptional map of the mouse Chromosome 10 proximal region syntenic to human 6q16-q21.

    PubMed

    Chalhoub, N; Benachenhou, N; Vacher, J

    2001-12-01

    Toward the isolation of the grey-lethal (gl) gene, we have genetically localized this locus on mouse Chromosome (Chr) 10 between the Fyn gene and the D10Mit148 microsatellite marker. Here, we have screened five yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) libraries and isolated more than 100 YAC clones mapping to this region. Forty-two clones were characterized and assembled in an approximately 8.5 megabases (Mb) contig showing high linkage conservation with the human 6q16-q21 interval. During this study, 24 specific novel sequence-tagged sites (STSs) were derived from YAC insert ends, and 15 mouse genes were precisely mapped to the contig. The physical and transcriptional map presented here will provide novel resources to isolate the gl locus associated with osteopetrosis, and will also provide candidate loci for other defects mapped on human Chr 6q.

  17. Admixture mapping identifies a locus on 6q25 associated with breast cancer risk in US Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Fejerman, Laura; Chen, Gary K.; Eng, Celeste; Huntsman, Scott; Hu, Donglei; Williams, Amy; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; John, Esther M.; Via, Marc; Gignoux, Christopher; Ingles, Sue; Monroe, Kristine R.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; González Burchard, Esteban; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Ziv, Elad

    2012-01-01

    Among US Latinas and Mexican women, those with higher European ancestry have increased risk of breast cancer. We combined an admixture mapping and genome-wide association mapping approach to search for genomic regions that may explain this observation. Latina women with breast cancer (n= 1497) and Latina controls (n= 1272) were genotyped using Affymetrix and Illumina arrays. We inferred locus-specific genetic ancestry and compared the ancestry between cases and controls. We also performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association analyses in regions of interest. Correction for multiple-hypothesis testing was conducted using permutations (Pcorrected). We identified one region where genetic ancestry was significantly associated with breast cancer risk: 6q25 [odds ratio (OR) per Indigenous American chromosome 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65–0.85, P= 1.1 × 10−5, Pcorrected= 0.02]. A second region on 11p15 showed a trend towards association (OR per Indigenous American chromosome 0.77, 95% CI: 0.68–0.87, P= 4.3 × 10−5, Pcorrected= 0.08). In both regions, breast cancer risk decreased with higher Indigenous American ancestry in concordance with observations made on global ancestry. The peak of the 6q25 signal includes the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) gene and 5′ region, a locus previously implicated in breast cancer. Genome-wide association analysis found that a multi-SNP model explained the admixture signal in both regions. Our results confirm that the association between genetic ancestry and breast cancer risk in US Latinas is partly due to genetic differences between populations of European and Indigenous Americans origin. Fine-mapping within the 6q25 and possibly the 11p15 loci will lead to the discovery of the biologically functional variant/s behind this association. PMID:22228098

  18. Identifying Causal Genes at the Multiple Sclerosis Associated Region 6q23 Using Capture Hi-C

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen; Orozco, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Background The chromosomal region 6q23 has been found to be associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) predisposition through genome wide association studies (GWAS). There are four independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with MS in this region, which spans around 2.5 Mb. Most GWAS variants associated with complex traits, including these four MS associated SNPs, are non-coding and their function is currently unknown. However, GWAS variants have been found to be enriched in enhancers and there is evidence that they may be involved in transcriptional regulation of their distant target genes through long range chromatin looping. Aim The aim of this work is to identify causal disease genes in the 6q23 locus by studying long range chromatin interactions, using the recently developed Capture Hi-C method in human T and B-cell lines. Interactions involving four independent associations unique to MS, tagged by rs11154801, rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 were analysed using Capture Hi-C Analysis of Genomic Organisation (CHiCAGO). Results We found that the pattern of chromatin looping interactions in the MS 6q23 associated region is complex. Interactions cluster in two regions, the first involving the rs11154801 region and a second containing the rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 SNPs. Firstly, SNPs located within the AHI1 gene, tagged by rs11154801, are correlated with expression of AHI1 and interact with its promoter. These SNPs also interact with other potential candidate genes such as SGK1 and BCLAF1. Secondly, the rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 SNPs interact with each other and with immune-related genes such as IL20RA, IL22RA2, IFNGR1 and TNFAIP3. Finally, the above-mentioned regions interact with each other and therefore, may co-regulate these target genes. Conclusion These results suggest that the four 6q23 variants, independently associated with MS, are involved in the regulation of several genes, including immune genes. These findings

  19. High affinity human IFN-gamma-binding capacity is encoded by a single receptor gene located in proximity to c-ros on human chromosome region 6q16 to 6q22.

    PubMed

    Pfizenmaier, K; Wiegmann, K; Scheurich, P; Krönke, M; Merlin, G; Aguet, M; Knowles, B B; Ucer, U

    1988-08-01

    We have used human-rodent somatic cell hybrids to investigate the regional localization of the IFN-gamma R gene on human chromosome 6 and studied functional and antigenic characteristics of the expressed IFN-gamma R by Scatchard analyses of 125I-IFN-gamma binding and binding of an anti-receptor mAb (A6C5). The data obtained revealed coordinate expression of IFN-gamma- and A6C5-binding capacity as well as competition in binding to chromosome 6-positive hybrids and normal cells, indicating that the A6C5-defined protein is by itself capable of high affinity IFN-gamma binding and, thus, is likely to constitute the major IFN-gamma R protein of distinct cell types. The receptor gene could be allocated to region 6q16 to 6q22, which also contains the c-ros oncogene. Genetic linkage of the IFN-gamma R gene to an oncogene located in a region of non-random chromosomal aberrations may have a causal relationship to the deregulated IFN-gamma R expression in several malignancies.

  20. Endocrine phenotype of 6q16.1-q21 deletion involving SIM1 and Prader-Willi syndrome-like features.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kosuke; Housam, Ryan; Kapadia, Chirag; Stallings, Virginia A; Medne, Livija; Shaikh, Tamim H; Kublaoui, Bassil M; Zackai, Elaine H; Grimberg, Adda

    2013-12-01

    Proximal interstitial 6q deletion involving Single-minded 1 (SIM1) gene causes a syndromic form of obesity mimicking Prader-Willi syndrome. In addition to obesity, Prader-Willi syndrome includes several other endocrinopathies, such as hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The endocrine phenotype of interstitial 6q deletion remains largely unknown, although clinical similarities between Prader-Willi syndrome and interstitial 6q deletion suggest endocrine abnormalities also may contribute to the interstitial 6q deletion phenotype. This report describes the endocrine phenotype in a propositus with the Prader-Willi-like syndrome associated with an interstitial 6q deletion including the SIM1 gene. Detailed endocrine evaluation of the propositus during childhood and adolescence revealed hypopituitarism, though initial endocrine evaluations during infancy were unremarkable. Our patient raises the possibility that hypopituitarism may be part of the phenotype, especially short stature, caused by interstitial 6q deletion. SIM1 plays an important role in the development of neuroendocrine lineage cells, implicating SIM1 haploinsufficiency in the pathophysiology of hypopituitarism seen in our propositus. Early identification of endocrine abnormalities can improve clinical outcome by allowing timely introduction of hormone replacement therapy. Hence, we suggest that detailed endocrine evaluation and longitudinal endocrine follow up be performed in individuals with proximal interstitial 6q deletion involving SIM1.

  1. Development of a Novel Prognostic Marker to Link a Potential Tumor Suppressor Gene at Chromosome 6q to Aberrant Signal Transduction Pathway in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    frequency of LOH is found in 6q24 region in breast cancers Laforin gene EPM2A is located in 6q24 in human genome (9-11). The long arm of chromosome 6 is...in patients (Wang et al., 2002). Although defects in the EPM2a gene have not been implicated in cancers, EPM2a is located in 6q24 of the human genome ...lymphoma, we treated the genomic DNA with bisulfite and sequenced 4 PCR products covering 102 CpG di-nucleotides within the 5’-CpG island. Our preliminary

  2. Genome-wide association study of breast cancer in Latinas identifies novel protective variants on 6q25

    PubMed Central

    Fejerman, Laura; Ahmadiyeh, Nasim; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Beckman, Kenneth B.; Caswell, Jennifer L.; Tsung, Karen; John, Esther M.; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Echeverry, María Magdalena; Tuazon, Anna Marie D.; Ramirez, Carolina; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Echeverry, María Magdalena; Bohórquez, Mabel Elena; Prieto, Rodrigo; Criollo, Ángel; Ramírez, Carolina; Estrada, Ana Patricia; Suáres, John Jairo; Mateus, Gilbert; Castro, Jorge Mario; Sánchez, Yesid; Murillo, Raúl; Lucia Serrano, Martha; Sanabria, Carolina; Olaya, Justo Germán; Bolaños, Fernando; Vélez, Alejandro; Carmona, Jenny Andrea; Vélez, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Nancy Guerrero; Serón Sousa, Cristina; Mendez, Cesar Eduardo Alvarez; Galviz, Ana Isabel Orduz; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Eng, Celeste; Gonzalez-Burchard, Esteban; Henderson, Brian; Marchand, Loic Le; Kooperberg, Charles; Hou, Lifang; Agalliu, Ilir; Kraft, Peter; Lindström, Sara; Perez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Ziv, Elad

    2014-01-01

    The genetic contributions to breast cancer development among Latinas are not well understood. Here we carry out a genome-wide association study of breast cancer in Latinas and identify a genome-wide significant risk variant, located 5′ of the Estrogen Receptor 1 gene (ESR1; 6q25 region). The minor allele for this variant is strongly protective (rs140068132: odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53–0.67, P=9 × 10−18), originates from Indigenous Americans and is uncorrelated with previously reported risk variants at 6q25. The association is stronger for oestrogen receptor-negative disease (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.21–0.54) than oestrogen receptor-positive disease (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.49–0.80; P heterogeneity=0.01) and is also associated with mammographic breast density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer (P=0.001). rs140068132 is located within several transcription factor-binding sites and electrophoretic mobility shift assays with MCF-7 nuclear protein demonstrate differential binding of the G/A alleles at this locus. These results highlight the importance of conducting research in diverse populations. PMID:25327703

  3. Interstitial Deletions at 6q14.1q15 Associated with Developmental Delay and a Marfanoid Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, R.B.; Chernos, J.E.; Connelly, M.S.; Wyse, J.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    There are a number of reports of interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 that have developmental delay and obesity suggesting that this is a distinct phenotype almost like Prader-Willi syndrome. Here we report a patient with a similar deletion but a strikingly different phenotype, one more in keeping with Marfan syndrome, although he does not fulfil the criteria for that syndrome. Array comparative genomic hybridization was performed to investigate a patient with a striking phenotype. This revealed an interstitial deletion of 6q14.1q15. Parental FISH studies were normal, indicating that this is a de novo deletion. Our patient has a completely different phenotype compared to other patients reported to have similar deletions. The common feature is developmental delay, but the body features are quite different in that our patient is tall, strikingly thin with pectus excavatum, scoliosis, skin striae, arachnodactyly, pes planus, cataracts, and a high-arched palate. This contrasts with other patients who have a similar deletion but have short stature and obesity. 6q14.1q15 interstitial deletions can have a very variable phenotype and do not necessarily conform to a clinical recognizable microdeletion syndrome caused by haploinsufficiency of dosage-sensitive genes in that region as proposed by others. PMID:24167463

  4. Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping of the Chromosome 6q21–22.31 Bipolar I Disorder Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jinbo; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; McQueen, Matthew B.; Devlin, Bernie; Purcell, Shaun; Faraone, Stephen V.; Allen, Michael H.; Bowden, Charles L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Fossey, Mark D.; Friedman, Edward S.; Gyulai, Laszlo; Hauser, Peter; Ketter, Terence B.; Marangell, Lauren B.; Miklowitz, David J.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Patel, Jayendra K.; Sachs, Gary S.; Thase, Michael E.; Molay, Francine B.; Escamilla, Michael A.; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.; Sklar, Pamela; Laird, Nan M.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported genome-wide significant evidence for linkage between chromosome 6q and bipolar I disorder (BPI) by performing a meta-analysis of original genotype data from 11 genome scan linkage studies. We now present follow-up linkage disequilibrium mapping of the linked region utilizing 3,047 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in a case–control sample (N = 530 cases, 534 controls) and family-based sample (N = 256 nuclear families, 1,301 individuals). The strongest single SNP result (rs6938431, P=6.72× 10−5) was observed in the case–control sample, near the solute carrier family 22, member 16 gene (SLC22A16). In a replication study, we genotyped 151 SNPs in an independent sample (N = 622 cases, 1,181 controls) and observed further evidence of association between variants at SLC22A16 and BPI. Although consistent evidence of association with any single variant was not seen across samples, SNP-wise and gene-based test results in the three samples provided convergent evidence for association with SLC22A16, a carnitine transporter, implicating this gene as a novel candidate for BPI risk. Further studies in larger samples are warranted to clarify which, if any, genes in the 6q region confer risk for bipolar disorder. PMID:19308960

  5. Cloning and characterization of two overlapping genes in a subregion at 6q21 involved in replicative senescence and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Morelli, C; Magnanini, C; Mungall, A J; Negrini, M; Barbanti-Brodano, G

    2000-07-11

    Two new genes were cloned from region 6q21 and characterized. One gene, C6orf4-6, expresses three mRNA isoforms diverging at the 5' and 3' ends, and encodes two protein isoforms that differ by nine amino acids at their amino terminus. The second gene, C6UAS, is transcribed in the antisense orientation from the complementary strand of C6orf4-6. C6UAS overlaps the second exon of C6orf4, where the start codon of protein isoform 1 is located. C6UAS has no apparent ORF and most likely represents a structural RNA gene that is transcribed but not translated. This feature and the antisense polarity of transcription suggest that C6UAS could play a regulatory role on the expression of C6orf4, as indicated by a significant decrease of endogenous C6orf4 expression after transfection of C6UAS cDNA in human fibroblasts. Neither C6UAS nor C6orf4-6 genes show any homology with known human genes. The two genes were cloned from a subregion at 6q21 containing a replicative senescence gene, a tumor suppressor gene and a gene involved in hereditary schizophrenia. In addition, the common fragile site FRA6F was mapped in the same region. Cloning and characterization of C6orf4-6 and C6UAS may help to clarify the structure and the functional role of this important region.

  6. Genome-wide association study of breast cancer in Latinas identifies novel protective variants on 6q25.

    PubMed

    Fejerman, Laura; Ahmadiyeh, Nasim; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Beckman, Kenneth B; Caswell, Jennifer L; Tsung, Karen; John, Esther M; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Echeverry, María Magdalena; Tuazon, Anna Marie D; Ramirez, Carolina; Gignoux, Christopher R; Eng, Celeste; Gonzalez-Burchard, Esteban; Henderson, Brian; Le Marchand, Loic; Kooperberg, Charles; Hou, Lifang; Agalliu, Ilir; Kraft, Peter; Lindström, Sara; Perez-Stable, Eliseo J; Haiman, Christopher A; Ziv, Elad

    2014-10-20

    The genetic contributions to breast cancer development among Latinas are not well understood. Here we carry out a genome-wide association study of breast cancer in Latinas and identify a genome-wide significant risk variant, located 5' of the Estrogen Receptor 1 gene (ESR1; 6q25 region). The minor allele for this variant is strongly protective (rs140068132: odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0.67, P=9 × 10(-18)), originates from Indigenous Americans and is uncorrelated with previously reported risk variants at 6q25. The association is stronger for oestrogen receptor-negative disease (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.21-0.54) than oestrogen receptor-positive disease (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.49-0.80; P heterogeneity=0.01) and is also associated with mammographic breast density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer (P=0.001). rs140068132 is located within several transcription factor-binding sites and electrophoretic mobility shift assays with MCF-7 nuclear protein demonstrate differential binding of the G/A alleles at this locus. These results highlight the importance of conducting research in diverse populations.

  7. 31 CFR 30.6 - Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirement under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.6 Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply... months the terms of each employee compensation plan and identify and eliminate the features in...

  8. Cloning and expression analysis of a novel gene, RP42, mapping to an autism susceptibility locus on 6q16.

    PubMed

    Mas, C; Bourgeois, F; Bulfone, A; Levacher, B; Mugnier, C; Simonneau, M

    2000-04-01

    We isolated a novel mouse gene, RP42, in a systematic search for genes expressed in proliferating neuroblasts whose human orthologs map to susceptibility loci for autism. This gene is intronless and encodes a putative 259-amino-acid protein that exhibits 30-36% overall sequence identity to a fission yeast and a nematode protein (GenPept Accession Nos. CAA17006 and CAB54261). Nevertheless, no homology to any known gene was found. RP42 has developmentally regulated expression, particularly in proliferating neuroblasts from which neocortical neurons originate. Its human ortholog is located in a cluster of embryonic neuronally expressed genes on the 6q16 chromosome, making it a positional candidate susceptibility gene for autism.

  9. Combined effects of three independent SNPs greatly increase the risk estimate for RA at 6q23.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Gisela; Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Gibbons, Laura J; Bowes, John; Flynn, Edward; Martin, Paul; Wilson, Anthony G; Bax, Deborah E; Morgan, Ann W; Emery, Paul; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Thomson, Wendy; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane

    2009-07-15

    The most consistent finding derived from the WTCCC GWAS for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was association to a SNP at 6q23. We performed a fine-mapping of the region in order to search the 6q23 region for additional disease variants. 3962 RA patients and 3531 healthy controls were included in the study. We found 18 SNPs associated with RA. The SNP showing the strongest association was rs6920220 [P = 2.6 x 10(-6), OR (95% CI) 1.22 (1.13-1.33)]. The next most strongly associated SNP was rs13207033 [P = 0.0001, OR (95% CI) 0.86 (0.8-0.93)] which was perfectly correlated with rs10499194, a SNP previously associated with RA in a US/European series. Additionally, we found a number of new potential RA markers, including rs5029937, located in the intron 2 of TNFAIP3. Of the 18 associated SNPs, three polymorphisms, rs6920220, rs13207033 and rs5029937, remained significant after conditional logistic regression analysis. The combination of the carriage of both risk alleles of rs6920220 and rs5029937 together with the absence of the protective allele of rs13207033 was strongly associated with RA when compared with carriage of none [OR of 1.86 (95% CI) (1.51-2.29)]. This equates to an effect size of 1.50 (95% CI 1.21-1.85) compared with controls and is higher than that obtained for any SNP individually. This is the first study to show that the confirmed loci from the GWA studies, that confer only a modest effect size, could harbour a significantly greater effect once the effect of additional risk variants are accounted for.

  10. Array-CGH study of partial trisomy 9p without mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Bouhjar, Inesse Ben Abdallah; Hannachi, Hanane; Zerelli, Soumaya Mougou; Labalme, Audrey; Gmidène, Abir; Soyah, Najla; Missaoui, Sonia; Sanlaville, Damien; Elghezal, Hatem; Saad, Ali

    2011-07-01

    Partial trisomy 9p is one of the most common detected autosomal structural anomalies, so the phenotype-genotype correlation of this rearrangement has been well described. Despite variation in size of the 9p duplications, trisomy 9p syndrome is characterized by typical dysmorphic features and a variable but constant psychomotor and mental retardation. Previously reported phenotype genotype correlation studies proposed that the critical region for phenotype is located in 9p22. We report here on a new patient with partial trisomy 9p13.3→9pter in an 8-year-old boy with typical trisomy 9p dysmorphic features but a normal mental development. Cytogenetics investigations showed that our patient karyotype was 47,XY,+ der(22)t(9;22)(p13.q11) inherited by a 3:1 disjunction of a maternal reciprocal translocation t(9;22)(p13.q11). FISH and array CGH analysis were used to better characterize duplicated chromosomal regions and showed a large duplication of chromosome 9p13.3→9pter associated to microduplication in 22q11.1. The size of the duplications in chromosomes 9p and 22q were estimated about 33.9 and 2.67 Mb, respectively. The comparison between this case and those reported in the literature allows us to support that all syndromes show variability and that not all partial trisomies 9p are associated with intellectual disability.

  11. A systematic association mapping on chromosome 6q in bipolar affective disorder--evidence for the melanin-concentrating-hormone-receptor-2 gene as a risk factor for bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Abou Jamra, Rami; Schulze, Thomas G; Becker, Tim; Brockschmidt, Felix F; Green, Elaine; Alblas, Margrieta A; Wendland, Jens R; Adli, Mazda; Grozeva, Detelina; Strohmeier, Jana; Georgi, Alexander; Craddock, Nick; Propping, Peter; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus M; Cichon, Sven; Schumacher, Johannes

    2010-06-05

    Strong evidence of linkage between chromosomal region 6q16-q22 and bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) has previously been reported. We conducted a systematic association mapping of the 6q-linkage interval using 617 SNP markers in a BPAD case-control sample of German descent (cases = 330, controls = 325). In this screening step, 46 SNPs showed nominally significant BPAD-association (P-values between 0.0007 and 0.0484). Although none of the 46 SNPs survived correction for multiple testing, they were genotyped in a second and ethnically matched BPAD sample (cases = 328, controls = 397). At the melanin-concentrating-hormone-receptor-2 (MCHR2) gene, we found nominal association in both the initial and second BPAD samples (combined P = 0.008). This finding was followed up by the genotyping of 17 additional MCHR2-SNPs in the combined sample in order to define our findings more precisely. We found that the MCHR2-locus can be divided into three different haplotype-blocks, and observed that the MCHR2-association was most pronounced in BPAD male patients with psychotic symptoms. In two neighboring blocks, putative risk-haplotypes were found to be 7% more frequent in patients (block II: 23.3% vs. 16.2%, P = 0.005, block III: 39.2% vs. 32.0%, P = 0.024), whereas the putative protective haplotypes were found to be 5-8% less frequent in patients (block II: 11.6% vs. 16.4%, P = 0.041, block III: 30.0% vs. 38.8%, P = 0.007). The corresponding odds ratios (single-marker analysis) ranged between 1.25 and 1.46. Our findings may indicate that MCHR2 is a putative risk factor for BPAD. These findings should be interpreted with caution and replicated in independent BPAD samples.

  12. ATP25, a New Nuclear Gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Required for Expression and Assembly of the Atp9p Subunit of Mitochondrial ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiaomei; Barros, Mario H.; Shulman, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    We report a new nuclear gene, designated ATP25 (reading frame YMR098C on chromosome XIII), required for expression of Atp9p (subunit 9) of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial proton translocating ATPase. Mutations in ATP25 elicit a deficit of ATP9 mRNA and of its translation product, thereby preventing assembly of functional F0. Unlike Atp9p, the other mitochondrial gene products, including ATPase subunits Atp6p and Atp8p, are synthesized normally in atp25 mutants. Northern analysis of mitochondrial RNAs in an atp25 temperature-sensitive mutant confirmed that Atp25p is required for stability of the ATP9 mRNA. Atp25p is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein with a predicted mass of 70 kDa. The primary translation product of ATP25 is cleaved in vivo after residue 292 to yield a 35-kDa C-terminal polypeptide. The C-terminal half of Atp25p is sufficient to stabilize the ATP9 mRNA and restore synthesis of Atp9p. Growth on respiratory substrates, however, depends on both halves of Atp25p, indicating that the N-terminal half has another function, which we propose to be oligomerization of Atp9p into a proper size ring structure. PMID:18216280

  13. Detection and characterization of a human G9P[4] rotavirus strain in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiji P; Kaida, Atsushi; Ono, Atsushi; Kubo, Hideyuki; Iritani, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    In a surveillance system in Osaka City, Japan, 48 sporadic rotavirus A (RVA) infections were detected during 2008/2009-2011/2012 seasons. The G/P-genotypes of detected RVAs were G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G9P[4], and G9P[8]. Although G9P[4] is a rare genotype that had not been reported in Japan, it was the second most prevalent genotype, following G1P[8], and accounted for 35.3% of RVA cases in the 2011/2012 season. Further genotyping revealed that the G9P[4] strain had genotype 2 internal protein genes except for NSP3: G9-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T1-E2-H2. Among detected RVA strains, G9P[4] and some G9P[8] strains shared high nucleotide identity in VP7 and NSP3 genes. Phylogenetic and BLAST search analyses showed that the G9P[4] strain in Japan shared high nucleotide identity in genotype 2 genes with common G2P[4] strains circulating globally, but was distinct from other G9P[4] strains circulating worldwide. These results suggest that the G9P[4] strain in Japan may have emerged through an independent reassortment between G9P[8] and G2P[4]. Finally, the role of NSP3 protein in the circulating RVA from an amino acid comparison between T1- and T2-type NSP3 is discussed. These findings provide an important insight into less problematic combinations of circulating RVA genes derived from different genotypes.

  14. Deletion at chromosome arms 6q16-22 and 10q22.3-23.1 associated with initiation of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, T; Hano, H

    2008-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 6q16-22 and 10q22.3-23.1 is common chromosomal alteration in advanced prostate cancer and suggests that one or more tumor suppressor genes may lie within these chromosome arms. However, the genetic changes in early stage prostate cancer and premalignant lesions remain to be investigated. We used 11 informative microsatellite markers at 6q16-22 and 10q22.3-23.1 in Japanese patients to compare the frequency of LOH in 53 lesions of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), 38 cases (38 lesions) of incidental prostate cancer (IPC) and 107 cases (168 lesions) of clinical prostate cancer (CPC). The frequency of LOH at 6q16-22 with at least one marker was 38 and 49% in IPC and CPC cases, respectively. Similarly, allelic loss at 10q22.3-23.1 was present in 35 and 39% of IPC and CPC, respectively. High-frequency LOH was detected in both the clinically insignificant and significant prostate cancers at 6q16-22 and 10q22.3-23.1 (P>0.05). However, no allelic loss was detected in any markers at the same regions in HGPIN (0%), which is usually considered a premalignant lesion to prostate cancer. Deletions of both the chromosome regions, 6q16-22 and 10q22.3-23.1, are more likely important events in the initiation and/or promotion of prostate cancer.

  15. Detailed characterization of and clinical correlations in ten patients with distal deletions of chromosome 9p

    PubMed Central

    Hauge, Xueya; Raca, Gordana; Cooper, Sara; May, Kristin; Spiro, Rhonda; Adam, Margaret; Martin, Lese

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Deletions of distal 9p are associated with trigonocephaly, mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, cardiac anomalies, and abnormal genitalia. Previous studies identified a proposed critical region for the consensus phenotype in band 9p23, between 11.8 Mb and 16 Mb from the 9p telomere. Here we report 10 new patients with 9p deletions; 9 patients have clinical features consistent with 9p- syndrome, but possess terminal deletions smaller than most reported cases, whereas one individual lacks the 9p- phenotype and shows a 140-kb interstitial telomeric deletion inherited from his mother. Methods We combined fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and microarray analyses to delineate the size of each deletion. Results The deletion sizes vary from 800 kb to 12.4 Mb in our patients with clinically relevant phenotypes. Clinical evaluation and comparison showed little difference in physical features with regard to the deletion sizes. Severe speech and language impairment were observed in all patients with clinically relevant phenotypes. Conclusion The smallest deleted region common to our patients who demonstrate a phenotype consistent with 9p- is less than 2 Mb of 9pter, which contains 6 known genes. These genes may contribute to some of the cardinal features of 9p deletion syndrome. PMID:18641517

  16. Distal 8p deletion (8) (p23.1): An easily missed chromosomal abnormality that may be associated with congenital heart defect and mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bai-Lin; Schneider, G.H.; Sabatino, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    We describe the clinical manifestations and molecular cytogenetic analyses of three patients with a similar distal deletion of chromosome 8. Each child had mild developmental delay and subtle minor anomalies. Two had cardiac anomalies but no other major congenital anomalies were present. High resolution G and R banding showed in all three patients del(8)(p23.1), but the breakpoint in case 1 was distal to 8p23.1, in case 2 was in the middle of 8p23.1, and in case 3 proximal to 8p23.1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies with a chromosome 8 paint probe confirmed that no other rearrangement had occurred. FISH with a chromosome 8-specific telomere probe indicated that two patients had terminal deletions. Chromosome analysis of the parents of case 1 and mother of case 2 were normal; the remaining parents were not available for study. Thirteen individual patients including the three in this study, and three relatives in one family with del(8)(p23.1), have been reported in the past 5 years. Major congenital anomalies, especially congenital heart defects, are most often associated with a breakpoint proximal to 8p23.1. Three patients were found within a 3-year period in this study and five cases were found within 4 years by another group, indicating that distal 8p deletion might be a relatively common chromosomal abnormality. This small deletion is easily overlooked (i.e., cases 1 and 2 were reported as normal at amniocentesis) and can be associated with few or no major congenital anomalies. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. The distal 8p deletion (8)(p23.1): A common syndrome associated with cogenital heart defect and mental retardation?

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, B.L.; Schneider, G.H.; Sabatino, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    We describe the clinical manifestations and molecular cytogenetic analysis of three patients with a similar distal deletion: del(8)(p23.1). Case 1: A nine-year-old girl who was the product of a normal pregnancy, with family history of recurrent miscarriages. She has an ASD, development delay and dysmorphic features. Case 2: A three-month-old female who died with a hypoplastic left heart and dysmorphic features. Her non-identical twin sister is healthy. No further family history is available. Case 3: A four-year-old boy who was the product of a normal pregnancy with family history of mental retardation. He has bifid uvula, delayed speech and language, and no major malformations or dysmorphic features. High resolution G and R banding revealed in all three patients del(8)(p23.1), but the breakpoint for case 1 and 2 was proximal to 8p23.1 and for case 3 distal to 8p23.1. FISH studies with a chromosome 8 paint probe confirmed that no other rearrangement was involved. Chromosome analysis of the parents of case 3 and mother of case 1 were normal; the remaining parents were not available for study. Eight individual patients and three members in one family with del(8)(p23.1) have been reported in the past five years. Major congenital anomalies, especially congenital heart defect, is most often associated with a breakpoint proximal to 8p23.1 Three patients were detected within a three year period in this study and five cases were found within a four year period by another group, suggesting that the distal 8p deletion may be a relatively common syndrome. This small deletion is easily overlooked (i.e. case 1 and 3 were reported as normal at amniocentesis) and can be associated with few or no major congenital anomalies.

  18. Hodgkin disease therapy induced second malignancy susceptibility 6q21 functional variants in roma and hungarian population samples.

    PubMed

    Varszegi, Dalma; Duga, Balazs; Melegh, Bela I; Sumegi, Katalin; Kisfali, Peter; Maasz, Anita; Melegh, Bela

    2014-07-01

    Patients treated successfully for pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma are known to develop secondary malignancies; care is already taken in treatment to prevent this adverse effect. Recent GWAS study identified rs4946728 and rs1040411 noncoding SNPs located between PRDM1 and ATG1 genes on chromosome 6q21 as risk factors for secondary malignancies in patients formerly treated with radiotherapy for pediatric Hodgkin disease. We investigated the allele frequencies of these two SNPs in biobanked, randomly selected DNA of average, apparently healthy Hungarians (n = 277) and in samples of Roma (n = 279) population living Hungary. The risk allele frequency for rs4946728 was 79.4 % in Hungarian and 83.5 % in Roma samples, while for rs1040411 it was 56.4 % in Hungarian and 55.8 % in Roma samples. These values are quite similar in the two populations, and are rather high. The values are higher than those frequencies observed in the controls (rs4946728: 59.1 % and rs1040411: 39.6 %, p < 0.05), and are in the range of the cases (86 % and 68.2 %, respectively) of the above original GWAS study. Our findings suggest, that beside the already taken precautions, genetic characterization of Hungarian pediatric Hodgkin patients seems to be advantageous prior to the treatment of their disease.

  19. Common variation at 6q16 within HACE1 and LIN28B influences susceptibility to neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Diskin, Sharon J; Capasso, Mario; Schnepp, Robert W; Cole, Kristina A; Attiyeh, Edward F; Hou, Cuiping; Diamond, Maura; Carpenter, Erica L; Winter, Cynthia; Lee, Hanna; Jagannathan, Jayanti; Latorre, Valeria; Iolascon, Achille; Hakonarson, Hakon; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2012-10-01

    Neuroblastoma is a cancer of the sympathetic nervous system that accounts for approximately 10% of all pediatric oncology deaths. Here, we report a genome-wide association study of 2,817 neuroblastoma cases and 7,473 controls. We identified two new associations at 6q16, the first within HACE1 (rs4336470; combined P=2.7×10(-11); odds ratio 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-1.35) and the second within LIN28B (rs17065417; combined P=1.2×10(-8); odds ratio 1.38, 95% CI 1.23-1.54). Expression of LIN28B and let-7 miRNA correlated with rs17065417 genotype in neuroblastoma cell lines, and we observed significant growth inhibition upon depletion of LIN28B, specifically in neuroblastoma cells that were homozygous for the risk allele. Low HACE1 and high LIN28B expression in diagnostic primary neuroblastomas were associated with worse overall survival (P=0.008 and 0.014, respectively). Taken together, these data show that common variants in HACE1 and LIN28B influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and indicate that both genes likely have a role in disease progression.

  20. Localization of a gene for an autosomal recessive form of juvenile Parkinsonism to chromosome 6q25.2-27

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumine, Hiroto; Shimoda-Matsubayashi, Satoe; Nakagawa-Hattori, Yuko

    1997-03-01

    An autosomal recessive form of juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP) (MIM 600116) is a levodopa-responsive Parkinsonism whose pathological finding is a highly selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the zona compacta of the substantia nigra. By linkage analysis of diallelic polymorphism of the Mn-superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2), we found a family with AR-JP showing perfect segregation of the disease with the SOD2 locus. By extending the linkage analysis to 13 families with AR-JP, we discovered strong evidence for the localization of the AR-JP gene at chromosome 6q25.2-27, including the SOD2 locus, with the maximal cumulative pairwise LOD scores of 7.26 and 7.71 at D6S305 ({theta} = .03) and D6S253 ({theta} = .02), respectively. Observation of obligate recombination events, as well as multipoint linkage analysis, placed the AR-JP gene in a 17-cM interval between D6S437 and D6S264. Delineation of the AR-JP gene will be an important step toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying selective degeneration of the nigral neurons. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies variation at 6q25.1 associated with survival in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David C.; Weinhold, Niels; Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Chen, Bowang; Kaiser, Martin; Begum, Dil B.; Hillengass, Jens; Bertsch, Uta; Gregory, Walter A.; Cairns, David; Jackson, Graham H.; Försti, Asta; Nickel, Jolanta; Hoffmann, Per; Nöethen, Markus M.; Stephens, Owen W.; Barlogie, Bart; Davis, Faith E.; Hemminki, Kari; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Houlston, Richard S.; Morgan, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    Survival following a diagnosis of multiple myeloma (MM) varies between patients and some of these differences may be a consequence of inherited genetic variation. In this study, to identify genetic markers associated with MM overall survival (MM-OS), we conduct a meta-analysis of four patient series of European ancestry, totalling 3,256 patients with 1,200 MM-associated deaths. Each series is genotyped for ∼600,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms across the genome; genotypes for six million common variants are imputed using 1000 Genomes Project and UK10K as the reference. The association between genotype and OS is assessed by Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for age, sex, International staging system and treatment. We identify a locus at 6q25.1 marked by rs12374648 associated with MM-OS (hazard ratio=1.34, 95% confidence interval=1.22–1.48, P=4.69 × 10–9). Our findings have potential clinical implications since they demonstrate that inherited genotypes can provide prognostic information in addition to conventional tumor acquired prognostic factors. PMID:26743840

  2. Glassy Behavior and Isolated Spin Dimers in a New Frustrated Magnet BaCr9pGa12-9pO19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junjie; Samarakoon, Anjana M.; Hong, Kyun Woo; Copley, John R. D.; Huang, Qingzhen; Tennant, Alan; Sato, Taku J.; Lee, Seung-Hun

    2016-09-01

    Using bulk susceptibility and neutron scattering techniques, we have studied a new frustrated magnet, BaCr9pGa12-9pO19 [BCGO(p)], with 0.4 ≲ p ≲ 0.9. This system is isostructural to SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 [SCGO(p)], in which the magnetic Cr3+ (3d3, s = 3/2) ions form a quasi-two-dimensional triangular lattice of bi-pyramids or kagome-triangle-kagome trilayers. Our bulk susceptibility data exhibit glassy behavior at temperatures much lower than the absolute values of the Curie-Weiss temperature ΘCW ≈ -695(1) K for BCGO(p = 0.902(8)). The frustration index |ΘCW|/Tf is as high as 190 for BCGO(p = 0.902(8)) indicating strong frustration. Our inelastic neutron scattering data on BCGO(p = 0.902(8)) reveal a dispersionless magnetic excitation centered at ħω = 16.5(1) meV, due to a singlet to triplet excitation of spin s = 3/2 dimers. The spin dimers are formed by Cr3+ ions in two 4fvi layers that lie between 12k-2a-12k (kagome-triangle-kagome) trilayers. These results indicate that BCGO(p) is another good candidate system for a strongly frustrated quasi-two-dimensional magnet.

  3. Full-length genomic analysis of porcine G9P[23] and G9P[7] rotavirus strains isolated from pigs with diarrhea in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Hyun; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Kwon, Hyung-Jun; Park, Jun-Gyu; Son, Kyu-Yeol; Ryu, Eun-Hye; Kim, Deok-Song; Lee, Woo Song; Kang, Mun-Il; Yang, Dong-Kun; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Park, Sang-Ik; Park, Su-Jin; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2012-10-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are agents causing severe gastroenteritis in infants and young animals. G9 RVA strains are believed to have originated from pigs. However, this genotype has emerged as the fifth major human RVA genotype worldwide. To better understand the relationship between human and porcine RVA strains, complete RVA genome data are needed. For human RVA strains, the number of complete genome data have grown exponentially. However, there is still a lack of complete genome data on porcine RVA strains. Recently, G9 RVA strains have been identified as the third most important genotype in diarrheic pigs in South Korea in combinations with P[7] and P[23]. This study is the first report on complete genome analyses of 1 G9P[7] and 3 G9P[23] porcine RVA strains, resulting in the following genotype constellation: G9-P[7]/P[23]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1. By comparisons of these genotype constellations, it was revealed that the Korean G9P[7] and G9P[23] RVA strains possessed a typical porcine RVA backbone, similar to other known porcine RVA strains. However, detailed phylogenetic analyses revealed the presence of intra-genotype reassortments among porcine RVA strains in South Korea. Thus, our data provide genetic information of G9 RVA strains increasingly detected in both humans and pigs, and will help to establish the role of pigs as a source or reservoir for novel human RVA strains.

  4. Pure 9p trisomy derived from a terminal balanced unreciprocal translocation.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, A J L; Neira, V A; Vásquez-Velásquez, A I; Jimenez-Arredondo, R E; Chávez-González, E L; Picos-Cárdenas, V J; Fletes-Rayas, A L; Figuera, L E

    2014-01-01

    The 9p trisomy is a relatively frequent disorder, while pure 9p trisomies are less frequent and usually derived from 9;22 translocations, duplications or 9p extra chromosomes. Here we report a patient with pure trisomy 9p derived from a terminal balanced unreciprocal translocation. The patient derived to the genetic service by psychomotor delay, presented at 2 years and 11 months: short stature, open anterior fontanelle, dysplastic ears, facial dysmorphisms, long and broad first toes with hypoplastic nails, central nervous system and skeletal alterations. The patient karyotype was: 46,XY,der(10)t(9;10) (p13.1;qter)mat while the mother karyotype was: 46,XX,t(9;10)(p13.1;qter). The presence of the subtelomeric region of 10q showed by FISH as well as the duplication of 9p subtelomere was further confirmed with multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for the subtelomeric region of all chromosomes. The mechanism of formation seems to be due to a telomere break in 10q leading to loss of telomeric functions, permitting the 9p fusion; this has been supported with molecular probes showing telomere shortening in interstitial telomeric repeats, which are unable to prevent chromosome fusion. This is one of the few cases reported with terminal translocations (not jumping) preserving the subtelomeric region and highlights the importance of subtelomeric probes in terminal arrangements, and the utility of molecular probes, such as MLPA in defining this kind of abnormalities. In the clinical context, the patient presented a high proportion of 9p trisomy features which is expected considering the large 9p segment involved and the presence of the critical region 9p22.

  5. A genome-wide association study identifies a novel locus at 6q22.1 associated with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Julià, Antonio; Domènech, Eugeni; Chaparro, María; García-Sánchez, Valle; Gomollón, Fernando; Panés, Julián; Mañosa, Míriam; Barreiro-De Acosta, Manuel; Gutiérrez, Ana; Garcia-Planella, Esther; Aguas, Mariam; Muñoz, Fernando; Esteve, Maria; Mendoza, Juan L; Vera, Maribel; Márquez, Lucía; Tortosa, Raül; López-Lasanta, María; Alonso, Arnald; Gelpí, Josep L; García-Montero, Andres C; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Myers, Richard M; Gisbert, Javier P; Marsal, Sara

    2014-12-20

    The genetic analysis of ulcerative colitis (UC) has provided new insights into the etiology of this prevalent inflammatory bowel disease. However, most of the heritability of UC (>70%) has still not been characterized. To identify new risk loci for UC we have performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) in a Southern European population and undertaken a meta-analysis study combining the newly genotyped 825 UC patients and 1525 healthy controls from Spain with the six previously published GWAS comprising 6687 cases and 19 718 controls from Northern-European ancestry. We identified a novel locus with genome-wide significance at 6q22.1 [rs2858829, P = 8.97 × 10(-9), odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval, CI] = 1.12 (1.08-1.16)] that was validated with genotype data from a replication cohort of the same Southern European ancestry consisting in 1073 cases and 1279 controls [combined P = 7.59 × 10(-10), OR (95% CI) = 1.12 (1.08-1.16)]. Furthermore, we confirmed the association of 33 reported associations with UC and we nominally validated the GWAS results of nine new risk loci (P < 0.05, same direction of effect). SNP rs2858829 lies in an intergenic region and is a strong cis-eQTL for FAM26F gene, a gene that is shown to be selectively upregulated in UC colonic mucosa with active inflammation. Our results provide new insight into the genetic risk background of UC, confirming that there is a genetic risk component that differentiates from Crohn's Disease, the other major form of inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of inverted duplication deletion 8p syndrome mimicking trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Akkurt, Mehmet Ozgur; Higgs, Amanda; Turan, Ozerk T; Turan, Ozhan M; Turan, Sifa

    2017-03-01

    Inverted duplication deletion of 8p (invdupdel[8p]) is a well-described and uncommon chromosomal rearrangement. The majority of the reported cases have revealed no life-threatening malformations. Although the invdupdel[8p] syndrome in children with central nervous system abnormalities has been reported before, we present the first prenatal microarray diagnosis of invdupdel[8p] syndrome mimicking trisomy 18 due to similar sonographic features. Contrary to reported cases with invdupdel[8p] syndrome, the present case had severe polyvalvular dysplasia and the infant deceased at day 12 of life. In this case, we also emphasize the diagnostic power of microarray analysis in detecting the underlying genetic causes for fetuses with multiple congenital anomalies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Eleven new cases of del(9p) and features from 80 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Huret, J L; Leonard, C; Forestier, B; Rethoré, M O; Lejeune, J

    1988-01-01

    We report 11 cases of del(9p) and review 69 previously published ones. Of the 80 cases, 39 have a del(9p) as the sole anomaly. The symptoms are typical and diagnosis should be suspected at birth. The sex ratio does not appear to be unbalanced. A cardiac murmur is often present but surgery is rarely necessary. Mean IQ is 48. The number of reported cases with an associated trisomy has previously been underestimated. Death in infancy, owing mainly to gross visceral malformations, occurs more often in cases of del(9p) with another unbalanced chromosome segment (16/41) than in cases of del(9p) as the sole anomaly (1/39). Images PMID:3070043

  8. 4q32-q35 and 6q16-q22 are valuable candidate regions for split hand/foot malformation.

    PubMed

    Niedrist, Dunja; Lurie, Iosif W; Schinzel, Albert

    2009-08-01

    On the basis of the Human Cytogenetic Database, a computerized catalog of the clinical phenotypes associated with cytogenetically detectable human chromosome aberrations, we collected from the literature 102 cases with chromosomal aberrations and split hand/foot malformation or absent fingers/toes. Statistical analysis revealed a highly significant association (P<0.001) between the malformation and the chromosomal bands 4q32-q35, 5q15, 6q16-q22 and 7q11.2-q22 (SHFM1). Considering these findings, we suggest additional SHFM loci on chromosome 4q, 6q and probably 5q. The regions 4q and 6q have already been discussed in the literature as additional SHFM loci. We now show further evidence. In the proposed regions, there are interesting candidate genes such as, on 4q: HAND2, FGF2, LEF1 and BMPR1B; on 5q: MSX2, FLT4, PTX1 and PDLIM7; and on 6q: SNX3, GJA1, HEY2 and Tbx18.

  9. Restoration of senescence in breast and ovarian cancer cells following the transfer of the YAC carrying SEN6A gene located at 6q16.3.

    PubMed

    Rane, Neena S; Sandhu, Arbansjit K; Zhawar, Vikramjit S; Kaur, Gurpreet; Popescu, Nicholas C; Kandpal, Raj P; Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena; Athwal, Raghbir S

    2011-01-01

    We previously located a senescence gene locus (SEN6A), at chromosome 6q14-21 by a functional strategy using chromosome transfer into immortal ovarian tumor cells. To further elucidate the SEN6A locus, intact chromosome 6 or 6q was transferred into rat ovarian tumor cells and a panel of immortal revertant clones of senescent cells was generated. The panel of independent colonies as well as mixed populations of revertant cells was analyzed for the presence or absence of chromosome 6 specific markers. These investigations led to the identification of a fine deletion of approximately 1cM at chromosomal interval 6q16.3. A contiguous stretch containing five yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones was constructed across the deleted region. The non-chimeric YAC clones were retrofitted and transferred into mouse A9 cells by spheroplast fusion to generate YAC/A9 hybrids. YAC DNA present in YAC/A9 hybrids was subsequently transferred by microcell fusion into immortal tumor cells, and the hybrid cells were characterized for their senescence phenotype. Using this functional strategy, the transfer of YAC clone 966b10 was shown to restore senescence in both rat and human ovarian and breast tumor cells. Our results demonstrate that the SEN6A gene is carried on a 1 Mb YAC, 966b10, which maps at 6q16.3.

  10. Deletion of 8p is an independent prognostic parameter in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galal, Rami; Möller-Koop, Christina; Barrow, Phillipp; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Jacobsen, Frank; Hinsch, Andrea; Wittmer, Corinna; Steurer, Stefan; Krech, Till; Büscheck, Franziska; Clauditz, Till Sebastian; Beyer, Burkhard; Wilczak, Waldemar; Graefen, Markus; Huland, Hartwig; Minner, Sarah; Schlomm, Thorsten; Sauter, Guido; Simon, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Deletion of chromosome 8p is the second most frequent genomic alteration in prostate cancer. To better understand its clinical significance, 8p deletion was analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization on a prostate cancer tissue microarray. 8p deletion was found in 2,581 of 7,017 cancers (36.8%), and was linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype. 8p deletion increased from 29.5% in 4,456 pT2 and 47.8% in 1,598 pT3a to 53.0% in 931 pT3b-pT4 cancers (P < 0,0001). Deletions of 8p were detected in 25.5% of 1,653 Gleason ≤ 3 + 3, 36.6% of 3,880 Gleason 3 + 4, 50.2% of 1,090 Gleason 4 + 3, and 51.1% of 354 Gleason ≥ 4 + 4 tumors (P < 0,0001). 8p deletions were strongly linked to biochemical recurrence (P < 0.0001) independently from established pre- and postoperative prognostic factors (P = 0.0100). However, analysis of morphologically defined subgroups revealed, that 8p deletion lacked prognostic significance in subgroups with very good (Gleason ≤ 3 + 3, 3 + 4 with ≤ 5% Gleason 4) or very poor prognosis (pT3b, Gleason ≥ 8, pN1). 8p deletions were markedly more frequent in cancers with (53.5%) than without PTEN deletions (36.4%; P < 0,0001) and were slightly more frequent in ERG-positive (40.9%) than in ERG-negative cancers (34.7%, P < 0.0001) due to the association with the ERG-associated PTEN deletion. Cancers with 8p/PTEN co-deletions had a strikingly worse prognosis than cancers with deletion of PTEN or 8p alone (P ≤ 0.0003). In summary, 8p deletion is an independent prognostic parameter in prostate cancer that may act synergistically with PTEN deletions. Even statistically independent prognostic biomarkers like 8p may have limited clinical impact in morphologically well defined high or low risk cancers. PMID:27880722

  11. Chromosome Breakage Hotspots and Delineation of the Critical Region for the 9p-Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Laurie A.; Crowe, Carol A.; Micale, Mark A.; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Schwartz, Stuart

    1999-01-01

    Summary The clinical features of the 9p-deletion syndrome include dysmorphic facial features (trigonocephaly, midface hypoplasia, upward-slanting palpebral fissures, and a long philtrum) and mental retardation. The majority of these patients appear to have similar cytogenetic breakpoints in 9p22, but some cases show phenotypic heterogeneity. To define the breakpoints of the deleted chromosomes, we studied 24 patients with a deletion of 9p, by high-resolution cytogenetics, FISH with 19 YACs, and PCR using 25 different sequence-tagged sites. Of 10 different breakpoints identified, 9 were localized within an ∼5-Mb region, in 9p22-p23, that encompasses the interval between D9S1869 (telomeric) and D9S162 (centromeric). Eight unrelated patients had a breakpoint (group 1) in the same interval, between D9S274 (948h1) and D9S285 (767f2), suggesting a chromosome-breakage hotspot. Among 12 patients, seven different breakpoints (groups 3–9) were localized to a 2-Mb genomic region between D9S1709 and D9S162, which identified a breakpoint-cluster region. The critical region for the 9p-deletion syndrome maps to a 4–6-Mb region in 9p22-p23. The results from this study have provided insight into both the heterogeneous nature of the breakage in this deletion syndrome and the resultant phenotype-karyotype correlations. PMID:10521304

  12. Independent post-zygotic breaks of a dicentric chromosome result in mosaicism for an inverted duplication deletion 9p and terminal deletion 9p.

    PubMed

    Schlade-Bartusiak, Kamilla; Tucker, Tracy; Safavi, Holly; Livingston, Janet; van Allen, Margot I; Eydoux, Patrice; Armstrong, Linlea

    2013-05-01

    Mosaicism with two cell lines having different rearrangements of the same chromosome is rare. Only a few cases of mosaicism have been described in association with chromosomal inverted duplication deletion (inv dup del) rearrangements. A well-established mechanism of formation of inv dup del rearrangements involves a dicentric intermediate, which undergoes breakage during cell division, generating cells with either an inv dup del or a simple deletion. A patient with developmental delay and dysmorphic features was found to carry two cell lines with rearrangements of 9p: an inv dup del 9p and a terminal deletion 9p. Microarray and FISH analysis showed that these cell lines do not constitute the reciprocal products of a single dicentric breakage event. We propose that independent post-zygotic breaks of a dicentric chromosome as a likely mechanism leading to the generation of the observed cell lines. The post-zygotic origin of the inv dup del rearrangements and the associated mosaicism can be a more frequent phenomenon than currently appreciated. Therefore, genotype-phenotype correlations in the inv dup del rearrangements need to take into account the possible presence of other abnormal cell lines during early development.

  13. Genotype–Phenotype Association Studies of Chromosome 8p Inverted Duplication Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ryan; Youngblom, Janey; Gregg, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with chromosome 8p inverted duplication deletion (invdupdel(8p)) manifest a wide range of clinical features and cognitive impairment. The purpose of this study is to employ array CGH technology to define more precisely the cytogenetic breakpoints and regions of copy number variation found in several individuals with invdupdel(8p), and compare these results with their neuropsychological characteristics. We examined the cognitive-behavioral features of two male and two female children, ages 3–15 years, with invdupdel(8p). We noted cognitive deficits that ranged from mild to severe, and adaptive behavior composites that ranged from significantly to substantially lower than adequate levels. CARS scores, a measure of autistic behavior, identified three children with autism or autistic-like features. Three of the four children exhibited attention deficits and hyperactivity consistent with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of ADHD. One child showed extreme emotional lability. Interestingly, intellectual disability was not correlated with deletion size, nor was the deletion location associated with the autistic phenotype. On the other hand, the duplication length in 8p21.1/8p22 was associated with cognitive deficit. In addition, a small locus of over-expression in 8p21.3 was common for all three participants diagnosed as autistic. A limitation of the study is its small sample size. Further analyses of the deleted and over-expressed regions are needed to ascertain the genes involved in cognitive function and, possibly, autism. PMID:21259039

  14. Mosaic "tetrasomy" 8p: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Winters, J; Markello, T; Nance, W; Jackson-Cook, C

    1995-10-01

    A male infant presenting with multiple anomalies including a midline cleft palate, anasarca, hepatomegaly, pulmonary edema, agenesis of the corpus collosum, and complex congential cardiac anomalies was found to have mosaicism for an additional chromosome that appeared (following GTG-banding and FISH) to be a monocentric isochromosome of the short arm of chromosome 8 (46,XY/47,XY, +i(8p)). Nine other cases of mosaicism for an additional i(8p) were reviewed. Considerable phenotypic variation was noted. Consistent features were identified including agenesis of the corpus callosum, cardiac malformations, and minor facial dysmorphology. The phenotype of these patients partially overlaps those of trisomy 8 and trisomy 8p. By studying additional individuals with this condition, mosaic tetrasomy 8p may emerge as a recognizable clinical phenotype.

  15. A 2-Mb YAC contig linking the plasminogen-apoprotein(a) gene family to the insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF2R) gene on the telomeric region of chromosome 6 (6q26-q27)

    SciTech Connect

    Acquati, F.; Taramelli, R.; Malgaretti, N.

    1994-08-01

    Chromosome 6 has been reported to be frequently rearranged in several human malignancies. In particular, deletions of the long arm of this chromosome are observed in melanomas, renal cell carcinomas, salivary gland adenocarcinomas, and ovarian carcinomas, as well as in lymphoid tumors such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Molecular studies of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas using the loss of heterozygosity analysis allowed the definition of two distinct regions of minimal deletion (RMD), which were mapped to 6q25 to 6q27 and to 6q21 to 6q23, respectively. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Child with Deletion 9p Syndrome Presenting with Craniofacial Dysmorphism, Developmental Delay, and Multiple Congenital Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sirisena, Nirmala D.; Wijetunge, U. Kalpani S.; de Silva, Ramya; Dissanayake, Vajira H. W.

    2013-01-01

    A 4-month-old Sri Lankan male child case with a de novo terminal deletion in the p22→pter region of chromosome 9 is described. The child presented with craniofacial dysmorphism, developmental delay, and congenital malformations in agreement with the consensus phenotype. A distinctive feature observed in this child was complete collapse of the left lung due to malformation of lung tissue. Cytogenetic studies confirmed terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 distal to band p22 [46,XY,del(9)(p22→pter)]. This is the first reported case of a de novo deletion 9p syndrome associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. This finding contributes to the widening of the spectrum of phenotypic features associated with deletion 9p syndrome. PMID:23984121

  17. Oropharyngeal dysphagia and language delay in partial trisomy 9p: case report.

    PubMed

    Rossi, N F; Gatto, A R; Cola, P C; Souza, D H; Moretti-Ferreira, D; Giacheti, C M

    2009-09-22

    The phenotype of partial trisomy 9p includes global developmental delay, microcephaly, bulbous nose, downturned oral commissures, malformed ears, hypotonia, and severe cognitive and language disorders. We present a case report and a comparative review of clinical findings on this condition, focusing on speech-language development, cognitive abilities and swallowing evaluation. We suggest that oropharyngeal dysphagia should be further investigated, considering that pulmonary and nutritional disorders affect the survival and quality of life of the patient. As far as we know, this is the first study of a patient with partial trisomy 9p described with oropharyngeal dysphagia.

  18. Small 6q16.1 Deletions Encompassing POU3F2 Cause Susceptibility to Obesity and Variable Developmental Delay with Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Kasher, Paul R.; Schertz, Katherine E.; Thomas, Megan; Jackson, Adam; Annunziata, Silvia; Ballesta-Martinez, María J.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Clayton, Peter E.; Eaton, Jennifer L.; Granata, Tiziana; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Hernando, Cristina; Laverriere, Caroline E.; Liedén, Agne; Villa-Marcos, Olaya; McEntagart, Meriel; Nordgren, Ann; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Sarret, Catherine; Sciacca, Francesca L.; Wright, Ronnie; Kerr, Bronwyn; Glasgow, Eric; Banka, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies of intellectual disability and identification of monogenic causes of obesity in humans have made immense contribution toward the understanding of the brain and control of body mass. The leptin > melanocortin > SIM1 pathway is dysregulated in multiple monogenic human obesity syndromes but its downstream targets are still unknown. In ten individuals from six families, with overlapping 6q16.1 deletions, we describe a disorder of variable developmental delay, intellectual disability, and susceptibility to obesity and hyperphagia. The 6q16.1 deletions segregated with the phenotype in multiplex families and were shown to be de novo in four families, and there was dramatic phenotypic overlap among affected individuals who were independently ascertained without bias from clinical features. Analysis of the deletions revealed a ∼350 kb critical region on chromosome 6q16.1 that encompasses a gene for proneuronal transcription factor POU3F2, which is important for hypothalamic development and function. Using morpholino and mutant zebrafish models, we show that POU3F2 lies downstream of SIM1 and controls oxytocin expression in the hypothalamic neuroendocrine preoptic area. We show that this finding is consistent with the expression patterns of POU3F2 and related genes in the human brain. Our work helps to further delineate the neuro-endocrine control of energy balance/body mass and demonstrates that this molecular pathway is conserved across multiple species. PMID:26833329

  19. Small 6q16.1 Deletions Encompassing POU3F2 Cause Susceptibility to Obesity and Variable Developmental Delay with Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Kasher, Paul R; Schertz, Katherine E; Thomas, Megan; Jackson, Adam; Annunziata, Silvia; Ballesta-Martinez, María J; Campeau, Philippe M; Clayton, Peter E; Eaton, Jennifer L; Granata, Tiziana; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Hernando, Cristina; Laverriere, Caroline E; Liedén, Agne; Villa-Marcos, Olaya; McEntagart, Meriel; Nordgren, Ann; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Sarret, Catherine; Sciacca, Francesca L; Wright, Ronnie; Kerr, Bronwyn; Glasgow, Eric; Banka, Siddharth

    2016-02-04

    Genetic studies of intellectual disability and identification of monogenic causes of obesity in humans have made immense contribution toward the understanding of the brain and control of body mass. The leptin > melanocortin > SIM1 pathway is dysregulated in multiple monogenic human obesity syndromes but its downstream targets are still unknown. In ten individuals from six families, with overlapping 6q16.1 deletions, we describe a disorder of variable developmental delay, intellectual disability, and susceptibility to obesity and hyperphagia. The 6q16.1 deletions segregated with the phenotype in multiplex families and were shown to be de novo in four families, and there was dramatic phenotypic overlap among affected individuals who were independently ascertained without bias from clinical features. Analysis of the deletions revealed a ∼350 kb critical region on chromosome 6q16.1 that encompasses a gene for proneuronal transcription factor POU3F2, which is important for hypothalamic development and function. Using morpholino and mutant zebrafish models, we show that POU3F2 lies downstream of SIM1 and controls oxytocin expression in the hypothalamic neuroendocrine preoptic area. We show that this finding is consistent with the expression patterns of POU3F2 and related genes in the human brain. Our work helps to further delineate the neuro-endocrine control of energy balance/body mass and demonstrates that this molecular pathway is conserved across multiple species.

  20. Detailed phenotype-genotype study in five patients with chromosome 6q16 deletion: narrowing the critical region for Prader-Willi-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bonaglia, Maria Clara; Ciccone, Roberto; Gimelli, Giorgio; Gimelli, Stefania; Marelli, Susan; Verheij, Joke; Giorda, Roberto; Grasso, Rita; Borgatti, Renato; Pagone, Filomena; Rodrìguez, Laura; Martinez-Frias, Maria-Luisa; van Ravenswaaij, Conny; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2008-12-01

    Most patients with an interstitial deletion of 6q16 have Prader-Willi-like phenotype, featuring obesity, hypotonia, short hands and feet, and developmental delay. In all reported studies, the chromosome rearrangement was detected by karyotype analysis, which provides an overview of the entire genome but has limited resolution. Here we describe a detailed clinical presentation of five patients, two of whom were previously reported, with overlapping interstitial 6q16 deletions and Prader-Willi-like phenotype. Our patients share the following main features with previously reported cases: global developmental delay, hypotonia, obesity, hyperphagia, and eye/vision anomalies. All rearrangement breakpoints have been accurately defined through array-CGH at about 100 Kb resolution. We were able to narrow the shortest region of deletion overlap for the presumed gene(s) involved in the Prader-Willi-like syndrome to 4.1 Mb located at 6q16.1q16.2. Our results support the evidence that haploinsufficiency of the SIM1 gene is responsible for obesity in these patients. A possible involvement of the GRIK2 gene in autistic-like behaviour, of POPDC3 in heart development, and of MCHR2 in the control of feeding behaviour and energy metabolism is also hypothesized.

  1. Microdeletion of 6q16.1 encompassing EPHA7 in a child with mild neurological abnormalities and dysmorphic features: case report

    PubMed Central

    Traylor, Ryan N; Fan, Zheng; Hudson, Beth; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaffer, Lisa G; Torchia, Beth S; Ballif, Blake C

    2009-01-01

    Background Of the fewer than 100 cases reported within the literature of constitutional deletions involving the long arm of chromosome 6, only five have been characterized using high-resolution microarray analysis. Reported 6q deletion patients show a high incidence of mental retardation, ear anomalies, hypotonia, and postnatal growth retardation. Results We report a 16-month-old male presenting with developmental delay and dysmorphic features who was found by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to have a ~2.16 Mb de novo deletion within chromosome band 6q16.1 that encompasses only two genes. Expression studies of the mouse homologue of one of the genes, the ephrin receptor 7 gene (EPHA7), have shown the gene functions during murine embryogenesis to form cortical domains, determine brain size and shape, and play a role in development of the central nervous system (CNS). Discussion Our results suggest that deletion of EPHA7 plays a role in the neurologic and dysmorphic features, including developmental delay, hypotonia, and ear malformations, observed in some 6q deletion patients. PMID:19664229

  2. Physical localisation of the breakpoints of a constitutional translocation t(5;6)(q21;q21) in a child with bilateral Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Hoban, P R; Cowen, R L; Mitchell, E L; Evans, D G; Kelly, M; Howard, P J; Heighway, J

    1997-01-01

    A 6 month old boy presented with bilateral Wilms' tumour. Cytogenetic analysis of the lymphocytes from the patient showed a de novo balanced translocation t(5;6)(q21;q21), which was also present in the tumour material as the sole cytogenetic abnormality. To facilitate the identification of the translocation breakpoints, we have established a lymphoblastoid cell line (MA214L) from the patient which maintains the translocation in culture. We have used Genethon microsatellite markers as sequence tagged sites (STSs) to isolate yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones to 5q and 6q from human genomic libraries. Using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) on metaphase preparations of MA214L, we have physically defined the translocation breakpoints between YAC clones on each chromosome arm. The genetic distance separating the flanking YACs on 6q21 is 3 cM, while that on 5q21 is 4 cM. To date this is the first report of these chromosomal regions being implicated in Wilms' tumourigenesis. Images PMID:9138163

  3. High-dispersion infrared spectroscopic observations of comet 8P/Tuttle with VLT/CRIRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Kawakita, H.; Dello Russo, N.; Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Smette, A.; Hutsemékers, D.; Stüwe, J.; Weiler, M.; Arpigny, C.; Biver, N.; Cochran, A.; Crovisier, J.; Magain, P.; Sana, H.; Schulz, R.; Vervack, R. J.; Weaver, H.; Zucconi, J.-M.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the composition of the Halley-family comet (HFC) 8P/Tuttle investigated with high-dispersion near-infrared spectroscopic observations. The observations were carried out at the ESO VLT (Very Large Telescope) with the CRIRES instrument as part of a multi-wavelength observation campaign of 8P/Tuttle performed in late January and early February 2008. Radar observations suggested that 8P/Tuttle is a contact binary, and it was proposed that these components might be heterogeneous in chemistry. We determined mixing ratios of organic volatiles with respect to H2O and found that mixing ratios were consistent with previous near infrared spectroscopic observations obtained in late December 2007 and in late January 2008. It has been suggested that because 8P/Tuttle is a contact binary, it might be chemically heterogeneous. However, we find no evidence for chemical heterogeneity within the nucleus of 8P/Tuttle. We also compared the mixing ratios of organic molecules in 8P/Tuttle with those of both other HFCs and long period comets (LPCs) and found that HCN, C2H2, and C2H6 are depleted whereas CH4 and CH3OH have normal abundances. This may indicate that 8P/Tuttle was formed in a different region of the early solar nebula than other HFCs and LPCs. We estimated the conversion efficiency from C2H2 to C2H6 by hydrogen addition reactions on cold grains by employing the C2H6/(C2H6+C2H2) ratio. The C2H6/(C2H6+C2H2) ratio in 8P/Tuttle is consistent with the ratios found in other HFCs and LPCs within the error bars. We also discuss the source of C2 and CN based on our observations and conclude that the abundances of C2H2 and C2H6 are insufficient to explain the C2 abundances in comet 8P/Tuttle and that the abundance of HCN is insufficient to explain the CN abundances in the comet, so at least one additional parent is needed for each species, as pointed out in previous study. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Prog. 080.C

  4. The same molecular mechanism at the maternal meiosis I produces mono- and dicentric 8p duplications

    SciTech Connect

    Floridia, G.; Piantanida, M.; Minelli, A.; Dellavecchia, C.; Bonaglia, C.

    1996-04-01

    We studied 16 cases of 8p duplications, with a karyotype 46,XX or XY,dup(8p), associated with mental retardation, facial dysmorphisms, and brain defects. We demonstrate that these 8p rearrangements can be either dicentric (6 cases) with the second centromere at the tip of the short arm or monocentric (10 cases). The distal 8p23 region, from D8S349 to the telomere, including the defensin 1 locus, is deleted in all the cases. The region spanning from D8S252 to D8S265, at the proximal 8p23 region, is present in single copy, and the remaining part of the abnormal 8 short arm is duplicated in the dicentric cases and partially duplicated in the monocentric ones. The distal edge of the duplication always spans up to D8S552 (8p23.1), while its proximal edge includes the centromere in the dicentric cases and varies from case to case in the monocentric ones. The analysis of DNA polymorphisms indicates that the rearrangement is consistently of maternal origin. In the deleted region, only paternal alleles were present in the patient. In the duplicated region, besides one paternal allele, some loci showed two different maternal alleles, while others, which were duplicated by FISH analysis, showed only one maternal allele. We hypothesize that, at maternal meiosis I, there was abnormal pairing of chromosomes 8 followed by anomalous crossover at the regions delimited by D8S552 and D8S35 and by D8S252 and D8S349, which presumably contain inverted repeated sequences. The resulting dicentric chromosome, 8qter-8p23.1 (D8S552)::8p23.1-(D8S35)-8qter, due to the presence of two centromeres, breaks at anaphase I, generating an inverted duplicated 8p, dicentric if the breakage occurs at the centromere or monocentric if it occurs between centromeres. 44 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic characterization of de novo partial trisomy 12q (12q24.21→qter) and partial monosomy 6q (6q27→qter) associated with coarctation of the aorta, ventriculomegaly and thickened nuchal fold.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chen, Yi-Yung; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chen, Li-Feng; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-03-01

    We present rapid aneuploidy diagnosis of de novo partial trisomy 12q (12q24.21→qter) and partial monosomy 6q (6q27→qter) by aCGH using uncultured amniocytes in a fetus with coarctation of the aorta, ventriculomegaly and thickened nuchal fold. We discuss the association of TBX3, TBX5 and MED13L gene duplication with coarctation of the aorta, and the association of RNASET2 gene haploinsufficiency with ventriculomegaly in this case.

  6. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type, Is Linked to Chromosome 8p22-8p21.1 in an Extended Belgian Family

    PubMed Central

    Syx, Delfien; Symoens, Sofie; Steyaert, Wouter; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul J.; Malfait, Fransiska

    2015-01-01

    Joint hypermobility is a common, mostly benign, finding in the general population. In a subset of individuals, however, it causes a range of clinical problems, mainly affecting the musculoskeletal system. Joint hypermobility often appears as a familial trait and is shared by several heritable connective tissue disorders, including the hypermobility subtype of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS-HT) or benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS). These hereditary conditions provide unique models for the study of the genetic basis of joint hypermobility. Nevertheless, these studies are largely hampered by the great variability in clinical presentation and the often vague mode of inheritance in many families. Here, we performed a genome-wide linkage scan in a unique three-generation family with an autosomal dominant EDS-HT phenotype and identified a linkage interval on chromosome 8p22-8p21.1, with a maximum two-point LOD score of 4.73. Subsequent whole exome sequencing revealed the presence of a unique missense variant in the LZTS1 gene, located within the candidate region. Subsequent analysis of 230 EDS-HT/BJHS patients resulted in the identification of three additional rare variants. This is the first reported genome-wide linkage analysis in an EDS-HT family, thereby providing an opportunity to identify a new disease gene for this condition. PMID:26504261

  7. Molecular monitoring of 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome in an infant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyong W; Habeebu, Sultan; Sheehan, Andrea M; Naeem, Rizwan; Hernandez, Vivian S; Dreyer, Zoann E; López-Terrada, Dolores

    2009-11-01

    The 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome is a rare hematologic malignancy derived from a pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell associated with rearrangements involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene located on chromosome 8p11. The most common translocation, t(8;13) (p11;q13), results in a ZNF198-FGFR1 fusion gene and constitutively active FGFR1 tyrosine kinase activity. Typical pathologic findings include myeloid hyperplasia, lymphadenopathy, precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma, and eosinophilia. The disease is usually associated with an aggressive course and progression to acute myeloid leukemia is frequent. We report here the first case of 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome in an infant and demonstrate the value of molecular testing in the diagnosis and minimal disease monitoring of this rare disease.

  8. Transgenerational function of Tetrahymena Piwi protein Twi8p at distinctive noncoding RNA loci.

    PubMed

    Farley, Brian M; Collins, Kathleen

    2017-04-01

    Transgenerational transmission of genome-regulatory epigenetic information can determine phenotypes in the progeny of sexual reproduction. Sequence specificity of transgenerational regulation derives from small RNAs assembled into Piwi-protein complexes. Known targets of transgenerational regulation are primarily transposons and transposon-derived sequences. Here, we extend the scope of Piwi-mediated transgenerational regulation to include unique noncoding RNA loci. Ciliates such as Tetrahymena have a phenotypically silent germline micronucleus and an expressed somatic macronucleus, which is differentiated anew from a germline genome copy in sexual reproduction. We show that the nuclear-localized Tetrahymena Piwi protein Twi8p shuttles from parental to zygotic macronuclei. Genetic elimination of Twi8p has no phenotype for cells in asexual growth. On the other hand, cells lacking Twi8p arrest in sexual reproduction with zygotic nuclei that retain the germline genome structure, without the DNA elimination and fragmentation required to generate a functional macronucleus. Twi8p-bound small RNAs originate from long-noncoding RNAs with a terminal hairpin, which become detectable in the absence of Twi8p. Curiously, the loci that generate Twi8p-bound small RNAs are essential for asexual cell growth, even though Twi8 RNPs are essential only in sexual reproduction. Our findings suggest the model that Twi8 RNPs act on silent germline chromosomes to permit their conversion to expressed macronuclear chromosomes. Overall this work reveals that a Piwi protein carrying small RNAs from long-noncoding RNA loci has transgenerational function in establishing zygotic nucleus competence for gene expression.

  9. Identification of candidate genes for congenital heart defects on proximal chromosome 8p

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Liu, Chunjie; Xu, Yuejuan; Guo, Qianqian; Chen, Sun; Sun, Kun; Xu, Rang

    2016-01-01

    With the application of advanced molecular cytogenetic techniques, the number of patients identified as having abnormal chromosome 8p has increased progressively. Individuals with terminal 8p deletion have been extensively described in previous studies. The manifestations usually include cardiac anomalies, developmental delay/mental retardation, craniofacial abnormalities, and multiple other minor anomalies. However, some patients with proximal deletion also presented with similar phenotypic features. Here we describe a female child with an 18.5-Mb deletion at 8p11.23–p22 that include the cardiac-associated loci NKX2-6 and NRG1. Further mutation screening of these two candidate genes in 143 atrial septal defect patients, two heterozygous mutations NKX2-6 (c.1A > T) and NRG1 (c.1652G > A) were identified. The mutations were described for the first time in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). The c.1A > T NKX2-6 generated a protein truncated by 45 amino acids with a decreased level of mRNA expression, whereas the NRG1 mutation had no significant effect on protein functions. Our findings suggest that 8p21-8p12 may be another critical region for 8p-associated CHD, and some cardiac malformations might be due to NKX2-6 haploinsufficiency. This study also links the NKX2-6 mutation to ASD for the first time, providing novel insight into the molecular underpinning of this common form of CHD. PMID:27808268

  10. Lifetimes of the 9s and 8p levels of atomic francium

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, S.; Gomez, E.; Orozco, L.A.; Sprouse, G.D.

    2004-10-01

    We use time-correlated single-photon counting techniques on a sample of {sup 210}Fr atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optical trap to measure the lifetimes of the 9S{sub 1/2}, 8P{sub 3/2}, and 8P{sub 1/2} excited levels. We populate the 9S{sub 1/2} level by two-photon resonant excitation through the 7P{sub 1/2} level. The direct measurement of the 9S{sub 1/2} decay through the 7P{sub 3/2} level at 851 nm gives a lifetime of 107.53{+-}0.90 ns. We observe the decay of the 9S{sub 1/2} level through the 8P{sub 3/2} level at 423 nm and the 8P{sub 1/2} level at 433 nm down to the 7S{sub 1/2} ground level, and indirectly determine the lifetimes of these to be 83.5{+-}1.5 ns and 149.3{+-}3.5 ns, respectively.

  11. The origin, global distribution, and functional impact of the human 8p23 inversion polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Salm, Maximilian P A; Horswell, Stuart D; Hutchison, Claire E; Speedy, Helen E; Yang, Xia; Liang, Liming; Schadt, Eric E; Cookson, William O; Wierzbicki, Anthony S; Naoumova, Rossi P; Shoulders, Carol C

    2012-06-01

    Genomic inversions are an increasingly recognized source of genetic variation. However, a lack of reliable high-throughput genotyping assays for these structures has precluded a full understanding of an inversion's phylogenetic, phenotypic, and population genetic properties. We characterize these properties for one of the largest polymorphic inversions in man (the ∼4.5-Mb 8p23.1 inversion), a structure that encompasses numerous signals of natural selection and disease association. We developed and validated a flexible bioinformatics tool that utilizes SNP data to enable accurate, high-throughput genotyping of the 8p23.1 inversion. This tool was applied retrospectively to diverse genome-wide data sets, revealing significant population stratification that largely follows a clinal "serial founder effect" distribution model. Phylogenetic analyses establish the inversion's ancestral origin within the Homo lineage, indicating that 8p23.1 inversion has occurred independently in the Pan lineage. The human inversion breakpoint was localized to an inverted pair of human endogenous retrovirus elements within the large, flanking low-copy repeats; experimental validation of this breakpoint confirmed these elements as the likely intermediary substrates that sponsored inversion formation. In five data sets, mRNA levels of disease-associated genes were robustly associated with inversion genotype. Moreover, a haplotype associated with systemic lupus erythematosus was restricted to the derived inversion state. We conclude that the 8p23.1 inversion is an evolutionarily dynamic structure that can now be accommodated into the understanding of human genetic and phenotypic diversity.

  12. A Case of Partial Trisomy of Chromosome 8p Associated with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanikolaou, Katerina; Paliokosta, Elena; Gyftodimou, Jolanda; Kolaitis, Gerassimos; Vgenopoulou, Sofia; Sarri, Catherine; Tsiantis, John

    2006-01-01

    We report on a case of a 6-year-old female with partial trisomy 8p(21-23) associated with autism, mild dysmorphic features, and moderate learning disability. Although mental retardation is a common finding in patients with mosaic trisomy 8 or partial trisomy of various regions of chromosome 8, only two cases associated with autism have been…

  13. Microarray Analysis of 8p23.1 Deletion in New Patients with Atypical Phenotypical Traits.

    PubMed

    Khelifa, Hela Ben; Kammoun, Molka; Hannachi, Hanene; Soyah, Najla; Hammami, Saber; Elghezal, Hatem; Sanlaville, Damien; Saad, Ali; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya

    2015-12-01

    We describe two patients carrying deletions of chromosome 8p23.1 with a commonly critical region identified by means of oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). They didn't present congenital heart defects or behavioral problems. Only one patient presented with intellectual disability and carrying deletion of TNKS gene. We presumed the inclusion of TNKS gene in the mental impairment.

  14. 7q36 deletion and 9p22 duplication: effects of a double imbalance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of mental retardation/developmental delay (MRDD) remains a challenge to geneticists and clinicians and can be correlated to environmental and genetic factors. Chromosomal aberrations are common causes of moderate to severe mental retardation and may represent 10% of these occurrences. Here we report the case of a boy with development delay, hypoplasia of corpus callosum, microcephaly, muscular hypotonia, and facial dysmorphisms. A deletion of 7q36.1 → 36.3 and duplication of 9p22.3 → 23 was detected as a result of an unbalanced translocation of paternal origin. Breakpoint delimitation was achieved with array comparative genomic hybridization assay. Additional multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analyzes confirmed one copy loss of 7q36.3 region and one copy gain of 9p24.3 region. Patient resultant phenotype is consistent with the already described findings for both 7q deletion and 9p duplication syndromes. PMID:23317051

  15. Deep Impact: A Call for Pro-Am Observations of Comet 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, S. A.; McFadden, L. A.; Emerson, G.

    2000-10-01

    Deep Impact (DI) was selected in 1999 to be the eighth mission of the Discovery Program, funded by NASA. The mission's goal is to impact comet 9P/Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005 and analyze the resulting crater and ejecta to enhance our understanding of cometary nuclei and the evolution of the solar system. We are calling for advanced-amateur and professional CCD observers to join the mission's Small Telescope Science Program (STSP). The goal of this science program is to provide as much data on comet 9P as we can prior to impact. Our immediate need is for observations from June through December 2000, when the comet is at opposition and is visible from the northern and southern hemispheres. To illustrate the potential of this program, we present some images of comet 9P taken by our observers along with preliminary analyses. We also present equipment requirements and observing procedures needed for obtaining useful CCD images. Detailed information about STSP is available at the program's website: http://www.ss.astro.umd.edu/deepimpact/stsp. An overview of DI is available at the mission's website: http://www.ss.astro.umd.edu/deepimpact.

  16. Liveborn with both partial trisomy of 3q and partial monosomy of 9p

    SciTech Connect

    Farren-Chavez, D.M.; Guzman, E.R.; Peters, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    A 32-year-old G{sub 3}P{sub 2002} Hispanic female presented at 14 weeks gestation for routine dating ultrasound. At that time ultrasonography revealed a septated cystic hygroma, omphalocele, bilateral talipes equinovarus, and hydrops. Amniocentesis was performed at 15 weeks and revealed a 46,XX,9p+ chromosome complement. The origin of the extra material on the terminal short arm of chromosome 9 could not be identified. Chromosome analysis was performed on the parents and the mother was found to carry the balanced translocation 46,XX,p(3;9)(q23;p13). Further analysis revealed that the fetus had inherited the derivative 9 chromosome. The fetus was therefore monosomic for 9p13-9pter and trisomic for 3q23-3pter. The patient chose to continue the pregnancy. Serial ultrasonography later demonstrated a sloping forehead, small nose, micrognathia, ventriculomegaly, possible VSD, micropenis, hypospadias, cryptorchidism and post-axial polydactyly of the hands. The fetus was delivered prematurely at 31 weeks and survived one hour. Post-mortem examination confirmed the ultrasound findings and revealed additional stigmata consistent with both 9p monosomy and 3q trisomy. A review of the literature indicates no previous report of both syndromes concurrently.

  17. Genome-wide significance for a modifier of age at neurological onset in Huntington's Disease at 6q23-24: the HD MAPS study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Liang; Hayden, Michael R; Warby, Simon C; Durr, Alexandra; Morrison, Patrick J; Nance, Martha; Ross, Christopher A; Margolis, Russell L; Rosenblatt, Adam; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Frati, Luigi; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; García, Carmen Ayuso; Suchowersky, Oksana; Klimek, Mary Lou; Trent, Ronald JA; McCusker, Elizabeth; Novelletto, Andrea; Frontali, Marina; Paulsen, Jane S; Jones, Randi; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Lazzarini, Alice; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Prakash, Ranjana; Xu, Gang; Djoussé, Luc; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Gillis, Tammy; Hakky, Michael; Cupples, L Adrienne; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H; Cha, Jang-Ho J; Hersch, Steven M; Penney, John B; Harrison, Madaline B; Perlman, Susan L; Zanko, Andrea; Abramson, Ruth K; Lechich, Anthony J; Duckett, Ayana; Marder, Karen; Conneally, P Michael; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Myers, Richard H

    2006-01-01

    Background Age at onset of Huntington's disease (HD) is correlated with the size of the abnormal CAG repeat expansion in the HD gene; however, several studies have indicated that other genetic factors also contribute to the variability in HD age at onset. To identify modifier genes, we recently reported a whole-genome scan in a sample of 629 affected sibling pairs from 295 pedigrees, in which six genomic regions provided suggestive evidence for quantitative trait loci (QTL), modifying age at onset in HD. Methods In order to test the replication of this finding, eighteen microsatellite markers, three from each of the six genomic regions, were genotyped in 102 newly recruited sibling pairs from 69 pedigrees, and data were analyzed, using a multipoint linkage variance component method, in the follow-up sample and the combined sample of 352 pedigrees with 753 sibling pairs. Results Suggestive evidence for linkage at 6q23-24 in the follow-up sample (LOD = 1.87, p = 0.002) increased to genome-wide significance for linkage in the combined sample (LOD = 4.05, p = 0.00001), while suggestive evidence for linkage was observed at 18q22, in both the follow-up sample (LOD = 0.79, p = 0.03) and the combined sample (LOD = 1.78, p = 0.002). Epistatic analysis indicated that there is no interaction between 6q23-24 and other loci. Conclusion In this replication study, linkage for modifier of age at onset in HD was confirmed at 6q23-24. Evidence for linkage was also found at 18q22. The demonstration of statistically significant linkage to a potential modifier locus opens the path to location cloning of a gene capable of altering HD pathogenesis, which could provide a validated target for therapeutic development in the human patient. PMID:16914060

  18. Selections from 2015: EGSY8p7, the Galaxy Far, Far Away

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Editors Note:In these last two weeks of 2015, well be looking at a few selections from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume after the AAS winter meeting.Ly Emission from a Luminous z = 8.68 Galaxy: Implications for Galaxies as Tracers of Cosmic ReionizationPublished August 2015Main takeaway:A team led by Adi Zitrin (Hubble Fellow at California Institute of Technology) detected Ly emission in the bright galaxy EGSY8p7 using the MOSFIRE spectrograph at Keck Observatory. From this emission line, they calculated that the galaxy has an astonishing redshift of z=8.68.Why its interesting:This spectroscopic confirmation crowned EGSY8p7 as the record-holder for the farthest-known (and therefore oldest) galaxy. Its redshift shattered the previous record, a galaxy at z=7.73.Why its even more interesting than that:Spectroscopic detection of emission in EGSY8p7 with MOSFIRE. The black line is the raw data; the red line shows the best-fit model to the data. [Zitrin et al. 2015]Based on our understanding of how the universe evolved, the detection of Ly emission from this galaxy came as a surprise. At EGSY8p7s redshift of 8.68, the universe was still full of clouds of neutral hydrogen that should have absorbed the galaxys Ly emission long before it reached us. So what does it mean that we do see Ly emission from EGSY8p7? The reionization of the universe through which the neutral hydrogen clouds were made transparent may have been a patchy process. In particular, EGSY8p7 might have emitted an unusual amount of ionizing radiation, creating an early ionized bubble around it that allowed the Ly emission to escape.CitationAdi Zitrin et al 2015 ApJ 810 L12. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/810/1/L12

  19. Characterization of Novel Genes Within 8P11-12 Amplicon in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    C-myc amplification in breast cancer: a meta - analysis of its occurrence and prognostic relevance. Br J Cancer, 83: 1688-1695, 2000. 2. Hui, R...Nass SJ, Dickson RB, Trock BJ. C-myc amplification in breast cancer: a meta - analysis of its occurrence and prognostic relevance. Br J Cancer 2000;83...a detailed genomic and expression analysis of the 8p11-p12 amplicon in breast cancer cell lines and identified several novel candidate genes

  20. Microarray Analysis of 8p23.1 Deletion in New Patients with Atypical Phenotypical Traits

    PubMed Central

    Khelifa, Hela Ben; Kammoun, Molka; Hannachi, Hanene; Soyah, Najla; Hammami, Saber; Elghezal, Hatem; Sanlaville, Damien; Saad, Ali; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya

    2015-01-01

    We describe two patients carrying deletions of chromosome 8p23.1 with a commonly critical region identified by means of oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). They didn't present congenital heart defects or behavioral problems. Only one patient presented with intellectual disability and carrying deletion of TNKS gene. We presumed the inclusion of TNKS gene in the mental impairment. PMID:27617130

  1. Hyperfine Quantum Beat Spectroscopy of the Cs 8p level with Pulsed Pump-Probe Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, Burcin; Popov, Oleg; Kelly, Stephen; Boyle, Patrick; Salsman, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Quantum beats arising from the hyperfine interaction were measured in a three-level excitation (lambda) scheme: pump for the 6s2S1 / 2 --> 8p2P3 / 2 and stimulated emission pump (probe) for the 8p2P3 / 2 --> 5d2D5 / 2 transitions of atomic cesium. In the technique, pump laser instantaneously excites the hot atomic vapor and creates anisotropy in the 8p2P3 / 2 level, and probe laser comes after some time delay. Delaying the probe time allows us to map out the motion of the polarized atoms like a stroboscope. According to the observed evolution of the hyperfine structure dependent parameters, e.g. alignment and atomic polarization, by delaying the arrival time of the stimulated emission pump laser (SEP), precise values of the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole coefficients are obtained with an improved precision over previous results. The usefulness of the PUMP-SEP excitation scheme for the polarization hyperfine quantum beat measurements without complications from the Doppler effect will also be discussed. The financial support of the Research Corporation under the Grant number CC7133 and MiamiUniversity, College of the Arts and Sciences are acknowledged.

  2. Allelic Imbalance in Regulation of ANRIL through Chromatin Interaction at 9p21 Endometriosis Risk Locus

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Gurumurthy, Aishwarya; Hayano, Takahide; Ahmadloo, Somayeh; Omer, Waleed H; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Akihito; Kurose, Keisuke; Enomoto, Takayuki; Akira, Shigeo; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with human complex disorders. However, functional characterization of the disease-associated SNPs remains a formidable challenge. Here we explored regulatory mechanism of a SNP on chromosome 9p21 associated with endometriosis by leveraging “allele-specific” functional genomic approaches. By re-sequencing 1.29 Mb of 9p21 region and scrutinizing DNase-seq data from the ENCODE project, we prioritized rs17761446 as a candidate functional variant that was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the original GWAS SNP (rs10965235) and located on DNase I hypersensitive site. Chromosome conformation capture followed by high-throughput sequencing revealed that the protective G allele of rs17761446 exerted stronger chromatin interaction with ANRIL promoter. We demonstrated that the protective allele exhibited preferential binding affinities to TCF7L2 and EP300 by bioinformatics and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses. ChIP assays for histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation and RNA polymerase II reinforced the enhancer activity of the SNP site. The allele specific expression analysis for eutopic endometrial tissues and endometrial carcinoma cell lines showed that rs17761446 was a cis-regulatory variant where G allele was associated with increased ANRIL expression. Our work illuminates the allelic imbalances in a series of transcriptional regulation from factor binding to gene expression mediated by chromatin interaction underlie the molecular mechanism of 9p21 endometriosis risk locus. Functional genomics on common disease will unlock functional aspect of genotype-phenotype correlations in the post-GWAS stage. PMID:27055116

  3. Deep Impact 9P/TEMPEL Encounter - Raw its Nav Images V1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcich, B.; Shaw, A. S.; Desnoyer, M.; McLaughlin, S. A.; Mastrodemos, N.; Klaasen, K. P.

    2010-01-01

    This data set contains raw comet 9P/Tempel 1 and calibration images acquired by the Deep Impact Impactor Targeting Sensor Visible CCD during the encounter phase of the mission. These observations were used for optical and autonomous navigation (NAV) of the impactor spacecraft as well as for scientific investigations. These data were collected from 6 May to 4 July 2005. In this version 1.1 of the data set, the values for the INTEGRATION_DURATION keyword in the PDS data labels were corrected. This revised data set supersedes version 1.0.

  4. Deep Impact 9P/TEMPEL Encounter - Raw MRI Nav Images V1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcich, B.; Shaw, A. S.; Desnoyer, M.; McLaughlin, S. A.; Mastrodemos, N.; Klaasen, K. P.

    2010-01-01

    This data set contains raw 9P/Tempel 1 and calibration images acquired by the Deep Impact Medium Resolution Instrument Visible CCD during the encounter phase of the mission. These observations were used for optical and autonomous navigation (NAV) of the flyby spacecraft as well as for scientific investigations. These data were collected from 1 May to 4 July 2005. In this version 1.1 of the data set, the values for the INTEGRATION_DURATION keyword in the PDS data labels were corrected. This revised data set supersedes version 1.0.

  5. Deep Impact 9P/TEMPEL Cruise - Raw MRI Nav Images V1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcich, B.; Shaw, A. S.; Desnoyer, M.; McLaughlin, S. A.; Mastrodemos, N.; Klaasen, K. P.

    2010-01-01

    This data set contains raw calibration and test images acquired by the Deep Impact Medium Resolution Instrument Visible CCD during the cruise phase of the mission. These observations were used for optical and autonomous navigation (NAV) of the flyby spacecraft. These data were collected from 14 January to 25 April 2005. Test images of comet 9P/Tempel 1 were acquired on 25 April. In this version 1.1 of the data set, the values for the INTEGRATION_DURATION keyword in the PDS data labels were corrected. This revised data set supersedes version 1.0.

  6. The Cortical Localization of the Microtubule Orientation Protein, Kar9p, Is Dependent upon Actin and Proteins Required for Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rita K.; Matheos, Dina; Rose, Mark D.

    1999-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, positioning of the mitotic spindle requires both the cytoplasmic microtubules and actin. Kar9p is a novel cortical protein that is required for the correct position of the mitotic spindle and the orientation of the cytoplasmic microtubules. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)– Kar9p localizes to a single spot at the tip of the growing bud and the mating projection. However, the cortical localization of Kar9p does not require microtubules (Miller, R.K., and M.D. Rose. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 140: 377), suggesting that Kar9p interacts with other proteins at the cortex. To investigate Kar9p's cortical interactions, we treated cells with the actin-depolymerizing drug, latrunculin-A. In both shmoos and mitotic cells, Kar9p's cortical localization was completely dependent on polymerized actin. Kar9p localization was also altered by mutations in four genes, spa2Δ, pea2Δ, bud6Δ, and bni1Δ, required for normal polarization and actin cytoskeleton functions and, of these, bni1Δ affected Kar9p localization most severely. Like kar9Δ, bni1Δ mutants exhibited nuclear positioning defects during mitosis and in shmoos. Furthermore, like kar9Δ, the bni1Δ mutant exhibited misoriented cytoplasmic microtubules in shmoos. Genetic analysis placed BNI1 in the KAR9 pathway for nuclear migration. However, analysis of kar9Δ bni1Δ double mutants suggested that Kar9p retained some function in bni1Δ mitotic cells. Unlike the polarization mutants, kar9Δ shmoos had a normal morphology and diploids budded in the correct bipolar pattern. Furthermore, Bni1p localized normally in kar9Δ. We conclude that Kar9p's function is specific for cytoplasmic microtubule orientation and that Kar9p's role in nuclear positioning is to coordinate the interactions between the actin and microtubule networks. PMID:10085294

  7. Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite Observations of Comet 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensch, F.; Melnick, G. J.; Neufeld, D. A.; Harwit, M.; Snell, R. L.; Patten, B. M.; Tolls, V.

    We present observations of the 1_{10}-1_{01} ortho-water ground-state rotational transition in comet 9P/Tempel 1 made with the NASA Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS). The SWAS monitoring covered a 3-month period from June to August 2005 and included observations of the comet's activity during the collision of the Deep Impact spacecraft with the nucleus on 4 July 2005. No excess emission from the material ejected by the impactor was detected and we derive an upper limit of 1.8× 10^7 kg on the vaporized water ice. However, the water production rate of the comet shows large natural variations of up to a factor of three throughout the 3-month monitoring period. The total amount of water vaporized between 5 June and 1 September 2005 is 4.5× 1034 molecules (˜ 1.3× 10^9 kg) and we estimate that 9P/Tempel 1 has lost as much as N˜ 1035 molecules during its 2005 apparition.

  8. Secular variation of activity in comets 2P/Encke and 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haken, Michael; AHearn, Michael F.; Feldman, Paul D.; Budzien, Scott A.

    1995-01-01

    We compare production rates of H20 derived from International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra from multiple apparitions of 2 comets, 2P/Encke and 9P/Tempel 1, whose orbits are in near-resonance with that of the Earth. Since model-induced errors are primarily a function of observing geometry, the close geometrical matches afforded by the resonance condition results in the cancellation of such errors when taking ratios of production rates. Giving careful attention to the variation of model parameters with solar activity, we find marginal evidence of change in 2P/Encke: a 1-sigma pre-perihelion decrease averaging 4%/revolution over 4 apparitions from 1980-1994, and a 1-sigma post-perihelion increase of 16%/revolution for 2 successive apparitions in 1984 and 1987. We find for 9P/Tempel 1, however, a 7-sigma decrease of 29%/revolution over 3 apparitions from 1983-1994, even after correcting for a tracking problem which made the fluxes systematically low. We speculate on a possible association of the character of long-term brightness variations with physical properties of the nucleus, and discuss implications for future research.

  9. The ESR1 (6q25) Locus Is Associated with Calcaneal Ultrasound Parameters and Radial Volumetric Bone Mineral Density in European Men

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Wendy; Boonen, Steven; Borghs, Herman; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Gielen, Evelien; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Casanueva, Felipe; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Kula, Krzysztof; Labrie, Fernand; Lean, Michael E. J.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C. W.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 6q25, which incorporates the oestrogen receptor α gene (ESR1), as a quantitative trait locus for areal bone mineral density (BMDa) of the hip and lumbar spine. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of this locus on other bone health outcomes; calcaneal ultrasound (QUS) parameters, radial peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) parameters and markers of bone turnover in a population sample of European men. Methods Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the 6q25 locus were genotyped in men aged 40–79 years from 7 European countries, participating in the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). The associations between SNPs and measured bone parameters were tested under an additive genetic model adjusting for centre using linear regression. Results 2468 men, mean (SD) aged 59.9 (11.1) years had QUS measurements performed and bone turnover marker levels measured. A subset of 628 men had DXA and pQCT measurements. Multiple independent SNPs showed significant associations with BMD using all three measurement techniques. Most notably, rs1999805 was associated with a 0.10 SD (95%CI 0.05, 0.16; p = 0.0001) lower estimated BMD at the calcaneus, a 0.14 SD (95%CI 0.05, 0.24; p = 0.004) lower total hip BMDa, a 0.12 SD (95%CI 0.02, 0.23; p = 0.026) lower lumbar spine BMDa and a 0.18 SD (95%CI 0.06, 0.29; p = 0.003) lower trabecular BMD at the distal radius for each copy of the minor allele. There was no association with serum levels of bone turnover markers and a single SNP which was associated with cortical density was also associated with cortical BMC and thickness. Conclusions Our data replicate previous associations found between SNPs in the 6q25 locus and BMDa at the hip and extend these data to include associations with calcaneal ultrasound parameters and radial volumetric BMD. PMID:21760950

  10. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Afshan; Couch, Fergus J.; Chen, Gary K.; Lindström, Sara; Eccles, Diana; Millikan, Robert C.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Stram, Daniel O.; Beckmann, Lars; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Amiano, Pilar; Apicella, Carmel; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Berg, Christine D.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brinton, Louise; Bui, Quang M.; Buring, Julie E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Campa, Daniele; Carpenter, Jane E.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Constance; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Deming, Sandra L.; Diasio, Robert B.; Diver, W. Ryan; Dunning, Alison M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Fejerman, Laura; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fletcher, Olivia; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gerty, Susan M.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Giles, Graham G.; van Gils, Carla H.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Huntsman, Scott; Ingles, Sue A.; Irwanto, Astrid; Isaacs, Claudine; Jacobs, Kevin B.; John, Esther M.; Justenhoven, Christina; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Adam M.; Lee, I-Min; Lesnick, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Martin, Nicholas G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miron, Penelope; Monroe, Kristine R.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nickels, Stefan; Nyante, Sarah J.; Olswold, Curtis; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Park, Daniel J.; Palmer, Julie R.; Pathak, Harsh; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul; Rahman, Nazneen; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Slager, Susan; Southey, Melissa C.; Stevens, Kristen N.; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Press, Michael F.; Ross, Eric; Riboli, Elio; Ridker, Paul M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Severi, Gianluca; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Stone, Jennifer; Sund, Malin; Tapper, William J.; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang, Xianshu; Wang, Zhaoming; Weaver, JoEllen; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Van Den Berg, David; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Ziv, Elad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Kraft, Peter; Haiman, Christopher A.; Vachon, Celine M.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of ER-negative disease to date, comprising 4754 ER-negative cases and 31 663 controls from three GWAS: NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) (2188 ER-negative cases; 25 519 controls of European ancestry), Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (1562 triple negative cases; 3399 controls of European ancestry) and African American Breast Cancer Consortium (AABC) (1004 ER-negative cases; 2745 controls). We performed in silico replication of 86 SNPs at P ≤ 1 × 10-5 in an additional 11 209 breast cancer cases (946 with ER-negative disease) and 16 057 controls of Japanese, Latino and European ancestry. We identified two novel loci for breast cancer at 20q11 and 6q14. SNP rs2284378 at 20q11 was associated with ER-negative breast cancer (combined two-stage OR = 1.16; P = 1.1 × 10−8) but showed a weaker association with overall breast cancer (OR = 1.08, P = 1.3 × 10–6) based on 17 869 cases and 43 745 controls and no association with ER-positive disease (OR = 1.01, P = 0.67) based on 9965 cases and 22 902 controls. Similarly, rs17530068 at 6q14 was associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.12; P = 1.1 × 10−9), and with both ER-positive (OR = 1.09; P = 1.5 × 10−5) and ER-negative (OR = 1.16, P = 2.5 × 10−7) disease. We also confirmed three known loci associated with ER-negative (19p13) and both ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancer (6q25 and 12p11). Our results highlight the value of large-scale collaborative studies to identify novel breast cancer risk loci. PMID:22976474

  11. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Laura Putignano, Anna; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Nelen, Marcel R.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A.M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Gareth Evans, D.; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; John Kennedy, M.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Catharina Dressler, Anne; Hansen, Thomas v.O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Bjork Barkardottir, Rosa; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Sluiter, Michelle D.; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r2 = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10−9 for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18–1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10−8 for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01–1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92–1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women. PMID:21593217

  12. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Putignano, Anna Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G; Caligo, Maria A; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B; Rookus, Matti A; Hooning, Maartje J; Nelen, Marcel R; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Os, Theo A M; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; Kennedy, M John; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L; Daly, Mary B; Terry, Mary B; John, Esther M; Buys, Saundra S; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Hansen, Thomas v O; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine S; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L; Beattie, Mary S; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Sluiter, Michelle D; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-08-15

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r(2) = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10(-9) for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18-1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10(-8) for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02-1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92-1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women.

  13. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, Afshan; Couch, Fergus J; Chen, Gary K; Lindström, Sara; Eccles, Diana; Millikan, Robert C; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Stram, Daniel O; Beckmann, Lars; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Ambrosone, Christine B; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Amiano, Pilar; Apicella, Carmel; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brinton, Louise; Bui, Quang M; Buring, Julie E; Buys, Saundra S; Campa, Daniele; Carpenter, Jane E; Chasman, Daniel I; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Constance; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Diver, W Ryan; Dunning, Alison M; Durcan, Lorraine; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Fejerman, Laura; Figueroa, Jonine D; Fletcher, Olivia; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gaudet, Mia M; Gerty, Susan M; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Giles, Graham G; van Gils, Carla H; Godwin, Andrew K; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Hu, Jennifer J; Huntsman, Scott; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Isaacs, Claudine; Jacobs, Kevin B; John, Esther M; Justenhoven, Christina; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Lathrop, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Adam M; Lee, I-Min; Lesnick, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Martin, Nicholas G; McLean, Catriona A; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miron, Penelope; Monroe, Kristine R; Montgomery, Grant W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nickels, Stefan; Nyante, Sarah J; Olswold, Curtis; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Park, Daniel J; Palmer, Julie R; Pathak, Harsh; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul; Rahman, Nazneen; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Slager, Susan; Southey, Melissa C; Stevens, Kristen N; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Press, Michael F; Ross, Eric; Riboli, Elio; Ridker, Paul M; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Severi, Gianluca; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Stone, Jennifer; Sund, Malin; Tapper, William J; Thun, Michael J; Travis, Ruth C; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang, Xianshu; Wang, Zhaoming; Weaver, Joellen; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Wilkens, Lynne R; Van Den Berg, David; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Ziv, Elad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas F; Hunter, David J; Henderson, Brian E; Chanock, Stephen J; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Kraft, Peter; Haiman, Christopher A; Vachon, Celine M

    2012-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of ER-negative disease to date, comprising 4754 ER-negative cases and 31 663 controls from three GWAS: NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) (2188 ER-negative cases; 25 519 controls of European ancestry), Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (1562 triple negative cases; 3399 controls of European ancestry) and African American Breast Cancer Consortium (AABC) (1004 ER-negative cases; 2745 controls). We performed in silico replication of 86 SNPs at P ≤ 1 × 10(-5) in an additional 11 209 breast cancer cases (946 with ER-negative disease) and 16 057 controls of Japanese, Latino and European ancestry. We identified two novel loci for breast cancer at 20q11 and 6q14. SNP rs2284378 at 20q11 was associated with ER-negative breast cancer (combined two-stage OR = 1.16; P = 1.1 × 10(-8)) but showed a weaker association with overall breast cancer (OR = 1.08, P = 1.3 × 10(-6)) based on 17 869 cases and 43 745 controls and no association with ER-positive disease (OR = 1.01, P = 0.67) based on 9965 cases and 22 902 controls. Similarly, rs17530068 at 6q14 was associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.12; P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), and with both ER-positive (OR = 1.09; P = 1.5 × 10(-5)) and ER-negative (OR = 1.16, P = 2.5 × 10(-7)) disease. We also confirmed three known loci associated with ER-negative (19p13) and both ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancer (6q25 and 12p11). Our results highlight the value of large-scale collaborative studies to identify novel breast cancer risk loci.

  14. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF COMETS 8P/TUTTLE AND 17P/HOLMES DURING SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, D. J.; Bodewits, D.; Lisse, C. M.; Dennerl, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Hsieh, H.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Zhao, L. E-mail: damian.christian@csun.edu E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu E-mail: swolk@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

    2010-04-01

    We present results for Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of two comets made during the minimum of solar cycle 24. The two comets, 17P/Holmes (17P) and 8P/Tuttle (8P), were very different in their activity and geometry. 17P was observed, for 30 ks right after its major outburst, on 2007 October 31 (10:07 UT), and comet 8P/Tuttle was observed in 2008 January for 47 ks. During the two Chandra observations, 17P was producing at least 100 times more water than 8P but was 2.2 times further away from the Sun. Also, 17P was at a relatively high solar latitude (+19.{sup 0}1) while 8P was observed at a lower solar latitude (3.{sup 0}4). The X-ray spectrum of 17P is unusually soft with little significant emission at energies above 500 eV. Depending on our choice of background, we derive a 300-1000 eV flux of 0.5-4.5 x 10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with over 90% of the emission in the 300-400 eV range. This corresponds to an X-ray luminosity between 0.4 and 3.3 x 10{sup 15} erg s{sup -1}. However, we cannot distinguish between this significant excess emission and possible instrumental effects, such as incomplete charge transfer across the CCD. 17P is the first comet observed at high latitude during solar minimum. Its lack of X-rays in the 400-1000 eV range, in a simple picture, may be attributed to the polar solar wind, which is depleted in highly charged ions. 8P/Tuttle was much brighter, with an average count rate of 0.20 counts s{sup -1} in the 300-1000 eV range. We derive an average X-ray flux in this range of 9.4 x 10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and an X-ray luminosity for the comet of 1.7 x 10{sup 14} erg s{sup -1}. The light curve showed a dramatic decrease in flux of over 60% between observations on January 1 and 4. When comparing outer regions of the coma to inner regions, its spectra showed a decrease in ratios of C VI/C V, O VIII/O VII, as predicted by recent solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission models. There are remarkable differences

  15. Genome annotation of a 1.5 Mb region of human chromosome 6q23 encompassing a quantitative trait locus for fetal hemoglobin expression in adults

    PubMed Central

    Close, James; Game, Laurence; Clark, Barnaby; Bergounioux, Jean; Gerovassili, Ageliki; Thein, Swee Lay

    2004-01-01

    Background Heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) is a common multifactorial trait characterized by a modest increase of fetal hemoglobin levels in adults. We previously localized a Quantitative Trait Locus for HPFH in an extensive Asian-Indian kindred to chromosome 6q23. As part of the strategy of positional cloning and a means towards identification of the specific genetic alteration in this family, a thorough annotation of the candidate interval based on a strategy of in silico / wet biology approach with comparative genomics was conducted. Results The ~1.5 Mb candidate region was shown to contain five protein-coding genes. We discovered a very large uncharacterized gene containing WD40 and SH3 domains (AHI1), and extended the annotation of four previously characterized genes (MYB, ALDH8A1, HBS1L and PDE7B). We also identified several genes that do not appear to be protein coding, and generated 17 kb of novel transcript sequence data from re-sequencing 97 EST clones. Conclusion Detailed and thorough annotation of this 1.5 Mb interval in 6q confirms a high level of aberrant transcripts in testicular tissue. The candidate interval was shown to exhibit an extraordinary level of alternate splicing – 19 transcripts were identified for the 5 protein coding genes, but it appears that a significant portion (14/19) of these alternate transcripts did not have an open reading frame, hence their functional role is questionable. These transcripts may result from aberrant rather than regulated splicing. PMID:15169551

  16. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: combined results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M; Antoniou, Antonis C; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Dunning, Alison M; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W R; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Braaf, Linde M; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Hooning, Maartje J; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G; Spurdle, Amanda B; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Caligo, Maria A; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Aalfs, Cora M; Gille, Hans J P; Wijnen, Juul T; Gómez García, Encarna B; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D P; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I(2) = 49.3%; p = <0.004). In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80-1.00, p = 0.048), indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk.

  17. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33: Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; kConFab; Group, AOCS Study; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; SWE-BRCA; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; HEBON; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J.P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; EMBRACE; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004). In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80–1.00, p = 0.048), indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk. PMID:22768030

  18. Exposed water ice deposits on the surface of comet 9P/Tempel 1.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, J M; A'Hearn, M F; Groussin, O; Li, J-Y; Belton, M J S; Delamere, W A; Kissel, J; Klaasen, K P; McFadden, L A; Meech, K J; Melosh, H J; Schultz, P H; Thomas, P C; Veverka, J; Yeomans, D K; Busko, I C; Desnoyer, M; Farnham, T L; Feaga, L M; Hampton, D L; Lindler, D J; Lisse, C M; Wellnitz, D D

    2006-03-10

    We report the direct detection of solid water ice deposits exposed on the surface of comet 9P/Tempel 1, as observed by the Deep Impact mission. Three anomalously colored areas are shown to include water ice on the basis of their near-infrared spectra, which include diagnostic water ice absorptions at wavelengths of 1.5 and 2.0 micrometers. These absorptions are well modeled as a mixture of nearby non-ice regions and 3 to 6% water ice particles 10 to 50 micrometers in diameter. These particle sizes are larger than those ejected during the impact experiment, which suggests that the surface deposits are loose aggregates. The total area of exposed water ice is substantially less than that required to support the observed ambient outgassing from the comet, which likely has additional source regions below the surface.

  19. An unusual haplotype structure on human chromosome 8p23 derived from the inversion polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Deng, Libin; Zhang, Yuezheng; Kang, Jian; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Hongbin; Gao, Yang; Li, Chaohua; Pan, Hao; Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Dunmei; Niu, Tianhua; Yang, Huanming; Zeng, Changqing

    2008-10-01

    Chromosomal inversion is an important type of genomic variations involved in both evolution and disease pathogenesis. Here, we describe the refined genetic structure of a 3.8-Mb inversion polymorphism at chromosome 8p23. Using HapMap data of 1,073 SNPs generated from 209 unrelated samples from CEPH-Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe (CEU); Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI); and Asian (ASN) samples, which were comprised of Han Chinese from Beijing, China (CHB) and Japanese from Tokyo, Japan (JPT)-we successfully deduced the inversion orientations of all their 418 haplotypes. In particular, distinct haplotype subgroups were identified based on principal component analysis (PCA). Such genetic substructures were consistent with clustering patterns based on neighbor-joining tree reconstruction, which revealed a total of four haplotype clades across all samples. Metaphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in a subset of 10 HapMap samples verified their inversion orientations predicted by PCA or phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Positioning of the outgroup haplotype within one of YRI clades suggested that Human NCBI Build 36-inverted order is most likely the ancestral orientation. Furthermore, the population differentiation test and the relative extended haplotype homozygosity (REHH) analysis in this region discovered multiple selection signals, also in a population-specific manner. A positive selection signal was detected at XKR6 in the ASN population. These results revealed the correlation of inversion polymorphisms to population-specific genetic structures, and various selection patterns as possible mechanisms for the maintenance of a large chromosomal rearrangement at 8p23 region during evolution. In addition, our study also showed that haplotype-based clustering methods, such as PCA, can be applied in scanning for cryptic inversion polymorphisms at a genome-wide scale.

  20. Pre-impact monitoring of Comet 9P/Tempel 1, the Deep Impact target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, L. M.; Boehnhardt, H.; Gredel, R.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Ortiz, J. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Vidal-Nuñez, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    Comet 9P/Tempel 1, the target of the Deep Impact Mission, has been monitored for 6 months aiming at its characterization before the impact experiment. During this period of time, the coma has gone through a slow morphological evolution from a wide structure in the south-western quadrant in mid-February to a porcupine pattern in mid-April and up to seven features identified in June. In addition to this evolution, an arclet in the western coma hemisphere was detected on June 14, related to an outburst event. Interpretation of these features and their evolution seems to indicate the presence of at least 3 or 4 very active regions on the nucleus, consistent with the rotation axis being oriented close to previous solutions found by Belton et al. (2005), or close to the angular momentum vector of the orbital motion of the comet. The value of Afρ varies with heliocentric distance as r_h-6.71; slightly enhanced Afρ (above the r_h-6.71 curve) was observed from mid-February until the end of March, when fan-shaped structures appeared in the coma for the first time. Somewhere between mid-April to mid-May (i.e. 80 to 60 days before perihelion), the comet peaked in activity. In terms of gas production rates, CN, C2 and C3 have been obtained at rh ˜ 1.7, 1.60 and 1.51 AU, being slightly below those derived from previous passages. Abundance ratios of these species indicate that comet 9P/Tempel 1 is classified as typical in terms of C2 abundance. The surface brightness profiles of the continuum, either azimuthally averaged profiles from the broadband images or in north-south direction from the long-slit spectra can be well fit with -1.9 ≤ m ≤ -1.14 in log B - log ρ representation. Steeper slopes are obtained at larger rh which might be related to variable dust size distribution with distance from the nucleus due to the radiation pressure dynamics and/or physical processing of the dust grains (sublimation, fragmentation). Normalized color of the dust inside the coma in the

  1. Comparison of 6q25 Breast Cancer Hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC)

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Rebecca; Maranian, Melanie; Hopper, John L.; Kapuscinski, Miroslaw K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Park, Daniel J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Bueno-de-Mesquit, H. Bas; Muir, Kenneth R.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Marmee, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Rahman, Nazneen; Seal, Sheila; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Meindl, Alfons; Schott, Sarah; Bartram, Claus R.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Zalutsky, Iosif V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokovieva, Darya; Farahtdinova, Albina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Investigators, kConFab; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Figueroa, Jonine D.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Collée, Margriet; Hall, Per; Humpreys, Keith; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Ahmed, Shahana; Ghoussaini, Maya; Pharoah, Paul DP.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Morrison, Jonathan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    The 6q25.1 locus was first identified via a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in Chinese women and marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210, approximately 180 Kb upstream of ESR1. There have been conflicting reports about the association of this locus with breast cancer in Europeans, and a GWAS in Europeans identified a different SNP, tagged here by rs12662670. We examined the associations of both SNPs in up to 61,689 cases and 58,822 controls from forty-four studies collaborating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, of which four studies were of Asian and 39 of European descent. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Case-only analyses were used to compare SNP effects in Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+) versus negative (ER−) tumours. Models including both SNPs were fitted to investigate whether the SNP effects were independent. Both SNPs are significantly associated with breast cancer risk in both ethnic groups. Per-allele ORs are higher in Asian than in European studies [rs2046210: OR (A/G) = 1.36 (95% CI 1.26–1.48), p = 7.6×10−14 in Asians and 1.09 (95% CI 1.07–1.11), p = 6.8×10−18 in Europeans. rs12662670: OR (G/T) = 1.29 (95% CI 1.19–1.41), p = 1.2×10−9 in Asians and 1.12 (95% CI 1.08–1.17), p = 3.8×10−9 in Europeans]. SNP rs2046210 is associated with a significantly greater risk of ER− than ER+ tumours in Europeans [OR (ER−) = 1.20 (95% CI 1.15–1.25), p = 1.8×10−17 versus OR (ER+) = 1.07 (95% CI 1.04–1.1), p = 1.3×10−7, pheterogeneity = 5.1×10−6]. In these Asian studies, by contrast, there is no clear evidence of a differential association by tumour receptor status. Each SNP is associated with risk after adjustment for the other SNP. These results suggest the presence of two variants at 6q25.1 each independently associated with breast cancer risk in Asians and in Europeans. Of these two, the one

  2. Comparison of 6q25 breast cancer hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC).

    PubMed

    Hein, Rebecca; Maranian, Melanie; Hopper, John L; Kapuscinski, Miroslaw K; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Bueno-de-Mesquit, H Bas; Muir, Kenneth R; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Marmee, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Zamora, M Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Rahman, Nazneen; Seal, Sheila; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Meindl, Alfons; Schott, Sarah; Bartram, Claus R; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Zalutsky, Iosif V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokovieva, Darya; Farahtdinova, Albina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Gaudet, Mia M; Vijai, Joseph; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Figueroa, Jonine D; García-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Collée, Margriet; Hall, Per; Humpreys, Keith; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Ahmed, Shahana; Ghoussaini, Maya; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Morrison, Jonathan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M

    2012-01-01

    The 6q25.1 locus was first identified via a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in Chinese women and marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210, approximately 180 Kb upstream of ESR1. There have been conflicting reports about the association of this locus with breast cancer in Europeans, and a GWAS in Europeans identified a different SNP, tagged here by rs12662670. We examined the associations of both SNPs in up to 61,689 cases and 58,822 controls from forty-four studies collaborating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, of which four studies were of Asian and 39 of European descent. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Case-only analyses were used to compare SNP effects in Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+) versus negative (ER-) tumours. Models including both SNPs were fitted to investigate whether the SNP effects were independent. Both SNPs are significantly associated with breast cancer risk in both ethnic groups. Per-allele ORs are higher in Asian than in European studies [rs2046210: OR (A/G) = 1.36 (95% CI 1.26-1.48), p = 7.6 × 10(-14) in Asians and 1.09 (95% CI 1.07-1.11), p = 6.8 × 10(-18) in Europeans. rs12662670: OR (G/T) = 1.29 (95% CI 1.19-1.41), p = 1.2 × 10(-9) in Asians and 1.12 (95% CI 1.08-1.17), p = 3.8 × 10(-9) in Europeans]. SNP rs2046210 is associated with a significantly greater risk of ER- than ER+ tumours in Europeans [OR (ER-) = 1.20 (95% CI 1.15-1.25), p = 1.8 × 10(-17) versus OR (ER+) = 1.07 (95% CI 1.04-1.1), p = 1.3 × 10(-7), p(heterogeneity) = 5.1 × 10(-6)]. In these Asian studies, by contrast, there is no clear evidence of a differential association by tumour receptor status. Each SNP is associated with risk after adjustment for the other SNP. These results suggest the presence of two variants at 6q25.1 each independently associated with breast cancer risk in Asians and in Europeans. Of these two, the one tagged by rs2046210 is associated with a greater

  3. The Deep Impact crater on 9P/Tempel-1 from Stardust-NExT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Hermalyn, Brendan; Veverka, Joe

    2013-02-01

    The Stardust-NExT (SdN) mission returned to Comet 9P/Tempel-1 and viewed the site of the Deep Impact (DI) collision just over one comet year later. Comparisons between pre-impact images from the ITS camera on the DI probe and SdN images reveal a 50 m-diameter crater surrounded by a low rim about 180 m in diameter. The removal of a small mound uprange (but offset from the trajectory) from the impact site can be related to changes in the evolution of ejecta. A narrow (6°) gap in the ejecta curtain downrange indicates that a ridge extending from the impact-facing scarp downrange interrupted the final stages of cratering in one small region. Together, these observations indicate that the DI excavation crater diameter was about 200 m (±20 m), a value consistent with the ejected mass derived from Earth- and space-based observations with the assumption that this mass represents only 10-20% of the total ejected mass. As a result, the DI crater visible today is consistent with either a larger transient crater, which collapsed, or a central crater of a nested crater resembling an inverted sombrero. The latter alternative would be expected from a layered target: a loose particulate surface about 1-2 m deep over a slightly more competent substrate.

  4. Spectrophotometry of the Deep Impact Ejecta of Comet 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, K. W.; Aldering, G.; Meech, K. J.; Cochran, A.

    We have obtained optical spectrophotometry of the evolution of comet 9P/Tempel 1 after the impact of the Deep Impact spacecraft [1], using the SNIFS Supernova Integral Field Spectrograph at the UH 2.2 m telescope. From the data-cubes, we extracted both continuum flux distributions as well as emission line fluxes of the violet CN system and of [OI].We found that the continuum brightness of the comet, i.e., scattered sunlight, started rising immediately after the impact, but that the ejecta were slightly bluer in color than the material normally released by the comet.The emission of [OI] at 630 nm, which is a tracer of water, rose similar to the scattered continuum light, but then remained nearly constant for several hours after impact.We found that CN emission at 388 nm centered on the nucleus was delayed compared to the rise of dust-scattered sunlight. This CN emission also expanded faster spatially than the cloud of scattering dust.

  5. Genetic Variant rs10757278 on Chromosome 9p21 Contributes to Myocardial Infarction Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangyuan; Fu, Xiuhua; Wang, Guangyu; Liu, Guiyou; Bai, Xiuping

    2015-05-21

    Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed that rs10757278 polymorphism (or its proxy rs1333049) on chromosome 9p21 is associated with myocardial infarction (MI) susceptibility in individuals of Caucasian ancestry. Following studies in other populations investigated this association. However, some of these studies reported weak or no significant association. Here, we reevaluated this association using large-scale samples by searching PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Our results showed significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI with p = 6.09 × 10-22, odds ratio (OR) = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-1.36 in pooled population. We further performed a subgroup analysis, and found significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI in Asian and Caucasian populations. We identified that the association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI did not vary substantially by excluding any one study. However, the heterogeneity among the selected studies varies substantially by excluding the study from the Pakistan population. We found even more significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI in pooled population, p = 3.55 × 10-53, after excluding the study from the Pakistan population. In summary, previous studies reported weak or no significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that rs10757278 polymorphism is significantly associated with MI susceptibility by analyzing large-scale samples.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope observations of the nucleus of Comet 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, P. L.; Toth, I.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Weaver, H. A.; Weissman, P. R.

    The nucleus of Comet 9P/Tempel 1, the target of the Deep Impact mission, was detected during Hubble Space Telescope observations taken with the wide-field planetary camera 2 (WFPC2) on 31 December 1997 when the comet's solar phase angle was 3.°8, its heliocentric distance was 4.48 AU, and its geocentric distance was 3.53 AU. Sixteen images were taken through the F675W filter, and all of them revealed a point-like source without any detectable coma. From these images, we derived the R magnitude of the nucleus in the Johnson Kron Cousins photometric system for the entire 11.5-h time span of the observations. Assuming a prolate spheroid whose spin axis lies close to the plane of the sky, the partial lightcurve indicates semi-axes a-3.9 km and b-2.8 km (assuming a geometric albedo of 0.04 for the R band and a phase coefficient of 0.04 mag deg-1) and a rotational period in the range of ˜25-33 h. The upper limit of the parameter Afρ, which characterizes the dust production rate, is 1 cm. We also derive a fractional active area at 1.78 AU of ˜4%.

  7. Isolation of the human genomic brain-2/N-Oct 3 gene (POUF3) and assignment to chromosome 6q16

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasoski, S.; Malipiero, U.; Shreiber, E.

    1995-03-20

    N-Oct 3 is a human POU domain transcription factor that binds to the octamer sequence ATGCAAAT. The protein is expressed in the central nervous system during development and in adult brain. We have isolated and characterized genomic clones encoding the human N-Oct 3 gene (HGMW-approved symbol POUF3). Comparison of the structure of these clones with the N-Oct 3 cDNA revealed that POUF3 is an intronless gene. Sequencing of 650 bp of the promoter region showed 84% sequence identity of POUF3 with its murine homologue, the brain-2 (designated brn-2) gene. Whereas both POUF3 and brn-2 lack a TATA box, consensus sequences for AP-2, GCF, and SP1 transcription factors were identified within the highly conserved 5{prime}- flanking region. These sequences may play a crucial role for the tissue-specific transcription activation of the POUF3 gene. Southern blotting and in situ hybridization localized the human POUF3 gene to chromosome 6q16. 61 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Isolation of the human genomic brain-2/N-Oct 3 gene (POUF3) and assignment to chromosome 6q16.

    PubMed

    Atanasoski, S; Toldo, S S; Malipiero, U; Schreiber, E; Fries, R; Fontana, A

    1995-03-20

    N-Oct 3 is a human POU domain transcription factor that binds to the octamer sequence ATGCAAAT. The protein is expressed in the central nervous system during development and in adult brain. We have isolated and characterized genomic clones encoding the human N-Oct 3 gene (HGMW-approved symbol POUF3). Comparison of the structure of these clones with the N-Oct 3 cDNA revealed that POUF3 is an intronless gene. Sequencing of 650 bp of the promoter region showed 84% sequence identity of POUF3 with its murine homologue, the brain-2 (designated brn-2) gene. Whereas both POUF3 and brn-2 lack a TATA box, consensus sequences for AP-2, GCF, and SP1 transcription factors were identified within the highly conserved 5'-flanking region. These sequences may play a crucial role for the tissue-specific transcription activation of the POUF3 gene. Southern blotting and in situ hybridization localized the human POUF3 gene to chromosome 6q16.

  9. Combined Analysis from Eleven Linkage Studies of Bipolar Disorder Provides Strong Evidence of Susceptibility Loci on Chromosomes 6q and 8q

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, Matthew B.; Devlin, B.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.; Sklar, Pamela; Smoller, Jordan W.; Abou Jamra, Rami; Albus, Margot; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Baron, Miron; Barrett, Thomas B.; Berrettini, Wade; Blacker, Deborah; Byerley, William; Cichon, Sven; Coryell, Willam; Craddock, Nick; Daly, Mark J.; DePaulo, J. Raymond; Edenberg, Howard J.; Foroud, Tatiana; Gill, Michael; Gilliam, T. Conrad; Hamshere, Marian; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Juo, Suh-Hang; Kelsoe, John R.; Lambert, David; Lange, Christoph; Lerer, Bernard; Liu, Jianjun; Maier, Wolfgang; MacKinnon, James D.; McInnis, Melvin G.; McMahon, Francis J.; Murphy, Dennis L.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nurnberger, John I.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Potash, James B.; Propping, Peter; Pulver, Ann E.; Rice, John P.; Rietschel, Marcella; Scheftner, William; Schumacher, Johannes; Segurado, Ricardo; Van Steen, Kristel; Xie, Weiting; Zandi, Peter P.; Laird, Nan M.

    2005-01-01

    Several independent studies and meta-analyses aimed at identifying genomic regions linked to bipolar disorder (BP) have failed to find clear and consistent evidence of linkage regions. Our hypothesis is that combining the original genotype data provides benefits of increased power and control over sources of heterogeneity that outweigh the difficulty and potential pitfalls of the implementation. We conducted a combined analysis using the original genotype data from 11 BP genomewide linkage scans comprising 5,179 individuals from 1,067 families. Heterogeneity among studies was minimized in our analyses by using uniform methods of analysis and a common, standardized marker map and was assessed using novel methods developed for meta-analysis of genome scans. To date, this collaboration is the largest and most comprehensive analysis of linkage samples involving a psychiatric disorder. We demonstrate that combining original genome-scan data is a powerful approach for the elucidation of linkage regions underlying complex disease. Our results establish genomewide significant linkage to BP on chromosomes 6q and 8q, which provides solid information to guide future gene-finding efforts that rely on fine-mapping and association approaches. PMID:16175504

  10. Variation at 3p24.1 and 6q23.3 influences the risk of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Matthew; da Silva Filho, Miguel Inacio; Broderick, Peter; Thomsen, Hauke; Försti, Asta; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Cooke, Rosie; Enciso-Mora, Victor; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M; Lloyd, Amy; Holroyd, Amy; Eisele, Lewin; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Ponader, Sabine; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge; Lightfoot, Tracy; Roman, Eve; Lake, Annette; Montgomery, Dorothy; Jarrett, Ruth F; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Engert, Andreas; Hemminki, Kari; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    In addition to HLA, recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (HL) have identified susceptibility loci for HL at 2p16.1, 8q24.21 and 10p14. In this study, we perform a GWAS meta-analysis with published GWAS (totaling 1,465 cases and 6,417 controls of European background), and follow up the most significant association signals in 2,024 cases and 1,853 controls. A combined analysis identifies new HL susceptibility loci mapping to 3p24.1 (rs3806624; P=1.14×10-12, odds ratio [OR]=1.26) and 6q23.3 (rs7745098; P=3.42×10-9, OR=1.21). rs3806624 localizes 5’ to the EOMES (eomesodermin) gene within a p53 response element affecting p53 binding. rs7745098 maps intergenic to HBS1L and MYB, a region previously associated with hematopoiesis. These findings provide further insight into the genetic and biological basis of inherited susceptibility to HL. PMID:24149102

  11. The 8p23 inversion polymorphism determines local recombination heterogeneity across human populations.

    PubMed

    Alves, Joao M; Chikhi, Lounès; Amorim, António; Lopes, Alexandra M

    2014-04-01

    For decades, chromosomal inversions have been regarded as fascinating evolutionary elements as they are expected to suppress recombination between chromosomes with opposite orientations, leading to the accumulation of genetic differences between the two configurations over time. Here, making use of publicly available population genotype data for the largest polymorphic inversion in the human genome (8p23-inv), we assessed whether this inhibitory effect of inversion rearrangements led to significant differences in the recombination landscape of two homologous DNA segments, with opposite orientation. Our analysis revealed that the accumulation of genetic differentiation is positively correlated with the variation in recombination profiles. The observed recombination dissimilarity between inversion types is consistent across all populations analyzed and surpasses the effects of geographic structure, suggesting that both structures (orientations) have been evolving independently over an extended period of time, despite being subjected to the very same demographic history. Aside this mainly independent evolution, we also identified a short segment (350 kb, <10% of the whole inversion) in the central region of the inversion where the genetic divergence between the two structural haplotypes is diminished. Although it is difficult to demonstrate it, this could be due to gene flow (possibly via double-crossing over events), which is consistent with the higher recombination rates surrounding this segment. This study demonstrates for the first time that chromosomal inversions influence the recombination landscape at a fine-scale and highlights the role of these rearrangements as drivers of genome evolution.

  12. Targeted deletion of the 9p21 noncoding coronary artery disease risk interval in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Visel, Axel; Zhu, Yiwen; May, Dalit; Afzal, Veena; Gong, Elaine; Attanasio, Catia; Blow, Matthew J.; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence polymorphisms in a 58kb interval on chromosome 9p21 confer a markedly increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), the leading cause of death worldwide 1,2. The variants have a substantial impact on the epidemiology of CAD and other life?threatening vascular conditions since nearly a quarter of Caucasians are homozygous for risk alleles. However, the risk interval is devoid of protein?coding genes and the mechanism linking the region to CAD risk has remained enigmatic. Here we show that deletion of the orthologous 70kb noncoding interval on mouse chromosome 4 affects cardiac expression of neighboring genes, as well as proliferation properties of vascular cells. Chr4delta70kb/delta70kb mice are viable, but show increased mortality both during development and as adults. Cardiac expression of two genes near the noncoding interval, Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b, is severely reduced in chr4delta70kb/delta70kb mice, indicating that distant-acting gene regulatory functions are located in the noncoding CAD risk interval. Allelespecific expression of Cdkn2b transcripts in heterozygous mice revealed that the deletion affects expression through a cis-acting mechanism. Primary cultures of chr4delta70kb/delta70kb aortic smooth muscle cells exhibited excessive proliferation and diminished senescence, a cellular phenotype consistent with accelerated CAD pathogenesis. Taken together, our results provide direct evidence that the CAD risk interval plays a pivotal role in regulation of cardiac Cdkn2a/b expression and suggest that this region affects CAD progression by altering the dynamics of vascular cell proliferation.

  13. Detection and Whole-Genome Characterization of a G8P[1] Group A Rotavirus Strain from Deer

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus A strain 14-02218-2, with genome constellation G8P[1]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3, was isolated from newborn fawns. The 14-02218-2 rotavirus strain is related to bovine and bovine-like rotavirus strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report on whole-genome-based characterization of a deer rotavirus G8P[1] strain. PMID:27932644

  14. p16 overexpression and 9p21 deletion are linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lebok, Patrick; Roming, Magdalena; Kluth, Martina; Koop, Christina; Özden, Cansu; Taskin, Berivan; Hussein, Khakan; Lebeau, Annette; Witzel, Isabell; Wölber, Linn; Geist, Stefan; Paluchowski, Peter; Wilke, Christian; Heilenkötter, Uwe; Müller, Volkmar; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Terracciano, Luigi; Krech, Rainer Horst; von der Assen, Albert; Burandt, Eike

    2016-12-06

    Overexpression of the p16 tumor suppressor, but also deletion of its gene locus 9p21, is linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype and poor prognosis in breast cancer. To better understand these contradictory observations, and to clarify the prognostic impact of p16 expression and 9p21 deletion, a tissue microarray (TMA) with 2,197 breast cancers was analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry (FISH) for 9p21 deletion and p16 expression. p16 immunostaining was weak in 25.6%, moderate in 7.1%, and strong in 12.7% of 1,684 evaluable cancers. Strong p16 staining was linked to advanced tumor stage (p = 0.0003), high-grade (p < 0.0001), high tumor cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p < 0.0001 each), and shorter overall survival (p = 0.0038). 9p21 deletion was found in 15.3% of 1,089 analyzable breast cancers, including 1.7% homozygous and 13.6% heterozygous deletions. 9p21 deletion was linked to adverse tumor features, including high-grade (p < 0.0001) and nodal positive cancers (p = 0.0063), high cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p ≤ 0.0006), and HER2 amplification (p = 0.0078). Patient outcome was worse in 9p21 deleted than in undeleted cancers (p = 0.0720). p16 expression was absent in cancers harboring homozygous 9p21 deletions, but no difference in p16 expression was found between cancers with (59.2% p16 positive) and without heterozygous 9p21 deletion (51.3% p16 positive, p = 0.0256). In summary, p16 expression is unrelated to partial 9p21 deletion, but both alterations are linked to aggressive breast cancer phenotype. High-level p16 expression is a strong predictor of unfavorable disease course in breast cancer.

  15. Allelic loss of 9p21.3 is a prognostic factor in 1p/19q codeleted anaplastic gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Alentorn, Agustí; Dehais, Caroline; Ducray, François; Carpentier, Catherine; Mokhtari, Karima; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Chinot, Olivier; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Ramirez, Carole; Loiseau, Hugues; Elouahdani-Hamdi, Selma; Beauchesne, Patrick; Langlois, Olivier; Desenclos, Christine; Guillamo, Jean-Sébastien; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Ghiringhelli, François; Colin, Philippe; Godard, Joel; Parker, Fabrice; Dhermain, Frédéric; Carpentier, Antoine F.; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Menei, Philippe; Bauchet, Luc; Faillot, Thierry; Fesneau, Mélanie; Fontaine, Denys; Motuo-Fotso, Marie-Jeannette; Vauleon, Elodie; Gaultier, Claude; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Gueye, Edouard-Marcel; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Durando, Xavier; Barrascout, Eduardo; Wager, Michel; Ricard, Damien; Carpiuc, Ioana; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to study the potential clinical relevance of 9p allelic loss, with or without copy number variation, in 1p/19q codeleted anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors (AOTs). Methods: This study enrolled 216 patients with 1p/19q codeleted AOT. The prognostic value of 9p allelic loss was investigated using a French nation-wide prospective registry, POLA (prise en charge des tumeurs oligodendrogliales anaplasiques) and high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays. We validated our results using the Repository of Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) dataset. Results: The minimal common region of allelic loss in chromosome arm 9p was 9p21.3. Allelic loss of 9p21.3, detected in 41.7% of tumors, was associated with shorter progression-free and overall survival rates in univariate (p = 0.008 and p < 0.001, respectively) and multivariate analyses (p = 0.009 and p = 0.009, respectively). This finding was validated in the REMBRANDT dataset in univariate and multivariate analysis (p = 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion: Our study highlights a novel potential prognostic biomarker in 1p/19q codeleted AOT. Further prospective studies are warranted to investigate our finding. PMID:26385879

  16. Several loci at chromosome 9p are involved in early and late stages of growth of cutaneous malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Puig, S. |; Ruiz, A.; Lazaro, C.

    1994-09-01

    To study the inactivation of a possible tumor suppressor gene at chromosome 9p associated with the development and progression of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), we have analyzed 12 microsatellite markers in 54 paired tumors and normal tissues. Forty-six percent of the tumors (corresponding to 52% of patients) showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for at least one marker. The smallest deleted region included markers D9S126, D9S265 and D9S259, spanning 5 centiMorgans of chromosome 9p21. Forty-two percent of the metastasic tumors and 50% of the primary tumors, including two in situ CMM, showed 9p21 deletions. Tumors with the worst prognoses showed larger deletions at 9p, ({chi}{sup 2} = 4.16, p < 0.04), and three cases showed two non-contiguous regions deleted, one telomeric to IFNA and the other centromeric. The presence of large and non-contiguous deletions, in the cases with the worst prognoses, suggests the existence of more than one tumor suppressor gene at 9p involved in the predisposition to, and progression of, malignant melanoma, outside the region of the recently identified p16 gene (MTS1), which has been found deleted in about 60% of melanoma cell lines.

  17. The Size, Shape, and Albedo of Deep Impact Target 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A'Hearn, Michael; Lisse, Carey; Lisse, C.; Fernandez, Y.; Belton, M.; Groussin, O.; Meech, K.; van Cleve, J.

    2004-02-01

    The Deep Impact mission, the eighth mission in NASA's Discovery Program, will launch on 30 Dec 2004 and will impact the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1 on 4 July 2005. Delivering an impactor to a cometary nucleus and observing the results of the impact is a challenging task. Mission success depends critically on the ability of the DI spacecraft to navigate to the comet. Despite robust targeting algorithms, large uncertainties in size, shape, albedo distribution, and rotational state significantly degrade the probability that the impactor will land in a sunlit portion of the surface that is observable from the flyby. The uncertainties in the size, axial ratio, and rotational state further jeopardize the ability of the flyby spacecraft to point its High Resolution Instrument at the actual impact site with sufficient precision to ensure it is in the field of view. Current estimate of the comet's size using Keck LWS observations are uncertain by 50% and they have provided no information on the distribution of albedo. Although uncertainty in the phasing of the optical lightcurve represents a large part of that error, there is also a significant uncertainty due to the combination of low SNR in the data from Keck and the limited spectral range over which data could be obtained. In order to improve our estimate of the size and shape of the nucleus of Tempel 1, we must obtain data with much higher SNR and with one-hour time resolution over a significant portion of the rotation light curve when the comet is inactive. We must determine whether or not there are large variations in albedo across the surface to order to ensure that the rotational lightcurve from optical data can be used to predict the convex hull of the actual shape. Tempel 1 is available in only one Spitzer viewing widow before it is expected to be close enough to the sun to become active, namely the window from 27 Feb through 29 April 2004, before the first GO observing period, at 3.7 AU from the Sun. The expect

  18. Congenital, low penetrance lymphedema of lower limbs maps to chromosome 6q16.2-q22.1 in an inbred Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sajid; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2008-03-01

    Hereditary lymphedema is a rare, lymphatic disorder resulting in the chronic swelling of the extremities. It shows wide inter- and intra-familial clinical heterogeneity as well as variability in the age of onset. There are more than four genetically distinct lymphedema conditions known and mutations in three genes have been discovered in families with lymphedema. However, many other familial lymphedemas do not show linkage with the known loci, suggesting genetic heterogeneity. Here, we describe a large inbred Pakistani family with congenital, progressive lymphedema confined to the lower limbs, which fades away at 40-45 years of age. This condition segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion with reduced penetrance. The features are close to primary lymphedema I, Nonne-Milory type (MIM 153100). We exclude this condition for linkage to the known loci for lymphedema by employing highly polymorphic microsatellite markers from these intervals. Then, through a genome-wide linkage study we show that the malformation in our family maps to chromosome 6q16.2-q22.1. The highest pair-wise LOD score (Z(max) = 3.19) was obtained with microsatellite marker D6S1671, and a multipoint score of 3.75 was obtained at 108 cM. Haplotype analysis indicated that the critical interval in this family flanks between markers D6S1716 and D6S303. Mutation analysis in FOXO3, a likely candidate within this interval, did not show any pathogenic change in the affected family subjects. Our study provides an evidence of a second locus for lymphedema type I. The discovery of the underlying gene could be helpful for the understanding of this heterogeneous hereditary condition.

  19. Responses of the Q6/Q6s ATD Positioned in Booster Seats in the Far-Side Seat Location of Side Impact Passenger Car and Sled Tests.

    PubMed

    Tylko, Suzanne; Bohman, Katarina; Bussières, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Passenger car side impact crash tests and sled tests were conducted to investigate the influence of booster seats, near-side occupant characteristics and vehicle interiors on the responses of the Q6/Q6s child ATD positioned in the rear, far-side seating location. Data from nine side impact sled tests simulating a EuroNCAP AEMD barrier test were analyzed with data obtained from 44 side impact crash tests. The crash tests included: FMVSS 214 and IIHS MDB, moving car-to-stationary car and moving car-to-moving car. A Q6 or prototype Q6s ATD was seated on the far-side, using a variety of low and high back booster seats. Head and chest responses were recorded and ATD motions were tracked with high-speed videos. The vehicle lateral accelerations resulting from MDB tests were characterized by a much earlier and more rapid rise to peak than in tests where the bullet was another car. The near-side seating position was occupied by a Hybrid III 10-year-old ATD in the sled tests, and a rear or front facing child restraint or a 5th percentile side impact ATD in the crash tests. Head impacts occurred more frequently in vehicles where a forward facing child restraint was present behind the driver seat for both the low and high back booster seats. Pretensioners were found to reduce lateral head displacements in all sled test configurations but the greatest reduction in lateral excursion was obtained with a high back booster seat secured with LATCH and tested in combination with pretensioners.

  20. Thyroid cancer GWAS identifies 10q26.12 and 6q14.1 as novel susceptibility loci and reveals genetic heterogeneity among populations.

    PubMed

    Mancikova, Veronika; Cruz, Raquel; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Landa, Iñigo; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Celeiro, Catuxa; Pastor, Susana; Velázquez, Antonia; Marcos, Ricard; Andía, Victor; Álvarez-Escolá, Cristina; Meoro, Amparo; Schiavi, Francesca; Opocher, Giuseppe; Quintela, Inés; Ansede-Bermejo, Juan; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Santisteban, Pilar; Robledo, Mercedes; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-10-15

    Thyroid cancer is the most heritable cancer of all those not displaying typical Mendelian inheritance. However, most of the genetic factors that would explain the high heritability remain unknown. Our aim was to identify additional common genetic variants associated with susceptibility to this disease. In order to do so, we performed a genome-wide association study in a series of 398 cases and 502 controls from Spain, followed by a replication in four well-defined Southern European case-control collections contributing a total of 1,422 cases and 1,908 controls. The association between the variation at the 9q22 locus near FOXE1 and thyroid cancer risk was consistent across all series, with several SNPs identified (rs7028661: OR = 1.64, p = 1.0 × 10(-22) , rs7037324: OR = 1.54, p = 1.2 × 10(-17) ). Moreover, the rare alleles of three SNPs (rs2997312, rs10788123 and rs1254167) at 10q26.12 showed suggestive evidence of association with higher risk of the disease (OR = 1.35, p = 1.2 × 10(-04) , OR = 1.26, p = 5.2 × 10(-04) and OR = 1.38, p = 5.9 × 10(-05) , respectively). Finally, the rare allele of rs4075570 at 6q14.1 conferred protection in the series studied (OR = 0.82, p = 2.0 × 10(-04) ). This study suggests that heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility between populations is a key feature to take into account when exploring genetic risk factors related to this disease.

  1. Partial trisomy 4q and partial monosomy 9p in a girl with choanal atresia and various dysmorphic findings.

    PubMed

    Cakmak-Genc, Gunes; Karakas-Celik, Sevim; Dursun, Ahmet; Piskin, İbrahim Etem

    2015-09-01

    We report a new-born girl with partial trisomy of 4q28-qter and partial monosomy of 9p24-9ter. Our patient has choanal atresia, hypertelorism, wide nasal bridge, high arched palate, discrete nipples, heart defects, myoclonic seizures and various dysmorphic findings. Standard chromosomal analysis with G-banding with Trypsin-Giemsa revealed 46,XX,der(9)t(4;9)(q28;p24) resulting from the mother's t(4,9) (q28;p24) karyotype. Deletions of the terminal part of 9p and partial trisomy of chromosome 4q are rare chromosomal alterations. To our knowledge, this is the first report of choanal atresia in a patient with a partial trisomy of 4q28-qter and partial monosomy 9p24-9ter combination, which were detected by integrated cytogenetic and genomic analysis.

  2. Monovalent rotavirus vaccine provides protection against an emerging fully heterotypic G9P[4] rotavirus strain in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Yen, Catherine; Figueroa, Jesùs Reyna; Uribe, Edgar Sánchez; Carmen-Hernández, Luz Del; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M; Richardson López-Collado, Vesta

    2011-09-01

    After the introduction of monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) in Mexico in 2006-2007, diarrhea mortality and morbidity declined substantially among Mexican children under 5 years of age. In January 2010, surveillance identified the emergence of a novel G9P[4] rotavirus strain nationwide. We conducted a case-control study to assess the field effectiveness of RV1 against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis caused by this unusual strain and to determine whether the G9P[4] emergence was related to vaccine failure or failure to vaccinate. RV1 was 94% effective (95% confidence interval, 16%-100%) against G9P[4] rotavirus-related hospitalization, indicating that its emergence was likely unrelated to vaccine pressure.

  3. CDKN2B expression and subcutaneous adipose tissue expandability: Possible influence of the 9p21 atherosclerosis locus

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, Per-Arne; Wahlstrand, Björn; Olsson, Maja; Froguel, Philippe; Falchi, Mario; Bergman, Richard N.; McTernan, Philip G.; Hedner, Thomas; Carlsson, Lena M.S.; Jacobson, Peter

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • The tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B is highly expressed in human adipose tissue. • Risk alleles at the 9p21 locus modify CDKN2B expression in a BMI-dependent fashion. • There is an inverse relationship between expression of CDKN2B and adipogenic genes. • CDKN2B expression influences to postprandial triacylglycerol clearance. • CDKN2B expression in adipose tissue is linked to markers of hepatic steatosis. - Abstract: Risk alleles within a gene desert at the 9p21 locus constitute the most prevalent genetic determinant of cardiovascular disease. Previous research has demonstrated that 9p21 risk variants influence gene expression in vascular tissues, yet the biological mechanisms by which this would mediate atherosclerosis merits further investigation. To investigate possible influences of this locus on other tissues, we explored expression patterns of 9p21-regulated genes in a panel of multiple human tissues and found that the tumor suppressor CDKN2B was highly expressed in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). CDKN2B expression was regulated by obesity status, and this effect was stronger in carriers of 9p21 risk alleles. Covariation between expression of CDKN2B and genes implemented in adipogenesis was consistent with an inhibitory effect of CDKN2B on SAT proliferation. Moreover, studies of postprandial triacylglycerol clearance indicated that CDKN2B is involved in down-regulation of SAT fatty acid trafficking. CDKN2B expression in SAT correlated with indicators of ectopic fat accumulation, including markers of hepatic steatosis. Among genes regulated by 9p21 risk variants, CDKN2B appears to play a significant role in the regulation of SAT expandability, which is a strong determinant of lipotoxicity and therefore might contribute to the development of atherosclerosis.

  4. A decade of G3P[8] and G9P[8] rotaviruses in Brazil: epidemiology and evolutionary analyses.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Mariela Martínez; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe Anibal; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; da Silva, Marcelle Figueira Marques; Fialho, Alexandre Madi; de Assis, Rosane Maria Santos; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to estimate the frequency of group A rotaviruses (RVA) infection with genotypes G3P[8] and G9P[8] in children that suffered from diarrheal disease (DD) between 2001 and 2011 in different Brazilian regions. In addition, the genetic diversity of G3P[8] and G9P[8] RVA strains recovered from vaccinated and non-vaccinated children was assessed. Laboratory-based RVA surveillance included 15,115 cases of DD, and RVA was detected by enzyme immune-assay and/or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in 3357 (22%) samples. RVA was genotyped by the semi-nested RT-PCR and among RVA-positive samples, 100 (2.9%) were G3 (63 G3P[8], 32 G3P not typed [NT], and 5 G3P[6]) and 378 (16.2%) were G9 (318 G9P[8], 59 G9P[NT], and 1 G9P[6]). From the G3 and G9 positive samples, 16 and 12, respectively, were obtained from children aged 4-48months vaccinated with the monovalent vaccine (Rotarix®, RV1). Phylogenetic analyses of the VP7 and VP8(∗) encoding genes were performed for 26 G3P[8] and 48 G9P[8] strains. VP8(∗) phylogenetic analysis revealed that all strains analyzed belonged to P[8] lineage III, whereas RV1 belongs to P[8]-I lineage. VP7 analysis revealed that all G3 and G9 strains belonged to G3-lineage III and G9-lineage III. The comparison of the VP7 and VP8(∗) antigenic epitopes regions of Brazilian strains with RV1 strain revealed several amino acid changes. However, no particular differences among Brazilian strains detected before and after vaccine introduction were observed, or among strains detected from vaccinated and non-vaccinated children. Complete genome characterization of four G3P[8] and seven G9P[8] strains revealed a typical conserved human Wa-like genomic constellation. Changes in the genetic diversity of G3P[8] and G9P[8] RVA detected from 2001 to 2011 in Brazil seemed not be related to RV1 introduction in Brazil.

  5. Analysis of a familial three way translocation involving chromosomes 3q, 6q, and 15q by high resolution banding and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) shows two different unbalanced karyotypes in sibs.

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, D; Engels, H; Viersbach, R; Henke, B; Schwanitz, G; Passarge, E

    1998-01-01

    We report on a familial three way translocation involving chromosomes 3, 6, and 15 identified by prometaphase banding and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Two mentally retarded sibs with different phenotypic abnormalities, their phenotypically normal sister and mother, and two fetuses of the phenotypically normal sister were analysed. The terminal regions of chromosomes 3q, 6q, and 15q were involved in a reciprocal translocation, in addition to a paracentric inversion of the derivative chromosome 15. Conventional cytogenetic studies with high resolution GTG banding did not resolve this rearrangement. FISH using whole chromosome paints (WCPs) identified the chromosomal regions involved, except the aberrant region of 3q, which was undetectable with these probes. Investigation of this region with the subtelomeric FISH probe D3S1445/D3S1446 showed a balanced karyotype, 46,XX,t(3;15;6) (q29;q26.1;q26), inv der(15) (q15.1q26.1) in two adult females and one fetus. It was unbalanced in two sibs, showing two different types of unbalanced translocation resulting in partial trisomy 3q in combination with partial monosomy 6q in one patient and partial trisomy 15q with partial monosomy 6q in the other patient and one fetus. These represent apparently new chromosomal phenotypes. Images PMID:9678698

  6. Stardust-NExT, Deep Impact, and the Accelerating Spin of 9P/Tempel One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.; Meech, Karen J.; Chesley, Steven; Pittichova, Jana; Carcich, Brian; Drahus, Michal; Harris, Alan; Gillam, Stephen; Veverka, Joseph; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bastien, Fabienne; Crockett, Christopher J.; Mastrodemos, Nicholas; Owen, William; Bauer, Gerbs; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Bhatt, B. C.; Buie, Marc; Farnham, Tony; Fernandez, Yan R.; Gutierrez, Pedro; Hainaut, Olivier; Klaasen, Kenneth; Lara, Luisa M.; McFadden, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the spin rate of comet 9P/Tempel 1 through two perihelion passages (CYs 2000 and 2005) is determined from 1922 Earth-based observations taken over a period of 13y as part of a World-Wide observing campaign and 2888 observations taken over a period of 50d from the Deep Impact spacecraft. We determine the following sidereal spin rates (periods): 209.023 +/- 0.025 degrees /day (41.335 +/- 0.005 h) prior to the 2000 perihelion passage, 210.448 +/- 0.016 degrees/day (41.055 +/- 0.003 h) for the interval between the 2000 and 2005 perihelion passages, 211.856 +/- 0.030 degrees/day (40.783 +/- 0.006 h) from Deep Impact photometry just prior to the 2005 perihelion passage, and 211.625 +/- 0.012 degrees /day (40.827 +/- 0.002 h) in the interval 2006-2010 following the 2005 perihelion passage. The period decreased by 16.8 +/- 0.3 min during the 2000 passage and by 13.7 +/- 0.2 min during the 2005 passage suggesting a secular decrease in the net torque. The change in spin rate is asymmetric with respect to perihelion with the maximum net torque being applied on approach to perihelion. The Deep Impact data alone show that the spin rate was increasing at a rate of 0.024 +/- 0.003 degree/d/d at JD2453530.60510 (i.e., 25.134 d before impact) and provides independent confirmation of the change seen in the Earth-based observations. The rotational phase of the nucleus at times before and after each perihelion and at the Deep Impact encounter is estimated based on the Thomas et al. pole and longitude system. The possibility of a 180 degree error in the rotational phase is assessed and found to be significant. Analytical and physical modeling of the behavior of the spin rate through of each perihelion is presented and used as a basis to predict the rotational state of the nucleus at the time of the nominal (i.e., prior to February 2010) Stardust-NExT encounter on 2011 February 14 20:42. We find that a net torque in the range of 0.3 - 2.5 x 10(exp 7) kg.square m2/square

  7. Stardust-NExT, Deep Impact, and the Accelerating Spin of 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.; Meech, Karen J.; Chesley, Steven; Pittichova, Jana; Carcich, Brian; Drahus, Michal; Harris, Alan; Gillam, Stephen; Veverka, Joseph; Mastrodemos, Nicholas; Owen, William; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bagnulo, S.; Bai, J.; Barrera L.; Bastien, Fabienne; Bauer, James M.; Bedient, J.; Bhatt, B. C.; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Brosch, N.; Buie, Marc; Candia, Pablo; Chen, W.-P.; Chiang, P.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the spin rate of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 through two perihelion passages (in 2000 and 2005) is determined from 1922 Earth-based observations taken over a period of 13 year as part of a World-Wide observing campaign and from 2888 observations taken over a period of 50 days from the Deep Impact spacecraft. We determine the following sidereal spin rates (periods): 209.023 +/- 0.025deg/dy (41.335 0.005 h) prior to the 2000 perihelion passage, 210.448 +/- 0.016deg/dy (41.055 +/- 0.003 h) for the interval between the 2000 and 2005 perihelion passages, 211.856 +/- 0.030deg/dy (40.783 +/- 0.006 h) from Deep Impact photometry just prior to the 2005 perihelion passage, and 211.625 +/- 0.012deg/dy (40.827 +/- 0.002 h) in the interval 2006-2010 following the 2005 perihelion passage. The period decreased by 16.8 +/- 0.3 min during the 2000 passage and by 13.7 +/- 0.2 min during the 2005 passage suggesting a secular decrease in the net torque. The change in spin rate is asymmetric with respect to perihelion with the maximum net torque being applied on approach to perihelion. The Deep Impact data alone show that the spin rate was increasing at a rate of 0.024 +/- 0.003deg/dy/dy at JD2453530.60510 (i.e., 25.134 dy before impact), which provides independent confirmation of the change seen in the Earth-based observations. The rotational phase of the nucleus at times before and after each perihelion and at the Deep Impact encounter is estimated based on the Thomas et al. (Thomas et al. [2007]. Icarus 187, 4-15) pole and longitude system. The possibility of a 180deg error in the rotational phase is assessed and found to be significant. Analytical and physical modeling of the behavior of the spin rate through of each perihelion is presented and used as a basis to predict the rotational state of the nucleus at the time of the nominal (i.e., prior to February 2010) Stardust-NExT encounter on 2011 February 14 at 20:42. We find that a net torque in the range of 0.3-2.5 x 10(exp

  8. Loss of expression of the metastasis suppressor gene KiSS1 during melanoma progression and its association with LOH of chromosome 6q16.3-q23.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, F; Takata, M; Hatta, N; Takehara, K

    2001-10-15

    KiSS1 is a putative melanoma metastasis suppressor gene, the expression of which may be regulated by another gene(s) mapping to chromosome 6q16.3-q23. To additionally elucidate the role of KiSS1 in the progression of human melanoma in vivo, we examined KiSS1 mRNA expression in 51 melanocytic tumors with various stages of progression by in situ hybridization. We also examined a correlation between loss of KiSS1 mRNA expression and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 6q16.3-q23 in 27 melanoma metastases. All of the four nevocellular nevi and eight primary melanomas <4 mm in thickness showed KiSS1 mRNA expression, whereas only 50% (6 of 12) of primary melanomas >4 mm in thickness expressed KiSS1. Loss of KiSS1 mRNA was equally frequent in metastases; 44% (12 of 27) of tumors lost KiSS1 expression. LOH of 6q16.3-q23 was observed in 52% (14 of 27) of metastases. There was a strong association between LOH and loss of KiSS1 expression (P = 0.03); nine metastases with LOH of 6q16.3-q23 lost KiSS1 expression, whereas 10 tumors with no LOH showed positive KiSS1 mRNA expression. The findings in this study show, for the first time, KiSS1 down-regulation during the progression of melanoma in vivo and strongly suggest that inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene(s) mapping to 6q16.3-q23 by deletion or mutation coupled with LOH may lead to the down-regulation of KiSS1.

  9. Crater-diameter distribution on Comets 9P and 81P and potential meteoroid streams crossing their orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, O. V.; Neslušan, L.; Svoreň, J.; Seman Krišandová, Z.

    2015-07-01

    We attempt to answer two questions concerning the impacts of stream meteoroids on the nuclei of Comets 9P/Tempel 1 and 81P/Wild 2: firstly, how many streams cross the orbits of both comets and, secondly, what is the index of the differential mass distribution of impactors, s, when we assume that a prevailing number of the craters on the surfaces of cometary nuclei were created by stream meteoroids? We found that 110 and 129 potential streams originating from comets likely cross the orbits of 9P and 81P, respectively (and 103 potential streams cross the orbit of 1P/Halley, for comparison). If we consider the more compact streams originating from asteroids, the 9P and 81P pass through such streams 15 664 and 65 368 times. Neither these large numbers of passages imply, however, enough large impactors to excavate the whole observed variety of craters on studied comets. For all craters on 9P and 81P, s = 2.09 ± 0.01 and s = 2.25 ± 0.03 , respectively. The craters on 81P seem to be, however, excavated by the impactors from four discernible sources. For two numerous enough sources we find s = 5.6 ± 0.2 and s = 5.2 ± 0.5 . The difference between the indices for the set of all craters and the sets of their partial groups obviously implies an unknown cosmogonic consequence.

  10. Comparative Polarimetry of Comets 103P/Hartley 2, 9P/Tempel 1, and C/2009 P1 (Garradd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, N. N.; Rosenbush, V. K.; Afanasiev, V. L.; Blinov, D. A.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Zaitsev, S. V.

    2012-05-01

    The results of polarimetry of comets 103P/Hartley 2 and 9P/Tempel 1 obtained during the EPOXI mission encounter and DEEP IMPACT mission respectively and comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd) during its approach to the Earth in 2011-2012 are presented.

  11. Replication and functional genomic analyses of the breast cancer susceptibility locus at 6q25.1 generalize its importance in women of chinese, Japanese, and European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiuyin; Wen, Wanqing; Qu, Shimian; Li, Guoliang; Egan, Kathleen M; Chen, Kexin; Deming, Sandra L; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Chen-Yang; Gammon, Marilie D; Blot, William J; Matsuo, Keitaro; Haiman, Christopher A; Khoo, Ui Soon; Iwasaki, Motoki; Santella, Regina M; Zhang, Lina; Fair, Alecia Malin; Hu, Zhibin; Wu, Pei-Ei; Signorello, Lisa B; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Tajima, Kazuo; Henderson, Brian E; Chan, Kelvin Y K; Kasuga, Yoshio; Newcomb, Polly A; Zheng, Hong; Cui, Yong; Wang, Furu; Shieh, Ya-Lan; Iwata, Hiroji; Le Marchand, Loic; Chan, Sum Yin; Shrubsole, Martha J; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Long, Jirong; Li, Chun; Shi, Jiajun; Huang, Bo; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zheng, Wei

    2011-02-15

    We evaluated the generalizability of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2046210 (A/G allele), associated with breast cancer risk that was initially identified at 6q25.1 in a genome-wide association study conducted among Chinese women. In a pooled analysis of more than 31,000 women of East-Asian, European, and African ancestry, we found a positive association for rs2046210 and breast cancer risk in Chinese women [ORs (95% CI) = 1.30 (1.22-1.38) and 1.64 (1.50-1.80) for the AG and AA genotypes, respectively, P for trend = 1.54 × 10⁻³⁰], Japanese women [ORs (95% CI) = 1.31 (1.13-1.52) and 1.37 (1.06-1.76), P for trend = 2.51 × 10⁻⁴], and European-ancestry American women [ORs (95% CI) = 1.07 (0.99-1.16) and 1.18 (1.04-1.34), P for trend = 0.0069]. No association with this SNP, however, was observed in African American women [ORs (95% CI) = 0.81 (0.63-1.06) and 0.85 (0.65-1.11) for the AG and AA genotypes, respectively, P for trend = 0.4027]. In vitro functional genomic studies identified a putative functional variant, rs6913578. This SNP is 1,440 bp downstream of rs2046210 and is in high linkage disequilibrium with rs2046210 in Chinese (r(2) = 0.91) and European-ancestry (r² = 0.83) populations, but not in Africans (r² = 0.57). SNP rs6913578 was found to be associated with breast cancer risk in Chinese and European-ancestry American women. After adjusting for rs2046210, the association of rs6913578 with breast cancer risk in African Americans approached borderline significance. Results from this large consortium study confirmed the association of rs2046210 with breast cancer risk among women of Chinese, Japanese, and European ancestry. This association may be explained in part by a putatively functional variant (rs6913578) identified in the region.

  12. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Interval on Chromosome 8p23.1 Characterized by Genetics and Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Longoni, Mauro; Lage, Kasper; Russell, Meaghan K.; Loscertales, Maria; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; Baynam, Gareth; Bleyl, Steven B.; Brady, Paul D.; Breckpot, Jeroen; Chen, Chih P.; Devriendt, Koenraad; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Grix, Arthur W.; Rope, Alan F.; Shimokawa, Osamu; Strauss, Bernarda; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Zackai, Elaine H.; Coletti, Caroline M.; Maalouf, Faouzi I.; Noonan, Kristin M.; Park, Ji H.; Tracy, Adam A.; Lee, Charles; Donahoe, Patricia K.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome 8p23.1 is a common hotspot associated with major congenital malformations, including congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and cardiac defects. We present findings from high-resolution arrays in patients who carry a loss (n =18) or a gain (n =1) of sub-band 8p23.1. We confirm a region involved in both diaphragmatic and heart malformations. Results from a novel CNVConnect algorithm, prioritizing protein–protein interactions between products of genes in the 8p23.1 hotspot and products of previously known CDH causing genes, implicated GATA4, NEIL2, and SOX7 in diaphragmatic defects. Sequence analysis of these genes in 226 chromosomally normal CDH patients, as well as in a small number of deletion 8p23.1 patients, showed rare unreported variants in the coding region; these may be contributing to the diaphragmatic phenotype. We also demonstrated that two of these three genes were expressed in the E11.5–12.5 primordial mouse diaphragm, the developmental stage at which CDH is thought to occur. This combination of bioinformatics and expression studies can be applied to other chromosomal hotspots, as well as private microdeletions or microduplications, to identify causative genes and their interaction networks. PMID:23165946

  13. Physical mapping of chromosome 8p22 markers and their homozygous deletion in a metastatic prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bova, G.S.; Pin, S.S.; Isaacs, W.B. |

    1996-07-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the short arm of chromosome 8 as the site of one or more tumor suppressor genes inactivated in carcinogenesis of the prostate, colon, lung, and liver. Previously, we identified a homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22 in a metastatic prostate cancer. To map this homozygous deletion physically, long-range restriction mapping was performed using yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of chromosome band 8p22. Subcloned genomic DNA and cDNA probes isolated by hybrid capture from these YACs were mapped in relation to one another, reinforcing map integrity. Mapped single-copy probes from the region were then applied to DNA isolated from a metastatic prostate cancer containing a chromosome 8p22 homozygous deletion and indicated that its deletion spans 730-970 kb. Candidate genes PRLTS (PDGF-receptor {beta}-like tumor suppressor) and CTSB (cathepsin B) are located outside the region of homozygous deletion. Genethon marker D8S549 is located approximately at the center of this region of homozygous deletion. Two new microsatellite polymorphisms, D8S1991 and D8S1992, also located within the region of homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22, are described. Physical mapping places cosmid CI8-2644 telomeric to MSR (macrophage scavenger receptor), the reverse of a previously published map, altering the interpretation of published deletion studies. This work should prove helpful in the identification of candidate tumor suppressor genes in this region. 47 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. The Catalytic and Conformational Cycle of Aquifex aeolicus KDO8P Synthase: Role of the L7 Loop†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xingjue; Kona, Fathima; Wang, Jian; Lu, Jinshuang; Stemmler, Timothy; Gatti, Domenico L.

    2015-01-01

    KDO8P synthase catalyzes the condensation of arabinose 5-phosphate (A5P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to form the 8-carbon sugar KDO8P and inorganic phosphate (Pi). The X-ray structure of the wild-type enzyme shows that when both PEP and A5P bind, the active site becomes isolated from the environment due to a conformational change of the L7 loop. The structures of the R106G mutant, without substrates, and with PEP and PEP plus A5P bound, were determined and reveal that in R106G closure of the L7 loop is impaired. The structural perturbations originating from the loss of the Arg106 side chain point to a role of the L2 loop in stabilizing the closed conformation of the L7 loop. Despite the increased exposure of the R106G active site, no abnormal reaction of PEP with water was observed, ruling out the hypothesis that the primary function of the L7 loop is to shield the active site from bulk solvent during the condensation reaction. However, the R106G enzyme displays several kinetic abnormalities on both the substrate side (smaller KmPEP, larger KiA5P and KmA5P) and the product side (smaller KiPi and KiKDO8P) of the reaction. As a consequence, the mutant enzyme is less severely inhibited by A5P and more severely inhibited by Pi and KDO8P. Simulations of the flux of KDO8P synthesis under metabolic steady-state conditions (constant concentration of reactants and products over time) suggest that in vivo R106G is expected to perform optimally in a narrower range of substrate and product concentrations than the wild-type enzyme. PMID:16156656

  15. Casp8p41: The Protean Mediator of Death in CD4 T-cells that Replicate HIV

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Rahul; Cummins, Nathan W.; Badley, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    HIV cure is now the focus of intense research after Timothy Ray Brown (the Berlin patient) set the precedent of being the first and only person cured. A major barrier to achieving this goal on a meaningful scale is an elimination of the latent reservoir, which is thought to comprise CD4-positive cells that harbor integrated, replication-competent HIV provirus. These cells do not express viral proteins, are indistinguishable from uninfected CD4 cells, and are thought to be responsible for HIV viral rebound—that occurs within weeks of combination anti retroviral therapy (cART) interruption. Modalities to engineer transcriptional stimulation (reactivation) of this dormant integrated HIV provirus, leading to expression of cytotoxic viral proteins, are thought to be a specific way to eradicate the latently infected CD4 pool and are becoming increasingly relevant in the era of HIV cure. HIV protease is one such protein produced after HIV reactivation that cleaves procaspase-8 to generate a novel protein Casp8p41. Casp8p41 then binds to the BH3 domain of BAK, leading to BAK oligomerization, mitochondrial depolarization, and apoptosis. In central memory T cells (TCMs) from HIV-infected patients, an elevated Bcl-2/procaspase-8 ratio was observed, and Casp8p41 binding to Bcl-2 was associated with a lack of reactivation-induced cell death. This was reversed by priming cells with a specific Bcl-2 antagonist prior to reactivation, resulting in increased cell death and decreased HIV DNA in a Casp8p41-dependent pathway. This review describes the biology, clinical relevance, and implications of Casp8p41 for a potential cure. PMID:27721655

  16. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake, chromosome 9p21 variants, and risk of myocardial infarction in Hispanics1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan; Li, Yanping; Huang, Tao; Cheng, Han-Ling; Campos, Hannia; Qi, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chromosome 9p21 variants are among the most robust genetic markers for coronary artery disease (CAD), and previous studies have suggested that genetic effects of this locus might be modified by dietary factors. Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), which are the main dietary source of added sugar, has been shown to interact with genetic factors in affecting CAD risk factors such as obesity. Objective: We aimed to test whether SSB intake modified the association between chromosome 9p21 variants and CAD risk in Hispanics living in Costa Rica. Design: The current study included 1560 incident cases of nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) and 1751 population-based controls. Three independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the chromosome 9p21 locus were genotyped. SSB intake was assessed with the use of a food-frequency questionnaire and was defined as the frequency of intake of daily servings of sweetened beverages and fruit juice. Results: We showed a significant interaction between SSB intake and one of the 3 variants (i.e., rs4977574) on MI risk. The per–risk allele OR (95% CI) of rs4977574 for MI was 1.44 (1.19, 1.74) in participants with higher SSB consumption (>2 servings/d), 1.21 (1.00, 1.47) in those with average consumption (1–2 servings/d), and 0.97 (0.81, 1.16) in subjects with lower consumption (<1 serving/d; P-interaction = 0.005). A genetic risk score derived from the sum of risk alleles of the 3 SNPs also showed a significant interaction with SSB intake on MI risk (P-interaction = 0.03). Conclusion: Our data suggest that unhealthy dietary habits such as higher intake of SSBs could exacerbate the effects of chromosome 9p21 variants on CAD. PMID:26961926

  17. Value of Chromosome 9p21 Polymorphism for Prediction of Cardiovascular Mortality in Han Chinese Without Coronary Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Te; Liang, Kae-Woei; Wang, Jun-Sing; Lee, Wen-Jane; Chen, Yii-der Ida; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lee, Wen-Lieng; Sheu, Wayne H.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Variants at chromosome 9p21 are associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the longitudinal effects of 9p21 variants on cardiovascular mortality remain controversial and may depend on whether the patient has CAD. We tested the hypothesis that the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4977574 is associated longitudinally with cardiovascular death in patients without detectable coronary lesions. We enrolled patients who underwent coronary angiography for angina pectoris but had normal angiographic findings. Laboratory analyses and rs4977574 TaqMan genotyping were performed using fasting blood samples collected during hospitalization. Cardiovascular and all-cause mortality rates were acquired from a national database. Among the 679 enrolled subjects with neither myocardial infarction nor an angiographic coronary lesion, 28 (19.0%) of the 147 homozygous GG carriers suffered a cardiovascular death, compared with 63 (11.8%) of the 532 subjects with the AG or AA genotype during the median 12.3 years (interquartile range 8.6–12.7 years) of follow-up. In a recessive model, cardiovascular mortality was significantly higher in subjects with the GG genotype than in those with the other genotypes (hazard ratio, 1.69, 95% confidence interval 1.08 to 2.64; P = 0.021). In this follow-up study, rs4977574, a tag SNP at chromosome 9p21, was shown to be associated with cardiovascular mortality in Taiwanese patients with angina pectoris but no coronary lesions. PMID:26426617

  18. Association of polymorphisms in 9p21 region with CAD in North Indian population: replication of SNPs identified through GWAS.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J; Yumnam, S; Basu, T; Ghosh, A; Garg, G; Karthikeyan, G; Sengupta, S

    2011-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide that is influenced by both environmental as well as genetic factors. Several recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have reported the association of multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mainly in the 9p21 region with CAD. However, the association of these SNPs with CAD has not been rigorously tested in Indian population, which accounts for the largest incidences of CAD in the world. Herein, we genotyped six such SNPs (rs10116277, rs10757274, rs1333040, rs2383206, rs2383207 and rs1994016) identified through GWAS, in 754 individuals (311 angiography-confirmed CAD patients and 443 treadmill test controls) recruited mainly from North India to evaluate if these SNPs were associated with CAD. The minor allele frequency of these six SNPs was comparable to that reported in the respective GWAS. We found that three of these SNPs (rs10116277, rs1333040 and rs2383206) present at the locus 9p21 were significantly associated with CAD even after controlling for the confounding factors such as age, sex, body mass index, homocysteine, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, diet, etc. In conclusion, the locus 9p21 found to be significantly associated with cardiovascular diseases in the Caucasian populations seems to be also important in North Indian population.

  19. A 6q14.1-q15 microdeletion in a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features with concomitant presence of a maternally inherited Xp22.31 copy number gain.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Resches, Mariela; Eiris, Jesus; Barros, Francisco; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-06-01

    We report on a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features who carries a rare interstitial microdeletion of 4.96 Mb at chromosome 6q14.1-q15. The patient also harbors a maternally inherited copy number gain of 1.69 Mb at chromosome Xp22.31, whose pathogenicity is under debate.

  20. A 6q14.1-q15 microdeletion in a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features with concomitant presence of a maternally inherited Xp22.31 copy number gain

    PubMed Central

    Quintela, Ines; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Resches, Mariela; Eiris, Jesus; Barros, Francisco; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report on a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features who carries a rare interstitial microdeletion of 4.96 Mb at chromosome 6q14.1-q15. The patient also harbors a maternally inherited copy number gain of 1.69 Mb at chromosome Xp22.31, whose pathogenicity is under debate. PMID:26185640

  1. Loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 9p21 is a frequent finding in enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Obermann, E C; Diss, T C; Hamoudi, R A; Munson, P; Wilkins, B S; Camozzi, M L P; Isaacson, P G; Du, M Q; Dogan, A

    2004-02-01

    Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) and ulcerative jejunitis (UJ) are rare disorders often occurring in patients with coeliac disease. The genetic events associated with the accumulation of intraepithelial lymphocytes in coeliac disease and tumour development are largely unknown. Deletions at chromosome 9p21, which harbours the tumour suppressor genes p14/ARF, p15/INK4b, and p16/INK4a, and 17p13, where p53 is located, are associated with the development and progression of lymphomas. To examine whether deletions at 9p21 and 17p13 play a role in ETL, 22 cases of ETL and seven cases of UJ were screened for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) by tissue microdissection and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for microsatellite markers. Furthermore, p53 and p16 protein expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis for detection of mutations in exons 5-8 of the p53 gene was performed in five cases of ETL and three cases of UJ. LOH was found in at least one microsatellite marker at the 9p21 locus in 8 of 22 (36%) ETLs, but not in UJ. Five of nine (56%) tumours composed of large cells showed LOH at 9p21, as opposed to two of eight (25%) tumours with small- or medium-sized cell morphology. The region spanning the p14/p15/p16 gene locus was most frequently affected (five cases); LOH at these markers coincided with loss of p16 protein expression in all of these cases. p53 overexpression was demonstrated in all ETLs examined and in four of seven cases of UJ. However, no alterations of the p53 gene were detected by LOH or PCR-SSCP analysis. The results of this study show that LOH at chromosome 9p21 is frequent in ETL, especially in tumours with large cell morphology; this finding suggests that gene loss at this locus may play a role in the development of ETL.

  2. A new case of interstitial 6q16.2 deletion in a patient with Prader-Willi-like phenotype and investigation of SIM1 gene deletion in 87 patients with syndromic obesity.

    PubMed

    Varela, Monica C; Simões-Sato, Alex Y; Kim, Chong A; Bertola, Débora R; De Castro, Claudia I E; Koiffmann, Celia P

    2006-01-01

    The association of obesity, phenotypic abnormalities and mental retardation characterizes syndromic obesity. Its most common form is the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS-- neonatal hypotonia, poor sucking, delayed psychomotor development, hyperphagia, severe obesity, short stature, small hands and feet, hypogonadism, mild to moderate mental retardation and behavioral disorders). A PWS-like phenotype has been described in patients with chromosome abnormalities involving the chromosome region 6q16.2 that includes the SIM1 gene. Herein we report cytogenetic and gene studies including a screening for the SIM1 gene deletion, performed on 87 patients with PWS-like phenotype, and describe the fifth case of syndromic obesity with an interstitial deletion of the chromosome segment 6q16-q21 and suggest that mutational analysis and further studies of the parental origin of chromosome alterations of 6q16.2 in patients with and without PWS-like phenotype are needed to evaluate possible imprinting effects of SIM1 gene and establish the contribution that alterations in this gene makes to the etiology of syndromic and non-syndromic obesity.

  3. Genome-wide association study identifies 8p21.3 associated with persistent hepatitis B virus infection among Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanfeng; Si, Lanlan; Zhai, Yun; Hu, Yanling; Hu, Zhibin; Bei, Jin-Xin; Xie, Bobo; Ren, Qian; Cao, Pengbo; Yang, Fei; Song, Qingfeng; Bao, Zhiyu; Zhang, Haitao; Han, Yuqing; Wang, Zhifu; Chen, Xi; Xia, Xia; Yan, Hongbo; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Ying; Gao, Chengming; Meng, Jinfeng; Tu, Xinyi; Liang, Xinqiang; Cui, Ying; Liu, Ying; Wu, Xiaopan; Li, Zhuo; Wang, Huifen; Li, Zhaoxia; Hu, Bo; He, Minghui; Gao, Zhibo; Xu, Xiaobing; Ji, Hongzan; Yu, Chaohui; Sun, Yi; Xing, Baocai; Yang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Haiying; Tan, Aihua; Wu, Chunlei; Jia, Weihua; Li, Shengping; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Shen, Hongbing; He, Fuchu; Mo, Zengnan; Zhang, Hongxing; Zhou, Gangqiao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a common infectious disease. Here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) among Chinese populations to identify novel genetic loci involved in persistent HBV infection. GWAS scan is performed in 1,251 persistently HBV infected subjects (PIs, cases) and 1,057 spontaneously recovered subjects (SRs, controls), followed by replications in four independent populations totally consisting of 3,905 PIs and 3,356 SRs. We identify a novel locus at 8p21.3 (index rs7000921, odds ratio=0.78, P=3.2 × 10−12). Furthermore, we identify significant expression quantitative trait locus associations for INTS10 gene at 8p21.3. We demonstrate that INST10 suppresses HBV replication via IRF3 in liver cells. In clinical plasma samples, we confirm that INST10 levels are significantly decreased in PIs compared with SRs, and negatively correlated with the HBV load. These findings highlight a novel antiviral gene INTS10 at 8p21.3 in the clearance of HBV infection. PMID:27244555

  4. Heavy-Fermion Compound of the Ternary Phosphide Ce2Pt8P with a Non-Centrosymmetric Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Naoki; Furukawa, Shoh; Nakano, Tomohito; Takeda, Naoya

    2017-01-01

    The low-temperature properties of Ce2Pt8P are studied by magnetic susceptibility χ(T), electrical resistivity ρ(T), and specific heat C(T) measurements. The crystal structure is considered to be analogs of the CePt3Si-type structure. From the magnetic susceptibility χ(T), the effective paramagnetic moment μeff is estimated to be 2.30 μB/Ce, suggesting that the valence state of Ce ions is expected to be close to trivalent (Ce3+). The paramagnetic Curie-Weiss temperature θcw is determined to be 12 K. The electrical resistivity ρ(T) shows -ln T dependence with a small slope from 10 to 3 K, which indicates a weak Kondo anomaly. The specific heat exhibits a λ-type anomaly at around T* = 1.0 K, while the magnetic entropy at T* is reduced to 80% of R ln 2. The linear coefficient of specific heat is determined to be 145 mJ/(mol-Ce·K2). From several measurements, Ce2Pt8P can be classified as a moderate heavy-fermion compound. The ground state is far from the quantum-critical point (QCP) compared with CePt3Si. La2Pt8P shows normal metallic behavior and no superconductivity is observed above 0.28 K.

  5. A novel 6.14 Mb duplication of chromosome 8p21 in a patient with autism and self mutilation.

    PubMed

    Ozgen, Heval M; Staal, Wouter G; Barber, John C; de Jonge, Maretha V; Eleveld, Marc J; Beemer, Frits A; Hochstenbach, Ron; Poot, Martin

    2009-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders with a strong genetic etiology. Cytogenetic abnormalities have been detected in 5-10% of the patients with autism. In this study, we present the clinical, cytogenetic and array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) evaluation of a 13-year-old male with severe developmental delay, facial dysmorphic features, autism and self mutilation. The patient was found to carry a de novo duplication of chromosome region 8p21 of minimally 6.14 and maximally 6.58 Mb as ascertained by bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based array-CGH. Hitherto, only a few patients with autism with cytogenetically visible duplications involving the chromosome 8p21 region have been described, but the extent of these duplications has not been determined at the molecular level. This represents the smallest rearrangement of chromosomal region 8p21 as yet found in a patient with autism. For 11 of the 36 genes with known functions located within this duplication clear transcription in the brain was found. Of those the STMN4 and DPYSL2 genes are the most likely candidate genes to be involved in neuronal development, and, if altered in gene-dosage, in the autistic phenotype of our patient.

  6. Schizosaccharomyces pombe AGC family kinase Gad8p forms a conserved signaling module with TOR and PDK1-like kinases

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Tomohiko; Kubo, Yoshiya; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2003-01-01

    The TOR protein is a phosphoinositide kinase-related kinase widely conserved among eukaryotes. Fission yeast tor1 encodes an ortholog of TOR, which is required for sexual development and growth under stressed conditions. We isolated gad8, which encodes a Ser/Thr kinase of the AGC family, as a high-copy suppressor of the sterility of a tor1 mutant. Disruption of gad8 caused phenotypes similar to those of tor1 disruption. Gad8p was less phosphorylated and its kinase activity was undetectable in tor1Δ cells. Three amino acid residues corresponding to conserved phosphorylation sites in the AGC family kinases, namely Thr387 in the activation loop, Ser527 in the turn motif and Ser546 in the hydrophobic motif, were important for the kinase activity of Gad8p. Tor1p was responsible for the phosphorylation of Ser527 and Ser546, whereas Ksg1p, a PDK1-like kinase, appeared to phosphorylate Thr387 directly. Altogether, Tor1p, Ksg1p and Gad8p appear to constitute a signaling module for sexual development and growth under stressed conditions in fission yeast, which resembles the mTOR–PDK1–S6K1 system in mammals and may represent a basic signaling module ubiquitous in eukaryotes. PMID:12805221

  7. Association of rs10757274 and rs2383206 Polymorphisms on 9p21 locus with Coronary Artery Disease in Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Okyay, Kaan; Yılmaz, Akın; Şahinarslan, Asife; Yar Sağlam, Atiye Seda; Eyiol, Azmi; Bolayır, Hasan Ata; Sezenöz, Burak; Menevşe, Sevda; Çengel, Atiye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genetic predisposition is an important risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of rs10757274 and rs2383206 polymorphisms in chromosome 9p21 on presence and severity of CAD in a Turkish population. Subjects and Methods A total of 646 patients who underwent coronary angiography were included in this study. Coronary vessel score and Gensini score were calculated to assess the angiographic severity of CAD. Alleles of AA, AG, and GG were determined for rs10757274 (polymorphism-1) and rs2383206 (polymorphism-2) polymorphisms located in chromosome 9p21 from the blood samples. Results There was a significant difference between the alleles in polymorphism-1 in the presence of coronary artery disease (38.9% in AA, 48.0% in GG and 56.4% in AG, p=0.017). However, there was no difference between the alleles in polymorphism-2. According to vessel scores, there was a significant difference between the alleles in polymorphism-1 (AA 0.71±1.04, GG 0.88±1.07, AG 1.06±1.12, p=0.018). In polymorphism-2, vessel scores did not show a difference between the alleles. In polymorphism-1, there was a significant difference in Gensini score (p=0.041). Gensini scores did not differ between the alleles in polymorphism-2 (p>0.05 for all). In multivariate analyses, none of the alleles was an independent factor for presence of CAD. Conclusion The presence of rs10757274 polymorphism including AG allele in chromosome 9p21 was related to CAD. However, this relationship was not independent of other cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:27721851

  8. Tumour suppressor gene (CDKNA2) status on chromosome 9p in resected renal tissue improves prognosis of localised kidney cancer

    PubMed Central

    El-Mokadem, Ismail; Kidd, Thomas; Pratt, Norman; Fleming, Stewart; Nabi, Ghulam

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic alterations on chromosome 9p, including inactivation of the tumour suppressor gene, CDKN2A, result in cellular proliferation and growth of tumours. Our aim was to use microsatellite analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to characterise the architecture of this region. Results Seventy-five out of 77 clear cell renal cell cancers (tumour/normal pairs) were interpretable for LOH analysis on chromosome 9p (two tumours were excluded, as all five primers were uninformative). Twenty out of 75 (26.6%) tumours showed LOH in at least one of the five primers employed. Most allelic deletions were detected, telomeric to the CDKN2A region at D9S916, with 11 out of 52 informative tumours (21%) displaying LOH. The LOH in the coding region of CDKN2A, at D9S974 and D9S942, was associated with a higher pT-stage (p = 0.004) and metastasis (p = 0.006, both markers). The rate of chromosome 9p deletion in ccRCC was 44% (35/80 cases) according to FISH. Somatic copy number loss of chromosome 9p was associated with a larger tumour size (p = 0.002), higher pathological tumour stage (p = 0.021), presence of tumour necrosis (p = 0.019) and microvascular invasion (p = 0.032). The cases with copy number loss, loss of heterozygosity and copy number neutral (n = 42) were at a higher risk of cancer-specific death when compared to tumours in category D (n = 32) (Log-rank: p = 0.001). Seventeen patients with localised ccRCC developed recurrence, and fourteen of those showed either LOH or somatic copy number loss at CDKN2A (Log-rank: p = 0.005). Multivariate analysis showed that LOH or copy number loss at CDKN2A retained its independent prognostic effect, improving the predictive accuracy of stage and SSIGN score by concordance Index C from 0.823 to 0.878 (p = 0.001). Materials and Methods Cytogenetics data, microsatellite analysis and FISH were acquired for a cohort of patients undergoing resection for clinically localised renal cancer between January 2001 and

  9. Ebstein anomaly: Genetic heterogeneity and association with microdeletions 1p36 and 8p23.1.

    PubMed

    Digilio, Maria Cristina; Bernardini, Laura; Lepri, Francesca; Giuffrida, Maria Grazia; Guida, Valentina; Baban, Anwar; Versacci, Paolo; Capolino, Rossella; Torres, Barbara; De Luca, Alessandro; Novelli, Antonio; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2011-09-01

    Ebstein anomaly is an uncommon congenital heart defect (CHD), characterized by downward displacement of the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle. To uncover the genetic associations with Ebstein anomaly, we have searched chromosomal imbalances using standard cytogenetic and array-CGH analysis, and single gene conditions associated with syndromic Ebstein anomaly (with extracardiac anomalies), and screened GATA4 and NKX2.5 mutations in nonsyndromic patients (without extracardiac anomalies). Between January 1997 and September 2009, 44 consecutive patients with Ebstein anomaly were evaluated in two centers of Pediatric Cardiology. Ebstein anomaly was syndromic in 12 (27%) patients, and nonsyndromic in 32 (73%). A recognizable syndrome or complex was diagnosed by clinical criteria in seven patients. In one syndromic patient an 18q deletion was diagnosed by standard cytogenetic analysis. Array-CGH analysis performed in 10 of the 12 syndromic patients detected an interstitial deletion of about 4 Mb at 8p23.1 in one patient, and a deletion 1pter > 1p36.32/dup Xpter- > Xp22.32 in another patient. In the 28 of 32 nonsyndromic patients who underwent molecular testing, no mutation in GATA4 and NKX2.5 genes were detected. We conclude that Ebstein anomaly is a genetically heterogeneous defect, and that deletion 1p36 and deletion 8p23.1 are the most frequent chromosomal imbalances associated with Ebstein anomaly. Candidate genes include the GATA4 gene (in patients with del 8p23.1), NKX2.5 (based on published patients with isolated Ebstein anomaly) and a hypothetical gene in patients with del 1p36).

  10. Phenotypic variability of a deletion and duplication 6q16.1 → q21 due to a paternal balanced ins(7;6)(p15;q16.1q21).

    PubMed

    Spreiz, Ana; Müller, Doris; Zotter, Sibylle; Albrecht, Ursula; Baumann, Matthias; Fauth, Christine; Erdel, Martin; Zschocke, Johannes; Utermann, Gerd; Kotzot, Dieter

    2010-11-01

    Constitutional insertional translocations are rare findings in clinical cytogenetics. Here, we report on the unbalanced segregation of a balanced paternal insertional translocation ins(7;6)(p15;q16.1q21) to three children. Investigations by conventional karyotyping, FISH with locus-specific probes, microsatellite marker analysis, and SNP-array based copy number analysis revealed a direct orientation of the inserted segment, a size of 11.3 Mb, and breakpoints between rs4370337 and rs12660854 and rs12110990 and rs4946730 on 6q16.1 and 6q21, respectively, as well as within BAC clone RP11-182J2 on 7p15. A 17-year-old daughter inherited the der(6) chromosome and was affected by severe mental retardation, obesity, and minor anomalies. Two further children inherited the der(7) chromosome. A daughter shows an almost unremarkable phenotype and only minor features in neuropsychological testing at 19 years of age. Her 14-year-old half-brother demonstrates a mild delay in cognitive development most likely jointly caused by the chromosomal rearrangement and asphyxia during delivery. The patient with the deletion confirms the previously reported phenotype of severe mental retardation and obesity in patients with del(6)(q16.2), while both patients with partial trisomy for the same segment of chromosome 6 are further examples for a generally less severe phenotype associated with duplications than with deletions, and even for the recent insight that chromosomal aneusomies of several megabases may go without major clinical consequences.

  11. Genome-Wide Linkage Screen for Systolic Blood Pressure in the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES) of Mexican-Americans and Confirmation of a Major Susceptibility Locus on Chromosome 6q14.1

    PubMed Central

    Puppala, Sobha; Coletta, Dawn K.; Schneider, Jennifer; Hu, Shirley L.; Farook, Vidya S.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Arya, Rector; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Jenkinson, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Hypertension or high blood pressure is a strong correlate of diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. We conducted a genome-wide linkage screen to identify susceptibility genes influencing systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Mexican-Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Methods Using data from 1,089 individuals distributed across 266 families, we performed a multipoint linkage analysis to localize susceptibility loci for SBP and DBP by applying two models. In model 1, we added a sensible constant to the observed BP values in treated subjects [Tobin et al.; Stat Med 2005;24:2911–2935] to account for antihypertensive use (i.e. 15 and 10 mm Hg to SBP and DBP values, respectively). In model 2, we fixed values of 140 mm Hg for SBP and 90 mm Hg for DBP, if the treated values were less than the standard referenced treatment thresholds of 140/90 mm Hg for hypertensive status. However, if the observed treated BP values were found to be above these standard treatment thresholds, the actual observed treated BP values were retained in order not to reduce them by substitution of the treatment threshold values. Results The multipoint linkage analysis revealed strong linkage signals for SBP compared with DBP. The strongest evidence for linkage of SBP (model 1, LOD = 5.0; model 2, LOD = 3.6) was found on chromosome 6q14.1 near the marker D6S1031 (89 cM) in both models. In addition, some evidence for SBP linkage occurred on chromosomes 1q, 4p, and 16p. Most importantly, our major SBP linkage finding on chromosome 6q near marker D6S1031 was independently confirmed in a Caucasian population (LOD = 3.3). In summary, our study found evidence for a major locus on chromosome 6q influencing SBP levels in Mexican-Americans. PMID:21293138

  12. Two pedigrees of autosomal dominant atrioventricular canal defect (AVCD): Exclusion from the critical region on 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Amati, F.; Mari, A.; Mingarelli, R.

    1995-07-03

    Atrioventricular canal defects (AVCD) constitute the predominant congenital heart defect in Down`s syndrome. For this reason, a candidate gene involved in atrioventricular canal development was previously searched and excluded in dominant pedigrees of AVCD, using linkage analysis of polymorphisms from chromosome 21. Because of the striking association between 8p deletion and AVCD, a search for an AVCD gene was carried out in two pedigrees of individuals with autosomal dominant AVCD using a set of DNA markers of the 8pter{r_arrow}q12 region. These two families include affected individuals and subjects who have transmitted the defect but are not clinically affected. Two-point lod scores were significantly negative for all markers at penetrance levels of 90% and 50%. Multipoint analysis excluded the region covered by the markers LPL-D8S262 and 30 cM to either side of this area. This result corroborates heterogeneity of this heart defect and indicates that the genetic basis of familial AVCD is different from AVCD associated to either trisomy 21 or 8p deletion. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of the 5 and 8 pH point titration methods for monitoring anaerobic digesters treating solid waste.

    PubMed

    Vannecke, T P W; Lampens, D R A; Ekama, G A; Volcke, E I P

    2015-01-01

    Simple titration methods certainly deserve consideration for on-site routine monitoring of volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration and alkalinity during anaerobic digestion (AD), because of their simplicity, speed and cost-effectiveness. In this study, the 5 and 8 pH point titration methods for measuring the VFA concentration and carbonate system alkalinity (H2CO3*-alkalinity) were assessed and compared. For this purpose, synthetic solutions with known H2CO3*-alkalinity and VFA concentration as well as samples from anaerobic digesters treating three different kind of solid wastes were analysed. The results of these two related titration methods were verified with photometric and high-pressure liquid chromatography measurements. It was shown that photometric measurements lead to overestimations of the VFA concentration in the case of coloured samples. In contrast, the 5 pH point titration method provides an accurate estimation of the VFA concentration, clearly corresponding with the true value. Concerning the H2CO3*-alkalinity, the most accurate and precise estimations, showing very similar results for repeated measurements, were obtained using the 8 pH point titration. Overall, it was concluded that the 5 pH point titration method is the preferred method for the practical monitoring of AD of solid wastes due to its robustness, cost efficiency and user-friendliness.

  14. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valérie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lázaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-wide association study recently identified an association between the rare allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3814113 (ie, the C allele) at 9p22.2 and decreased risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated the association of this SNP with ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers by use of data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. Methods We genotyped rs3814113 in 10 029 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 5837 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Associations with ovarian and breast cancer were assessed with a retrospective likelihood approach. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The minor allele of rs3814113 was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.72 to 0.85; P = 4.8 × 10-9) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 0.90; P = 5.5 × 10-4). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk among either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers with the TT genotype at SNP rs3814113 were predicted to have an ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years of 48%, and those with the CC genotype were predicted to have a risk of 33%. Conclusion Common genetic variation at the 9p22.2 locus was associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer for carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. PMID:21169536

  15. A 8.26Mb deletion in 6q16 and a 4.95Mb deletion in 20p12 including JAG1 and BMP2 in a patient with Alagille syndrome and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Le Gloan, Laurianne; Pichon, Olivier; Isidor, Bertrand; Boceno, Michelle; Rival, Jean-Marie; David, Albert; Le Caignec, Cédric

    2008-01-01

    We report a child presenting with Alagille and Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndromes. Standard karyotyping showed a de novo 46,XY,t(1;6)(p31;q16) translocation. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis identified a de novo deletion in the 20p12 chromosomal region encompassing JAG1, the major gene responsible for Alagille syndrome. The aberration was further characterized using an Agilent 44K oligonucleotide array, which confirmed the 4.95Mb 20p12 deletion. An additional 8.26Mb deletion was identified at the 6q16 translocation breakpoint. To our knowledge, WPW has never been associated with Alagille syndrome. The patient we describe presented with a 6q16 deletion containing 21 genes but no good candidate genes for WPW. The 20p12 deletion included 19 genes among them JAG1 and BMP2. Recently, two unrelated patients with WPW and BMP2 deletions have been reported. Despite a relationship between WPW and JAG1 deletion cannot be excluded, the JAG1 deletion is unlikely responsible for the ventricular preexcitation since WPW has never been associated with Alagille syndrome. Among the other deleted genes in 20p12, BMP2 appears to be a good candidate responsible for the WPW.

  16. Dissection of the major hematopoietic quantitative trait locus in chromosome 6q23.3 identifies miR-3662 as a novel player in hematopoiesis and acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maharry, Sophia E.; Walker, Christopher J.; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Mehta, Sujay; Patel, Mitra; Bainazar, Maryam A.; Huang, Xiaomeng; Lankenau, Malori A.; Hoag, Kevin W.; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Garzon, Ramiro; Blachly, James S.; Guttridge, Denis C.; Bloomfield, Clara D.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations and multiple genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have established a major hematopoietic quantitative trait locus in chromosome 6q23.3. The locus comprises an active enhancer region, in which some of the associated SNPs alter transcription factor binding. We now identify microRNA-3662 as a new functional driver contributing to the associated phenotypes. The GWAS SNPs are strongly associated with higher miR-3662 expression. Genome editing of rs66650371, a three base pair deletion, suggests a functional link between the SNP genotype and the abundance of miR-3662. Increasing miR-3662’s abundance increases colony formation in hematopoietic progenitor cells, particularly the erythroid lineage. In contrast, miR-3662 is not expressed in acute myeloid leukemia cells and its overexpression has potent anti-leukemic effects in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, miR-3662 directly targets NF-ĸB-mediated transcription. Thus, miR-3662 is a new player of the hematopoietic 6q23.3 locus. PMID:27354268

  17. Fluorescence reaction of 5-(p-methoxyphenylazo)-8-(p-tolylsulfonamido)quinoline with cobalt(II) and its analytical application

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Zuotao ) Xu Qiheng )

    1992-08-01

    5-(p-Methoxyphenylazo)-8-(p-tolylsulfonamido)quinoline(MTAQ) has been synthesized. The product was checked by IR, thermogravimetry, NMR and elemental analysis. A highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of cobalt(II) based on the formation of a complex with MTAQ in slightly basic medium aqueous solution and in the presence of nonionic surfactant, tween-80. The complex shows two excitation maxima at 304 nm and 338 nm, its emission maximum is centered at 402nm. The fluorescence intensity is proportional to cobalt(II) concentration in the range of 0-85 ppb. The method has good selectivity and has been applied to the direct fluorimetric determination of trace cobalt(II) in pig's liver, Dianchi shrimp and celery.

  18. Schizophrenia: A genome scan targets chromosomes 3p and 8p as potential sites of susceptibility genes

    SciTech Connect

    Pulver, A.E.; Lasseter, V.K.; Kasch, L.

    1995-06-19

    Using a systematically ascertained sample of 57 families, each having 2 or more members with a consensus diagnosis of schizophrenia (DSM-III-R criteria), we have carried out linkage studies of 520 loci, covering approximately 70% of the genome for susceptibility loci for schizophrenia. A two-stage strategy based on lod score thresholds from simulation studies of our sample identified regions for further exploration. In each region, a dense map of highly informative dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms (heterozygosity greater than .70) was analyzed using dominant, recessive, and {open_quotes}affected only{close_quotes} models and nonparametric sib pair identity-by-descent methods. For one region, 8p22-p21, affected sib-pair analyses gave a P value = .0001, corresponding to a lod score approximately equal to 3.00. For 8p22-p21, the maximum two-point lod score occurred using the {open_quotes}affected only{close_quotes} recessive model (Z{sub max} = 2.35; {theta}{sub M} = {theta}{sub F}); allowing for a constant sex difference in recombination fractions found in reference pedigrees, Z{sub max} = 2.78 ({theta}{sub M}/{theta}{sub F} = 3). For a second region, 3p26-p24, the maximum two-point lod score was 2.34 ({open_quotes}affected only{close_quotes} dominant model), and the affected sib-pair P value was .01. These two regions are worthy of further exploration as potential sites of susceptibility genes for schizophrenia. 59 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Clinical and cytogenetic findings in seven cases of inverted duplication of 8p with evidence of a telomeric deletion using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wen-Jun; Callif-Daley, F.; Zapata, M.C.; Miller, M.E.

    1995-09-11

    We report on the clinical and cytogenetic findings in 7 cases of inverted duplication of region 8p11.2-p23. The phenotype of inv dup (8p) compiled from this series and the literature (N = 29) consists of severe mental retardation (100%), minor facial alterations (97%), agenesis of the corpus callosum (80%), hypotonia (66%), orthopedic abnormalities (58%), scoliosis/kyphosis (40%), and congenital heart defect (26%). A telomeric deletion of region 8p23.3-pter was confirmed in 3 of our cases studied using fluorescent in situ hybridization with a telomeric probe for 8p. Thus, these karyotypes are inv dup del(8) (qter{r_arrow} p23.1::p23.1{r_arrow}p11.2:). Our findings suggest that most cases of inv dup(8p) probably have a telomeric deletion. 20 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Key Role of Ser562/661 in Snf1-Dependent Regulation of Cat8p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Charbon, Godefroid; Breunig, Karin D.; Wattiez, Ruddy; Vandenhaute, Jean; Noël-Georis, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    Utilization of nonfermentable carbon sources by Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the Snf1p kinase and the Cat8p transcriptional activator, which binds to carbon source-responsive elements of target genes. We demonstrate that KlSnf1p and KlCat8p from K. lactis interact in a two-hybrid system and that the interaction is stronger with a kinase-dead mutant form of KlSnf1p. Of two putative phosphorylation sites in the KlCat8p sequence, serine 661 was identified as a key residue governing KlCat8p regulation. Serine 661 is located in the middle homology region, a regulatory domain conserved among zinc cluster transcription factors, and is part of an Snf1p consensus phosphorylation site. Single mutations at this site are sufficient to completely change the carbon source regulation of the KlCat8p transactivation activity observed. A serine-to-glutamate mutant form mimicking constitutive phosphorylation results in a nearly constitutively active form of KlCat8p, while a serine-to-alanine mutation has the reverse effect. Furthermore, it is shown that KlCat8p phosphorylation depends on KlSNF1. The Snf1-Cat8 connection is evolutionarily conserved: mutation of corresponding serine 562 of ScCat8p gave similar results in S. cerevisiae. The enhanced capacity of ScCat8S562E to suppress the phenotype caused by snf1 strengthens the hypothesis of direct phosphorylation of Cat8p by Snf1p. Unlike that of S. cerevisiae ScCAT8, KlCAT8 transcription is not carbon source regulated, illustrating the prominent role of posttranscriptional regulation of Cat8p in K. lactis. PMID:15121831

  1. Cometary activity, active areas, and a mechanism for collimated outflows on 1P, 9P, 19P, and 81P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.

    2010-12-01

    The properties of 50 jet and jet-filament outflows from 27 active areas observed on the four comet nuclei that have been visited by spacecraft (1P/Halley, 19P/Borrelly, 81P/Wild 2, and 9P/Tempel 1) are investigated and we propose a taxonomic categorization in which there are three types of active areas: Type I that is dominated by the sublimation of H 2O through the porous mantle; Type II that is controlled by the localized and persistent effusion of super-volatiles from the interior; and Type III that is characterized by episodic releases of super-volatiles. The zonally averaged distribution of active area locations associated with Type II outflows over the four comets is calculated and we find that they are distributed randomly in latitude. In longitude, the distribution shows a marginal tendency for active areas to occur more frequently in the region near the ends of the long axis or, alternatively, a tendency to avoid the region close to the ends of the intermediate axis. Combining observations of filamentary structure with exploratory hydrodynamic calculations we find that Type II outflows are likely to be relatively cold laminar flows (Re < 1000) of a mixture of CO 2, CO and H 2O that are highly collimated (6-10° full-cone angle) during the daytime as a result of being constrained by the ambient H 2O atmosphere. We propose that they become visible as a result of the turbulent momentum flux at the base of the filamentary structure that causes the friable surface to release dust at a higher rate than in surrounding areas. We present evidence that indicates that geophysical flows occur on cometary nuclei other than 9P/Tempel 1 and discuss a possible scenario for the long-term evolution of cometary surfaces near the Sun. We conclude with an exposition of a cometary activity paradigm brought up-to-date with discoveries made with recent space missions, associated Earth-based investigations, and the results of this work.

  2. Clinical and pathological features of familial frontotemporal dementia caused by C9ORF72 mutation on chromosome 9p.

    PubMed

    Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Feldman, Howard H; Sengdy, Pheth; Bouchard-Kerr, Phoenix; Dwosh, Emily; Butler, Rachel; Leung, Bonnie; Fok, Alice; Rutherford, Nicola J; Baker, Matt; Rademakers, Rosa; Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2012-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are closely related clinical syndromes with overlapping molecular pathogenesis. Several families have been reported with members affected by frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or both, which show genetic linkage to a region on chromosome 9p21. Recently, two studies identified the FTD/ALS gene defect on chromosome 9p as an expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in a non-coding region of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 gene (C9ORF72). In the present study, we provide detailed analysis of the clinical features and neuropathology for 16 unrelated families with frontotemporal dementia caused by the C9ORF72 mutation. All had an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Eight families had a combination of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis while the other eight had a pure frontotemporal dementia phenotype. Clinical information was available for 30 affected members of the 16 families. There was wide variation in age of onset (mean = 54.3, range = 34-74 years) and disease duration (mean = 5.3, range = 1-16 years). Early diagnoses included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 15), progressive non-fluent aphasia (n = 5), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 9) and progressive non-fluent aphasia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 1). Heterogeneity in clinical presentation was also common within families. However, there was a tendency for the phenotypes to converge with disease progression; seven subjects had final clinical diagnoses of both frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and all of those with an initial progressive non-fluent aphasia diagnosis subsequently developed significant behavioural abnormalities. Twenty-one affected family members came to autopsy and all were found to have transactive response DNA binding protein with M(r) 43 kD (TDP-43) pathology in a wide neuroanatomical distribution. All had involvement of the extramotor

  3. Genomewide linkage analysis of bipolar disorder by use of a high-density single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay: a comparison with microsatellite marker assays and finding of significant linkage to chromosome 6q22.

    PubMed

    Middleton, F A; Pato, M T; Gentile, K L; Morley, C P; Zhao, X; Eisener, A F; Brown, A; Petryshen, T L; Kirby, A N; Medeiros, H; Carvalho, C; Macedo, A; Dourado, A; Coelho, I; Valente, J; Soares, M J; Ferreira, C P; Lei, M; Azevedo, M H; Kennedy, J L; Daly, M J; Sklar, P; Pato, C N

    2004-05-01

    We performed a linkage analysis on 25 extended multiplex Portuguese families segregating for bipolar disorder, by use of a high-density single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay, the GeneChip Human Mapping 10K Array (HMA10K). Of these families, 12 were used for a direct comparison of the HMA10K with the traditional 10-cM microsatellite marker set and the more dense 4-cM marker set. This comparative analysis indicated the presence of significant linkage peaks in the SNP assay in chromosomal regions characterized by poor coverage and low information content on the microsatellite assays. The HMA10K provided consistently high information and enhanced coverage throughout these regions. Across the entire genome, the HMA10K had an average information content of 0.842 with 0.21-Mb intermarker spacing. In the 12-family set, the HMA10K-based analysis detected two chromosomal regions with genomewide significant linkage on chromosomes 6q22 and 11p11; both regions had failed to meet this strict threshold with the microsatellite assays. The full 25-family collection further strengthened the findings on chromosome 6q22, achieving genomewide significance with a maximum nonparametric linkage (NPL) score of 4.20 and a maximum LOD score of 3.56 at position 125.8 Mb. In addition to this highly significant finding, several other regions of suggestive linkage have also been identified in the 25-family data set, including two regions on chromosome 2 (57 Mb, NPL = 2.98; 145 Mb, NPL = 3.09), as well as regions on chromosomes 4 (91 Mb, NPL = 2.97), 16 (20 Mb, NPL = 2.89), and 20 (60 Mb, NPL = 2.99). We conclude that at least some of the linkage peaks we have identified may have been largely undetected in previous whole-genome scans for bipolar disorder because of insufficient coverage or information content, particularly on chromosomes 6q22 and 11p11.

  4. Genomewide Linkage Analysis of Bipolar Disorder by Use of a High-Density Single-Nucleotide–Polymorphism (SNP) Genotyping Assay: A Comparison with Microsatellite Marker Assays and Finding of Significant Linkage to Chromosome 6q22

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, F. A.; Pato, M. T.; Gentile, K. L.; Morley, C. P.; Zhao, X.; Eisener, A. F.; Brown, A.; Petryshen, T. L.; Kirby, A. N.; Medeiros, H.; Carvalho, C.; Macedo, A.; Dourado, A.; Coelho, I.; Valente, J.; Soares, M. J.; Ferreira, C. P.; Lei, M.; Azevedo, M. H.; Kennedy, J. L.; Daly, M. J.; Sklar, P.; Pato, C. N.

    2004-01-01

    We performed a linkage analysis on 25 extended multiplex Portuguese families segregating for bipolar disorder, by use of a high-density single-nucleotide–polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay, the GeneChip Human Mapping 10K Array (HMA10K). Of these families, 12 were used for a direct comparison of the HMA10K with the traditional 10-cM microsatellite marker set and the more dense 4-cM marker set. This comparative analysis indicated the presence of significant linkage peaks in the SNP assay in chromosomal regions characterized by poor coverage and low information content on the microsatellite assays. The HMA10K provided consistently high information and enhanced coverage throughout these regions. Across the entire genome, the HMA10K had an average information content of 0.842 with 0.21-Mb intermarker spacing. In the 12-family set, the HMA10K-based analysis detected two chromosomal regions with genomewide significant linkage on chromosomes 6q22 and 11p11; both regions had failed to meet this strict threshold with the microsatellite assays. The full 25-family collection further strengthened the findings on chromosome 6q22, achieving genomewide significance with a maximum nonparametric linkage (NPL) score of 4.20 and a maximum LOD score of 3.56 at position 125.8 Mb. In addition to this highly significant finding, several other regions of suggestive linkage have also been identified in the 25-family data set, including two regions on chromosome 2 (57 Mb, NPL = 2.98; 145 Mb, NPL = 3.09), as well as regions on chromosomes 4 (91 Mb, NPL = 2.97), 16 (20 Mb, NPL = 2.89), and 20 (60 Mb, NPL = 2.99). We conclude that at least some of the linkage peaks we have identified may have been largely undetected in previous whole-genome scans for bipolar disorder because of insufficient coverage or information content, particularly on chromosomes 6q22 and 11p11. PMID:15060841

  5. Neutron diffraction studies towards deciphering the protonation state of catalytic residues in the bacterial KDN9P phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Tyrel; González, Javier M; Bacik, John P; DeNunzio, Nicholas J; Unkefer, Clifford J; Schrader, Tobias E; Ostermann, Andreas; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N; Fisher, S Zoë

    2013-09-01

    The enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-9-O-phosphonononic acid phosphatase (KDN9P phosphatase) functions in the pathway for the production of 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-nononic acid, a sialic acid that is important for the survival of commensal bacteria in the human intestine. The enzyme is a member of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily and represents a good model for the active-site protonation state of family members. Crystals of approximate dimensions 1.5 × 1.0 × 1.0 mm were obtained in space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.1, b = 108.9, c = 75.7 Å. A complete neutron data set was collected from a medium-sized H/D-exchanged crystal at BIODIFF at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Garching, Germany in 18 d. Initial refinement to 2.3 Å resolution using only neutron data showed significant density for catalytically important residues.

  6. Neutron diffraction studies towards deciphering the protonation state of catalytic residues in the bacterial KDN9P phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Tyrel; González, Javier M.; Bacik, John P.; DeNunzio, Nicholas J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N.; Fisher, S. Zoë

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-9-O-phosphonononic acid phosphatase (KDN9P phosphatase) functions in the pathway for the production of 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-­glycero-d-galacto-nononic acid, a sialic acid that is important for the survival of commensal bacteria in the human intestine. The enzyme is a member of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily and represents a good model for the active-site protonation state of family members. Crystals of approximate dimensions 1.5 × 1.0 × 1.0 mm were obtained in space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.1, b = 108.9, c = 75.7 Å. A complete neutron data set was collected from a medium-sized H/D-exchanged crystal at BIODIFF at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Garching, Germany in 18 d. Initial refinement to 2.3 Å resolution using only neutron data showed significant density for catalytically important residues. PMID:23989152

  7. Search for Ammonia Radio Emission in Comet 9P/Tempel~1 after the Deep Impact Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozzi, G. P.; Palagi, F.; Codella, C.; Poppi, S.; Crovisier, J.

    About 30 hours after the DI impact event, comet 9P/Tempel 1 has been observed with the 32 m dish of Medicina observatory (Bologna, Italy) to search for the NH_3 inversion transitions in the region around 24 GHz. The results show the presence of a line with S/N of about 6 and a FWHM equal to 1.35 km/s close to the NH_3(1,1) frequency. The cometary origin of the line seems sure, because the search for possible background sources of such a emission, performed a few days later along the same comet path, did not show any line at that frequency. Its identification is however dubious because of its too high outflow projected velocity and the too high ammonia production necessary to fit the line intensity. The frequency of the line is also close to a transition of methyl formate, a species already observed in comet Hale-Bopp and in hot cores. The outflow projected velocity would be smaller than in the case of the ammonia, but its abundance would be too high as well.

  8. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies A New Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Locus On 9p22.2

    PubMed Central

    Song, Honglin; Ramus, Susan J.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolton, Kelly L.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Wozniak, Eva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cramer, Daniel W.; DiCioccio, Richard; Dörk, Thilo; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Sellers, Thomas; Baglietto, Laura; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beesley, Jonathan; Blaakaer, Jan; Carney, Michael E; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Zhihua; Cunningham, Julie M.; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dürst, Matthias; Ekici, Arif B.; Fenstermacher, David; Fridley, Brooke L.; Giles, Graham; Gore, Martin E.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus; Hogdall, Estrid; Iversen, Edwin S; Jacobs, Ian J; Jakubowska, Anna; Li, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lubiński, Jan; Lurie, Galina; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John; Mędrek, Krzysztof; Moorman, Patricia G.; Moysich, Kirsten; Narod, Steven; Phelan, Catherine; Pye, Carole; Risch, Harvey; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa; Stram, Daniel O.; Thiel, Falk C.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Webb, Penelope M.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Brewster, Wendy; Ziogas, Argyrios; Houlston, Richard; Tomlinson, Ian; Whittemore, Alice S; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Ness, Roberta B.; Menon, Usha; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Gronwald, Jacek; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Fasching, Peter A.; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer has a major heritable component, but the known susceptibility genes explain less than half the excess familial risk1. We performed a genome wide association study (GWAS) to identify common ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles. We evaluated 507,094 SNPs genotyped in 1,817 cases and 2,353 controls from the UK and ~2 million imputed SNPs. We genotyped the 22,790 top ranked SNPs in 4,274 cases and 4,809 controls of European ancestry from Europe, USA and Australia. We identified 12 SNPs at 9p22 associated with disease risk (P<10−8). The most significant SNP (rs3814113; P = 2.5 × 10−17) was genotyped in a further 2,670 ovarian cancer cases and 4,668 controls confirming its association (combined data odds ratio = 0.82 95% CI 0.79 – 0.86, P-trend = 5.1 × 10−19). The association differs by histological subtype, being strongest for serous ovarian cancers (OR 0.77 95% CI 0.73 – 0.81, Ptrend = 4.1 × 10−21). PMID:19648919

  9. Constitutional trisomy 8p11.21-q11.21 mosaicism: a germline alteration predisposing to myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ripperger, Tim; Tauscher, Marcel; Praulich, Inka; Pabst, Brigitte; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Yeoh, Allen; Göhring, Gudrun; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Flotho, Christian; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Steinemann, Doris

    2011-10-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML) is a unique myeloproliferative disorder of early childhood. Frequently, mutations in NRAS, KRAS, PTPN11, NF1 or CBL are found in these patients. Monosomy 7 is the most common cytogenetic aberration. To identify submicroscopic genomic copy number alterations, 20 JMML samples were analysed by comparative genomic hybridization. Ten out of 20 samples displayed additional submicroscopic alterations. In two patients, an almost identical gain of chromosome 8 was identified. In both patients, fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed a constitutional partial trisomy 8 mosaic (cT8M). A survey on 27 cT8M patients with neoplasms showed that 21 had myeloid malignancies, and five of these had a JMML. Notably, the region gained in our cases is the smallest gain of chromosome 8 reported in cT8M cases with malignancies so far. Our results dramatically reduce the critical region to 8p11.21q11.21 harbouring 31 protein coding genes and two non-coding RNAs, e.g. MYST3, IKBKB, UBE2V2, GOLGA7, FNTA and MIR486--a finding with potential implications for the role of somatic trisomy 8 in myeloid malignancies. Further investigations are required to more comprehensively determine how constitutional partial trisomy 8 mosaicisms may contribute to leukaemogenesis in different mutational subtypes of JMML and other myeloid malignancies.

  10. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype studies of chromosome 8p 11. 1-21. 1 markers and Werner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-En; Schellenberg, G.D.; Oshima, Junko; Martin, G.M.; Goddard, K.A.B.; Wijsman, E.M. ); Miki, Tetsuro; Nakura, Jun; Ogihara, Toshio ); Poot, M.; Hoehn, H. )

    1994-08-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized as a progeroid syndrome, previously mapped to the 8p 11.2-21.1 region. Because WS is so rare, and because many patients are from consanguineous marriages, fine localization of the gene by traditional meiotic mapping methods is unlikely to succeed. Here the authors present the results of a search for a region that exhibits linkage disequilibrium with the disorder, under the assumption that identification of such a region may provide an alternative method of narrowing down the location of WRN, the gene responsible for WS. They present allele frequencies in Japanese and Caucasian cases and controls for D8S137, D8S131, D8S87, D8S278, D8S259, D8S283, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, ankyrin 1, D8S339, and two polymorphisms in glutathione reductase (GSR), covering [approximately] 16.5 cM in total. They show that three of the markers examined - D8S339 and both polymorphisms in the GSR locus - show strong statistically significant evidence of disequilibrium with WRN in the Japanese population but not in the Caucasian population. In addition, they show that a limited number of haplotypes are associated with the disease in both populations and that these haplotypes define clusters of apparently related haplotypes that may identify as many as eight or nine independent WRN mutations in these two populations. 36 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  11. Molecular characterization of OP354-like P[8] (P[8]b subtype) human rotaviruses A species isolated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kuzuya, Mitsutaka; Fujii, Ritsushi; Hamano, Masako; Kida, Kouji; Kanadani, Tomohisa; Nishimura, Keiko; Kishimoto, Toshio

    2012-04-01

    OP354-like P[8] (P[8]b subtype) species A rotaviruses (RVAs) were isolated first time in Japan during a RVA survey in Okayama Prefecture between 2006 and 2009. Two of 236 RVA-positive samples were identified as G1P[8]b by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. P[8]b strains (RVA/human-wt/JPN/OH1998/2008/G1P[8]b and RVA/human-wt/JPN/OH2024/2008/G1P[8]b) were isolated only in May, 2008 and both patients infected with P[8]b viruses lived in the same city, suggesting that the prevalence of P[8]b RVAs is limited considerably in Okayama Prefecture. Molecular analysis of four genes (VP4, VP6, VP7, and NSP4 genes) of Japanese P[8]b strains revealed that the VP4 genes of these strains were related closely to those of Southeast Asian and Indian P[8]b strains. In contrast, the VP6, VP7, and NSP4 genes of Japanese P[8]b strains were highly homologous to G1P[8]a strains prevalent in the same area. These results suggest that the Japanese P[8]b strain may be a result of reassortment events between Japanese G1P[8]a viruses and unidentified Asian viruses possessing the P[8]b VP4 gene.

  12. Linkage Disequilibrium and Haplotype Studies of Chromosome 8p 11.1-21.1 Markers and Werner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang-En; Oshima, Junko; Goddard, Katrina A. B.; Miki, Tetsuro; Nakura, Jun; Ogihara, Toshio; Poot, Martin; Hoehn, Holger; Fraccaro, Marco; Piussan, Charles; Martin, George M.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Wijsman, Ellen M.

    1994-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized as a progeroid syndrome, previously mapped to the 8p 11.1-21.1 region. Because WS is so rare, and because many patients are from consanguineous marriages, fine localization of the gene by traditional meiotic mapping methods is unlikely to succeed. Here we present the results of a search for a region that exhibits linkage disequilibrium with the disorder, under the assumption that identification of such a region may provide an alternative method of narrowing down the location of WRN, the gene responsible for WS. We present allele frequencies in Japanese and Caucasian cases and controls for D8S137, D8S131, D8S87, D8S278, D8S259, D8S283, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, ankyrin 1, D8S339, and two polymorphisms in glutathione reductase (GSR), covering ∼16.5 cM in total. We show that three of the markers examined—D8S339 and both polymorphisms in the GSR locus—show strong statistically significant evidence of disequilibrium with WRN in the Japanese population but not in the Caucasian population. In addition, we show that a limited number of haplotypes are associated with the disease in both populations and that these haplotypes define clusters of apparently related haplotypes that may identify as many as eight or nine independent WRN mutations in these two populations. PMID:8037212

  13. On the pre-perihelion temporal activity of comet 9P/Tempel 1 during the favorable apparition of 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, A.; Serrano, G.; Sanzovo, G.; Trevisan Sanzovo, D.

    2014-07-01

    The short-period (5.5 years) comet 9P/Tempel 1 was revisited by NASA's Stardust-NExT probe in 2011 February 15, in a flyby at a distance of only about 181 km. This is the first time a comet is visited twice by two different probes (the first visit in 2005 July 4, by NASA's Deep Impact probe). Tempel 1 is not a bright or very active comet. The brightest apparent magnitude in 25 appearances, since the discovery (1867), has been m=9.5, well below the limit of visibility to the naked eye. Here, we study the temporal activity, based on 495 apparent visual magnitude estimates (ICQ), obtained during the very favorable apparition of 2005 (the comet passed at 0.71 au from the Earth in 2005 May 3) by the Semi-Empirical Method of Visual Magnitudes (SEMVM, de Almeida, Singh&Huebner, 1997). We determine a model dependent activity at the time immediately before the Deep Impact (4 July 2005 at 5:52 UTC) in fairly good agreement with Schleicher et al. (2006), Feaga et al. (2007) and Gicquel et al. (2012) from the Spitzer spacecraft observations, and a day later, at the time of the perihelion passage (5 July 2005 at 5:31 UTC), also in good agreement with Biver et al. (2007) and Farnham et al. (2010), most likely powered by water-ice sublimation. Our results are consistent, for an active area of 10% and a minimum nuclear radius of 2.5 km , with the radio OH observations in 18-cm (Howell et al., 2007; Biver et al., 2007), and the H_2O observations by satellites SWAN (Mäkinen et al., 2007; Bensch et al., 2007) and Odin (Biver et al., 2007), in the pre-perihelion phase.

  14. Visible and near-infrared spectrophotometry of the Deep Impact ejecta of Comet 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, Klaus W.; Aldering, Greg; Meech, Karen J.; Cochran, Anita L.; Antilogus, Pierre; Pécontal, Emmanuel; Chickering, William; Blanc, Nathalie; Copin, Yannick; Lynch, David K.; Rudy, Richard J.; Mazuk, S.; Venturini, Catherine C.; Puetter, Richard C.; Perry, Raleigh B.

    2007-03-01

    We have obtained optical spectrophotometry of the evolution of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 after the impact of the Deep Impact probe, using the Supernova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS) at the UH 2.2-m telescope, as well as simultaneous optical and infrared spectra using the Lick Visible-to-Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (VNIRIS). The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the "violet band" CN (0-0) emission and of the 630 nm [OI] emission was studied. We found that CN emission centered on the nucleus increased in the 2 h after impact, but that this CN emission was delayed compared to the light curve of dust-scattered sunlight. The CN emission also expanded faster than the cloud of scattering dust. The emission of [OI] at 630 nm rose similarly to the scattered light, but then remained nearly constant for several hours after impact. On the day following the impact, both CN and [OI] emission concentrated on the comet nucleus had returned nearly to pre-impact levels. We have also searched for differences in the scattering properties of the dust ejected by the impact compared to the dust released under normal conditions. Compared to the pre-impact state of the comet, we find evidence that the color of the comet was slightly bluer during the post-impact rise in brightness. Long after the impact, in the following nights, the comet colors returned to their pre-impact values. This can be explained by postulating a change to a smaller particle size distribution in the ejecta cloud, in agreement with the findings from mid-infrared observations, or by postulating a large fraction of clean ice particles, or by a combination of these two.

  15. Visible and near-infrared spectrophotometry of the Deep Impact ejecta of Comet 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, Klaus W.; Aldering, Greg; Meech, Karen J.; Cochran, Anita L.; Antilogus, Pierre; Pécontal, Emmanuel; Chickering, William; Blanc, Nathalie; Copin, Yannick; Lynch, David K.; Rudy, Richard J.; Mazuk, S.; Venturini, Catherine C.; Puetter, Richard C.; Perry, Raleigh B.

    We have obtained optical spectrophotometry of the evolution of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 after the impact of the Deep Impact probe, using the Supernova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS) at the UH 2.2-m telescope, as well as simultaneous optical and infrared spectra using the Lick Visible-to-Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (VNIRIS). The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the “violet band” CN (0 0) emission and of the 630 nm [OI] emission was studied. We found that CN emission centered on the nucleus increased in the 2 h after impact, but that this CN emission was delayed compared to the light curve of dust-scattered sunlight. The CN emission also expanded faster than the cloud of scattering dust. The emission of [OI] at 630 nm rose similarly to the scattered light, but then remained nearly constant for several hours after impact. On the day following the impact, both CN and [OI] emission concentrated on the comet nucleus had returned nearly to pre-impact levels. We have also searched for differences in the scattering properties of the dust ejected by the impact compared to the dust released under normal conditions. Compared to the pre-impact state of the comet, we find evidence that the color of the comet was slightly bluer during the post-impact rise in brightness. Long after the impact, in the following nights, the comet colors returned to their pre-impact values. This can be explained by postulating a change to a smaller particle size distribution in the ejecta cloud, in agreement with the findings from mid-infrared observations, or by postulating a large fraction of clean ice particles, or by a combination of these two.

  16. Spitzer Observations of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 During Deep Impact : Water and Dust Production and Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, Adeline; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Kelley, M. S.; Woodward, C. E.

    2009-09-01

    The Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft encountered comet 9P/Tempel 1 on July 4th, 2005 (rh = 1.506 AU). Spectral maps covering 20'' x 67'' (1.85''/pixel) were acquired with the IRS instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope (ΔSpitzer = 0.72 AU) at different times around the Deep Impact event: twice before impact (TI-41.3hrs and TI-22.9hrs) and twelve times after impact (between TI+0.67hrs and TI+1027hrs). These IRS observations (Lisse et al 2006, Sciences 313, 635) were taken from the Spitzer data archive. We present the interpretation of 5.2-7.6 µm spectra obtained in the second order of the short-wavelength module (SL2). To reduce the contribution of artifacts in the spectra, 5x5 pixel extraction apertures (9.25''x9.25'') were used. On the first stage we studied the water ν2 vibrational band emission at 6.4µm, which is present in most spectra. The water production rate before impact is deduced ( 4.25e27 molecules/sec). In order to study both the amount and origin of the water molecules released after impact, we used extractions centered on the nucleus and along the length of the slit. We analyzed the spatial distribution of water and its time evolution with a time-dependent model which describes the evolution of the water cloud after impact. The underlying continuum in the spectra provides information on the evolution and color temperature of the dust ejecta. The dust mass and dust/gas ratio in the ejecta cloud are derived and compared with other values published in the literature.

  17. GALAXY EVOLUTION EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF CS AND OH EMISSION IN COMET 9P/TEMPEL 1 DURING DEEP IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, Paul D.; McCandliss, Stephan R.; Morgenthaler, Jeffrey P.; Lisse, Carey M.; Weaver, Harold A.; A'Hearn, Michael F.

    2010-03-10

    Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) observations of comet 9P/Tempel 1 using the near-ultraviolet (NUV) objective grism were made before, during and after the Deep Impact event that occurred on 2005 July 4 at 05:52:03 UT when a 370 kg NASA spacecraft was maneuvered into the path of the comet. The NUV channel provides usable spectral information in a bandpass covering 2000-3400 A with a point source spectral resolving power of R {approx} 100. The primary spectral features in this range include solar continuum scattered from cometary dust and emissions from OH and CS molecular bands centered near 3085 and 2575 A, respectively. In particular, we report the only cometary CS emission detected during this event. The observations allow the evolution of these spectral features to be tracked over the period of the encounter. In general, the NUV emissions observed from Tempel 1 are much fainter than those that have been observed by GALEX from other comets. However, it is possible to derive production rates for the parent molecules of the species detected by GALEX in Tempel 1 and to determine the number of these molecules liberated by the impact. The derived quiescent production rates are Q(H{sub 2}O) = 6.4 x 10{sup 27} molecules s{sup -1} and Q(CS{sub 2}) = 6.7 x 10{sup 24} molecules s{sup -1}, while the impact produced an additional 1.6 x 10{sup 32} H{sub 2}O molecules and 1.3 x 10{sup 29} CS{sub 2} molecules, a similar ratio as in quiescent outgassing.

  18. Full genomic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a zoonotic human G8P[14] rotavirus strain detected in a sample from Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rashi; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Roy, Sunando; Esona, Mathew D; Lopez, Beatriz; Mencos, Yolanda; Rey-Benito, Gloria; Bowen, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    We report the genomic characterization of a rare human G8P[14] rotavirus strain, identified in a stool sample from Guatemala (GTM) during routine rotavirus surveillance. This strain was designated as RVA/Human-wt/GTM/2009726790/2009/G8P[14], with a genomic constellation of G8-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A13-N2-T6-E2-H3. The VP4 gene occupied lineage VII within the P[14] genotype. Phylogenetic analysis of each genome segment revealed close relatedness to several zoonotic simian, guanaco and bovine strains. Our findings suggest that strain RVA/Human-wt/GTM/2009726790/2009/G8P[14] is an example of a direct zoonotic transmission event. The results of this study reinforce the potential role of interspecies transmission and reassortment in generating novel and rare rotavirus strains which infect humans.

  19. TSQ (6-methoxy-8-p-toluenesulfonamido-quinoline), a common fluorescent sensor for cellular zinc, images zinc proteins.

    PubMed

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W; Tomasiewicz, Henry; Nowakowski, Andrew; Petering, David H

    2011-08-15

    Zn(2+) is a necessary cofactor for thousands of mammalian proteins. Research has suggested that transient fluxes of cellular Zn(2+) are also involved in processes such as apoptosis. Observations of Zn(2+) trafficking have been collected using Zn(2+) responsive fluorescent dyes. A commonly used Zn(2+) fluorophore is 6-methoxy-8-p-toluenesulfonamido-quinoline (TSQ). The chemical species responsible for TSQ's observed fluorescence in resting or activated cells have not been characterized. Parallel fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorometry of LLC-PK(1) cells incubated with TSQ demonstrated punctate staining that concentrated around the nucleus and was characterized by an emission maximum near 470 nm. Addition of cell permeable Zn-pyrithione resulted in greatly increased, diffuse fluorescence that shifted the emission peak to 490 nm, indicative of the formation of Zn(TSQ)(2). TPEN (N,N,N'N'-tetrakis(-)[2-pyridylmethyl]-ethylenediamine), a cell permeant Zn(2+) chelator, largely quenched TSQ fluorescence returning the residual fluorescence to the 470 nm emission maximum. Gel filtration chromatography of cell supernatant from LLC-PK(1) cells treated with TSQ revealed that TSQ fluorescence (470 nm emission) eluted with the proteome fractions. Similarly, addition of TSQ to proteome prior to chromatography resulted in 470 nm fluorescence emission that was not observed in smaller molecular weight fractions. It is hypothesized that Zn-TSQ fluorescence, blue-shifted from the 490 nm emission maximum of Zn(TSQ)(2), results from ternary complex, TSQ-Zn-protein formation. As an example, Zn-carbonic anhydrase formed a ternary adduct with TSQ characterized by a fluorescence emission maximum of 470 nm and a dissociation constant of 1.55 × 10(-7) M. Quantification of TSQ-Zn-proteome fluorescence indicated that approximately 8% of cellular Zn(2+) was imaged by TSQ. These results were generalized to other cell types and model Zn-proteins.

  20. A gene defect causing a novel progressive epilepsy with mental retardation, EPMR, maps to chromosome 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Ranta, S.; Tahvanainen, E.; Karila, E.

    1994-09-01

    EPMR (progressive epilepsy with mental retardation) is a newly discovered autosomal recessively inherited disorder which occurs with high frequency in an isolated rural population in Finland. So far 25 patients have been identified, 21 of whom are alive. Twenty-three patients share a common ancestor from the 18th century. The main features of EPMR are: normal early development, tonic-clonic seizures with onset between ages 5 and 10, and mental retardation which begins approximately 2 years after the onset of epilepsy and soon leads to deepening mental retardation. Adult patients do not manage their daily life without help. The EEG is normal at the onset of epilepsy but later progressive slowing of the background activity occurs. The etiology and pathogenesis of EPMR remain known. As this is a novel disease entity without any definitive diagnostic marker we wished to begin its elucidation by first defining its gene locus. A random search for linkage in four multiplex families (only 20 individuals tested) resulted in the finding of linkage to marker D8S264 with a lod score of 4.45 at zero recombination. The EPMR gene resides in a 7 centimorgan interval between marker loci AFM185xb2 and D8S262 with a maximum multipoint lod score of 7.03 at 1.8 centimorgans proximal to D8S264. Physically this region is very distal on 8p. Of the sixteen EPMR chromosomes haplotyped 15 were identical or almost identical. One chromosome, however, had a distinctly different haplotype raising the possibility of there being two different mutations or one very old mutation. These findings are a starting point toward isolating and characterizing the gene and its protein product. Physical mapping has been initiated by isolating nine YACs from the region.

  1. Functional characterization, localization, and inhibitor sensitivity of the TPR-FGFR1 fusion in 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Malli, Theodora; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Rammer, Melanie; Erdel, Martin; Kranewitter, Wolfgang; Rumpold, Holger; Marschon, Renate; Deutschbauer, Sabine; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Valent, Peter; Muellner-Ammer, Kirsten; Sebesta, Christian; Birkner, Thomas; Webersinke, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) abnormalities, also known as 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome (EMS), represent rare and aggressive disorders, associated with chromosomal aberrations that lead to the fusion of FGFR1 to different partner genes. We report on a third patient with a fusion of the translocated promoter region (TPR) gene, a component of the nuclear pore complex, to FGFR1 due to a novel ins(1;8)(q25;p11p23). The fact that this fusion is a rare but recurrent event in EMS prompted us to examine the localization and transforming potential of the chimeric protein. TPR-FGFR1 localizes in the cytoplasm, although the nuclear pore localization signal of TPR is retained in the fusion protein. Furthermore, TPR-FGFR1 enables cytokine-independent survival, proliferation, and granulocytic differentiation of the interleukin-3 dependent myeloid progenitor cell line 32Dcl3, reflecting the chronic phase of EMS characterized by myeloid hyperplasia. 32Dcl3 cells transformed with the TPR-FGFR1 fusion and treated with increasing concentrations of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors ponatinib (AP24534) and infigratinib (NVP-BGJ398) displayed reduced survival and proliferation with IC50 values of 49.8 and 7.7 nM, respectively. Ponatinib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is already shown to be effective against several FGFR1-fusion kinases. Infigratinib, tested only against FGFR1OP2-FGFR1 to date, is also efficient against TPR-FGFR1. Taking its high specificity for FGFRs into account, infigratinib could be beneficial for EMS patients and should be further investigated for the treatment of myeloproliferative neoplasms with FGFR1 abnormalities.

  2. Dbp9p, a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase involved in 60S-ribosomal-subunit biogenesis, functionally interacts with Dbp6p.

    PubMed Central

    Daugeron, M C; Kressler, D; Linder, P

    2001-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis is a highly complex process and constitutes a major cellular activity. The biogenesis of this ribonucleoprotein assembly requires a multitude of protein trans-acting factors including several putative ATP-dependent RNA helicases of the DEAD-box and related protein families. Here we show that the previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame YLR276C, hereafter named DBP9 (DEAD-box protein 9), encodes an essential nucleolar protein involved in 60S-ribosomal-subunit biogenesis. Genetic depletion of Dbp9p results in a deficit in 60S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of half-mer polysomes. This terminal phenotype is likely due to the instability of early pre-ribosomal particles, as evidenced by the low steady-state levels and the decreased synthesis of the 27S precursors to mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs. In agreement with a role of Dbp9p in 60S subunit synthesis, we find that increased Dbp9p dosage efficiently suppresses certain dbp6 alleles and that dbp6/dbp9 double mutants show synthetic lethality. Furthermore, Dbp6p and Dbp9p weakly interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Altogether, our findings indicate an intimate functional interaction between Dbp6p and Dbp9p during the process of 60S-ribosomal-subunit assembly. PMID:11565753

  3. Deep Impact, Stardust-NExT and the Behavior of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 from 1997 to 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meech, K. J.; Pittichova, J.; Yang, B.; Zenn, A.; Belton, M. J. S.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bagnulo, S.; Bai, J.; Barrera, L.; Bauer, J. M.; Bedient, J.; Bhatt, B. C.; Boehnhardt H.; Brosch, N.; Buie, M.; Candia, P.; Chen, W. P.; Chesley, S.; Choi, Y.-J.; Cochran, A.; Duddy, S.; Farnham, T. L.; Fernandez, Y.; Gutierrez, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present observational data for Comet 9P/Tempel 1 taken from 1997 through 2010 in an international collaboration in support of the Deep Impact and Stardust-NExT missions. The data were obtained to characterize the nucleus prior to the Deep Impact 2005 encounter, and to enable us to understand the rotation state in order to make a time of arrival adjustment in February 2010 that would allow us to image at least 25% of the nucleus seen by the Deep Impact spacecraft to better than 80 m/pixel, and to image the crater made during the encounter, if possible. In total, approx.500 whole or partial nights were allocated to this project at 14 observatories worldwide, utilizing 25 telescopes. Seventy percent of these nights yielded useful data. The data were used to determine the linear phase coefficient for the comet in the R-band to be 0.045 +/- 0.001 mag/deg from 1deg to 16deg. Cometary activity was observed to begin inbound near r approx. 4.0 AU and the activity ended near r approx. 4.6 AU as seen from the heliocentric secular light curves, water-sublimation models and from dust dynamical modeling. The light curve exhibits a significant pre- and post-perihelion brightness and activity asymmetry. There was a secular decrease in activity between the 2000 and 2005 perihelion passages of approx. 20%. The post-perihelion light curve cannot be easily explained by a simple decrease in solar insolation or observing geometry. CN emission was detected in the comet at 2.43 AU pre-perihelion, and by r = 2.24 AU emission from C2 and C3 were evident. In December 2004 the production rate of CN increased from 1.8 x 10(exp 23) mol/s to Q(sub CN) = 2.75 x 10(exp 23) mol/s in early January 2005 and 9.3 x 10(exp 24) mol/s on June 6, 2005 at r = 1.53 AU.

  4. Association between variation in the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 gene on chromosome 8p and anxiety-related personality traits.

    PubMed

    Lohoff, Falk W; Lautenschlager, Marion; Mohr, Johannes; Ferraro, Thomas N; Sander, Thomas; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2008-03-21

    Vesicular monoamine transporters are involved in the presynaptic packaging of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin into storage vesicles. The vesicles release their content upon arrival of an action potential into the synaptic cleft. Dysregulation of monoaminergic neurotransmission has been long postulated to play a relevant role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. The gene encoding the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1/SLC18A1) maps to chromosome 8p21, a region where several linkage peaks overlap between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and anxiety-related personality traits. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the missence variation Thr136Ile in the VMAT1/SLC18A1 gene is associated with anxiety-related personality traits. We tested a total of 337 unrelated subjects of German descent (167 male, 170 female). All participants were carefully screened for psychiatric disorders. The self-report State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was completed by all subjects. Genotypes were obtained for the Thr136Ile (rs1390938) variation in the VMAT1 gene for all subjects. Genotype effects on personality variables were computed with MANOVA including age as a co-variant and gender as independent factor (MANCOVA). Results show that STAI scores were significantly affected by genotype (F=3.108; d.f.=4,331; p=0.015) and age (F=7.233; d.f.=2,331; p=0.001) but not by gender. A gender-by-genotype effect was observed for both the STAI state (p=0.052) and trait score (p=0.035). Dissection of the group by gender and subsequent contrast analysis of the genotype effects performed within the female group showed significant results (STAI state: Thr/Ile vs. Ile/Ile: T=4.408, p=0.0004; STAI trait: Thr/Ile vs. Ile/Ile: T=3.074, p=0.009) but not in the male group. Our findings support the hypothesis that anxiety-related personality traits are associated with variation in the VMAT1/SLC18A1 gene.

  5. The OD/OH Isotope Ratio in Comets 8P/Tuttle and C/2012 F6 (Lemmon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselot, Philippe; Jehin, Emmanuel; Hutsemekers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Decock, Alice; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique

    2016-10-01

    The determination of isotopic ratios in solar system objects is an important source of information about their origin, especially for comets. Among these ratios the D/H is of particular importance because of its sensitivity to fractionation processes and physical environment, and the abundance of hydrogen in the solar system. The main molecule used to derive this ratio in comets is water. So far, apart water, only HCN has permitted to derive D/H ratio and not only upper limits.Most of the existing determinations of D/H in water molecules have been obtained by spectroscopic observations of water lines in the sub-mm or near infrared range [1,2]. So far only one measurement has been based on OD/OH emission lines radicals in the near-UV [3] and another one on the Lyman-alpha D emission [4]. In situ measurements have also been obtained in comets 1P/Halley and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using mass spectrometer [5,6,7,8].In this work we have used the OH and OD ultraviolet bands at 310 nm observed with the ESO 8-m Very Large Telescope feeding the Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) for measuring the D/H ratio in comets 8P/Tuttle and C/2012 F6 (Lemmon). The OH and OD being the photodissociation products of H2O and HDO such observations allow to derive D/H ratio for water molecules. This work constitutes an independant determination of the D/H ratios already published for these comets and based on observations performed in the sub-mm and near infrared range of H2O and HDO lines. We present our modeling, data analysis and numerical values obtained for this ratio.[1] D. Bockelée-Morvan et al., 2015, SSR 197, 47-83 [2] N. Biver et al., 2016, A&A 589, id A78, 11p [3] D. Hutsemékers et al., 2008, A&A 490, L31 [4] H.A. Weaver et al., 2008, LPI Contributions 1405, 8216 [5] H. Balsiger, K. Altwegg, J. Geiss, 1995, JGR 100, 5827 [6] P. Eberhardt et al., 1995, A&A 302, 301 [7] R.H. Brown et al., 2012, PSS 60, 166 [8] K. Alwegg et al., 2015, Science 347, article id. 1261952

  6. Transcriptional Activation of Metalloid Tolerance Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Requires the AP-1–like Proteins Yap1p and Yap8p

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Robert; Fortier, Pierre-Karl; Maciaszczyk, Ewa; Thorsen, Michael; Leduc, Anick; Odhagen, Åsa; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Ulaszewski, Stanislaw; Ramotar, Dindial; Tamás, Markus J.

    2004-01-01

    All organisms are equipped with systems for detoxification of the metalloids arsenic and antimony. Here, we show that two parallel pathways involving the AP-1–like proteins Yap1p and Yap8p are required for acquisition of metalloid tolerance in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. Yap8p is demonstrated to reside in the nucleus where it mediates enhanced expression of the arsenic detoxification genes ACR2 and ACR3. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that Yap8p is associated with the ACR3 promoter in untreated as well as arsenic-exposed cells. Like for Yap1p, specific cysteine residues are critical for Yap8p function. We further show that metalloid exposure triggers nuclear accumulation of Yap1p and stimulates expression of antioxidant genes. Yap1p mutants that are unable to accumulate in the nucleus during H2O2 treatment showed nearly normal nuclear retention in response to metalloid exposure. Thus, our data are the first to demonstrate that Yap1p is being regulated by metalloid stress and to indicate that this activation of Yap1p operates in a manner distinct from stress caused by chemical oxidants. We conclude that Yap1p and Yap8p mediate tolerance by controlling separate subsets of detoxification genes and propose that the two AP-1–like proteins respond to metalloids through distinct mechanisms. PMID:14978214

  7. Identifying novel homozygous deletions by microsatellite analysis and characterization of tumor suppressor candidate 1 gene, TUSC1, on chromosome 9p in human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Zhihong; Parker, Tracy; Wiest, Jonathan S

    2012-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies indicate that genetic alterations of chromosome 9p occur in numerous tumor types, suggesting the presence of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) on chromosome 9p critical in carcinogenesis. Our previous LOH analyses in primary lung tumors led us to propose that chromosome 9p harbors other TSGs important in lung tumorigenesis. In this study, 30 non-small-cell lung cancer and 12 small-cell lung cancer cell lines were screened with 55 markers to identify new regions of homozygous deletion (HD) on chromosome 9p. Three novel noncontiguous homozygously deleted regions were detected and ranged in size from 840 kb to 7.4 Mb. One gene identified in the deletion at D9S126, TUSC1 (tumor suppressor candidate 1), is an intronless gene. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot confirmed the HD of TUSC1. Northern blot analysis of TUSC1 demonstrated two transcripts of approximately 2 and 1.5 kb that are likely generated by alternative polyadenylation signals. Both transcripts are expressed in several human tissues and share an open-reading frame encoding a peptide of 209 amino acids. Analysing cell line cDNAs by reverse transcriptase (RT)–PCR demonstrated downregulation of TUSC1 in cell lines with or without HDs, suggesting that TUSC1 may play a role in lung tumorigenesis. PMID:15208665

  8. Co-occurrence of non-mosaic trisomy 22 and inherited balanced t(4;6)(q33;q23.3) in a liveborn female: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kehinde, Folasade I; Anderson, Carol E; McGowan, Jane E; Jethva, Reena N; Wahab, Mohammed A; Glick, Adina R; Sterner, Mark R; Pascasio, Judy M; Punnett, Hope H; Liu, Jinglan

    2014-12-01

    Trisomy 22 is the third most common autosomal trisomy occurring in about 0.4% of all clinically recognized pregnancies. Complete non-mosaic trisomy 22 is extremely rare in live births. Most affected children die before one year of age. To date, only 29 liveborn cases have been reported and none has carried an additional genetic lesion. In this report, we describe the clinical presentation, cytogenetic, and cytogenomic findings in a liveborn female with complete non-mosaic trisomy 22 as well as a paternally inherited, balanced reciprocal chromosomal rearrangement t(4;6)(q33;q23.3). The proband manifested features commonly seen in individuals with non-mosaic trisomy 22 such as intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), single umbilical artery, cranial abnormalities, short neck, cleft lip and palate, dysmorphic ears, hypoplastic nipples, digital malformation, congenital heart defects, dysplastic kidneys, and genital anomalies. In addition, she had lobar holoprosencephaly, aqueductal stenosis, and limb and eye problems that have not been associated with complete trisomy 22 in previous reports. She died at 35 days of age of complex heart disease and renal failure. We are hereby expanding the cytogenetic and clinical spectrum of this rare chromosome disorder. Clinical features of liveborn children with non-mosaic trisomy 22 are reviewed and compared to those in our proband. The impact of genomic content in relation to the survival of trisomies in humans is also discussed.

  9. Genetic Variants at Chromosome 9p21 and Risk of First Versus Subsequent Coronary Heart Disease Events

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Riyaz S.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Palmer, Tom M.; Finan, Chris I.; Tragante, Vinicius; Deanfield, John; Hemingway, Harry; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Holmes, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this analysis was to compare the association between variants at the chromosome 9p21 locus (Ch9p21) and risk of first versus subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) events through systematic review and meta-analysis. Background Ch9p21 is a recognized risk factor for a first CHD event. However, its association with risk of subsequent events in patients with established CHD is less clear. Methods We searched PubMed and EMBASE for prospective studies reporting association of Ch9p21 with incident CHD events and extracted information on cohort type (individuals without prior CHD or individuals with established CHD) and effect estimates for risk of events. Results We identified 31 cohorts reporting on 193,372 individuals. Among the 16 cohorts of individuals without prior CHD (n = 168,209), there were 15,664 first CHD events. Ch9p21 was associated with a pooled hazard ratio (HR) of a first event of 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 1.17 to 1.22) per risk allele. In individuals with established CHD (n = 25,163), there were 4,436 subsequent events providing >99% and 91% power to detect a per-allele HR of 1.19 or 1.10, respectively. The pooled HR for subsequent events was 1.01 (95% confidence interval: 0.97 to 1.06) per risk allele. There was strong evidence of heterogeneity between the effect estimates for first and subsequent events (p value for heterogeneity = 5.6 × 10−11). We found no evidence for biases to account for these findings. Conclusions Ch9p21 shows differential association with risk of first versus subsequent CHD events. This has implications for genetic risk prediction in patients with established CHD and for mechanistic understanding of how Ch9p21 influences risk of CHD. PMID:24607648

  10. Contribution of 1p, 19q, 9p and 10q Automated Analysis by FISH to the Diagnosis and Prognosis of Oligodendroglial Tumors According to WHO 2016 Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Karine; de Tayrac, Marie; D’Astous, Myreille; Duval, Céline; Paquet, Claudie; Samassekou, Oumar; Gould, Peter Vincent; Saikali, Stéphan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the feasibility and the diagnostic and prognostic interest of automated analysis of 1p, 19q, 9p and 10q status by FISH technique in oligodendroglial tumors. Methods We analyzed a retrospective series of 33 consecutive gliomas with oligodendroglial histology (originally diagnosed as 24 oligodendrogliomas and 9 oligoastrocytomas). For all cases, automated FISH analysis of 1p, 19q, 9p and 10q status were performed and compared to clinical and histological data, ATRX, IDH1R132H and alpha-internexin status (studied by immunohistochemistry) and overall survival (OS). Manual analysis of 9p and 10q status were also performed and compared to automated analysis to verify the concordance of the two methods. Results The 33 gliomas were reclassified into 13 low-grade oligodendrogliomas (OII), 10 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (OIII), 3 diffuse astrocytomas (AII), 3 anaplastic astrocytomas (AIII) and 4 glioblastomas (GBM) according to the WHO 2016 histological criteria. The 1p and/or 19q imbalanced status were restricted to astrocytomas with no correlation to their grade or their OS. Chromosome 9p deletion was restricted to OIII (70%) and GBM (100%) and was correlated with a shorter OS in the total cohort (p = 0.0007), the oligodendroglioma cohort (p = 0.03) and the astrocytoma cohort (p = 0.001). Concordance between 9p manual and automated analysis was satisfactory (81%, κ = 0.69). Chromosome 10q deletion was restricted to GBMs (50%) and was correlated with a poor OS in both the total cohort (p = 0.003) and the astrocytoma (AS) cohort (p = 0.04). Concordance between manual and automated analysis was satisfactory (79%, κ = 0.62). Conclusion Automated analysis of 1p, 19q, 9p and 10q status by FISH is a reliable technique which allows for refined classification of oligodendroglial tumors. 1p and/or 19q imbalanced status is evidence of astrocytic differentiation. 9p deletion is found in high grade oligodendrogliomas and astrocytomas with a poor OS. 10q is

  11. Co-existence of 9p deletion and Silver-Russell syndromes in a patient with maternally inherited cryptic complex chromosome rearrangement involving chromosomes 4, 9, and 11.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Sathanoori, Malini; Kochmar, Sally; Madan-Khetarpal, Suneeta; McGuire, Marianne; Surti, Urvashi

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with a maternally inherited unbalanced complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR) involving chromosomes 4, 9, and 11 detected by microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This patient presents with clinical features of 9p deletion syndrome and Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). Chromosome analysis performed in 2000 showed what appeared to be a simple terminal deletion of chromosome 9p22.1. aCGH performed in 2010 revealed a 1.63 Mb duplication at 4q28.3, a 15.48 Mb deletion at 9p24.3p22.3, and a 1.95 Mb duplication at 11p15.5. FISH analysis revealed a derivative chromosome 9 resulting from an unbalanced translocation between chromosomes 9 and 11, a chromosome 4 fragment inserted near the breakpoint of the translocation. The 4q28.3 duplication does not contain any currently known genes. The 9p24.3p22.3 deletion region contains 36 OMIM genes including a 3.5 Mb critical region for the 9p-phenotype. The 11p15.5 duplication contains 49 OMIM genes including H19 and IGF2. Maternal aCGH was normal. However, maternal chromosomal and FISH analyses revealed an apparently balanced CCR involving chromosomes 4, 9, and 11. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with maternally inherited trans-duplication of the entire imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) among the 11p15.5 duplications reported in SRS patients. This report supports the hypothesis that the trans-duplication of the maternal copy of ICR1 alone is sufficient for the clinical manifestation of SRS and demonstrates the usefulness of combining aCGH with karyotyping and FISH for detecting cryptic genomic imbalances.

  12. Full genome analysis of rotavirus G9P[8] strains identified in acute gastroenteritis cases reveals genetic diversity: Pune, western India.

    PubMed

    Tatte, Vaishali S; Chaphekar, Deepa; Gopalkrishna, Varanasi

    2017-02-27

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the major enteric etiological agents of severe acute gastroenteritis among children globally. As G9 RVA now represents as one of the major human RVA genotypes, studies on full genome of this particular genotype are being carried out worldwide. So far, no such studies on G9P[8] RVAs have been reported from Pune, western part of India. Keeping in view of this, the study was undertaken to understand the degree of genetic diversity of the commonly circulating G9P[8] RVA strains. Rotavirus surveillance studies carried out earlier during the years 2009-2011 showed increase in the prevalence of G9P[8] RVAs. Representative G9P[8] RVA strains from the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 were selected for the study. In general, all the G9 RVA strains showed clustering in the globally circulating sublineage of the VP7 gene and showed nucleotide / amino acid identities of 96.8-99.7% / 96.9-99.8% with global G9 RV strains. Full genome analysis, of all three RVAs in this study indicated Wa-like genotype constellation G9-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. Within the strains nucleotide/ amino acid divergence of 0.1-3.4% / 0.0-4.1% was noted in all the RVA structural and non-structural genes. In conclusion the present study highlights intra-genotypic variations throughout the RVA genome. The study further emphasizes the need for surveillance and analysis of the whole genomic constellation of the commonly circulating RVA strains of other regions in the country for understanding to a greater degree of the impact of rotavirus vaccination recently introduced in India. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Genomic characterization of a rotavirus G8P[1] detected in a child with diarrhea reveal direct animal-to-human transmission.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Magaly; Phan, Tung Gia; Galeano, Maria Eugenia; Russomando, Graciela; Parreno, Viviana; Delwart, Eric; Parra, Gabriel I

    2014-10-01

    Group A rotavirus is a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in children and young animals. During a retrospective analysis of samples collected from Paraguayan children under 5 years old with diarrhea, and previously negative for rotavirus and norovirus, we detected the presence of bovine rotavirus sequences by viral metagenomics. Nucleic acid was extracted direct from stool sample and determined to be G8P[1]. The genomic analyzes revealed that the strain presents an Artiodactyl-like genome (G8-P[1]-I2-R2-C2-M1-Ax-N2-T6-E12-H3) suggesting a direct animal-to-human transmission.

  14. Molecular characterization of human G8P[4] rotavirus strains in Italy: proposal of a more complete subclassification of the G8 genotype in three major lineages.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, G; Delogu, R; Bonomo, P; Castiglia, P; Ruggeri, F M; Fiore, L

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, two children with acute rotavirus gastroenteritis were hospitalized in Sardinia, Italy. Two RVA strains with G8P[4] genotype were detected in their stools, and were named SS56/2011 and SS65/2011. The aim of the study was to characterize these two rare strains, collected within a national RVA gastroenteritis surveillance program. Eight of the 11 RVA genes were sequenced and phylogenetic analysis performed. VP7 amino acid sequence was also analyzed. Sequencing of genes encoding the VP4, VP6, VP7, and NSP1-5 proteins classified both strains as G8-P[4]-I2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2, not detected previously in Italy. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most genes of Italian RVA strains were closely similar to typical DS-1 like strains circulating worldwide, whereas the VP7 gene was strictly related to G8 strains firstly reported in Africa. This finding of G8P[4] RVA strains with a DS-1 like genomic constellation also in a southern European country further confirms the wide circulation of this uncommon genotype in the world. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the VP7 capsid protein of the Italian G8P[4] RVA strains with sequences reported previously suggests that the G8 genotype should be divided into three major lineages.

  15. A de novo interstitial deletion of 8p11.2 including ANK1 identified in a patient with spherocytosis, psychomotor developmental delay, and distinctive facial features.

    PubMed

    Miya, Kazushi; Shimojima, Keiko; Sugawara, Midori; Shimada, Shino; Tsuri, Hiroyuki; Harai-Tanaka, Tomomi; Nakaoka, Sachiko; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Miyawaki, Toshio; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2012-09-10

    The contiguous gene syndrome involving 8p11.2 is recognized as a combined phenotype of both Kallmann syndrome and hereditary spherocytosis, because the genes responsible for these 2 clinical entities, the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and ankyrin 1 (ANK1) genes, respectively, are located in this region within a distance of 3.2Mb. We identified a 3.7Mb deletion of 8p11.2 in a 19-month-old female patient with hereditary spherocytosis. The identified deletion included ANK1, but not FGFR1, which is consistent with the absence of any phenotype or laboratory findings of Kallmann syndrome. Compared with the previous studies, the deletion identified in this study was located on the proximal end of 8p, indicating a pure interstitial deletion of 8p11.21. This patient exhibited mild developmental delay and distinctive facial findings in addition to hereditary spherocytosis. Thus, some of the genes included in the deleted region would be related to these symptoms.

  16. A Genome-Wide Linkage Scan for Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Identifies a Novel Locus on 8p11-23

    PubMed Central

    Riley, B.M.; Schultz, R.E.; Cooper, M.E.; Goldstein-McHenry, T.; Daack-Hirsch, S.; Lee, K.T.; Dragan, E.; Vieira, A.R.; Lidral, A.C.; Marazita, M.L.; Murray, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Isolated or nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate (NS CLP) is a complex disorder resulting from multiple genetic and environmental factors. NS CLP has a birth prevalence of 1 per 500 in the Philippines where large families provide an opportunity for gene localization. Genotyping of 392 microsatellite repeat markers at 10 cM intervals over the genome was performed by the Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) on 220 Filipino families with 567 affected and 1,109 unaffected family members genotyped. Among the most statistically significant results from analysis of the genome-wide scan data was a 20 cM region at 8p11-23 in which markers had LODs ≥1.0. This region on 8p11-23 has not been found in any previous genome wide scan nor does it contain any of the candidate genes widely studied in CLP. Fine mapping in 8p11-23 was done in the 220 families plus an additional 51 families, using SNP markers from 10 known genes (FGFR1, NRG1, FZD3, SLC8A1, PPP3CC, EPHX2, BNIP3L, EGR3, PPP2R2A, and NAT1) within the 20 cM region of 8p11-23. Linkage and association analyses of these SNPs yield suggestive results for markers in FGFR1 (recessive multipoint HLOD 1.07) and BAG4 (recessive multipoint HLOD 1.31). PMID:17366557

  17. Off-target effect of the Epac agonist 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP on P2Y12 receptors in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Herfindal, Lars; Nygaard, Gyrid; Kopperud, Reidun; Krakstad, Camilla; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Selheim, Frode

    2013-08-09

    The primary target of the cAMP analogue 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP is exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). Here we tested potential off-target effects of the Epac activator on blood platelet activation signalling. We found that the Epac analogue 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP inhibits agonist-induced-GPCR-stimulated, but not collagen-stimulated, P-selectin surface expression on Epac1 deficient platelets. In human platelets, 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP inhibited P-selectin expression elicited by the PKC activator PMA. This effect was abolished in the presence of the extracellular ADP scavenger system CP/CPK. In silico modelling of 8-pCPT-2'O-Me-cAMP binding into the purinergic platelet receptor P2Y12 revealed that the analogue docks similar to the P2Y12 antagonist 2MeSAMP. The 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP analogue per se, did not provoke Rap 1 (Rap 1-GTP) activation or phosphorylation on the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) at Ser-157. In addition, the protein kinase A (PKA) antagonists Rp-cAMPS and Rp-8-Br-cAMPS failed to block the inhibitory effect of 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP on thrombin- and TRAP-induced Rap 1 activation, thus suggesting that PKA is not involved. We conclude that the 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP analogue is able to inhibit agonist-induced-GPCR-stimulated P-selectin independent from Epac1; the off-target effect of the analogue appears to be mediated by antagonistic P2Y12 receptor binding. This has implications when using cAMP analogues on specialised system involving such receptors. We found, however that the Epac agonist 8-Br-2'-O-Me-cAMP did not affect platelet activation at similar concentrations.

  18. Validated context-dependent associations of coronary heart disease risk with genotype variation in the chromosome 9p21 region: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study

    PubMed Central

    Lusk, Christine M.; Dyson, Greg; Clark, Andrew G.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Markers of the chromosome 9p21 region are regarded as the strongest and most reliably significant genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals for Coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; this was recently confirmed by the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Consortium meta-analysis. However, while these associations are significant at the population level, they may not be clinically relevant predictors of risk for all individuals. We describe here the results of a study designed to address the question: What is the contribution of context defined by traditional risk factors in determining the utility of DNA sequence variations marking the 9p21 region for explaining variation in CHD risk? We analyzed a sample of 7,589 (3,869 females and 3,720 males) European American participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. We confirmed CHD-SNP genotype associations for two 9p21 region marker SNPs previously identified by the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Consortium study, of which ARIC was a part. We then tested each marker SNP genotype effect on prediction of CHD within sub-groups of the ARIC sample defined by traditional CHD risk factors by applying a novel multi-model strategy, PRIM. We observed that the effects of SNP genotypes in the 9p21 region were strongest in a subgroup of hypertensives. We subsequently validated the effect of the region in an independent sample from the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Our study suggests that marker SNPs identified as predictors of CHD risk in large population based GWAS may have their greatest utility in explaining risk of disease in particular sub-groups characterized by biological and environmental effects measured by the traditional CHD risk factors. PMID:24889828

  19. A New Case of a Complex Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosome: A Der(9)t(7;9)(p22;q22) due to a Maternal Balanced Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Manvelyan, Marine; Simonyan, Izabella; Hovhannisyan, Galina; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Hamid, Ahmed B.; Liehr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Complex small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs) constitute one of the smallest subsets within the patients with an sSMC. Complex sSMCs consist of chromosomal material derived from more than one chromosome, for example, the derivative der(22)t(11;22)(q23;q11.2) in Emanuel syndrome. Here, a yet unreported case of a complex sSMC formed due to a t(7;9)(p22;q22)mat is presented. PMID:27617132

  20. Good response to long-term therapy with growth hormone in a patient with 9p trisomy syndrome: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Canton, Ana Pinheiro Machado; Nishi, Mirian Yumie; Furuya, Tatiane Katsue; Roela, Rosimeire Aparecida; Jorge, Alexander Augusto Lima

    2016-04-01

    The 9p trisomy syndrome is a rare condition, clinically characterized by a wide range of dysmorphic features, intellectual disability, and, in most patients, by short stature. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy is still controversial in syndromic disorders, the reason for which it is not currently indicated. Here we report a 7-year-old boy with 9p trisomy syndrome and marked short stature. Results of routine laboratory assessments were normal. IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels were both in the normal range (-1.6 and -0.7 SDS, respectively). GH peak in response to oral clonidine stimulation test was 3.5 μg/L, which is considered a normal response. Chromosomal analysis revealed the karyotype 47,XY, + del(9)(pter-q11:) dn. SNP array data indicated absence of mosaicism [arr 9p24.3-p13.1 (203,861-38,787,480) x3]. By the age of 8.3 years, the patient had persistent short stature (-2.9 SDS) with normal growth velocity (4.9 cm/y; -0.7 SDS), not showing spontaneous catch-up. After 5.6 years of rhGH therapy (50 μg/kg/d), height SDS improved from -2.9 to -1.0. This result suggests that rhGH therapy could be considered for patients with 9p trisomy syndrome who present with short stature. The degree of intellectual disability and the potential for social inclusion should be taken into account when recommending this treatment. Additional studies are needed to establish the benefits of height gain in these patients.

  1. Replication of the association of chromosomal region 9p21.3 with generalized aggressive periodontitis (gAgP) using an independent case-control cohort

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The human chromosomal region 9p21.3 has been shown to be strongly associated with Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) in several Genome-wide Association Studies (GWAS). Recently, this region has also been shown to be associated with Aggressive Periodontitis (AgP), strengthening the hypothesis that the established epidemiological association between periodontitis and CHD is caused by a shared genetic background, in addition to common environmental and behavioural risk factors. However, the size of the analyzed cohorts in this primary analysis was small compared to other association studies on complex diseases. Using our own AgP cohort, we attempted to confirm the described associations for the chromosomal region 9p21.3. Methods We analyzed our cohort consisting of patients suffering from the most severe form of AgP, generalized AgP (gAgP) (n = 130) and appropriate periodontally healthy control individuals (n = 339) by genotyping four tagging SNPs (rs2891168, rs1333042, rs1333048 and rs496892), located in the chromosomal region 9p21.3, that have been associated with AgP. Results The results confirmed significant associations between three of the four SNPs and gAgP. The combination of our results with those from the study which described this association for the first time in a meta-analysis of the four tagging SNPs produced clearly lower p-values compared with the results of each individual study. According to these results, the most plausible genetic model for the association of all four tested SNPs with gAgP seems to be the multiplicative one. Conclusion We positively replicated the finding of an association between the chromosomal region 9p21.3 and gAgP. This result strengthens support for the hypothesis that shared susceptibility genes within this chromosomal locus might be involved in the pathogenesis of both CHD and gAgP. PMID:20696043

  2. Comparative In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Porcine Rotavirus G9P[13] and Human Rotavirus Wa G1P[8

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lulu; Fischer, David D.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Rauf, Abdul; Langel, Stephanie N.; Wentworth, David E.; Stucker, Karla M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Lam, Ham Ching; Marthaler, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The changing epidemiology of group A rotavirus (RV) strains in humans and swine, including emerging G9 strains, poses new challenges to current vaccines. In this study, we comparatively assessed the pathogenesis of porcine RV (PRV) G9P[13] and evaluated the short-term cross-protection between this strain and human RV (HRV) Wa G1P[8] in gnotobiotic pigs. Complete genome sequencing demonstrated that PRV G9P[13] possessed a human-like G9 VP7 genotype but shared higher overall nucleotide identity with historic PRV strains. PRV G9P[13] induced longer rectal virus shedding and RV RNAemia in pigs than HRV Wa G1P[8] and generated complete short-term cross-protection in pigs challenged with HRV or PRV, whereas HRV Wa G1P[8] induced only partial protection against PRV challenge. Moreover, PRV G9P[13] replicated more extensively in porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) than did HRV Wa G1P[8]. Cross-protection was likely not dependent on serum virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies, as the heterologous VN antibody titers in the sera of G9P[13]-inoculated pigs were low. Thus, our results suggest that heterologous protection by the current monovalent G1P[8] HRV vaccine against emerging G9 strains should be evaluated in clinical and experimental studies to prevent further dissemination of G9 strains. Differences in the pathogenesis of these two strains may be partially attributable to their variable abilities to replicate and persist in porcine immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). Additional studies are needed to evaluate the emerging G9 strains as potential vaccine candidates and to test the susceptibility of various immune cells to infection by G9 and other common HRV/PRV genotypes. IMPORTANCE The changing epidemiology of porcine and human group A rotaviruses (RVs), including emerging G9 strains, may compromise the efficacy of current vaccines. An understanding of the pathogenesis and genetic, immunological, and biological features of the new emerging

  3. Identification of RFC(Ctf18p, Ctf8p, Dcc1p): an alternative RFC complex required for sister chromatid cohesion in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M L; Gygi, S P; Aebersold, R; Hieter, P

    2001-05-01

    We have identified and characterized an alternative RFC complex RFC(Ctf18p, Ctf8p, Dcc1p) that is required for sister chromatid cohesion and faithful chromosome transmission. Ctf18p, Ctf8p, and Dcc1p interact physically in a complex with Rfc2p, Rfc3p, Rfc4p, and Rfc5p but not with Rfc1p or Rad24p. Deletion of CTF18, CTF8, or DCC1 singly or in combination (ctf18Deltactf8Deltadcc1Delta) leads to sensitivity to microtubule depolymerizing drugs and a severe sister chromatid cohesion defect. Furthermore, temperature-sensitive mutations in RFC4 result in precocious sister chromatid separation. Our results highlight a novel function of the RFC proteins and support a model in which sister chromatid cohesion is established at the replication fork via a polymerase switching mechanism and a replication-coupled remodeling of chromatin.

  4. Triple-negative breast cancers with amplification of JAK2 at the 9p24 locus demonstrate JAK2-specific dependence.

    PubMed

    Balko, Justin M; Schwarz, Luis J; Luo, Na; Estrada, Mónica V; Giltnane, Jennifer M; Dávila-González, Daniel; Wang, Kai; Sánchez, Violeta; Dean, Phillip T; Combs, Susan E; Hicks, Donna; Pinto, Joseph A; Landis, Melissa D; Doimi, Franco D; Yelensky, Roman; Miller, Vincent A; Stephens, Phillip J; Rimm, David L; Gómez, Henry; Chang, Jenny C; Sanders, Melinda E; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2016-04-13

    Amplifications at 9p24 have been identified in breast cancer and other malignancies, but the genes within this locus causally associated with oncogenicity or tumor progression remain unclear. Targeted next-generation sequencing of postchemotherapy triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) identified a group of 9p24-amplified tumors, which contained focal amplification of the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) gene. These patients had markedly inferior recurrence-free and overall survival compared to patients with TNBC without JAK2 amplification. Detection of JAK2/9p24 amplifications was more common in chemotherapy-treated TNBCs than in untreated TNBCs or basal-like cancers, or in other breast cancer subtypes. Similar rates of JAK2 amplification were confirmed in patient-derived TNBC xenografts. In patients for whom longitudinal specimens were available, JAK2 amplification was selected for during neoadjuvant chemotherapy and eventual metastatic spread, suggesting a role in tumorigenicity and chemoresistance, phenotypes often attributed to a cancer stem cell-like cell population. In TNBC cell lines with JAK2 copy gains or amplification, specific inhibition of JAK2 signaling reduced mammosphere formation and cooperated with chemotherapy in reducing tumor growth in vivo. In these cells, inhibition of JAK1-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling had little effect or, in some cases, counteracted JAK2-specific inhibition. Collectively, these results suggest that JAK2-specific inhibitors are more efficacious than dual JAK1/2 inhibitors against JAK2-amplified TNBCs. Furthermore, JAK2 amplification is a potential biomarker for JAK2 dependence, which, in turn, can be used to select patients for clinical trials with JAK2 inhibitors.

  5. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Andrulis, Irene L; Arun, Banu K; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cohn, David E; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; Pauw, Antoine de; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Hake, Christopher R; Hansen, Thomas V O; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Ross, Eric A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J; Greene, Mark H; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  6. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arun, Banu K.; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cohn, David E.; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Hake, Christopher R.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ong, Kai-ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rookus, Matti A.; Ross, Eric A.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Slavin, Thomas P.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J.; Greene, Mark H.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10−16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10−6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population. PMID:27463617

  7. Chromosome 9p21 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms are Not Associated with Recurrent Myocardial Infarction in Patients with Established Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Virani, Salim S.; Brautbar, Ariel; Lee, Vei-Vei; Elayda, MacArthur; Morrison, Alanna C.; Grove, Megan L.; Nambi, Vijay; Frazier, Lorraine; Wilson, James M.; Willerson, James T.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosome 9p21 single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) have shown to be associated with coronary heart disease in multiple studies. We aimed to identify whether these SNPs are associated with recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), revascularization, or death in acute-coronary-syndromes (ACS) patients or those undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods and Results TexGen registry participants with ACS (n=2,067) or CABG (n=1,176) were evaluated. We assessed whether 9p21 SNPs (rs1333049, rs2383206, rs10757278, rs10757274) were associated with recurrent MI (primary outcome), recurrent revascularization, or death (secondary outcomes) at ≈ 3.2 years of follow-up. Carriers of risk allele (C) for rs1333049 presented at an earlier age (62 vs. 63.5 years in non-carriers, p=0.0004) with more extensive disease (number of vessels with significant stenosis =1.9 vs. 1.7 in non-carriers, p=0.001) in the ACS group. In adjusted models, C allele was not associated with recurrent MI (HR 1.01, 95%CI 0.74–1.38), recurrent revascularization (HR 0.98, 95%CI 0.78–1.23), or death (HR 0.91, 95%CI 0.69–1.18) in ACS or CABG group (HR 0.64, 95%CI 0.40–1.05 for recurrent MI; HR 0.98, 95%CI 0.61–1.55 for recurrent revascularization; and HR 0.89, 95%CI 0.61–1.30 for death). Results were similar for the other 3 SNPs. Conclusions 9p21 SNPs were not associated with recurrent MI, revascularization, or mortality after ACS or CABG. However, individuals with the rs1333049 C allele may present with earlier and more extensive disease. PMID:22322877

  8. Association between 9p21 genetic variants and mortality risk in a prospective cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes (ZODIAC-15).

    PubMed

    Landman, Gijs W D; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Kleefstra, Nanne; van Hateren, Kornelis J J; Drion, Iefke; Groenier, Klaas H; Gans, Rijk O B; Snieder, Harold; Hofker, Marten H; Bilo, Henk J G

    2012-11-07

    The genomic region at 9p21 chromosome near the CDKN2A/CDKN2B genes is associated with type 2 diabetes(T2D) and cardiovascular disease(CVD). The effect of the 9p21 locus on long-term mortality in patients with T2D has yet to be determined.We examined three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on 9p21, consistently and independently associated with T2D (rs10811661) or CVD (rs10757278, rs2383206), in relation to the risk of total and cardiovascular mortality in diabetic patients. We also aimed to replicate the previously observed interaction between rs2383206 and glycemic control on mortality.Genotypes for three SNPs were determined in 914 individuals from a prospective cohort of T2D patients of Dutch origin. Associations with mortality were assessed using Cox proportional hazard analyses.After a median follow-up of 9.5 years, 358 out of 914 patients had died. The hazard ratio (HR) for total mortality among individuals homozygous for the T2D-risk allele of rs10811661 compared to non-homozygous individuals was 0.74(95%CI 0.59-0.93). For the carriers of both CVD-risk alleles of rs10757278, the HR for total mortality was 1.31(95%CI 1.01-1.70). We found a significant interaction between rs2383206 and HbA1c on mortality, which was higher among patients with two CVD-risk alleles in the two lowest HbA1c tertiles (HR 1.68(95%CI 1.08-2.63); HR 1.48(95%CI 1.01-2.18).In conclusion, common variants on 9p21 were associated with mortality in patients with T2D in a Dutch population. The T2D SNP was inversely associated with mortality, while the CVD SNP increased the risk for mortality. We confirmed a possible, although different, synergistic relationship between HbA1c and rs2383206 on total mortality.

  9. Full genome characterization of a porcine-like human G9P[6] rotavirus strain isolated from an infant in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Heylen, Elisabeth; De Coster, Sarah; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2012-10-01

    Interspecies transmissions of group A rotavirus (RVA) strains among animals and humans are thought to take place frequently. During a RVA surveillance study in Belgium we isolated an unusual G9P[6] RVA strain, RVA/human-wt/BEL/BE2001/2009/G9P[6], from a 1month old boy, which did not cluster with other G9 or P[6] strains isolated in Belgium. In this study we sequenced and characterized the complete genome of this unusual G9P[6] strain BE2001. Phylogenetic analyses of all 11 genes revealed a unique genotype constellation: G9-P[6]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T7-E1-H1. The VP6 and NSP1 genotypes I5 and A8 are genotypes commonly found in porcine RVA strains, while the VP7 and VP4 genes clustered only distantly to human lineages of G9 and P[6], respectively. The VP1, VP2, VP3, NSP2, NSP4 and NSP5 genes all belonged to Wa-like genotypes, but clustered more closely to porcine strains than to human strains. NSP3 belonged to the rare T7 genotype. Thus far, T7 genotypes have only been detected in one porcine-like human strain (RVA/human-tc/CHN/R479/2004/G4P[6]), one bovine-like human strain (RVA/human-xx/IND/mani-265/2007/G10P[6]) and one bovine RVA strain (RVA/cow-tc/GBR/UK/1973/G6P7[5]). Sequence analysis of the BE2001 NSP5 gene segment revealed a 300 nucleotide duplication in the 3' end non-coding region. BE2001 is most likely a direct interspecies transmission between a pig and a human. Inquiry with the patient's physician revealed that the father of the patient had been working on a pig farm in the week the patient became ill, providing a plausible route of transmission.

  10. Genetic variants in loci 1p13 and 9p21 and fatal coronary heart disease in a Norwegian case-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Mona Dverdal; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Myhre, Ronny; Høiseth, Gudrun; Mørland, Jørg; Næss, Øyvind; Tambs, Kristian; Magnus, Per

    2014-05-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in loci 1p13 and 9p21 have previously been found to be associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD). This study aimed to investigate whether these SNPs show associations with fatal CHD in a population-based cohort study after adjustment for socioeconomic- and lifestyle-related CHD risk factors not commonly included in genetic association studies. Using the population-based Cohort of Norway (CONOR), a nested case-cohort study was set up and DNA from 2,953 subjects (829 cases and 2,124 non-cases) were genotyped. The association with fatal CHD was estimated for four SNPs, three from locus 1p13 and one from locus 9p21. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate unstratified and gender-stratified hazard ratios while adjusting for major CHD risk factors. The associations between three SNPs from locus 1p13 and non-HDL cholesterol levels were also estimated. Men homozygous for the risk alleles on rs1333049 (9p21) and rs14000 (1p13) were found to have significantly increased hazard ratios in crude and adjusted models, and the hazard ratios remained statistically significant when both genders were analyzed together. Adjustment for additional socioeconomic- and lifestyle-related CHD risk factors influenced the association estimates only slightly. No significant associations were observed between the other two SNPs in loci 1p13 (rs599839 and rs646776) and CHD mortality in either gender. Both rs599839 and rs646776 showed significant, gradual increases in non-HDL cholesterol levels with increasing number of risk alleles. This study confirms the association between 9p21 (rs1333049) and fatal CHD in a Norwegian population-based cohort. The effect was not influenced by several socioeconomic- and lifestyle-related risk factors. Our results show that 1p13 (rs14000) may also be associated with fatal CHD. SNPs at 1p13 (rs599839 and rs646776) were associated with non-HDL cholesterol levels.

  11. Post-zygotic breakage of a dicentric chromosome results in mosaicism for a telocentric 9p marker chromosome in a boy with developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Pedurupillay, C R J; Misceo, D; Gamage, T H; Dissanayake, V H W; Frengen, E

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements resulting in an inverted duplication and a terminal deletion (inv dup del) can occur due to three known mechanisms, two of them resulting in a normal copy region between the duplicated regions. These mechanisms involve the formation of a dicentric chromosome, which undergo breakage during cell division resulting in cells with either an inverted duplication and deletion or a terminal deletion. We describe a mosaic 3 year old patient with two cell lines carrying a chromosome 9p deletion where one of the cell lines contains an additional telocentric marker chromosome. Our patient is mosaic for the product of a double breakage of a dicentric chromosome including a centric fission. Mosaicism involving different rearrangements of the same chromosome is rare and suggests an early mitotic breakage event. Chr9p terminal deletions associated with duplications have previously been reported in 11 patients. We compare the clinical features of all 12 patients including the patient that we report here. To the best to our knowledge this is a first case reported where the double breakage occurred in the dicentric derivative chromosome 9.

  12. Expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in noncoding region of C9ORF72 causes chromosome 9p-linked FTD and ALS.

    PubMed

    DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Mackenzie, Ian R; Boeve, Bradley F; Boxer, Adam L; Baker, Matt; Rutherford, Nicola J; Nicholson, Alexandra M; Finch, NiCole A; Flynn, Heather; Adamson, Jennifer; Kouri, Naomi; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Sengdy, Pheth; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Karydas, Anna; Seeley, William W; Josephs, Keith A; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Feldman, Howard; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Miller, Bruce L; Dickson, Dennis W; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Rademakers, Rosa

    2011-10-20

    Several families have been reported with autosomal-dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), genetically linked to chromosome 9p21. Here, we report an expansion of a noncoding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the gene C9ORF72 that is strongly associated with disease in a large FTD/ALS kindred, previously reported to be conclusively linked to chromosome 9p. This same repeat expansion was identified in the majority of our families with a combined FTD/ALS phenotype and TDP-43-based pathology. Analysis of extended clinical series found the C9ORF72 repeat expansion to be the most common genetic abnormality in both familial FTD (11.7%) and familial ALS (23.5%). The repeat expansion leads to the loss of one alternatively spliced C9ORF72 transcript and to formation of nuclear RNA foci, suggesting multiple disease mechanisms. Our findings indicate that repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is a major cause of both FTD and ALS.

  13. Polymorphism on Chromosome 9p21.3 Is Associated with Severity and Early-Onset CAD in Type 2 Diabetic Tunisian Population.

    PubMed

    Abid, Kaouthar; Mili, Donia; Kenani, Abderraouf

    2015-01-01

    Multiple association studies found that the human 9p21.3 chromosome locus is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of the severity and early-onset of coronary artery disease with variant rs1333049 on chromosome 9p21.3 polymorphism and the impact of this variant on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients. The study population consisted of a control CAD group (101 patients) and 273 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients. Severity and extent of coronary atherosclerosis were scored numerically using the Gensini scoring system. The diabetic population was divided into three groups according to Gensini score: Group 1: no stenosis; Group 2: moderate CAD; Group 3, severe CAD. The homozygous CC genotype of rs1333049 was significantly associated with CAD in Group 2 (OR: 1.36; p = 0.02) and Group 3 (OR: 5.77, p < 0.001) compared to Group 1 (OR: 0.18; p = 0.2) and control group (OR: 0.22; p = 0.21). Among diabetic patients with early-onset CAD, CC genotype carriers had significantly higher Gensini scores than non-CC genotype carriers (49 ± 21.3 versus 14.87 ± 25.22; p < 0.001). The homozygous CC genotype of rs1333049 confers a magnified risk of early-onset and severe CAD in type 2 diabetic Tunisian population.

  14. Molecular screening for microdeletions at 9p22-p24 and 11q23-q24 in a large cohort of patients with trigonocephaly.

    PubMed

    Jehee, F S; Johnson, D; Alonso, L G; Cavalcanti, D P; de Sá Moreira, E; Alberto, F L; Kok, F; Kim, C; Wall, S A; Jabs, E W; Boyadjiev, S A; Wilkie, A O M; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2005-06-01

    Trigonocephaly is a rare form of craniosynostosis characterized by the premature closure of the metopic suture. To contribute to a better understanding of the genetic basis of metopic synostosis and in an attempt to restrict the candidate regions related to metopic suture fusion, we studied 76 unrelated patients with syndromic and non-syndromic trigonocephaly. We found a larger proportion of syndromic cases in our population and the ratio of affected male to female was 1.8 : 1 and 5 : 1 in the non-syndromic and syndromic groups, respectively. A microdeletion screening at 9p22-p24 and 11q23-q24 was carried out for all patients and deletions in seven of them were detected, corresponding to 19.4% of all syndromic cases. Deletions were not found in non-syndromic patients. We suggest that a molecular screening for microdeletions at 9p22-p24 and 11q23-q24 should be offered to all syndromic cases with an apparently normal karyotype because it can potentially elucidate the cause of trigonocephaly in this subset of patients. We also suggest that genes on the X-chromosome play a major role in syndromic trigonocephaly.

  15. The rs10757278 polymorphism of the 9p21.3 locus is associated with premature coronary artery disease in Polish patients.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Pawel; Gorczynska-Kosiorz, Sylwia; Iwanicki, Tomasz; Krauze, Jolanta; Trautsolt, Wanda; Grzeszczak, Wladyslaw; Bochenek, Andrzej; Zak, Iwona

    2012-09-01

    Recently, genome-wide association studies have revealed a locus associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction, namely, 9p21.3. Its participation in the conditioning of the disease has been proven in many populations of European descent, but not yet in Slavs. Allelic variants of the rs10757278 polymorphism functionally affect the activity of the 9p21.3 locus; therefore, we conducted a study to determine whether the rs10757278 is associated with premature CAD in Polish patients. We studied 320 subjects aged 25-55 years, divided into two groups matched by sex and age: (1) patients with angiographically proven premature CAD (n=160), and (2) blood donors as a control group (n=160). The rs10757278 was genotyped using the method of fluorescently labeled allele-specific oligonucleotides. The frequency of the G allele was significantly higher in patients than in controls (58.2% vs. 42.8%, respectively, p=0.011) and was similar to the frequency of the GG homozygotes (30.6% vs. 17.5%, respectively, p=0.006). Both the GG homozygosity (odds ratio [OR]=2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-3.66) as well as the G allele (OR=1.49, 95% CI: 1.08-2.07) have been associated with CAD in the analyzed population. These variants may be considered as risk factors, also in the Polish population.

  16. ND9P, a novel protein with armadillo-like repeats involved in exocytosis: physiological studies using allelic mutants in paramecium.

    PubMed Central

    Froissard, M; Keller, A M; Cohen, J

    2001-01-01

    In Paramecium, a number of mutants affected in the exocytotic membrane fusion step of the regulated secretory pathway have been obtained. Here, we report the isolation of one of the corresponding genes, ND9, previously suspected to encode a soluble protein interacting with both plasma and trichocyst membranes. Nd9p is a novel polypeptide that contains C-terminal Armadillo-like repeats. Point mutations were found in the first N-terminal quarter of the molecule and in the last putative Armadillo repeat, respectively, for the two thermosensitive mutants, nd9-1 and nd9-2. The different behaviors of these mutants in recovery experiments upon temperature shifts suggest that the N-terminal domain of the molecule may be involved in membrane binding activity, whereas the C-terminal domain is a candidate for protein-protein interactions. The nonsense nd9-3 mutation that produces a short N-terminal peptide has a dominant negative effect on the nd9-1 allele. We show here that, when overexpressed, the dominant negative effect can be produced even on the wild-type allele, suggesting competition for a common target. We suggest that Nd9p could act, like some SNARE proteins, at the membrane-cytosol interface to promote membrane fusion. PMID:11156983

  17. Construction of a 2.8-megabase yeast artificial chromosome contig and cloning of the human methylthioadenosine phosphorylase gene from the tumor suppressor region on 9p21

    SciTech Connect

    Olopade, O.I.; Pomykala, H.M.; Hagos, F.

    1995-07-03

    Many human malignant cells lack methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) enzyme activity. The gene (MTAP) encoding this enzyme was previously mapped to the short arm of chromosome 9, band p21-22, a region that is frequently deleted in multiple tumor types. To clone candidate tumor suppressor genes from the deleted region on 9p21-22, we have constructed a long-range physical map of 2.8 megabases for 9p21 by using overlapping yeast artificial chromosome and cosmid clones. This map includes the type I IFN gene cluster, the recently identified candidate tumor suppressor genes CDKN2 (p16{sup INK4A}) and CDKN2B (p15{sup INK4B}), and several CpG islands. In addition, we have identified other transcription units within the yeast artificial chromosome contig. Sequence analysis of a 2.5-kb cDNA clone isolated from a CpG island that maps between the IFN genes and CDKN2 reveals a predicted open reading frame of 283 amino acids followed by 1302 nucleotides of 3{prime} untranslated sequence. This gene is evolutionarily conserved and shows significant amino acid homologies to mouse and human purine nucleoside phosphorylases and to a hypothetical 25.8-kDa protein in the pet gene (coding for cytochrome bc{sub 1} complex) region of Rhodospirillum rubrum. The location, expression pattern, and nucleotide sequences of this gene suggest that it codes for the MTAP enzyme. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The rs10757278 Polymorphism of the 9p21.3 Locus Is Associated with Premature Coronary Artery Disease in Polish Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynska-Kosiorz, Sylwia; Iwanicki, Tomasz; Krauze, Jolanta; Trautsolt, Wanda; Grzeszczak, Wladyslaw; Bochenek, Andrzej; Zak, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    Recently, genome-wide association studies have revealed a locus associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction, namely, 9p21.3. Its participation in the conditioning of the disease has been proven in many populations of European descent, but not yet in Slavs. Allelic variants of the rs10757278 polymorphism functionally affect the activity of the 9p21.3 locus; therefore, we conducted a study to determine whether the rs10757278 is associated with premature CAD in Polish patients. We studied 320 subjects aged 25–55 years, divided into two groups matched by sex and age: (1) patients with angiographically proven premature CAD (n=160), and (2) blood donors as a control group (n=160). The rs10757278 was genotyped using the method of fluorescently labeled allele-specific oligonucleotides. The frequency of the G allele was significantly higher in patients than in controls (58.2% vs. 42.8%, respectively, p=0.011) and was similar to the frequency of the GG homozygotes (30.6% vs. 17.5%, respectively, p=0.006). Both the GG homozygosity (odds ratio [OR]=2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19–3.66) as well as the G allele (OR=1.49, 95% CI: 1.08–2.07) have been associated with CAD in the analyzed population. These variants may be considered as risk factors, also in the Polish population. PMID:22946666

  19. Fine mapping of a region on chromosome 8p gives evidence for a QTL contributing to individual differences in an anxiety-related personality trait: TPQ harm avoidance.

    PubMed

    Dina, Christian; Nemanov, Lubov; Gritsenko, Inga; Rosolio, Naama; Osher, Yamima; Heresco-Levy, Uri; Sariashvilli, Emma; Bachner-Melman, Rachel; Zohar, Ada H; Benjamin, Jonathan; Belmaker, Robert H; Ebstein, Richard P

    2005-01-05

    The chromosome 8p region is of interest in human behavioral genetics since it harbors a susceptibility region not only for schizophrenia but also for anxiety-related personality traits such as harm avoidance and neuroticism. Towards verifying our preliminary linkage finding of a QTL for TPQ harm avoidance at chromosome 8p, we have now genotyped altogether 24 micro-satellite markers in 377 families. Using three methods (maximum likelihood binomial or MLB, MERLIN, and an associated one parameter model), we observed significant results (P values from 0.002 to 0.0004) for linkage to harm avoidance in this region. A peak multipoint LOD score of 2.76 (P value 0.0002) was obtained with the MLB method. The region-wide empirical P value was 0.002 [0.001-0.0046]. Although, the peak position varied somewhat according to the method (D8S1048 for MLB, D8S1463 for the two other methods), for three methods D8S1810 ( approximately 60 cM) is within 1-2 cM of the peak for harm avoidance. This marker is of particular interest since it is proximate (<0.5 cM) of the core haplotype that in several recent studies show significant association with schizophrenia near neuroregulin 1. Although association studies with microsatellite markers need to be interpreted cautiously, using the Haplotype Trend Regression test one marker, D8S499 ( approximately 60 cM), showed an empirical P value of 2 x 10(-5) for allele 3, which confers a decreased harm avoidance score. Altogether, the current linkage and association results suggest the possibility that the same locus near the neuroregulin 1 gene on chromosome 8p confers risk for both an anxiety-related personality trait as well as schizophrenia. We hypothesize that this common genetic factor may contribute to emotional liability during early development, which constitutes a predisposing factor for major psychosis.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of rotaviruses in Nigeria: detection of unusual strains with G2P[6] and G8P[1] specificities.

    PubMed

    Adah, M I; Wade, A; Taniguchi, K

    2001-11-01

    During an epidemiological study on rotaviruses among diarrheic children in the northeastern and middle belt regions of Nigeria, the distribution of G and P types was investigated in 127 stool specimens. By PCR G typing, the G type of rotaviruses in 97 samples was identified. Interestingly, an unusual G8 type, as well as common G1, G2, and G3 types, was detected more frequently (31 of 112; 27.7%). Eleven samples contained multiple G types, and a G9 strain (Bulumkutu) was identified for one of the probable mixed infections. In PCR P typing, P[6] was detected most frequently, P[8] being the second most common type, while the P type of 73 samples could not be identified. One rotavirus strain with a G8 type specificity could be cultivated in cell culture, and the P type of this strain was found to be P[1], which is usually carried by bovine strains. When the combinations of G and P types were examined, the unusual strains G2P[6] and G8P[1] were often identified. Sequence analysis was performed for the VP7 gene of the G9 strain Bulumkutu and the VP4 and VP7 genes of G8P[1] strain HMG035. The VP7 sequence of the Nigerian serotype G9 was more closely related to that of a Brazilian strain than to those of other African strains. The VP7 and VP4 genes of G8P[1] strain HMG035 were found to be very similar to that of a Thai bovine strain A5, suggesting that bovine strains may have been transmitted directly to humans. These results highlight an unexpected diversity among rotavirus strains in Nigeria and emphasize the need for further serological and genetic surveys on more rotavirus strains in African countries, including Nigeria.

  1. Construction of 110 cosmid markers and a 4.5-Mb YAC contig on human chromosome 8p12-q11

    SciTech Connect

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Kumano, Satoshi; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    1995-07-20

    Microcell hybrids containing various regions of human chromosome 8 were formed by microcell-mediated transfer of neo-tagged chromosome 8 into the cells derived from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse. Thus, 110 cosmid markers were isolated from SV40-transformed SCID fibroblast cell line (SCVA) containing a p12-q11.1 region of human chromosome 8 and were assigned to eight regions in 8p12-q11.1, using a microcell-hybrid panel. For positional cloning of a human gene that restores the DNA-repair defect in a mouse with SCID on 8p11.1-q11.1 (SCID region), we constructed a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of about 4.5 Mb. Overlapping YACs were further aligned by restriction mapping, using rare-cutting restriction endonucleases. The cosmids and YAC contig should facilitate isolation of the SCID gene and other genes, such as the Werner syndrome-responsible gene in or near this region. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Pre- and Postnatal Analysis of Chromosome 15q26.1 and 8p23.1 Deletions in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Mitesh; Kadandale, Jayarama; Hegde, Sridevi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is defined as a protrusion of abdominal content into the thoracic cavity through an abnormal opening in the diaphragm present at birth. It is a common birth defect with high mortality and morbidity. Submicroscopic deletions of 15q26.1 and 8p23.1 have been reported in several cases of CDH. We studied a total of 17 cases with CDH in pre- and postnatal samples using FISH probes. Deletion 15q26.1 was seen in 1/17 prenatal samples. There was no deletion for 8p23.1 in all the samples analyzed. CDH has a genetic etiology, and deletion 15q26.1 increases the risk of CDH. Deletion 15q26.1 in a fetus with CDH is a predictor of poor prognosis. This deletion is also seen in a phenotype similar to Fryns syndrome. CDH identified pre- or postnatally should be investigated further to exclude a 15q26.1 deletion and enable appropriate parental counseling. PMID:26997946

  3. Yeast artificial chromosome and radiation hybrid map of loci in chromosome band 8p22, a common region of allelic loss in multiple human cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Bookstein, R.; Levy, A.; MacGrogan, D.

    1994-11-15

    Polymorphic alleles at loci such as LPL (lipoprotein lipase) and MSR (macrophage scavenger receptor) in chromosome band 8p22 are frequently lost during the genesis of several types of human cancer, including colorectal, non-small cell lung, hepatocellular, and prostatic carcinomas. A physical map of 31 published or novel probes and sequence-tagged sites in this genetic region was constructed using a radiation hybrid panel and the CEPH (Centre d`Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library. Thirty-six overlapping YACs defined a physical order for the following polymorphic markers: tel-D8S26-D8S511-D8S549-MSR-D8S254-D8S233-D8S261-D8S21-LPL-D8S2580 cen. These maps unify small consensus regions of allelic loss on chromosome 8p defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms with more informative PCR-based polymorphisms and widely available YAC mapping resources. 31 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Monosomy 9p24{r_arrow}pter and trisomy 5q31{r_arrow}qter: Case report and review of two cases

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmenti, L.A.; Steinberger, J.; Mammel, M.C.

    1995-05-22

    Partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 (p24{r_arrow}pter) and partial duplication of the long arm of chromosome 5 (q32{r_arrow}qter) were observed in an abnormal boy who died at age 8 weeks of a complex cyanotic cardiac defect. He also had minor anomalies, sagittal craniosynostosis, triphalangeal thumbs, hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum. Two other infants with similar cytogenetic abnormalities were described previously. These patients had severe congenital heart defect, genitourinary anomalies, broad nasal bridge, low hairline, apparently low-set ears, short neck, and triphalangeal thumbs, in common with our patient. We suggest that combined monosomy 9q23,24{r_arrow}pter and trisomy 5q31,32{r_arrow}qter may constitute a clinically recognizable syndrome. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Genome-wide allelotyping indicates increased loss of heterozygosity on 9p and 14q in early age of onset colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Weber, T K; Conroy, J; Keitz, B; Rodriguez-Bigas, M; Petrelli, N J; Stoler, D L; Anderson, G R; Shows, T B; Nowak, N J

    1999-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains a significant public health challenge, despite our increased understanding of the genetic mechanisms involved in the initiation and progression of this disorder. It has become clear that multiple mechanisms lead to the tumorigenic phenotype, with familial predisposition syndromes accounting for less than 15% of all colorectal cancers. A genome-wide scan for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was carried out with 150 highly polymorphic markers in an effort to identify additional loci involved in colorectal tumorigenesis in DNA samples from 42 colorectal cancer patients. The results confirm earlier observations that tumor DNAs from patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) either maintain heterozygosity or exhibit altered or additional alleles. DNAs from patients with early onset colorectal carcinomas (diagnosed prior to age 50) revealed a higher overall degree of LOH than DNAs from patients with sporadic colorectal cancers diagnosed later in life (after age 50). While regions on 1p, 10q and 14q are suggestive, statistical analysis of LOH at these regions failed to reach significance. However, LOH at 9p did reveal a statistically significant increase in the early onset patient group, compared to the greater than age 50 group. LOH on 9p may involve inactivation of p16/CDKN2 through aberrant DNA methylation on the remaining chromosome, resulting in a situation analogous to a homozygous deletion of p16 and providing a selective growth advantage to these cells. This marker may prove to be a useful prognostic indicator for patient stratification in the design of therapy for early onset colorectal cancer patients.

  6. Genomic losses at 5q13.2 and 8p23.1 in dysplastic hepatocytes are common events in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, ZHANG; CHEN, GUANG-YONG; LONG, JIANG; LI, HAI; HUANG, JIAN

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal loci with genomic imbalances are frequently identified in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Greater than two-thirds of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCCs originate from liver cirrhosis following a duration of up to two decades. However, it is unclear whether these genomic imbalances occur and accumulate in dysplastic hepatocytes of the cirrhotic liver during the progression from regenerated nodules to preneoplastic lesions, including dysplastic nodules (DN). In the present study, high-grade DNs (HGDNs) of HBV-related liver cirrhosis were screened to identify loci with genomic imbalances, and the frequency of the identified loci in a group of HCCs was analyzed in order to determine whether there may be a genetic link between liver cirrhosis and HCC. Genomic DNA was extracted from six HGDNs of two cases of HBV-related liver cirrhosis and subjected to array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis with a NimbleGen 720K microarray. Loci with the most frequently observed genomic imbalances in DNs were further analyzed in 83 cases of HCC by differential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative PCR. The array CGH analysis revealed that the majority of genomic imbalances in the HGDNs were genomic losses of small segments, with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 5q13.2 and 8p23.1 identified most frequently. Of the 83 HCC cases, 30 (36.1%) cases were identified with LOH at 5q13.2, where known tumor-associated genes are located, including general transcription factor IIH subunit 2 (GTF2H2), baculoviral IAP repeat-containing protein 1 (BIRC1) and occludin (OCLN). LOH frequency at 8p23.1 in HCC was 61.29% (D8S1130) and 68.4% (D8S503) respectively, similar to the results obtained in previous studies. In conclusion, the results of the present study provided evidence that genomic losses at 5q13.2 and 8p23.1 identified in dysplastic hepatocytes of the cirrhotic liver are common events in HCC. HCC-associated chromosomal abnormalities may occur and accumulate

  7. Analysis of complete genome sequences of G9P[19] rotavirus strains from human and piglet with diarrhea provides evidence for whole-genome interspecies transmission of nonreassorted porcine rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Khamrin, Pattara; Chuchaona, Watchaporn; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Kongkaew, Aphisek; Vachirachewin, Ratchaya; Okitsu, Shoko; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2017-01-01

    Whole genomes of G9P[19] human (RVA/Human-wt/THA/CMH-S070-13/2013/G9P[19]) and porcine (RVA/Pig-wt/THA/CMP-015-12/2012/G9P[19]) rotaviruses concurrently detected in the same geographical area in northern Thailand were sequenced and analyzed for their genetic relationships using bioinformatic tools. The complete genome sequence of human rotavirus RVA/Human-wt/THA/CMH-S070-13/2013/G9P[19] was most closely related to those of porcine rotavirus RVA/Pig-wt/THA/CMP-015-12/2012/G9P[19] and to those of porcine-like human and porcine rotaviruses reference strains than to those of human rotavirus reference strains. The genotype constellation of G9P[19] detected in human and piglet were identical and displayed as the G9-P[19]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1 genotypes with the nucleotide sequence identities of VP7, VP4, VP6, VP1, VP2, VP3, NSP1, NSP2, NSP3, NSP4, and NSP5 at 99.0%, 99.5%, 93.2%, 97.7%, 97.7%, 85.6%, 89.5%, 93.2%, 92.9%, 94.0%, and 98.1%, respectively. The findings indicate that human rotavirus strain RVA/Human-wt/THA/CMH-S070-13/2013/G9P[19] containing the genome segments of porcine genetic backbone is most likely a human rotavirus of porcine origin. Our data provide an evidence of interspecies transmission and whole-genome transmission of nonreassorted G9P[19] porcine RVA to human occurring in nature in northern Thailand.

  8. A colorectal cancer genome-wide association study in a Spanish cohort identifies two variants associated with colorectal cancer risk at 1p33 and 8p12

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a disease of complex aetiology, with much of the expected inherited risk being due to several common low risk variants. Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have identified 20 CRC risk variants. Nevertheless, these have only been able to explain part of the missing heritability. Moreover, these signals have only been inspected in populations of Northern European origin. Results Thus, we followed the same approach in a Spanish cohort of 881 cases and 667 controls. Sixty-four variants at 24 loci were found to be associated with CRC at p-values <10-5. We therefore evaluated the 24 loci in another Spanish replication cohort (1481 cases and 1850 controls). Two of these SNPs, rs12080929 at 1p33 (Preplication=0.042; Ppooled=5.523x10-03; OR (CI95%)=0.866(0.782-0.959)) and rs11987193 at 8p12 (Preplication=0.039; Ppooled=6.985x10-5; OR (CI95%)=0.786(0.705-0.878)) were replicated in the second Phase, although they did not reach genome-wide statistical significance. Conclusions We have performed the first CRC GWAS in a Southern European population and by these means we were able to identify two new susceptibility variants at 1p33 and 8p12 loci. These two SNPs are located near the SLC5A9 and DUSP4 loci, respectively, which could be good functional candidates for the association signals. We therefore believe that these two markers constitute good candidates for CRC susceptibility loci and should be further evaluated in other larger datasets. Moreover, we highlight that were these two SNPs true susceptibility variants, they would constitute a decrease in the CRC missing heritability fraction. PMID:23350875

  9. Sintered powder cores of high Bs and low coreloss Fe84.3Si4B8P3Cu0.7 nano-crystalline alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Sharma, Parmanand; Makino, Akihiro

    2013-06-01

    Nano-crystalline Fe-rich Fe84.3Si4B8P3Cu0.7 alloy ribbon with saturation magnetic flux density (Bs) close to Si-steel exhibits much lower core loss (Wt) than Si-Steels. Low glass forming ability of this alloy limits fabrication of magnetic cores only to stack/wound types. Here, we report on fabrication, structural, thermal and magnetic properties of bulk Fe84.3Si4B8P3Cu0.7 cores. Partially crystallized ribbons (obtained after salt-bath annealing treatment) were crushed into powdered form (by ball milling), and were compacted to high-density (˜88%) bulk cores by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Nano-crystalline structure (consisting of α-Fe grain in remaining amorphous matrix) similar to wound ribbon cores is preserved in the compacted cores. At 50 Hz, cores sintered at Ts = 680 K show Wt < 10 W/kg (f = 50 Hz, Bm ˜1 T). Coating/mixing of powders with an insulating agent like SiO2 is shown to be effective in further reduction of Wt at f > 1 kHz. A trade-off between porosity and electrical resistivity is necessary to get low Wt at higher f. In the f range of ˜1 to 100 kHz, we have shown that the cores mixed with SiO2 exhibit much lower Wt than Fe-powder cores, non-oriented Si-steel sheets and commercially available sintered cores. We believe our core material is very promising to make power electronics/electrical devices much more energy-efficient.

  10. Common Variants at 9p21 and 8q22 Are Associated with Increased Susceptibility to Optic Nerve Degeneration in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Michael A.; Kang, Jae H.; Allingham, R. Rand; Olson, Lana M.; Abdrabou, Wael; Fan, Bao J.; Wang, Dan Y.; Brodeur, Wendy; Budenz, Donald L.; Caprioli, Joseph; Crenshaw, Andrew; Crooks, Kristy; DelBono, Elizabeth; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Friedman, David S.; Gaasterland, Douglas; Gaasterland, Terry; Laurie, Cathy; Lee, Richard K.; Lichter, Paul R.; Loomis, Stephanie; Liu, Yutao; Medeiros, Felipe A.; McCarty, Cathy; Mirel, Daniel; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Musch, David C.; Realini, Anthony; Rozsa, Frank W.; Schuman, Joel S.; Scott, Kathleen; Singh, Kuldev; Stein, Joshua D.; Trager, Edward H.; VanVeldhuisen, Paul; Vollrath, Douglas; Wollstein, Gadi; Yoneyama, Sachiko; Zhang, Kang; Weinreb, Robert N.; Ernst, Jason; Kellis, Manolis; Masuda, Tomohiro; Zack, Don; Richards, Julia E.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Pasquale, Louis R.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Optic nerve degeneration caused by glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Patients affected by the normal-pressure form of glaucoma are more likely to harbor risk alleles for glaucoma-related optic nerve disease. We have performed a meta-analysis of two independent genome-wide association studies for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) followed by a normal-pressure glaucoma (NPG, defined by intraocular pressure (IOP) less than 22 mmHg) subgroup analysis. The single-nucleotide polymorphisms that showed the most significant associations were tested for association with a second form of glaucoma, exfoliation-syndrome glaucoma. The overall meta-analysis of the GLAUGEN and NEIGHBOR dataset results (3,146 cases and 3,487 controls) identified significant associations between two loci and POAG: the CDKN2BAS region on 9p21 (rs2157719 [G], OR = 0.69 [95%CI 0.63–0.75], p = 1.86×10−18), and the SIX1/SIX6 region on chromosome 14q23 (rs10483727 [A], OR = 1.32 [95%CI 1.21–1.43], p = 3.87×10−11). In sub-group analysis two loci were significantly associated with NPG: 9p21 containing the CDKN2BAS gene (rs2157719 [G], OR = 0.58 [95% CI 0.50–0.67], p = 1.17×10−12) and a probable regulatory region on 8q22 (rs284489 [G], OR = 0.62 [95% CI 0.53–0.72], p = 8.88×10−10). Both NPG loci were also nominally associated with a second type of glaucoma, exfoliation syndrome glaucoma (rs2157719 [G], OR = 0.59 [95% CI 0.41–0.87], p = 0.004 and rs284489 [G], OR = 0.76 [95% CI 0.54–1.06], p = 0.021), suggesting that these loci might contribute more generally to optic nerve degeneration in glaucoma. Because both loci influence transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) signaling, we performed a genomic pathway analysis that showed an association between the TGF-beta pathway and NPG (permuted p = 0.009). These results suggest that neuro-protective therapies targeting TGF-beta signaling could be effective for multiple

  11. A variant at 9p21.3 functionally implicates CDKN2B in paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia aetiology

    PubMed Central

    Hungate, Eric A.; Vora, Sapana R.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Moriyama, Takaya; Best, Timothy; Hulur, Imge; Lee, Younghee; Evans, Tiffany-Jane; Ellinghaus, Eva; Stanulla, Martin; Rudant, Jéremie; Orsi, Laurent; Clavel, Jacqueline; Milne, Elizabeth; Scott, Rodney J.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Cox, Nancy J.; Loh, Mignon L.; Yang, Jun J.; Skol, Andrew D.; Onel, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) is the most common cancer of childhood, yet little is known about BCP-ALL predisposition. In this study, in 2,187 cases of European ancestry and 5,543 controls, we discover and replicate a locus indexed by rs77728904 at 9p21.3 associated with BCP-ALL susceptibility (Pcombined=3.32 × 10−15, OR=1.72) and independent from rs3731217, the previously reported ALL-associated variant in this region. Of correlated SNPs tagged by this locus, only rs662463 is significant in African Americans, suggesting it is a plausible causative variant. Functional analysis shows that rs662463 is a cis-eQTL for CDKN2B, with the risk allele associated with lower expression, and suggests that rs662463 influences BCP-ALL risk by regulating CDKN2B expression through CEBPB signalling. Functional analysis of rs3731217 suggests it is associated with BCP-ALL by acting within a splicing regulatory element determining CDKN2A exon 3 usage (P=0.01). These findings provide new insights into the critical role of the CDKN2 locus in BCP-ALL aetiology. PMID:26868379

  12. High-density nucleosome occupancy map of human chromosome 9p21-22 reveals chromatin organization of the type I interferon gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Freaney, Jonathan E; Zhang, Quanwei; Yigit, Erbay; Kim, Rebecca; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Ji-Ping; Horvath, Curt M

    2014-09-01

    Genome-wide investigations have dramatically increased our understanding of nucleosome positioning and the role of chromatin in gene regulation, yet some genomic regions have been poorly represented in human nucleosome maps. One such region is represented by human chromosome 9p21-22, which contains the type I interferon gene cluster that includes 16 interferon alpha genes and the single interferon beta, interferon epsilon, and interferon omega genes. A high-density nucleosome mapping strategy was used to generate locus-wide maps of the nucleosome organization of this biomedically important locus at a steady state and during a time course of infection with Sendai virus, an inducer of interferon gene expression. Detailed statistical and computational analysis illustrates that nucleosomes in this locus exhibit preferences for particular dinucleotide and oligomer DNA sequence motifs in vivo, which are similar to those reported for lower eukaryotic nucleosome-DNA interactions. These data were used to visualize the region's chromatin architecture and reveal features that are common to the organization of all the type I interferon genes, indicating a common nucleosome-mediated gene regulatory paradigm. Additionally, this study clarifies aspects of the dynamic changes that occur with the nucleosome occupying the transcriptional start site of the interferon beta gene after virus infection.

  13. A novel ankyrin repeat-containing gene (Kank) located at 9p24 is a growth suppressor of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shubhashish; Roy, Badal Chandra; Hatano, Naoya; Aoyagi, Teiichiro; Gohji, Kazuo; Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2002-09-27

    By a combination of genome subtraction and comprehensive analysis of loss of heterozygosity based on mapping hemizygous deletions for a potential tumor-related locus, a minimum overlapping region of deletions at 9p24 the size of 165 kb was identified and found to harbor a new potential tumor suppressor gene for renal cell carcinoma, the Kank gene. Kank (for kidney ankyrin repeat-containing protein) contains four ankyrin repeats at its C terminus. Expression of the gene was suppressed in 6 of 8 or 6 of 10 cancer tissues examined by reverse transcription-PCR or Western blotting, respectively, and in several kidney tumor cell lines due to methylation at CpG sites in the gene. Epigenetic methylation or imprinting seemed to be the first hit, which was followed by a second hit of deletion, resulting in loss of function in many of these deletion cases. Expression of this gene in expression-negative HEK293 cells induced growth retardation at G(0)/G(1) as well as morphological changes.

  14. A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is the cause of chromosome 9p21-linked ALS-FTD.

    PubMed

    Renton, Alan E; Majounie, Elisa; Waite, Adrian; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Rollinson, Sara; Gibbs, J Raphael; Schymick, Jennifer C; Laaksovirta, Hannu; van Swieten, John C; Myllykangas, Liisa; Kalimo, Hannu; Paetau, Anders; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Remes, Anne M; Kaganovich, Alice; Scholz, Sonja W; Duckworth, Jamie; Ding, Jinhui; Harmer, Daniel W; Hernandez, Dena G; Johnson, Janel O; Mok, Kin; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Danyah; Guerreiro, Rita J; Orrell, Richard W; Neal, James; Murray, Alex; Pearson, Justin; Jansen, Iris E; Sondervan, David; Seelaar, Harro; Blake, Derek; Young, Kate; Halliwell, Nicola; Callister, Janis Bennion; Toulson, Greg; Richardson, Anna; Gerhard, Alex; Snowden, Julie; Mann, David; Neary, David; Nalls, Michael A; Peuralinna, Terhi; Jansson, Lilja; Isoviita, Veli-Matti; Kaivorinne, Anna-Lotta; Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Ikonen, Elina; Sulkava, Raimo; Benatar, Michael; Wuu, Joanne; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Borghero, Giuseppe; Sabatelli, Mario; Heckerman, David; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Sendtner, Michael; Drepper, Carsten; Eichler, Evan E; Alkan, Can; Abdullaev, Ziedulla; Pack, Svetlana D; Dutra, Amalia; Pak, Evgenia; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Williams, Nigel M; Heutink, Peter; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Morris, Huw R; Tienari, Pentti J; Traynor, Bryan J

    2011-10-20

    The chromosome 9p21 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) locus contains one of the last major unidentified autosomal-dominant genes underlying these common neurodegenerative diseases. We have previously shown that a founder haplotype, covering the MOBKL2b, IFNK, and C9ORF72 genes, is present in the majority of cases linked to this region. Here we show that there is a large hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion in the first intron of C9ORF72 on the affected haplotype. This repeat expansion segregates perfectly with disease in the Finnish population, underlying 46.0% of familial ALS and 21.1% of sporadic ALS in that population. Taken together with the D90A SOD1 mutation, 87% of familial ALS in Finland is now explained by a simple monogenic cause. The repeat expansion is also present in one-third of familial ALS cases of outbred European descent, making it the most common genetic cause of these fatal neurodegenerative diseases identified to date.

  15. Clinical and pathological features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis caused by mutation in the C9ORF72 gene on chromosome 9p.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Heather; Rutherford, Nicola J; Briemberg, Hannah; Krieger, Charles; Cashman, Neil; Fabros, Marife; Baker, Matt; Fok, Alice; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Eisen, Andrew; Rademakers, Rosa; Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2012-03-01

    Two studies recently identified a GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in a non-coding region of the chromosome 9 open-reading frame 72 gene (C9ORF72) as the cause of chromosome 9p-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). In a cohort of 231 probands with ALS, we identified the C9ORF72 mutation in 17 familial (27.4%) and six sporadic (3.6%) cases. Patients with the mutation presented with typical motor features of ALS, although subjects with the C9ORF72 mutation had more frequent bulbar onset, compared to those without this mutation. Dementia was significantly more common in ALS patients and families with the C9ORF72 mutation and was usually early-onset FTD. There was striking clinical heterogeneity among the members of individual families with the mutation. The associated neuropathology was a combination of ALS with TDP-ir inclusions and FTLD-TDP. In addition to TDP-43-immunoreactive pathology, a consistent and specific feature of cases with the C9ORF72 mutation was the presence of ubiquitin-positive, TDP-43-negative inclusions in a variety of neuroanatomical regions, such as the cerebellar cortex. These findings support the C9ORF72 mutation as an important newly recognized cause of ALS, provide a more detailed characterization of the associated clinical and pathological features and further demonstrate the clinical and molecular overlap between ALS and FTD.

  16. Lipid droplet proteins, Lds1p, Lds2p, and Rrt8p, are implicated in membrane protein transport associated with ergosterol.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kazuma; Nagano, Makoto; Shimizu, Shigeki; Toshima, Junko Y; Toshima, Jiro

    2016-07-08

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles, enclosed in a monolayer of phospholipid, which store excess fatty acids as neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol and sterol esters. Previous studies have revealed that LDs contain many proteins with various functions required for lipid metabolism and vesicular trafficking. Among them, Lds (Lipid Droplet in Sporulation) proteins, Lds1p and Lds2p, are reportedly induced and localized to LDs during yeast sporulation, but their cellular function has not been clarified. Here we show that the Lds proteins, Lds1p, Lds2p and Rrt8p, are expressed and localized at LDs in vegetative cells, being required for proper localization of plasma membrane proteins. We found that deletion of Lds genes led to mis-sorting of Wsc1p, a cell wall stress sensor, from the plasma membrane to the vacuole. We also demonstrated that lack of these proteins partially suppressed the growth defect and mis-sorting of the high-affinity tryptophan transporter Tat2p, induced by impairment of ergosterol biosynthesis. Furthermore, we identified Sec39p/Dsl3p, a component of the DSL1 tethering complex that mediates the interaction with COPI vesicles, as a binding partner for Lds2p. These results suggest a possible role of Lds proteins in maintenance of membrane lipid homeostasis and accompanying membrane protein transport.

  17. Cloning and characterization of Rep-8 (D8S2298E) in the human chromosome 8p11.2-p12

    SciTech Connect

    Yamabe, Yukako; Ichikawa, Koji; Sugawara, Kahori

    1997-01-15

    A novel human gene referred to as the Rep-8 gene (D8S2298E) was cloned by a combination of exon trapping, thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR, and screening of a cDNA library. It is located in human chromosome 8p.11.2-p12. The gene consists of eight exons and spans about 20 kb between the glutathione S-reductase and the protein phosphatase 2A beta subunit genes. The full-length Rep-8 gene contains 1483 nucleotides and codes for a protein of 270 amino acids. Southern blot experiments showed that the Rep-8 gene exists as a single copy per haploid. With a zoo blot analysis, human Rep-8 DNA hybridized strongly with the monkey DNA, but only weakly with the DNAs of species other than Homo sapiens. Northern blot analysis showed that it is expressed abundantly in the testis and ovary, suggesting that the Rep-8 gene product may play a role in reproduction. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Toward localization of the Werner syndrome gene by linkage disequilibrium and ancestral haplotyping: Lessons learned from analysis of 35 chromosome 8p11.1-21.1 markers

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, K.A.B.; Wijsman, E.M.; Martin, G.M.

    1996-06-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature onset of a number of age-related diseases. The gene for WS, WRN, has been mapped to the 8p11.1-21.1 region with further localization through linkage disequilibrium mapping. Here we present the results of linkage disequilibrium and ancestral haplotype analyses of 35 markers to further refine the location of WRN. We identified an interval in this region in which 14 of 18 markers tested show significant evidence of linkage disequilibrium in at least one of the two populations tested. Analysis of extended and partial haplotypes covering 21 of the markers studied supports the existence of both obligate and probable ancestral recombinant events which localize WRN almost certainly to the interval between DSS2196 and D8S2186, and most likely to the narrower interval between D8S2168 and D8S2186. These haplotype analyses also suggest that there are multiple WRN mutations in each of the two populations under study. We also present a comparison of approaches to performing disequilibrium tests with multiallelic markers, and show that some commonly used approximations for such tests perform poorly in comparison to exact probability tests. Finally, we discuss some of the difficulties introduced by the high mutation rate at microsatellite markers which influence our ability to use ancestral haplotype analysis to localize disease genes. 51 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Nanoparticle formulation enhanced protective immunity provoked by PYGPI8p-transamidase related protein (PyTAM) DNA vaccine in Plasmodium yoelii malaria model.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Kodama, Yukinobu; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Helegbe, Gideon Kofi; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Yui, Katsuyuki; Tien, Nguyen Huy; Karbwang, Juntra; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-04-07

    We have previously reported the new formulation of polyethylimine (PEI) with gamma polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) nanoparticle (NP) to have provided Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein-1 (PyMSP-1) plasmid DNA vaccine with enhanced protective cellular and humoral immunity in the lethal mouse malaria model. PyGPI8p-transamidase-related protein (PyTAM) was selected as a possible candidate vaccine antigen by using DNA vaccination screening from 29 GPI anchor and signal sequence motif positive genes picked up using web-based bioinformatics tools; though the observed protection was not complete. Here, we observed augmented protective effect of PyTAM DNA vaccine by using PEI and γ-PGA complex as delivery system. NP-coated PyTAM plasmid DNA immunized mice showed a significant survival rate from lethal P. yoelii challenge infection compared with naked PyTAM plasmid or with NP-coated empty plasmid DNA group. Antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2b subclass antibody levels, proportion of CD4 and CD8T cells producing IFN-γ in the splenocytes and IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α levels in the sera and in the supernatants from ex vivo splenocytes culture were all enhanced by the NP-coated PyTAM DNA vaccine. These data indicates that NP augments PyTAM protective immune response, and this enhancement was associated with increased DC activation and concomitant IL-12 production.

  20. 8-p-Hdroxybenzoyl Tovarol Induces Paraptosis Like Cell Death and Protective Autophagy in Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui; Jiang, Yingnan; Zhang, Jin; Huang, Jian; Wang, Jinhui

    2015-07-02

    8-p-Hdroxybenzoyl tovarol (TAW) is a germacrane-type sesquiterpenoid that can be isolated from the roots of Ferula dissecta (Ledeb.) Ledeb. In this study, the growth inhibitory effects induced by TAW were screened on some types of tumor cells, and the mechanism was investigated on TAW-induced growth inhibition, including paraptosis and autophagy in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. TAW-induced paraptosis involved extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization in the absence of caspase activation. Additionally, TAW evoked cell paraptotic death mediated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Autophagy induced by TAW was found to antagonize paraptosis in HeLa cells. This effect was enhanced by rapamycin and suppressed by the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA). Loss of beclin 1 (an autophagic regulator) function led to promote ER stress. Taken together, these results suggest that TAW induces paraptosis like cell death and protective autophagy in HeLa cells, which would provide a new clue for exploiting TAW as a promising agent for the treatment of cervical cancer.

  1. Chromosome 9p21 in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the UK and seven other countries: a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Shatunov, Aleksey; Mok, Kin; Newhouse, Stephen; Weale, Michael E; Smith, Bradley; Vance, Caroline; Johnson, Lauren; Veldink, Jan H; van Es, Michael A; van den Berg, Leonard H; Robberecht, Wim; Van Damme, Philip; Hardiman, Orla; Farmer, Anne E; Lewis, Cathryn M; Butler, Amy W; Abel, Olubunmi; Andersen, Peter M; Fogh, Isabella; Silani, Vincenzo; Chiò, Adriano; Traynor, Bryan J; Melki, Judith; Meininger, Vincent; Landers, John E; McGuffin, Peter; Glass, Jonathan D; Pall, Hardev; Leigh, P Nigel; Hardy, John; Brown, Robert H; Powell, John F; Orrell, Richard W; Morrison, Karen E; Shaw, Pamela J; Shaw, Christopher E; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons that results in progressive weakness and death from respiratory failure, commonly within about 3 years. Previous studies have shown association of a locus on chromosome 9p with ALS and linkage with ALS–frontotemporal dementia. We aimed to test whether this genomic region is also associated with ALS in an independent set of UK samples, and to identify risk factors associated with ALS in a further genome-wide association study that combined data from the independent analysis with those from other countries. Methods We collected samples from patients with sporadic ALS from 20 UK hospitals and obtained UK control samples from the control groups of the Depression Case Control study, the Bipolar Affective Case Control Study, and the British 1958 birth cohort DNA collection. Genotyping of DNA in this independent analysis was done with Illumina HumanHap550 BeadChips. We then undertook a joint genome-wide analysis that combined data from the independent set with published data from the UK, USA, Netherlands, Ireland, Italy, France, Sweden, and Belgium. The threshold for significance was p=0·05 in the independent analysis, because we were interested in replicating a small number of previously reported associations, whereas the Bonferroni-corrected threshold for significance in the joint analysis was p=2·20×10−7 Findings After quality control, samples were available from 599 patients and 4144 control individuals in the independent set. In this analysis, two single nucleotide polymorphisms in a locus on chromosome 9p21.2 were associated with ALS: rs3849942 (p=2·22×10−6; odds ratio [OR] 1·39, 95% CI 1·21–1·59) and rs2814707 (p=3·32×10−6; 1·38, 1·20–1·58). In the joint analysis, which included samples from 4312 patients with ALS and 8425 control individuals, rs3849942 (p=4·64×10−10; OR 1·22, 95% CI 1·15–1·30) and rs2814707 (p=4·72×10−10; 1

  2. Zinc rescues obesity-induced cardiac hypertrophy via stimulating metallothionein to suppress oxidative stress-activated BCL10/CARD9/p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shudong; Gu, Junlian; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiguo; Bai, Tao; Xu, Jianxiang; Cai, Jun; Barnes, Gregory; Liu, Qiu-Ju; Freedman, Jonathan H; Wang, Yonggang; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2017-02-03

    Obesity often leads to obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy (ORCH), which is suppressed by zinc-induced inactivation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which zinc inactivates p38 MAPK to prevent ORCH. Mice (4-week old) were fed either high fat diet (HFD, 60% kcal fat) or normal diet (ND, 10% kcal fat) containing variable amounts of zinc (deficiency, normal and supplement) for 3 and 6 months. P38 MAPK siRNA and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 were used to suppress p38 MAPK activity in vitro and in vivo, respectively. HFD activated p38 MAPK and increased expression of B-cell lymphoma/CLL 10 (BCL10) and caspase recruitment domain family member 9 (CARD9). These responses were enhanced by zinc deficiency and attenuated by zinc supplement. Administration of SB203580 to HFD mice or specific siRNA in palmitate-treated cardiomyocytes eliminated the HFD and zinc deficiency activation of p38 MAPK, but did not significantly impact the expression of BCL10 and CARD9. In cultured cardiomyocytes, inhibition of BCL10 expression by siRNA prevented palmitate-induced increased p38 MAPK activation and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression. In contrast, inhibition of p38 MAPK prevented ANP expression, but did not affect BCL10 expression. Deletion of metallothionein abolished the protective effect of zinc on palmitate-induced up-regulation of BCL10 and phospho-p38 MAPK. HFD and zinc deficiency synergistically induce ORCH by increasing oxidative stress-mediated activation of BCL10/CARD9/p38 MAPK signalling. Zinc supplement ameliorates ORCH through activation of metallothionein to repress oxidative stress-activated BCL10 expression and p38 MAPK activation.

  3. Temporal Evolution of Water and Dust in Comet 9P/Tempel 1 after the Deep Impact Event, as Observed from Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, Adeline; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Kelley, M. S.; Woodward, C. E.; Wooden, D. H.

    2010-10-01

    The Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft encountered comet 9P/Tempel 1 on July 4th, 2005. The spacecraft released an impactor that collided with the comet nucleus and excavated (possibly unprocessed) cometary material in a prominent ejecta plume. Spectral maps covering 20'' x 67'' (1.85''/pixel) were acquired with the IRS instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope at different times around the DI event: twice before impact (TI-41.3hrs and TI-22.9hrs) and twelve times after impact (between TI+0.67hrs and TI+1027hrs). These IRS observations are stored in the Spitzer data archive and presented by Lisse et al. (2006, Science 313, 635). We present the interpretation of 5.2-7.6 micrometer spectra obtained in the second order of the short-wavelength module (SL2). To reduce the contribution of artifacts in the spectra, 5x5 pixel extraction apertures (9.25''x9.25'') were used. The underlying continuum in the spectra provides information on the grain size distribution and color temperature of the dust ejecta. In order to determine the grain size distribution, we assumed that ejecta consist of a composition of both amorphous carbon and silicates. The grains are assumed to be spherical with sizes in range from 0.1 to 100 micrometers. We used the Mie theory to calculate the optical properties of each material and the temperature of the grain. We constrained the grain size distribution and velocities from the spectra and the temporal evolution of the dust flux. The dust mass and dust/gas ratio in the ejecta cloud are also derived and compared with other values published in the literature.

  4. Assignment of the gene coding for the human high-affinity glutamate transporter EAAC1 to 9p24: Potential role in dicarboxylic aminoaciduria and neurodegenerative disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.P.; Kanai, Y.; Stelzner, M.; Hediger, M.A.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C. )

    1994-03-15

    Functional defects of high-affinity glutamate transporters have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In small intestine and kidney, in which the high-affinity glutamate transporter mediates net absorption of glutamate and aspartate across epithelial cells, an inborn error of glutamate transport is thought to cause dicarboxylic aminoaciduria. This disorder is characterized by increased urinary excretion of glutamate and aspartate and is, in general, associated with neurologic and developmental abnormalities. Recently, the authors isolated a cDNA encoding a high-affinity glutamate transporter (EAAC1) that also transports aspartate but not other amino acids. EAAC1 is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, particularly in brain (neurons), intestine, and kidney. Here, the authors present mapping of the chromosome location of EAAC1 using Southern analysis of a panel of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Southern analysis of EcoRI-digested DNA gave bands at 6.5, 5.6, 5.1, and 1.2 kb for human genomic DNA; 7.5 kb for mouse genomic DNA; and 7.3, 3.2, and 1 kb for hamster genomic DNA. All four human EAAC1-specific bands were observed in the lane corresponding to the human/Chinese hamster hybrid containing chromosome 9 but not in lanes corresponding to any other hybrid. Because the human/Chinese hamster hybrid is the only one retaining chromosome 9, this result unambiguously assigns human EAAC1 to chromosome 9. For precise chromosome assignment of the human EAAC1 gene, they employed FISH. Map position of the EAAC1 probe was assigned by visual inspection of the fluorescent signal on the DAPI-stained metaphase chromosomes. The human EAAC1 gene was assigned to 9p24.

  5. An Aggressive Primary Cutaneous Follicle Center Lymphoma With c-MYC Translocation and CDKN2A (9p21) Deletion: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Hamilton C; Mathew, Susan; Magro, Cynthia M

    2017-03-01

    Diffuse large cell B-cell lymphoma of the skin is most commonly represented by diffuse large cell variants of primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma and the leg-type lymphoma. In a minority of cases, the infiltrates are an expression of stage 4 disease of established extracutaneous B-cell lymphoma. We describe 1 female patient 85 years of age with an aggressive form of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma manifesting in multiple firm erythematous indurated solid nodules 1-2 cm each symmetrically on the face periorbitally and on the upper extremities bilaterally. The tumor was a de novo presentation of this aggressive form of lymphoma. The disease demonstrated an aggressive course with only transient improvement of skin lesions after chemotherapy. Punch biopsy taken from a left arm skin lesion showed a diffuse and nodular large cell lymphocytic infiltrate in the 15-20 μm range exhibiting round to oval nuclei and prominent eosinophilic nucleoli. Phenotypically, the tumor cells were CD10, Bcl-2, Bcl-6, and CD43 positive with a residuum of a follicular dendritic cell network revealed by CD21 staining. There was c-MYC rearrangement and CDKN2A deletion in this sample. The importance in reporting this case is to emphasize that in the context of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma, the 9p21 deletion while characteristic of the leg-type lymphoma is not a unique signature of the leg-type lymphoma and is not exclusionary to lymphomas falling under the designation of follicle center lymphoma. As with the leg-type lymphoma, however, this cytogenetic abnormality is a critical determinant to a more aggressive clinical course.

  6. The spatial distribution of water in the inner coma of Comet 9P/Tempel 1: Comparison between models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finklenburg, S.; Thomas, N.; Su, C. C.; Wu, J.-S.

    2014-07-01

    The near nucleus coma of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 has been simulated with the 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code PDSC++ (Su, C.-C. [2013]. Parallel Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) Methods for Modeling Rarefied Gas Dynamics. PhD Thesis, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan) and the derived column densities have been compared to observations of the water vapour distribution found by using infrared imaging spectrometer on the Deep Impact spacecraft (Feaga, L.M., A’Hearn, M.F., Sunshine, J.M., Groussin, O., Farnham, T.L. [2007]. Icarus 191(2), 134-145. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2007.04.038). Modelled total production rates are also compared to various observations made at the time of the Deep Impact encounter. Three different models were tested. For all models, the shape model constructed from the Deep Impact observations by Thomas et al. (Thomas, P.C., Veverka, J., Belton, M.J.S., Hidy, A., A’Hearn, M.F., Farnham, T.L., et al. [2007]. Icarus, 187(1), 4-15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2006.12.013) was used. Outgassing depending only on the cosine of the solar insolation angle on each shape model facet is shown to provide an unsatisfactory model. Models constructed on the basis of active areas suggested by Kossacki and Szutowicz (Kossacki, K., Szutowicz, S. [2008]. Icarus, 195(2), 705-724. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2007.12.014) are shown to be superior. The Kossacki and Szutowicz model, however, also shows deficits which we have sought to improve upon. For the best model we investigate the properties of the outflow.

  7. Localization of the gene causing keratolytic winter erythema to chromosome 8p22-p23, and evidence for a founder effect in South African Afrikaans-speakers.

    PubMed Central

    Starfield, M; Hennies, H C; Jung, M; Jenkins, T; Wienker, T; Hull, P; Spurdle, A; Küster, W; Ramsay, M; Reis, A

    1997-01-01

    Keratolytic winter erythema (KWE), also known as "Oudtshoorn skin disease," or "erythrokeratolysis hiemalis," is an autosomal dominant skin disorder of unknown etiology characterized by a cyclical erythema, hyperkeratosis, and recurrent and intermittent peeling of the palms and soles, particularly during winter. Initially KWE was believed to be unique to South Africa, but recently a large pedigree of German origin has been identified. The disorder occurs with a prevalence of 1/7,000 in the South African Afrikaans-speaking Caucasoid population, and this high frequency has been attributed to founder effect. After a number of candidate regions were excluded from linkage to KWE in both the German family and several South African families, a genomewide analysis was embarked on. Linkage to the microsatellite marker D8S550 on chromosome 8p22-p23 was initially observed, with a maximum LOD score (Z(max)) of 9.2 at a maximum recombination fraction (theta(max)) of .0 in the German family. Linkage was also demonstrated in five of the larger South African families, with Z(max) = 7.4 at theta(max) = .02. When haplotypes were constructed, 11 of 14 South African KWE families had the complete "ancestral" haplotype, and 3 demonstrated conservation of parts of this haplotype, supporting the hypothesis of founder effect. The chromosome segregating with the disease in the German family demonstrated a different haplotype, suggesting that these chromosomes do not have a common origin. Recombination events place the KWE gene in a 6-cM interval between D8S550 and D8S552. If it is assumed that there was a single South African founder, a proposed ancestral recombinant suggests that the gene is most likely in a 1-cM interval between D8S550 and D8S265. PMID:9311742

  8. Copy number variation of the beta defensin gene cluster on chromosome 8p influences the bacterial microbiota within the nasopharynx of otitis-prone children.

    PubMed

    Jones, Eric A; Kananurak, Anchasa; Bevins, Charles L; Hollox, Edward J; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2014-01-01

    As there is increasing evidence that aberrant defensin expression is related to susceptibility for infectious disease and inflammatory disorders, we sought to determine if copy number of the beta-defensin gene cluster located on chromosome 8p23.1 (DEFB107, 106, 105, 104, 103, DEFB4 and SPAG11), that shows copy number variation as a block, was associated with susceptibility to otitis media (OM). The gene DEFB103 within this complex encodes human beta defensin-3 (hBD-3), an antimicrobial peptide (AP) expressed by epithelial cells that line the mammalian airway, important for defense of mucosal surfaces and previously shown to have bactericidal activity in vitro against multiple human pathogens, including the three that predominate in OM. To this end, we conducted a retrospective case-control study of 113 OM prone children and 267 controls aged five to sixty months. We identified the copy number of the above defined beta-defensin gene cluster (DEFB-CN) in each study subject by paralogue ratio assays. The mean DEFB-CN was indistinguishable between subjects classified as OM prone based on a recent history of multiple episodes of OM and control subjects who had no history of OM (4.4 ± 0.96 versus 4.4 ± 1.08, respectively: Odds Ratio [OR]: 1.16 (95% CI: 0.61, 2.20). Despite a lack of direct association, we observed a statistically significant correlation between DEFB-CN and nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization patterns. Collectively, our findings suggested that susceptibility to OM might be mediated by genetic variation among individuals, wherein a DEFB-CN less than 4 exerts a marked influence on the microbiota of the nasopharynx, specifically with regard to colonization by the three predominant bacterial pathogens of OM.

  9. Studying the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1 using the structure of the Deep Impact ejecta cloud at the early stages of its development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Nagdimunov, Lev; A'Hearn, Michael; King, Ashley; Wolff, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents an attempt to extract information about the comet 9P/Tempel 1 nucleus from the characteristics of the ejecta cloud produced by the impactor of the Deep Impact mission. For this purpose we use two techniques. We first study the shadow cast on the nucleus surface by the ejecta cloud and investigate how areas of different brightness are related to the varying optical thickness or albedo of the ejecta cloud. The shadow was seen during the first 2.0 s after the impact (afterward it became obscured by the ejecta cloud). We have found that all brightness variations in the shadow are the result of the surface inhomogeneities, indicating that during first 2.0 s the ejecta cloud was homogeneous within the MRI spatial resolution. Our second technique is to study the obscuration of the nucleus limb by the ejecta. This study covers the period 0.76-68.8 s after impact and is based on comparison of the ejecta cloud brightness on the limb and just beyond the limb. At this stage we do see inhomogeneities in the ejecta cloud that relate to the albedo and optical thickness variations in the ejected dust. Specifically, we have found two distinct bands of low optical thickness and one band of a high optical thickness. Based on crater formation ideas we estimate the depth of excavation of the ejected material for the found inhomogeneities and, thus, define a potential layering structure for the comet nucleus, Our estimates suggest that the low-optical thickness material was excavated from a depth of 15-18 and 30-32 m in the case the porous nucleus material and 37-46 and 87-93 m in the case of a non-porous nucleus material, and a layer of high optical thickness originated from the depth 9-11 m for porous material or 20-23 m for non-porous material. Based on the crater diameter estimates, we expect that the real depth of the layers is between these two cases. The rest of the ejecta do not show any signs of layering but have significant azimuthal inhomogeneity with

  10. Broad- and narrowband visible imaging of comet 9P/Tempel 1 at ESO around the time of the Deep Impact event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnhardt, H.; Pompei, E.; Tozzi, G. P.; Hainaut, O.; Ageorges, N.; Bagnulo, S.; Barrera, L.; Bonev, T.; Käufl, H. U.; Kerber, F.; Locurto, G.; Marco, O.; Pantin, E.; Rauer, H.; Saviane, I.; Selman, F.; Sterken, C.; Weiler, M.

    2007-08-01

    Context: On 4 July 2005 at 05:52UT the impactor of NASA's DeepImpact (DI) mission exploded at comet 9P/Tempel 1. The ejecta material of the impact expanded into the coma that is produced by normal cometary activity. The La Silla and Paranal sites of the European Southern Observatory ESO in Chile participated in the world-wide campaign to observe this event. Aims: The gas and dust content of the cometary coma is observed around the time of the DI event to identify signatures of the impact, like changes in the gas production (CN, C{3}, C{2}, NH{2} and Na) and in the dust properties. The study also describes the normal activity pattern in the coma and the expanding ejecta cloud. Methods: The gas production rates and the dust reddening slope are measured in images obtained through narrowband cometary filters. The ejecta cloud and the features of normal cometary activity, as imaged in narrow- and broadband filter images, are studied with respect to geometry, intensity, and persistence. Results: The production of CN, C{3}, and C{2} gas by the nucleus is at similar level on 3 July and 9+10 July 2005. The mixing ratios of these gases are in the range of those for “typical” comets. NH{2} and Na gas are not detected above the dust continuum flux in the coma. The reddening slope of the dust continuum changes from a value of 9%/100 nm, constant throughout 20 000 km distance around the nucleus, on 3 July to about 19-20%/100 nm on 9+10 July 2005. An increase of the slope with radial distance is found. Both changes might be due to the presence of dust from the ejecta cloud. The dust coma of the comet showed a porcupine pattern of 9 coma jets before impact which remained intact after impact. It can be interpreted as being due to embedded fan structures produced by at least 4 active regions on the rotating nucleus. The ejecta cloud contains dust grains of likely absorbing material and possibly dielectric admixtures with solar radiation pressure factors β of 0.2-1.9 and

  11. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Murabito, Joanne M.; White, Charles C.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sun, Yan V.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Nambi, Vijay; Lamina, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Coassin, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C.; Broer, Linda; Crawford, Dana C.; Franceschini, Nora; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Haun, Margot; Holewijn, Suzanne; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kiechl, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Montasser, May E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rudock, Megan E.; Senft, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; van der Harst, Pim; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wassel, Christina L.; Absher, Devin M.; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Arnold, Alice; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Boban, Mladen; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Couper, David J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dehghan, Abbas; Heijer, Martin den; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Ding, Jingzhong; Dörr, Marcus; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gibson, Quince; Goodloe, Robert; Gunjaca, Grgo; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Kieback, Arne; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Li, Xiaohui; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lohman, Kurt; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Mohler, Emile R; Mudnic, Ivana; Mueller, Thomas; Navis, Gerjan; Oberhollenzer, Friedrich; Olin, Jeffrey W.; O’Connell, Jeff; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Petersmann, Astrid; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rantner, Barbara; Rice, Ken; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Stadler, Marietta; Summerer, Monika; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Wild, Sarah H.; Wild, Philipp S.; Willeit, Johann; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boerwinkle, Eric; Campbell, Harry; Cooke, John P.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Herrington, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Anna; Münzel, Thomas; Newman, Anne; Oostra, Ben A.; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Snieder, Harold; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Völker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Liu, Yongmei; Hayward, Caroline; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Ziegler, Andreas; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kronenberg, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts. Methods and Results Continuous ABI and PAD (ABI≤0.9) phenotypes adjusted for age and sex were examined. Each study conducted genotyping and imputed data to the ~2.5 million SNPs in HapMap. Linear and logistic regression models were used to test each SNP for association with ABI and PAD using additive genetic models. Study-specific data were combined using fixed-effects inverse variance weighted meta-analyses. There were a total of 41,692 participants of European ancestry (~60% women, mean ABI 1.02 to 1.19), including 3,409 participants with PAD and with GWAS data available. In the discovery meta-analysis, rs10757269 on chromosome 9 near CDKN2B had the strongest association with ABI (β= −0.006, p=2.46x10−8). We sought replication of the 6 strongest SNP associations in 5 population-based studies and 3 clinical samples (n=16,717). The association for rs10757269 strengthened in the combined discovery and replication analysis (p=2.65x10−9). No other SNP associations for ABI or PAD achieved genome-wide significance. However, two previously reported candidate genes for PAD and one SNP associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) were associated with ABI : DAB21P (rs13290547, p=3.6x10−5); CYBA (rs3794624, p=6.3x10−5); and rs1122608 (LDLR, p=0.0026). Conclusions GWAS in more than 40,000 individuals identified one genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9p21 with ABI. Two candidate genes for PAD and 1 SNP for CAD are associated with ABI. PMID:22199011

  12. Loss of heterozygosity and mutation analysis of the p16 (9p21) and p53 (17p13) genes in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    González, M V; Pello, M F; López-Larrea, C; Suárez, C; Menéndez, M J; Coto, E

    1995-09-01

    We analyzed allelic loss at the p53 gene (17p13) and at chromosome region 9p21 in 35 primary head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at p53 and 9p21 was found in 50 and 75% of informative cases, respectively. LOH at the p53 gene did not increase significantly with tumor stage, but was more frequent in moderately and poorly differentiated tumors than in well-differentiated tumors. LOH plus mutation or homozygous deletion of p53 was limited to advanced stage and poorly differentiated tumors. Allelic loss at 9p21 is frequent in early stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and is not significantly associated with LOH at p53. The second exon of the p16/MTS1/CDKN2 gene was found to be homozygously deleted in 1 of 19 cases showing LOH at 9p21, but direct sequencing did not show mutations in the remaining 18 cases. This suggests that p16 plays a limited role in the development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  13. Optical rectification in a strained GaAs{sub 0.9}P{sub 0.1}/GaAs{sub 0.6}P{sub 0.4} quantum dot: Simultaneous effects of electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vinolin, Ada; Peter, A. John

    2014-04-24

    Simultaneous effects of electric field and magnetic field on exciton binding energy as a function of dot radius in a cylindrical GaAs{sub 0.9}P{sub 0.1}/GaAs{sub 0.6}P{sub 0.4} strained quantum dot are investigated. The strain contribution includes the strong built-in electric field induced by the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations. Numerical calculations are performed using variational procedure within the single band effective mass approximation. Optical rectification in the GaAs{sub 0.9}P{sub 0.1}/GaAs{sub 0.6}P{sub 0.4} quantum dot is computed in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.

  14. t(6;9)(p23;q34) presenting acute myeloid leukemia in a child with an unsuspected 45,X/46,X,derY [?t(Yp;Yq)] chromosomal constitution: yet another Y chromosome overdosage and malignancy association.

    PubMed

    Ogur, Gönül; Duru, Feride; Ozyurek, Emel; Fisgin, Tunc

    2012-08-01

    Development of leukemia in patients with sexual chromosome abnormalities is relatively rare and mostly involves cases of monosomy X, Turner syndrome. Here, we report on a child having a 45,X/46,X,derY [?t(Yp;Yq)] chromosomal constitution (variant Turner syndrome) presenting with concordant acute myeloid leukemia and a rarely seen clonal neoplasic cell lineage-related karyotype, t(6;9)(p23;q34).

  15. Thermodynamic analysis of binary Fe85B15 to quinary Fe85Si2B8P4Cu1 alloys for primary crystallizations of α-Fe in nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, A.; Zhang, Y.; Takenaka, K.; Makino, A.

    2015-05-01

    Fe-based Fe85B15, Fe84B15Cu1, Fe82Si2B15Cu1, Fe85Si2B12Cu1, and Fe85Si2B8P4Cu1 (NANOMET®) alloys were experimental and computational analyzed to clarify the features of NANOMET that exhibits high saturation magnetic flux density (Bs) nearly 1.9 T and low core loss than conventional nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys. The X-ray diffraction analysis for ribbon specimens produced experimentally by melt spinning from melts revealed that the samples were almost formed into an amorphous single phase. Then, the as-quenched samples were analyzed with differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimentally for exothermic enthalpies of the primary and secondary crystallizations (ΔHx1 and ΔHx2) and their crystallization temperatures (Tx1 and Tx2), respectively. The ratio ΔHx1/ΔHx2 measured by DSC experimentally tended to be extremely high for the Fe85Si2B8P4Cu1 alloy, and this tendency was reproduced by the analysis with commercial software, Thermo-Calc, with database for Fe-based alloys, TCFE7 for Gibbs free energy (G) assessments. The calculations exhibit that a volume fraction (Vf) of α-Fe tends to increase from 0.56 for the Fe85B15 to 0.75 for the Fe85Si2B8P4Cu1 alloy. The computational analysis of the alloys for G of α-Fe and amorphous phases (Gα-Fe and Gamor) shows that a relationship Gα-Fe ˜ Gamor holds for the Fe85Si2B12Cu1, whereas Gα-Fe < Gamor for the Fe85Si2B8P4Cu1 alloy at Tx1 and that an extremely high Vf = 0.75 was achieved for the Fe85Si2B8P4Cu1 alloy by including 2.8 at. % Si and 4.5 at. % P into α-Fe. These computational results indicate that the Fe85Si2B8P4Cu1 alloy barely forms amorphous phase, which, in turn, leads to high Vf and resultant high Bs.

  16. Direct imaging of structural heterogeneity of the melt-spun Fe{sub 85.2}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 0.8} alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Kazuhisa Takenaka, Kana; Makino, Akihiro; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-06-15

    A structural heterogeneity of the melt-spun Fe{sub 85.2}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 0.8} alloy has been studied by spherical aberration (C{sub s}) corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Hollow-cone illumination imaging revealed that the density of coherent scattering regions in the as-quenched Fe{sub 85.2}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 0.8} alloy is much higher than that in the Fe{sub 76}Si{sub 9}B{sub 10}P{sub 5} bulk metallic glass. According to the C{sub s}-corrected TEM, crystalline atomic clusters, typically of ∼1 nm in diameter, are densely distributed in an amorphous matrix of Fe{sub 85.2}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 0.8} alloy. Observation of four-fold and six-fold atomic arrangements of these clusters implies existence of Fe clusters with the body centered cubic structure. These Fe clusters must be responsible for the formation of ultrahigh-density α-Fe nanocrystals produced by post-annealing.

  17. Optical transition energy of magneto-polaron in a GaAs{sub 0.9}P{sub 0.1}/GaAs{sub 0.6}P{sub 0.4} quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Vinolin, Ada; Peter, A. John

    2015-06-24

    Magneto-LO-polaron in a cylindrical GaAs{sub 0.9} P{sub 0.1} / GaAs{sub 0.6} P{sub 0.4} quantum dot is investigated taking into consideration of geometrical confinement effect. The effects of phonon on the exciton binding energy and the interband emission energy as a function of dot radius are found. The calculations are performed within the single band effective mass approximation using the variational method based on the Lee-Low-Pine LLP transformation.

  18. Optical transition energy of magneto-polaron in a GaAs0.9P0.1/GaAs0.6P0.4 quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinolin, Ada; Peter, A. John

    2015-06-01

    Magneto-LO-polaron in a cylindrical GaAs0.9 P0.1 / GaAs0.6 P0.4 quantum dot is investigated taking into consideration of geometrical confinement effect. The effects of phonon on the exciton binding energy and the interband emission energy as a function of dot radius are found. The calculations are performed within the single band effective mass approximation using the variational method based on the Lee-Low-Pine LLP transformation.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of Rotavirus A, causing acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations among children in Nha Trang, Vietnam, 2007-2008: Identification of rare G9P[19] and G10P[14] strains.

    PubMed

    Do, Loan Phuong; Kaneko, Miho; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Gauchan, Punita; Agbemabiese, Chantal Ama; Dang, Anh Duc; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2017-04-01

    Rotavirus A (RVA) causes acute diarrhea in children as well as animals. As part of a cross-sectional study of children less than 5 years of age hospitalized for acute diarrhea in Vietnam during a 15-month period (2007-2008), 322 (43.5%) of 741 fecal specimens contained RVA with 92% either G1P[8] or G3P[8]. This study was undertaken to further characterize strains that remained untypeable to complete the G and P genotypes of the 322 rotavirus-positive specimens. While 307 (95.3%) strains possessed the common human RVA genotypes: G1P[8] (45.0%), G2P[4] (2.8%), G3P[8] (46.9%), and G9P[8] (0.6%), sequencing of initially untypeable specimens revealed the presence of two unusual strains designated NT0073 and NT0082 possessing G9P[19] and G10P[14], respectively. The genotype constellation of NT0073 (G9-P[19]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T7-E1-H1) and the phylogenetic trees suggested its origin as a porcine RVA strain causing diarrhea in a 24-month-old girl whereas the genotype constellation of NT0082 (G10-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3) and the phylogenetic trees suggested its origin as an RVA strain of artiodactyl origin (such as cattle, sheep and goats) causing diarrhea in a 13-month-old boy. This study showed that RVA strains of animal host origin were not necessarily attenuated in humans. A hypothesis may be postulated that P[19] and P[14] VP4 spike proteins helped the virus to replicate in the human intestine but that efficient onward human-to-human spread after crossing the host species barrier may require the virus to obtain some additional features as there was no evidence of widespread transmission with the limited sampling performed over the study period. J. Med. Virol. 89:621-631, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Study on structures and properties of ammonia clusters (NH3)n (n=1-5) and liquid ammonia in terms of ab initio method and atom-bond electronegativity equalization method ammonia-8P fluctuating charge potential model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ling; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2010-05-07

    Structures, binding energies, and vibrational frequencies of (NH(3))(n) (n=2-5) isomers and dynamical properties of liquid ammonia have been explored using a transferable intermolecular potential eight point model including fluctuating charges and flexible body based on a combination of the atom-bond electronegativity equalization and molecular (ABEEM) mechanics (ABEEM ammonia-8P) in this paper. The important feature of this model is to divide the charge sites of one ammonia molecule into eight points region containing four atoms, three sigma bonds, and a lone pair, and allows the charges in system to fluctuate responding to the ambient environment. Due to the explicit descriptions of charges and special treatment of hydrogen bonds, the results of equilibrium geometries, dipole moments, cluster interaction energies, vibrational frequencies for the gas phase of small ammonia clusters, and radial distribution function for liquid ammonia calculated with the ABEEM ammonia-8P potential model are in good agreement with those measured by available experiments and those obtained from high level ab initio calculations. The properties of ammonia dimer are studied in detail involving the structure and one-dimensional, two-dimensional potential energy surface. As for interaction energies, the root mean square deviation is 0.27 kcal/mol, and the linear correlation coefficient reaches 0.994.

  1. Full Genome Characterization of Novel DS-1-Like G8P[8] Rotavirus Strains that Have Emerged in Thailand: Reassortment of Bovine and Human Rotavirus Gene Segments in Emerging DS-1-Like Intergenogroup Reassortant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Komoto, Satoshi; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Sinchai, Phakapun; Upachai, Sompong; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tharmaphornpilas, Piyanit; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of unusual DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant rotavirus strains have been recently reported in Asia, Australia, and Europe. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand in 2013–2014, novel DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains having G8P[8] genotypes (i.e., strains KKL-17, PCB-79, PCB-84, PCB-85, PCB-103, SKT-107, SWL-12, NP-130, PCB-656, SKT-457, SSKT-269, and SSL-55) were identified in stool samples from hospitalized children with severe diarrhea. In this study, we determined and characterized the complete genomes of these 12 strains (seven strains, KKL-17, PCB-79, PCB-84, PCB-85, PCB-103, SKT-107, and SWL-12, found in 2013 (2013 strains), and five, NP-130, PCB-656, SKT-457, SSKT-269, and SSL-55, in 2014 (2014 strains)). On full genomic analysis, all 12 strains showed a unique genotype constellation comprising a mixture of genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G8-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. With the exception of the G genotype, the unique genotype constellation of the 12 strains (P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2) was found to be shared with DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains. On phylogenetic analysis, six of the 11 genes of the 2013 strains (VP4, VP2, VP3, NSP1, NSP3, and NSP5) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains, while the remaining four (VP7, VP6, VP1, and NSP2) and one (NSP4) gene appeared to be of bovine and human origin, respectively. Thus, the 2013 strains appeared to be reassortant strains as to DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant, bovine, bovine-like human, and/or human rotaviruses. On the other hand, five of the 11 genes of the 2014 strains (VP4, VP2, VP3, NSP1, and NSP3) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains, while three (VP7, VP1, and NSP2) and one (NSP4) were assumed to be of bovine and human origin, respectively. Notably, the remaining two genes, VP6 and NSP5, of the 2014 strains appeared to have originated from locally

  2. Atomic packing and diffusion in Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 9}P{sub 4} amorphous alloy analyzed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yaocen; Takeuchi, Akira; Makino, Akihiro; Liang, Yunye; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2015-05-07

    In the work reported in this paper, ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was performed on Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 9}P{sub 4} amorphous alloy. Preferred atomic environment of the elements was analyzed with Voronoi polyhedrons. It showed that B and P atoms prefer less neighbors compared with Fe and Si, making them structurally incompatible with Fe rich structure and repulsive to the formation of α-Fe. However, due to the low bonding energy of B and P caused by low coordination number, the diffusion rates of them were considerably large, resulting in the requirement of fast annealing for achieving optimum nano-crystallization for its soft magnetic property. The simulation work also indicates that diffusion rate in amorphous alloy is largely determined by bonding energy rather than atomic size.

  3. A Comparative Study of the Dust Environment near the Nuclei of Comets 1P/Halley, 19P/Borrelly, 81P/Wild 2 & 9P/Tempel1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tra-Mi; Knollenberg, Joerg; Hoekzema, N.; Boice, Daniel; Kuehrt, Ekkehard; Schulz, Rita; Stuewe, J.; Thomas, Nicolas

    There have been four comets imaged by spacecrafts: 19P/Halley (HMC on Giotto); 19P/Borrelly (MICAS on DS1); 81P/Wild 2 (NavCam on Stardust); and 9P/Tempel 1 (MIR & HIR on Deep Impact). This paper presents a comparative studies of the dust emission within the first 30 - 40 km of the nuclei of these four comets. On March 14, 1986, Giotto encountered comet 1P/Halley's nucleus at a distance of 596km carrying the Halley Multicolour Camera (HMC) [1]. Five years later, Deep Space 1 obtained images of the nucleus of comet 19P/Borrelly with the Miniature Integrated Camera and Spectrometer (MICAS) at a closest distance of 2174km [2]. The next cometary flyby occurred when Stardust approached comet 81P/Wild 2 at 236km on January 2, 2004, tracking its nucleus with its optical navigation camera (NavCam) [3]. The latest close encounter occurred in July 4, 2005, when Deep Impact flew by 9P/Tempel 1 at 500km [4] carrying the Medium Resolution Instrument (MIR). Since the nuclei of 1P/Halley, 19P/Borrelly, 81P/Wild 2 and 9P/Tempel 1 have been observed under similar phase angles (108° , 88° , 73° , and 63° , respectively), we can do a comparative analysis of the inner dust environment of these data sets. The inner dust coma morphology, particularly dust jets and broader fans, of these four comets has been investigated by several authors [5]-[8]. We concentrate on the comparative study of their dust emission. The outflow of dust particles is force-free at large radial distance from the comet nucleus. Thus, integrating the intensity Ids [9] around a comet results in constant Ids. However, the integrated intensities of comets 1P/Halley and 19P/Borrelly indicate deviation from the expected behavior within the first 50 km from their nuclei [10]. 1P/Halley's Ids decreases near the nucleus surface whereas comet 19P/Borrelly's Ids increases. But at large distances, they both converge to constant values. These opposite effects in the first 50km indicate that different mechanisms dominate

  4. The contribution of a 9p21.3 variant, a KIF6 variant, and C-reactive protein to predicting risk of myocardial infarction in a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic risk factors might improve prediction of coronary events. Several variants at chromosome 9p21.3 have been widely reported to be associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) in prospective and case-control studies. A variant of KIF6 (719Arg) has also been reported to be associated with increased risk of CHD in large prospective studies, but not in case-control studies. We asked whether the addition of genetic information (the 9p21.3 or KIF6 variants) or a well-established non-genetic risk factor (C-reactive protein [CRP]) can improve risk prediction by the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS)--a prospective observational study of risk factors for cardiovascular disease among > 5,000 participants aged 65 or older. Methods Improvement of risk prediction was assessed by change in the area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUC) and by net reclassification improvement (NRI). Results Among white participants the FRS was improved by addition of KIF6 719Arg carrier status among men as assessed by the AUC (from 0.581 to 0.596, P = 0.03) but not by NRI (NRI = 0.027, P = 0.32). Adding both CRP and 719Arg carrier status to the FRS improved risk prediction by the AUC (0.608, P = 0.02) and NRI (0.093, P = 0.008) in men, but not women (P ≥ 0.24). Conclusions While none of these risk markers individually or in combination improved risk prediction among women, a combination of KIF6 719Arg carrier status and CRP levels modestly improved risk prediction among white men; although this improvement is not significant after multiple-testing correction. These observations should be investigated in other prospective studies. PMID:21406102

  5. Structure analyses of Cu nanoclusters in the soft magnetic Fe85.2Si1B9P4Cu0.8 alloy by XAFS and fcc cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, M.; Nishijima, M.; Konno, K.; Ofuchi, H.; Takenaka, K.; Makino, A.

    2016-05-01

    Size of the clusters and structure details of fcc Cu clusters in nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloy of Fe85-86Si1-2B8P4Cu1 (NANOMET) are investigated. A linear combination fitting of XAFS data indicates that about 30% of Cu atoms are partitioned in the fcc clusters and the rest in the amorphous matrix. EXAFS of the fcc Cu nanocluster embedded in amorphous matrix is calculated on the basis of a simple fcc structure model using FEFF9. Surface effect of the nanoclusters is considered by counting a fraction of the nearest neighbour atoms in amorphous matrix. Good agreement with the experimental result is obtained for the fcc nanocluster with 9 coordination shells which consists of total 177 atoms within 1.5 nm in a diameter.

  6. Structure of equine 2'-5'oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) gene family and FISH mapping of OAS genes to ECA8p15-->p14 and BTA17q24-->q25.

    PubMed

    Perelygin, A A; Lear, T L; Zharkikh, A A; Brinton, M A

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian 2'-5' oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetases are important mediators of the antiviral activity of interferons. Both human and mouse 2-5A synthetase gene families encode four forms of enzymes: small, medium, large and ubiquitin-like. In this study, the structures of four equine OAS genes were determined using DNA sequences derived from fifteen cDNA and four BAC clones. Composition of the equine OAS gene family is more similar to that of the human OAS family than the mouse Oas family. Two OAS-containing bovine BAC clones were identified in GenBank. Both equine and bovine BAC clones were physically assigned by FISH to horse and cattle chromosomes, ECA8p15-->p14 and BTA17q24--> q25, respectively. The comparative mapping data confirm conservation of synteny between ungulates, humans and rodents.

  7. Genome-wide significant linkage to IgG subclass responses against Plasmodium falciparum antigens on chromosomes 8p22-p21, 9q34 and 20q13.

    PubMed

    Brisebarre, A; Kumulungui, B; Sawadogo, S; Afridi, S; Fumoux, F; Rihet, P

    2015-01-01

    A genome-wide scan was conducted for the levels of total immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG subclasses directed against Plasmodium falciparum antigens in an urban population living in Burkina Faso. Non-parametric multipoint linkage analysis provided three chromosomal regions with genome-wide significant evidence (logarithm of the odds (LOD) score >3.6), and five chromosomal regions with genome-wide suggestive evidence (LOD score >2.2). IgG3 levels were significantly linked to chromosomes 8p22-p21 and 20q13, whereas IgG4 levels were significantly linked to chromosome 9q34. In addition, we detected suggestive linkage of IgG1 levels to chromosomes 18p11-q12 and 18q12-q21, IgG4 levels to chromosomes 1p31 and 12q24 and IgG levels to chromosome 6p24-p21. Moreover, we genotyped genetic markers located within the regions of interest in a rural population living in Burkina Faso. We detected genome-wide significant and suggestive linkage results when combining the two study populations for chromosomes 1p31, 6p24-p21, 8p22-p21, 9q34, 12q24 and 20q13. Because high anti-parasite IgG3 and low anti-parasite IgG4 levels were associated with malaria resistance, the chromosomal regions linked to IgG3 and IgG4 levels are of special interest. Although the results should be confirmed in an independent population, they may provide new insights in understanding both the genetic control of IgG production and malaria resistance.

  8. A Genome-wide Association Study Provides Evidence of Sex-specific Involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46) With Diabetic Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Weihua; Deshmukh, Harshal A.; Donnelly, Louise A.; Torrance, Nicola; Colhoun, Helen M.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Smith, Blair H.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is defined as pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system and it affects around 1 in 4 diabetic patients in the UK. The purpose of this genome-wide association study (GWAS) was to identify genetic contributors to this disorder. Cases of neuropathic pain were defined as diabetic patients with a multiple prescription history of at least one of five drugs specifically indicated for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Controls were diabetic individuals who were not prescribed any of these drugs, nor amitriptyline, carbamazepine, or nortriptyline. Overall, 961 diabetic neuropathic pain cases and 3260 diabetic controls in the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research Tayside (GoDARTS) cohort were identified. We found a cluster in the Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) with a lowest P value of 2.74 × 10− 7 at rs71647933 in females and a cluster in the Chr8p23.1, next to HMGB1P46 with a lowest P value of 8.02 × 10− 7 at rs6986153 in males. Sex-specific narrow sense heritability was higher in males (30.0%) than in females (14.7%). This GWAS on diabetic neuropathic pain provides evidence for the sex-specific involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46) with the disorder, indicating the need for further research. PMID:26629533

  9. Synthesis of a novel chromium-phosphate built up with unprecedented [CR{sub 9}P{sub 12}O{sub 58}H{sub 12}]{sup 17-} clusters under hydrothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Xiong Dingbang; Yang Xinxin; Zhao Jingtai

    2007-07-15

    A new chromium-phosphate has been prepared under hydrothermal conditions for the first time. It crystallizes in the Monoclinic system, space group C2/c, a=17.002(3) A, b=26.333(5) A, c=16.017(4) A, {beta}=96.63 (3){sup o}, V=7123.07(2) A{sup 3} and Z=4. The crystal structure displays a centrosymmetric complex aggregate [Cr{sub 9}P{sub 12}O{sub 58}H{sub 12}]{sup 17-}, constructed from the unprecedented enneanucleus chromic core Cr{sub 9}O{sub 10} with peripheral ligations provided by 12 phosphate groups. The sodium ions and water as guests fill in the cavities among the clusters to satisfy the charge balance and keep the structural stability. The magnetic measurement indicates the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions. - Graphical abstract: Polyhedral representation of the oxo-chromium core in compound 1, showing the bridging function of phosphate groups around the octahedral chromium core (CrO{sub 6} octahedron, grey and transparent; Cr, green sphere; P, pink sphere; O, red sphere; H, small black sphere)

  10. Genome-wide scan of bipolar disorder and investigation of population stratification effects on linkage: support for susceptibility loci at 4q21, 7q36, 9p21, 12q24, 14q24, and 16p13.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, F; Zhao, C; Badger, J; Claffey, E; Dobrin, S; Roche, S; McKeon, P

    2007-09-05

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) is a complex genetic disorder with cycling symptoms of depression and mania. Despite the extreme complexity of this psychiatric disorder, attempts to localize genes which confer vulnerability to the disorder have had some success. Chromosomal regions including 4p16, 12q24, 18p11, 18q22, and 21q21 have been repeatedly linked to BPD in different populations. Here we present the results of a whole genome scan for linkage to BPD in an Irish population. Our most significant result was at 14q24 which yielded a non-parametric LOD (NPL) score of 3.27 at the D14S588 marker with a nominal P-value of 0.0006 under a narrow (bipolar type I only) model of affection. We previously reported linkage to 14q22-24 in a subset of the families tested in this analysis. We also obtained suggestive evidence for linkage at 4q21, 9p21, 12q24, and 16p13, chromosomal regions that have all been previously linked to BPD. Additionally, we report on a novel approach to linkage analysis, STRUCTURE-Guided Linkage Analysis (SGLA), which is designed to reduce genetic heterogeneity and increase the power to detect linkage. Application of this technique resulted in more highly significant evidence for linkage of BPD to three regions including 16p13, a locus that has been repeatedly linked to numerous psychiatric disorders.

  11. UV spectroscopy, refractive indices and elastic properties of the (76 - x) TeO2·9P2O5·15ZnO·xLiNbO3 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, El Sayed; Al-Qaisi, Badriah

    2013-05-01

    Tellurite glass with composition (76 - x) TeO2·9P2O5·15ZnO·xLiNbO3 (where x = 12.5, 25, 30 and 35 in mol%) have been prepared by melt-quenching method. The optical properties of the glass were estimated by measuring UV-VIS spectroscopy and refractive indices at different wavelength. From the absorption edge studies, the optical energy gap (Eopt) and Urbach energy (ΔE) has been evaluated. Moreover mechanical properties with structural properties of the glasses were investigated by measuring both longitudinal and shear velocities by using the pulse-echo overlap technique at 5 MHz. The elastic moduli such as: longitudinal (λ), shear (μ), bulk (B) and Young's (Y) increase with the increase in LiNbO3 content in the prepared glasses matrix. The different physical parameters such as density, molar volume, oxygen molar volume, oxygen packing density, molar polarizability, Debye temperature, microhardness, Poisson's ratio, kinetic fragility and fractal bond connectivity have been computed and were found to depend on the glass composition.

  12. Pre- and postnatal findings in a patient with a novel rec(8)dup(8q)inv(8)(p23.2q22.3) associated with San Luis Valley syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vera-Carbonell, Ascensión; López-González, Vanesa; Bafalliu, Juan Antonio; Piñero-Fernández, Juan; Susmozas, Joaquín; Sorli, Moisés; López-Pérez, Rocío; Fernández, Asunción; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; López-Expósito, Isabel

    2013-09-01

    San Luis Valley syndrome, which is due to a recombinant chromosome 8 (SLV Rec8) found in Hispanic individuals from Southwestern United States, is a well-established syndrome associated with intellectual disabilities and, frequently, severe cardiac anomalies. We report for the first time on a Moroccan girl with a recombinant chromosome 8 prenatally diagnosed as SLV Rec8 by conventional cytogenetic studies. At birth, an oligo array-CGH (105 K) defined the breakpoints and the size of the imbalanced segments, with a deletion of ≈ 2.27 Mb (8p23.2-pter) and a duplication of ≈ 41.93 Mb (8q22.3-qter); thus this recombinant chromosome 8 differed from that previously reported in SLV Rec8 syndrome. The phenotypic characteristics associated with this SLV Rec8 genotype overlap those commonly found in patients with 8q duplication reported in the literature. We review SLV Rec8 and other chromosome 8 aberrations and suggest that the overexpression of cardiogenic genes located at 8q may be the cause of the cardiac defects in this patient.

  13. Nano-crystallization and magnetic mechanisms of Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 1} amorphous alloy by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yaocen; Takeuchi, Akira; Makino, Akihiro; Liang, Yunye; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-05-07

    Iron-based amorphous and nano-crystalline alloys have attracted a growing interest due to their potential in the application of magnetic coil production. However, fundamental understanding of the nano-crystallization mechanisms and magnetic features in the amorphous structure are still lack of knowledge. In the present work, we performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulation to clarify the ionic and electronic structure in atomic scale, and to derive the origin of the good magnetic property of Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 1} amorphous alloy. The simulation gave a direct evidence of the Cu-P bonding preference in the amorphous alloy, which may promote nucleation in nano-crystallization process. On the other hand, the electron transfer and the band/orbital features in the amorphous alloy suggests that alloying elements with large electronegativity and the potential to expand Fe disordered matrix are preferred for enhancing the magnetization.

  14. Suppression of Heregulin-β1/HER2-Modulated Invasive and Aggressive Phenotype of Breast Carcinoma by Pterostilbene via Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, p38 Kinase Cascade and Akt Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Min-Hsiung; Lin, Ying-Ting; Lin, Chih-Li; Wei, Chi-Shiang; Ho, Chi-Tang; Chen, Wei-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Invasive breast cancer is the major cause of death among females and its incidence is closely linked to HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) overexpression. Pterostilbene, a natural analog of resveratrol, exerts its cancer chemopreventive activity similar to resveratrol by inhibiting cancer cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. However, the anti-invasive effect of pterostilbene on HER2-bearing breast cancer has not been evaluated. Here, we used heregulin-β1 (HRG-β1), a ligand for HER3, to transactivate HER2 signaling. We found that pterostilbene was able to suppress HRG-β1-mediated cell invasion, motility and cell transformation of MCF-7 human breast carcinoma through down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity and growth inhibition. In parallel, pterostilbene also inhibited protein and mRNA expression of MMP-9 driven by HRG-β1, suggesting that pterostilbene decreased HRG-β1-mediated MMP-9 induction via transcriptional regulation. Examining the signaling pathways responsible for HRG-β1-associated MMP-9 induction and growth inhibition, we observed that pterostilbene, as well as SB203580 (p38 kinase inhibitor), can abolish the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 kinase), a downstream HRG-β1-responsive kinase responsible for MMP-9 induction. In addition, HRG-β1-driven Akt phosphorylation required for cell proliferation was also suppressed by pterostilbene. Taken together, our present results suggest that pterostilbene may serve as a chemopreventive agent to inhibit HRG-β1/HER2-mediated aggressive and invasive phenotype of breast carcinoma through down-regulation of MMP-9, p38 kinase and Akt activation. PMID:19617202

  15. Synthesis and characterization of 9-[P-(N, N-dipropyl sulfamide)] benzoylamino-1,2,3,4-4H-acridine--a potential prodrug for the CNS delivery of tacrine.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tao; Huang, Yuan; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; Li, Li-Li

    2004-04-01

    9-[P-(N,N-dipropylsulfamide)]benzoylamino-1,2,3,4-4H-acridine (PTHA) was synthesized as a prodrug to improve the curative effect of tacrine hydrochloride (THA), to prolong the activation time in brain, and to decrease the hepatic toxicity. The prodrug was prepared by attaching carboxyl group of probenecid to 9-amino group of THA. The structure of PTHA was confirmed by IR, HNMR, MS and UV. The physiochemical properties and stabilities of the prodrug under various conditions were investigated. Possibility of the prodrug passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was evaluated in vitro by biopartition micellar chromatography (BMC). The concentrations of THA and PTHA in various tissues were determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography after intravenous (i.v.) administration. The results showed PTHA was stable in various pHs and temperatures. It was indicated by partition coefficient in ethyl acetate/water that lipophilicity of the prodrug increased and it was predicted by BMC that the prodrug could improve the infiltration ability across BBB of THA. In-vivo experiment showed the concentrations of THA in brain and liver kept stable for about 4 h, which was beneficial for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Compared with THA at the same time, AUC in liver decreases significantly, the overall targeting efficiency (TE) was enhanced from 10.97 to 16.11% and AUC(brain)/AUC(liver) increased from 1.52 to 2.53, which suggests the possibility to reduce the hepatic toxicity of THA by the way of the prodrug.

  16. Evolution of fcc Cu clusters and their structure changes in the soft magnetic Fe85.2Si1B9P4Cu0.8 (NANOMET) and FINEMET alloys observed by X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, M.; Nishijima, M.; Takenaka, K.; Takeuchi, A.; Ofuchi, H.; Makino, A.

    2015-05-01

    It is known that Cu plays an essential role in reducing the grain size of precipitated bcc Fe(Si) nanocrystallites in a nanocrystalline soft-magnetic Fe85.2Si1B9P4Cu0.8 (NANOMET®) alloys like as an Fe73.5Si13.5B9Nb3Cu1 (FINEMET®). However, significant differences are there between two alloys; NANOMET has much higher iron content (˜85%) than FINEMET (73.5%) and the former contains P instead of Nb for the latter. In the present work, the local structure around Cu in FINEMET was measured by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) at 20 K and compared with those of NANOMET during nanocrystallization. Definite differences between NANOMET and FINEMET are found in the way of the evolution of Cu clusters during nanocrystallization. In FINEMET, an fcc structure of Cu is recognized in an as-quenched ribbon indicating existence of a small number of Cu clusters or a very small size of Cu clusters which is stable up to 450 °C, while the fcc Cu clusters are developed rapidly above 450 °C. An fcc structure of the Cu clusters in FINEMET is retained all the way to the end of the nanocrystallization. On the contrary, for NANOMET the local structure around Cu changes in a sequence as "amorphous → fcc → bcc → fcc" by annealing. The reasons of such different behaviors of the local structure around Cu during nanocrystallization are discussed in terms of different contributions of Cu clusters in bcc Fe precipitation between FINEMET and NANOMET. A significantly fast crystallization process with an extraordinary large heat release can be another reason for the transition of the local structure around Cu from fcc to bcc for NANOMET.

  17. Phase transition from fcc to bcc structure of the Cu-clusters during nanocrystallization of Fe85.2Si1B9P4Cu0.8 soft magnetic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Masahiko; Matsuura, Makoto; Takenaka, Kana; Takeuchi, Akira; Ofuchi, Hironori; Makino, Akihiro

    2014-05-01

    A role of Cu on the nanocrystallization of an Fe85.2Si1B9P4Cu0.8 alloy was investigated by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Cu K-edge XAFS results show that local structure around Cu is disordered for the as-quenched sample whereas it changes to fcc-like structure at 613 K. The fcc Cu-clusters are, however, thermodynamically unstable and begin to transform into bcc structure at 638 K. An explicit bcc structure is observed for the sample annealed at 693 K for 600 s in which TEM observation shows that precipitated bcc-Fe crystallites with ˜12 nm are homogeneously distributed. The bcc structure of the Cu-clusters transforms into the fcc-type again at 973 K, which can be explained by the TEM observations; Cu segregates at grain boundaries between bcc-Fe crystallites and Fe3(B,P) compounds. Combining the XAFS results with the TEM observations, the structure transition of the Cu-clusters from fcc to bcc is highly correlated with the preliminary precipitation of the bcc-Fe which takes place prior to the onset of the first crystallization temperature, Tx1 = 707 K. Thermodynamic analysis suggests that an interfacial energy density γ between an fcc-Cu cluster and bcc-Fe matrix dominates at a certain case over the structural energy between fcc and bcc Cu, ΔGfcc - bcc, which causes phase transition of the Cu clusters from fcc to bcc structure.

  18. Common variants at 12p11, 12q24, 9p21, 9q31.2 and in ZNF365 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Several common alleles have been shown to be associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recent genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified eight additional breast cancer susceptibility loci: rs1011970 (9p21, CDKN2A/B), rs10995190 (ZNF365), rs704010 (ZMIZ1), rs2380205 (10p15), rs614367 (11q13), rs1292011 (12q24), rs10771399 (12p11 near PTHLH) and rs865686 (9q31.2). Methods To evaluate whether these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers and analysed the associations with breast cancer risk within a retrospective likelihood framework. Results Only SNP rs10771399 near PTHLH was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.81 to 0.94, P-trend = 3 × 10-4). The association was restricted to mutations proven or predicted to lead to absence of protein expression (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 3.1 × 10-5, P-difference = 0.03). Four SNPs were associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs10995190, P-trend = 0.015; rs1011970, P-trend = 0.048; rs865686, 2df-P = 0.007; rs1292011 2df-P = 0.03. rs10771399 (PTHLH) was predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 4 × 10-5) and there was marginal evidence of association with ER-negative breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.62 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.049). Conclusions The present findings, in combination with previously identified modifiers of risk, will ultimately lead to more accurate risk prediction and an improved understanding of the disease etiology in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22348646

  19. Electronic Structure of the Metal Center in the Cd[superscript 2+], Zn[superscript 2+], and Cu[superscript 2+] Substituted Forms of KDO8P Synthase: Implications for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kona, Fathima; Tao, Peng; Martin, Philip; Xu, Xingjue; Gatti, Domenico L.

    2009-07-31

    Aquifex aeolicus 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate synthase (KDO8PS) is active with a variety of different divalent metal ions bound in the active site. The Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} substituted enzymes display similar values of k{sub cat} and similar dependence of K{sub m}{sup PEP} and K{sub m}{sup A5P} on both substrate and product concentrations. However, the flux-control coefficients for some of the catalytically relevant reaction steps are different in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+}, suggesting that the type of metal bound in the active site affects the behavior of the enzyme in vivo. The type of metal also affects the rate of product release in the crystal environment. For example, the crystal structure of the Cu{sup 2+} enzyme incubated with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and arabinose 5-phosphate (A5P) shows the formed product, 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate (KDO8P), still bound in the active site in its linear conformation. This observation completes our structural studies of the condensation reaction, which altogether have provided high-resolution structures for the reactants, the intermediate, and the product bound forms of KDO8PS. The crystal structures of the Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} substituted enzymes show four residues (Cys-11, His-185, Glu-222, and Asp-233) and a water molecule as possible metal ligands. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) geometry optimizations reveal that the metal centers have a delocalized electronic structure, and that their true geometry is square pyramidal for Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} and distorted octahedral or distorted tetrahedral for Cu{sup 2+}. These geometries are different from those obtained by QM optimization in the gas phase (tetrahedral for Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}, distorted tetrahedral for Cu{sup 2+}) and may represent conformations of the metal center that minimize the reorganization energy between the substrate-bound and product-bound states

  20. Double partial trisomy of 6p23-pter and 9pter-q21.2 in a neonate resulting from 4:2 meiotic segregation of a maternal complex t(6;7;9)(p23;p15;q21.2) translocation.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Z; Mihci, E; Keser, I; Karaali, K; Berker, S; Luleci, G

    2012-01-01

    We report, a newborn presenting multiple congenital abnormalities with karyotype; 47,XY,der(7)t(6;7)(pter-p23::p15-->qter),+der(9)t(7;9)(pter-->p15::q21.2--> pter)t(6;7;9)(p23;p15;q21.2)mat[20]. The mother and her phenotypically normal daughter were carriers of a complex chromosomal rearrangement with karyotypes; 46,XX,t(6;7;9)(p23;p15;q21.2)[20]. Paternal chromosomes were normal. In our case the extra derivative chromosome was the result of a 4:2 segregation of the chromosomes involved in translocation during oogenesis. Double partial trisomy in newborns resulting from 4:2 segregation is a rare event, and double partial trisomies of the 6p23-pter and trisomy 9pter-q22 regions have not reported to date.

  1. 75 FR 21623 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form Nos. 6 and 6-Q); Comment Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... FERC, as well as customers, investors and others, an important tool to help identify emerging trends... profitability, efficiency, risk and in its overall monitoring. A summary of the comment received (from the...

  2. 78 FR 8500 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 6-Q); Comment Request; Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... information concerning a company's past performance and its future prospects. Without reliable financial... well as customers, investors and others, an important tool to help identify emerging trends and...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: 6q24-related transient neonatal diabetes mellitus

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes mellitus and why the condition improves after infancy. The protein produced from the PLAGL1 gene helps ... of physiologic stress, including the rapid growth of infancy, childhood illnesses, and pregnancy. Because insulin acts as ...

  4. 18 CFR 357.4 - FERC Form No. 6-Q, Quarterly report of oil pipeline companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... must be properly completed and verified. Filing on electronic media pursuant to § 385.2011 of this... FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT ANNUAL SPECIAL OR PERIODIC REPORTS: CARRIERS SUBJECT TO PART I OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 357.4 FERC...

  5. 18 CFR 357.4 - FERC Form No. 6-Q, Quarterly report of oil pipeline companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... must be properly completed and verified. Filing on electronic media pursuant to § 385.2011 of this... FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT ANNUAL SPECIAL OR PERIODIC REPORTS: CARRIERS SUBJECT TO PART I OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 357.4 FERC...

  6. 18 CFR 357.4 - FERC Form No. 6-Q, Quarterly report of oil pipeline companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT ANNUAL SPECIAL OR PERIODIC REPORTS: CARRIERS SUBJECT TO PART I OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 357.4 FERC Form... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false FERC Form No....

  7. Genetics Home Reference: 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) American Cancer ... Khuri F, Chen J. 14-3-3 Integrates prosurvival signals mediated by the AKT and MAPK pathways in ZNF198-FGFR1-transformed hematopoietic cells. Blood. 2007 ...

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of binary Fe{sub 85}B{sub 15} to quinary Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 1} alloys for primary crystallizations of α-Fe in nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, A. Zhang, Y.; Takenaka, K.; Makino, A.

    2015-05-07

    Fe-based Fe{sub 85}B{sub 15}, Fe{sub 84}B{sub 15}Cu{sub 1}, Fe{sub 82}Si{sub 2}B{sub 15}Cu{sub 1}, Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 12}Cu{sub 1}, and Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 1} (NANOMET{sup ®}) alloys were experimental and computational analyzed to clarify the features of NANOMET that exhibits high saturation magnetic flux density (B{sub s}) nearly 1.9 T and low core loss than conventional nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys. The X-ray diffraction analysis for ribbon specimens produced experimentally by melt spinning from melts revealed that the samples were almost formed into an amorphous single phase. Then, the as-quenched samples were analyzed with differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimentally for exothermic enthalpies of the primary and secondary crystallizations (ΔH{sub x1} and ΔH{sub x2}) and their crystallization temperatures (T{sub x1} and T{sub x2}), respectively. The ratio ΔH{sub x1}/ΔH{sub x2} measured by DSC experimentally tended to be extremely high for the Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 1} alloy, and this tendency was reproduced by the analysis with commercial software, Thermo-Calc, with database for Fe-based alloys, TCFE7 for Gibbs free energy (G) assessments. The calculations exhibit that a volume fraction (V{sub f}) of α-Fe tends to increase from 0.56 for the Fe{sub 85}B{sub 15} to 0.75 for the Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 1} alloy. The computational analysis of the alloys for G of α-Fe and amorphous phases (G{sub α-Fe} and G{sub amor}) shows that a relationship G{sub α-Fe} ∼ G{sub amor} holds for the Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 12}Cu{sub 1}, whereas G{sub α-Fe} < G{sub amor} for the Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 1} alloy at T{sub x1} and that an extremely high V{sub f} = 0.75 was achieved for the Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 1} alloy by including 2.8 at. % Si and 4.5 at. % P into α-Fe. These computational results indicate that the Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B

  9. Phase transition from fcc to bcc structure of the Cu-clusters during nanocrystallization of Fe{sub 85.2}Si{sub 1}B{sub 9}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 0.8} soft magnetic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Nishijima, Masahiko; Matsuura, Makoto; Takenaka, Kana; Takeuchi, Akira; Makino, Akihiro; Ofuchi, Hironori

    2014-05-15

    A role of Cu on the nanocrystallization of an Fe{sub 85.2}Si{sub 1}B{sub 9}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 0.8} alloy was investigated by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Cu K-edge XAFS results show that local structure around Cu is disordered for the as-quenched sample whereas it changes to fcc-like structure at 613 K. The fcc Cu-clusters are, however, thermodynamically unstable and begin to transform into bcc structure at 638 K. An explicit bcc structure is observed for the sample annealed at 693 K for 600 s in which TEM observation shows that precipitated bcc-Fe crystallites with ∼12 nm are homogeneously distributed. The bcc structure of the Cu-clusters transforms into the fcc-type again at 973 K, which can be explained by the TEM observations; Cu segregates at grain boundaries between bcc-Fe crystallites and Fe{sub 3}(B,P) compounds. Combining the XAFS results with the TEM observations, the structure transition of the Cu-clusters from fcc to bcc is highly correlated with the preliminary precipitation of the bcc-Fe which takes place prior to the onset of the first crystallization temperature, T{sub x1} = 707 K. Thermodynamic analysis suggests that an interfacial energy density γ between an fcc-Cu cluster and bcc-Fe matrix dominates at a certain case over the structural energy between fcc and bcc Cu, ΔG{sub fcc} {sub −} {sub bcc}, which causes phase transition of the Cu clusters from fcc to bcc structure.

  10. Non-mosaic tetrasomy 9p in a liveborn infant with multiple congenital anomalies: Case report and comparison with trisomy 9p

    SciTech Connect

    Leichtman, L.G.; Zackowski, J.L.; Storto, P.D.; Newlin, A.

    1996-06-14

    Tetrasomy of the short(p) arm of chromosome 9 has been reported in few cases. Most of these children present with microbrachycephaly, wide forehead, hypertelorism, lowset, malformed ears, beaked noses, and micrognathia. Additional anomalies include short neck, congenital heart disease, genital abnormalities, multiple limb defects, hypotonia, and early death.

  11. The genetics of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: dissecting psychosis.

    PubMed

    Craddock, N; O'Donovan, M C; Owen, M J

    2005-03-01

    Much work has been done to identify susceptibility genes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Several well established linkages have emerged in schizophrenia. Strongly supported regions are 6p24-22, 1q21-22, and 13q32-34, while other promising regions include 8p21-22, 6q16-25, 22q11-12, 5q21-q33, 10p15-p11, and 1q42. Genomic regions of interest in bipolar disorder include 6q16-q22, 12q23-q24, and regions of 9p22-p21, 10q21-q22, 14q24-q32, 13q32-q34, 22q11-q22, and chromosome 18. Recently, specific genes or loci have been implicated in both disorders and, crucially, replicated. Current evidence supports NRG1, DTNBP1, DISC1, DAOA(G72), DAO, and RGS4 as schizophrenia susceptibility loci. For bipolar disorder the strongest evidence supports DAOA(G72) and BDNF. Increasing evidence suggests an overlap in genetic susceptibility across the traditional classification systems that dichotomised psychotic disorders into schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, most notably with association findings at DAOA(G72), DISC1, and NRG1. Future identification of psychosis susceptibility genes will have a major impact on our understanding of disease pathophysiology and will lead to changes in classification and the clinical practice of psychiatry.

  12. Localisation of the gene for cylindromatosis (turban tumor syndrome) to chromosome 9p12-13

    SciTech Connect

    Wooster, R.; Mangion, J.; Quirk, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Cylindromatosis (multiple cylindromas, tomato syndrome syndrome, turban tumor syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by the development of multiple, slow growing neoplasms of the skin appendages. The tumors, known as dermal cylindromas, exhibit histological features of eccrine or apocrine sweat glands and occur most commonly in the scalp area. Genetic linkage analysis of two families yielded a maximum two point LOD score of 3.2 at D9S169. Critical recombinants place the gene between D9S161 and IFN, a distance of approximately 9 cM. This region of chromosome 9 harbors a gene that encodes a 16 kD protein which is an inhibitor of cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK-4) and which is somatically mutated in many classes of cancer. However, the observation of recombinants between the disease and a polymorphic microsatellite repeat CT29 close to this gene, suggests that the CDK-4 inhibitor gene is unlikely to be responsible for cylindromatosis.

  13. The nucleus of Comet 9P/Tempel 1: Shape and geology from two flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P.; A'Hearn, M.; Belton, M. J. S.; Brownlee, D.; Carcich, B.; Hermalyn, B.; Klaasen, K.; Sackett, S.; Schultz, P. H.; Veverka, J.; Bhaskaran, S.; Bodewits, D.; Chesley, S.; Clark, B.; Farnham, T.; Groussin, O.; Harris, A.; Kissel, J.; Li, J.-Y.; Meech, K.; Melosh, J.; Quick, A.; Richardson, J.; Sunshine, J.; Wellnitz, D.

    2013-02-01

    The nucleus of comet Tempel 1 has been investigated at close range during two spacecraft missions separated by one comet orbit of the Sun, 5½ years. The combined imaging covers ˜70% of the surface of this object which has a mean radius of 2.83 ± 0.1 km. The surface can be divided into two terrain types: rough, pitted terrain and smoother regions of varying local topography. The rough surface has round depressions from resolution limits (˜10 m/pixel) up to ˜1 km across, spanning forms from crisp steep-walled pits, to subtle albedo rings, to topographic rings, with all ranges of morphologic gradation. Three gravitationally low regions of the comet have smoother terrain, parts of which appear to be deposits from minimally modified flows, with other parts likely to be heavily eroded portions of multiple layer piles. Changes observed between the two missions are primarily due to backwasting of scarps bounding one of these probable flow deposits. This style of erosion is also suggested by remnant mesa forms in other areas of smoother terrain. The two distinct terrains suggest either an evolutionary change in processes, topographically-controlled processes, or a continuing interaction of erosion and deposition.

  14. The Nucleus of Comet 9P-Tempel 1: Shape and Geology from Two Flybys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; A'Hearn, M.; Belton, M. J. S.; Brownlee, D.; Carcich, B.; Hermalyn, B.; Klaasen, K.; Sackett, S.; Schultz, P. H.; Veverka, J.; Bhaskaran, S.; Bodewits, D.; Chesley, S.; Clark, B.; Farnham, T.; Groussin, O.; Harris, J.; Kissel, J.; Li, J.-Y; Meech, K.; Melosh, J.; Quick, A.; Richardson, J.; Sunshine, J.; Wellnitz, D.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus of comet Tempel 1 has been investigated at close range during two spacecraft missions separated by one comet orbit of the Sun, 5 1/2 years. The combined imaging covers 70% of the surface of this object which has a mean radius of 2.83 +/- 0.1 km. The surface can be divided into two terrain types: rough, pitted terrain and smoother regions of varying local topography. The rough surface has round depressions from resolution limits (10 m/pixel) up to 1 km across, spanning forms from crisp steep-walled pits, to subtle albedo rings, to topographic rings, with all ranges of morphologic gradation. Three gravitationally low regions of the comet have smoother terrain, parts of which appear to be deposits from minimally modified flows, with other parts likely to be heavily eroded portions of multiple layer piles. Changes observed between the two missions are primarily due to backwasting of scarps bounding one of these probable flow deposits. This style of erosion is also suggested by remnant mesa forms in other areas of smoother terrain. The two distinct terrains suggest either an evolutionary change in processes, topographically- controlled processes, or a continuing interaction of erosion and deposition.

  15. Ground Optical Navigation for the Stardust-Next Mission to Comet 9P/TEMPEL1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillam, Stephen D.; Riedel, J. Ed.; Owen, William M., Jr.; Wang, Tseng-Chan Mike; Werner, Robert A.; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Chesley, Steven R.; Thompson, Paul F.; Wolf, Aron A.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based optical navigation (OpNav) using pictures taken by the Naviga-tion camera on the Stardust spacecraft provided the target-relative information needed to design maneuvers during its approach to comet Tempel 1. Hardware problems, limited downlink bandwidth, and changes in the flight profile affected the OpNav picture schedule, sometimes in near-real time. The Stardust naviga-tion camera and attitude control presented challenges. Picture-processing techniques were developed during approach that included background estimation, co-addition, and co-registration. These techniques, along with adaptive picture scheduling, successfully addressed the challenges.

  16. Deep Impact 9P/TEMPEL Cruise - Raw its Nav Images V1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcich, B.; Shaw, A. S.; Desnoyer, M.; McLaughlin, S. A.; Mastrodemos, N.; Klaasen, K. P.

    2010-01-01

    This data set contains raw calibration and test images acquired by the Deep Impact Impactor Targeting Sensor Visible CCD during the cruise phase of the mission. These observations were used for optical and autonomous navigation (NAV) of the impactor spacecraft. These data were collected from 7 April to 30 April 2005. The comet was not imaged during cruise. In this version 1.1 of the data set, the values for the INTEGRATION_DURATION keyword in the PDS data labels were corrected. This revised data set supersedes version 1.0.

  17. Parent volatiles in comet 9P/Tempel 1: before and after impact.

    PubMed

    Mumma, Michael J; DiSanti, Michael A; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Bonev, Boncho P; Villanueva, Geronimo L; Kawakita, Hideyo; Dello Russo, Neil; Gibb, Erika L; Blake, Geoffrey A; Lyke, James E; Campbell, Randall D; Aycock, Joel; Conrad, Al; Hill, Grant M

    2005-10-14

    We quantified eight parent volatiles (H2O, C2H6, HCN, CO, CH3OH, H2CO, C2H2, and CH4) in the Jupiter-family comet Tempel 1 using high-dispersion infrared spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2.8 to 5.0 micrometers. The abundance ratio for ethane was significantly higher after impact, whereas those for methanol and hydrogen cyanide were unchanged. The abundance ratios in the ejecta are similar to those for most Oort cloud comets, but methanol and acetylene are lower in Tempel 1 by a factor of about 2. These results suggest that the volatile ices in Tempel 1 and in most Oort cloud comets originated in a common region of the protoplanetary disk.

  18. Parent volatiles in comet 9P/Tempel 1: before and after impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Bonev, Boncho P.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Kawakita, Hideyo; Dello Russo, Neil; Gibb, Erika L.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Lyke, James E.; Campbell, Randall D.; Aycock, Joel; Conrad, Al; Hill, Grant M.

    2005-01-01

    We quantified eight parent volatiles (H2O, C2H6, HCN, CO, CH3OH, H2CO, C2H2, and CH4) in the Jupiter-family comet Tempel 1 using high-dispersion infrared spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2.8 to 5.0 micrometers. The abundance ratio for ethane was significantly higher after impact, whereas those for methanol and hydrogen cyanide were unchanged. The abundance ratios in the ejecta are similar to those for most Oort cloud comets, but methanol and acetylene are lower in Tempel 1 by a factor of about 2. These results suggest that the volatile ices in Tempel 1 and in most Oort cloud comets originated in a common region of the protoplanetary disk.

  19. A Girl with Pervasive Developmental Disorder and Complex Chromosome Rearrangement Involving 8p and 10p

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaigenbaum, L; Sonnenberg, L. K.; Heshka, T.; Eastwood, S.; Xu, J.

    2005-01-01

    We report a 4-year-old girl with a "de novo", apparently balanced complex chromosome rearrangement. She initially presented for assessment of velopharyngeal insufficiency due to hypernasal speech. She has distinctive facial features (long face, broad nasal bridge, and protuberant ears with simplified helices), bifid uvula, strabismus,…

  20. Isolation of serotype G8, P6[1] bovine rotavirus from adult cattle with diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, M; Nakagomi, T; Tajima, K; Ezura, K; Akashi, H; Nakagomi, O

    1997-01-01

    Two electrophoretically identical strains of group A rotavirus were isolated from diarrheic cows aged 3, 4, and 7 years on a dairy farm in Japan. They had a rare serotype combination of G8 and P6[1] and were shown by RNA-RNA hybridization to be most closely related to bovine strain NCDV-Lincoln (G6P6[1]). PMID:9114422

  1. Candidate Luminal B Breast Cancer Genes Identified by Genome, Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype. PMID:24416132

  2. Candidate luminal B breast cancer genes identified by genome, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Cornen, Stéphanie; Guille, Arnaud; Adélaïde, José; Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Raynaud, Stéphane; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype.

  3. Chromosomal and Genetic Analysis of a Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OM

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Wu; Bai, Lin; Dai, Lyu-Xia; He, Xu; Zhou, Xian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer has become the leading cause of death in many regions. Carcinogenesis is caused by the stepwise accumulation of genetic and chromosomal changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosome and gene alterations in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM. Methods: We used Giemsa banding and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization focusing on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM to analyze its chromosome alterations. In addition, the gains and losses in the specific chromosome regions were identified by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the amplifications of cancer-related genes were also detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: We identified a large number of chromosomal numerical alterations on all chromosomes except chromosome X and 19. Chromosome 10 is the most frequently involved in translocations with six different interchromosomal translocations. CGH revealed the gains on chromosome regions of 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, and the losses on 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p13.31-13.33 and 17p13.1-13.3. And PCR showed the amplification of genes: Membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME), sucrase-isomaltase (SI), butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE), and kininogen (KNG). Conclusions: The lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM exhibited multiple complex karyotypes, and chromosome 10 was frequently involved in chromosomal translocation, which may play key roles in tumorigenesis. We speculated that the oncogenes may be located at 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, while tumor suppressor genes may exist in 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p13.31-13.33, and 17p13.1-13.3. Moreover, at least four genes (MME, SI, BCHE, and KNG) may be involved in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM. PMID:26879013

  4. A cluster of ten novel MHC class I related genes on human chromosome 6q24.2-q25.3.

    PubMed

    Radosavljevic, Mirjana; Cuillerier, Benoît; Wilson, Michael J; Clément, Oliver; Wicker, Sophie; Gilfillan, Susan; Beck, Stephan; Trowsdale, John; Bahram, Seiamak

    2002-01-01

    We have identified a novel family of human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes. This MHC class I related gene family is defined by 10 members, among which 6 encode potentially functional glycoproteins. The 180-kb cluster containing them has been generated by serial duplication and minimal diversification of an ancestral prototype. They are not located within the MHC on 6p21.3, but near the tip of its long arm at q24.2-q25.3, close to the human equivalent of the mouse H2-linked t-complex, a subchromosomal region syntenic to a segment of mouse chromosome 10 harboring the orthologous MHC class I related retinoic acid early transcript loci, Raet1a-d. Hence we have named the identified loci RAET1E-N. Human RAET1 products are all devoid of the membrane-proximal immunoglobulin-like alpha3 domain and most, but not all, are predicted to remain membrane-anchored via glycosylphosphatidylinositol linkage and are shown to display an atypical pattern of polymorphism. RAET1 transcripts are absent from hematopoietic tissues, but largely expressed in tumors. The involvement of orthologous mouse RAET1A-D/H60 in natural killer and T-cell activation through NKG2D engagement augurs a similar function for the human RAET1 proteins.

  5. Breast cancer risk variants at 6q25 display different phenotype associations and regulate ESR1, RMND1 and CCDC170.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Alison M; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Thompson, Deborah; French, Juliet D; Beesley, Jonathan; Healey, Catherine S; Kar, Siddhartha; Pooley, Karen A; Lopez-Knowles, Elena; Dicks, Ed; Barrowdale, Daniel; Sinnott-Armstrong, Nicholas A; Sallari, Richard C; Hillman, Kristine M; Kaufmann, Susanne; Sivakumaran, Haran; Moradi Marjaneh, Mahdi; Lee, Jason S; Hills, Margaret; Jarosz, Monika; Drury, Suzie; Canisius, Sander; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; González-Neira, Anna; Perez, Jose I A; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Eunjung, Lee; Arndt, Volker; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Ito, Hidemi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Bogdanova, Natasha; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Wu, Anna H; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Goldberg, Mark S; Teo, Soo H; Yip, Cheng Har; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei; Pylkäs, Katri; Winqvist, Robert; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark E; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Humphreys, Keith; Gao, Yu-Tang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Ghoussaini, Maya; Perkins, Barbara J; Shah, Mitul; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Kang, Daehee; Lee, Soo Chin; Hartman, Mikael; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Brennan, Paul; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Ambrosone, Christine B; Toland, Amanda E; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Kapuscinski, Miroslav; John, Esther M; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ejlertsen, Bent; Hansen, Thomas V O; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Rando, Rachel; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Manoukian, Siranoush; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Garber, Judy; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Frost, Debra; Izatt, Louise; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Rhiem, Kerstin; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Sagne, Charlotte; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen B M; De Leeneer, Kim; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Hooning, Maartje J; Rookus, Matti A; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Laframboise, Rachel; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R; Park, Sue Kyung; Lindor, Noralane; Couch, Fergus J; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Hulick, Peter J; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Piedmonte, Marion; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Bojesen, Anders; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria A; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rantala, Johanna; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ganz, Patricia A; Nussbaum, Robert L; Gayther, Simon A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Arun, Banu K; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Woolcott, Christy; Scott, Christopher; Stone, Jennifer; Apicella, Carmel; Tamimi, Rulla; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Helland, Åslaug; Haakensen, Vilde; Dowsett, Mitch; Pharoah, Paul D P; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; García-Closas, Montserrat; Vachon, Celine; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F; Edwards, Stacey L

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed 3,872 common genetic variants across the ESR1 locus (encoding estrogen receptor α) in 118,816 subjects from three international consortia. We found evidence for at least five independent causal variants, each associated with different phenotype sets, including estrogen receptor (ER(+) or ER(-)) and human ERBB2 (HER2(+) or HER2(-)) tumor subtypes, mammographic density and tumor grade. The best candidate causal variants for ER(-) tumors lie in four separate enhancer elements, and their risk alleles reduce expression of ESR1, RMND1 and CCDC170, whereas the risk alleles of the strongest candidates for the remaining independent causal variant disrupt a silencer element and putatively increase ESR1 and RMND1 expression.

  6. Breast cancer risk variants at 6q25 display different phenotype associations and regulate ESR1, RMND1 and CCDC170

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Alison M; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Thompson, Deborah; French, Juliet D; Beesley, Jonathan; Healey, Catherine S; Kar, Siddhartha; Pooley, Karen A; Lopez-Knowles, Elena; Dicks, Ed; Barrowdale, Daniel; Sinnott-Armstrong, Nicholas A; Sallari, Richard C; Hillman, Kristine M; Kaufmann, Susanne; Sivakumaran, Haran; Marjaneh, Mahdi Moradi; Lee, Jason S; Hills, Margaret; Jarosz, Monika; Drury, Suzie; Canisius, Sander; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; González-Neira, Anna; Perez, Jose I A; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Eunjung, Lee; Arndt, Volker; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Ito, Hidemi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Bogdanova, Natasha; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Wu, Anna H; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Goldberg, Mark S; Teo, Soo H; Yip, Cheng Har; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei; Pylkäs, Katri; Winqvist, Robert; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark E; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Humphreys, Keith; Gao, Yu-Tang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Ghoussaini, Maya; Perkins, Barbara J; Shah, Mitul; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Kang, Daehee; Lee, Soo Chin; Hartman, Mikael; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Brennan, Paul; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Ambrosone, Christine B; Toland, Amanda E; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Kapuscinski, Miroslav; John, Esther M; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ejlertsen, Bent; Hansen, Thomas V O; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Rando, Rachel; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Manoukian, Siranoush; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Garber, Judy; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Frost, Debra; Izatt, Louise; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Rhiem, Kerstin; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Sagne, Charlotte; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen B M; De Leeneer, Kim; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Hooning, Maartje J; Rookus, Matti A; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Laframboise, Rachel; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R; Park, Sue Kyung; Lindor, Noralane; Couch, Fergus J; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Hulick, Peter J; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Piedmonte, Marion; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Bojesen, Anders; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria A; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rantala, Johanna; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ganz, Patricia A; Nussbaum, Robert L; Gayther, Simon A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Arun, Banu K; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Woolcott, Christy; Scott, Christopher; Stone, Jennifer; Apicella, Carmel; Tamimi, Rulla; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Helland, Åslaug; Haakensen, Vilde; Dowsett, Mitch; Pharoah, Paul D P; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; García-Closas, Montserrat; Vachon, Celine; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F; Edwards, Stacey L

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed 3,872 common genetic variants across the ESR1 locus (encoding estrogen receptor α) in 118,816 subjects from three international consortia. We found evidence for at least five independent causal variants, each associated with different phenotype sets, including estrogen receptor (ER+ or ER−) and human ERBB2 (HER2+ or HER2−) tumor subtypes, mammographic density and tumor grade. The best candidate causal variants for ER− tumors lie in four separate enhancer elements, and their risk alleles reduce expression of ESR1, RMND1 and CCDC170, whereas the risk alleles of the strongest candidates for the remaining independent causal variant disrupt a silencer element and putatively increase ESR1 and RMND1 expression. PMID:26928228

  7. Assignment of the gene encoding the 5-HT{sub 1E} serotonin receptor (S31) (locus HTR1E) to human chromosome 6q14-q15

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, F.O.; Tasken, K.; Solberg, R.

    1994-08-01

    The human gene for the 5-HT{sub 1E} serotonin receptor was recently cloned, but no chromosomal assignment has yet been given to this gene (locus HTR1E). In this work, we demonstrate by two independent polymerase chain reactions on a panel of human-hamster somatic cell hybrid genomic DNA that the 5-HT{sub 1E} serotonin receptor gene is localized on human chromosome 6. Furthermore, by means of in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes, using the cloned 5-HT{sub 1E} receptor gene (phage clone {lambda}-S31) as a probe, we demonstrate that this gene is localized to the q14-q15 region on chromosome 6. Screening of genomic DNA from 15 unrelated Caucasian individuals, using as a probe the open reading frame of the cloned 5-HT{sub 1E} receptor gene, did not reveal any restriction fragment length polymorphisms with the enzymes BamHI, BanII, BglII, EcoRI, HincII, HindIII, HinfI, MspI, PstI, and PvuII. Since the 5-HT{sub 1E} receptor is found mainly in the cerebral cortex and abnormal function of the serotonergic system has been implicated in a variety of neurologic and psychiatric diseases, the precise chromosomal assignment of the 5-HT{sub 1E} receptor gene is the crucial first step toward the evaluation of this locus as a candidate for mutations in such syndromes. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. 31 CFR 30.6 - Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirement under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance the compensation of any of the TARP... manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance the compensation of any of the TARP... plans that could encourage the manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance...

  9. 31 CFR 30.6 - Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirement under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance the compensation of any of the TARP... manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance the compensation of any of the TARP... plans that could encourage the manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance...

  10. 31 CFR 30.6 - Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirement under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance the compensation of any of the TARP... manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance the compensation of any of the TARP... plans that could encourage the manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance...

  11. 31 CFR 30.6 - Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirement under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance the compensation of any of the TARP... manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance the compensation of any of the TARP... plans that could encourage the manipulation of reported earnings of the TARP recipient to enhance...

  12. Comprehensive high-resolution genomic profiling and cytogenetics of two pediatric and one adult medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Holland, Heidrun; Xu, Li-Xin; Ahnert, Peter; Kirsten, Holger; Koschny, Ronald; Bauer, Manfred; Schober, Ralf; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Krupp, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    Medulloblastoma (WHO grade IV) is a rare, malignant, invasive, embryonal tumor which mainly occurs in children and represents less than 1% of all adult brain tumors. Systematic comprehensive genetic analyses on medulloblastomas are rare but necessary to provide more detailed information. Therefore, we performed comprehensive cytogenetic analyses (blood and tissue) of two pediatric and one adult medulloblastoma, using trypsin-Giemsa staining, spectral karyotyping (tissues only), SNP-arrays, and gene expression analyses. We confirmed frequently detected chromosomal aberrations in medulloblastoma, such as +7q, -8p/q, -9q, -11q, -12q, and +17q and identified novel genetic events. Applying SNP-array, we identified constitutional de novo losses 5q21.1, 15q11.2, 17q21.31, 19p12 (pediatric medulloblastoma), 9p21.1, 19p12, 19q13.3, 21q11.2 (adult medulloblastoma) and gains 16p11.1-16p11.2, 18p11.32, Yq11.223-Yq11.23 (pediatric medulloblastoma), Xp22.31 (adult medulloblastoma) possibly representing inherited causal events for medulloblastoma formation. We show evidence for somatic segmental uniparental disomy in regions 1p36, 6q16.3, 6q24.1, 14q21.2, 17p13.3, and 17q22 not previously described for primary medulloblastoma. Gene expression analysis supported classification of the adult medulloblastoma to the WNT-subgroup and classification of pediatric medulloblastomas to group 3 tumors. Analyses of tumors and matched normal tissues (blood) with a combination of complementary techniques will help to further elucidate potentially causal genetic events for medulloblastomas.

  13. High resolution SNP array genomic profiling of peripheral T cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified, identifies a subgroup with chromosomal aberrations affecting the REL locus.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sylvia; Gesk, Stefan; Scholtysik, René; Kreuz, Markus; Bug, Stefanie; Vater, Inga; Döring, Claudia; Cogliatti, Sergio; Parrens, Marie; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Kwiecinska, Anna; Porwit, Anna; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Hoefler, Gerald; Küppers, Ralf; Siebert, Reiner; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about genomic aberrations in peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL NOS). We studied 47 PTCL NOS by 250k GeneChip single nucleotide polymorphism arrays and detected genomic imbalances in 22 of the cases. Recurrent gains and losses were identified, including gains of chromosome regions 1q32-43, 2p15-16, 7, 8q24, 11q14-25, 17q11-21 and 21q11-21 (> or = 5 cases each) as well as losses of chromosome regions 1p35-36, 5q33, 6p22, 6q16, 6q21-22, 8p21-23, 9p21, 10p11-12, 10q11-22, 10q25-26, 13q14, 15q24, 16q22, 16q24, 17p11, 17p13 and Xp22 (> or = 4 cases each). Genomic imbalances affected several regions containing members of nuclear factor-kappaB signalling and genes involved in cell cycle control. Gains of 2p15-16 were confirmed in each of three cases analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and were associated with breakpoints at the REL locus in two of these cases. Three additional cases with gains of the REL locus were detected by FISH among 18 further PTCL NOS. Five of 27 PTCL NOS investigated showed nuclear expression of the REL protein by immunohistochemistry, partly associated with genomic gains of the REL locus. Therefore, in a subgroup of PTCL NOS gains/rearrangements of REL and expression of REL protein may be of pathogenetic relevance.

  14. The genetics of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: dissecting psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, N; O'Donovan, M; Owen, M

    2005-01-01

    Much work has been done to identify susceptibility genes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Several well established linkages have emerged in schizophrenia. Strongly supported regions are 6p24–22, 1q21–22, and 13q32–34, while other promising regions include 8p21–22, 6q16–25, 22q11–12, 5q21–q33, 10p15–p11, and 1q42. Genomic regions of interest in bipolar disorder include 6q16–q22, 12q23–q24, and regions of 9p22–p21, 10q21–q22, 14q24–q32, 13q32–q34, 22q11–q22, and chromosome 18. Recently, specific genes or loci have been implicated in both disorders and, crucially, replicated. Current evidence supports NRG1, DTNBP1, DISC1, DAOA(G72), DAO, and RGS4 as schizophrenia susceptibility loci. For bipolar disorder the strongest evidence supports DAOA(G72) and BDNF. Increasing evidence suggests an overlap in genetic susceptibility across the traditional classification systems that dichotomised psychotic disorders into schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, most notably with association findings at DAOA(G72), DISC1, and NRG1. Future identification of psychosis susceptibility genes will have a major impact on our understanding of disease pathophysiology and will lead to changes in classification and the clinical practice of psychiatry. PMID:15744031

  15. 77 FR 51698 - Authorization To Seize Property Involved in Drug Offenses for Administrative Forfeiture (2012R-9P)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ....130(b). ATF investigations focusing on violent crime frequently involve complex criminal organizations.... 107-296). One of the primary missions of the ATF is to combat firearm-related violent crime. The nexus... effectiveness of ATF in the investigation of violent crimes involving firearms. Consequently, by this final...

  16. Allelic loss of chromosome 8p22 loci in a primary tissue culture from a patient with prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Godec, C.J.; Macera, M.J.; Szabo, P. |

    1994-09-01

    It is presently estimated that over 11 million men in the United States alone have histological prostate cancer. Approximately 200,000 new cases will be diagnosed in 1994 with 36,000 deaths attributed to the most common cancer in U.S. men. Although the incidence of this disease is so high, little is known about the molecular etiology of this cancer. Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes Rb and p53 have been observed at a low frequency in this disease, although allelic loss on chromosomes 8, 10 and 16 suggest possible unidentified tumor suppression genes may be more directly associated with this cancer. It was recently shown that allelic loss of D8S163, located at 8q22 {r_arrow} pter, was seen in a large percentage of primary prostate cancers. Our patient underwent a radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer. A portion of the tissue was minced, treated with collagenase and a fibroblast-like culture was established. DNA was obtained from the culture and peripheral blood of the patient. Probe K5R2 (American Type Culture Collection) specific for loci D8S163 was hybridized to Southern blots of TagI-digested DNA. Two alleles at 3.3 Kb and 1.9 Kb were seen in the peripheral blood, while only the 1.9 Kb fragment was seen in the DNA from the culture. Loss of the allele at 3.3 Kb resembles results obtained from primary tumors, suggesting that the established line may be derived from the tumor.

  17. Materials Data on LiMo8(P2O11)4 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-22

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. A Novel 6.14 Mb Duplication of Chromosome 8p21 in a Patient with Autism and Self Mutilation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgen, Heval M.; Staal, Wouter G.; Barber, John C.; de Jonge, Maretha V.; Eleveld, Marc J.; Beemer, Frits A.; Hochstenbach, Ron; Poot, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders with a strong genetic etiology. Cytogenetic abnormalities have been detected in 5-10% of the patients with autism. In this study, we present the clinical, cytogenetic and array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) evaluation of a 13-year-old male with severe…

  19. Crystal chemistry of anhydrous Li uranyl phosphates and arsenates. II. Tubular fragments and cation-cation interactions in the 3D framework structures of Li{sub 6}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 12}(PO{sub 4}){sub 8}(P{sub 4}O{sub 13})], Li{sub 5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 13}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 9}(As{sub 2}O{sub 7})], Li[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}] and Li{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 7}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 5}O

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.; Depmeier, Wulf

    2009-11-15

    Single crystals of the new compounds Li{sub 6}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 12}(PO{sub 4}){sub 8}(P{sub 4}O{sub 13})] (1), Li{sub 5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 13}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 9}(As{sub 2}O{sub 7})] (2), Li[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}] (3) and Li{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 7}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 5}O)] (4) have been prepared using high-temperature solid state reactions. The crystal structures have been solved by direct methods: 1-monoclinic, C2/m, a=26.963(3) A, b=7.063(1) A, c=19.639(1) A, beta=126.890(4){sup o}, V=2991.2(6) A{sup 3}, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.0357 for 3248 unique reflections with |F{sub 0}|>=4sigma{sub F}; 2-triclinic, P1-bar, a=7.1410(8) A, b=13.959(1) A, c=31.925(1) A, alpha=82.850(2){sup o}, beta=88.691(2){sup o}, gamma=79.774(3){sup o}, V=3107.4(4) A{sup 3}, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.0722 for 9161 unique reflections with |F{sub 0}|>=4sigma{sub F}; 3-tetragonal, I4{sub 1}/amd, a=7.160(3) A, c=33.775(9) A, V=1732(1) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0356 for 318 unique reflections with |F{sub 0}|>=4sigma{sub F}; 4-tetragonal, P4-bar, a=7.2160(5) A, c=14.6540(7) A, V=763.04(8) A{sup 3}, Z=1, R{sub 1}=0.0423 for 1600 unique reflections with |F{sub 0}|>=4sigma{sub F}. Structures of all the phases under consideration are based on complex 3D frameworks consisting of different types of uranium polyhedra (UO{sub 6} and UO{sub 7}) and different types of tetrahedral TO{sub 4} anions (T=P or As): PO{sub 4} and P{sub 4}O{sub 13} in 1, AsO{sub 4} and As{sub 2}O{sub 7} in 2, and single AsO{sub 4} tetrahedra in 3 and 4. In the structures of 1 and 2, UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids share edges to form (UO{sub 5}){sub i}nfinity chains extended along the b axis in 1 and along the a axis in 2. The chains are linked via single TO{sub 4} tetrahedra into tubular units with external diameters of 11 A in 1 and 11.5 A in 2, and internal diameters of 4.1 A in 1 and 4.5 A in 2. The channels accommodate Li{sup +} cations. The tubular units are linked into 3D frameworks by intertubular complexes. Structures of 3 and 4

  20. Genome profiling of chondrosarcoma using oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Meera; Ulger, Celal; Yasar, Duygu; Limaye, Neha; Kurvathi, Rohini; Streck, Deanna; Benevenia, Joseph; Patterson, Francis; Dermody, James J; Toruner, Gokce A

    2009-07-15

    Chondrosarcomas of the bone are malignant hyaline cartilage-forming tumors with an annual incidence rate of 3.6% of all primary bone malignancies in the United States. Specimens of 25 chondrosarcomas (10 grade I, 9 grade II, 1 grade III, and 5 dedifferentiated) from 23 patients were collected from the Department of Pathology at the University Hospital at UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School from 1996 to 2007. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) studies were performed on frozen tumor specimens. Recurrent deletions observed in at least in six tumors were 5q13.2, 5q14.2 approximately q21.3, 6q12 approximately q13, 6q16 approximately q25.3, 9p24.2 approximately q12, and 9p21.3. There was a statistically significant association between high-grade tumor (grade III and dedifferentiated) and the recurrent genetic deletions at 5q14.2 approximately q21.3, 6q16 approximately q25.3, 9p24.2 approximately q12, and 9p21.3. There is consistency between increased levels of aneuploidy and the progression of chondrosarcoma from lower to higher grades.

  1. 75 FR 20007 - Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee... by NSF Division of Chemistry (1191). Dates & Times: May 9, 2010; 8 p.m.-9 p.m., May 10, 2010; 8 a.m.- 9 p.m., May 11, 2010; 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Place: Department of Chemistry, California Institute...

  2. Large-scale polymorphism near the ends of several human chromosomes analyzed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.; Giorgi, D.

    1994-09-01

    We have discovered a large DNA segment that is polymorphically present at the ends of several human chromosomes. The segment, f7501, was originally derived form a human chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. FISH was used to determine the cosmid`s chromosomal distribution on 44 unrelated humans and several closely related primates. The human subjects represent a diversity of reproductively isolated ethnic populations. FISH analysis revealed that sequences highly homologous to the cosmid`s insert are present on both homologs at 3q, 15q,. and 19p in almost all individuals (88, 85, and 87 of 88 homologs, respectively). Other chromosomes sites were labeled much more rarely in the sampled individuals. For example, 56 of the 88 analyzed chromosomes 11 were labeled (18+/+, 6-/-, and 20+/- individuals). In contrast, 2q was labeled on only 1/88 sampled chromosomes. The termini of 2q, 5q, 6p, 6q, 7p, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 12q, 16p, 19q, and 20q and an interstitial site at 2q13-14 were labeled in at least one individual of the set. EcoR1-fragments derived from the cosmid showed the same hybridization pattern as the entire cosmid, indicating that at least 40 kbp is shared by these chromosome ends. Ethnic differences in the allele frequency of these polymorphic variants was observed. For example, signals were observed on 8/10 and 7/10 of the chromosomes 7p and 16q, respectively, derived form Biakan Pygmies, but these sites were infrequently labeled in non-Pygmy human populations (2/68, respectively). This region has undergone significant changes in chromosome location during human evolution. Strong signal was seen on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosome 3, which is homologous to human chromosome 4, a chromosome unlabeled in any of the humans we have analyzed.

  3. Genomic imbalances in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma identified by molecular cytogenetic techniques

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the chromosomal changes detected by molecular cytogenetic approaches in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the ninth most common malignancy in the world. Whole genome analyses of ESCC cell lines and tumors indicated that the most frequent genomic gains occurred at 1, 2q, 3q, 5p, 6p, 7, 8q, 9q, 11q, 12p, 14q, 15q, 16, 17, 18p, 19q, 20q, 22q and X, with focal amplifications at 1q32, 2p16-22, 3q25-28, 5p13-15.3, 7p12-22, 7q21-22, 8q23-24.2, 9q34, 10q21, 11p11.2, 11q13, 13q32, 14q13-14, 14q21, 14q31-32, 15q22-26, 17p11.2, 18p11.2-11.3 and 20p11.2. Recurrent losses involved 3p, 4, 5q, 6q, 7q, 8p, 9, 10p, 12p, 13, 14p, 15p, 18, 19p, 20, 22, Xp and Y. Gains at 5p and 7q, and deletions at 4p, 9p, and 11q were significant prognostic factors for patients with ESCC. Gains at 6p and 20p, and losses at 10p and 10q were the most significant imbalances, both in primary carcinoma and in metastases, which suggested that these regions may harbor oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Gains at 12p and losses at 3p may be associated with poor relapse-free survival. The clinical applicability of these changes as markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of ESCC, or as molecular targets for personalized therapy should be evaluated. PMID:21637470

  4. Measurement of Anomalously Strong Emission from the 1s-9p Transition in the Spectrum of H-like Phosphorus Following Charge Exchange with Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized argon and phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen at low collision energy in an electron beam ion trap using an x-ray calorimeter array with approx.6 eV resolution. We find that the emission at the high-end of the Lyman series is greater by a factor of two for phosphorus than for argon, even though the measurement was performed concurrently and the atomic numbers are similar. This does not agree with current theoretical models and deviates from the trend observed in previous measurements.

  5. Structure and methylation-associated silencing of a gene within a homozygously deleted region of human chromosome band 8p22

    SciTech Connect

    MacGrogan, D.; Levy, A.; Bookstein, R.

    1996-07-01

    The structure and expression pattern of a human gene located within a homozygously deleted region of a metastatic prostate cancer have been characterized. Multiple cDNA fragments of this gene were isolated by hybrid capture with yeast artificial chromosome hybrid capture with yeast artificial chromosome clones covering the deletion region. Eleven coding exons spanned 205-220 kb of the 730- to 970-kb deletion. The predicted amino acid sequence was 43% identical to that of an accessory or regulatory subunit of the oligosaccharyltransferase enzyme complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Hydrophobicity profiles of all three gene products were similar and showed four putative membrane-spanning domains in the molecules` C-terminal halves, suggesting a general conservation of function. The gene was expressed as an {approximately}1.5-kb mRNA in most nonlymphoid human cells/tissues including prostate, lung, liver, and colon. Expression was detected in many epithelial tumor cell lines, but was undetectable by Northern blot or RT-PCR in 14 of 15 colorectal, 1 of 8 lung, and 1 of 4 liver cancer cell lines. Lack of expression in tumor cell lines was highly correlated with hypermethylation of a CpG island located at the gene`s 5{prime} end. These findings form a basis for further work on this candidate tumor suppressor gene. 36 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular studies in ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency novel mutation c.802A>G in exon 8 (p.Met268Val).

    PubMed

    Jamroz, E; Paprocka, J; Sokół, M; Popowska, E; Ciara, E

    2013-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, an X-linked, semidominant disorder, is the most common inherited de-fect in ureagenesis, resulting in hyperammonaemia type II. The OTC gene, localised on chromosome X, has been mapp-ed to band Xp21.1, proximate to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene. More than 350 different mutations, including missense, nonsense, splice-site changes, small de-letions or insertions and gross deletions, have been describ-ed so far. Almost all mutations in consensus splicing sites confer a neonatal phenotype. Most mutations in the OTC gene are 'private' and are distributed throughout the gene with a paucity of mutation in the sequence encoding the leader peptide (exon 1 and beginning of exon 2) and in exon 7. They have familial origin or occur de novo. Even with sequencing of the entire reading frame and exon/intron boundaries, only about 80% of the mutations are detected in patients with proven OTC deficiency. The remainder probably occur within the introns or in regulatory domains. The authors present a 4-year-old boy with the unreported missense mutation c.802A>G. The nucleotide transition leads to amino acid substitution Met to Val at codon 268 of the OTC protein.

  7. VP8*P[8] lineages of group A rotaviruses circulating over 20 years in Brazil: proposal of six different sub-lineages for P[8]-3 clade.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcelle Figueira Marques; Gómez, Mariela Martínez; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe Anibal; Bello, Gonzalo; Leite, Jose Paulo Gagliardi

    2013-06-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) is the most important cause of severe gastroenteritis among children worldwide. Vaccination is considered the best alternative among public health measures to reduce and prevent the global burden caused by RVA infections. Rotarix™, a monovalent vaccine based on a human strain with a G1P[8]-1 specificity, was introduced in the National Brazilian Immunization Programs (NIP) in March, 2006. RVA P[8] is the most prevalent P genotype worldwide and four distinct phylogenetic lineages: P[8]-1, -2, -3, and -4 have been described. In the current study phylogenetic analysis of the VP8(*) gene of 135 RVA P[8] Brazilian strains, in combination with G1, G3, G5 or G9 VP7 genotype, collected from 1986 to 2011 were carried out for a better understanding of the evolution of this viral genotype in Brazil. Lineages P[8]-1, P[8]-2, and P[8]-3 were observed circulating in Brazil. In 2001 these three P[8] lineages co-circulated simultaneously and this is the first report in South America to date. Considering the P[8] lineage and the G genotype, all G3 strains were related to lineage P[8]-3, whereas the G9 strains were related to P[8]-2 and P[8]-3 and G1 and G5 were related to P[8]-1, P[8]-2, and P[8]-3. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis based on estimate of genetic distances between P[8]-3 strains and the definition of a 1.5% cutoff value (with relevant statistical support) it was possible to propose a new classification for the P[8]-3 lineage into six different sub-lineages: P[8]-3.1 to P[8]-3.6. These findings reinforce the notion of the existence of constraints within specific RVA strains populations. The results obtained in this study reinforce the importance of a continuous RVA surveillance of circulating strains in order to predict the possible variants that will circulate in a country, assess the effects of vaccination on RVA circulating strains, and ultimately help in the design, challenges, and prospects of RVA vaccines.

  8. A genetic model of melanoma tumorigenesis based on allelic losses

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, N.K.; Palmer, J.M.; Walters, M.K.

    1994-09-01

    Previous karyotypic studies have indicated a possible series of non-random chromosomal events involved in the progression of melanoma. We sought to define a model of melanocyte tumorigenesis by studying allelic deletions of polymorphic simple tandem repeat markers mapping to chromosome 1, 6q, 7, 9p, 10, 11, 17, and 21 in thirty matched pairs of melanoma and constitutional DNAs. The most frequent and earliest deletions were found on 9p (57%) and 10q (32%) and with the exception of one case, no sample has loss of markers on another chromosome without concomitant loss of markers on 9p and/or 10q. Losses on 6q were also a frequent (32%) event that sometimes occurred in primary melanomas, whereas losses of loci on distal 1p (26%) or 11q (26%) occurred only in metastic melanomas. A background rate (0-17%) of allele loss was seen on chromosomes 7, 17, and 21. Homozygous deletions in a panel of 31 melanoma cell lines were only detected for markers on 9p (4 cases). These data strongly support the previous model of melanoma tumorigenesis based primarily on karyotypic findings in melanocytic lesions. However, we have been able to further augment the model by delimiting the regions of loss on 10q to a region distal to D10S254, and on 1p, to between D1S243 and D1S160.

  9. Microarray-based genomic profiling reveals novel genomic aberrations in follicular lymphoma which associate with patient survival and gene expression status.

    PubMed

    Schwaenen, Carsten; Viardot, Andreas; Berger, Hilmar; Barth, Thomas F E; Bentink, Stefan; Döhner, Hartmut; Enz, Martina; Feller, Alfred C; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Hummel, Michael; Kestler, Hans A; Klapper, Wolfram; Kreuz, Markus; Lenze, Dido; Loeffler, Markus; Möller, Peter; Müller-Hermelink, Hans-Konrad; Ott, German; Rosolowski, Maciej; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ruf, Sandra; Siebert, Reiner; Spang, Rainer; Stein, Harald; Truemper, Lorenz; Lichter, Peter; Bentz, Martin; Wessendorf, Swen

    2009-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is characterized by a large number of chromosomal aberrations. However, their exact genomic extension and involved target genes remain to be determined. For this purpose, we used array-based intermediate-high resolution genomic profiling in combination with Affymetrix gene expression analysis. Tumor specimens from 128 FL patients were analyzed for the presence of genomic aberrations and the results were correlated to clinical data sets and mRNA expression levels. In 114 (89%) of the 128 analyzed cases, a total of 688 genomic aberrations (384 gains/amplifications and 304 losses) were detected. Frequent genomic aberrations were: -1p36 (18%), +2p15 (24%), -3q (14%), -6q (25%), +7p (19%), +7q (23%), +8q (14%), -9p (16%), -11q (15%), +12q (20%), -13q (11%), -17p (16%), +18p (18%), and +18q (28%). Critical segments of these imbalances were delineated to genomic fragments with a minimum size down to 0.2 Mb. By comparison of these with mRNA gene expression data, putative candidate genes were identified. Moreover, we found that deletions affecting the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2A/B on 9p21 were detected in nontransformed FL grade I-II. For this aberration as well as for -6q25 and -6q26, an association with inferior survival was observed.

  10. Chromosomal aberrations of malignant pleural effusions of lung adenocarcinoma: different cytogenetic changes are correlated with genders and smoking habits.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Liang, Shu-Ching; Jong, Yiin-Jeng; Chen, Yann-Jang; Lin, Chi-Hung; Chen, Yuh-Min; Wu, Yu-Chung; Su, Wu-Chou; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Tseng, Szu-Wen; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline

    2007-09-01

    Chromosomal aberrations of malignant cells from pleural effusions of 31 cases of lung adenocarcinoma were analyzed. Pooled CGH results showed frequent amplifications on chromosome arms 1p (22.6%), 1q (35.5%), 2q (25.8%), 3q (38.7%), 4q (41.9%), 5p (41.9%), 5q (51.6%), 6p (19.4%), 6q (25.8%), 7p (41.9%), 7q (35.5%), 8q (32.3%), 12q (38.7%), 13q (22.6%), 14q (35.5%), 17q (19.4%), Xp (22.6%), and Xq (38.7%). Frequent deletions were found on 1p (19.4%), 3p (16.1%), 4q (16.1%), 8p (25.8%), 9p (22.6%), 9q (29.0%), 10q (22.6%), 13q (22.6%), 16p (19.4%), 16q (22.6%), 17p (29.0%), 18q (16.1%), 19p (41.9%), 19q (32.3%), 20p (19.4%) and 22q (29%). These genomic changes were generally found consistent with previous reports of CGH analysis of primary tumors of lung adenocarcinoma. Loss of 19q and 22q were more frequently found in our studies (32.3% and 29.0%, respectively) than studies of primary tumors (less than 7% for both genetic changes). Gain of 11p, although not a frequent finding, was relatively more common in this (16%) than other studies (range, 2.9-11.8%). Interestingly, occurrences of 3p loss and 11p gain were higher in smokers than non-smokers, and deletion of 3p and increased copy number of 11p and Xp appeared more often in male than female patients. Among 17 male patients, gain of chromosomal 11p was a frequent aberration in tumors of smokers, while gain of Xp was more easily found in tumors of non-smokers. One candidate gene located within 11p15, lactate dehydrogenase C (LDHC), was selected for further study. Three cases with 11p gain had amplified FISH signals of LDHC. Also tumors from smokers or male had significantly higher transcript level of LDHC than non-smokers or female, respectively. The results demonstrate that different cytogenetic changes of malignant pleural effusions from lung adenocarcinoma are correlated with genders and smoking habits. The role of LDHC in the carcinogenesis of smoking-related lung adenocarcinoma, especially in male patients with

  11. Nonlinear infrared generation in alkali metal vapors: steady state susceptibilities and dynamic behavior. Effective relaxation rates and preliminary Raman gain predictions for the Cs system. Technical progress report, 1 July-31 December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1986-12-01

    Effective relaxation rates for atomic cesium pumped by doubled Alexandrite radiation are presented. Laser radiation levels are 8S 1/2 and 9S 1/2; resonance levels 3 = 8P 1/2 and 8P 1/2, respectively. In addition, Raman gain is represented in two graphs which plot chi per atom (10 to the -13 power) at Raman peak versus the infrared wave number per centimeter and the corresponding doubled Alexandrite wave number. One graph covers resonance level 8P, the other 9P; in both cases cesium is pumped with a peak pulse height of 0.5 MW in a 200 micron diameter spot size.

  12. Nonlinear infrared generation in alkali metal vapors: Steady state susceptibilities and dynamic behavior. Effective relaxation rates and preliminary Raman gain predictions for the Cs system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    Effective relaxation rates for atomic cesium pumped by doubled Alexandrite radiation are presented. Laser radiation levels are 8S 1/2 and 9S 1/2; resonance levels 3 = 8P 1/2 and 8P 1/2, respectively. In addition, Raman gain is represented in two graphs which plot chi per atom (10 to the -13 power) at Raman peak versus the infrared wave number per centimeter and the corresponding doubled Alexandrite wave number. One graph covers resonance level 8P, the other 9P; in both cases cesium is pumped with a peak pulse height of 0.5 MW in a 200 micron diameter spot size.

  13. Consistent chromosome abnormalities including double minutes (dms) in adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, C.A.; Morsberger, L.; Ellingham, T.

    1994-09-01

    Little is known about the somatic genetic changes which characterize pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA), and identification of acquired genomic alterations would further our understanding of the biology of this neoplasm. We have studied 62 primary specimens of PA using classical and FISH methods. Clonally abnormal karyotypes were observed in 44 neoplasms. Karyotypes were generally complex (greater than 3 abnormalities) including both numerical and structural chromosome changes. Many tumors contained at least one marker chromosome. The most frequent whole chromosomal gains were chromosomes 20 (7 tumors) and 7 (5 tumors). Losses were much more frequent: chromosome 18 was lost in 22 tumors, followed by chromosomes 13 (15 tumors), 12 (13 tumors), and 6 (12 tumors). Structural abnormalities were common. 200 chromosome breakpoints were identified. Excluding Robertsonian translocations, chromosomal arms most frequently involved were 6q (12 chromosomes), 1p and 3p (10 each), 11p and 17p (9 each), 1q (8), 8p and 19q (7 each). Of particular interest, we found dms in 6 cases. These represent the first PAs with cytogenetic evidence of gene amplification, and are under investigation using chromosome microdissection. To begin to define the smallest region of 6q which is deleted, 5 tumors with 6q deletions were hybridized with a biotin-labeled probe, made by microdissection of 6q24-qter. Loss of one copy of this region was verified in 4/5 tumors; additional probes are being made. Our results are similar to those of 34 other reported PAs, and the combined data suggest that gains of chromosomes 7 and 20 and deletions and rearrangements of 1p and 6q may be particularly important in the biology of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas.

  14. Markers of Ovarian Cancer Using a Glycoprotein/Antibody Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    differentiation 8 P02774 VTDB Vitamin D-binding protein SNA 0.02 In plasma , it carries the vitamin D sterols and prevents polymerization of acti 9 P02790...Analysis: Application to Pancreatic Cancer Serum, J. Proteome Res. 2006, 5, 1792- 1802 . 4. Zheng T, Peelen D, Smith LM., Lectin arrays for profiling

  15. Photochemical Conversion of H2Os3(CO)10(P-Donor) to H2Os3(CO)9(P-Donor) in Solution and on High Surface Area Silica.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-28

    near- UV irradiation of an alkane suspension of IS102]-L𔃺S3-CCO11QHI2 yields ISiO02] L0s3 CO) H2 weet1 2 -’s(O 2 0 2 is the solid prepared byreactfon of...alkane solution at 298 K. Lk~wise, near- UV irradiation of an alkane suspension of -iESiO2j-L’Osj3( )j6Hj yields (Sf0 J-L’Os3(CO) ij where (SiOj3-La’stj...rigid alkane glasses, but einitial (51 conversion) product is not derived fromt loss of CO. Continue I rradiation at 77 K yields H2Os3’(CO)’gL and CO

  16. Replication of KCNJ11 (p.E23K) and ABCC8 (p.S1369A) Association in Russian Diabetes Mellitus 2 Type Cohort and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Ekaterina Alekseevna; Bondar, Irina Arkadievna; Shabelnikova, Olesya Yurievna; Pyankova, Olga Vladimirovna; Filipenko, Maxim Leonidovich

    2015-01-01

    The genes ABCC8 and KCNJ11 have received intense focus in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) research over the past two decades. It has been hypothesized that the p.E23K (KCNJ11) mutation in the 11p15.1 region may play an important role in the development of T2DM. In 2009, Hamming et al. found that the p.1369A (ABCC8) variant may be a causal factor in the disease; therefore, in this study we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including our original data on the Siberian population (1384 T2DM and 414 controls). We found rs5219 and rs757110 were not associated with T2DM in this population, and that there was linkage disequilibrium in Siberians (D’=0.766, r2= 0.5633). In addition, the haplotype rs757110[T]-rs5219[C] (p.23K/p.S1369) was associated with T2DM (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.04-2.24). We included 44 original studies published by June 2014 in a meta-analysis of the p.E23K association with T2DM. The total OR was 1.14 (95% CI: 1.11-1.17) for p.E23K for a total sample size of 137,298. For p.S1369A, a meta-analysis was conducted on a total of 10 studies with a total sample size of 14,136 and pooled OR of 1.14 [95% CI (1.08-1.19); p = 2 x 10-6]. Our calculations identified causal genetic variation within the ABCC8/KCNJ11 region for T2DM with an OR of approximately 1.15 in Caucasians and Asians. Moreover, the OR value was not dependent on the frequency of p.E23K or p.S1369A in the populations. PMID:25955821

  17. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of olfactory neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Guled, Mohamed; Myllykangas, Samuel; Frierson, Henry F; Mills, Stacey E; Knuutila, Sakari; Stelow, Edward B

    2008-06-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma is an unusual neuroectodermal malignancy, which is thought to arise at the olfactory membrane of the sinonasal tract. Due to its rarity, little is understood regarding its molecular and cytogenetic abnormalities. The aim of the current study is to identify specific DNA copy number changes in olfactory neuroblastoma. Thirteen dissected tissue samples were analyzed using array comparative genomic hybridization. Our results show that gene copy number profiles of olfactory neuroblastoma samples are complex. The most frequent changes included gains at 7q11.22-q21.11, 9p13.3, 13q, 20p/q, and Xp/q, and losses at 2q31.1, 2q33.3, 2q37.1, 6q16.3, 6q21.33, 6q22.1, 22q11.23, 22q12.1, and Xp/q. Gains were more frequent than losses, and high-stage tumors showed more alterations than low-stage olfactory neuroblastoma. Frequent changes in high-stage tumors were gains at 13q14.2-q14.3, 13q31.1, and 20q11.21-q11.23, and loss of Xp21.1 (in 66% of cases). Gains at 5q35, 13q, and 20q, and losses at 2q31.1, 2q33.3, and 6q16-q22, were present in 50% of cases. The identified regions of gene copy number change have been implicated in a variety of tumors, especially carcinomas. In addition, our results indicate that gains in 20q and 13q may be important in the progression of this cancer, and that these regions possibly harbor genes with functional relevance in olfactory neuroblastoma.

  18. Clinically significant copy number alterations and complex rearrangements of MYB and NFIB in head and neck adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Persson, Marta; Andrén, Ywonne; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Frierson, Henry F; Cooke, Susanna L; Futreal, Philip Andrew; Kling, Teresia; Nelander, Sven; Nordkvist, Anders; Persson, Fredrik; Stenman, Göran

    2012-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the head and neck is a malignant tumor with poor long-term prognosis. Besides the recently identified MYB-NFIB fusion oncogene generated by a t(6;9) translocation, little is known about other genetic alterations in ACC. Using high-resolution, array-based comparative genomic hybridization, and massively paired-end sequencing, we explored genomic alterations in 40 frozen ACCs. Eighty-six percent of the tumors expressed MYB-NFIB fusion transcripts and 97% overexpressed MYB mRNA, indicating that MYB activation is a hallmark of ACC. Thirty-five recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs) were detected, including losses involving 12q, 6q, 9p, 11q, 14q, 1p, and 5q and gains involving 1q, 9p, and 22q. Grade III tumors had on average a significantly higher number of CNAs/tumor compared to Grade I and II tumors (P = 0.007). Losses of 1p, 6q, and 15q were associated with high-grade tumors, whereas losses of 14q were exclusively seen in Grade I tumors. The t(6;9) rearrangements were associated with a complex pattern of breakpoints, deletions, insertions, inversions, and for 9p also gains. Analyses of fusion-negative ACCs using high-resolution arrays and massively paired-end sequencing revealed that MYB may also be deregulated by other mechanisms in addition to gene fusion. Our studies also identified several down-regulated candidate tumor suppressor genes (CTNNBIP1, CASP9, PRDM2, and SFN) in 1p36.33-p35.3 that may be of clinical significance in high-grade tumors. Further, studies of these and other potential target genes may lead to the identification of novel driver genes in ACC.

  19. Phosphorylation of αS1-casein is regulated by different genes.

    PubMed

    Bijl, E; van Valenberg, H J F; Huppertz, T; van Hooijdonk, A C M; Bovenhuis, H

    2014-11-01

    Casein phosphorylation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by kinase enzymes that attach phosphate groups to specific AA in the protein sequence. This modification is one of the key factors responsible for the stabilization of calcium phosphate nanoclusters in casein micelles and for the internal structure of the casein micelles. α(S1)-Casein (α(s1)-CN) is of special interest because it constitutes up to 40% of the total casein fraction in milk, and it has 2 common phosphorylation states, with 8 (α(S1)-CN-8P) and 9 (α(S1)-CN-9P) phosphorylated serine residues. Factors affecting this variation in the degree of phosphorylation are not currently known. The objective of this research was to determine the genetic background of α(S1)-CN-8P and α(S1)-CN-9P. The genetic and phenotypic correlation between α(S1)-CN-8P and α(S1)-CN-9P was low (0.18 and 0.19, respectively). This low genetic correlation suggests a different genetic background. These differences were further investigated by means of a genome-wide association study, which showed that both α(S1)-CN-8P and α(S1)-CN-9P were affected by a region on Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 6, but only α(S1)-CN-8P was affected by a region on BTA11 that contains the gene that encodes for β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), and only α(S1)-CN-9P was affected by a region on BTA14 that contains the diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) gene. Estimated effects of β-LG protein genotypes showed that only α(S1)-CN-8P was associated with the β-LG A/B polymorphism (g.1772G>A and g.3054C>T); the AA genotype of β-LG was associated with a lower concentration of α(S1)-CN-8P (-0.32% wt/wt) than the BB genotype (+0.41% wt/wt). Estimated effects of DGAT1 K232A genotypes showed that only α(S1)-CN-9P was associated with the DGAT1 gene polymorphism; DGAT1 AA genotype was associated with a higher α(S1)-CN-9P concentration (+0.53% wt/wt) than the DGAT1 KK genotype (-0.44% wt/wt). The results give insight in phosphorylation of α(S1

  20. Method for Real Time Matched Field Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-30

    forming the N x 1 steering vector SP for each eigenray p: 9 P P d =dp,osp = epSp (8) p=1 p=1 [0040] In Equation (8), the eigenray steering vector is...by Equation (4): dHx= epSp X= ep (sp x) . (10) =1 p=1 b p 10 [0044] In Equation (10), bp is the complex beamformer output resulting from application

  1. Air Evacuation and Its Effect on Theater and Zone of Interior Hospitalization Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-10-13

    34:,; invalided home. 9 Medical Service- Communication Zone, Subj~ct 4308, Adv Sheet, par 8, p. 12 10 Historical Review, WuV II, Apend P, P• 58 11 FM...Service in Communication Zone", Apend 4 to Adv Sheet, par 9, p.26 25 liiJiil FM 8-35, par 102 f. 26 Maj Gen Kirk, op. cit. PP• 27-29 -12- skilled

  2. Porcine S100A8 and S100A9: molecular characterizations and crucial functions in response to Haemophilus parasuis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (S100A8) and S100 calcium-binding protein A9 (S100A9) are pivotal mediators of inflammatory and protective anti-infection responses for the mammalian host. In this study, we present the molecular cloning of porcine S100A8 (pS100A8) and porcine S100A9 (pS100A9). Both ...

  3. Partial allelotype of schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaw, M E; Elder, P A; Abbas, A; Knowles, M A

    1999-03-01

    In Egypt and other regions of the Middle East where the trematode Schistosoma haematobium is endemic, bladder cancer is the most common adult cancer. Unlike bladder cancers in Western countries, which are predominantly transitional-cell carcinoma (TCC), these schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancers are predominantly squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC). Our aim was to assess a large series of schistosomiasis-associated bladder tumours for genetic alterations commonly found in TCC in the United Kingdom and the United States. We have carried out a partial allelotype of 70 tumours from patients with schistosomiasis. LOH was found on all chromosome arms studied (3p, 4p, 4q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 11q, 13q, 14q, 17p, 18q). The most frequent regions of LOH were 9p (65%), 17p (58%), 3p (40%), 9q (39%) and 8p (37%). LOH on 17p, where the TP53 gene is located, was more common in Egyptian TCC than in SCC. Similarly, 8p LOH was more common in TCC than SCC. The most striking difference between this group of tumours and TCCs from the United Kingdom and the United States was the high frequency of 9p LOH in the region of the CDKN2 gene (65%) and the relatively low frequency of 9q LOH (39%); 15 of 43 tumours with LOH of at least one marker on chromosome 9 showed LOH of 9p only. This suggests that a 9p gene, possibly CDKN2, may contribute to the development of the majority of schistosomiasis-associated bladder tumours but that genes on 9q play a much less important role.

  4. Genomic alterations of the JAK2 and PDL loci occur in a broad spectrum of lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Van Roosbroeck, Katrien; Ferreiro, Julio Finalet; Tousseyn, Thomas; van der Krogt, Jo-Anne; Michaux, Lucienne; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Theate, Ivan; De Paepe, Pascale; Dierickx, Daan; Doyen, Chantal; Put, Natalie; Cools, Jan; Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona

    2016-05-01

    The recurrent 9p24.1 aberrations in lymphoid malignancies potentially involving four cancer-related and druggable genes (JAK2, CD274/PDL1, PDCD1LG2/PDL2, and KDM4C/JMJD2Cl) are incompletely characterized. To gain more insight into the anatomy of these abnormalities, at first we studied 9p24.1 alterations in 18 leukemia/lymphoma cases using cytogenetic and molecular techniques. The aberrations comprised structural (nine cases) and numerical (nine cases) alterations. The former lesions were heterogeneous but shared a common breakpoint region of 200 kb downstream of JAK2. The rearrangements predominantly targeted the PDL locus. We have identified five potential partner genes of PDL1/2: PHACTR4 (1p34), N4BP2 (4p14), EEF1A1 (6q13), JAK2 (9p24.1), and IGL (22q11). Interestingly, the cryptic JAK2-PDL1 rearrangement was generated by a microdeletion spanning the 3'JAK2-5'PDL1 region. JAK2 was additionally involved in a cytogenetically cryptic IGH-mediated t(9;14)(p24.1;q32) found in two patients. This rare but likely underestimated rearrangement highlights the essential role of JAK2 in B-cell neoplasms. Cases with amplification of 9p24.1 were diagnosed as primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (five cases) and T-cell lymphoma (four cases). The smallest amplified 9p24.1 region was restricted to the JAK2-PDL1/2-RANBP6 interval. In the next step, we screened 200 cases of classical Hodgkin lymphoma by interphase FISH and identified PDL1/2 rearrangement (CIITA- and IGH-negative) in four cases (2%), what is a novel finding. Forty (25%) cases revealed high level amplification of 9p24.1, including four cases with a selective amplification of PDL1/2. Altogether, the majority of 9p24.1 rearrangements occurring in lymphoid malignancies seem to target the programmed death-1 ligands, what potentiates the therapeutic activity of PD-1 blockade in these tumors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Kinetics and hydrolysis of fenamiphos, fipronil, and trifluralin in aqueous buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, A; Balasubramanian, M

    1999-08-01

    Hydrolyses of fenamiphos, fipronil, and trifluralin were studied in aqueous buffer solutions of pH 4.1, 7.1, and 9.1 at different temperatures, 5, 22 +/- 1, 32 +/- 1, and 50 +/- 1 degrees C. Fenamiphos, fipronil, and trifluralin were found to be more stable in acidic and neutral buffer solutions at temperatures of 5 and 22 +/- 1, and dissipation is rapid at 50 +/- 1 degrees C. In basic buffer and at higher temperature, degradation of fenamiphos was found to be very rapid when compared with fipronil and trifluralin. The rate constants calculated at 32 degrees C for fenamiphos were 2349.4 x 10(-)(8) (pH 4.1), 225.2 x 10(-)(8) (pH 7.1), and 30476.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 9.1); for fipronil 1750.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 4.1), 3103.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 7.1), and 3883.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 9.1); and for trifluralin 2331.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 4.1), 2360.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 7.1), and 3188.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 9.1). On the basis of rate constant values, these pesticides appeared to be more susceptible to hydrolysis than synthetic organophosphorus compounds such as chlorpyriphos, diazinon, malathion, and ronnel. DT(50) values calculated at 32 degrees C were 228 (pH 4.1), 5310.24 (pH 7.1), and 37.68 (pH 9.1) h for fenamiphos; 608.6 (pH 4.1), 373.9 (pH 7.1), and 270.2 (pH 9.1) h for fipronil; and 502.1 (pH 4.1), 496.8 (pH 7.1), and 355.7 (pH 9.1) h for trifluralin.

  6. Patient Access to Online Visit Notes: Perceptions of Doctors and Patients at an Urban HIV/AIDS Clinic.

    PubMed

    Oster, Natalia V; Jackson, Sara L; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Mejilla, Roanne; Ralston, James D; Leveille, Suzanne; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Janice D; Bell, Sigall K; Elmore, Joann G

    2015-01-01

    Patients living with HIV/AIDS face large societal and medical challenges. Inviting patients to read their doctors' visit notes via secure electronic portals may empower patients and improve health. We investigated whether utilization and perceptions about access to doctors' notes differed among doctors and patients in an HIV/AIDS clinic versus primary care setting. We analyzed pre- and 1-year postintervention data from 99 doctors and 3819 patients. HIV clinic patients did not report differences in perceived risks and benefits compared to primary care clinic patients, however, they were more likely to share notes with friends (33% versus 9%, P=.002), other health professionals (24% versus 8%, P=.03), or another doctor (38% versus 9%, P<.0001). HIV clinic doctors were less likely than primary care doctors to change the level of candor in visit notes (P<.04). Our findings suggest that HIV clinic patients and doctors are ready to share visit notes online.

  7. Ireland's hidden diaspora - the 'abortion trail'and the making of a london-irish underground,1980-2000 Ann Rossiter Ireland's hidden diaspora - the 'abortion trail'and the making of a london-irish underground,1980-2000 Iasc (email: arossit@yahoo.com ) 237 £8+p&p 9780956178503 0956178502 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2009-12-09

    This is a passionate book about patients, politics and women supporting women. It does not make for light reading. Every year more than 5,000 women cross the Irish Sea to have an abortion in a British clinic. The emigrant journey is deeply embedded in Irish consciousness, but, as Ann Rossiter points out, the abortion-seeker rarely features in migration lore.

  8. 75 FR 23574 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International, S.A. CFM56-5B1/P, -5B2/P, -5B3/P, -5B3/P1, -5B4/P...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ..., S.A. CFM56-5B1/P, - 5B2/P, -5B3/P, -5B3/P1, -5B4/P, -5B5/P, -5B6/P, -5B7/P, -5B8/P, -5B9/P, -5B1/2P...: The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for CFM International, S.A. CFM56-5B... 80296, December 31, 2008), with a proposed AD. The proposed AD applies to CFM International, S.A....

  9. Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction. Quaterly and Semiannual Report to the United States Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-30

    14 . ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...other agencies in Iraq, see Table 1.2. Currently, 5 SIGIR agents work in Baghdad, and 14 are in Arlington, Virginia. SIGIR inves- tigators work with the... 14 8 P. L. 10 9- 23 4 P. L. 10 9- 28 9 P. L. 1 10 -2 8 D A TE O F EN A C TM EN T 2/ 20 /0 3 4/ 16 /0 3 11 /6 /0 3 8/ 5/ 04 5/ 11 /0 5 11 /1 4/

  10. A suggested periodic table up to Z≤ 172, based on Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, Pekka

    2011-01-07

    Extended Average Level (EAL) Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions agree with earlier work in that a rough shell-filling order for the elements 119-172 is 8s < 5g≤ 8p(1/2) < 6f < 7d < 9s < 9p(1/2) < 8p(3/2). The present Periodic Table develops further that of Fricke, Greiner and Waber [Theor. Chim. Acta 1971, 21, 235] by formally assigning the elements 121-164 to (nlj) slots on the basis of the electron configurations of their ions. Simple estimates are made for likely maximum oxidation states, i, of these elements M in their MX(i) compounds, such as i = 6 for UF(6). Particularly high i are predicted for the 6f elements.

  11. Genomewide analysis of copy number variants in alopecia areata in a Central European cohort reveals association with MCHR2.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Johannes; Degenhardt, Franziska; Hofmann, Andrea; Redler, Silke; Basmanav, F Buket; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Hanneken, Sandra; Giehl, Kathrin A; Wolff, Hans; Moebus, Susanne; Kruse, Roland; Lutz, Gerhard; Blaumeiser, Bettina; Böhm, Markus; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Petukhova, Lynn; Christiano, Angela M; Nöthen, Markus M; Betz, Regina C

    2016-06-16

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a common hair loss disorder of autoimmune aetiology, which often results in pronounced psychological distress. Understanding of the pathophysiology of AA is increasing, due in part to recent genetic findings implicating common variants at several genetic loci. To date, no study has investigated the contribution of copy number variants (CNVs) to AA, a prominent class of genomic variants involved in other autoimmune disorders. Here, we report a genomewide- and a candidate gene-focused CNV analysis performed in a cohort of 585 patients with AA and 1340 controls of Central European origin. A nominally significant association with AA was found for CNVs in the following five chromosomal regions: 4q35.2, 6q16.3, 9p23, 16p12.1 and 20p12.1. The most promising finding was a 342.5-kb associated region in 6q16.3 (duplications in 4/585 patients; 0/1340 controls). The duplications spanned the genes MCHR2 and MCHR2-AS1, implicated in melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) signalling. These genes have not been implicated in previous studies of AA pathogenesis. However, previous research has shown that MCHR2 affects the scale colour of barfin flounder fish via the induction of melanin aggregation. AA preferentially affects pigmented hairs, and the hair of patients with AA frequently shows a change in colour when it regrows following an acute episode of AA. This might indicate a relationship between AA, pigmentation and MCH signalling. In conclusion, the present results provide suggestive evidence for the involvement of duplications in MCHR2 in AA pathogenesis.

  12. Genomewide profiling of copy-number alteration in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Mikulasova, Aneta; Smetana, Jan; Wayhelova, Marketa; Janyskova, Helena; Sandecka, Viera; Kufova, Zuzana; Almasi, Martina; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Gregora, Evzen; Kessler, Petr; Wrobel, Marek; Walker, Brian A; Wardell, Christopher P; Morgan, Gareth J; Hajek, Roman; Kuglik, Petr

    2016-12-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a benign condition with an approximate 1% annual risk of symptomatic plasma cell disorder development, mostly to multiple myeloma (MM). We performed genomewide screening of copy-number alterations (CNAs) in 90 MGUS and 33 MM patients using high-density DNA microarrays. We identified CNAs in a smaller proportion of MGUS (65.6%) than in MM (100.0%, P = 1.31 × 10(-5) ) and showed median number of CNAs is lower in MGUS (3, range 0-22) than in MM (13, range 4-38, P = 1.82 × 10(-10) ). In the MGUS cohort, the most frequent losses were located at 1p (5.6%), 6q (6.7%), 13q (30.0%), 14q (14.4%), 16q (8.9%), 21q (5.6%), and gains at 1q (23.3%), 2p (6.7%), 6p (13.3%), and Xq (7.8%). Hyperdiploidy was detected in 38.9% of MGUS cases, and the most frequent whole chromosome gains were 3 (25.6%), 5 (23.3%), 9 (37.8%), 15 (23.3%), and 19 (32.2%). We also identified CNAs such as 1p, 6q, 8p, 12p, 13q, 16q losses, 1q gain and hypodiploidy, which are potentially associated with an adverse prognosis in MGUS. In summary, we showed that MGUS is similar to MM in that it is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, but overall cytogenetic instability is lower than in MM, which confirms that genetic abnormalities play important role in monoclonal gammopathies.

  13. Up-conversion routines of Er{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} and YOF phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sangmoon; Yang, Wonseok; Park, Chu-Young; Noh, Minhee; Choi, Seulki; Park, Dahye; Jang, Ho Seong; Cho, So-Hye

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Single-phase optical materials of Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8}:Er and YOF:Er were prepared. • Effective spectral converting properties were observed in Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8}:Er,Yb. • 980 nm diode laser was irradiated for up-converting analysis. • A multi-photon process in the phosphors was investigated. - Abstract: Optical materials composed of a Y{sub 6(1−p−q)}Er{sub 6p}Yb{sub 6q}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} (p = 0.001–0.1, q = 0.005–0.1) solid solution with Y{sub 0.99}Er{sub 0.01}OF were prepared via a solid-state reaction using excess NH{sub 4}F flux at 950 °C for 30 min. X-ray diffraction patterns of Y{sub 6(1−p−q)}Er{sub 6p}Yb{sub 6q}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} and Y{sub 0.99}Er{sub 0.01}OF were compared upon altering the synthesis temperature and the molar ratio of the NH{sub 4}F flux to the Y{sup 3+} (Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+}) ions. The effective spectral-conversion properties of Er{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} ions in Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} phosphors were monitored during excitation with a 980 nm wavelength diode-laser. Selection of appropriate Er{sup 3+} and/or Yb{sup 3+} concentrations in the Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} structure led to achievement of the desired up-conversion emission, from the green to the red regions of the spectra. Furthermore, the mechanism of up-conversion in the phosphors was described by an energy-level schematic. Up-conversion emission spectra and the dependence of the emission intensity on pump power (between 193 and 310 mW) in the Y{sub 6(0.995−q)}Er{sub 0.03}Yb{sub 6q}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} phosphors were also investigated.

  14. Structural basis for the divergence of substrate specificity and biological function within HAD phosphatases in lipopolysaccharide and sialic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Daughtry, Kelly D; Huang, Hua; Malashkevich, Vladimir; Patskovsky, Yury; Liu, Weifeng; Ramagopal, Udupi; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Almo, Steven C; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N

    2013-08-13

    The haloacid dehalogenase enzyme superfamily (HADSF) is largely composed of phosphatases that have been particularly successful at adaptating to novel biological functions relative to members of other phosphatase families. Herein, we examine the structural basis for the divergence of function in two bacterial homologues: 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate phosphohydrolase (KDO8P phosphatase, KDO8PP) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-9-O-phosphonononic acid phosphohydrolase (KDN9P phosphatase, KDN9PP). KDO8PP and KDN9PP catalyze the final step in KDO and KDN synthesis, respectively, prior to transfer to CMP to form the activated sugar nucleotide. KDO8PP and KDN9PP orthologs derived from an evolutionarily diverse collection of bacterial species were subjected to steady-state kinetic analysis to determine their specificities toward catalyzed KDO8P and KDN9P hydrolysis. Although each enzyme was more active with its biological substrate, the degree of selectivity (as defined by the ratio of kcat/Km for KDO8P vs KDN9P) varied significantly. High-resolution X-ray structure determination of Haemophilus influenzae KDO8PP bound to KDO/VO3(-) and Bacteriodes thetaiotaomicron KDN9PP bound to KDN/VO3(-) revealed the substrate-binding residues. The structures of the KDO8PP and KDN9PP orthologs were also determined to reveal the differences in their active-site structures that underlie the variation in substrate preference. Bioinformatic analysis was carried out to define the sequence divergence among KDN9PP and KDO8PP orthologs. The KDN9PP orthologs were found to exist as single-domain proteins or fused with the pathway nucleotidyl transferases; the fusion of KDO8PP with the transferase is rare. The KDO8PP and KDN9PP orthologs share a stringently conserved Arg residue that forms a salt bridge with the substrate carboxylate group. The split of the KDN9PP lineage from the KDO8PP orthologs is easily tracked by the acquisition of a Glu/Lys pair that supports KDN9P binding. Moreover

  15. T1rho Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T Detects Knee Cartilage Changes After Viscosupplementation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Roshan P; Stambough, Jeffrey B; Fenty, Matthew; Mauck, Robert L; Kelly, John D; Reddy, Ravinder; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P

    2015-07-01

    Viscosupplementation may affect cartilage. Changes in T1rho magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) relaxation times correlate with proteoglycan changes in cartilage. The authors hypothesized that T1rho MRI will show an improvement in proteoglycan content at 6 weeks and 3 months after viscosupplementation and that this improvement will correlate with functional outcome scores. Ten patients (mean age, 56 years; Kellgren-Lawrence grade 1 or 2) underwent T1rho MRI at baseline, 6 weeks, and 3 months after viscosupplementation. Volumetric T1rho means were calculated by depth and region. Visual analog scale (VAS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were obtained. Mean T1rho values decreased in the superficial patella at 6 weeks (10.3%, P=.002) and 3 months (7.9%, P=.018) and in the middle patella at 6 weeks (7.0%, P=.014) compared with baseline values. Deep patella T1rho values increased at 3 months compared with 6 weeks (9.9%, P=.033), returning to values similar to baseline. Mean T1rho values increased in the deep tibia at 6 weeks (4.7%, P=.048) and in the middle tibia (5.2%, P=.004) and deep tibia (11.2%, P=.002) at 3 months compared with baseline. At 6 weeks, improvement was seen in VAS (5.9 to 3.9, P<.01), IKDC-9 (55.3 to 63.7, P=.03), and WOMAC (43.9 to 32.8, P=.03) scores. Functional VAS (4.0, P=.02), IKDC-9 (67.8, P=.04), and WOMAC (30.0, P=.04) scores remained better at 3 months. T1rho MRI is a feasible noninvasive method of studying molecular changes in cartilage. Some segments improved after viscosupplementation, and others worsened, possibly reflecting natural history or symptom relief and subsequent increase in activity-related wear.

  16. An asbestos-exposed family with multiple cases of pleural malignant mesothelioma without inheritance of a predisposing BAP1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Mitchell; Kadariya, Yuwaraj; Pei, Jianming; Talarchek, Jacqueline; Facciolo, Francesco; Visca, Paolo; Righi, Luisella; Cozzi, Ilaria; Testa, Joseph R; Ascoli, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    We report a family with domestic exposure to asbestos and diagnosis of multiple cancers, including eight pleural malignant mesotheliomas and several other lung or pleural tumors. DNA sequence analysis revealed no evidence for an inherited mutation of BAP1. Sequence analysis of other potentially relevant genes, including TP53, CDKN2A, and BARD1, also revealed no mutation. DNA microarray analysis of tissue from two mesotheliomas revealed multiple genomic imbalances, including consistent losses of overlapping segments in 2q, 6q, 9p, 14q, 15q, and 22q, but no losses of chromosome 3 harboring the BAP1 locus. However, the results of immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated loss of nuclear BAP1 staining in three of six mesotheliomas tested, suggesting that somatic alterations of BAP1 occurred in a subset of tumors from this family. Since mesothelioma could be confirmed in only a single generation, domestic exposure to asbestos may be the predominant cause of mesothelioma in this family. Given the existence of unspecified malignant pleural tumors and lung cancers in a prior generation, we discuss the possibility that some other tumor susceptibility or modifier gene(s) may contribute to the high incidence of mesothelioma in this family. Because the incidence of mesothelioma in this family is higher than that expected even in workers heavily exposed to asbestos, we conclude that both asbestos exposure and genetic factors have played a role in the high rate of mesothelioma and potentially other pleural or lung cancers seen in this family. 

  17. Dyess AFB, Texas. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    5 -. 6 o4.A ,,f PZ7 7 .1 6E.4 88. 85.1 69.6 t ’.o 47.2 4.C ". 1 90.1 .1 90.2 93.2 90. 1 .. 9.2 (- E 72 7.7 2 7., 89.2 9.2.? 43. 1. 1. , ,4 91,C ŕ.5...99.6 99.6 99.6 E .7i t’𔃻 t,2 97.48. ’ .,6 .9.< q).3 99.3 .9.6 99.7 99.7 99.7 99.7 99.7 99.7 ’I ’ C21 1 .?.. .. 97.4 88.1 48.9 P.6.5 99. 99. 3 99.3 99.6...99.b 99.6 99.6 99.6 q9.6 E 1221 46. ! S4.4 99.. 99.4 99.5 99.5 94.7 99.7 99.7 99.7 99.7 99.7 99.7 99.7 99.7 99.7 IO z C21 0 .I S55 99.5 99. 49.6 99.6

  18. Chromosome alterations in breast carcinomas: frequent involvement of DNA losses including chromosomes 4q and 21q.

    PubMed Central

    Schwendel, A.; Richard, F.; Langreck, H.; Kaufmann, O.; Lage, H.; Winzer, K. J.; Petersen, I.; Dietel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization was applied to map DNA gains and losses in 39 invasive ductal breast carcinomas. Frequent abnormalities included gains on chromosomal regions 1q, 8q, 11q12-13, 16p, 19, 20q and X as well as frequent losses on 1p, 5q, 6q, 9p, 11q, 13q and 16q. Furthermore, frequent losses on 4q (20 cases) and 21q (14 cases) were found for the first time in this tumour type. High copy number amplifications were observed at 8q12-24, 11q11-13 and 20q13-ter. Highly differentiated tumours were associated with gains on 1q and 11q12-13 along with losses on 1p21-22, 4q, 13q, 11q21-ter. Undifferentiated breast carcinomas were characterized by additional DNA imbalances, i.e. deletions of 5q13-23, all of chromosome 9, the centromeric part of chromosome 13 including band 13q14 and the overrepresentation of chromosome X. We speculate that these changes are associated with tumour progression of invasive ductal breast cancer. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9743305

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Li, Ni; Weinhold, Niels; Försti, Asta; Ali, Mina; van Duin, Mark; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Johnson, David C.; Chen, Bowang; Halvarsson, Britt-Marie; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Kuiper, Rowan; Stephens, Owen W.; Bertsch, Uta; Broderick, Peter; Campo, Chiara; Einsele, Hermann; Gregory, Walter A.; Gullberg, Urban; Henrion, Marc; Hillengass, Jens; Hoffmann, Per; Jackson, Graham H.; Johnsson, Ellinor; Jöud, Magnus; Kristinsson, Sigurður Y.; Lenhoff, Stig; Lenive, Oleg; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Migliorini, Gabriele; Nahi, Hareth; Nelander, Sven; Nickel, Jolanta; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Ross, Fiona M.; da Silva Filho, Miguel Inacio; Swaminathan, Bhairavi; Thomsen, Hauke; Turesson, Ingemar; Vangsted, Annette; Vogel, Ulla; Waage, Anders; Walker, Brian A.; Wihlborg, Anna-Karin; Broyl, Annemiek; Davies, Faith E.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Langer, Christian; Hansson, Markus; Kaiser, Martin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Stefansson, Kari; Morgan, Gareth J.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hemminki, Kari; Nilsson, Björn; Houlston, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy with a significant heritable basis. Genome-wide association studies have transformed our understanding of MM predisposition, but individual studies have had limited power to discover risk loci. Here we perform a meta-analysis of these GWAS, add a new GWAS and perform replication analyses resulting in 9,866 cases and 239,188 controls. We confirm all nine known risk loci and discover eight new loci at 6p22.3 (rs34229995, P=1.31 × 10−8), 6q21 (rs9372120, P=9.09 × 10−15), 7q36.1 (rs7781265, P=9.71 × 10−9), 8q24.21 (rs1948915, P=4.20 × 10−11), 9p21.3 (rs2811710, P=1.72 × 10−13), 10p12.1 (rs2790457, P=1.77 × 10−8), 16q23.1 (rs7193541, P=5.00 × 10−12) and 20q13.13 (rs6066835, P=1.36 × 10−13), which localize in or near to JARID2, ATG5, SMARCD3, CCAT1, CDKN2A, WAC, RFWD3 and PREX1. These findings provide additional support for a polygenic model of MM and insight into the biological basis of tumour development. PMID:27363682

  20. Compositions and methods for detecting gene rearrangements and translocations

    DOEpatents

    Rowley, Janet D.; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a series of nucleic acid probes for use in diagnosing and monitoring certain types of leukemia using, e.g., Southern and Northern blot analyses and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These probes detect rearrangements, such as translocations involving chromosome band 11q23 with other chromosomes bands, including 4q21, 6q27, 9p22, 19p13.3, in both dividing leukemic cells and interphase nuclei. The breakpoints in all such translocations are clustered within an 8.3 kb BamHI genomic region of the MLL gene. A novel 0.7 kb BamH1 cDNA fragment derived from this gene detects rearrangements on Southern blot analysis with a single BamHI restriction digest in all patients with the common 11q23 translocations and in patients with other 11q23 anomalies. Northern blot analyses are presented demonstrating that the MLL gene has multiple transcripts and that transcript size differentiates leukemic cells from normal cells. Also disclosed are MLL fusion proteins, MLL protein domains and anti-MLL antibodies.

  1. Molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer: in quest of tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Toru; Horii, Akira

    2004-04-01

    To find molecular clues useful for early detection and effective therapy for pancreatic cancer, we first carried out genomic analysis by means of comparative genomic hybridization and micro-satellite analysis. We found very complicated molecular alterations in multiple chromosomal regions, including 1p, 6q, 9p, 12q, 17p, 18q, and 21q for losses and 8q and 20q for gains. These diverse changes are very characteristic of pancreatic cancer, and from this information, we developed a method for detecting the aberrant copy numbers of specific chromosomal regions by fluorescence in situ hybridization in cells collected from pancreatic juice for early diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms. The regions of losses suggest the existence of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). We identified DUSP6/MKP-3 at 12q21-q22 as a strong candidate TSG; it showed epigenetic inactivation in some fractions of invasive pancreatic cancer and growth suppression and apoptosis by overexpression in vitro. To determine the pathologic roles of 18q, we introduced a normal copy of chromosome 18 into cultured pancreatic cancer cells. The introduction induced marked suppressions of tumor formation and metastasis formation in vivo. We continue work to more completely understand the complex molecular mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis and to apply the information gained to the clinical treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Cytogenetic characterization of complex karyotypes in seven established melanoma cell lines by multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization and DAPI banding.

    PubMed

    Schulten, Hans Jürgen; Gunawan, Bastian; Otto, Friedrich; Hassmann, René; Hallermann, Christian; Noebel, Albrecht; Füzesi, László

    2002-03-01

    We report the use of multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) to resolve chromosomal aberrations in seven established melanoma cell lines with hypotriploid to hypertetraploid complex karyotypes. By simultaneous identification of all human chromosomes in single FISH experiments using a set of 52 directly labeled, whole chromosome painting probes, cryptic chromosomal translocations and the origin of unclear chromosomal material in structural rearranged and marker chromosomes could be identified, refining the tumor karyotypes in all seven cell lines. The number of structural aberrations in each cell line assigned with combined M-FISH and DAPI banding analysis ranged from 15 to 45. Altogether, 275 breakpoints could be assigned to defined chromosomal regions or bands. The chromosome arms 1p, 6q, 7p, 9p, and 11q which are known to be nonrandomly associated with melanoma tumorigenesis, were frequently involved in chromosomal breaks and/or copy number changes. This study also demonstrated the practical usefulness of combining M-FISH with conventional cytogenetic banding techniques for the characterization of complex tumor karyotypes with massive genomic alterations.

  3. Development and characterization of a novel human Waldenström Macroglobulinemia cell line (RPCI-WM1; Roswell Park Cancer Institute-Waldenström Macroglobulinemia 1)

    PubMed Central

    Chitta, Kasyapa S.; Paulus, Aneel; Ailawadhi, Sikander; Foster, Barbara A.; Moser, Michael T.; Starostik, Petr; Masood, Aisha; Sher, Taimur; Miller, Kena C.; Iancu, Dan M.; Conroy, Jeffrey; Nowak, Norma J.; Sait, Sheila N.; Personett, David A.; Coleman, Morton; Furman, Richard R.; Martin, Peter; Ansell, Stephen M.; Lee, Kelvin; Chanan-Khan, Asher A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the biology of Waldenström Macroglobulinemia is hindered by a lack of preclinical models. We report a novel cell line, RPCI-WM1, from a patient treated for WM. The cell line secreted human IgM (hIgM) with k-light chain restriction identical to the primary tumor. The cell line has a modal chromosomal number of 46 and harbors chromosomal changes such as deletion of 6q21, monoallelic deletion of 9p21 (CDKN2A), 13q14 (RB1) and 18q21 (BCL-2) with a consistent amplification of 14q32 (IgH) identical to its founding tumor sample. Clonal relationship was confirmed by identical CDR3 length and single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as a matching IgH sequence of the cell line and founding tumor. Both also harbor a heterozygous, non-synonymous mutation at amino acid 265 in MYD88 gene (L265P). The cell line expresses most of the cell surface markers present on the parent cells. Over all, RPCI-WM1 represents a valuable model to study WM. PMID:22812491

  4. Are there any more ovarian tumor suppressor genes? A new perspective using ultra high-resolution copy number and loss of heterozygosity analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Williams, Louise H; Sridhar, Anita; Boyle, Samantha E; Bearfoot, Jennifer L; Li, Jason; Anglesio, Michael S; Campbell, Ian G

    2009-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is characterized by complex genetic alterations, including copy number loss and copy number-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). These alterations are assumed to represent the "second hit" of the underlying tumor suppressor gene (TSG), however, relative to the number of LOH hotspots reported, few ovarian TSGs have been identified. We conducted a high-resolution LOH analysis using SNP arrays (500K and SNP6.0) of 106 primary ovarian tumors of various histological subtypes together with matching normal DNA. LOH was detected in at least 35% of samples on chromosomes 17, 19p, 22q, Xp, 13q, 8p, 6q, 4q, 5q, 1p, 16q, and 9q with a median minimal region of overlap of only 300 kb. Subtype-specific differences in LOH frequency were noted, particularly for mucinous cases. We also identified 192 somatic homozygous deletions (HDs). Recurrent HDs targeted known TSGs such as CDKN2A (eight samples), RB1 (five samples), and PTEN (three samples). Additional recurrent HDs targeted 16 candidate TSGs near minimal regions of LOH on chromosomes 17, 13, 8p, 5q, and X. Given the importance of HDs in inactivating known genes, these candidates are highly likely to be ovarian TSGs. Our data suggest that the poor success of previous LOH studies was due to the inability of previous technology to resolve complex genomic alterations and distinguish true LOH from allelic imbalance. This study shows that recurrent regions of LOH and HD frequently align with known TSGs suggesting that LOH analysis remains a valid approach to discovering new candidates.

  5. Whole genome analyses of African G2, G8, G9, and G12 rotavirus strains using sequence-independent amplification and 454® pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Jere, Khuzwayo C; Mlera, Luwanika; O'Neill, Hester G; Potgieter, A Christiaan; Page, Nicola A; Seheri, Mapaseka L; van Dijk, Alberdina A

    2011-11-01

    High mortality rates caused by rotaviruses are associated with several strains such as G2, G8, G9, and G12 rotaviruses. Rotaviruses with G9 and G12 genotypes emerged worldwide in the past two decades. G2 and G8 rotaviruses are however also characterized frequently across Africa. To understand the genetic constellation of African G2, G8, G9, and G12 rotavirus strains and their possible origin, sequence-independent cDNA synthesis, amplification, and 454(®) pyrosequencing of the whole genomes of five human African rotavirus strains were performed. RotaC and phylogenetic analysis were used to assign and confirm the genotypes of the strains. Strains RVA/Human-wt/MWI/1473/2001/G8P[4], RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/3203WC/2009/G2P[4], RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/3133WC/2009/G12P[4], RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/3176WC/2009/G12P[6], and RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/GR10924/1999/G9P[6] were assigned G8-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2, G2-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2, G12-P[4]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1, G12-P[6]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1, and G9-P[6]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 genotypes, respectively. The detection of both Wa- and DS-1-like genotypes in strain RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/3133WC/2009/G12P[4] and Wa-like, DS-1-like and P[6] genotypes in strain RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/GR10924/1999/G9P[6] implies that these two strains were generated through intergenogroup genome reassortment. The close similarity of the genome segments of strain RVA/Human-wt/MWI/1473/2001/G8P[4] to artiodactyl-like, human-bovine reassortant strains and human rotavirus strains suggests that it originated from or shares a common origin with bovine strains. It is therefore possible that this strain might have emerged through interspecies genome reassortment between human and artiodactyl rotaviruses. This study illustrates the swift characterization of all the 11 rotavirus genome segments by using a single set of universal primers for cDNA synthesis followed by 454(®) pyrosequencing and RotaC analysis.

  6. DNA copy number aberrations associated with lymphovascular invasion in upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Misumi, Taku; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Miyachika, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Satoshi; Chochi, Yasuyo; Nakao, Motonao; Nagao, Kazuhiro; Hara, Takahiko; Sakano, Shigeru; Furuya, Tomoko; Oga, Atsunori; Kawauchi, Shigeto; Sasaki, Kohsuke; Matsuyama, Hideyasu

    2012-06-01

    Recent studies have reported that lymphovascular invasion (LVI) is a predictor of patient prognosis in upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UUTUC). DNA copy number aberrations (DCNAs) identified by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) had not previously been examined in UUTUC. We therefore examined DCNAs in UUTUC and compared them with DCNAs in LVI. We applied aCGH technology using DNA chips spotted with 4,030 BAC clones to 32 UUTUC patients. Frequent copy number gains were detected on chromosomal regions 8p23.1 and 20q13.12, whereas frequent copy number losses were detected on chromosomal regions 13q21.1, 17p13.1, 6q16.3, and 17p11.2. DCNAs occurred more frequently in tumors with LVI than in those without it (P = 0.0002), and this parameter was more closely associated with LVI than with the tumor grade or pT stage. Disease-specific survival rate was higher in tumors without LVI than in those with it (P = 0.0120); however, tumor grade and stage were not significant prognostic factors of patient outcome. These data support our hypothesis that tumors with LVI have more genetic alterations in terms of total numbers of DCNAs than those without, and provide proof that aggressive adjuvant therapy should be considered for UUTUC patients with LVI.

  7. Prospects of molybdenum and rhenium octahedral cluster complexes as X-ray contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Krasilnikova, Anna A; Shestopalov, Michael A; Brylev, Konstantin A; Kirilova, Irina A; Khripko, Olga P; Zubareva, Kristina E; Khripko, Yuri I; Podorognaya, Valentina T; Shestopalova, Lidiya V; Fedorov, Vladimir E; Mironov, Yuri V

    2015-03-01

    Investigation of new X-ray contrast media for radiography is an important field of science since discovering of X-rays in 1895. Despite the wide diversity of available X-ray contrast media the toxicity, especially nephrotoxicity, is still a big problem to be solved. The octahedral metal-cluster complexes of the general formula [{M6Q8}L6] can be considered as quite promising candidates for the role of new radiocontrast media due to the high local concentration of heavy elements, high tuning ability of ligand environment and low toxicity. To exemplify this, the X-ray computed tomography experiments for the first time were carried out on some octahedral cluster complexes of molybdenum and rhenium. Based on the obtained data it was proposed to investigate the toxicological proprieties of cluster complex Na2H8[{Re6Se8}(P(CH2CH2CONH2)(CH2CH2COO)2)6]. Observed low cytotoxic and acute toxic effects along with rapid renal excretion of the cluster complex evidence its perspective as an X-ray contrast media for radiography.

  8. Chromosomal aberrations in human hepatocellular carcinomas associated with hepatitis C virus infection detected by comparative genomic hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Sakakura, C; Hagiwara, A; Taniguchi, H; Yamaguchi, T; Yamagishi, H; Takahashi, T; Koyama, K; Nakamura, Y; Abe, T; Inazawa, J

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-five hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) were analysed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), to screen for changes in copy-number of DNA sequences. Chromosomal losses were noted in 1p34–36 (37%), 4q12–21 (48%), 5q13–21 (35%), 6q13–16 (23%), 8p21–23 (28%), 13q (20%), 16q (33%) and 17p13 (37%). Gains were noted in 1q (46%), 6p (20%), 8q21–24 (31%) and 17q (43%). High level gains indicative of gene amplifications were found in 7q31 (3%), 11q13 (3%), 14q12 (6%) and 17q12 (3%); amplification at 14q12 may be characteristic for HCCs. No significant difference in chromosomal aberrations was noted between carcinomas associated with HCV-infection in our study and those reported earlier in HCCs infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), indicating that both HBV- and HCV-related carcinomas may progress through a similar cascade of molecular events. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471057

  9. Identification of copy number alterations associated with the progression of DCIS to invasive ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Clint E; Gorringe, Kylie L; Thompson, Ella R; Opeskin, Ken; Boyle, Samantha E; Wang, Yuker; Hill, Prue; Mann, G Bruce; Campbell, Ian G

    2012-06-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-obligate precursor to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Annotation of the genetic differences between the two lesions may assist in the identification of genes that promote the invasive phenotype. Synchronous DCIS and IDC cells were microdissected from FFPE tissue and analysed by molecular inversion probe (MIP) copy number arrays. Matched IDC and DCIS showed highly similar copy number profiles (average of 83% of the genome shared) indicating a common clonal origin although there is evidence that the DCIS continues to evolve in parallel with the co-existing IDC. Four chromosomal regions of loss (3q, 6q, 8p and 11q) and four regions of gain (5q, 16p, 19q and 20) were recurrently affected in IDC but not in DCIS. CCND1 and MYC showed increased amplitude of gain in IDC. One region of loss (17p11.2) was specific to DCIS. IDC-specific regions include genes with previous links to breast cancer progression and potential therapeutic targets such as AXL, SPHK1 and PLAUR.

  10. [Antioxidant constituents from Smilax riparia].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Tang, Sheng'an; Qin, Nan; Zhai, Huiyuan; Duan, Hongquan

    2012-03-01

    By repeated column chromatography, including silica gel, toyopearl HW-40 and preparative HPLC, thirteen compounds (1-13) were isolated and purified from Smilax riparia. On the basis of spectral data analysis, the structures of isolated compounds were elucidated as 5-methoxy-[6]-gingerol (1), dehydroabietic acid (2), pteryxin (3), 2-methylphenyl-1-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzonic acid (5), isovanillin (6), vanillic acid (7), p-hydroxycinnamic acid (8), p-hydroxycinnamic methyl ester (9), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde (10), ferulic acid methyl ester (11), benzoic acid (12) and 5-hydroxy-methyl-2-furalclehyde (13). Compounds 1-4 and 8-12 were isolated from this genus for the first time. All compounds were isolated from this plant for the first time. Compounds 1 and 5-11 showed antioxidant activities on DPPH method.

  11. VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) Design Tools, Reference Manual, Release 3.0.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    Microns Rule wWp 3 P-Well width sWp 9 P-Well to P-Well spacing assuming all p-wells are connected to vss dW 4 Diffusion size dS 4 P+ diffusion to P...P-well pWp+ DS 8 P+ diffusion in N-substrate to P-well edge spacing Wpn+WnS 7 N+ diffusion in N-substrate to P-well edge spacing pWn+ DS 4 N+ diffusion...Lambda dS diffusion spacing 3.0 iOg implant-gate overlap 1.5 iSg implant-gate spacing 2.0 pS poly spacing 2.0 pOg poly-gate overlap 2.0 pSd poly-diff

  12. Altered cortical microarchitecture in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Farr, Joshua N; Zhang, Wei; Kumar, Shaji K; Jacques, Richard M; Ng, Alvin C; McCready, Louise K; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Drake, Matthew T

    2014-01-30

    Patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are at increased fracture risk, and we have previously shown that MGUS patients have altered trabecular bone microarchitecture compared with controls. However, there are no data on whether the porosity of cortical bone, which may play a greater role in bone strength and the occurrence of fractures, is increased in MGUS. Thus, we studied cortical porosity and bone strength (apparent modulus) using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography imaging of the distal radius in 50 MGUS patients and 100 age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched controls. Compared with controls, MGUS patients had both significantly higher cortical porosity (+16.8%; P < .05) and lower apparent modulus (-8.9%; P < .05). Despite their larger radial bone size, MGUS patients have significantly increased cortical bone porosity and reduced bone strength relative to controls. This increased cortical porosity may explain the increased fracture risk seen in MGUS patients.

  13. Rotavirus genotypes in children in the Basque Country (northern Spain) over a 13-year period (July 1996-June 2009).

    PubMed

    Cilla, G; Montes, M; Gomariz, M; Piñeiro, L; Pérez-Trallero, E

    2010-08-01

    To describe the circulation dynamics of human rotavirus genotypes in a region of southern Europe over a 13-year period. The G- and P-types of rotavirus isolates of patients aged less than 5 years were analyzed using multiplex, reverse transcription polymerase-chain reaction. Of 1,538 isolates investigated, a combination of individual G- and P-types was obtained in 1,368. The most prevalent combination was G1[P8] (57.5% of the genotyped strains), which circulated in all seasons and predominated in nine out of 13 seasons. The strains G2[P4] (14.4%), G3[P8] (8.3%), G4[P8] (5.5%) and G9[P8] (13.4%) circulated intermittently. G4[P8] strains were frequently detected in the 1990s but only sporadically after 2000. G9[P8] strains emerged from 1997-1998 and became dominant in the winters of 2005-2007. G2[P4] strains were predominant in 2003-2004, before the rotavirus vaccines were commercialized. Unusual combinations of common G- and P-types and the presence of unusual G- and/or P-types (G6[P14], G8[P8], G8[P14] and G12[P8]) were rarely observed (<1%). We found no differences in hospitalization due to distinct genotypes. G-types G1-G4 and G9 represented >99% of circulating rotaviruses over a 13-year period. Therefore, vaccine efficacy in this region can be expected to be high.

  14. MMP-8, MMP-9 and Neutrophil Elastase in Peripheral Blood and Exhaled Breath Condensate in COPD.

    PubMed

    Sng, JieHao Joshua; Prazakova, Silvie; Thomas, Paul S; Herbert, Cristan

    2017-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by progressive and irreversible airflow limitation associated with chronic inflammation involving cytokines and metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMP-8, MMP-9 and neutrophil elastase (NE) are known to be implicated in COPD but the factors influencing activation and suppression remain unclear. This study aimed to compare MMP-8, MMP-9 and NE in the peripheral blood of COPD patients and controls and to likewise assess exhaled breath condensate (EBC) for these MMPs. Peripheral blood micro(mi)RNA139-5p levels, which may regulate MMPs in COPD, were also measured. Blood and EBC were collected from COPD patients (stable and during exacerbations) and healthy controls. Expression of mRNA for MMP-8, MMP-9, NE and miRNA-139-5p expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was measured using qRT-PCR. MMP-8, MMP-9 and NE protein in plasma as well as MMP-8 and MMP-9 protein in EBC were analysed by enzyme-linked immunoassays. PBMCs from COPD patients showed greater expression of mRNA for MMP-8 (p = 0.0004), MMP-9 (p = 0.0023) and NE (p = 0.0019). PBMC expression of mRNA for NE was significantly higher in COPD exacerbations compared to stable cases (p < 0.05). Expression of mRNA for MMP-9 and NE correlated negatively with spirometry in patients (p < 0.05). Plasma from COPD patients showed greater levels of protein for MMP-8 (p = 0.003), MMP-9 (p = 0.046) and NE (p = 0.018). MMP-8 protein levels were lower in the EBC of COPD patients (p < 0.0001). In PBMCs, enhanced expression of mRNA for MMP-9 and NE is associated with COPD and may correlate with disease severity and exacerbations.

  15. Sex Differences in Outcomes Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention According to Age

    PubMed Central

    Epps, Kelly C.; Holper, Elizabeth M.; Selzer, Faith; Vlachos, Helen A.; Gualano, Sarah K.; Abbott, J. Dawn; Jacobs, Alice K.; Marroquin, Oscar C.; Naidu, Srihari S.; Groeneveld, Peter W.; Wilensky, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Women <50 years of age with coronary artery disease (CAD) may represent a group at higher risk for recurrent ischemic events following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI); however, no long-term, multi-center outcomes assessment exists in this population. Methods and Results Using the NHLBI Dynamic Registry we evaluated the association of sex and age on cardiovascular-related outcomes in10,963 patients (3,797 women, 394 <50 years) undergoing PCI and followed for 5 years. Death, myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), and repeat PCI were primary outcomes comprising major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). While procedural success rates were similar by sex, the cumulative rate of MACE at 1 year was higher in young women (27.8 vs. 19.9%, p=0.003) driven largely by higher rates of repeat revascularizations for target vessel or target lesion failure (CABG: 8.9% vs. 3.9%, p<0.001, adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 2.4, 95% CI 1.5-4.0; PCI: 19.0% vs. 13.0%, p=0.005, aHR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.2). At 5 years, young women remained at higher risk for repeat procedures (CABG: 10.7% vs. 6.8%, p=0.04, aHR 1.71, 95% CI 1.01-2.88; repeat PCI [target vessel]: 19.7% vs. 11.8%, p=0.002, aHR 1.8, 95% CI 1.24-2.82). Compared to older women, younger women remained at increased risk of MACE, while all outcome rates were similar in older women and men. Conclusions Young women, despite having less severe angiographic CAD have an increased risk of target vessel and target lesion failure. The causes of this difference deserve further investigation. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00005677. PMID:26908855

  16. Benefits of maltodextrin intake 2 hours before cholecystectomy by laparotomy in respiratory function and functional capacity: a prospective randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Zani, Fabiana Vieira Breijão; Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Diana Borges Dock; da Silva, Ageo Mário Cândido; Caporossi, Fernanda Stephan; Caporossi, Cervantes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the change in respiratory function and functional capacity according to the type of preoperative fasting. Methods: Randomized prospective clinical trial, with 92 female patients undergoing cholecystectomy by laparotomy with conventional or 2 hours shortened fasting. The variables measured were the peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, dominant handgrip strength, and non-dominant handgrip strength. Evaluations were performed 2 hours before induction of anesthesia and 24 hours after the operation. Results: The two groups were similar in preoperative evaluations regarding demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as for all variables. However, postoperatively the group with shortened fasting had higher values than the group with conventional fasting for lung function tests peak expiratory flow (128.7±62.5 versus 115.7±59.9; p=0.040), forced expiratory volume in the first second (1.5±0.6 versus 1.2±0.5; p=0.040), forced vital capacity (2.3±1.1 versus 1.8±0.9; p=0.021), and for muscle function tests dominant handgrip strength (24.9±6.8 versus 18.4±7.7; p=0.001) and non-dominant handgrip strength (22.9±6.3 versus 17.0±7.8; p=0.0002). In the intragroup evaluation, there was a decrease in preoperative compared with postoperative values, except for dominant handgrip strength (25.2±6.7 versus 24.9±6.8; p=0.692), in the shortened fasting group. Conclusion: Abbreviation of preoperative fasting time with ingestion of maltodextrin solution is beneficial to pulmonary function and preserves dominant handgrip strength. PMID:26154547

  17. Biofilm formation as a novel phenotypic feature of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Crohn's disease (CD) is a high morbidity chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) has been recently implicated in the origin and perpetuation of CD. Because bacterial biofilms in the gut mucosa are suspected to play a role in CD and biofilm formation is a feature of certain pathogenic E. coli strains, we compared the biofilm formation capacity of 27 AIEC and 38 non-AIEC strains isolated from the intestinal mucosa. Biofilm formation capacity was then contrasted with the AIEC phenotype, the serotype, the phylotype, and the presence of virulence genes. Results Specific biofilm formation (SBF) indices were higher amongst AIEC than non-AIEC strains (P = 0.012). In addition, 65.4% of moderate to strong biofilms producers were AIEC, whereas 74.4% of weak biofilm producers were non-AIEC (P = 0.002). These data indicate that AIEC strains were more efficient biofilm producers than non-AIEC strains. Moreover, adhesion (P = 0.009) and invasion (P = 0.003) indices correlated positively with higher SBF indices. Additionally, motility (100%, P < 0.001), H1 type flagellin (53.8%, P < 0.001), serogroups O83 (19.2%, P = 0.008) and O22 (26.9%, P = 0.001), the presence of virulence genes such as sfa/focDE (38.5%, P = 0.003) and ibeA (26.9%, P = 0.017), and B2 phylotype (80.8%, P < 0.001) were frequent characteristics amongst biofilm producers. Conclusion The principal contribution of the present work is the finding that biofilm formation capacity is a novel, complementary pathogenic feature of the recently described AIEC pathovar. Characterization of AIEC specific genetic determinants, and the regulatory pathways, involved in biofilm formation will likely bring new insights into AIEC pathogenesis. PMID:19772580

  18. The Empirical Comparison of Coordinate Transformation Models and Distortion Modeling Methods Based on a Case Study of Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grgic, M.; Varga, M.; Bašić, T.

    2015-12-01

    Several coordinate transformation models enable performing of the coordinate transformations between the historical astro-geodetic datums, which were utilized before the GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) technologies were developed, and datums related to the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS), which today are most often used to determine the position. The decision on the most appropriate coordinate transformation model is influenced by many factors, such as: required accuracy, available computational resources, possibility of the model application regarding the size and shape of the territory, coordinate distortion that very often exist in historical astro-geodetic datums, etc. This study is based on the geodetic data of the Republic of Croatia in both, historical and ITRS-related datum. It investigates different transformation models, including conformal Molodensky 3 parameters (p) and 5p (standard and abridged) transformation models, 7p transformation models (Bursa-Wolf and Molodensky-Badekas model), Affine transformation models (8p, 9p, 12p), and Multiple Regression Equation approach. Besides, it investigates the 7p, 8p, 9p, and 12p transformation models extended with distortion modeling, and the grid based only transformation model (NTv2 model). Furthermore, several distortion modeling methods were used to produce various models of distortion shifts in different resolutions. Thereafter, their performance and the performance of the transformation models was evaluated using summary statistics derived from the remained positional residuals that were computed for the independent control spatial data set. Lastly, the most appropriate method(s) of distortion modeling and most appropriate coordinate transformation model(s) were defined regarding the required accuracy for the Croatian case.

  19. Health-Related Quality of Life in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients With Cancer: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Husson, Olga; Zebrack, Brad J; Block, Rebecca; Embry, Leanne; Aguilar, Christine; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Cole, Steve

    2017-02-20

    Purpose To examine changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and its predictors during the first 2 years after initial cancer diagnosis in adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer. Patients and Methods A multicenter, longitudinal, prospective study was conducted among a diverse sample of AYA patients with cancer ages 15 to 39 years. One hundred seventy-six patients (75% response) completed a self-report measure of HRQoL (Short Form-36 [SF-36]) within the first 4 months after diagnosis and again 12 and 24 months later. Linear mixed models with random intercepts and slopes estimated changes in QoL. Results Recently diagnosed AYA patients with cancer had significantly worse physical component scale (PCS) scores (38.7 v 52.8; P < .001) and mental component scale (MCS) scores (42.9 v 48.9; P < .001) when compared with population norms. Significant improvements in PCS and MCS scores from baseline to 24-month follow-up were observed; however, these increases were largest during the first 12 months. At the 24-month follow-up, AYA patients still had significantly lower PCS scores (48.0 v 52.8; P < .001) and MCS scores (45.8 v 48.9; P = .002) when compared with population norms. Multivariable analyses revealed that improvements in PCS and MCS scores were primarily a function of being off-treatment and being involved in school or work. PCS but not MCS scores were worse for AYA patients diagnosed with cancers with poorer prognoses. Conclusion Although HRQoL improved over time, it was still compromised 24 months after primary diagnosis. Given relatively little observed improvement in HRQoL during the 12- to 24-month period after diagnosis, AYA patients may benefit from supportive care interventions administered during the second year after diagnosis.

  20. Gender differences, work stressors and musculoskeletal disorders in weaving industries.

    PubMed

    Nag, Anjali; Vyas, H; Nag, P K

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken to identify the work stressors among male and female weavers (N=516) in powerloom and handloom and examine the association of work stressors with the prevalence of work related musculo-skeletal disorders (MSDs). Physical and psychosocial stresses of work, job diagnostics, hazards of workplace, working environment and MSDs prevalence were assessed. There is high prevalence of MSDs among weavers. Female weavers in powerloom and handloom were more prone to developing MSDs in upper back (OR 1.8; p<0.05 and OR 2.1; p<0.01) and lower back (OR 1.9; p<0.05 and OR 1.8; p<0.05). Male weavers were more prone to developing pain in the knee (OR 2.9; p<0.001), and hand (OR 2.2; p<0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that job duration >10 yr (OR 3.7, p<0.05), manual material handling (OR 3, p<0.05), and poor machinery safety (OR 11, p<0.05), contributed to occurrence of MSDs amongst powerloom weavers. Among the handloom weavers, age >25 yr (OR 3.2, p<0.05), poor machinery design (OR 2.2, p<0.01), mental overload (OR 5.7, p<0.001), skill requirement to perform jobs (OR 20.7, p<0.05) had significant influence in the occurrence of pain. Gender differences exist in the prevalence of MSDs and the perception of work and psycho-social stresses among the weavers.

  1. Does breastfeeding education affect nursing staff beliefs, exclusive breastfeeding rates, and Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative compliance? The experience of a small, rural Canadian hospital.

    PubMed

    Martens, P J

    2000-11-01

    The effectiveness of a breastfeeding education intervention consisting of a 1 1/2-hour mandated session for all nursing staff, with an optional self-paced tutorial, was evaluated in a small rural Canadian hospital. The intervention was designed to increase exclusive breastfeeding rates, create positive beliefs and attitudes among staff members, and increase compliance with the World Health Organization/UNICEF Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). Staff surveys and chart audits were conducted at both the intervention and control site hospitals prior to the intervention and 7 months after the intervention. Over a 7-month period, the intervention hospital experienced an increase in BFHI compliance (24.4 vs. 31.9, P < .01), breastfeeding beliefs (55.0 vs. 58.8, P < .05), and exclusive breastfeeding rates (31% vs. 54% of breastfed babies, P < .05) but no change in breastfeeding attitudes (44.0 vs. 44.9, P = .80). The control site experienced no change in BFHI compliance, beliefs, or attitudes but a significant decrease in exclusive breastfeeding rates (43% vs. 0%, P < .05).

  2. Elevated Matrix Metalloproteinase Levels in Bronchi Infected with Periodontopathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bernasconi, Luca; Ramenzoni, Liza L.; Al-Majid, Ahmed; Tini, Gabrielo M.; Graber, Sereina M.; Schmidlin, Patrick R.; Irani, Sarosh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether bronchial colonisations/infections with periodontopathogenic bacteria are associated with elevated inflammatory markers such as MMPs, interleukins and Tumor necrosis factor alpha in the bronchial fluid. Methods Periodontal status was assessed in consecutive outpatients planned for elective bronchoscopies, and PCR for periodontopathogenic bacteria was performed from a protected specimen brush sample taken from the bronchial mucosa. Additionally, MMPs, interleukins and Tumor necrosis factor alpha were measured in the bronchial fluid. Results Out of the four species assessed, one species was found in 13 of 91 (14%) patients, and two in 12 (13%), three in 13 (14%) and all four in 1 (1%) patient, respectively. In multiple linear regression models the presence of Treponema denticola showed a consistent pattern of positive effects in bronchial fluid (Bonferroni adjusted p-values) on the levels of MMP9 (p adj.: 0.028) and MMP12 (p adj.: 0.029). Active smoking was independently associated with increased levels of aMMP8 (p adj.: 0.005) and MMP9 (p adj.: 0.009). Levels of IL-1 ß, IL-8 and Tumor necrosis factor alpha measured in the bronchial fluid were not affected by the presence of periodontopathogenic bacteria. Conclusions Bronchial colonisation/infection with Treponema denticola and smoking are independently associated with elevated MMPs (MMP9/MMP12 and MMP8/MMP9, respectively) in the bronchial fluid. PMID:26656474

  3. Effect of right ventricular pacing on cardiac apex rotation assessed by a gyroscopic sensor.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, Emanuela; Cercenelli, Laura; Parlapiano, Mario; Fumero, Roberto; Bagnoli, Paola; Costantino, Maria Laura; Plicchi, Gianni

    2007-01-01

    To quantify cardiac apex rotation (CAR), the authors recently proposed the use of a Coriolis force sensor (gyroscope) as an alternative to other complex techniques. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of right ventricular (RV) pacing on CAR. A sheep heart was initially paced from the right atrium to induce a normal activation sequence at a fixed heart rate (AAI mode) and then an atrioventricular pacing was performed (DOO mode, AV delay = 60 ms). A small gyroscope was epicardially glued on the cardiac apex to measure the angular velocity (Ang V). From AAI to DOO pacing mode, an increase (+9.2%, p < 0.05) of the maximum systolic twisting velocity (Ang VMAX) and a marked decrease (-19.9%, p < 0.05) of the maximum diastolic untwisting velocity (Ang VMIN) resulted. RV pacing had negligible effects (-3.1%, p = 0.09) on the maximum angle of CAR, obtained by integrating Ang V. The hemodynamic parameters of systolic (LVdP/dtMAX) and diastolic (LVdP/dtMIN) cardiac function showed slight variations (-3.8%, p < 0.05 and +3.9%, p < 0.05, respectively). Results suggest that cardiac dyssynchrony induced by RV pacing can alter the normal physiological ventricular twist patterns, particularly affecting diastolic untwisting velocity.

  4. Selective versus comprehensive neck dissection in the treatment of patients with a pathologically node-positive neck with or without microscopic extracapsular spread in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feng, Z; Gao, Y; Niu, L X; Peng, X; Guo, C B

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the prognosis and complications between selective neck dissection (SND) and comprehensive neck dissection (CND) for patients with a pathologically node-positive neck in squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and the floor of the mouth. This was a retrospective cohort study. There was no significant difference between the SND group and the CND group in 3-year neck control rate (86.2% vs. 85.9%, P=0.797) or disease-specific survival (DSS) rate (64.6% vs. 61.9%, P=0.646). Further analyses of the respective 3-year DSS rates in the SND and CND subgroups were as follows: pN1 without extracapsular spread (ECS), 67.7% vs. 72.2%, P=0.851; pN2b without ECS, 64.7% vs. 68.8%, P=0.797; and pN+ with ECS, 57.1% vs. 60.0%, P=0.939. Of note, there were significantly fewer complications in the SND group compared with the CND group (7.3% vs. 20.0%, P=0.032). Multivariate analysis showed that the modality of neck treatment, pN+ status, and microscopic ECS did not serve as independent prognostic factors. SND plus adjuvant radiotherapy is a management strategy of high efficiency and minor morbidity for selected oral cancer patients with a pN+ neck with or without microscopic ECS.

  5. Polymorphisms in the LPL and CETP Genes and Haplotype in the ESR1 Gene Are Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Women from Southwestern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cahua-Pablo, José Ángel; Cruz, Miguel; Méndez-Palacios, Abigail; Antúnez-Ortiz, Diana Lizzete; Vences-Velázquez, Amalia; del Carmen Alarcón-Romero, Luz; Parra, Esteban Juan; Tello-Flores, Vianet Argelia; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Valladares-Salgado, Adán; Pérez-Macedonio, Claudia Paola; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a combination of metabolic disorders associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies in women reported associations between polymorphisms in ESR1, LPL and CETP genes and MetS. Our aim was to evaluate the association between variants in ESR1, LPL and CETP genes with MetS and its components. Four hundred and eighty women were analyzed, anthropometric features and biochemical profiles were evaluated, and genotyping was performed by real-time PCR. We found an association with elevated glucose levels (odds ratio (OR) = 2.9; p = 0.013) in carrying the AA genotype of rs1884051 in the ESR1 gene compared with the GG genotype, and the CC genotype of rs328 in the LPL gene was associated with MetS compared to the CG or GG genotype (OR = 2.8; p = 0.04). Moreover, the GA genotype of rs708272 in the CETP gene is associated with MetS compared to the GG or AA genotype (OR = 1.8; p = 0.006). In addition the ACTCCG haplotype in the ESR1 gene is associated with a decrease in the risk of MetS (OR = 0.02; p < 0.001). In conclusion, our results show the involvement of the variants of ESR1, LPL and CETP genes in metabolic events related to MetS or some of its features. PMID:26370976

  6. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in asymptomatic women: relationship to history, contraception, and cervicitis.

    PubMed

    Bontis, J; Vavilis, D; Panidis, D; Theodoridis, T; Konstantinidis, T; Sidiropoulou, A

    1994-12-01

    The presence of Chlamydia trachomatis antigen was examined in 400 endocervical samples collected from an equal number of asymptomatic sexually active women. The overall prevalence was found to be 4%, using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Chlamydia infection was correlated with younger age (5.8%, p < 0.05), a history of pelvic inflammatory disease (30%, p < 0.0001), and more than four lifetime sexual partners (7.9%, p < 0.01). Women who used oral contraception had more infections (9.7%), than did women who used the intrauterine contraceptive device (4.8%, p > 0.05), condom (0%, p < 0.01) or no contraception (3.1%, p < 0.05). Infection was strongly associated with cervical erythema (8.2%, p < 0.0001), ectopy (7%, p < 0.05), friability (20%, p < 0.0001), and endocervical discharge (100%, p < 0.0001). These results support the view that Chlamydia trachomatis infection is associated with younger age, intense sexual life, and use of oral contraceptives. Given that the majority of infected women revealed cervical pathology, the detection of chlamydia in the high-risk female population with cervical changes seems to be essential.

  7. Adult Javanese migrants to Indonesian Papua at high risk of severe disease caused by malaria.

    PubMed

    Baird, J K; Basri, H; Weina, P; MaGuire, J D; Barcus, M J; Picarema, H; Elyazar, I R F; Ayomi, E; Sekartuti

    2003-08-01

    Migrants from Java arrive in hyperendemic Papua, Indonesia lacking exposure to endemic malaria. We evaluated records of evacuation to hospital with a diagnosis of severe malaria from a transmigration village in northeastern Papua. During the first 30 months, 198 residents with severe disease were evacuated (7.5 evacuations/100 person-years). During this period the risk of evacuation for adults (> 15 years of age) was 2.8. (95% CI = 2.1-3.8; P < 0.0001) relative to children, despite apparently equal exposure to risk of infection. Relative risk (RR) for adults was greatest during the first 6 months (RR > 16; 95% CI > or = 2.0-129; P = 0.0009), and diminished during the second 6 months (RR = 9.4; 95% CI = 2.7-32.8; P < 0.0001) and the third 6 months (RR = 3.7; 95% CI = 1.7-7.9; P = 0.0004). During the next two 6-month intervals, the RR for adults was 1.6 and 1.5 (95 % CI range 0.8-2.6; P < 0.18). Adults lacking chronic exposure were far more likely to progress to severe disease compared to children during initial exposure, but not after chronic exposure to infection.

  8. Adult Javanese migrants to Indonesian Papua at high risk of severe disease caused by malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Baird, J. K.; Basri, H.; Weina, P.; MaGuire, J. D.; Barcus, M. J.; Picarema, H.; Elyazar, I. R. F.; Ayomi, E.; Sekartuti

    2003-01-01

    Migrants from Java arrive in hyperendemic Papua, Indonesia lacking exposure to endemic malaria. We evaluated records of evacuation to hospital with a diagnosis of severe malaria from a transmigration village in northeastern Papua. During the first 30 months, 198 residents with severe disease were evacuated (7.5 evacuations/100 person-years). During this period the risk of evacuation for adults (> 15 years of age) was 2.8. (95% CI = 2.1-3.8; P < 0.0001) relative to children, despite apparently equal exposure to risk of infection. Relative risk (RR) for adults was greatest during the first 6 months (RR > 16; 95% CI > or = 2.0-129; P = 0.0009), and diminished during the second 6 months (RR = 9.4; 95% CI = 2.7-32.8; P < 0.0001) and the third 6 months (RR = 3.7; 95% CI = 1.7-7.9; P = 0.0004). During the next two 6-month intervals, the RR for adults was 1.6 and 1.5 (95 % CI range 0.8-2.6; P < 0.18). Adults lacking chronic exposure were far more likely to progress to severe disease compared to children during initial exposure, but not after chronic exposure to infection. PMID:12948380

  9. Live Birth and Cumulative Live Birth Rates in Expected Poor Ovarian Responders Defined by the Bologna Criteria Following IVF/ICSI Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Joyce; Lee, Vivian Chi-Yan; Yeung, Tracy Wing-Yee; Li, Raymond Wun-Hang; Ho, Pak-Chung; Ng, Ernest Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the live birth and cumulative live birth rates of expected poor ovarian responders according to the Bologna criteria and to compare their outcomes with those of expected normal responders Design Retrospective analysis Setting University infertility clinic Patients A total of 1,152 subfertile women undergoing their first in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle Interventions Women were classified into 4 groups according to the Bologna criteria for comparison Main Outcome Measure(s) Live birth and cumulative live birth rates Results Women with expected poor response (POR) had the lowest live birth rate than the other 3 groups (23.8%, p = 0.031). Cumulative live birth rates were significantly lower in those with expected POR than those with expected normal ovarian response (NOR) (35.8% vs 62.8%, p<0.0001). In the subgroup analysis, the cumulative live birth rates in expected PORs were significantly lower in those who had ≤3 oocytes retrieved (18.6% for ≤3 oocytes vs 44.0% for >3 oocytes, p = 0.006) whereas the live birth rates in fresh cycle did not differ (17.8% vs 30.9%, p = 0.108). Conclusion Women who were expected POR according to the Bologna criteria had lower live birth and cumulative live birth than expected NOR but they still can achieve reasonable treatment outcomes and IVF treatment should not be precluded. PMID:25748478

  10. Lymph node metastasis and pattern of recurrence in clinically early stage endometrial cancer with positive lymphovascular space invasion

    PubMed Central

    Jernigan, Amelia; Nutter, Benjamin; Michener, Chad; Rose, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the rate, predictors of lymph node metastasis (LNM) and pattern of recurrence in clinically early stage endometrial cancer (EC) with positive lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI). Methods Women with clinically early stage EC and positive LVSI 2005 to 2012 were identified. Kaplan-Meier curves and logistic regression models were used. Results One hundred forty-eight women were identified. Of them, 25.7% had LNM (21.7% pelvic LNM, 18.5% para-aortic LNM). Among patients with LNM who had both pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy, isolated pelvic, para-aortic and both LNM were noted in 51.4%, 17.1%, and 31.4% respectively. Age and depth of myometrial invasion were significant predictors of LNM in LVSI positive EC. Node positive patients had high recurrence rate (47% vs. 11.8%, p<0.05) especially distant (60.9% vs. 7.9%, p<0.001) and para-aortic (13.2% vs. 1.8%, p=0.017) recurrences compared to node negative EC. LNM was associated with lower progression-free survival (p=0.002) but not overall survival (p=0.73). Conclusion EC with positive LVSI is associated with high risk of LNM. LNM is associated with high recurrence rate especially distant and para-aortic recurrences. Adjuvant treatments should target prevention of recurrences in these areas. PMID:25686395

  11. Use of heterospermic inseminations and paternity testing to evaluate the relative contributions of common sperm traits and seminal plasma proteins in boar fertility.

    PubMed

    Flowers, W L; Deller, F; Stewart, K R

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate relationships between common semen quality estimates including sperm motility, sperm morphology, spontaneous capacitation status and seminal plasma proteins and boar fertility using heterospermic inseminations and subsequent paternity testing. All boars (n=12) used in the study had excellent semen quality (≥70% normal sperm) that resulted in average farrowing rates and litter sizes of 88.9±0.7% and 11.7±0.1 pigs, respectively. Their ejaculates were combined to make heterospermic insemination doses in such a way that each boar was tested against all of his contemporaries. The proportion of piglets sired by each individual was used to separate boars into three fertility groups: High (71.6±4.8%; n=3); Medium (51.6±3.8%; n=6); and Low (25.2%±5.3%; n=3). Ejaculates from High fertility boars had more motile sperm with normal acrosomes that moved faster in a straight-line and were more likely to undergo an acrosome reaction (p≤0.05) compared with their counterparts in the Low fertility group. Ejaculates from High fertility boars contained the greatest concentrations of three seminal plasma proteins (25.9kD/5.9pI; 55.1kD/4.8pI; and 70.1kD/5.2pI; p≤0.05), whereas concentrations of a 19.1kD/6.8pI were highest in semen from Low fertility boars (p≤0.05). Multiple regression analyses indicated that concentrations of the 25.9kD/5.9pI seminal plasma protein explained 66% of the variation observed in the proportion of pigs sired within a litter among boars (p≤0.00001). These results demonstrate that heterospermic inseminations and subsequent paternity testing is an effective technique for defining relationships between common semen quality tests and fertility, especially in situations where reproductive performance of all the boars is high. Motility, normal acrosome morphology, average linear velocity of motile sperm, and the proportion of sperm capable of an acrosome reaction were all positively associated with boar

  12. Structure-function analysis of 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galactonononate-9-phosphate phosphatase defines specificity elements in type C0 haloalkanoate dehalogenase family members.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhibing; Wang, Liangbing; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N

    2009-01-09

    The phosphotransferases of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) act upon a wide range of metabolites in all eukaryotes and prokaryotes and thus constitute a significant force in cell function. The challenge posed for biochemical function assignment of HADSF members is the identification of the structural determinants that target a specific metabolite. The "8KDOP" subfamily of the HADSF is defined by the known structure and catalytic activity of 2-keto-3-deoxy-8-phospho-d-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO-8-P) phosphatase. Homologues of this enzyme have been uniformly annotated as KDO-8-P phosphatase. One such gene, BT1713, from the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron genome was recently found to encode the enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-9-phosphonononic acid (KDN-9-P) phosphatase in the biosynthetic pathway of the 9-carbon alpha-keto acid, 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galactonononic acid (KDN). To find the structural elements that provide substrate-specific interactions and to allow identification of genomic sequence markers, the x-ray crystal structures of BT1713 liganded to the cofactor Mg(2+)and complexed with tungstate or VO(3)(-)/Neu5Ac were determined to 1.1, 1.85, and 1.63 A resolution, respectively. The structures define the active site to be at the subunit interface and, as confirmed by steady-state kinetics and site-directed mutagenesis, reveal Arg-64(*), Lys-67(*), and Glu-56 to be the key residues involved in sugar binding that are essential for BT1713 catalytic function. Bioinformatic analyses of the differentially conserved residues between BT1713 and KDO-8-P phosphatase homologues guided by the knowledge of the structure-based specificity determinants define Glu-56 and Lys-67(*) to be the key residues that can be used in future annotations.

  13. Structure-Function Analysis of 2-Keto-3-Deoxy-D-Glycero-D-Galacto-Nononate-9-Phosphate Phosphatase Defines Specificity Elements in Type C0 had Family Members

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.; Wang, L; Dunaway-Mariano, D; Allen, K

    2009-01-01

    The phosphotransferases of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) act upon a wide range of metabolites in all eukaryotes and prokaryotes and thus constitute a significant force in cell function. The challenge posed for biochemical function assignment of HADSF members is the identification of the structural determinants that target a specific metabolite. The '8KDOP' subfamily of the HADSF is defined by the known structure and catalytic activity of 2-keto-3-deoxy-8-phospho-d-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO-8-P) phosphatase. Homologues of this enzyme have been uniformly annotated as KDO-8-P phosphatase. One such gene, BT1713, from the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron genome was recently found to encode the enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-9-phosphonononic acid (KDN-9-P) phosphatase in the biosynthetic pathway of the 9-carbon ?-keto acid, 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galactonononic acid (KDN). To find the structural elements that provide substrate-specific interactions and to allow identification of genomic sequence markers, the x-ray crystal structures of BT1713 liganded to the cofactor Mg2+and complexed with tungstate or Formula/Neu5Ac were determined to 1.1, 1.85, and 1.63 A resolution, respectively. The structures define the active site to be at the subunit interface and, as confirmed by steady-state kinetics and site-directed mutagenesis, reveal Arg-64*, Lys-67*, and Glu-56 to be the key residues involved in sugar binding that are essential for BT1713 catalytic function. Bioinformatic analyses of the differentially conserved residues between BT1713 and KDO-8-P phosphatase homologues guided by the knowledge of the structure-based specificity determinants define Glu-56 and Lys-67* to be the key residues that can be used in future annotations.

  14. Clinical and imaging correlates of EEG patterns in hospitalized patients with encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Raoul; Stevens, Robert D; Kaplan, Peter W

    2013-04-01

    To identify the relationship between pathologic electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns, clinical and neuroradiological abnormalities, and outcome in hospitalized patients with acute encephalopathy. This 5-year cohort study was performed at an academic tertiary care center. EEGs in 154 patients with altered mental status were classified according to five predefined patterns: Isolated continuous slowing of background activity (theta, theta/delta, and delta activity) and patterns with slowing background activity with episodic transients [i.e., triphasic waves (TWs) or frontal intermittent delta activity (FIRDA)]. Clinical characteristics, blood tests and neuroimaging were compared among groups. Associations between EEG patterns and structural and non-structural abnormalities were calculated. Glasgow Outcome Score >3 at discharge was defined as favorable and 1-3 as unfavorable outcome. In multivariable analyses, theta was associated with brain atrophy (OR 2.6, p = 0.020), theta/delta with intracerebral hemorrhages (OR 6.8, p = 0.005), FIRDA with past cerebrovascular accidents (OR 2.7, p = 0.004), TWs with liver or multi-organ failure (OR 6, p = 0.004; OR 4, p = 0.039), and delta activity with alcohol/drug abuse with or without intoxication, and HIV infection (OR 3.8, p = 0.003; OR 9, p = 0.004). TWs were associated with death (OR 4.5, p = 0.005); theta/delta with unfavorable outcomes (OR 2.5, p = 0.033), while patients with FIRDA had favorable outcomes (OR 4.8, p = 0.004). In encephalopathic patients, well-defined EEG patterns are associated with specific pathological conditions and outcomes, suggesting that mechanistic hypotheses underlie these abnormal EEG patterns. To clarify the respective contributions of non-structural and structural abnormalities to encephalopathy reflected in specific EEG patterns, prospective studies using continuous EEG monitoring during the acute onset of encephalopathy are needed.

  15. Effects of a Combination of Berberis aristata, Silybum marianum and Monacolin on Lipid Profile in Subjects at Low Cardiovascular Risk; A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Angela; Romano, Davide; Maffioli, Pamela

    2017-02-07

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an anti-hypercholesterolemic agent containing Berberis aristata, Silybum marianum and monacolin K and KA in a sample of Caucasian patients at low cardiovascular risk according to Framingham score. The primary outcome was to evaluate the effects of this nutraceutical combination on lipid profile; the secondary outcome was to evaluate the effect on some inflammatory markers, in particular high sensitivity C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor-α interleukin-6. One hundred and forty-three patients were randomized to placebo or Berberol(®) K, once a day, during the dinner, for 3 months, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. We recorded a significant reduction of fasting plasma glucose with Berberol(®) K compared to placebo (-12.2%, p < 0.05). Moreover, we recorded an increase of fasting plasma insulin with Berberol(®) K both compared to baseline and to placebo (+9.9%, p < 0.05). Accordingly, the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index obtained after treatment with Berberol(®) K was lower than the one in the placebo group (-2.8%, p < 0.05). No variations of lipid profile were observed with placebo, while there was a significant decrease of total cholesterol (-20.5%, p < 0.05), triglycerides (-17.7%, p < 0.05), and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholestero (-27.8%, p < 0.05) with Berberol(®) K, compared to placebo. There was a decrease of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (-30.8%, p < 0.05), and interleukin-6 (-25.0%, p < 0.05), with Berberol(®) K compared to placebo. In conclusion, combining different hypocholesterolemic nutraceutical agents such as Berberis aristata, Silybum marianum and monacolin K and KA could be effective and safe to obtain a reduction of lipid profile and an improvement of inflammatory parameters.

  16. Who Follows eHealth Interventions as Recommended? A Study of Participants' Personal Characteristics From the Experimental Arm of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Daniela N; Crutzen, Rik; Kremers, Stef PJ; de Vries, Hein

    2015-01-01

    Background Computer-tailored eHealth interventions to improve health behavior have been demonstrated to be effective and cost-effective if they are used as recommended. However, different subgroups may use the Internet differently, which might also affect intervention use and effectiveness. To date, there is little research available depicting whether adherence to intervention recommendations differs according to personal characteristics. Objective The aim was to assess which personal characteristics are associated with using an eHealth intervention as recommended. Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted among a sample of the adult Dutch population (N=1638) testing an intervention aimed at improving 5 healthy lifestyle behaviors: increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, increasing physical activity, reducing alcohol intake, and promoting smoking cessation. Participants were asked to participate in those specific online modules for which they did not meet the national guideline(s) for the respective behavior(s). Participants who started with fewer than the recommended number of modules of the intervention were defined as users who did not follow the intervention recommendation. Results The fewer modules recommended to participants, the better participants adhered to the intervention modules. Following the intervention recommendation increased when participants were older (χ2 1=39.8, P<.001), female (χ2 1=15.8, P<.001), unemployed (χ2 1=7.9, P=.003), ill (χ2 1=4.5, P=.02), or in a relationship (χ2 1=7.8, P=.003). No significant relevant differences were found between groups with different levels of education, incomes, or quality of life. Conclusion Our findings indicate that eHealth interventions were used differently by subgroups. The more frequent as-recommended intervention use by unemployed, older, and ill participants may be an indication that these eHealth interventions are attractive to people with a greater need for health care information

  17. A new dietary strategy for long-term treatment of the metabolic syndrome is compared with the American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines: the MEtabolic Syndrome REduction in NAvarra (RESMENA) project.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, Rocio; Lopez-Legarrea, Patricia; Abete, Itziar; Bondia-Pons, Isabel; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Forga, Luis; Martinez, J Alfredo; Zulet, M Angeles

    2014-02-01

    The long-term effects of dietary strategies designed to combat the metabolic syndrome (MetS) remain unknown. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a new dietary strategy based on macronutrient distribution, antioxidant capacity and meal frequency (MEtabolic Syndrome REduction in NAvarra (RESMENA) diet) for the treatment of the MetS when compared with the American Heart Association guidelines, used as Control. Subjects with the MetS (fifty-two men and forty-one women, age 49 (se 1) years, BMI 36·11 (se 0·5) kg/m²) were randomly assigned to one of two dietary groups. After a 2-month nutritional-learning intervention period, during which a nutritional assessment was made for the participants every 15 d, a 4-month self-control period began. No significant differences were found between the groups concerning anthropometry, but only the RESMENA group exhibited a significant decrease in body weight ( - 1·7%; P= 0·018), BMI ( - 1·7%; P= 0·019), waist circumference ( - 1·8%; P= 0·021), waist:hip ratio ( - 1·4%; P= 0·035) and android fat mass ( - 6·9%; P= 0·008). The RESMENA group exhibited a significant decrease in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentrations ( - 26·8%; P= 0·008 and - 14·0%; P= 0·018, respectively), while the Control group exhibited a significant increase in glucose (7·9%; P= 0·011), AST (11·3%; P= 0·045) and uric acid (9·0%; P< 0·001) concentrations. LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations were increased (Control group: 34·4%; P< 0·001 and RESMENA group: 33·8%; P< 0·001), but interestingly so were the LDL-C:apoB ratio (Control group: 28·7%; P< 0·001, RESMENA group: 17·1%; P= 0·009) and HDL-cholesterol concentrations (Control group: 21·1%; P< 0·001, RESMENA group: 8·7; P= 0·001). Fibre was the dietary component that most contributed to the improvement of anthropometry, while body-weight loss explained changes in some biochemical markers. In conclusion, the RESMENA diet is a good

  18. Prognostic Implications of Diabetes in Patients With Left-Sided Endocarditis