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Sample records for 6t sram cell

  1. 6-T SRAM cell design with nanoscale double-gate SOI MOSFETs: impact of source/drain engineering and circuit topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashmi; Kranti, Abhinav; Armstrong, G. Alastair

    2008-07-01

    The impact of source/drain engineering on the performance of a six-transistor (6-T) static random access memory (SRAM) cell, based on 22 nm double-gate (DG) SOI MOSFETs, has been analyzed using mixed-mode simulation, for three different circuit topologies for low voltage operation. The trade-offs associated with the various conflicting requirements relating to read/write/standby operations have been evaluated comprehensively in terms of eight performance metrics, namely retention noise margin, static noise margin, static voltage/current noise margin, write-ability current, write trip voltage/current and leakage current. Optimal design parameters with gate-underlap architecture have been identified to enhance the overall SRAM performance, and the influence of parasitic source/drain resistance and supply voltage scaling has been investigated. A gate-underlap device designed with a spacer-to-straggle (s/σ) ratio in the range 2 3 yields improved SRAM performance metrics, regardless of circuit topology. An optimal two word-line double-gate SOI 6-T SRAM cell design exhibits a high SNM ~ 162 mV, Iwr ~ 35 µA and low Ileak ~ 70 pA at VDD = 0.6 V, while maintaining SNM ~ 30%VDD over the supply voltage (VDD) range of 0.4 0.9 V.

  2. Low standby leakage 12T SRAM cell characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Arjun; Nakhate, Sangeeta

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a low power and variability-aware static random access memory (SRAM) architecture based on a twelve-transistor (12T) cell is proposed. This cell obtains low static power dissipation due to a parallel global latch (G-latch) and storage latch (S-latch), along with a global wordline (GWL), which offer a high cell ratio and pull-up ratio for reliable read and write operations and a low cell ratio and pull-up ratio during idle mode to reduce the standby power dissipation. In the idle state, only the S-latch stores bits, while the G-latch is isolated from the S-latch and the GWL is deactivated. The leakage power consumption of the proposed SRAM cell is thereby reduced by 38.7% compared to that of the conventional six-transistor (6T) SRAM cell. This paper evaluates the impact of the chip supply voltage and surrounding temperature variations on the standby leakage power and observes considerable improvement in the power dissipation. The read/write access delay, read static noise margin (SNM) and write SNM were evaluated, and the results were compared with those of the standard 6T SRAM cell. The proposed cell, when compared with the existing cell using the Monte Carlo method, shows an appreciable improvement in the standby power dissipation and layout area.

  3. Stability and leakage characteristics of novel conducting PMOS based 8T SRAM cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yeonbae

    2014-06-01

    The stability and leakage power of SRAMs have become an important issue with scaling of CMOS technology. This article reports a novel 8-transistor (8T) SRAM cell improving the read and write stability of data storage elements and reducing the leakage current in idle mode. In read operation, the bit-cell keeps the noise-vulnerable data 'low' node voltage close to the ground level and thus producing near-ideal voltage transfer characteristics essential for robust read functionality. In write operation, a negative bias on the cell facilitates to change contents of the bit. Unlike the conventional 6T cell, there is no conflicting read and write requirement on sizing the transistors. In standby mode, the built-in stacked device in the 8T cell reduces the leakage current significantly. The 8T SRAM cell implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology demonstrates 2× higher read stability while bearing 20% better write-ability at 1.2 V typical condition and a reduction by 45% in leakage power consumption compared to the standard 6T cell. Results of the bit-cell architecture were also compared to the dual-port 8T SRAM cell. The stability enhancement and leakage power reduction provided with the proposed cell are confirmed under process, voltage and temperature variations.

  4. A new low-power 10T SRAM cell with improved read SNM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasandi, Ghasem; Jafari, Mohsen; Imani, Mohsen

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of a new 10T structure for SRAM cell that works quite well in the sub-threshold region. This new architecture has good characteristics in write and read delay and energy compared with other new structures. This new 10T topology improves read static noise margin (SNM) and write operation speed with respect to other topologies in the same or even lower power consumption. The new topology has at least 13% lower power consumption compared with the best of recent architectures. Its write characteristics also are similar to those of 6T-SRAM, which has improved write delay and energy. The new 10T SRAM cell also consumes lower power compared with other cells. The stacking is used to suppress the standby leakage through the read path. The simulations were performed using HSPICE 2011 in a 16 nm bulk CMOS Berkeley predictive technology model (BPTM).

  5. Fin shape fluctuations in FinFET: Correlation to electrical variability and impact on 6-T SRAM noise margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baravelli, Emanuele; De Marchi, Luca; Speciale, Nicolò

    2009-12-01

    Threshold voltage (VT) and drive current (ION) variability of low stand-by power (LSTP)-32 nm FinFETs subject to fin line-edge roughness (LER) is investigated through Technology Computer-Aided Design (TCAD) simulations featuring quantum-corrected hydrodynamic transport. Statistical results provided by an ensemble Monte Carlo (MC) approach highlight an increase in the average VT and a decrease in the average ION with respect to sensitivity analysis based predictions. Correlations of fin shape fluctuations to electrical performance are investigated, thus assessing further limitations of sensitivity analysis and proposing better alternatives to the expensive MC approach. An equivalent fin width is calculated, which allows reducing the spread in ION scatter plots and highlights relative importance of LER in different fin regions. Simplified device instances with linearly varying fin width are simulated to better assess the impact of local thinning/thickening in the channel, source and drain extensions. Asymmetries in the device behavior are observed upon swapping the taper direction and the critical role of extensions is identified. Moreover, the impact of LER on noise margins of FinFET-based Static Random Access Memories (SRAMs) is investigated, considering the hold, read and write operating modes. Results are compared to published data on fabricated cells with similar device features. " μ-6σ" statistics extracted from 1000 mixed-mode simulations helps with assessing variability concerns for mainstream integration of aggressively scaled of FinFET-SRAMs.

  6. SPICE analysis of the SEU sensitivity of a fully depleted SOI CMOS SRAM cell

    SciTech Connect

    Alles, M.L. )

    1994-12-01

    Fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technologies are of interest for commercial applications as well as for use in harsh (radiation-intensive) environments. In both types of application, effects of charged particles (single-event effects) are of concern. Here, SPICE analysis of SEU sensitivity of a 6-T SRAM cell using commercially-representative fully depleted SOI CMOS technology parameters indicates that reduction of the minority carrier lifetime (parasitic bipolar gain) and use of thinner silicon can significantly reduce SEU sensitivity.

  7. Characteristics of a Nonvolatile SRAM Memory Cell Utilizing a Ferroelectric Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Cody; Laws, Crystal; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    The SRAM cell circuit is a standard for volatile data storage. When utilizing one or more ferroelectric transistors, the hysteresis characteristics give unique properties to the SRAM circuit, providing for investigation into the development of a nonvolatile memory cell. This paper discusses various formations of the SRAM circuit, using ferroelectric transistors, n-channel and p-channel MOSFETs, and resistive loads. With varied source and supply voltages, the effects on the timing and retention characteristics are investigated, including retention times of up to 24 hours.

  8. Determination of key parameters of SEU occurrence using 3-D full cell SRAM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, P.; Palau, J.M.; Bruguier, G.; Tavernier, C.; Ecoffet, R.; Gasiot, J.

    1999-12-01

    A 3-D entire SRAM cell, based on a 0.35-{micro}m current CMOS technology, is simulated in this work with a DEVICE simulator. The transient current, resulting from a heavy ion strike in the most sensitive region of the cell, is studied as a function of the LET value, the cell layout and the ion penetration depth. A definition of the critical charge is proposed and two new methods are presented to compute this basic amount of charge only using SPICE simulations. Numerical applications are performed with two different generations of submicron CMOS technologies, including the determination of the sensitive thicknesses.

  9. Freeform illumination sources: an experimental study of source-mask optimization for 22-nm SRAM cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, J.; Laenens, B.; Verhaegen, S.; Van Look, L.; Trivkovic, D.; Lazzarino, F.; Vandenberghe, G.; van Adrichem, P.; Socha, R.; Baron, S.; Tsai, M. C.; Ning, K.; Hsu, S.; Liu, H. Y.; Mulder, M.; Bouma, A.; van der Heijden, E.; Mouraille, O.; Schreel, K.; Finders, J.; Dusa, M.; Zimmermann, J.; Gräupner, P.; Neumann, J. T.; Hennerkes, C.

    2010-04-01

    The use of customized illumination modes is part of the pursuit to stretch the applicability of immersion ArF lithography. Indeed, a specific illumination source shape that is optimized for a particular design leads to enhanced imaging results. Recently, freeform illumination has become available through pixelated DOEs or through FlexRayTM, ASML's programmable illuminator system, allowing for virtually unconstrained intensity distribution within the source pupil. In this paper, the benefit of freeform over traditional illumination is evaluated, by applying source mask co-optimization (SMO) for an aggressive use case, and wafer-based verification. For a 22 nm node SRAM of 0.099 μm² and 0.078 μm2 bit cell area, the patterning of the full contact and metal layer into a hard mask is demonstrated with the application of SMO and freeform illumination. In this work, both pixelated DOEs and FlexRay are applied. Additionally, the match between the latter two is confirmed on wafer, in terms of CD and process window.

  10. Low power options for 32 nm always-on SRAM architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouche, Lahcen; Allard, Bruno

    2011-04-01

    The SRAM 6T bit-cell suffers many limitations in advanced technology nodes among which variability effects. Various alternatives have been experimented and the paper focuses on the 5T-Portless bit-cell. Read and write operations are operated by varying voltage conditions. Literature regarding 32 nm CMOS for Portless SRAM has been reviewed and improvements are presented. The bit-cells are arranged in matrix to permit a current-mode read operation as opposed to voltage-based sensing techniques. Thus safety and stability of the bit-cell operation is established without constraints on memory periphery. The current-mode operation enables a significant gain in dynamic power consumption beneficial to always-on memories. The paper presents different existing solutions to limit the power consumption and their limitations in thin CMOS technologies. The portless bit-cell is presented as a low power architecture alternative to 6T-SRAM. A matrix test-chip is currently under fabrication in bulk CMOS 32 nm.

  11. Statistical modeling of SRAM yield performance and circuit variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qi; Chen, Yijian

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we develop statistical models to investigate SRAM yield performance and circuit variability in the presence of self-aligned multiple patterning (SAMP) process. It is assumed that SRAM fins are fabricated by a positivetone (spacer is line) self-aligned sextuple patterning (SASP) process which accommodates two types of spacers, while gates are fabricated by a more pitch-relaxed self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) process which only allows one type of spacer. A number of possible inverter and SRAM structures are identified and the related circuit multi-modality is studied using the developed failure-probability and yield models. It is shown that SRAM circuit yield is significantly impacted by the multi-modality of fins' spatial variations in a SRAM cell. The sensitivity of 6-transistor SRAM read/write failure probability to SASP process variations is calculated and the specific circuit type with the highest probability to fail in the reading/writing operation is identified. Our study suggests that the 6-transistor SRAM configuration may not be scalable to 7-nm half pitch and more robust SRAM circuit design needs to be researched.

  12. Alpha-particle sensitive test SRAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.

    1990-01-01

    A bench-level test is being developed to evaluate memory-cell upsets in a test SRAM designed with a cell offset voltage. This offset voltage controls the critical charge needed to upset the cell. The effect is demonstrated using a specially designed 2-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM and a Po-208 5.1-MeV 0.61-LET alpha-particle source. This test SRAM has been made sensitive to alpha particles through the use of a cell offset voltage, and this has allowed a bench-level characterization in a laboratory setting. The experimental data are linked to a alpha-particle interaction physics and to SPICE circuit simulations through the alpha-particle collection depth. The collection depth is determined by two methods and found to be about 7 micron. In addition, alpha particles that struck outside the bloated drain were able to flip the SRAM cells. This lateral charge collection was observed to be more than 6 micron.

  13. A four-interleaving HBD SRAM cell based on dual DICE for multiple node collection mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liu; Suge, Yue; Shijin, Lu

    2015-11-01

    A 4-interleaving cell of 2-dual interlocked cells (DICE) is proposed, which reduces single event induced multiple node collection between the sensitive nodes of sensitive pairs in a DICE storage cell in 65 nm technology. The technique involves the 4-interleaving of dual DICE cells at a layout level to meet the required spacing between sensitive nodes in an area-efficient manner. Radiation experiments using a 65 nm CMOS test chip demonstrate that the LETth of our 4-interleaving cell of dual DICE encounters are almost 4× larger and the SEU cross section per bit for our proposed dual DICE design is almost two orders of magnitude less compared to the reference traditional DICE cell.

  14. Nonclassical MHC-restricted invariant Vα6 T cells are critical for efficient early innate anti-viral immunity in the amphibian X. laevis1

    PubMed Central

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Grayfer, Leon; De Jesús, Francisco; Robert, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Nonclassical MHC class Ib (class Ib)-restricted invariant T (iT) cell subsets are attracting interest because of their potential to regulate immune responses against various pathogens. The biological relevance and evolutionary conservation of iT cells has recently been strengthened by the identification of iT cells (iVα6) restricted by the class Ib molecule XNC10 in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. These iVα6 T cells are functionally similar to mammalian CD1d-restricted iNKT cells. Using the amphibian pathogen frog virus 3 (FV3) in combination with XNC10 tetramers and RNAi loss-of-function by transgenesis, we show that XNC10-restricted iVα6 T cells are critical for early antiviral immunity in adult X. laevis. Within hours following intraperitoneal FV3 infection, iVα6 T cells were specifically recruited from the spleen into the peritoneum. XNC10-deficiency and concomitant lack of iVα6 T cells resulted in less effective antiviral and macrophage antimicrobial responses, which lead to impaired viral clearance, increased viral dissemination and more pronounced FV3-induced kidney damage. Together, these findings imply that X. laevis XNC10-restricted iVα6 T cells play important roles in the early anti-FV3 response and that, as has been suggested for mammalian iNKT cells, they may serve as immune regulators polarizing macrophage effector functions towards more effective antiviral states. PMID:26062996

  15. Simulation of SRAM SEU Sensitivity at Reduced Operating Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanathanamurthy, S.; Ramachandran, V.; Alles, M. L.; Reed, R. A.; Massengill, L. W.; Raman, A.; Turowski, M.; Mantooth, A.; Woods, B.; Barlow, M.; Moen, K.; Bellini, M.; Sutton, A.; Cressler, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    A new NanoTCAD-to-Spectre interface is applied to perform mixed-mode SEU simulations of an SRAM cell. Results using newly calibrated TCAD cold temperature substrate mobility models, and BSIM3 compact models extracted explicitly for the cold temperature designs, indicate a 33% reduction in SEU threshold for the range of temperatures simulated.

  16. Clementine RRELAX SRAM Particle Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Soli, G.; Blaes, B.; Ratliff, J.; Garrett, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Clementine RRELAX radiation monitor chip consists of a p-FET total dose monitor and a 4-kbit SRAM particle spectrometer. Eight of these chips were included in the RRELAX and used to detect the passage of the Clementine (S/C) and the innerstage adapter (ISA) through the earth's radiation belts and the 21-Feb 1994 solar flare. This is the first space flight for this 1.2 micron rad-soft custom CMOS radiation monitor. This paper emphasizes results from the SRAM particle detector which showed that it a) has a detection range of five orders of magnitude relative to the 21-Feb solar flare, b) is not affected by electrons, and c) detected microflares occurring with a 26.5 day period.

  17. A built-in SRAM for radiation hard CMOS pixel sensors dedicated to high energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaomin; Gao, Deyuan; Doziere, Guy; Hu, Yann

    2013-02-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) are attractive candidates for charged particle tracking in high energy physics experiments. However, CPS chips fabricated with standard CMOS processes, especially the built-in SRAM IP cores, are not radiation hard enough for this application. This paper presents a radiation hard SRAM for improving the CPS radiation tolerance. The SRAM cell is hardened by increasing the static noise margin (SNM) and adding P+ guard rings in layout. The peripheral circuitry is designed by building a radiation-hardened logic library. The SRAM internal timing control is hardened by a self-adaptive timing design. Finally, the SRAM design was implemented and tested in the Austriamicrosystems (AMS) 0.35 μm standard CMOS process. The prototype chips are adapted to work with frequencies up to 80 MHz, power supply voltages from 2.9 V to 3.3 V and temperatures from 0 °C to 60 °C. The single event latchup (SEL) tolerance is improved from 5.2 MeV cm2/mg to above 56 MeV cm2/mg. The total ionizing dose (TID) tolerance is enhanced by the P+ guard rings and the self-adaptive timing design. The single event upset (SEU) effects are also alleviated due to the high SNM SRAM cell and the P+ guard rings. In the near future, the presented SRAM will be integrated in the CPS chips for the STAR experiments.

  18. SRAM Based Re-programmable FPGA for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. J.; Sun, J. S.; Cronquist, B. E.; McCollum, J. L.; Speers, T. M.; Plants, W. C.; Katz, R. B.

    1999-01-01

    An SRAM (static random access memory)-based reprogrammable FPGA (field programmable gate array) is investigated for space applications. A new commercial prototype, named the RS family, was used as an example for the investigation. The device is fabricated in a 0.25 micrometers CMOS technology. Its architecture is reviewed to provide a better understanding of the impact of single event upset (SEU) on the device during operation. The SEU effect of different memories available on the device is evaluated. Heavy ion test data and SPICE simulations are used integrally to extract the threshold LET (linear energy transfer). Together with the saturation cross-section measurement from the layout, a rate prediction is done on each memory type. The SEU in the configuration SRAM is identified as the dominant failure mode and is discussed in detail. The single event transient error in combinational logic is also investigated and simulated by SPICE. SEU mitigation by hardening the memories and employing EDAC (error detection and correction) at the device level are presented. For the configuration SRAM (CSRAM) cell, the trade-off between resistor de-coupling and redundancy hardening techniques are investigated with interesting results. Preliminary heavy ion test data show no sign of SEL (single event latch-up). With regard to ionizing radiation effects, the increase in static leakage current (static I(sub CC)) measured indicates a device tolerance of approximately 50krad(Si).

  19. Worst-case total dose radiation effect in deep-submicron SRAM circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lili, Ding; Zhibin, Yao; Hongxia, Guo; Wei, Chen; Ruyu, Fan

    2012-07-01

    The worst-case radiation effect in deep-submicron SRAM (static random access memory) circuits is studied through theoretical analysis and experimental validation. Detailed analysis about the radiation effect in different parts of circuitry is presented. For SRAM cells and a sense amplifier which includes flip-flop structures, their failure level against ionizing radiation will have a connection with the storage state during irradiation. They are inclined to store or read the same state as the one stored during irradiation. Worst-case test scheme for an SRAM circuit is presented, which contains a write operation that changes the storage states into the opposite ones after irradiation and then a read operation with opposite storage states. An irradiation experiment is designed for one 0.25 μm SRAM circuit which has a capacity of 1 k × 8 bits. The failure level against ionizing radiation concluded from this test scheme (150 krad(Si)) is much lower than the one from the simplest test scheme (1 Mrad(Si)). It is obvious that the failure level will be overestimated if the simplest test scheme is chosen as the test standard for SRAM circuits against ionizing radiation.

  20. Toward the 5nm technology: layout optimization and performance benchmark for logic/SRAMs using lateral and vertical GAA FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh-Bao, Trong; Ryckaert, Julien; Sakhare, Sushil; Mercha, Abdelkarim; Verkest, Diederik; Thean, Aaron; Wambacq, Piet

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a layout and performance analysis of logic and SRAM circuits for vertical and lateral GAA FETs using 5nm (iN5) design rules. Extreme ultra-violet lithography (EUVL) processes are exploited to print the critical features: 32 nm gate pitch and 24 nm metal pitch. Layout architectures and patterning compromises for enabling the 5nm node will be discussed in details. A distinct standard-cell template for vertical FETs is proposed and elaborated for the first time. To assess electrical performances, a BSIM-CMG model has been developed and calibrated with TCAD simulations, which accounts for the quasi-ballistic transport in the nanowire channel. The results show that the inbound power rail layout construct for vertical devices could achieve the highest density while the interleaving diffusion template can maximize the port accessibility. By using a representative critical path circuit of a generic low power SoCs, it is shown that the VFET-based circuit is 40% more energy efficient than LFET designs at iso-performance. Regarding SRAMs, benefits given by vertical channel orientation in VFETs has reduced the SRAM area by 20%~30% compared to lateral SRAMs. A double exposures with EUV canner is needed to reach a minimum tip-to-tip (T2T) of 16 nm for middle-of-line (MOL) layers. To enable HD SRAMs with two metal layers, a fully self-aligned gate contact for LFETs and 2D routing of the top electrode for VFETs are required. The standby leakage of vertical SRAMs is 4~6X lower than LFET-based SRAMs at iso-performance and iso-area. The minimum operating voltage (Vmin) of vertical SRAMs is 170 mV lower than lateral SRAMs. A high-density SRAM bitcell of 0.014 um2 can be obtained for the iN5 technology node, which fully follows the SRAM scaling trend for the 45nm nodes and beyond.

  1. SRAM-Based Digital Arbiter PUF

    SciTech Connect

    Dondero, Rachel Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    The increased use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) in critical systems brings new challenges in securing the diversely programmable fabric from cyber-attacks. FPGAs are an inexpensive, efficient, and flexible alternative to Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), which are becoming increasingly expensive and impractical for low volume manufacturing as technology nodes continue to shrink. Unfortunately, FPGAs are not designed for high security applications, and their high-flexibility lends itself to low security and vulnerability to malicious attacks. Similar to securing an ASIC’s functionality, FPGA programmers can exploit the inherent randomness introduced into hardware structures during fabrication for security applications. Physically Unclonable Functions (PUFs) are one such solution that uses the die specific variability in hardware fabrication for both secret key generation and verification. PUFs strive to be random, unique, and reliable. Throughout recent years many PUF structures have been presented to try and maximize these three design constraints, reliability being the most difficult of the three to achieve. This thesis presents a new PUF structure that combines two elementary PUF concepts (a bi-stable SRAM PUF and a delay-based arbiter PUF) to create a PUF with increased reliability, while maintaining both random and unique qualities. Properties of the new PUF will be discussed as well as the various design modifications that can be made to tweak the desired performance and overhead.

  2. Preassembly of interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor subunits on resting Kit 225 K6 T cells and their modulation by IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15: a fluorescence resonance energy transfer study.

    PubMed

    Damjanovich, S; Bene, L; Matkó, J; Alileche, A; Goldman, C K; Sharrow, S; Waldmann, T A

    1997-11-25

    Assembly and mutual proximities of alpha, beta, and gamma(c) subunits of the interleukin 2 receptors (IL-2R) in plasma membranes of Kit 225 K6 T lymphoma cells were investigated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using fluorescein isothiocyanate- and Cy3-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that were directed against the IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta, and gamma(c) subunits of IL-2R. The cell-surface distribution of subunits was analyzed at the nanometer scale (2-10 nm) by FRET on a cell-by-cell basis. The cells were probed in resting phase and after coculture with saturating concentrations of IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15. FRET data from donor- and acceptor-labeled IL-2R beta-alpha, gamma-alpha, and gamma-beta pairs demonstrated close proximity of all subunits to each other in the plasma membrane of resting T cells. These mutual proximities do not appear to represent mAb-induced microaggregation, because FRET measurements with Fab fragments of the mAbs gave similar results. The relative proximities were meaningfully modulated by binding of IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15. Based on FRET analysis the topology of the three subunits at the surface of resting cells can be best described by a "triangular model" in the absence of added interleukins. IL-2 strengthens the bridges between the subunits, making the triangle more compact. IL-7 and IL-15 act in the opposite direction by opening the triangle possibly because they associate their private specific alpha receptors with the beta and/or gamma(c) subunits of the IL-2R complex. These data suggest that IL-2R subunits are already colocalized in resting T cells and do not require cytokine-induced redistribution. This colocalization is significantly modulated by binding of relevant interleukins in a cytokine-specific manner.

  3. Metallurgical evaluation of SRAM II/SRAM A programmer base plates

    SciTech Connect

    Damkroger, B.K.; Maguire, M.C.; Robino, C.V.

    1993-05-01

    Ten MC4073/4369 programmer base plates were analyzed. This component, a programmer base plate for the SRAM II (and later the SRAM A), is specified as a Grade C quality casting made of aluminum Alloy A356, heat treated to the T6 condition. A concern was expressed regarding the choice of an A356 casting for this application, given the complexity and severity of the loading environment. Preliminary tests and analyses suggested that the design was adequate, but noted the uncertainty involved in a number of their underlying assumptions. The uncertainty was compounded by the discovery that the casting used in the original series of mechanical tests failed. In this investigation, several production castings were examined and found to be of a quality superior to that required under current specifications. Their defect content and microstructure were studied and compared with published data to establish a mechanical property data base. The data base was supplemented with a series of X-direction static tests, which characterized the loading environment and measured the overall casting performance. It was found that the mechanical properties of the supplied castings were adequate for the anticipated X-direction loading environment, but the component is not over-designed. The established data base further indicates that a reduction in casting quality to the allowable level could result in failure of the component. Recommendations were made including (1) change the component specification to require higher casting quality in highly stressed areas, (2) supplement the inspection procedures to ensure adequate quality in critical regions, (3) alter the component design to reduce the stress levels in the mounting feet, (4) substitute a modified A356 alloy to improve the mechanical properties and their consistency, and (5) more thoroughly establish a data base for the mechanical property consequences of levels and configurations of casting defects.

  4. Analysis of static noise margin improvement for low voltage SRAM composed of nano-scale MOSFETs with ideal subthreshold factor and small variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Chika; Saitoh, Masumi; Ota, Kensuke; Numata, Toshinori

    2015-07-01

    An ultra-low voltage performance of nanowire-transistors-based SRAM cell is investigated using the SPICE model parameters extracted from measurement data. The impact of S-factor and threshold voltage variations on the static noise margin and the minimum operating voltage is evaluated in nanowire transistor as well as in planar bulk transistor and quasi-planar bulk transistor. The performance benefits of undoped nanowire-transistor-based SRAM are measured in terms of the read stability for low voltage and low off leakage current operation.

  5. Design of power balance SRAM for DPA-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keji, Zhou; Pengjun, Wang; Liang, Wen

    2016-04-01

    A power balance static random-access memory (SRAM) for resistance to differential power analysis (DPA) is proposed. In the proposed design, the switch power consumption and short-circuit power consumption are balanced by discharging and pre-charging the key nodes of the output circuit and adding an additional short-circuit current path. Thus, the power consumption is constant in every read cycle. As a result, the DPA-resistant ability of the SRAM is improved. In 65 nm CMOS technology, the power balance SRAM is fully custom designed with a layout area of 5863.6 μm2. The post-simulation results show that the normalized energy deviation (NED) and normalized standard deviation (NSD) are 0.099% and 0.04%, respectively. Compared to existing power balance circuits, the power balance ability of the proposed SRAM has improved 53%. Project supported by the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. LQ14F040001), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61274132, 61234002), and the K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University, China.

  6. Effect of back oxide thickness of FDSOI on SRAM performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Swarnil; Mukherjee, Sagar; Dutta, Arka; Sarkar, Chandan Kumar

    2016-10-01

    In this work a 6 Transistor SRAM circuit is designed and simulated with FDSOI device whose Channel length (LCH) and Buried Oxide (BOX) thickness (Tbox) is varied to observe the effects on the circuit performance in terms of stability, power consumption and delay. The LCH and Tbox are considered separately, the simulation is performed on same circuit considering four values of Tbox for each LCH to comprehend the effects of these parameters. The Static Noise Margin (SNM) is discussed with great importance as it gives a clear idea about the stability of the stored data which is satisfactory for FDSOI device based SRAM performance. The delay and standby power consumption also suggest that this device is suitable for constructing memory circuits.

  7. An effective BIST scheme for SRAM full speed test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijun; Yu, Yue; Zheng, Jianbin; Song, Xiaoyu

    2011-09-01

    This article presents a novel built-in self-test (BIST) scheme at full speed test where access time test is performed. Based on normal BIST circuits, we harness an all digital phase locked loop to generate a high-frequency clock for static random access memory (SRAM) performance test at full speed. A delay chain is incorporated to achieve the four-phase clock. As inputs to SRAM, clock, address, data are generated in terms of the four-phase clock. Key performance parameters, such as access time, address setup and hold times, are measured. The test chip has been fabricated by United Microelectronics Corporation 55 nm CMOS logic standard process. According to test results, the maximum test frequency is about 1.3 GHz, and the test precision is about 35 ps at the typical process corner with supply voltage 1.0 V and temperature 25°C.

  8. Validation techniques for fault emulation of SRAM-based FPGAs

    DOE PAGES

    Quinn, Heather; Wirthlin, Michael

    2015-08-07

    A variety of fault emulation systems have been created to study the effect of single-event effects (SEEs) in static random access memory (SRAM) based field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). These systems are useful for augmenting radiation-hardness assurance (RHA) methodologies for verifying the effectiveness for mitigation techniques; understanding error signatures and failure modes in FPGAs; and failure rate estimation. For radiation effects researchers, it is important that these systems properly emulate how SEEs manifest in FPGAs. If the fault emulation systems does not mimic the radiation environment, the system will generate erroneous data and incorrect predictions of behavior of the FPGA inmore » a radiation environment. Validation determines whether the emulated faults are reasonable analogs to the radiation-induced faults. In this study we present methods for validating fault emulation systems and provide several examples of validated FPGA fault emulation systems.« less

  9. Validation techniques for fault emulation of SRAM-based FPGAs

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather; Wirthlin, Michael

    2015-08-07

    A variety of fault emulation systems have been created to study the effect of single-event effects (SEEs) in static random access memory (SRAM) based field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). These systems are useful for augmenting radiation-hardness assurance (RHA) methodologies for verifying the effectiveness for mitigation techniques; understanding error signatures and failure modes in FPGAs; and failure rate estimation. For radiation effects researchers, it is important that these systems properly emulate how SEEs manifest in FPGAs. If the fault emulation systems does not mimic the radiation environment, the system will generate erroneous data and incorrect predictions of behavior of the FPGA in a radiation environment. Validation determines whether the emulated faults are reasonable analogs to the radiation-induced faults. In this study we present methods for validating fault emulation systems and provide several examples of validated FPGA fault emulation systems.

  10. Susceptibility of Redundant Versus Singular Clock Domains Implemented in SRAM-Based FPGA TMR Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie D.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present the challenges that arise when using redundant clock domains due to their clock-skew. Radiation data show that a singular clock domain (DTMR) provides an improved TMR methodology for SRAM-based FPGAs over redundant clocks.

  11. Computational nano OPC DFM for LV Fin-type SRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadota, Kazuya

    2016-05-01

    Design For Manufacturing (DFM) where the state-of-the-art nano-devices of the sub-20nm node to a subject, for each of the technology has been intricately sophisticated, comprehensive optimization to predict the performance of the device came become very important. [1] To get effective solutions on these subjects, one of the lithographic key is a nano Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) control with SMO technology, and another is TCAD approach using the most advanced computer simulations. And, it is very important to obtain DFM solutions by integrating both. On the other hand, to meet the needs of low-voltage drive and the characteristic variability reduction, in order to obtain a state-of-the-art device performance, the Fin-type transistors are introduced globally as the mainstream because of wider process control margin. This paper, from the point of view of the sub-20nm node DFM, the simulation are conducted on ArF-imm. technology with SMO in SPT, DPT and QPT on TachyonTM [2], and the guideline of design rules are obtained. Furthermore, the simulated transistor pattern shape are directly migrated into TCAD process flow on HyENEXSSTM [3]. Then calculated I-V characteristics on 6 transistors under the various parameters on TCAD, and finally summarized Static Noise Margin (SNM) of SRAMs. Here, various parameters that determine the performance of SRAMs (Fin width, height, angle, dopant concentrations, electric field strength, work function, drive voltage, and operation speed) are intentionally varied and calculated on the TCAD. This computational method is highly sophisticated DFM technology to predict for the leading-edge nano-devices toward for the sub-20nm nodes era [4] [5] [6] [7] .

  12. Analysis of functional failure mode of commercial deep sub-micron SRAM induced by total dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qi-Wen; Cui, Jiang-Wei; Zhou, Hang; Yu, De-Zhao; Yu, Xue-Feng; Lu, Wu; Guo, Qi; Ren, Di-Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Functional failure mode of commercial deep sub-micron static random access memory (SRAM) induced by total dose irradiation is experimentally analyzed and verified by circuit simulation. We extensively characterize the functional failure mode of the device by testing its electrical parameters and function with test patterns covering different functional failure modes. Experimental results reveal that the functional failure mode of the device is a temporary function interruption caused by peripheral circuits being sensitive to the standby current rising. By including radiation-induced threshold shift and off-state leakage current in memory cell transistors, we simulate the influence of radiation on the functionality of the memory cell. Simulation results reveal that the memory cell is tolerant to irradiation due to its high stability, which agrees with our experimental result.

  13. AYUSH: A Technique for Extending Lifetime of SRAM-NVM Hybrid Caches

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Recently, researchers have explored way-based hybrid SRAM-NVM (non-volatile memory) last level caches (LLCs) to bring the best of SRAM and NVM together. However, the limited write endurance of NVMs restricts the lifetime of these hybrid caches. We present AYUSH, a technique to enhance the lifetime of hybrid caches, which works by using data-migration to preferentially use SRAM for storing frequently-reused data. Microarchitectural simulations confirm that AYUSH achieves larger improvement in lifetime than a previous technique and also maintains performance and energy efficiency. For single, dual and quad-core workloads, the average increase in cache lifetime with AYUSH is 6.90X, 24.06X and 47.62X, respectively.

  14. Effective multicutline QUASAR illumination optimization for SRAM and logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brist, Travis E.; Bailey, George E.

    2003-07-01

    Lithographers face many hurdles to achieve the ever-shrinking process design rules (PDRs). Proximity effects are becoming more and more an issue requiring model-based Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), sub-resolution assist features, and properly tuned illumination settings in order to minimize these effects while providing enough contrast to maintain a viable process window. For any type of OPC application to be successful, a fundamental illumination optimization must first be completed. Unfortunately, the once trivial illumination optimization has evolved into a major task for ASIC houses that require a manufacturable process window for isolated logic structures as well as dense SRAM features. Since these features commonly appear on the same reticle, today"s illumination optimization must look at "common" process windows for multiple cutlines that include a variety of different feature types and pitches. This is a daunting task for the current single feature simulators and requires a considerable amount of simulation time, engineering time, and fab confirmation data in order to come up with an optimum illumination setting for such a wide variety of features. An internal Illumination Optimization (ILO) application has greatly simplified this process by allowing the user to optimize an illumination setting by simultaneously maximizing the "combined" DOF (depth of focus) over multiple cutlines (simulation sites). Cutlines can be placed on a variety of structures in an actual design as well as several key pitches. Any number of the cutlines can be constrained to the gds drawn CD (critical dimension) while others can be allowed to "float" with pseudo OPC allowing the co-optimization of the illumination setting for any OPC that may be applied in the final design. The automated illumination optimization is then run using a tuned model. Output data is a suggested illumination setting with supporting data used to formulate the recommendation. This paper will present the

  15. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    DOE PAGES

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; Sierawski, B. D.; Weller, R. A.; Funkhouser, E. D.; King, M. P.; Narasimham, B.; Bartz, B.; Baumann, R.; et al

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environmentsmore » for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.« less

  16. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; Sierawski, B. D.; Weller, R. A.; Funkhouser, E. D.; King, M. P.; Narasimham, B.; Bartz, B.; Baumann, R.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Labello, R.; Nichols, J.; Weeden-Wright, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environments for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.

  17. Cryostat for the SSC 6T magnet option

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Brown, D.P. Engler, N.H.; Gonczy, J.D.; Mann, T.L.; Nicol, T.H.; Powers, R.J.; Prodell, A.G.; Rode, C.C.; Schneider, C.W.J.

    1985-09-01

    A design has been developed for a SSC 6T option dipole magnet cryostat. The design criteria that defines the basic parameters and performance requirements are discussed. Details of the single phase assembly, suspension, insulation, thermal shields, vacuum vessels and interconnections are presented. Results of the experimental program in support of the design effort are discussed.

  18. Variability-aware compact modeling and statistical circuit validation on SRAM test array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ying; Spanos, Costas J.

    2016-03-01

    Variability modeling at the compact transistor model level can enable statistically optimized designs in view of limitations imposed by the fabrication technology. In this work we propose a variability-aware compact model characterization methodology based on stepwise parameter selection. Transistor I-V measurements are obtained from bit transistor accessible SRAM test array fabricated using a collaborating foundry's 28nm FDSOI technology. Our in-house customized Monte Carlo simulation bench can incorporate these statistical compact models; and simulation results on SRAM writability performance are very close to measurements in distribution estimation. Our proposed statistical compact model parameter extraction methodology also has the potential of predicting non-Gaussian behavior in statistical circuit performances through mixtures of Gaussian distributions.

  19. Development of a radiation-hardened SRAM with EDAC algorithm for fast readout CMOS pixel sensors for charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X.; Li, B.; Chen, N.; Wang, J.; Zheng, R.; Gao, W.; Wei, T.; Gao, D.; Hu, Y.

    2014-08-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) are attractive for use in the innermost particle detectors for charged particle tracking due to their good trade-off between spatial resolution, material budget, radiation hardness, and readout speed. With the requirements of high readout speed and high radiation hardness to total ionizing dose (TID) for particle tracking, fast readout CPS are composed by integrating a data compression block and two SRAM IP cores. However, the radiation hardness of the SRAM IP cores is not as high as that of the other parts in CPS, and thus the radiation hardness of the whole CPS chip is lowered. Especially, when CPS are migrated into 0.18-μm processes, the single event upset (SEU) effects should be also considered besides TID and single event latchup (SEL) effects. This paper presents a radiation-hardened SRAM with enhanced radiation hardness to SEU. An error detection and correction (EDAC) algorithm and a bit-interleaving storage strategy are adopted in the design. The prototype design has been fabricated in a 0.18-μm process. The area of the new SRAM is increased 1.6 times as compared with a non-radiation-hardened SRAM due to the integration of EDAC algorithm and the adoption of radiation hardened layout. The access time is increased from 5 ns to 8 ns due to the integration of EDAC algorithm. The test results indicate that the design satisfy requirements of CPS for charged particle tracking.

  20. Single Event Effects on Space Radiation Hardened 64K SRAMS at Room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, O.; Schwartz, H.; McCarty, K.; Coss, J.; Barnes, C.

    1993-01-01

    The laser threshold linear Energy transfer for single event upsetscan be estimaed, even at room temperature, for space radiation hardened 64K SRAMs. The memories where independently developed to quality for the Qualified Manufacturer's List by IBM and Honeywell. The memory was so hard that high energy heavy ions generated by the Van de Graff could not determine the SEU threshold at room temperature. Use of pulsed Laser tests would meake it possible to forgo very expensive testing at ultra-high energy accelerators.

  1. Mitigating Upsets in SRAM-Based FPGAs from the Xilinx Virtex 2 Family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, G. M.; Yui, C. C.; Carmichael, C.; Koga, R.; George, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    Static random access memory (SRAM) upset rates in field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) from the Xilinx Virtex 2 family have been tested for radiation effects on configuration memory, block RAM and the power-on-reset (POR) and SelectMAP single event functional interrupts (SEFIs). Dynamic testing has shown the effectiveness and value of Triple Module Redundancy (TMR) and partial reconfiguration when used in conjunction. Continuing dynamic testing for more complex designs and other Virtex 2 capabilities (i.e., I/O standards, digital clock managers (DCM), etc.) is scheduled.

  2. 26 CFR 1.263(a)-6T - Election to deduct or capitalize certain expenditures (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... expenditures (temporary). 1.263(a)-6T Section 1.263(a)-6T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT....263(a)-6T Election to deduct or capitalize certain expenditures (temporary). (a) In general. Under...) Section 198A (expensing of qualified disaster expenses); (18) Section 248 (organization expenditures of...

  3. 26 CFR 1.263(a)-6T - Election to deduct or capitalize certain expenditures (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... expenditures (temporary). 1.263(a)-6T Section 1.263(a)-6T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT....263(a)-6T Election to deduct or capitalize certain expenditures (temporary). (a) In general. Under...) Section 198A (expensing of qualified disaster expenses); (18) Section 248 (organization expenditures of...

  4. Power Management and SRAM for Energy-Autonomous and Low-Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gregory K.

    We demonstrate the two first-known, complete, self-powered millimeter-scale computer systems. These microsystems achieve zero-net-energy operation using solar energy harvesting and ultra-low-power circuits. A medical implant for monitoring intraocular pressure (IOP) is presented as part of a treatment for glaucoma. The 1.5mm3 IOP monitor is easily implantable because of its small size and measures IOP with 0.5mmHg accuracy. It wirelessly transmits data to an external wand while consuming 4.70nJ/bit. This provides rapid feedback about treatment efficacies to decrease physician response time and potentially prevent unnecessary vision loss. A nearly-perpetual temperature sensor is presented that processes data using a 2.1muW near-threshold ARMRTM Cortex-M3(TM) muP that provides a widely-used and trusted programming platform. Energy harvesting and power management techniques for these two microsystems enable energy-autonomous operation. The IOP monitor harvests 80nW of solar power while consuming only 5.3nW, extending lifetime indefinitely. This allows the device to provide medical information for extended periods of time, giving doctors time to converge upon the best glaucoma treatment. The temperature sensor uses on-demand power delivery to improve low-load dc-dc voltage conversion efficiency by 4.75x. It also performs linear regulation to deliver power with low noise, improved load regulation, and tight line regulation. Low-power high-throughput SRAM techniques help millimeter-scale microsystems meet stringent power budgets. VDD scaling in memory decreases energy per access, but also decreases stability margins. These margins can be improved using sizing, VTH selection, and assist circuits, as well as new bitcell designs. Adaptive Crosshairs modulation of SRAM power supplies fixes 70% of parametric failures. Half-differential SRAM design improves stability, reducing VMIN by 72mV. The circuit techniques for energy autonomy presented in this dissertation enable

  5. A software solution to estimate the SEU-induced soft error rate for systems implemented on SRAM-based FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhongming, Wang; Zhibin, Yao; Hongxia, Guo; Min, Lu

    2011-05-01

    SRAM-based FPGAs are very susceptible to radiation-induced Single-Event Upsets (SEUs) in space applications. The failure mechanism in FPGA's configuration memory differs from those in traditional memory device. As a result, there is a growing demand for methodologies which could quantitatively evaluate the impact of this effect. Fault injection appears to meet such requirement. In this paper, we propose a new methodology to analyze the soft errors in SRAM-based FPGAs. This method is based on in depth understanding of the device architecture and failure mechanisms induced by configuration upsets. The developed programs read in the placed and routed netlist, search for critical logic nodes and paths that may destroy the circuit topological structure, and then query a database storing the decoded relationship of the configurable resources and corresponding control bit to get the sensitive bits. Accelerator irradiation test and fault injection experiments were carried out to validate this approach.

  6. Empirical modeling of Single-Event Upset (SEU) in NMOS depletion-mode-load static RAM (SRAM) chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Smith, L. S.; Soli, G. A.; Smith, S. L.; Atwood, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation of single-event upset (SEU) in static RAM (SRAM) chips fabricated using a family of high-performance NMOS (HMOS) depletion-mode-load process technologies, has been done. Empirical SEU models have been developed with the aid of heavy-ion data obtained with a three-stage tandem van de Graaff accelerator. The results of this work demonstrate a method by which SEU may be empirically modeled in NMOS integrated circuits.

  7. False Operation of Static Random Access Memory Cells under Alternating Current Power Supply Voltage Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Takuya; Takata, Hidehiro; Nii, Koji; Nagata, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Static random access memory (SRAM) cores exhibit susceptibility against power supply voltage variation. False operation is investigated among SRAM cells under sinusoidal voltage variation on power lines introduced by direct RF power injection. A standard SRAM core of 16 kbyte in a 90 nm 1.5 V technology is diagnosed with built-in self test and on-die noise monitor techniques. The sensitivity of bit error rate is shown to be high against the frequency of injected voltage variation, while it is not greatly influenced by the difference in frequency and phase against SRAM clocking. It is also observed that the distribution of false bits is substantially random in a cell array.

  8. Verification of E-Beam direct write integration into 28nm BEOL SRAM technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohle, Christoph; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Gutsch, Manuela; Hanisch, Norbert; Seidel, Robert; Steidel, Katja; Thrun, Xaver; Werner, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Electron beam direct write lithography (EBDW) potentially offers advantages for low-volume semiconductor manufacturing, rapid prototyping or design verification due to its high flexibility without the need of costly masks. However, the integration of this advanced patterning technology into complex CMOS manufacturing processes remains challenging. The low throughput of today's single e-Beam tools limits high volume manufacturing applications and maturity of parallel (multi) beam systems is still insufficient [1,2]. Additional concerns like transistor or material damage of underlying layers during exposure at high electron density or acceleration voltage have to be addressed for advanced technology nodes. In the past we successfully proved that potential degradation effects of high-k materials or ULK shrink can be neglected and were excluded by demonstrating integrated electrical results of 28nm node transistor and BEOL performance following 50kV electron beam dry exposure [3]. Here we will give an update on the integration of EBDW in the 300mm CMOS manufacturing processes of advanced integrated circuits at the 28nm SRAM node of GLOBALFOUNDRIES Dresden. The work is an update to what has been previously published [4]. E-beam patterning results of BEOL full chip metal and via layers with a dual damascene integration scheme using a 50kV VISTEC SB3050DW variable shaped electron beam direct writer at Fraunhofer IPMSCNT are demonstrated. For the patterning of the Metal layer a Mix & Match concept based on the sequence litho - etch -litho -etch (LELE) was developed and evaluated wherein several exposure fields were blanked out during the optical exposure. Etch results are shown and compared to the POR. Results are also shown on overlay performance and optimized e-Beam exposure time using most advanced data prep solutions and resist processes. The patterning results have been verified using fully integrated electrical measurement of metal lines and vias on wafer level. In

  9. A Test Methodology for Determining Space-Readiness of Xilinx SRAM-Based FPGA Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M; Graham, Paul S; Morgan, Keith S; Caffrey, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    Using reconfigurable, static random-access memory (SRAM) based field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) for space-based computation has been an exciting area of research for the past decade. Since both the circuit and the circuit's state is stored in radiation-tolerant memory, both could be alterd by the harsh space radiation environment. Both the circuit and the circuit's state can be prote cted by triple-moduler redundancy (TMR), but applying TMR to FPGA user designs is often an error-prone process. Faulty application of TMR could cause the FPGA user circuit to output incorrect data. This paper will describe a three-tiered methodology for testing FPGA user designs for space-readiness. We will describe the standard approach to testing FPGA user designs using a particle accelerator, as well as two methods using fault injection and a modeling tool. While accelerator testing is the current 'gold standard' for pre-launch testing, we believe the use of fault injection and modeling tools allows for easy, cheap and uniform access for discovering errors early in the design process.

  10. Fault Tolerance Implementation within SRAM Based FPGA Designs based upon Single Event Upset Occurrence Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    Emerging technology is enabling the design community to consistently expand the amount of functionality that can be implemented within Integrated Circuits (ICs). As the number of gates placed within an FPGA increases, the complexity of the design can grow exponentially. Consequently, the ability to create reliable circuits has become an incredibly difficult task. In order to ease the complexity of design completion, the commercial design community has developed a very rigid (but effective) design methodology based on synchronous circuit techniques. In order to create faster, smaller and lower power circuits, transistor geometries and core voltages have decreased. In environments that contain ionizing energy, such a combination will increase the probability of Single Event Upsets (SEUs) and will consequently affect the state space of a circuit. In order to combat the effects of radiation, the aerospace community has developed several "Hardened by Design" (fault tolerant) design schemes. This paper will address design mitigation schemes targeted for SRAM Based FPGA CMOS devices. Because some mitigation schemes may be over zealous (too much power, area, complexity, etc.. . .), the designer should be conscious that system requirements can ease the amount of mitigation necessary for acceptable operation. Therefore, various degrees of Fault Tolerance will be demonstrated along with an analysis of its effectiveness.

  11. Self-assembly of α-6T Molecule on Ag(100) and Related STM Induced Luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liu-guo; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Rui; Dong, Zhen-chao

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated the self-assembly and light emission properties of organic α-sexithiophene (α-6T) molecules on Ag(100) under different coverage by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At very low coverage, the α-6T molecules form a unique enantiomer by grouping four molecules into a windmill supermolecular structure. As the coverage is increased, α-6T molecules tend to pack side by side into a denser stripe structure. Further increase of the coverage will lead to the layer-by-layer growth of molecules on Ag(100) with the lower-layer stripe pattern serving as a template. Molecular fluorescence for α-6T molecules on Ag(100) at a coverage of five monolayers has been detected by light excitations, which indicates a well decoupled electronic states for the top-layer α-6T molecules. However, the STM induced luminescent spectra for the same sample reveal only plasmonic-like emission. The absence of intramolecular fluorescence in this case suggests that the electronic decoupling is not a sufficient condition for generating photon emission from molecules. For intramolecular fluorescence to occur, the orientation of the dynamic dipole moment of molecules and the energy-level alignment at the molecule-metal interface are also important so that molecules can be effectively excited through efficient dipolar coupling with local plasmons and by injecting holes into the molecules.

  12. Modeling of an Oil-Free Carbon Dioxide Compressor Using Sanderson-Rocker Arm Motion (S-RAM) Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Kurtulus, Orkan; Groll, Eckhard A.

    2015-08-01

    A simulation model to predict the performance of a prototype CO2 compressor is presented. This prototype compressor employs the Sanderson-Rocker Arm Motion (S-RAM) mechanism, which converts the rotary motion of the shaft into a linear reciprocating motion of the cylinders. The piston stroke can be variable by changing the incline angle between the connecting rod and compressor main shaft centerline. The compressor model is mainly composed of two main sub-models simulating the kinematics of the drive mechanism and the compression process. A valve sub-model is included in the compression process model.

  13. 17 CFR 270.30b1-6T - Weekly portfolio report for certain money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... certain money market funds. 270.30b1-6T Section 270.30b1-6T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES...-6T Weekly portfolio report for certain money market funds. Link to an amendment published at 75 FR 10117, Mar. 4, 2010. (a) Notice and portfolio reports. If the market-based NAV of a money market fund...

  14. 26 CFR 1.6081-6T - Automatic extension of time to file estate or trust income tax return (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... trust income tax return (temporary). 1.6081-6T Section 1.6081-6T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Extension of Time for Filing Returns § 1.6081-6T Automatic extension of time to file estate or trust income...

  15. Integration of e-beam direct write in BEOL processes of 28nm SRAM technology node using mix and match

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutsch, Manuela; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Hanisch, Norbert; Hohle, Christoph; Seidel, Robert; Steidel, Katja; Thrun, Xaver; Werner, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Many efforts were spent in the development of EUV technologies, but from a customer point of view EUV is still behind expectations. In parallel since years maskless lithography is included in the ITRS roadmap wherein multi electron beam direct patterning is considered as an alternative or complementary approach for patterning of advanced technology nodes. The process of multi beam exposures can be emulated by single beam technologies available in the field. While variable shape-beam direct writers are already used for niche applications, the integration capability of e-beam direct write at advanced nodes has not been proven, yet. In this study the e-beam lithography was implemented in the BEoL processes of the 28nm SRAM technology. Integrated 300mm wafers with a 28nm back-end of line (BEoL) stack from GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Dresden, were used for the experiments. For the patterning of the Metal layer a Mix and Match concept based on the sequence litho - etch - litho - etch (LELE) was developed and evaluated wherein several exposure fields were blanked out during the optical exposure. E-beam patterning results of BEoL Metal and Via layers are presented using a 50kV VISTEC SB3050DW variable shaped electron beam direct writer at Fraunhofer IPMS-CNT. Etch results are shown and compared to the POR. In summary we demonstrate the integration capability of EBDW into a productive CMOS process flow at the example of the 28nm SRAM technology node.

  16. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-6T - Determinations of population (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Determinations of population (temporary). 1.103....103(n)-6T Determinations of population (temporary). Q-1: What is the proper method for determining population? A-1: All determinations of population must be made with respect to any calendar year on the...

  17. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-6T - Determinations of population (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Determinations of population (temporary). 1.103....103(n)-6T Determinations of population (temporary). Q-1: What is the proper method for determining population? A-1: All determinations of population must be made with respect to any calendar year on the...

  18. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-6T - Determinations of population (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determinations of population (temporary). 1.103....103(n)-6T Determinations of population (temporary). Q-1: What is the proper method for determining population? A-1: All determinations of population must be made with respect to any calendar year on the...

  19. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-6T - Determinations of population (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determinations of population (temporary). 1.103....103(n)-6T Determinations of population (temporary). Q-1: What is the proper method for determining population? A-1: All determinations of population must be made with respect to any calendar year on the...

  20. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-6T - Determinations of population (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Determinations of population (temporary). 1.103....103(n)-6T Determinations of population (temporary). Q-1: What is the proper method for determining population? A-1: All determinations of population must be made with respect to any calendar year on the...

  1. 26 CFR 1.909-6T - Pre-2011 foreign tax credit splitting events (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pre-2011 foreign tax credit splitting events... States § 1.909-6T Pre-2011 foreign tax credit splitting events (temporary). (a) Foreign tax credit splitting event—(1) In general. This section provides rules for determining whether foreign income...

  2. 26 CFR 1.909-6T - Pre-2011 foreign tax credit splitting events (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pre-2011 foreign tax credit splitting events... States § 1.909-6T Pre-2011 foreign tax credit splitting events (temporary). (a) Foreign tax credit splitting event—(1) In general. This section provides rules for determining whether foreign income...

  3. 17 CFR 270.30b1-6T - Weekly portfolio report for certain money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... certain money market funds. 270.30b1-6T Section 270.30b1-6T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES...-6T Weekly portfolio report for certain money market funds. (a) Notice and portfolio reports. If the market-based NAV of a money market fund on any business day (“report date”) is less than 99.75 percent...

  4. Impact of Device Scaling on Deep Sub-micron Transistor Reliability: A Study of Reliability Trends using SRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Mark; Huang, Bing; Qin, Jin; Gur, Zvi; Talmor, Michael; Chen, Yuan; Heidecker, Jason; Nguyen, Duc; Bernstein, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    As microelectronics are scaled in to the deep sub-micron regime, users of advanced technology CMOS, particularly in high-reliability applications, should reassess how scaling effects impact long-term reliability. An experimental based reliability study of industrial grade SRAMs, consisting of three different technology nodes, is proposed to substantiate current acceleration models for temperature and voltage life-stress relationships. This reliability study utilizes step-stress techniques to evaluate memory technologies (0.25mum, 0.15mum, and 0.13mum) embedded in many of today's high-reliability space/aerospace applications. Two acceleration modeling approaches are presented to relate experimental FIT calculations to Mfr's qualification data.

  5. Effective stimulating factors for microbial levan production by Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6T.

    PubMed

    Sarilmiser, Hande Kazak; Ates, Ozlem; Ozdemir, Gonca; Arga, Kazim Yalcin; Oner, Ebru Toksoy

    2015-04-01

    Levan is a bioactive fructan polymer that is mainly associated with high-value applications where exceptionally high purity requirements call for well-defined cultivation conditions. In this study, microbial levan production by the halophilic extremophile Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6(T) was investigated systematically. For this, different feeding strategies in fed-batch cultures were employed and fermentation profiles of both shaking and bioreactor cultures were analyzed. Initial carbon and nitrogen source concentrations, production pH, NaCl and nitrogen pulses, nitrogen and phosphorous limitations, trace elements and thiamine contents of the basal production medium were found to affect the levan yields at different extends. Boric acid was found to be the most effective stimulator of levan production by increasing the sucrose utilization three-fold and levan production up to five-fold. This significant improvement implied the important role of quorum sensing phenomenon and its regulatory impact on levan production mechanism. Levan produced by bioreactor cultures under conditions optimized within this study was found to retain its chemical structure. Moreover, its biocompatibility was assessed for a broad concentration range. Hence H. smyrnensis AAD6(T) has been firmly established as an industrially important resource microorganism for high-quality levan production. PMID:25454698

  6. Effective stimulating factors for microbial levan production by Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6T.

    PubMed

    Sarilmiser, Hande Kazak; Ates, Ozlem; Ozdemir, Gonca; Arga, Kazim Yalcin; Oner, Ebru Toksoy

    2015-04-01

    Levan is a bioactive fructan polymer that is mainly associated with high-value applications where exceptionally high purity requirements call for well-defined cultivation conditions. In this study, microbial levan production by the halophilic extremophile Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6(T) was investigated systematically. For this, different feeding strategies in fed-batch cultures were employed and fermentation profiles of both shaking and bioreactor cultures were analyzed. Initial carbon and nitrogen source concentrations, production pH, NaCl and nitrogen pulses, nitrogen and phosphorous limitations, trace elements and thiamine contents of the basal production medium were found to affect the levan yields at different extends. Boric acid was found to be the most effective stimulator of levan production by increasing the sucrose utilization three-fold and levan production up to five-fold. This significant improvement implied the important role of quorum sensing phenomenon and its regulatory impact on levan production mechanism. Levan produced by bioreactor cultures under conditions optimized within this study was found to retain its chemical structure. Moreover, its biocompatibility was assessed for a broad concentration range. Hence H. smyrnensis AAD6(T) has been firmly established as an industrially important resource microorganism for high-quality levan production.

  7. Monolithically integrated enhancement/depletion-mode AlGaN/GaN HEMTs SRAM unit and voltage level shifter using fluorine plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonghe, Chen; Xuefeng, Zheng; Jincheng, Zhang; Xiaohua, Ma; Yue, Hao

    2016-05-01

    A GaN-based E/D mode direct-couple logic 6 transistors SRAM unit and a voltage level shifter were designed and fabricated. E-mode and D-mode AlGaN/GaN HEMTs were integrated in one wafer using fluorine plasma treatment and using a moderate AlGaN barrier layer heterojunction structure. The 6 transistors SRAM unit consists of two symmetrical E/D mode inverters and two E-mode switch HEMTs. The output low and high voltage of the SRAM unit are 0.95 and 0.07 V at a voltage supply of 1 V. The voltage level shifter lowers the supply voltage using four Ni-AlGaN Schottky diodes in a series at a positive supply voltage of 6 V and a negative supply voltage of -6 V. By controlling the states of inverter modules of the level shifter in turn, the level shifter offers two channel voltage outputs of -0.5 and -5 V. The flip voltage of the level shifter is 0.76 V. Both the SRAM unit and voltage shifter operate correctly, demonstrating the promising potential for GaN-based E/D mode digital and analog integrated circuits. Several considerations are proposed to avoid the influence of threshold voltage degradation of D-mode and E-mode HEMT on the operation of the circuit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61334002), the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory (No. ZHD201206), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (No. NCET-12-0915).

  8. Complete genome sequence of Hydrogenobacter thermophilus type strain (TK-6T)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeytun, Ahmet; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Ubler, Susanne; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Wirth, Reinhard; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenobacter thermophilus Kawasumi et al. 1984 is the type species of the genus Hydrogenobacter. H. thermophilus was the first obligate autotrophic organism reported among aerobic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. Strain TK-6T is of interest because of the unusually efficient hydrogen-oxidizing ability of this strain, which results in a faster generation time compared to other autotrophs. It is also able to grow anaerobically using nitrate as an electron acceptor when molecular hydrogen is used as the energy source, and able to aerobically fix CO2 via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. This is the fifth completed genome sequence in the family Aquificaceae, and the second genome sequence determined from a strain derived from the original isolate. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,742,932 bp long genome with its 1,899 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. 15158A SP6T RF switch based on IBM SOI CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiqun, Cheng; Guoguo, Yan; Wayne, Ni; Dandan, Zhu; Hannah, Ni; Jin, Li; Shuai, Chen; Guohua, Liu

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the design of single-pole six-throw (SP6T) RF switch with IBM 0.18 μm SOI CMOS technology, which can be widely used in a wireless communication system with its high performance and low cost. The circuit is designed and simulated by using an idea that the total load is divided into six branches and SOI special structures. The insertion loss is less than 0.6 dB, isolation is more than 30 dB, the input power P0.1dB for 0.1 dB compression point is more than 37.5 dBm, IIP3 is more than 70 dBm, the 2nd and the 3rd harmonic compressions are more than 96 dBc, and the control voltage is (+2.46 V, 0, -2.46 V) in the frequency from 0.1 to 2.7 GHz. Project supported by the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. LZ16F010001).

  10. Quench characteristics of 6 T conduction-cooled NbTi magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Soni, V.; Konduru, P.; Sharma, R. G.; Kanjilal, D.; Datta, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    Conduction-cooled superconducting magnets are cooled by cryocooler alone through the conductive thermal links. The limited refrigeration capacity and conductive cooling make the magnets more prone to quench. We have studied the quench characteristics of a 6 T conduction-cooled NbTi magnet system in detail in this paper. The NbTi magnet has been designed for 102 A with 31% current margin to achieve 0.8 K temperature margin. During a training quench at 101.2 A, the outer surface of the NbTi magnet reached 53.25 K and the temperature of the 2nd stage cold head of the cryocooler reached 15.8 K. Conductive cooling by the cryocooler makes the post-quench recovery of the NbTi magnet in 40 minutes. The maximum sweep rate is 6 A/min for thermally stable operation of this conduction-cooled NbTi magnet. We have done an intentional quench at a sweep rate of 8 A/min. The maximum hot-spot temperature and the post-quench current decay have been simulated using a finite element analysis (FEA) code. Post-quench distribution of the dumped energy in the different components of the magnet system is also presented.

  11. 15158A SP6T RF switch based on IBM SOI CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiqun, Cheng; Guoguo, Yan; Wayne, Ni; Dandan, Zhu; Hannah, Ni; Jin, Li; Shuai, Chen; Guohua, Liu

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the design of single-pole six-throw (SP6T) RF switch with IBM 0.18 μm SOI CMOS technology, which can be widely used in a wireless communication system with its high performance and low cost. The circuit is designed and simulated by using an idea that the total load is divided into six branches and SOI special structures. The insertion loss is less than 0.6 dB, isolation is more than 30 dB, the input power P0.1dB for 0.1 dB compression point is more than 37.5 dBm, IIP3 is more than 70 dBm, the 2nd and the 3rd harmonic compressions are more than 96 dBc, and the control voltage is (+2.46 V, 0, ‑2.46 V) in the frequency from 0.1 to 2.7 GHz. Project supported by the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. LZ16F010001).

  12. High quality draft genome sequence of the heavy metal resistant bacterium Halomonas zincidurans type strain B6T

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Halomonas zincidurans strain B6T was isolated from a deep-sea heavy metal rich sediment from the South Atlantic Mid-Ocean Ridge. The strain showed significant resistance to heavy metals, especially to zinc. Here we describe the genome sequence and annotation, as well as the features, of the organism. The genome contains 3,325 protein-coding genes (2,848 with predicted functions), 61 tRNA genes and 6 rRNA genes. H. zincidurans strain B6T encodes 31 genes related to heavy metal resistance. And HGT may play an important role in its adaption to the heavy metal rich environment. H. zincidurans strain B6T may have potential applications in the bioremediation of heavy metal-contaminated environments. PMID:25945155

  13. High quality draft genome sequence of the heavy metal resistant bacterium Halomonas zincidurans type strain B6(T).

    PubMed

    Huo, Ying-Yi; Li, Zheng-Yang; Cheng, Hong; Wang, Chun-Sheng; Xu, Xue-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Halomonas zincidurans strain B6(T) was isolated from a deep-sea heavy metal rich sediment from the South Atlantic Mid-Ocean Ridge. The strain showed significant resistance to heavy metals, especially to zinc. Here we describe the genome sequence and annotation, as well as the features, of the organism. The genome contains 3,325 protein-coding genes (2,848 with predicted functions), 61 tRNA genes and 6 rRNA genes. H. zincidurans strain B6(T) encodes 31 genes related to heavy metal resistance. And HGT may play an important role in its adaption to the heavy metal rich environment. H. zincidurans strain B6(T) may have potential applications in the bioremediation of heavy metal-contaminated environments.

  14. 26 CFR 1.468A-6T - Disposition of an interest in a nuclear power plant (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disposition of an interest in a nuclear power... § 1.468A-6T Disposition of an interest in a nuclear power plant (temporary). (a) In general. This section describes the Federal income tax consequences of a transfer of the assets of a...

  15. Genomic analysis reveals the biotechnological and industrial potential of levan producing halophilic extremophile, Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6T.

    PubMed

    Diken, Elif; Ozer, Tugba; Arikan, Muzaffer; Emrence, Zeliha; Oner, Ebru Toksoy; Ustek, Duran; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

    2015-01-01

    Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6T is a gram negative, aerobic, and moderately halophilic bacterium, and is known to produce high levels of levan with many potential uses in foods, feeds, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and chemical industries due to its outstanding properties. Here, the whole-genome analysis was performed to gain more insight about the biological mechanisms, and the whole-genome organization of the bacterium. Industrially crucial genes, including the levansucrase, were detected and the genome-scale metabolic model of H. smyrnensis AAD6T was reconstructed. The bacterium was found to have many potential applications in biotechnology not only being a levan producer, but also because of its capacity to produce Pel exopolysaccharide, polyhydroxyalkanoates, and osmoprotectants. The genomic information presented here will not only provide additional information to enhance our understanding of the genetic and metabolic network of halophilic bacteria, but also accelerate the research on systematical design of engineering strategies for biotechnology applications. PMID:26251777

  16. 26 CFR 301.9100-6T - Time and manner of making certain elections under the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... under the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984. 301.9100-6T Section 301.9100-6T Internal Revenue INTERNAL... elections under the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984. (a) Miscellaneous elections—(1) Elections to which this... Act of 1984 (the Act): Section of act Section of code Description of election Availability of...

  17. A Novel Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor Memory Cell Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; Bailey, Mark; Ho, Fat Duen

    2004-01-01

    The use of a Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MFSFET) in a resistive-load SRAM memory cell has been investigated A typical two-transistor resistive-load SRAM memory cell architecture is modified by replacing one of the NMOS transistors with an n-channel MFSFET. The gate of the MFSFET is connected to a polling voltage pulse instead of the other NMOS transistor drain. The polling voltage pulses are of sufficient magnitude to saturate the ferroelectric gate material and force the MFSFET into a particular logic state. The memory cell circuit is further modified by the addition of a PMOS transistor and a load resistor in order to improve the retention characteristics of the memory cell. The retention characteristics of both the "1" and "0" logic states are simulated. The simulations show that the MFSFET memory cell design can maintain both the "1" and "0" logic states for a long period of time.

  18. Quench protection tests of a cryocooler cooled 6 T NbTi superconducting magnet by an active power method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanato, Nozomu; Inoue, Takahiro; Murase, Satoru; Nishijima, Gen; Tamakawa, Katsunori; Amaya, Munenori; Uemura, Yoshifumi

    2012-07-01

    When a quench occurs in a superconducting magnet, excessive joule heating may damage the magnet. We have presented the quench protection system based on an active power method. Our previous quench protection tests have been carried out for small superconducting magnets whose self inductances are less than several hundred mH to verify principles of our proposed system. In this paper, we present experimental results of quench protection tests of a cryocooler cooled 6 T NbTi superconducting magnet (self inductance 15.5 H), which is a commercial size magnet made by Tamakawa Co., Ltd. We confirmed that our proposed system could inhibit the maximum temperature of the superconducting magnet (initial temperature 4.3 K) after the quench to less than about 44 K at operation magnetic field 5.5 T. Experimental results suggest that our proposed system is useful for practical used superconducting magnets.

  19. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND6 T14484C mutation in three Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yanhong; Wei Qiping; Zhou Xiangtian; Qian Yaping; Zhou Jian; Lu Fan; Qu Jia . E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-08-18

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with maternally transmitted Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. In the affected matrilineal relatives, the loss of central vision is bilateral, the fellow eye becoming affected either simultaneously (45%) or sequentially (55%). The penetrances of vision loss in these pedigrees were 27%, 50%, and 60%, respectively. The age-at-onset of vision loss in these families was 14, 19, and 24 years, respectively. Furthermore, the ratios between affected male and female matrilineal relatives were 1:1, 1:1.2, and 1:2, respectively. Mutational analysis of mitochondrial DNA revealed the presence of homoplasmic ND6 T14484C mutation, which has been associated with LHON. The incomplete penetrance and phenotypic variability implicate the involvement of nuclear modifier gene(s), environmental factor(s) or mitochondrial haplotype(s) in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated T14484C mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  20. Biodegradation of 4-bromophenol by Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6T in a newly designed packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Naresh Kumar; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar; Pakshirajan, Kannan

    2013-02-01

    Bromophenol is listed as a priority pollutant by the U.S. EPA. However, there has been no report on the removal of bromophenol in any biological system that is operated in a continuous mode. The efficiency of Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6(T) on the biodegradation of 4-bromophenol (4-BP) in a newly designed packed bed reactor (PBR) was evaluated with different influent 4-BP concentrations between 400 mg l(-1) and 1200 mg l(-1) and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) between 24 h and 7.5 h. The response of the PBR to 4-BP shock loadings was also tested, and the bioreactor was found to adequately handle these shock loadings. The percentage of effluent toxicity in the PBR was tested using mixed microbial consortia as the test species; this experiment was performed using a 4-BP influent concentration of 1200 mg l(-1) and HRTs between 24 h and 7.5 h. A maximal 98% effluent toxicity removal was achieved when the PBR was operated at an HRT of 24 h. In the present study, 4-BP was used as the sole source of carbon and energy, and the complete removal of 4-BP was achieved with 4-BP loading rates of up to 2277 mg l(-1) day(-1).

  1. The stimulatory effect of mannitol on levan biosynthesis: Lessons from metabolic systems analysis of Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6(T.).

    PubMed

    Ates, Ozlem; Arga, Kazim Y; Oner, Ebru Toksoy

    2013-01-01

    Halomonas smyrnensis AAD(T) is a halophilic, gram-negative bacterium that can efficiently produce levan from sucrose as carbon source via levansucrase activity. However, systems-based approaches are required to further enhance its metabolic performance for industrial application. As an important step toward this goal, the genome-scale metabolic network of Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM3043, which is considered a model organism for halophilic bacteria, has been reconstructed based on its genome annotation, physiological information, and biochemical information. In the present work, the genome-scale metabolic network of C. salexigens was recruited, and refined via integration of the available biochemical, physiological, and phenotypic features of H. smyrnensis AAD6(T) . The generic metabolic model, which comprises 1,393 metabolites and 1,108 reactions, was then systematically analyzed in silico using constraints-based simulations. To elucidate the relationship between levan biosynthesis and other metabolic processes, an enzyme-graph representation of the metabolic network and a graph decomposition technique were employed. Using the concept of control effective fluxes, significant links between several metabolic processes and levan biosynthesis were estimated. The major finding was the elucidation of the stimulatory effect of mannitol on levan biosynthesis, which was further verified experimentally via supplementation of mannitol to the fermentation medium. The optimal concentration of 30 g/L mannitol supplemented to the 50 g/L sucrose-based medium resulted in a twofold increase in levan production in parallel with increased sucrose hydrolysis rate, accumulated extracellular glucose, and decreased fructose uptake rate.

  2. Investigation of mercury tolerance in Chromohalobacter israelensis DSM 6768T and Halomonas zincidurans B6T by comparative genomics with Halomonas xinjiangensis TRM 0175T.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Huo, Ying-Yi; Xu, Lin; Wu, Yue-Hong; Meng, Fan-Xu; Wang, Chun-Sheng; Xu, Xue-Wei

    2015-02-01

    Chromohalobacter israelensis DSM 6768(T), Halomonas zincidurans B6(T), and Halomonas xinjiangensis TRM 0175(T) are three phylogenetically close strains belonging to the class Gammaproteobacteria. Both strains DSM 6768(T) and B6(T) can grow on plate containing 0.5mM HgCl2. Strain TRM 0175(T) could not grow on plates containing 0.1mM or more HgCl2. Here we report the draft genomes of strains DSM 6768(T) and TRM 0175(T) for comparative genomic analysis. Gene cluster with putative function in mercury resistance in strain DSM 6768(T) includes a mercuric ion reductase, whose homologues distribute among several marine microbes. Strain B6(T), which was isolated from the Atlantic Ocean, has one more gene cluster with putative function in mercury resistance than strain DSM 6768(T). This study will enhance our understanding of the mercury tolerance and further investigation in marine microbes.

  3. The beta+-IVS-I-6 (T-->C) mutation accounts for half of the thalassemia chromosomes in the Palestinian populations of the mountain regions.

    PubMed

    El-Latif, Mahmoud Abd; Filon, Dvora; Rund, Deborah; Oppenheim, Ariella; Kanaan, Moien

    2002-02-01

    A study of the spectrum of beta-thalassemia mutations in the southern part of the West Bank of the Palestinian Authority revealed the presence of 10 different beta-globin mutations. The study included 41 patients and 54 carriers of beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. The spectrum of mutations observed was typically Mediterranean. However, their relative frequencies was unique. The predominant allele was IVS-I-6 (T-->C), with an exceptionally high frequency of 48.5% for this mutation. The homozygous IVS-I-6 patients had widely variable clinical presentations, from typical transfusion-dependent thalassemia major to non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia intermedia phenotype. Since it is so widespread in these West Bank populations, the IVS-I-6 mutation may date back to ancient times. The nonsense mutation at codon 37 (G-->A) was found at a relatively high frequency of 11.3%, supporting the hypothesis that it originated in this region. The other mutations, at decreasing frequencies ranging from 9.5-1.5%, were: IVS-I-110 (G-->A), frameshift codon 5 (- CT), IVS-I-1 (G-->A), IVS-II-1 (G-->A), Hb S [beta6(A3)Glu-->Val], frameshift codons 8/9 (+G), codon 39 (C-->T), and -30 (T-->A). Our findings will improve health care for the Palestinian population, and also has implications for the study of the origin and spread of thalassemia in the Middle East. PMID:11939510

  4. Normally-off type nonvolatile static random access memory with perpendicular spin torque transfer-magnetic random access memory cells and smallest number of transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Chika; Abe, Keiko; Noguchi, Hiroki; Nomura, Kumiko; Ikegami, Kazutaka; Fujita, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel nonvolatile-random access memory (RAM) cell design based on a “normally-off memory architecture” using a perpendicular spin torque transfer-magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) based on a four-transistors static random access memory (SRAM) in order to reduce the operating power of mobile processors. After the cell design concept and basic operation are proposed, a stable and reliable operation for read/write is confirmed by circuit simulation.

  5. Re-Visiting College Students' Attitudes toward the Internet-Based on a 6-T Model: Gender and Grade Level Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Chien; Wu, Huan-Chueh; Chen, Chao-Hsiu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to propose a 6-T model (Tool, Toy, Telephone, Territory, Treasure of Information, and Trade) to explore college students' Internet-related attitudes, and to examine whether gender and grade level make any difference in their attitudes. Data from 1069 participants were collected from 96 Taiwanese universities and…

  6. Draft genome sequence of Lampropedia cohaerens strain CT6(T) isolated from arsenic rich microbial mats of a Himalayan hot water spring.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Charu; Mahato, Nitish K; Rani, Pooja; Singh, Yogendra; Kamra, Komal; Lal, Rup

    2016-01-01

    Lampropedia cohaerens strain CT6(T), a non-motile, aerobic and coccoid strain was isolated from arsenic rich microbial mats (temperature ~45 °C) of a hot water spring located atop the Himalayan ranges at Manikaran, India. The present study reports the first genome sequence of type strain CT6(T) of genus Lampropedia cohaerens. Sequencing data was generated using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform and assembled with ABySS v 1.3.5. The 3,158,922 bp genome was assembled into 41 contigs with a mean GC content of 63.5 % and 2823 coding sequences. Strain CT6(T) was found to harbour genes involved in both the Entner-Duodoroff pathway and non-phosphorylated ED pathway. Strain CT6(T) also contained genes responsible for imparting resistance to arsenic, copper, cobalt, zinc, cadmium and magnesium, providing survival advantages at a thermal location. Additionally, the presence of genes associated with biofilm formation, pyrroloquinoline-quinone production, isoquinoline degradation and mineral phosphate solubilisation in the genome demonstrate the diverse genetic potential for survival at stressed niches.

  7. Draft genome sequence of Lampropedia cohaerens strain CT6(T) isolated from arsenic rich microbial mats of a Himalayan hot water spring.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Charu; Mahato, Nitish K; Rani, Pooja; Singh, Yogendra; Kamra, Komal; Lal, Rup

    2016-01-01

    Lampropedia cohaerens strain CT6(T), a non-motile, aerobic and coccoid strain was isolated from arsenic rich microbial mats (temperature ~45 °C) of a hot water spring located atop the Himalayan ranges at Manikaran, India. The present study reports the first genome sequence of type strain CT6(T) of genus Lampropedia cohaerens. Sequencing data was generated using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform and assembled with ABySS v 1.3.5. The 3,158,922 bp genome was assembled into 41 contigs with a mean GC content of 63.5 % and 2823 coding sequences. Strain CT6(T) was found to harbour genes involved in both the Entner-Duodoroff pathway and non-phosphorylated ED pathway. Strain CT6(T) also contained genes responsible for imparting resistance to arsenic, copper, cobalt, zinc, cadmium and magnesium, providing survival advantages at a thermal location. Additionally, the presence of genes associated with biofilm formation, pyrroloquinoline-quinone production, isoquinoline degradation and mineral phosphate solubilisation in the genome demonstrate the diverse genetic potential for survival at stressed niches. PMID:27610214

  8. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Soli, G. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is described for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 micron was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 MeV sq cm/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV sq cm/mg was determined.

  9. A 0.6 T/650 mm RT Bore Solid Nitrogen Cooled MgB2 Demonstration Coil for MRI—a Status Report

    PubMed Central

    Bascuñán, Juan; Lee, Haigunan; Bobrov, Emmanuel S.; Hahn, Seungyong; Iwasa, Yukikazu; Tomsic, Mike; Rindfleisch, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Aiming to demonstrate feasibility and practicality of a low cost superconducting MRI magnet system targeted for use in small hospitals, rural communities and underdeveloped countries, MIT-Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory has developed a 0.6 T/650 mm room temperature bore demonstration coil wound with multifilament MgB2 conductor and cooled via an innovative cryogenic design/operation. The coil is to be maintained cold by solid nitrogen kept in the solid state by a cryocooler. In the event of a power failure the cryocooler is automatically thermally decoupled from the system. In this paper we present details of the MgB2 conductor, winding process, and preliminary theoretical analysis of the current-carrying performance of the conductively cooled coils in zero background field and over the 10–30 K temperature range. PMID:25580068

  10. Effects of Silicon Variation on Nano-Scale Solid-State Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halupka, David

    This thesis explores means of mitigating the effects of silicon variation on SRAM by means of circuit techniques. This thesis also explores novel read and write techniques for MRAM that support a non-destructive read operation and power-saving write operations in the face of device and silicon variation. First, this thesis proposes the use of a cross-coupled bit line BL biasing scheme that retains an SRAM's fast access speed while reducing the read-access failures in the presence of Vt variation, without excessively increasing the SRAM cell size. It is shown, by extensive Monte-Carlo simulations using 22-nm predictive CMOS models, that the proposed scheme reduces the cell area by 6.5% compared to the conventional BL biasing schemes also analyzed. Second, this thesis proposes a 10T SRAM cell that supports lower voltage operation, achieves lower static power dissipation, and is similar in area to the 6T SRAM cell when the 3-sigma variation of Vt exceeds 40% of nominal Vt. The 10T cell achieves improved write functionality, in comparison to the 6T cell, by preemptively turning off the cell's power supply to the side of the cell that is being pulled low, while not disturbing any unselected cells. Write access time is not affected, as the positive-feedback required to quickly regenerate CMOS voltage levels remains intact. Finally, this thesis proposes a negative-resistance read scheme and write scheme for spin-torque-transfer (STT) MRAM. A negative resistance shunting an STT-MRAM cell guarantees a non-destructive read operation, and saves power during write operations compared with a conventional scheme. Measurements confirm an 7ns non-destructive read access time without the use of a typical sense amplifier and an average write power savings of 10.5% for a 16Kb STT-MRAM fabricated in 0.13mum CMOS using a CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJ.

  11. A study on the spectroscopic, energy band, and optoelectronic properties of α,ω-dihexylsexithiophene/tris(8-hydroxyquinolinate) gallium blends; DH6T/Gaq3 composite system.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Fahmi F; Yahya, Mohd Yazid; Ketuly, Kamal Aziz; Muhammad, Abdulkader Jaleel; Sulaiman, Khaulah

    2016-12-01

    In this work the optical response, spectroscopic behaviour, and optoelectronic properties of solution and solid state composite systems based on α,ω-dihexylsexithiophene/tris(8-hydroxyquinolinate) gallium (DH6T/Gaq3) are studied upon the incorporation of different molar percentages of Gaq3. UV-vis, PL, FTIR spectrophotometers and SEM technique were utilized to perform the investigations. The results showed a reduced energy band (Eg) (from 2.33eV to 1.83eV) and a broadened absorption spectrum for the blend system when 29.8% molar of Gaq3 was incorporated. These were attributed to the enhanced intermolecular interactions that are brought about by the increased strength of π-π overlap between the molecular moieties. A mathematical formula was developed to interpret the non-monotonic change occurred in Eg, while numerical calculations have been made to assign the type and nature of the electronic transitions governing the spectroscopic behaviour of the system. The results were elaborated and comprehensively discussed in terms of the exciton generation, energy band theory, molecular interactions, and spatial geometry.

  12. A study on the spectroscopic, energy band, and optoelectronic properties of α,ω-dihexylsexithiophene/tris(8-hydroxyquinolinate) gallium blends; DH6T/Gaq3 composite system.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Fahmi F; Yahya, Mohd Yazid; Ketuly, Kamal Aziz; Muhammad, Abdulkader Jaleel; Sulaiman, Khaulah

    2016-12-01

    In this work the optical response, spectroscopic behaviour, and optoelectronic properties of solution and solid state composite systems based on α,ω-dihexylsexithiophene/tris(8-hydroxyquinolinate) gallium (DH6T/Gaq3) are studied upon the incorporation of different molar percentages of Gaq3. UV-vis, PL, FTIR spectrophotometers and SEM technique were utilized to perform the investigations. The results showed a reduced energy band (Eg) (from 2.33eV to 1.83eV) and a broadened absorption spectrum for the blend system when 29.8% molar of Gaq3 was incorporated. These were attributed to the enhanced intermolecular interactions that are brought about by the increased strength of π-π overlap between the molecular moieties. A mathematical formula was developed to interpret the non-monotonic change occurred in Eg, while numerical calculations have been made to assign the type and nature of the electronic transitions governing the spectroscopic behaviour of the system. The results were elaborated and comprehensively discussed in terms of the exciton generation, energy band theory, molecular interactions, and spatial geometry. PMID:27372510

  13. The Efficiency of Delone Coverings of the Canonical Tilings T^*(A4) and 6)) -> T^*(D6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopolos, Zorka; Kasner, Gerald

    This chapter is devoted to the coverings of the two quasiperiodic canonical tilings T^*(A4) and T^*(D6) T^*(2F), obtained by projection from the root lattices A4 and D6, respectively. In the first major part of this chapter, in Sect. 5.2, we shall introduce a Delone covering C^sT^*(A4) of the 2-dimensional decagonal tiling T^*(A4). In the second major part of this chapter, Sect. 5.3, we summarize the results related to the Delone covering of the icosahedral tiling 6)) -> T^*(D6), CT^*(D6) and determine the zero-, single-, and double- deckings and the resulting thickness of the covering. In the conclusions section, we give some suggestions as to how the definition of the Delone covering might be changed in order to reach some real (full) covering of the icosahedral tiling 6)) -> T^*(D6). In Section 5.2 the definition of the Delone covering is also changed in order to avoid an unnecessary large thickness of the covering.

  14. Phase diagram of Mg insertion into Chevrel phases, MgxMo6T8 (T = S, Se). 3. The crystal structure of triclinic Mg2Mo6Se8.

    PubMed

    Levi, E; Mitelman, A; Isnard, O; Brunelli, M; Aurbach, D

    2008-03-17

    This series of papers is devoted to unique cathode materials for Mg batteries, MgxMo6T8 (T = S, Se, x = 1 and 2) Chevrel phases (CPs). In this part, a combination of neutron and high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffractions was used to study the crystal structure of Mg2Mo6Se8, which is triclinic at room temperature (space group P1, a = 6.868 A, b = 6.921 A, c = 6.880 A, alpha = 93.00 degrees , beta = 94.40 degrees , gamma = 96.22 degrees ). In contrast to other members of the MgxMo6T8 family, this compound does not follow the classic scheme of successive cation insertion into so-called inner and outer sites: Both the Mg(2+) ions per formula are located in the tetrahedral sites of the outer ring. This surprising cation location, predicted previously for Mg-containing CPs by ab initio calculations, provides the uniform distribution of the cation charge in the triclinic structure, which is similar to that of rhombohedral CPs. A mapping of the cation sites was widely used to demonstrate the variety of cation arrangement in CPs and the factors affecting this arrangement, as well as to clarify the origin of the exceptionally high mobility of the Mg(2+) ions in Mg2Mo6Se8. PMID:18290612

  15. The coexistence of mitochondrial ND6 T14484C and 12S rRNA A1555G mutations in a Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Qiping; Zhou Xiangtian; Yang Li; Sun Yanhong; Zhou Jian; Li Guang; Jiang, Robert; Lu Fan; Qu Jia . E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2007-06-15

    We report here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of one three-generation Han Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and hearing loss. Four of 14 matrilineal relatives exhibited the moderate central vision loss at the average age of 12.5 years. Of these, one subject exhibited both LHON and mild hearing impairment. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in the pedigree showed the presence of homoplasmic LHON-associated ND6 T14484C mutation, deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1555 mutation and 47 other variants belonging to Eastern Asian haplogroup H2. None of other mitochondrial variants was evolutionarily conserved and functional significance. Therefore, the coexistence of the A1555G mutation and T14484C mutations in this Chinese family indicate that the A1555G mutation may play a synergistic role in the phenotypic manifestation of LHON associated ND6 T14484C mutation. However, the incomplete penetrance of vision and hearing loss suggests the involvement of nuclear modifier genes and environmental factors in the phenotypic expression of these mtDNA mutations.

  16. Identification of B6T173 (ZmPrx35) as the prevailing peroxidase in highly insect-resistant maize (Zea mays, p84C3) kernels by activity-directed purification

    PubMed Central

    López-Castillo, Laura M.; López-Arciniega, Janet A. I.; Guerrero-Rangel, Armando; Valdés-Rodríguez, Silvia; Brieba, Luis G.; García-Lara, Silverio; Winkler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Plant peroxidases (PODs) are involved in diverse physiological processes, including defense against pathogens and insects. Contrary to their biological importance, only very few plant PODs have been proven on protein level, because their low abundance makes them difficult to detect in standard proteomics work-flows. A statistically significant positive correlation between POD activity and post-harvest insect resistance has been found for maize (Zea mays, p84C3) kernels. In combining activity-directed protein purification, genomic and proteomic tools we found that protein B6T173 (ZmPrx35) is responsible for the majority of the POD activity of the kernel. We successfully produced recombinant ZmPrx35 protein in Escherichia coli and demonstrate both, in vitro activity and the presence of a haem (heme) cofactor of the enzyme. Our findings support the screening for insect resistant maize variants and the construction of genetically optimized maize plants. PMID:26379694

  17. Carrier injection dynamics in heterojunction solar cells with bipolar molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yosuke; Yonezawa, Kouhei; Yasuda, Takeshi E-mail: moritomo.yutaka.gf@u.tsukuba.ac.jp; Moritomo, Yutaka E-mail: moritomo.yutaka.gf@u.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2015-03-23

    A boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) is a bipolar molecule and is used in hetero-junction organic solar cells. Here, we investigated the carrier injection dynamics from the donor α-sexithiophene (6T) or acceptor C{sub 60} layers to the bipolar SubPc layer by means of the femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy. We observed gradual increase of the SubPc{sup –} (SubPc{sup +}) species within ≈300 ps. The increases are interpreted in terms of the exciton diffusion within the 6T (C{sub 60}) layer and subsequent electron (hole) injection at the interface. In 6T/SubPc heterojunction, the electron injection is observed even at 80 K. The robust electron injection is ascribed to the efficient charge separation within the 6T layer under photo exciation at 400 nm.

  18. Performance analysis of an ultralow power circuit using single halo CNTFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Huan; Liu, Jichao; Li, Na; Zhang, Ting; Jiang, Sitao; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Min; Gao, Jian

    2015-05-01

    This work presents a comprehensive study of the influence of channel engineering on the switching, high frequency characteristics, and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). At the device level, new CNTFETs with single halo doping (SH-CNTFETs) have been proposed. The impact of SH implantation on the cutoff frequency (fT), switching delay (τ), and on/off current ratio (Ion/Ioff) has been explored and it is revealed that SH-CNTFETs have improved radio frequency (RF) and switching characteristics. At the circuit level, using the Hailey Simulation Program with IC Emphasis (HSPICE) with lookup table (LUT)-based Verilog-A models, the performance parameters of the circuit have been calculated. Results show that compared to a conventional CNTFET (C-CNTFET)-based inverter, the SH-CNTFET-based inverter exhibits better performance. In addition, we evaluate the stability and performance of six-transistor (6T) CNTFET static random access memory (SRAM) cells with SH-CNTFETs. The performance parameters such as static noise margin (SNM) and write delay as well as power-delay product (PDP) and SNM/write delay (SWD) have been calculated and optimized. It is shown that SH-CNTFET SRAMs have an improved performance in SNM, PDP, and write power compared to C-CNTFET SRAMs and the optimum halo doping level has been concluded. Our results may be useful for designing and optimizing CNTFET devices and circuits.

  19. Efficient bulk heterojunction solar cells with poly[2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene)-alt-bithiophene] and 6,6-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester blends and their application in tandem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dewei; Tang, Weihua; Ke, Lin; Tan, Swee Tiam; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2010-03-01

    We present herein efficient bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells via mixing poly[2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene)-alt-bithiophene] (F6T2) and 6,6-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) with variable weight ratios. The photo-physics and morphology of F6T2:PCBM blend films and the electrical characteristics of their corresponding single cells were studied in details by changing PCBM concentration. The complete photoluminescence quenching of F6T2 emission occurs with only a small fraction of PCBM blended, demonstrating effective photoinduced charge transfer between F6T2 and PCBM. Morphology images from atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal that the phase separation in F6T2:PCBM blend films becomes pronounced with the increase of PCBM concentration, resulting in the increased fill factor from 25.2% (1:1) to 56.9% (1:6). A SEM image also shows the phase separation is within the range of 10 - 20 nm. With the optimized F6T2:PCBM weight ratio (1:2), the single cell exhibits a highest power conversion efficiency of 2.46% due to the balance of light absorption and charge transport. Finally, the polymer-small molecule tandem cells are constructed using F6T2:PCBM BHJ as the bottom cell and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc):fullerene (C(60)) as the top cell. The open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) of tandem cell (1.27 V) is equal to the summation of the V(oc) values of the bottom cell (0.86 V) and the top cell (0.43 V). PMID:20356288

  20. Gas-Sensing Flip-Flop Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Blaes, Brent R.; Williams, Roger; Ryan, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Gas-sensing integrated circuits consisting largely of modified static random-access memories (SRAMs) undergoing development, building on experience gained in use of modified SRAMs as radiation sensors. Each SRAM memory cell includes flip-flop circuit; sensors exploit metastable state that lies between two stable states (corresponding to binary logic states) of flip-flop circuit. Voltages of metastable states vary with exposures of gas-sensitive resistors.

  1. Analysis of power gating in different hierarchical levels of 2MB cache, considering variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Mohsen; Imani, Mohsen; Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-09-01

    This article reintroduces power gating technique in different hierarchical levels of static random-access memory (SRAM) design including cell, row, bank and entire cache memory in 16 nm Fin field effect transistor. Different structures of SRAM cells such as 6T, 8T, 9T and 10T are used in design of 2MB cache memory. The power reduction of the entire cache memory employing cell-level optimisation is 99.7% with the expense of area and other stability overheads. The power saving of the cell-level optimisation is 3× (1.2×) higher than power gating in cache (bank) level due to its superior selectivity. The access delay times are allowed to increase by 4% in the same energy delay product to achieve the best power reduction for each supply voltages and optimisation levels. The results show the row-level power gating is the best for optimising the power of the entire cache with lowest drawbacks. Comparisons of cells show that the cells whose bodies have higher power consumption are the best candidates for power gating technique in row-level optimisation. The technique has the lowest percentage of saving in minimum energy point (MEP) of the design. The power gating also improves the variation of power in all structures by at least 70%.

  2. Variation in SEU sensitivity of dose-imprinted CMOS SRAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Brucker, G. J.; Van Gunten, O.; Kim, H. S.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report on an experimental study of dose-induced changes in SEU (single-event-upset) sensitivity of CMOS static RAMs. Two time regimes were investigated following exposure of memories to cobalt-60 gamma rays: the near term, within a few hours after exposure, and the long term, after many days. Samples were irradiated both at room and at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The latter procedure was used in order to freeze in the damage state until SEU measurements could be made prior to annealing. Results show that memories damaged by dose are more sensitive to upsets by heavy ions. The induced changes are substantial: threshold linear energy transfer (LET) values decreased by as much as 46 percent and asymptotic cross sections increased by factors of two to four (unannealed samples).

  3. Determination Of LETs Of SRAMs By Use Of A Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Quiesup; Mccarty, Kenneth P.; Barnes, Charles E.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Coss, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of use of microelectronic advanced laser scanner (MEALS) to cause single-event upsets (SEUs) in integrated logic circuits. Basic concepts of SEU testing by use of MEALS described in "Laser Scanner Tests for Single-Event Upsets" (NPO-18216), "Single-Event-Upset Laser Scanner With Optical Bias" (NPO-18217), and "More About Laser Scanner Tests for Single-Event Upsets" (NPO-18494). Study part of continuing effort to study SEU effects of ionizing radiation on such circuits and to use MEALS as relatively inexpensive SEU-prescreening laboratory apparatus serving as alternative to heavy-ion acclerator.

  4. 26 CFR 1.181-6T - Effective date (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... first day of principal photography for which occurs on or after February 9, 2007, and before January 1...-between animation” in place of “principal photography”. Productions involving both animation and live-action photography may use either standard. (2) The applicability of §§ 1.181-1T through 1.181-5T...

  5. 26 CFR 1.181-6T - Effective date (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... first day of principal photography for which occurs on or after February 9, 2007, and before January 1...-between animation” in place of “principal photography”. Productions involving both animation and live-action photography may use either standard. (2) The applicability of §§ 1.181-1T through 1.181-5T...

  6. Power reduction by power gating in differential pair type spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memories for low-power nonvolatile cache memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, Takashi; Ikeda, Shoji; Hanyu, Takahiro; Ohno, Hideo; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Array operation currents in spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memories (STT-MRAMs) that use four differential pair type magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ)-based memory cells (4T2MTJ, two 6T2MTJs and 8T2MTJ) are simulated and compared with that in SRAM. With L3 cache applications in mind, it is assumed that the memories are composed of 32 Mbyte capacity to be accessed in 64 byte in parallel. All the STT-MRAMs except for the 8T2MTJ one are designed with 32 bit fine-grained power gating scheme applied to eliminate static currents in the memory cells that are not accessed. The 8T2MTJ STT-MRAM, the cell’s design concept being not suitable for the fine-grained power gating, loads and saves 32 Mbyte data in 64 Mbyte unit per 1 Mbit sub-array in 2 × 103 cycles. It is shown that the array operation current of the 4T2MTJ STT-MRAM is 70 mA averaged in 15 ns write cycles at Vdd = 0.9 V. This is the smallest among the STT-MRAMs, about the half of the low standby power (LSTP) SRAM whose array operation current is totally dominated by the cells’ subthreshold leakage.

  7. Method for characterizing the upset response of CMOS circuits using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. A technique utilizing test structures to quickly and inexpensively characterize the SEU sensitivity of standard cell latches intended for use in a space environment. This bench-level approach utilizes alpha particles to induce upsets in a low LET sensitive 4-k bit test SRAM. This SRAM consists of cells that employ an offset voltage to adjust their upset sensitivity and an enlarged sensitive drain junction to enhance the cell's upset rate.

  8. Laser-ablated titania nanoparticles for aqueous processed hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körstgens, V.; Pröller, S.; Buchmann, T.; Moseguí González, D.; Song, L.; Yao, Y.; Wang, W.; Werhahn, J.; Santoro, G.; Roth, S. V.; Iglev, H.; Kienberger, R.; Müller-Buschbaum, P.

    2015-02-01

    Titania nanoparticles are produced by laser ablation in liquid in order to initiate functionalization of titania with the polymer for the active layer. By combining these titania nanoparticles and water-soluble poly[3-(potassium-6-hexanoate)thiophene-2,5-diyl] (P3P6T) hybrid solar cells are realized.Titania nanoparticles are produced by laser ablation in liquid in order to initiate functionalization of titania with the polymer for the active layer. By combining these titania nanoparticles and water-soluble poly[3-(potassium-6-hexanoate)thiophene-2,5-diyl] (P3P6T) hybrid solar cells are realized. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Full scheme of the production of solar cells, additional spectra and details of the measurement techniques. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06782g

  9. Design and development of cell queuing, processing, and scheduling modules for the iPOINT input-buffered ATM testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Haoran

    1997-12-01

    This dissertation presents the concepts, principles, performance, and implementation of input queuing and cell-scheduling modules for the Illinois Pulsar-based Optical INTerconnect (iPOINT) input-buffered Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) testbed. Input queuing (IQ) ATM switches are well suited to meet the requirements of current and future ultra-broadband ATM networks. The IQ structure imposes minimum memory bandwidth requirements for cell buffering, tolerates bursty traffic, and utilizes memory efficiently for multicast traffic. The lack of efficient cell queuing and scheduling solutions has been a major barrier to build high-performance, scalable IQ-based ATM switches. This dissertation proposes a new Three-Dimensional Queue (3DQ) and a novel Matrix Unit Cell Scheduler (MUCS) to remove this barrier. 3DQ uses a linked-list architecture based on Synchronous Random Access Memory (SRAM) to combine the individual advantages of per-virtual-circuit (per-VC) queuing, priority queuing, and N-destination queuing. It avoids Head of Line (HOL) blocking and provides per-VC Quality of Service (QoS) enforcement mechanisms. Computer simulation results verify the QoS capabilities of 3DQ. For multicast traffic, 3DQ provides efficient usage of cell buffering memory by storing multicast cells only once. Further, the multicast mechanism of 3DQ prevents a congested destination port from blocking other less- loaded ports. The 3DQ principle has been prototyped in the Illinois Input Queue (iiQueue) module. Using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices, SRAM modules, and integrated on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), iiQueue can process incoming traffic at 800 Mb/s. Using faster circuit technology, the same design is expected to operate at the OC-48 rate (2.5 Gb/s). MUCS resolves the output contention by evaluating the weight index of each candidate and selecting the heaviest. It achieves near-optimal scheduling and has a very short response time. The algorithm originates from a

  10. CD6 modulates thymocyte selection and peripheral T cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Orta-Mascaró, Marc; Consuegra-Fernández, Marta; Carreras, Esther; Roncagalli, Romain; Carreras-Sureda, Amado; Alvarez, Pilar; Girard, Laura; Simões, Inês; Martínez-Florensa, Mario; Aranda, Fernando; Merino, Ramón; Martínez, Vanesa-Gabriela; Vicente, Rubén; Merino, Jesús; Sarukhan, Adelaida; Malissen, Marie; Malissen, Bernard; Lozano, Francisco

    2016-07-25

    The CD6 glycoprotein is a lymphocyte surface receptor putatively involved in T cell development and activation. CD6 facilitates adhesion between T cells and antigen-presenting cells through its interaction with CD166/ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule), and physically associates with the T cell receptor (TCR) at the center of the immunological synapse. However, its precise role during thymocyte development and peripheral T cell immune responses remains to be defined. Here, we analyze the in vivo consequences of CD6 deficiency. CD6(-/-) thymi showed a reduction in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) single-positive subsets, and double-positive thymocytes exhibited increased Ca(2+) mobilization to TCR cross-linking in vitro. Bone marrow chimera experiments revealed a T cell-autonomous selective disadvantage of CD6(-/-) T cells during development. The analysis of TCR-transgenic mice (OT-I and Marilyn) confirmed that abnormal T cell selection events occur in the absence of CD6. CD6(-/-) mice displayed increased frequencies of antigen-experienced peripheral T cells generated under certain levels of TCR signal strength or co-stimulation, such as effector/memory (CD4(+)TEM and CD8(+)TCM) and regulatory (T reg) T cells. The suppressive activity of CD6(-/-) T reg cells was diminished, and CD6(-/-) mice presented an exacerbated autoimmune response to collagen. Collectively, these data indicate that CD6 modulates the threshold for thymocyte selection and the generation and/or function of several peripheral T cell subpopulations, including T reg cells. PMID:27377588

  11. Closed-form analytical model of static noise margin for ultra-low voltage eight-transistor tunnel FET static random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuketa, Hiroshi; O'uchi, Shin-ichi; Fukuda, Koichi; Mori, Takahiro; Morita, Yukinori; Masahara, Meishoku; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Variations of eight-transistor (8T) tunnel FET (TFET) static random access memory (SRAM) cells at ultra-low supply voltage (V DD) of 0.3 V are discussed. A closed-form analytical model for the static noise margin (SNM) of the TFET SRAM cells is proposed to clarify the dependence of SNM on device parameters and is verified by simulations. The SNM variations caused by process variations are investigated using the proposed model, and we show a requirement for the threshold voltage (V TH) variation in the TFET SRAM design, which indicates that the V TH variation must be reduced as the subthreshold swing becomes steeper. In addition, a feasibility of the TFET SRAM cells operating at V DD = 0.3 V in two different process technologies is evaluated using the proposed model.

  12. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Study on the dose rate upset effect of partially depleted silicon-on-insulator static random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fa-Zhan; Liu, Meng-Xin; Guo, Tian-Lei; Liu, Gang; Hai, Chao-He; Han, Zheng-Sheng; Yang, Shan-Chao; Li, Rui-Bin; Lin, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Wei

    2008-12-01

    This paper implements the study on the Dose Rate Upset effect of PDSOI SRAM (Partially Depleted Silicon-On-Insulator Static Random Access Memory) with the Qiangguang-I accelerator in Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology. The SRAM (Static Random Access Memory) chips are developed by the Institute of Microelectronics of Chinese Academy of Sciences. It uses the full address test mode to determine the upset mechanisms. A specified address test is taken in the same time. The test results indicate that the upset threshold of the PDSOI SRAM is about 1×108 Gy(Si)/s. However, there are a few bits upset when the dose rate reaches up to 1.58 × 109 Gy(Si)/s. The SRAM circuit can still work after the high level γ ray pulse. Finally, the upset mechanism is determined to be the rail span collapse by comparing the critical charge with the collected charge after γ ray pulse. The physical locations of upset cells are plotted in the layout of the SRAM to investigate the layout defect. Then, some layout optimizations are made to improve the dose rate hardened performance of the PDSOI SRAM.

  13. Direct evidence for clonal destruction of allo-reactive T cells in the mice treated with cyclophosphamide after allo-priming.

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, T; Eto, M; Nishimura, Y; Nomoto, K; Kong, Y Y; Nomoto, K

    1993-01-01

    It has previously been reported that a single i.p. injection of 200 mg/kg cyclophosphamide (CP) 2 days after priming with 10(8) donor spleen cells (SC) leads to donor-specific skin allograft tolerance in H-2 compatible, multiminor antigen incompatible murine strain combinations. It is speculated that the i.v. injection of donor cells may result in synchronized proliferation of donor-reactive host T cells and subsequently administered CP may specifically destroy these proliferating T cells in the periphery. Although this unique action of CP is considered to be a principal mechanism in this method, direct evidence has not yet been obtained. In the present article, this in vivo destructive effect of CP is clearly demonstrated by assessing detailed kinetics of host-derived blastoid T cells and donor (Mls-1a)-reactive V beta 6+ T cells in the model system of C3H mice rendered tolerant to AKR. Frequencies of the blastoid cells and V beta 6+ cells, which increased as a result of AKR priming, decreased rapidly with the administration of CP. C3H mice, which received AKR SC alone, also exhibited partial deletion of V beta 6+ T cells, but both tempo and magnitude of decrease in the frequency of V beta 6+ cells were quite different from those of the C3H mice given AKR SC and CP, which showed more rapid and profound elimination of V beta 6+ T cells. In accordance with these kinetic studies, in vitro proliferative response to Mls-1a antigens was greatly impaired in mice treated with SC and CP, whereas a low but appreciable response was detected in mice given SC alone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 PMID:8436396

  14. High LET Single Event Upset Cross Sections For Bulk and SOI CMOS SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, F.D.; Doyle, B.L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Dodd, P.E.; Rossi, P.

    2003-08-26

    Electronics in spacecraft and satellites are exposed to high-energy cosmic radiation. In addition, terrestrial radiation can also affect earth-based electronics. To study the effects of radiation upon integrated circuits and to insure the reliability of electronic devices, cosmic and terrestrial radiations are simulated with ion beams from particle accelerators. A new, higher Linear Energy Transfer (LET) acceleration system for heavy ions has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Heavy ions from a 6.5 MV EN tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at 0.25 MeV/amu are injected into a two-stage Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac, which accelerates the ions to 1.9 MeV/amu. These ions together with those from the Brookhaven National Laboratory MP Tandem have been used to measure single event upset (SEU) cross sections as a function of LET for both bulk and Silicon on Insulator (SOI) Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor, Static Random Access Memories. The magnitudes of these cross sections indicate that the upsets in both the SOI and bulk parts are caused by OFF-drain strikes.

  15. Using SRAM Based FPGAs for Power-Aware High Performance Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Juan; Otero, Andres; Lopez, Miguel; Portilla, Jorge; de la Torre, Eduardo; Riesgo, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    While for years traditional wireless sensor nodes have been based on ultra-low power microcontrollers with sufficient but limited computing power, the complexity and number of tasks of today’s applications are constantly increasing. Increasing the node duty cycle is not feasible in all cases, so in many cases more computing power is required. This extra computing power may be achieved by either more powerful microcontrollers, though more power consumption or, in general, any solution capable of accelerating task execution. At this point, the use of hardware based, and in particular FPGA solutions, might appear as a candidate technology, since though power use is higher compared with lower power devices, execution time is reduced, so energy could be reduced overall. In order to demonstrate this, an innovative WSN node architecture is proposed. This architecture is based on a high performance high capacity state-of-the-art FPGA, which combines the advantages of the intrinsic acceleration provided by the parallelism of hardware devices, the use of partial reconfiguration capabilities, as well as a careful power-aware management system, to show that energy savings for certain higher-end applications can be achieved. Finally, comprehensive tests have been done to validate the platform in terms of performance and power consumption, to proof that better energy efficiency compared to processor based solutions can be achieved, for instance, when encryption is imposed by the application requirements. PMID:22736971

  16. Using SRAM based FPGAs for power-aware high performance wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Juan; Otero, Andres; Lopez, Miguel; Portilla, Jorge; de la Torre, Eduardo; Riesgo, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    While for years traditional wireless sensor nodes have been based on ultra-low power microcontrollers with sufficient but limited computing power, the complexity and number of tasks of today's applications are constantly increasing. Increasing the node duty cycle is not feasible in all cases, so in many cases more computing power is required. This extra computing power may be achieved by either more powerful microcontrollers, though more power consumption or, in general, any solution capable of accelerating task execution. At this point, the use of hardware based, and in particular FPGA solutions, might appear as a candidate technology, since though power use is higher compared with lower power devices, execution time is reduced, so energy could be reduced overall. In order to demonstrate this, an innovative WSN node architecture is proposed. This architecture is based on a high performance high capacity state-of-the-art FPGA, which combines the advantages of the intrinsic acceleration provided by the parallelism of hardware devices, the use of partial reconfiguration capabilities, as well as a careful power-aware management system, to show that energy savings for certain higher-end applications can be achieved. Finally, comprehensive tests have been done to validate the platform in terms of performance and power consumption, to proof that better energy efficiency compared to processor based solutions can be achieved, for instance, when encryption is imposed by the application requirements.

  17. Mitigating Upsets in SRAM Based FPGAs from the Xilinix Virtex 2 Family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Gary M.; Yui, Candice C.; Carmichael, Carl; Koga, Rocky; George, Jeffrey S.

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the single event upset static testing of the Virtex II field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) that were tested in protons and heavy-ions. The test designs and static and dynamic test results are reviewed.

  18. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. They serve as a repair ... body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  19. Cell Structure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cells, Tissues, & Membranes Cell Structure & Function Cell Structure Cell Function Body Tissues Epithelial Tissue Connective Tissue Muscle Tissue ... apparatus , and lysosomes . « Previous (Cell Structure & Function) Next (Cell Function) » Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Accessibility | FOIA | File Formats ...

  20. A study of charged particles/radiation damage to VLSI device materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okyere, John G.

    1987-01-01

    Future spacecraft systems such as the manned space station will be subjected to low-dose long term radiation particles. Most electronic systems are affected by such particles. There is therefore a great need to understand device physics and failure mechanisms affected by radiation and to design circuits that would be less susceptible to radiation. Using 2 MeV electron radiation and bias temperature aging, it was found that MOS capacitors that were prepositively biased have lower flatband voltage shift and lesser increase in density of surface state charge than those that were not prepositively biased. In addition, it was shown that there is continued recovery of flatband voltage and density of state charge in irradiated capacitors during both room temperature anneal and 137 degree anneal. When nMOS transistors were subjected to 1 MeV proton radiation, charge pumping and current versus voltage measurements indicated that transconductance degradation, threshold voltage shifts and changes in interface states density may be the primary cause of nMOS transistor failure after radiation. Simulation studies using SPICE were performed on CMOS SRAM cells of various transistor sizes. It is shown that transistor sizing affects the noise margins of CMOS SRAM cells, and that as the beta ratio of the transistors of the CMOS SRAM cell decreases, the effective noise margin of the SRAM cell increases. Some suggestions were made in connection with the design of CMOS SRAMS that are hardened against single event upsets.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Odoribacter splanchnicus type strain (1651/6T)

    SciTech Connect

    Goker, Markus; Gronow, Sabine; Zeytun, Ahmet; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Christine; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Odoribacter splanchnicus (Werner et al. 1975) Hardham et al. 2008 is the type species of the genus Odoribacter, which belongs to the family Porphyromonadaceae in the order Bacteroidales . The species is of interest because members of the Odoribacter form an isolated cluster within the Porphyromonadaceae. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Odoribacter and the fourth sequence from the family Porphyromonadaceae. The 4,392,288 bp long genome with its 3,672 protein-coding and 74 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. 26 CFR 1.132-6T - De minimis fringe-1985 through 1988 (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... benefit (or any fringe benefit provided to an employee through the use of a charge or credit card) is not... employer provides a free meal to one employee on a daily basis, but not to any other employee, the value of... cards that enable an individual to travel on the transit system. The exclusion provided in...

  3. 26 CFR 1.132-6T - De minimis fringe-1985 through 1988 (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... benefit (or any fringe benefit provided to an employee through the use of a charge or credit card) is not... employer provides a free meal to one employee on a daily basis, but not to any other employee, the value of... cards that enable an individual to travel on the transit system. The exclusion provided in...

  4. 26 CFR 1.132-6T - De minimis fringe-1985 through 1988 (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... benefit (or any fringe benefit provided to an employee through the use of a charge or credit card) is not... employer provides a free meal to one employee on a daily basis, but not to any other employee, the value of... cards that enable an individual to travel on the transit system. The exclusion provided in...

  5. 26 CFR 1.132-6T - De minimis fringe-1985 through 1988 (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... benefit (or any fringe benefit provided to an employee through the use of a charge or credit card) is not... employer provides a free meal to one employee on a daily basis, but not to any other employee, the value of... cards that enable an individual to travel on the transit system. The exclusion provided in...

  6. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND6 T14502C mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fuxin; Guan, Minqiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Yuan, Meixia; Liang, Ming; Liu, Qi; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yongmei; Yang, Li; Tong, Yi; Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong; Qu, Jia; and others

    2009-11-20

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age of onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T14502C (I58V) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved isoleucine at position 58 of ND6, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups M10a, F1a1, and H2. The occurrence of T14502C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Here, mtDNA variants I187T in the ND1, A122V in CO1, S99A in the A6, and V254I in CO3 exhibited an evolutionary conservation, indicating a potential modifying role in the development of visual impairment associated with T14502C mutation in those families. Furthermore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic manifestation of the LHON-associated T14502C mutation in these Chinese families.

  7. 26 CFR 1.181-6T - Effective/applicability dates (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... paragraph (b) of this section, § 1.181-1T applies to productions, the first day of principal photography for... animation” in place of “principal photography.” Productions involving both animation and live-action photography may use either standard. (2) The applicability of § 1.181-1T expires on October 17, 2014....

  8. Cryogenic fracture behavior of 316LN in magnetic fields up to 14.6 T

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J.W.; Chu, D.; Tseng, C.; Morris, J.W. Jr. |

    1993-07-01

    Some of the proposed magnet case alloys for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are metastable austenitic stainless steels. The case will be subjected to high loads and can be as much as 100 mm thick. Case assembly will probably require thick section welding with its attendant chemical inhomogeneity. Even alloys that are thermally stable with respect to martensitic transformation can, under these conditions of high stresses, cryogenic temperature, and high magnetic fields, undergo transformation. Previous work at 8 T has shown a measurable magnetic field effect on the 4.2K tensile and fracture toughness properties of AISI300 series metastable austenitic stainless steels. Thus, it is important to understand how these alloys will behave under conditions of high magnetic fields and cryogenic temperature, particularly at the higher magnetic fields that will be used in ITER. 4.2K data for 316LN indicates that the change in fracture toughness is not monotonic. It initially decreases and then later increases with applied field.

  9. 26 CFR 1.892-6T - Income of international organizations (temporary regulations).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of the International Organizations Immunities Act (22 U.S.C. 288) (the provisions of which are set... privileges, exemptions, and immunities provided in the International Organizations Immunities Act may...

  10. 26 CFR 1.892-6T - Income of international organizations (temporary regulations).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... International Organizations Immunities Act (22 U.S.C. 288) (the provisions of which are set forth in paragraph..., exemptions, and immunities provided in the International Organizations Immunities Act may enjoy the...

  11. 26 CFR 1.892-6T - Income of international organizations (temporary regulations).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of the International Organizations Immunities Act (22 U.S.C. 288) (the provisions of which are set... privileges, exemptions, and immunities provided in the International Organizations Immunities Act may...

  12. 26 CFR 1.892-6T - Income of international organizations (temporary regulations).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Income of international organizations (temporary... international organizations (temporary regulations). (a) Exempt from tax. Subject to the provisions of section 1 of the International Organizations Immunities Act (22 U.S.C. 288) (the provisions of which are...

  13. 26 CFR 1.892-6T - Income of international organizations (temporary regulations).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Income of international organizations (temporary... international organizations (temporary regulations). (a) Exempt from tax. Subject to the provisions of section 1 of the International Organizations Immunities Act (22 U.S.C. 288) (the provisions of which are...

  14. Complete genome sequence of Halopiger xanaduensis type strain (SH6T)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Tindall, Brian; Rohde, Manfred; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Pati, Amrita; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Teshima, Hazuki; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N

    2012-01-01

    Halopiger xanaduensis is the type species of the genus Halopiger and belongs to the euryarchaeal family Halobacteriaceae. H. xanaduensis strain SH-6, which is designated as the type strain, was isolated from the sediment of a salt lake in Inner Mongolia, Lake Shangmatala. Like other members of the family Halobacteriaceae, it is an extreme halophile requiring at least 2.5 M salt for growth. We report here the sequencing and annotation of the 4,355,268 bp genome, which includes one chromosome and three plasmids. This genome is part of a Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Community Sequencing Program (CSP) project to sequence diverse haloarchaeal genomes.

  15. 26 CFR 1.132-6T - De minimis fringe-1985 through 1988 (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... holiday gifts of property (not cash) with a low fair market value; occasional theatre or sporting event... benefit (or any fringe benefit provided to an employee through the use of a charge or credit card) is not... cards that enable an individual to travel on the transit system. The exclusion provided in...

  16. 26 CFR 1.41-6T - Aggregation of expenditures (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... are members of a consolidated group and no member of the group made any basic research payments or... are treated as a single taxpayer for purposes of computing the research credit. The group credit is... research credit (if any) that would be allowable to a member of a controlled group if the credit...

  17. 26 CFR 1.41-6T - Aggregation of expenditures (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... are members of a consolidated group and no member of the group made any basic research payments or... are treated as a single taxpayer for purposes of computing the research credit. The group credit is... research credit (if any) that would be allowable to a member of a controlled group if the credit...

  18. 26 CFR 1.25-6T - Form of qualified mortgage credit certificate (Temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... following information: (1) The name, address, and TIN of the issuer, (2) The date of the issuer's election... number assigned to the certificate, (4) The name, address, and TIN of the holder of the certificate,...

  19. 26 CFR 1.25-6T - Form of qualified mortgage credit certificate (Temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... following information: (1) The name, address, and TIN of the issuer, (2) The date of the issuer's election... number assigned to the certificate, (4) The name, address, and TIN of the holder of the certificate,...

  20. Mannosylated self-peptide inhibits the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis via expansion of nonencephalitogenic T cells.

    PubMed

    Kel, Junda M; Slütter, Bram; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Koning, Frits; Nagelkerken, Lex

    2008-07-01

    Tolerance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in SJL mice can be induced by immunization with a mannosylated form of the proteolipid protein (M-PLP139-151), despite the presence of CFA. The state of tolerance is characterized by poor delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and the absence of clinical EAE symptoms. In vivo monitoring of CFSE-labeled PLP139-151-specific TCR-transgenic (5B6) T cells revealed that immunization with M-PLP139-151 increases the clonal expansion of 5B6 T cells that do not develop full effector functions. Moreover, nonfunctional T cells obtained from M-PLP139-151-immunized mice showed poor blastogenesis and were unable to transfer EAE to naïve recipients. Nevertheless, the in vitro production of cytokines and chemokines associated with EAE was unaffected. Importantly, tolerance induced by M-PLP139-151 was abrogated by the administration of pertussis toxin, resulting in EAE development. Our results suggest that M-PLP139-151 inhibits EAE development by affecting the differentiation of T cells into encephalitogenic effector cells.

  1. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... or turn off the immune response. Cytotoxic or “killer” T cells directly attack and destroy cells bearing ... involve selective activation of helper T cells and killer T cells, with a corresponding decrease in regulatory ...

  2. Cell division

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... hours after conception, the fertilized egg cell remains a single cell. After approximately 30 hours, it divides ... 3 days, the fertilized egg cell has become a berry-like structure made up of 16 cells. ...

  3. Investigating Microenvironmental Regulation of Human Chordoma Cell Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priya; Brooks, Courtney; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Hess, David A.; Séguin, Cheryle A.

    2014-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment is complex and composed of many different constituents, including matricellular proteins such as connective tissue growth factor (CCN2), and is characterized by gradients in oxygen levels. In various cancers, hypoxia and CCN2 promote stem and progenitor cell properties, and regulate the proliferation, migration and phenotype of cancer cells. Our study was aimed at investigating the effects of hypoxia and CCN2 on chordoma cells, using the human U-CH1 cell line. We demonstrate that under basal conditions, U-CH1 cells express multiple CCN family members including CCN1, CCN2, CCN3 and CCN5. Culture of U-CH1 cells in either hypoxia or in the presence of recombinant CCN2 peptide promoted progenitor cell-like characteristics specific to the notochordal tissue of origin. Specifically, hypoxia induced the most robust increase in progenitor-like characteristics in U-CH1 cells, including increased expression of the notochord-associated markers T, CD24, FOXA1, ACAN and CA12, increased cell growth and tumour-sphere formation, and a decrease in the percentage of vacuolated cells present in the heterogeneous population. Interestingly, the effects of recombinant CCN2 peptide on U-CH1 cells were more pronounced under normoxia than hypoxia, promoting increased expression of CCN1, CCN2, CCN3 and CCN5, the notochord-associated markers SOX5, SOX6, T, CD24, and FOXA1 as well as increased tumour-sphere formation. Overall, this study highlights the importance of multiple factors within the tumour microenvironment and how hypoxia and CCN2 may regulate human chordoma cell behaviour. PMID:25541962

  4. Solution-Processable Low-Molecular Weight Extended Arylacetylenes: Versatile p-Type Semiconductors for Field-Effect Transistors and Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestri, Fabio; Marrocchi, Assunta; Seri, Mirko; Kim, Choongik; Marks, Tobin J.; Facchetti, Antonio; Taticchi, Aldo

    2010-04-08

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a series of five extended arylacetylenes, 9,10-bis-{[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]ethynyl}-anthracene (A-P6t, 1), 9,10-bis-[(p-{[m,p-bis(hexyloxy) phenyl]ethynyl}phenyl)ethynyl]-anthracene (PA-P6t, 2), 4,7-bis-{[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]ethynyl}-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BTZ-P6t, 5), 4,7-bis(5-{[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]ethynyl}thien-2-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (TBTZ-P6t, 6), and 7,7'-({[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]ethynyl}-2,1,3-benzothiadiazol-4,4'-ethynyl)-2,5-thiophene (BTZT-P6t, 7), and two arylvinylenes, 9,10-bis-{(E)-[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]vinyl}-anthracene (A-P6d, 3), 9,10-bis-[(E)-(p-{(E)-[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]vinyl}phenyl)vinyl]-anthracene (PA-P6d, 4). Trends in optical absorption spectra and electrochemical redox processes are first described. Next, the thin-film microstructures and morphologies of films deposited from solution under various conditions are investigated, and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and bulk heterojunction photovoltaic (OPV) cells fabricated. We find that substituting acetylenic for olefinic linkers on the molecular cores significantly enhances device performance. OFET measurements reveal that all seven of the semiconductors are FET-active and, depending on the backbone architecture, the arylacetylenes exhibit good p-type mobilities (μ up to ~0.1 cm2 V-1 s-1) when optimum film microstructural order is achieved. OPV cells using [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as the electron acceptor exhibit power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) up to 1.3% under a simulated AM 1.5 solar irradiation of 100 mW/cm2. These results demonstrate that arylacetylenes are promising hole-transport materials for p-channel OFETs and promising donors for organic solar cells applications. A direct correlation between OFET arylacetylene hole mobility and OPV performance is identified and analyzed.

  5. Fault handling schemes in electronic systems with specific application to radiation tolerance and VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attia, John Okyere

    1993-01-01

    Naturally occurring space radiation particles can produce transient and permanent changes in the electrical properties of electronic devices and systems. In this work, the transient radiation effects on DRAM and CMOS SRAM were considered. In addition, the effect of total ionizing dose radiation of the switching times of CMOS logic gates were investigated. Effects of transient radiation on the column and cell of MOS dynamic memory cell was simulated using SPICE. It was found that the critical charge of the bitline was higher than that of the cell. In addition, the critical charge of the combined cell-bitline was found to be dependent on the gate voltage of the access transistor. In addition, the effect of total ionizing dose radiation on the switching times of CMOS logic gate was obtained. The results of this work indicate that, the rise time of CMOS logic gates increases, while the fall time decreases with an increase in total ionizing dose radiation. Also, by increasing the size of the P-channel transistor with respect to that of the N-channel transistor, the propagation delay of CMOS logic gate can be made to decrease with, or be independent of an increase in total ionizing dose radiation. Furthermore, a method was developed for replacing polysilicon feedback resistance of SRAMs with a switched capacitor network. A switched capacitor SRAM was implemented using MOS Technology. The critical change of the switched capacitor SRAM has a very large critical charge. The results of this work indicate that switched capacitor SRAM is a viable alternative to SRAM with polysilicon feedback resistance.

  6. Pattern dependence in synergistic effects of total dose on single-event upset hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongxia; Ding, Lili; Xiao, Yao; Zhang, Fengqi; Luo, Yinhong; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Yuanming

    2016-09-01

    The pattern dependence in synergistic effects was studied in a 0.18 μm static random access memory (SRAM) circuit. Experiments were performed under two SEU test environments: 3 MeV protons and heavy ions. Measured results show different trends. In heavy ion SEU test, the degradation in the peripheral circuitry also existed because the measured SEU cross section decreased regardless of the patterns written to the SRAM array. TCAD simulation was performed. TID-induced degradation in nMOSFETs mainly induced the imprint effect in the SRAM cell, which is consistent with the measured results under the proton environment, but cannot explain the phenomena observed under heavy ion environment. A possible explanation could be the contribution from the radiation-induced GIDL in pMOSFETs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. U1532261).

  7. Experimental study on radiation effects in floating gate read-only-memories and static random access memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao-Hui; Li, Yong-Hong

    2007-09-01

    Radiation effects of the floating gate read-only-memory (FG ROM) and the static random access memory (SRAM) have been evaluated using the 14 MeV neutron and 31.9MeV proton beams and Co-60 γ-rays. The neutron fluence, when the first error occurs in the FG ROMs, is at least 5 orders of magnitude higher than that in the SRAMs, and the proton fluence, 4 orders of magnitude higher. The total dose threshold for Co-60 γ-ray irradiation is about 104 rad (Si) for both memories. The difference and similarity are attributed to the structure of the memory cells and the mechanism of radiation effects. It is concluded that the FG ROMs are more reliable as semiconductor memories for storing data than the SRAMs, when they are used in the satellites or space crafts exposed to high energy particle radiation.

  8. Cell counting.

    PubMed

    Phelan, M C; Lawler, G

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents protocols for counting cells using either a hemacytometer or electronically using a Coulter counter. Cell counting with a hemacytometer permits effective discrimination of live from dead cells using trypan blue exclusion. In addition, the procedure is less subject to errors arising from cell clumping or size heterogeneity. Counting cells is more quickly and easily performed using an electronic counter, but live-dead discrimination is unreliable. Cell populations containing large numbers of dead cells and/or cell clumps are difficult to count accurately. In addition, electronic counting requires resetting of the instrument for cell populations of different sizes; heterogeneous populations can give rise to inaccurate counts, and resting and activated cells may require counting at separate settings. In general, electronic cell counting is best performed on fresh peripheral blood cells. PMID:18770655

  9. Galvanic Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, I. G.

    1973-01-01

    Many standard physical chemistry textbooks contain ambiguities which lead to confusion about standard electrode potentials, calculating cell voltages, and writing reactions for galvanic cells. This article shows how standard electrode potentials can be used to calculate cell voltages and deduce cell reactions. (Author/RH)

  10. Cell Biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioufle, B. Le; Picollet-D'Hahan, N.

    A cell biochip is a microsystem, equipped with electronic and microfluidic functions, designed to manipulate or analyse living cells. The first publications in this emerging area of research appeared toward the end of the 1980s. In 1989 Washizu described a biochip designed to fuse two cells by electropermeabilisation of the cytoplasmic membrane [1]. Research centers have devised a whole range of cell chip structures, for simultaneous or sequential analysis of single cells, cell groups, or cell tissues reconstituted on the chip. The cells are arranged in a square array on a parallel cell chip for parallel analysis, while they are examined and processed one by one in a microchannel in the case of a series cell chip. In contrast to these biochips for high-throughput analysis of a large number of cells, single-cell chips focus on the analysis of a single isolated cell. As in DNA microarrays, where a large number of oligonucleotides are ordered in a matrix array, parallel cell chips order living cells in a similar way. At each point of the array, the cells can be isolated, provided that the cell type allows this, e.g., blood cells, or cultivated in groups (most adhesion cells can only survive in groups). The aim is to allow massively parallel analysis or processing. Le Pioufle et al. describe a microdevice for the culture of single cells or small groups of cells in a micropit array [2]. Each pit is equipped to stimulate the cell or group of cells either electrically or fluidically. Among the applications envisaged are gene transfer, cell sorting, and screening in pharmacology. A complementary approach, combining the DNA microarray and cell biochip ideas, has been put forward by Bailey et al. [3]. Genes previously arrayed on the chip transfect the cultured cells on the substrate depending on their position in the array (see Fig. 19.1). This way of achieving differential lipofection on a chip was then taken up again by Yoshikawa et al. [4] with primary cells, more

  11. Mouse mammary tumor proviruses from a T-cell lymphoma are associated with the retroposon L1Md.

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, J P

    1988-01-01

    Four Charon 4A clones containing mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviruses and their cellular flanking sequences were obtained from partial EcoRI libraries of a C57BL/6 T-cell lymphoma with both endogenous and newly acquired MMTV proviruses. The cellular flanking sequences of three of four MMTV proviruses contained DNA homologous to the 3' end of the long interspersed retroposon L1Md. Two of the three proviruses were newly acquired in the lymphoma DNA, and these MMTV proviruses appeared to be 5 kilobases downstream and in the same transcriptional orientation as the L1 sequence. The third provirus was endogenous Mtv-9 and was located less than 500 base pairs from the 3' end of L1. Seven additional clones containing MMTV proviruses were isolated from partial MboI libraries of a B6 T-cell lymphoma. Five of the seven clones contained L1 elements in the cellular DNA flanking MMTV DNA. At least two clones (including one with the Mtv-8 provirus) had multiple L1 copies flanking the MMTV provirus, and one clone contained a single MMTV long terminal repeat directly integrated into a truncated L1 sequence. Although the frequencies of B1 and L1 in random library clones were similar, only one MMTV-containing clone hybridized to the abundant repetitive element B1. These data suggest a nonrandom association between MMTV and L1Md. Images PMID:2826809

  12. Engineering cell-cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Blagovic, Katarina; Gong, Emily S; Milano, Daniel F; Natividad, Robert J; Asthagiri, Anand R

    2013-10-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cells (cell surface engineering and synthetic gene circuits) to modulate juxtacrine cell-cell signaling. In addition, significant progress has been made in elucidating design rules and strategies to modulate juxtacrine signaling on the basis of quantitative, engineering analysis of the mechanical and regulatory role of juxtacrine signals in the context of other cues and physical constraints in the microenvironment. These advances in engineering juxtacrine signaling lay a strong foundation for an integrative approach to utilize synthetic cells, advanced 'chassis' and predictive modeling to engineer the form and function of living tissues.

  13. Clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells in irradiation bone marrow chimeras and neonatally tolerant mice. Evidence for intercellular transfer of Mlsa

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Tolerance to Mlsa has been shown to be associated with clonal deletion of cells carrying TCR beta chain variable regions V beta 6 or V beta 8.1 in mice possessing I-E antigens. To evaluate the rules of tolerance induction to Mlsa we prepared irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressing Mlsa or Mlsb and I-E by different cell types. Deletion of V beta 6+, Mlsa-reactive T cells required the presence of Mlsa and I-E products either on bone marrow-derived cells or on irradiated recipient cells. Tolerance was induced when Mlsa and I-E were expressed by distinct cells of the chimera. Also neonatally tolerized mice exhibited depletion of V beta 6+ cells after injection of I-E- Mlsa spleen cells (DBA/1) into newborn I-E+ Mlsb mice (BALB/c x B10.G)F1. These results suggest that the product of the Mlsa locus is soluble and/or may be transferred from cell to cell and bound to I-E antigens. The chimera experiments also showed that tolerance to Mlsa is H-2 allele independent, i.e., is apparently unrestricted. Differentiation of chimeric (H-2d/Mlsa x H-2q/Mlsb)F1 stem cells in either an H-2d or an H- 2q thymus revealed that tolerance assessed by absence of V beta 6+ T cells is not dependent on the thymically determined restriction specificity of T cells. PMID:2526850

  14. Fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, has supported and managed a fuel cell research and development (R and D) program since 1976. Responsibility for implementing DOE's fuel cell program, which includes activities related to both fuel cells and fuel cell systems, has been assigned to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The total United States effort of the private and public sectors in developing fuel cell technology is referred to as the National Fuel Cell Program (NFCP). The goal of the NFCP is to develop fuel cell power plants for base-load and dispersed electric utility systems, industrial cogeneration, and on-site applications. To achieve this goal, the fuel cell developers, electric and gas utilities, research institutes, and Government agencies are working together. Four organized groups are coordinating the diversified activities of the NFCP. The status of the overall program is reviewed in detail.

  15. Design and implementation of power efficient 10-bit dual port SRAM on 28 nm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulati, Anmol; Gupta, Ashutosh; Murgai, Shruti; Bhaskar, Lala

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, 10 bit synchronous clock gated Dual port RAM has been designed. The negative latch based clock gating technique has been employed to optimize the power of the design. The design has been implemented on XV7K70T device, -3 speed grade, and kintex 7 FPGA family on Xilinx ISE Design Suite 14.7 using 28 nm technology. The design has been synthesized using Verilog HDL. We have been successful in achieving approximately 55 % reduction in total clock power, 81.55% reduction in BRAM power, 82.65%, 0.07%, 1.04% and 11.31% reduction in static power, 72.32%, 38.60%, 68.74% and 71.97%, reduction in dynamic power and 72.44%, 16.96%, 60.88% and 71.06% reduction in total supply power at 1 THz, 1GHz, 100 GHz and 1000 GHz frequency respectively. The power of the device has been calculated using XPower Analyzer tool of Xilinx ISE Design Suite 14.7.

  16. Treatment of spontaneous EAE by laquinimod reduces Tfh, B cell aggregates, and disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Varrin-Doyer, Michel; Pekarek, Kara L.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Cree, Bruce A.C.; Schulze-Topphoff, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of oral laquinimod, a candidate multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment, on induction of T follicular helper cells, development of meningeal B cell aggregates, and clinical disease in a spontaneous B cell–dependent MS model. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with recombinant myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (rMOG) protein. Spontaneous EAE was evaluated in C57BL/6 MOG p35-55–specific T cell receptor transgenic (2D2) × MOG-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)H-chain knock-in (IgHMOG-ki [Th]) mice. Laquinimod was administered orally. T cell and B cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Results: Oral laquinimod treatment (1) reduced CD11c+CD4+ dendritic cells, (2) inhibited expansion of PD-1+CXCR5+BCL6+ T follicular helper and interleukin (IL)-21–producing activated CD4+CD44+ T cells, (3) suppressed B cell CD40 expression, (4) diminished formation of Fas+GL7+ germinal center B cells, and (5) inhibited development of MOG-specific IgG. Laquinimod treatment not only prevented rMOG-induced EAE, but also inhibited development of spontaneous EAE and the formation of meningeal B cell aggregates. Disability progression was prevented when laquinimod treatment was initiated after mice developed paralysis. Treatment of spontaneous EAE with laquinimod was also associated with increases in CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ and CD4+CD25+IL-10+ regulatory T cells. Conclusions: Our observations that laquinimod modulates myelin antigen–specific B cell immune responses and suppresses both development of meningeal B cell aggregates and disability progression in spontaneous EAE should provide insight regarding the potential application of laquinimod to MS treatment. Results of this investigation demonstrate how the 2D2 × Th spontaneous EAE model can be used successfully for preclinical evaluation of a candidate MS treatment. PMID:27704036

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Thyroid Hormone Metabolites in Cell Culture Samples Using LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Rathmann, Daniel; Rijntjes, Eddy; Lietzow, Julika; Köhrle, Josef

    2015-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to determine iodothyronines and thyronamines (TAM) from cell culture media was developed. Thyroid hormones (TH) are metabolized by sequential deiodination to eventually yield thyronine (T0), but can also be decarboxylated, resulting in TAM. The method presented here for extraction of DMEM/F12 cell culture media is a fundamental procedure for a precise determination of 9 TH and 6 TAM from a single LC run. Analytes and internal standards (IS) were extracted from DMEM/F12 (w/o phenol red) by liquid-liquid extraction using isopropanol-TBME (30:70 v/v). Measurement of TH and TAM was performed during a 10-min run time using 13C6-T4, 13C6-T3, 13C6-rT3, 13C6-3,3′T2 and 2H4-T1AM as IS. Calibration curves covered 11 calibrators measured as triplicates each for the analysis of the 9 TH and 6 TAM metabolites, and the 5 IS were linear and reproducible in the range of 0.12-120 nM (R2 0.991-0.999) for all calibrators. The lower limit of quantification was 0.078-0.234 nM. Method validation and robustness were demonstrated by the analysis of precision, accuracy, process efficiency, matrix effects and recoveries, as well as intra- and interassay stability. These parameters were investigated for high, middle and low concentrations of quality controls of all 9 TH and 6 TAM metabolites. This validated, sensitive and interaction-free LC-MS/MS method allows rapid analysis and accurate determination of TH and TAM from DMEM/F12 (w/o phenol red) conditioned media and seems to be easily transferable and applied to commonly used buffers and cell culture media. PMID:26601073

  18. Types of Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... stem cells blog from the International Society for Stem Cell Research. Learn About Stem Cells From Lab to You ...

  19. Electrolytic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, J. S.; Hale, B. D.

    1984-09-01

    An apparatus is described for the separation of the anolyte and the catholyte during electrolysis. The electrolyte flows through an electrolytic cell between the oppositely charged electrodes. The cell is equipped with a wedge-shaped device, the tapered end is located between the electrodes on the effluent side of the cell. The wedge diverts the flow of the electrolyte to either side of the wedge, substantially separating the anolyte and the catholyte.

  20. Transistor-level characterization of static random access memory bit failures induced by random telegraph noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Tomoko; Saraya, Takuya; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Bit failure events induced by random telegraph noise (RTN) for silicon-on-thin-buried-oxide (SOTB) static random access memory (SRAM) cells were characterized by directly monitoring the storage node voltage of individual cells, using a device-matrix-array (DMA) test element group (TEG). Correlating the cell-level RTN and failure waveforms with the RTN waveforms of individual transistors that constitute the same cell, RTN of a specific transistor that causes the cell failure was identified.

  1. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  2. Cell Chauvinism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Dolores Elaine

    1972-01-01

    Indicates that biological terminology, such as mother cell'' and labels of sex factors in bacteria, reflect discrimination against females by reinforcing perpetuation of stereotyped gender roles. (AL)

  3. Cell Trivision of Hyperploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gabor; Kiraly, Gabor; Turani, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Malignant transformation is likely to render cells hyperploid, primarily tetraploid. We have measured the frequency of division into three rather than two daughter cells as a function of ploidy. Such trivisions were followed in near-tetraploid uveal melanoma (UM), hypotetraploid HaCaT (<4 N), hypertriploid HeLa (>3 N), and in near-diploid (∼2 N) lung epithelial cell lines by time-lapse image analyses. A stepwise analysis of cytokinesis revealed higher frequency of cell trivisions relative to divisions in hyperploid HeLa (1:24, 4%), HaCaT (1:126, 8%), and UM (1:186, 0.5%) cells. The occurrence of trivision was significantly lower in near-diploid endothelial cells (1:1400, 0.07%). We have previously observed the phenomenon of trivision in HaCaT cells treated with heavy metal lead, and here we describe that trivision is a spontaneous process taking place without genotoxic treatment. Beside re-diploidization by trivision, the hyperploid state decreases the cell size of the daughter cells and is likely to increase the time of cytokinesis. On the basis of the results, it is hypothesized that among other cancer-related causes, hyperploidy could be related to cell trivision, could cause random aneuploidy, and could generate new cancer-specific karyotypes. PMID:24093497

  4. A Cryptographic SoC for Robust Protection of Secret Keys in IPTV DRM Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghan; Yang, Hae-Yong; Yeom, Yongjin; Park, Jongsik

    The security level of an internet protocol television (IPTV) digital right management (DRM) system ultimately relies on protection of secret keys. Well known devices for the key protection include smartcards and battery backup SRAMs (BB-SRAMs); however, these devices could be vulnerable to various physical attacks. In this paper, we propose a secure and cost-effective design of a cryptographic system on chip (SoC) that integrates the BB-SRAM with a cell-based design technique. The proposed SoC provides robust safeguard against the physical attacks, and satisfies high-speed and low-price requirements of IPTV set-top boxes. Our implementation results show that the maximum encryption rate of the SoC is 633Mb/s. In order to verify the data retention capabilities, we made a prototype chip using 0.18µm standard cell technology. The experimental results show that the integrated BB-SRAM can reliably retain data with a 1.4µA leakage current.

  5. T cell and non-T cell compartments can independently determine resistance to Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In experimental murine cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major (Lm), the cellular determinants governing development of protective or exacerbative T cells are not well understood. We, therefore, attempted to determine the influence of T cell and non-T cell compartments on disease outcome. To this end, T cell chimeric mice were constructed using adult thymectomized lethally irradiated, bone marrow-reconstituted (ATXBM) animals of genetically resistant, C57BL/6, or susceptible, BALB/c, backgrounds. These hosts were engrafted with naive T cell populations from H-2-congenic susceptible, BALB.B6-H-2b, or resistant, C57BL/6.C-H-2d, animals, respectively. Chimeric mice were then infected with Lm, and disease outcome was monitored. BALB/c T cell chimeric mice, BALB/c ATXBM hosts given naive C57BL/6.C-H-2d T cells, resolved their infections as indicated by reductions in both lesion size and parasite numbers. Furthermore, the mice developed typical Th1 (interferon[IFN]-gamma hiinterleukin[IL]-4lo) cytokine patterns. In contrast, both sham chimeric, BALB/c ATXBM hosts given naive BALB/c T cells, and control irradiated euthymic mice succumbed to infection, producing Th2 profiles (IFN-gamma loIL-4hiIL-10hi). C57BL/6 T cell chimeras, C57BL/6 ATXBM hosts given naive BALB.B6-H-2b T cells, resolved their infections as did C57BL/6 sham chimeras and euthymic controls. Interestingly, whereas C57BL/6 control animals produced Th1 cytokines, chimeric animals progressed from Th0 (IFN-gamma hiIL-4hiIL- 10hi) to Th2 (IFN-gamma loIL-4hiIL-10hi) cytokine profiles as cure ensued. Both reconstitution and chimeric status of all mice were confirmed by flow cytometry. In addition, T cell receptor V beta usage of Lm-specific blasts was determined. In all cases, V beta use was multiclonal, involving primarily V beta 2, 4, 6, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 10, and 14, with relative V beta frequencies differing between H-2b and H-2d animals. Most importantly, however, these differences did not segregate

  6. T Cell Immunity to the Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase of Burkholderia pseudomallei: A Correlate of Disease Outcome in Acute Melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Catherine; Goudet, Amélie; Jenjaroen, Kemajittra; Sumonwiriya, Manutsanun; Rinchai, Darawan; Musson, Julie; Overbeek, Saskia; Makinde, Julia; Quigley, Kathryn; Manji, Jiten; Spink, Natasha; Yos, Pagnarith; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Bancroft, Gregory; Robinson, John; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Dunachie, Susanna; Maillere, Bernard; Holden, Matthew; Altmann, Daniel; Boyton, Rosemary

    2015-05-15

    There is an urgent need for a better understanding of adaptive immunity to Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis that is frequently associated with sepsis or death in patients in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. The imperative to identify vaccine targets is driven both by the public health agenda in these regions and biological threat concerns. In several intracellular bacterial pathogens, alkyl hydroperoxidase reductases are upregulated as part of the response to host oxidative stress, and they can stimulate strong adaptive immunity. We show that alkyl hydroperoxidase reductase (AhpC) of B. pseudomallei is strongly immunogenic for T cells of 'humanized' HLA transgenic mice and seropositive human donors. Some T cell epitopes, such as p6, are able to bind diverse HLA class II heterodimers and stimulate strong T cell immunity in mice and humans. Importantly, patients with acute melioidosis who survive infection show stronger T cell responses to AhpC relative to those who do not. Although the sequence of AhpC is virtually invariant among global B. pseudomallei clinical isolates, a Cambodian isolate varies only in C-terminal truncation of the p6 T cell epitope, raising the possibility of selection by host immunity. This variant peptide is virtually unable to stimulate T cell immunity. For an infection in which there has been debate about centrality of T cell immunity in defense, these observations support a role for T cell immunity to AhpC in disease protection.

  7. T Cells Engineered With Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting NKG2D Ligands Display Lethal Toxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    VanSeggelen, Heather; Hammill, Joanne A; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Tantalo, Daniela G M; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Denisova, Galina F; Rabinovich, Brian; Wan, Yonghong; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2015-10-01

    Ligands for the NKG2D receptor are overexpressed on tumors, making them interesting immunotherapy targets. To assess the tumoricidal properties of T cells directed to attack NKG2D ligands, we engineered murine T cells with two distinct NKG2D-based chimeric antigen receptors (CARs): (i) a fusion between the NKG2D receptor and the CD3ζ chain and (ii) a conventional second-generation CAR, where the extracellular domain of NKG2D was fused to CD28 and CD3ζ. To enhance the CAR surface expression, we also engineered T cells to coexpress DAP10. In vitro functionality and surface expression levels of all three CARs was greater in BALB/c T cells than C57BL/6 T cells, indicating strain-specific differences. Upon adoptive transfer of NKG2D-CAR-T cells into syngeneic animals, we observed significant clinical toxicity resulting in morbidity and mortality. The severity of these toxicities varied between the CAR configurations and paralleled their in vitro NKG2D surface expression. BALB/c mice were more sensitive to these toxicities than C57BL/6 mice, consistent with the higher in vitro functionality of BALB/c T cells. Treatment with cyclophosphamide prior to adoptive transfer exacerbated the toxicity. We conclude that while NKG2D ligands may be useful targets for immunotherapy, the pursuit of NKG2D-based CAR-T cell therapies should be undertaken with caution. PMID:26122933

  8. Unit Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Robert C.; Tobiason, Fred L.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of unit cells using clear plastic cubes which can be disassembled, and one inch cork balls of various colors, which can be cut in halves, quarters, or eighths, and glued on the inside face of the cube, thus simulating a unit cell. (MLH)

  9. Photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Bronstein-Bonte, I.Y.; Fischer, A.B.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a product comprising a photovoltaic cell including a luminescent dye which will absorb radiation at a wavelength to which the cell is not significantly responsive and emit radiation at a higher wavelength at which it is responsive. The improvement described here is wherein the dye comprises a lepidopterene.

  10. Fuel Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the theories, construction, operation, types, and advantages of fuel cells developed by the American space programs. Indicates that the cell is an ideal small-scale power source characterized by its compactness, high efficiency, reliability, and freedom from polluting fumes. (CC)

  11. 26 CFR 1.1441-6T - Claim of reduced withholding under an income tax treaty (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... benefits, it provides the documentation required by paragraph (b)(1) of this section. If dual claims, as... limitation on benefits provision. (ii) Analysis. Absent actual knowledge or reason to know otherwise, W may... payment that H does not claim as its distributive share. (ii) Analysis. Absent actual knowledge or...

  12. 26 CFR 1.367(a)-6T - Transfer of foreign branch with previously deducted losses (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Transfers of certain intangible property. Gain realized on the transfer of intangible property (computed with reference to the fair market value of the intangible property as of the date of the transfer) that..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (Continued) Effects on...

  13. 26 CFR 1.367(a)-6T - Transfer of foreign branch with previously deducted losses (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Transfers of certain intangible property. Gain realized on the transfer of intangible property (computed with reference to the fair market value of the intangible property as of the date of the transfer) that..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Effects on...

  14. 26 CFR 1.367(a)-6T - Transfer of foreign branch with previously deducted losses (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... constitute a single foreign branch include a substantial identity of products, customers, operational... contemplated at the time of the initial transfer to the domestic corporation and that avoidance of the...

  15. 26 CFR 1.367(a)-6T - Transfer of foreign branch with previously deducted losses (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the active conduct of a trade or business outside the United States. (c) Special rules concerning gain... pursuant to the rules of this section shall be treated as income from sources outside the United States... outside the United States. Whether the activities of a U.S. person outside the United States constitute...

  16. 26 CFR 1.367(a)-6T - Transfer of foreign branch with previously deducted losses (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... transferred for use in the active conduct of a trade or business outside the United States. (c) Special rules... outside the United States. Whether the activities of a U.S. person outside the United States constitute a... the U.S. person in carrying out business activities outside the United States. Activities outside...

  17. 26 CFR 1.897-6T - Nonrecognition exchanges applicable to corporations, their shareholders, and other taxpayers, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) and XXX (5) of the United States-Canada Income Tax Convention or other income tax treaty entered into after June 6, 1988. In regard to Article XXX (5) the Income Tax Treaty with Canada, see, Rev. Rul....

  18. 26 CFR 1.897-6T - Nonrecognition exchanges applicable to corporations, their shareholders, and other taxpayers, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) and XXX (5) of the United States-Canada Income Tax Convention or other income tax treaty entered into after June 6, 1988. In regard to Article XXX (5) the Income Tax Treaty with Canada, see, Rev. Rul....

  19. 26 CFR 1.897-6T - Nonrecognition exchanges applicable to corporations, their shareholders, and other taxpayers, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) and XXX (5) of the United States-Canada Income Tax Convention or other income tax treaty entered into after June 6, 1988. In regard to Article XXX (5) the Income Tax Treaty with Canada, see, Rev. Rul....

  20. 26 CFR 1.897-6T - Nonrecognition exchanges applicable to corporations, their shareholders, and other taxpayers, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) and XXX (5) of the United States-Canada Income Tax Convention or other income tax treaty entered into after June 6, 1988. In regard to Article XXX (5) the Income Tax Treaty with Canada, see, Rev. Rul....

  1. 26 CFR 1.897-6T - Nonrecognition exchanges applicable to corporations, their shareholders, and other taxpayers, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) and XXX (5) of the United States-Canada Income Tax Convention or other income tax treaty entered into after June 6, 1988. In regard to Article XXX (5) the Income Tax Treaty with Canada, see, Rev. Rul....

  2. Cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis of the dynamic multi-phase process that transforms a small population of lateral plate mesoderm into the mature limb skeleton, the mechanisms by which signaling pathways regulate cellular behaviors to generate morphogenetic forces are not known. Recently, a series of papers have offered the intriguing possibility that regulated cell polarity fine-tunes the morphogenetic process via orienting cell axes, division planes and cell movements. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical signaling, which may include planar cell polarity, has emerged as a common thread in the otherwise distinct signaling networks that regulate morphogenesis in each phase of limb development. These findings position the limb as a key model to elucidate how global tissue patterning pathways direct local differences in cell behavior that, in turn, generate growth and form. PMID:22064549

  3. Fuel cells 101

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschenhofer, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the various types of fuel cells, the importance of cell voltage, fuel processing for natural gas, cell stacking, fuel cell plant description, advantages and disadvantages of the types of fuel cells, and applications. The types covered include: polymer electrolyte fuel cell, alkaline fuel cell, phosphoric acid fuel cell; molten carbonate fuel cell, and solid oxide fuel cell.

  4. 9. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL ACCESS ELEVATOR, CELLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL ACCESS ELEVATOR, CELLS 2 AND 4, BASEMENT LEVEL. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  5. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-09-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) has been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC-25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory consists of two external electrodes wrapping around a quartz tube and nitrogen as a feed gas and operates based on dielectric barrier gas discharge. Generally, it is more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, this design provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to the noble gases for future clinical operation. Different parameters of the APPJ configuration were tested in order to determine radiation dosage. To explore the effects of delayed damage and cell self-repairing, various incubation times of cells after plasma treatment were also performed. Reactive species generated in plasma jet and in liquid environment are essential to be identified and quantified, with the aim of unfolding the mystery of detailed mechanisms for plasma-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, from the comparison of plasma treatment effect on normal oral cells OKF6T, an insight to the selectivity for cancer treatment by APPJ can be explored. All of these studies are critical to better understand the damage responses of normal and abnormal cellular systems to plasma radiation, which are useful for the development of advanced plasma therapy for cancer treatment at a later stage.

  6. EphB6 crosslinking results in costimulation of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hongyu; Yu, Guang; Wu, Yulian; Wu, Jiangping

    2002-01-01

    Erythropoietin-producing hepatocyte (Eph) kinases represent the largest receptor tyrosine kinase family. Some of them are expressed in the T cell compartment, but their function in T cells is unknown. In peripheral blood, EphB6 was predominantly expressed on T cells, and was upregulated after culture. EphB6 crosslinking by anti-EphB6 mAb or ephrinB2 in the presence of suboptimal T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation led to drastic T cell proliferation, suggesting that EphB6 can co-stimulate T cells. The proliferation was accompanied by enhanced production of several lymphokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β, TNF-α, and GM-CSF, but not IL-2 and IL-4. Sorted EphB6+ T cells had significantly stronger response to anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 stimulation than EphB6– T cells had. Taken together, these data suggest an important role of EphB6 in normal T cell activation. Within two minutes of anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 stimulation, EphB6 aggregated and colocalized with TCR, and this provides a morphological basis for EphB6 to enhance TCR signaling. The capping was followed by p38 MAPK activation, showing that EphB6 is capable of signaling, in spite of its lack of intrinsic kinase activity. This study demonstrates that interaction between EphB6 and its ligands facilitates T cell responses to antigen. PMID:12393850

  7. Local T/B cooperation in inflamed tissues is supported by T follicular helper-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Vu Van, Dana; Beier, Katja C.; Pietzke, Lea-Jean; Al Baz, Maysun S.; Feist, Randi K.; Gurka, Stephanie; Hamelmann, Eckard; Kroczek, Richard A.; Hutloff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases and other inflammatory conditions are characterized by large lymphocytic tissue infiltrates in which T and B cells can be found in close contact. Here, using a murine airway inflammation model, we compare antigen-specific T and B cells in lung tissue versus lung-draining lymph node. In the lung we identify a B-cell population exhibiting a classical germinal centre phenotype without being organized into ectopic lymphoid tissue. By contrast, classical CXCR5+ Bcl-6+ T follicular helper cells are not present. Nevertheless, lung-infiltrating T cells exhibit follicular helper-like properties including the potential to provide help to naive B cells. The lung tissue is also a survival niche for memory T and B cells remaining in residual peribronchial infiltrates after resolution of inflammation. Collectively, this study shows the importance of T/B cooperation not only in lymph nodes but also in inflamed peripheral tissues for local antibody responses to infection and autoimmunity. PMID:26915335

  8. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  9. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1996-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  10. Solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, R.I.; Kaplow, R.

    1980-08-26

    An improved solar cell designed for optimum efficiency is comprised of a plurality of series connected unit solar cells formed from a common substrate of semiconductor material. Each unit solar cell has spaced elongate sidewalls, and a ''dead space'' area between adjoining sidewalls of adjacent units is made substantially smaller than an active, light receiving area, extending between the opposite sidewalls of each individual unit. In addition, the width of the active area is concisely limited to ensure that radiation incident on the active area is incident at a point which is spaced from the p-n junction of each unit by no more than a predetermined optimum distance. Reducing the ''dead space'' area while concisely limiting the width of the active area provides improved solar cell performance without requiring focusing lenses.

  11. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1996-07-16

    An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm{sup 3}; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6{times}10{sup 4}cm{sup 2}/g of Ni. 6 figs.

  12. [Cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Cipro, Simon; Groh, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Cell or tissue cultures (both terms are interchangeable) represent a complex process by which eukaryotic cells are maintained in vitro outside their natural environment. They have a broad usage covering not only scientific field but also diagnostic one since they represent the most important way of monoclonal antibodies production which are used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Cell cultures are also used as a "cultivation medium" in virology and for establishing proliferating cells in cytodiagnostics. They are well-established and easy-to-handle models in the area of research, e.g. as a precious source of nucleic acids or proteins. This paper briefly summarizes their importance and methods as well as the pitfalls of the cultivation and new trends in this field. PMID:24624984

  13. Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) produces high efficiency crystal ingots in an automated well-insulated furnace offering low equipment, labor and energy costs. The "grown" silicon crystals are used to make solar cells, or photovoltaic cells which convert sunlight directly into electricity. The HEM method is used by Crystal Systems, Inc. and was developed under a NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory contract. The square wafers which are the result of the process are sold to companies manufacturing solar panels.

  14. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a .beta." alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl.sub.4 or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose.

  15. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, B.L.

    1998-12-15

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

  16. Electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.E.

    1984-04-24

    A process and cell for electrolysis of alkali metal halides, especially sodium chloride, are described, wherein the anolyte and catholyte compartments are separated by a fluorinated ion-exchange membrane whose surface facing the catholyte compartment is of a polymer having carboxylic functionality and which has a roughness which does not exceed 1.5 microns. Such a cell and process operate at high current efficiency, low voltage and low power consumption.

  17. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

  18. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.

  19. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  20. Immunological Signatures after Bordetella pertussis Infection Demonstrate Importance of Pulmonary Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brummelman, Jolanda; van der Maas, Larissa; Tilstra, Wichard; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Han, Wanda G. H.; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.; van Riet, Elly; Kersten, Gideon F. A.; Metz, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Effective immunity against Bordetella pertussis is currently under discussion following the stacking evidence of pertussis resurgence in the vaccinated population. Natural immunity is more effective than vaccine-induced immunity indicating that knowledge on infection-induced responses may contribute to improve vaccination strategies. We applied a systems biology approach comprising microarray, flow cytometry and multiplex immunoassays to unravel the molecular and cellular signatures in unprotected mice and protected mice with infection-induced immunity, around a B. pertussis challenge. Pre-existing systemic memory Th1/Th17 cells, memory B-cells, and mucosal IgA specific for Ptx, Vag8, Fim2/3 were detected in the protected mice 56 days after an experimental infection. In addition, pre-existing high activity and reactivation of pulmonary innate cells such as alveolar macrophages, M-cells and goblet cells was detected. The pro-inflammatory responses in the lungs and serum, and neutrophil recruitment in the spleen upon an infectious challenge of unprotected mice were absent in protected mice. Instead, fast pulmonary immune responses in protected mice led to efficient bacterial clearance and harbored potential new gene markers that contribute to immunity against B. pertussis. These responses comprised of innate makers, such as Clca3, Retlna, Glycam1, Gp2, and Umod, next to adaptive markers, such as CCR6+ B-cells, CCR6+ Th17 cells and CXCR6+ T-cells as demonstrated by transcriptome analysis. In conclusion, besides effective Th1/Th17 and mucosal IgA responses, the primary infection-induced immunity benefits from activation of pulmonary resident innate immune cells, achieved by local pathogen-recognition. These molecular signatures of primary infection-induced immunity provided potential markers to improve vaccine-induced immunity against B. pertussis. PMID:27711188

  1. Electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.; You, Hoydoo; Melendres, C.A.

    1991-04-23

    This invention is comprised of an electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 900 in either direction while maintaining the working-and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte.

  2. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Myles, Kevin M.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1996-01-01

    An electrochemical cell with a positive electrode having an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride. A negative electrode of an alkali metal and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at cell operating temperature is included in the cell. The electrolyte is present at least partially as a corrugated .beta." alumina tube surrounding the negative electrode interior to the positive electrode. The ratio of the volume of liquid electrolyte to the volume of the positive electrode is in the range of from about 0.1 to about 3. A plurality of stacked electrochemical cells is disclosed each having a positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal molten at cell operating temperature, and a compatible electrolyte. The electrolyte is at least partially present as a corrugated .beta." alumina sheet separating the negative electrode and interior to the positive electrodes. The alkali metal is retained in a porous electrically conductive ceramic, and seals for sealing the junctures of the electrolyte and the adjacent electrodes at the peripheries thereof.

  3. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.; You, H.; Melendres, C.A.

    1992-08-25

    An electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 90[degree] in either direction while maintaining the working and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte. 5 figs.

  4. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Zoltan; Yonco, Robert M.; You, Hoydoo; Melendres, Carlos A.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 90.degree. in either direction while maintaining the working and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte.

  5. Air cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Okiyoshi; Wakasa, Masayuki; Tamanoi, Yoshihito

    1991-04-01

    The present invention relates to an air cell. This air cell provides a compact light-weight power source for model aircraft permitting them to fly for an extended period so that they may be used for such practical purposes as crop dusting, surveying, and photographing. The cell is comprised of a current collector so disposed between a magnesium, zinc, or aluminum alloy cathode and a petroleum graphite anode that it is in contact with the anode. The anode is formed by adding polytetrafluoroethylene dispersion liquid in a mixture of active carbon and graphite powder, pouring the mixture into a mold and heating it to form the anode. It is fabricated by a plurality of anode sections and is formed with at least one hole so that it can provide a cell which is compact in size and light in weight yet is capable of generating a high output. The anode, the cathode, and a separator are wetted by an electrolytic liquid. The electrolyte is continuously supplied through the life of the cell.

  6. Cell sealant

    SciTech Connect

    Markin, C.; Book, R.J.; James, D.A.

    1988-04-26

    An electrochemical cell is described comprising an anode, a cathode and an electrolyte disposed within an open ended cylindrical metallic cell container, with an insulative cell top member being positioned within the open end of a sealant at the interface between the cell top member and the metallic cell container. The sealant is a mixture of a Type 2 BUR asphalt and an elastomeric material selected from the group consisting of (cis-1,4-polyisoprene), styrene-butadiene copolymer (SBR), cis-1,4-polybutadiene and styrene butadiene styrene (SBS), styrene isoprene styrene (SIS), neoprene (poly-chloprene), acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer (NBR), ethylene-propylene elastomers (EPR), butyl rubber (copolymers of isobutylene), urethane, nitrile (polymers of butadiene and acrylonitrile), polysulfide, polyacrylate, silicone, chlorosulfonated polyethylene, and EPDM (terpolymers of ethylene, propylene and diene monomers), and mixtures thereof, and wherein the elastomeric material is substantially inert to the electrolyte and is present in an amount between 0.5% to 10% by weight of the asphalt.

  7. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.I.; Myles, K.M.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1996-07-02

    An electrochemical cell is described with a positive electrode having an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride. A negative electrode of an alkali metal and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at cell operating temperature is included in the cell. The electrolyte is present at least partially as a corrugated {beta}{double_prime} alumina tube surrounding the negative electrode interior to the positive electrode. The ratio of the volume of liquid electrolyte to the volume of the positive electrode is in the range of from about 0.1 to about 3. A plurality of stacked electrochemical cells is disclosed each having a positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal molten at cell operating temperature, and a compatible electrolyte. The electrolyte is at least partially present as a corrugated {beta}{double_prime} alumina sheet separating the negative electrode and interior to the positive electrodes. The alkali metal is retained in a porous electrically conductive ceramic, and seals for sealing the junctures of the electrolyte and the adjacent electrodes at the peripheries thereof. 8 figs.

  8. Solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treble, F. C.

    1980-11-01

    The history, state of the art, and future prospects of solar cells are reviewed. Solar cells are already competitive in a wide range of low-power applications, and during the 1980's they are expected to become cheaper to run than diesel or gasoline generators, the present mainstay of isolated communities. At this stage they will become attractive for water pumping, irrigation, and rural electrification, particularly in developing countries. With further cost reduction, they may be used to augment grid supplies in domestic, commercial, institutional, and industrial premises. Cost reduction to the stage where photovoltaics becomes economic for large-scale power generation in central stations depends on a technological breakthrough in the development of thin-film cells. DOE aims to reach this goal by 1990, so that by the end of the century about 20% of the estimated annual additions to their electrical generating capacity will be photovoltaic.

  9. Cell Phones

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cell phones are a relatively novel and evolving technology. While the potential benefits of this technology continue to emerge, so do the potential psychosocial risks. For example, one psychosocial risk is user stress, which appears to be related to feeling compelled to promptly respond to cell-phone activity in order to maintain spontaneity and access with others. Other potential psychosocial risks include disruptions in sleep; the user’s risk of exposure to cyberbullying, particularly the unwanted exposure of photographs and/or videos of the victim; and overuse, particularly among adolescents. With regard to the latter phenomenon, the boundaries among overuse, misuse, dependence, and addiction are not scientifically clear. Therefore, while cell phones are a convenient and expedient technology, they are not without their potential psychosocial hazards. PMID:23439568

  10. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1994-08-23

    An electrochemical cell is described having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a [beta] alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl[sub 4] or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose. 6 figs.

  11. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    An improved secondary electrochemical cell is disclosed having a negative electrode of lithium aluminum, a positive electrode of iron sulfide, a molten electrolyte of lithium chloride and potassium chloride, and the combination that the fully charged theoretical capacity of the negative electrode is in the range of 0.5-1.0 that of the positive electrode. The cell thus is negative electrode limiting during discharge cycling. Preferably, the negative electrode contains therein, in the approximate range of 1-10 volume % of the electrode, an additive from the materials of graphitized carbon, aluminum-iron alloy, and/or magnesium oxide.

  12. Cell Libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA contract led to the development of faster and more energy efficient semiconductor materials for digital integrated circuits. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) conducts electrons 4-6 times faster than silicon and uses less power at frequencies above 100-150 megahertz. However, the material is expensive, brittle, fragile and has lacked computer automated engineering tools to solve this problem. Systems & Processes Engineering Corporation (SPEC) developed a series of GaAs cell libraries for cell layout, design rule checking, logic synthesis, placement and routing, simulation and chip assembly. The system is marketed by Compare Design Automation.

  13. Stem Cell Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... stem cells? What are the potential uses of human stem cells and the obstacles that must be overcome before ... two kinds of stem cells from animals and humans: embryonic stem cells and non-embryonic "somatic" or "adult" stem cells . ...

  14. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... based therapies Cell culture Cell division Chromosome Clone Cloning Cord blood stem cells Culture medium Differentiation Directed ... Pluripotent Polar body Preimplantation Proliferation Regenerative medicine Reproductive cloning Signals Somatic cell Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) ...

  15. Learn About Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... ISSCR Get Involved Media © 2015 International Society for Stem Cell Research Terms of Use Disclaimer Privacy Policy

  16. Potent Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    It seems hard to believe that Dolly the cloned sheep was born 10 years ago, kindling furious arguments over the prospects and ethics of cloning a human. Today, the controversy over cloning is entwined, often confused, with concerns over the use of human embryonic stem cells. Most people are unclear what cloning is, and they know even less when it…

  17. Photovoltaic cell

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kurtz, Sarah

    1984-11-27

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  18. Photoelectrodialytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, G.W.

    1983-09-13

    A multicompartment photoelectrodialytic demineralization cell is provided with a buffer compartment interposed between the product compartment and a compartment containing an electrolyte solution. Semipermeable membranes separate the buffer compartment from the product and electrolyte compartments. The buffer compartment is flushed to prevent leakage of the electrolyte compartment from entering the product compartment. 3 figs.

  19. Photoelectrodialytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, George W.

    1983-01-01

    A multicompartment photoelectrodialytic demineralization cell is provided with a buffer compartment interposed between the product compartment and a compartment containing an electrolyte solution. Semipermeable membranes separate the buffer compartment from the product and electrolyte compartments. The buffer compartment is flushed to prevent leakage of the electrolyte compartment from entering the product compartment.

  20. 19. Oblique, typical cell (south cells) from rear of cell; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Oblique, typical cell (south cells) from rear of cell; view to north, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

  1. Evaluation of CD25-positive cells in relation to the subtypes and prognoses in various lymphoid tumours in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Noriyuki; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Tsuboi, Masaya; Kagawa, Yumiko; Ohno, Koichi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2016-05-01

    Interleukin-2 receptor alpha chain (CD25) expression has been reported in human lymphoid tumours and suggested to correlate with the prognosis. In this study, we detected CD25-positive cells in various types of lymphoid tumours in dogs. Immunohistochemical analyses of the tissues from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (n = 6), T-zone lymphoma (TZL) (n = 5), and follicular lymphoma (FL) (n = 2) revealed that cells strongly positive for CD25 were observed generally in accordance with lymphoma cell localization. CD25-positive cells were consistently detected in TZL and FL cases; however, the number of CD25-positive cells was variable among DLBCL cases. Furthermore, we evaluated the rate of CD25-positive cells by flow cytometric analysis in 29 dogs with lymphoid malignancies, including high-grade B-cell lymphoma (n = 17), TZL (n = 5), FL (n = 2), cutaneous lymphoma (n=2), and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) (n = 3). CD25-positivity in the lymph node cells was significantly higher in dogs with high-grade B-cell lymphoma (mean ± SD, 49.6 ± 31.3%) or TZL (mean ± SD, 80.2 ± 10.0%) than that in healthy dogs (mean ± SD, 9.8 ± 2.8%). In prognostic analysis of 15 cases with high-grade B-cell lymphoma, the progression-free survival was significantly shorter in CD25-high group than that in CD25-low group. The results obtained in this study are useful for subtype differentiation and prognostic analysis of canine lymphomas and future development of molecular-targeted therapy directed at CD25.

  2. Probing charge transfer and hot carrier dynamics in organic solar cells with terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Paul D.; Lane, Paul A.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Esenturk, Okan; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS) was used to explore charge generation, transfer, and the role of hot carriers in organic solar cell materials. Two model molecular photovoltaic systems were investigated: with zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) or alpha-sexathiophene (α-6T) as the electron donors and buckminsterfullerene (C60) as the electron acceptor. TRTS provides charge carrier conductivity dynamics comprised of changes in both population and mobility. By using time-resolved optical spectroscopy in conjunction with TRTS, these two contributions can be disentangled. The sub-picosecond photo-induced conductivity decay dynamics of C60 were revealed to be caused by auto-ionization: the intrinsic process by which charge is generated in molecular solids. In donor-acceptor blends, the long-lived photo-induced conductivity is used for weight fraction optimization of the constituents. In nanoscale multilayer films, the photo-induced conductivity identifies optimal layer thicknesses. In films of ZnPc/C60, electron transfer from ZnPc yields hot charges that localize and become less mobile as they thermalize. Excitation of high-lying Franck Condon states in C60 followed by hole-transfer to ZnPc similarly produces hot charge carriers that self-localize; charge transfer clearly precedes carrier cooling. This picture is contrasted to charge transfer in α-6T/C60, where hole transfer takes place from a thermalized state and produces equilibrium carriers that do not show characteristic signs of cooling and self-localization. These results illustrate the value of terahertz spectroscopic methods for probing charge transfer reactions.

  3. Stem Cells, Retinal Ganglion Cells, and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Sluch, Valentin M.; Zack, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells represent an essential neuronal cell type for vision. These cells receive inputs from light-sensing photoreceptors via retinal interneurons and then relay these signals to the brain for further processing. Retinal ganglion cell diseases that result in cell death, e.g. glaucoma, often lead to permanent damage since mammalian nerves do not regenerate. Stem cell differentiation can generate cells needed for replacement or can be used to generate cells capable of secreting protective factors to promote survival. In addition, stem cell-derived cells can be used in drug screening research. Here, we discuss the current state of stem cell research potential for interference in glaucoma and other optic nerve diseases with a focus on stem cell differentiation to retinal ganglion cells. PMID:24732765

  4. Cell division intersects with cell geometry.

    PubMed

    Moseley, James B; Nurse, Paul

    2010-07-23

    Single-celled organisms monitor cell geometry and use this information to control cell division. Such geometry-sensing mechanisms control both the decision to enter into cell division and the physical orientation of the chromosome segregation machinery, suggesting that signals controlling cell division may be linked to the mechanisms that ensure proper chromosome segregation.

  5. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  6. Red blood cells, sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    These crescent or sickle-shaped red blood cells (RBCs) are present with Sickle cell anemia, and stand out clearly against the normal round RBCs. These abnormally shaped cells may become entangled and ...

  7. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  8. Novel Genes Involved in Controlling Specification of Drosophila FMRFamide Neuropeptide Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bivik, Caroline; Bahrampour, Shahrzad; Ulvklo, Carina; Nilsson, Patrik; Angel, Anna; Fransson, Fredrik; Lundin, Erika; Renhorn, Jakob; Thor, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The expression of neuropeptides is often extremely restricted in the nervous system, making them powerful markers for addressing cell specification . In the developing Drosophila ventral nerve cord, only six cells, the Ap4 neurons, of some 10,000 neurons, express the neuropeptide FMRFamide (FMRFa). Each Ap4/FMRFa neuron is the last-born cell generated by an identifiable and well-studied progenitor cell, neuroblast 5-6 (NB5-6T). The restricted expression of FMRFa and the wealth of information regarding its gene regulation and Ap4 neuron specification makes FMRFa a valuable readout for addressing many aspects of neural development, i.e., spatial and temporal patterning cues, cell cycle control, cell specification, axon transport, and retrograde signaling. To this end, we have conducted a forward genetic screen utilizing an Ap4-specific FMRFa-eGFP transgenic reporter as our readout. A total of 9781 EMS-mutated chromosomes were screened for perturbations in FMRFa-eGFP expression, and 611 mutants were identified. Seventy-nine of the strongest mutants were mapped down to the affected gene by deficiency mapping or whole-genome sequencing. We isolated novel alleles for previously known FMRFa regulators, confirming the validity of the screen. In addition, we identified novel essential genes, including several with previously undefined functions in neural development. Our identification of genes affecting most major steps required for successful terminal differentiation of Ap4 neurons provides a comprehensive view of the genetic flow controlling the generation of highly unique neuronal cell types in the developing nervous system. PMID:26092715

  9. Sickle Cell Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... change Sickle Cell News from Around the Web Google Custom Search – sickle cell Cure for sickle cell ... from healthy, ... NYT, Nature, Wash Post, SciAm, CNN - Google Custom Search Genetic Treatments for Sickle Cell - Scientific ...

  10. Murine Mueller cells are progenitor cells for neuronal cells and fibrous tissue cells

    SciTech Connect

    Florian, Christian; Langmann, Thomas; Weber, Bernhard H.F.; Morsczeck, Christian

    2008-09-19

    Mammalian Mueller cells have been reported to possess retinal progenitor cell properties and generate new neurons after injury. This study investigates murine Mueller cells under in vitro conditions for their capability of dedifferentiation into retinal progenitor cells. Mueller cells were isolated from mouse retina, and proliferating cells were expanded in serum-containing medium. For dedifferentiation, the cultured cells were transferred to serum-replacement medium (SRM) at different points in time after their isolation. Interestingly, early cell passages produced fibrous tissue in which extracellular matrix proteins and connective tissue markers were differentially expressed. In contrast, aged Mueller cell cultures formed neurospheres in SRM that are characteristic for neuronal progenitor cells. These neurospheres differentiated into neuron-like cells after cultivation on laminin/ornithine cell culture substrate. Here, we report for the first time that murine Mueller cells can be progenitors for both, fibrous tissue cells and neuronal cells, depending on the age of the cell culture.

  11. T-cell count

    MedlinePlus

    Thymus derived lymphocyte count; T-lymphocyte count; T cell count ... T cells are a type of lymphocyte. Lymphocytes are white blood cells. They make up part of the immune system. T cells help the body fight diseases or harmful ...

  12. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  13. Sickle cell anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  14. CORONAL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P. E-mail: harry.warren@nrl.navy.mil

    2012-04-10

    We have recently noticed cellular features in Fe XII 193 A images of the 1.2 MK corona. They occur in regions bounded by a coronal hole and a filament channel, and are centered on flux elements of the photospheric magnetic network. Like their neighboring coronal holes, these regions have minority-polarity flux that is {approx}0.1-0.3 times their flux of majority polarity. Consequently, the minority-polarity flux is 'grabbed' by the majority-polarity flux to form low-lying loops, and the remainder of the network flux escapes to connect with its opposite-polarity counterpart in distant active regions of the Sun. As these regions are carried toward the limb by solar rotation, the cells disappear and are replaced by linear plumes projecting toward the limb. In simultaneous views from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, these plumes project in opposite directions, extending away from the coronal hole in one view and toward the hole in the other view, suggesting that they are sky-plane projections of the same radial structures. We conclude that these regions are composed of closely spaced radial plumes, extending upward like candles on a birthday cake and visible as cells when seen from above. We suppose that a coronal hole has this same discrete, cellular magnetic structure, but that it is not seen until the encroachment of opposite-polarity flux closes part or all of the hole.

  15. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  16. DNA-cell conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  17. Indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    The direction for InP solar cell research; reduction of cell cost; increase of cell efficiency; measurements needed to better understand cell performance; n/p versus p/n; radiation effects; major problems in cell contacting; and whether the present level of InP solar cell research in the USA should be maintained, decreased, or increased were considered.

  18. Photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.F.; Lampkin, C.M.

    1981-12-08

    A photovoltaic cell has: an electrically conductive substrate, which may be glass having a film of conductive tin oxide; a first layer containing a suitable semiconductor, which layer has a first component film with an amorphous structure and a second component film with a polycrystalline structure; a second layer forming a heterojunction with the first layer; and suitable electrodes where the heterojunction is formed from a solution containing copper, the amorphous film component is superposed above an electrically conductive substrate to resist permeation of the copper-containing material to shorting electrical contact with the substrate. The penetration resistant amporphous layer permits a variety of processes to be used in forming the heterojunction with even very thin layers (1-6 mu thick) of underlying polycrystalline semi-conductor materials. In some embodiments, the amorphous-like structure may be formed by the addition of aluminum or zirconium compounds to a solution of cadmium salts sprayed over a heated substrate.

  19. Photoelectrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Rauh, R. David; Boudreau, Robert A.

    1983-06-14

    A photoelectrochemical cell comprising a sealed container having a light-transmitting window for admitting light into the container across a light-admitting plane, an electrolyte in the container, a photoelectrode in the container having a light-absorbing surface arranged to receive light from the window and in contact with the electrolyte, the surface having a plurality of spaced portions oblique to the plane, each portion having dimensions at least an order of magnitude larger than the maximum wavelength of incident sunlight, the total surface area of the surface being larger than the area of the plane bounded by the container, and a counter electrode in the container in contact with the electrolyte.

  20. Fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Struthers, R.C.

    1983-06-28

    An improved fuel cell comprising an anode section including an anode terminal, an anode fuel, and an anolyte electrolyte, a cathode section including a cathode terminal, an electron distributor and a catholyte electrolyte, an ion exchange section between the anode and cathode sections and including an ionolyte electrolyte, ion transfer membranes separating the ionolyte from the anolyte and the catholyte and an electric circuit connected with and between the terminals conducting free electrons from the anode section and delivering free electrons to the cathode section, said ionolyte receives ions of one polarity moving from the anolyte through the membrane related thereto preventing chemical equilibrium in the anode section and sustaining chemical reaction and the generating of free electrons therein, said ions received by the ionolyte from the anolyte release different ions from the ionolyte which move through the membrane between the ionolyte and catholyte and which add to the catholyte.

  1. Beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1: Orphan nuclear receptor NR2F6 as T cell signaling switch and emerging target in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Klepsch, Victoria; Hermann-Kleiter, Natascha; Baier, Gottfried

    2016-10-01

    Blockade of immune checkpoints has emerged as key strategy in the development of effective cancer therapies. In contrast to cell surface checkpoints like CTLA-4 and PD-1, however, additional cancer therapeutic targets are located inside the effector immune cells. Targeting these alternative checkpoints in cancer immunotherapy with the goal to strengthen the patient's immune system are likely to extend the benefits of cancer immunotherapy in the near future. Along this line, we have defined and validated the orphan nuclear receptor NR2F6 (nuclear receptor subfamily 2 group F member 6, also called Ear-2) as an intracellular immune checkpoint in effector T cells. NR2F6 acts as a novel master switch of antitumor responses against both transplantable and spontaneous tumors in mice relevant for human cancer. NR2F6 directly represses transcription of key cytokine genes in T effector cells relevant for tumor cell rejection, such as IL-2, IFN and TNFα. Thus, in the presence of NR2F6, T cell activation is limited within the tumor microenvironment. This defines NR2F6 as a key checkpoint governing the amplitude of cancer immune surveillance. Based on our study, an approach shall be initiated to identify low molecular weight compounds that selectively interfere with NR2F6 function in the clinic.

  2. Experimental cell for molecular beam deposition and magnetic resonance studies of matrix isolated radicals at temperatures below 1 K

    SciTech Connect

    Sheludiakov, S. Ahokas, J.; Vainio, O.; Järvinen, J.; Zvezdov, D.; Vasiliev, S.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Mao, S.; Lee, D. M.

    2014-05-15

    We present the design and performance of an experimental cell constructed for matrix isolation studies of H and D atoms in solid H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} films, which are created by molecular beam deposition at temperatures below 1 K. The sample cell allows sensitive weighing of the films by a quartz microbalance (QM) and their studies by magnetic resonance techniques in a strong magnetic field of 4.6 T. We are able to regulate the deposition rate in the range from 0.01 to 10 molecular layers/s, and measure the thickness with ≈0.2 monolayer resolution. The upper QM electrode serves as a mirror for a 128 GHz Fabry-Perot resonator connected to an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer. H and D atoms were created by RF discharge in situ in the sample cell, and characterized by ESR and electron-nuclear double resonance. From the magnetic resonance measurements we conclude that the films are smooth and provide homogeneous trapping conditions for embedded atoms. The current sample cell design also makes it possible to calibrate the ESR signal and estimate the average and local concentrations of H and D radicals in the film.

  3. Integrated circuit cell library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R. (Inventor); Miles, Lowell H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    According to the invention, an ASIC cell library for use in creation of custom integrated circuits is disclosed. The ASIC cell library includes some first cells and some second cells. Each of the second cells includes two or more kernel cells. The ASIC cell library is at least 5% comprised of second cells. In various embodiments, the ASIC cell library could be 10% or more, 20% or more, 30% or more, 40% or more, 50% or more, 60% or more, 70% or more, 80% or more, 90% or more, or 95% or more comprised of second cells.

  4. Requirement for natural killer cell-produced interferon gamma in defense against murine cytomegalovirus infection and enhancement of this defense pathway by interleukin 12 administration

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The presence of natural killer (NK) cells contributes to early defense against murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Although NK cells can mediate in vivo protection against MCMV, the mechanism by which they do so has not been defined. The studies presented here evaluate cytokine production by NK cells activated during MCMV infection and the role of NK cell-produced cytokines in early in vivo antiviral defenses. Experiments with normal C57BL/6, T cell-deficient C57BL/6 nude, and severe combined immunodeficient mice lacking T and B cells demonstrated that both interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production were induced at early times after infection with MCMV. Conditioned media samples prepared with cells from these mice, on day 2 after infection, produced 11-43 pg/million cells of IFN-gamma and 12-19 pg/million cells of TNF as evaluated by specific protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Studies in the NK- and T cell-deficient mouse line, E26, in mice that had been depleted in vivo of NK cells by treatment with antibodies eliminating NK cells, anti-asialo ganglio-N- tetraosylceramide or anti-NK1.1, and with populations of cells that had been depleted of NK cells by complement treatment with the anti-NK cell antibody, SW3A4, demonstrated that NK cells were solely responsible for the IFN-gamma but were not required for TNF production. The in vivo absence of NK cells was accompanied by increased viral hepatitis and viral replication in both immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice, as well as decreased survival time of immunodeficient mice. In vivo treatments with antibodies neutralizing IFN-gamma demonstrated that this factor contributed to the NK cell-mediated antiviral defense and reduced the measured parameters of viral defense to levels indistinguishable from those observed in NK cell-deficient mice. These effects appeared to be independent of cytolytic activity, as NK cells isolated from anti-IFN-gamma-treated mice mediated

  5. Monitoring cell growth.

    PubMed

    Strober, W

    2001-05-01

    This appendix provides two protocols for monitoring cell growth. Counting cells using a hemacytometer is tedious but it allows one to effectively distinguish live cells from dead cells (using Trypan Blue exclusion). In addition, this procedure is less subject to errors due to cell clumping or heterogeneity of cell size. The use of an electronic cell counter is quicker and easier than counting cells using a hemacytometer. However, an electronic cell counter as currently constructed does not distinguish live from dead cells in a reliable fashion and is subject to error due to the presence of cell clumps. Overall, the electronic cell counter is best reserved for repetitive and rapid counting of fresh peripheral blood cells and should be used with caution when counting cell populations derived from tissues. PMID:18432653

  6. Automated Cell-Cutting for Cell Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Akihiko; Tanikawa, Tamio; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Takahashi, Seiya; Ohba, Kohtaro

    We develop an automated cell-cutting technique for cell cloning. Animal cells softened by the cytochalasin treatment are injected into a microfluidic chip. The microfluidic chip contains two orthogonal channels: one microchannel is wide, used to transport cells, and generates the cutting flow; the other is thin and used for aspiration, fixing, and stretching of the cell. The injected cell is aspirated and stretched in the thin microchannel. Simultaneously, the volumes of the cell before and after aspiration are calculated; the volumes are used to calculate the fluid flow required to aspirate half the volume of the cell into the thin microchannel. Finally, we apply a high-speed flow in the orthogonal microchannel to bisect the cell. This paper reports the cutting process, the cutting system, and the results of the experiment.

  7. Photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J. F.; Lampkin, C. M.

    1981-02-03

    A photovoltaic cell is disclosed having an electrically conductive substrate, which may be glass having a film of conductive tin oxide. A first layer contains a suitable semiconductor, which layer has a first component film with an amorphous structure and a second component film with a polycrystalline structure a second layer forms a heterojunction with the first layer suitable electrodes are provided where the heterojunction is formed from a solution containing copper, and the amorphous film component is superposed above an electrically conductive substrate to resist permeation of the copper-containing material to shorting electrical contact with the substrate. The penetration resistant amorphous layer permits a variety of processes to be used in forming the heterojunction with even very thin layers (1-6 mu thick) of underlying polycrystalline semi-conductor materials. In some embodiments, the amorphous-like structure may be formed by the addition of aluminum or zirconium compounds to a solution of cadmium salts sprayed over a heated substrate.

  8. Eukaryotic Cells and their Cell Bodies: Cell Theory Revised

    PubMed Central

    BALUŠKA, FRANTIŠEK; VOLKMANN, DIETER; BARLOW, PETER W.

    2004-01-01

    • Background Cell Theory, also known as cell doctrine, states that all eukaryotic organisms are composed of cells, and that cells are the smallest independent units of life. This Cell Theory has been influential in shaping the biological sciences ever since, in 1838/1839, the botanist Matthias Schleiden and the zoologist Theodore Schwann stated the principle that cells represent the elements from which all plant and animal tissues are constructed. Some 20 years later, in a famous aphorism Omnis cellula e cellula, Rudolf Virchow annunciated that all cells arise only from pre‐existing cells. General acceptance of Cell Theory was finally possible only when the cellular nature of brain tissues was confirmed at the end of the 20th century. Cell Theory then rapidly turned into a more dogmatic cell doctrine, and in this form survives up to the present day. In its current version, however, the generalized Cell Theory developed for both animals and plants is unable to accommodate the supracellular nature of higher plants, which is founded upon a super‐symplasm of interconnected cells into which is woven apoplasm, symplasm and super‐apoplasm. Furthermore, there are numerous examples of multinucleate coenocytes and syncytia found throughout the eukaryote superkingdom posing serious problems for the current version of Cell Theory. • Scope To cope with these problems, we here review data which conform to the original proposal of Daniel Mazia that the eukaryotic cell is composed of an elemental Cell Body whose structure is smaller than the cell and which is endowed with all the basic attributes of a living entity. A complement to the Cell Body is the Cell Periphery Apparatus, which consists of the plasma membrane associated with other periphery structures. Importantly, boundary stuctures of the Cell Periphery Apparatus, although capable of some self‐assembly, are largely produced and maintained by Cell Body activities and can be produced from it de novo. These

  9. Fuel cell arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1987-05-12

    A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber. 3 figs.

  10. Fuel cell arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1987-05-12

    A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber.

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma —

    Cancer.gov

    The hallmarks of squamous cell carcinoma are the differentiation features of the squamous epithelium: keratinization and intercellular bridges. Large central masses of keratin, individual cell keratinization, and/or keratin pearls may form. Necrosis of tumor cell nests and accumulation of acute inflammatory cells are frequent features of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

  13. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shengjuan; Bergen, Werner G.; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V.

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  14. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  15. Virus Cell-to-Cell Transmission▿

    PubMed Central

    Mothes, Walther; Sherer, Nathan M.; Jin, Jing; Zhong, Peng

    2010-01-01

    Viral infections spread based on the ability of viruses to overcome multiple barriers and move from cell to cell, tissue to tissue, and person to person and even across species. While there are fundamental differences between these types of transmissions, it has emerged that the ability of viruses to utilize and manipulate cell-cell contact contributes to the success of viral infections. Central to the excitement in the field of virus cell-to-cell transmission is the idea that cell-to-cell spread is more than the sum of the processes of virus release and entry. This implies that virus release and entry are efficiently coordinated to sites of cell-cell contact, resulting in a process that is distinct from its individual components. In this review, we will present support for this model, illustrate the ability of viruses to utilize and manipulate cell adhesion molecules, and discuss the mechanism and driving forces of directional spreading. An understanding of viral cell-to-cell spreading will enhance our ability to intervene in the efficient spreading of viral infections. PMID:20375157

  16. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    DOEpatents

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  17. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valérie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of α-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  18. Cell Membrane Softening in Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Händel, Chris; Käs, Josef

    Biomechanical properties are useful characteristics and regulators of the cell's state. Current research connects mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton to many cellular processes but does not investigate the biomechanics of the plasma membrane. We evaluated thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles, directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells and observed a lowered rigidity in the plasma membrane of malignant cells compared to non-malignant cells. To investigate the specific role of membrane rigidity changes, we treated two cell lines with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A. It changed the lipidome of cells and drastically increased membrane stiffness by up regulating short chained membrane lipids. These altered cells had a decreased motility in Boyden chamber assays. Our results indicate that the thermal fluctuations of the membrane, which are much smaller than the fluctuations driven by the cytoskeleton, can be modulated by the cell and have an impact on adhesion and motility.

  19. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). The abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as ...

  20. Sickle Cell Disease Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... False: People with sickle cell disease cannot get malaria. A True B False 4. True or False: ... False: People with sickle cell disease cannot get malaria. False People with sickle cell disease can get ...

  1. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1980-01-01

    The following aspects of kidney cell electrophoresis are discussed: (1) the development and testing of electrophoresis solutions; (2) optimization of freezing and thawing; (3) procedures for evaluation of separated kidney cells; and (4) electrophoretic mobility characterization of kidney cells.

  2. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1979-01-01

    A kidney cell electrophoresis technique is described in four parts: (1) the development and testing of electrophoresis solutions; (2) optimization of freezing and thawing; (3) procedures for evaluation of separated kidney cells; and (4) electrophoretic mobility characteristics of kidney cells.

  3. Fuel cells: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of fuel cell technology and applications is presented. The operating principles, performance capabilities, and limitations of fuel cells are discussed. Diagrams of fuel cell construction and operating characteristics are provided. Photographs of typical installations are included.

  4. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  5. Closed Large Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Closed Large Cell Clouds in the South Pacific     ... unperturbed by cyclonic or frontal activity. When the cell centers are cloudy and the main sinking motion is concentrated at cell ...

  6. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  7. Reprogramming of somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Rajasingh, Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Reprogramming of adult somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells may provide an attractive source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. It has emerged as an invaluable method for generating patient-specific stem cells of any cell lineage without the use of embryonic stem cells. A revolutionary study in 2006 showed that it is possible to convert adult somatic cells directly into pluripotent stem cells by using a limited number of pluripotent transcription factors and is called as iPS cells. Currently, both genomic integrating viral and nonintegrating nonviral methods are used to generate iPS cells. However, the viral-based technology poses increased risk of safety, and more studies are now focused on nonviral-based technology to obtain autologous stem cells for clinical therapy. In this review, the pros and cons of the present iPS cell technology and the future direction for the successful translation of this technology into the clinic are discussed.

  8. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  9. Cell rheology: Stressed-out stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holle, Andrew W.; Engler, Adam J.

    2010-01-01

    Experiments have shown that the physical characteristics of the matrix surrounding a stem cell can affect its behaviour. This picture gets further complicated by studies of stem cells and their differentiated counterparts that show that the cells' own softness also has a clear role in how they respond to stress.

  10. Glial cells: Old cells with new twists

    PubMed Central

    Ndubaku, Ugo; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2008-01-01

    Summary Based on their characteristics and function – migration, neural protection, proliferation, axonal guidance and trophic effects – glial cells may be regarded as probably the most versatile cells in our body. For many years, these cells were considered as simply support cells for neurons. Recently, it has been shown that they are more versatile than previously believed – as true stem cells in the nervous system – and are important players in neural function and development. There are several glial cell types in the nervous system: the two most abundant are oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. Although both of these cells are responsible for myelination, their developmental origins are quite different. Oligodendrocytes originate from small niche populations from different regions of the central nervous system, while Schwann cells develop from a stem cell population (the neural crest) that gives rise to many cell derivatives besides glia and which is a highly migratory group of cells. PMID:18068219

  11. CellFinder: a cell data repository

    PubMed Central

    Stachelscheid, Harald; Seltmann, Stefanie; Lekschas, Fritz; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Mah, Nancy; Neves, Mariana; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Leser, Ulf; Kurtz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    CellFinder (http://www.cellfinder.org) is a comprehensive one-stop resource for molecular data characterizing mammalian cells in different tissues and in different development stages. It is built from carefully selected data sets stemming from other curated databases and the biomedical literature. To date, CellFinder describes 3394 cell types and 50 951 cell lines. The database currently contains 3055 microscopic and anatomical images, 205 whole-genome expression profiles of 194 cell/tissue types from RNA-seq and microarrays and 553 905 protein expressions for 535 cells/tissues. Text mining of a corpus of >2000 publications followed by manual curation confirmed expression information on ∼900 proteins and genes. CellFinder’s data model is capable to seamlessly represent entities from single cells to the organ level, to incorporate mappings between homologous entities in different species and to describe processes of cell development and differentiation. Its ontological backbone currently consists of 204 741 ontology terms incorporated from 10 different ontologies unified under the novel CELDA ontology. CellFinder’s web portal allows searching, browsing and comparing the stored data, interactive construction of developmental trees and navigating the partonomic hierarchy of cells and tissues through a unique body browser designed for life scientists and clinicians. PMID:24304896

  12. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Misako; Indo, Hiroko P.; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Iwashita, Yoichiro; Fukushige, Tomoko; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Kanekura, Takuro; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Ozawa, Masayuki

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ► MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ► TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of

  13. Cell aggregation and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Davis, R H

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation of cells into clumps or flocs has been exploited for decades in such applications as biological wastewater treatment, beer brewing, antibiotic fermentation, and enhanced sedimentation to aid in cell recovery or retention. More recent research has included the use of cell aggregation and sedimentation to selectively separate subpopulations of cells. Potential biotechnological applications include overcoming contamination, maintaining plasmid-bearing cells in continuous fermentors, and selectively removing nonviable hybridoma cells from perfusion cultures.

  14. IAPs and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Dubrez, Laurence; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) constitute a family of cell signaling regulators controlling several fundamental biological processes such as innate immunity, inflammation, cell death, cell proliferation, and cell differentiation. Increasing evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies indicate a function for IAPs in the modulation of invasive and migratory properties of cells. Here, we present and discuss the mechanisms whereby IAPs can control cell migration.

  15. Sertoli cells as biochambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Don F. (Inventor); Sanberg, Paul R. (Inventor); Saporta, Samuel (Inventor); Hushen, Joelle J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    According to the present invention, there is provided a biological chamber system having a biochamber defined by outer walls of Sertoli cells. Also provided is a transplantation facilitator including a biochamber. A method of making biochambers by co-culturing facilitator cells and therapeutic cells and then aggregating the facilitator celes is also provided. Also provided is a method of transplanting cells by incorporating transplant cells into a biochamber and transplanting the biochamber containing the transplant cells.

  16. Stem Cell Sciences plc.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Sebnem

    2006-09-01

    Stem Cell Sciences' core objective is to develop safe and effective stem cell-based therapies for currently incurable diseases. In order to achieve this goal, Stem Cell Sciences recognizes the need for multiple technologies and a globally integrated stem cell initiative. The key challenges for the successful application of stem cells in the clinic is the need for a reproducible supply of pure, fully characterized stem cells that have been grown in suitable conditions for use in the clinic.

  17. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2009-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  18. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2002-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  19. Gaucher cell, photomicrograph (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Gaucher's disease is called a "lipid storage disease" where abnormal amounts of lipids called "glycosphingolipids" are stored in special cells called reticuloendothelial cells. Classically, the nucleus is ...

  20. Thymoquinone attenuates liver fibrosis via PI3K and TLR4 signaling pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ting; Lian, Li-Hua; Wu, Yan-Ling; Wan, Ying; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2013-02-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is the major active compound derived from the medicinal Nigella sativa. In the present study, we investigated the anti-fibrotic mechanism of TQ in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated rat hepatic stellate cells line, T-HSC/Cl-6. T-HSC/Cl-6 cells were treated with TQ (3.125, 6.25 and 12.5μM) prior to LPS (1μg/ml). Our data demonstrated that TQ effectively decreased activated T-HSC/Cl-6 cell viability. TQ significantly attenuated the expression of CD14 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). TQ also significantly inhibited phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase-protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation. The expression of α-SMA and collagen-I were significantly decreased by TQ. Furthermore, TQ decreased X linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular FLIP (c-FLIPL) expression, which are related with the regulation of apoptosis. Furthermore, TQ significantly increased the survival against LPS challenge in d-galactosamine (d-GlaN)-sensitized mice, and decreased the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), which were in line with in vitro results. Our data demonstrated that TQ attenuates liver fibrosis partially via blocking TLR4 expression and PI3K phosphorylation on the activated HSCs. Therefore, TQ may be a potential candidate for the therapy of hepatic fibrosis.

  1. Pluripotent stem cells from germ cells.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Candace L; Shamblott, Michael J; Gearhart, John D

    2006-01-01

    To date, stem cells have been derived from three sources of germ cells. These include embryonic germ cells (EGCs), embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs), and multipotent germ line stem cells (GSCs). EGCs are derived from primordial germ cells that arise in the late embryonic and early fetal period of development. ECCs are derived from adult testicular tumors whereas GSCs have been derived by culturing spermatogonial stem cells from mouse neonates and adults. For each of these lines, their pluripotency has been demonstrated by their ability to differentiate into cell types derived from the three germ layers in vitro and in vivo and in chimeric animals, including germ line transmission. These germ line-derived stem cells have been generated from many species including human, mice, porcine, and chicken albeit with only slight modifications. This chapter describes general considerations regarding critical aspects of their derivation compared with their counterpart, embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Detailed protocols for EGC derivation and maintenance from human and mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs) will be presented.

  2. Stem cells supporting other stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Leatherman, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cell therapies are increasingly prevalent for the treatment of damaged or diseased tissues, but most of the improvements observed to date are attributed to the ability of stem cells to produce paracrine factors that have a trophic effect on existing tissue cells, improving their functional capacity. It is now clear that this ability to produce trophic factors is a normal and necessary function for some stem cell populations. In vivo adult stem cells are thought to self-renew due to local signals from the microenvironment where they live, the niche. Several niches have now been identified which harbor multiple stem cell populations. In three of these niches – the Drosophila testis, the bulge of the mammalian hair follicle, and the mammalian bone marrow – one type of stem cell has been found to produce factors that contribute to the maintenance of a second stem cell population in the shared niche. In this review, I will examine the architecture of these three niches and discuss the molecular signals involved. Together, these examples establish a new paradigm for stem cell behavior, that stem cells can promote the maintenance of other stem cells. PMID:24348512

  3. Artificial cells for cell and organ replacements.

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2004-03-01

    The artificial cell is a Canadian invention (Chang, Science, 1964). This principle is being actively investigated for use in cell and organ replacements. The earliest routine clinical use of artificial cells is in the form of coated activated charcoal for hemoperfusion for use in the removal of drugs, and toxins and waste in uremia and liver failure. Encapsulated cells are being studied for the treatment of diabetes, liver failure, and kidney failure, and the use of encapsulated genetically-engineered cells is being investigated for gene therapy. Blood substitutes based on modified hemoglobin are already in Phase III clinical trials in patients, with as much as 20 units being infused into each patient during trauma surgery. Artificial cells containing enzymes are being developed for clinical trial in hereditary enzyme deficiency diseases and other diseases. The artificial cell is also being investigated for drug delivery and for other uses in biotechnology, chemical engineering, and medicine.

  4. Process monitoring using automatic physical measurement based on electrical and physical variability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shauly, Eitan N.; Levi, Shimon; Schwarzband, Ishai; Adan, Ofer; Latinsky, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    A fully automated silicon-based methodology for systematic analysis of electrical features is shown. The system was developed for process monitoring and electrical variability reduction. A mapping step was created by dedicated structures such as static-random-access-memory (SRAM) array or standard cell library, or by using a simple design rule checking run-set. The resulting database was then used as an input for choosing locations for critical dimension scanning electron microscope images and for specific layout parameter extraction then was input to SPICE compact modeling simulation. Based on the experimental data, we identified two items that must be checked and monitored using the method described here: transistor's sensitivity to the distance between the poly end cap and edge of active area (AA) due to AA rounding, and SRAM leakage due to a too close N-well to P-well. Based on this example, for process monitoring and variability analyses, we extensively used this method to analyze transistor gates having different shapes. In addition, analysis for a large area of high density standard cell library was done. Another set of monitoring focused on a high density SRAM array is also presented. These examples provided information on the poly and AA layers, using transistor parameters such as leakage current and drive current. We successfully define "robust" and "less-robust" transistor configurations included in the library and identified unsymmetrical transistors in the SRAM bit-cells. These data were compared to data extracted from the same devices at the end of the line. Another set of analyses was done to samples after Cu M1 etch. Process monitoring information on M1 enclosed contact was extracted based on contact resistance as a feedback. Guidelines for the optimal M1 space for different layout configurations were also extracted. All these data showed the successful in-field implementation of our methodology as a useful process monitoring method.

  5. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Felthaus, O.; Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O.; Brockhoff, G.; Reck, A.; Zeitler, K.; Hautmann, M.; Reichert, T.E.; Schmalz, G.; Morsczeck, C.

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  6. Dummy Cell Would Improve Performance Of Fuel-Cell Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suljak, G. T.

    1993-01-01

    Interposition of dummy cell between stack of alkaline fuel cells and accessory section of fuel-cell powerplant proposed to overcome operational deficiencies plaguing end-most active cell. Cell in combination with additional hydrogen/coolant separator plate keeps end cell warmer and drier. End cell 96th in stack of fuel cells.

  7. Stem cell therapy without the cells

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Greg

    2013-01-01

    As an example of the burgeoning importance of stem cell therapy, this past month the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has approved $70 million to create a new network of stem cell clinical trial centers. Much work in the last decade has been devoted to developing the use of autologous and allogeneic adult stem cell transplants to treat a number of conditions, including heart attack, dementia, wounds, and immune system-related diseases. The standard model teaches us that adult stem cells exists throughout most of the body and provide a means to regenerate and repair most tissues through replication and differentiation. Although we have often witnessed the medical cart placed in front of the scientific horse in the development of stem cell therapies outside of academic circles, great strides have been made, such as the use of purified stem cells1 instead of whole bone marrow transplants in cancer patients, where physicians avoid re-injecting the patients with their own cancer cells.2 We most often think of stem cell therapy acting to regenerate tissue through replication and then differentiation, but recent studies point to the dramatic effects adult stem cells exert in the repair of various tissues through the release of paracrine and autocrine substances, and not simply through differentiation. Indeed, up to 80% of the therapeutic effect of adult stem cells has been shown to be through paracrine mediated actions.3 That is, the collected types of molecules released by the stem cells, called the secretome, or stem cell released molecules (SRM), number in the 100s, including proteins, microRNA, growth factors, antioxidants, proteasomes, and exosomes, and target a multitude of biological pathways through paracrine actions. The composition of the different molecule types in SRM is state dependent, and varies with cell type and conditions such as age and environment. PMID:24567776

  8. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell disease? Sickle cell disease, also called sickle cell anemia, is a hereditary condition (which means it runs ... or blocks blood and oxygen reaching nearby tissues. Sickle cell disease ... the whites of the eyes) Anemia (the decreased ability of the blood to carry ...

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  10. Nanocomposite Photoelectrochemical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Kindler, Andrew; Whitacre, Jay F.

    2007-01-01

    Improved, solid-state photoelectrochemical cells for converting solar radiation to electricity have been proposed. (In general, photoelectrochemical cells convert incident light to electricity through electrochemical reactions.) It is predicted that in comparison with state-of-the-art photoelectrochemical cells, these cells will be found to operate with greater solar-to-electric energy-conversion efficiencies.

  11. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  12. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  13. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Smith, James L.

    1987-01-01

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas, the cell enclosures collectively providing an enclosure for the array and effectively avoiding the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components, the fuel cell further including an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  14. Cytokinesis in animal cells.

    PubMed

    D'Avino, Pier Paolo; Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Petronczki, Mark

    2015-02-13

    Cell division ends with the physical separation of the two daughter cells, a process known as cytokinesis. This final event ensures that nuclear and cytoplasmic contents are accurately partitioned between the two nascent cells. Cytokinesis is one of the most dramatic changes in cell shape and requires an extensive reorganization of the cell's cytoskeleton. Here, we describe the cytoskeletal structures, factors, and signaling pathways that orchestrate this robust and yet highly dynamic process in animal cells. Finally, we discuss possible future directions in this growing area of cell division research and its implications in human diseases, including cancer.

  15. Modeling collective cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    Eukaryotic cells often move in groups, a critical aspect of many biological and medical processes including wound healing, morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Modeling can provide useful insights into the fundamental mechanisms of collective cell motility. Constructing models that incorporate the physical properties of the cells, however, is challenging. Here, I discuss our efforts to build a comprehensive cell motility model that includes cell membrane properties, cell-substrate interactions, cell polarity, and cell-cell interaction. The model will be applied to a variety of systems, including motion on micropatterned substrates and the migration of border cells in Drosophila. This work was supported by NIH Grant No. P01 GM078586 and NSF Grant No. 1068869.

  16. Fuel cells seminar

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This year`s meeting highlights the fact that fuel cells for both stationary and transportation applications have reached the dawn of commercialization. Sales of stationary fuel cells have grown steadily over the past 2 years. Phosphoric acid fuel cell buses have been demonstrated in urban areas. Proton-exchange membrane fuel cells are on the verge of revolutionizing the transportation industry. These activities and many more are discussed during this seminar, which provides a forum for people from the international fuel cell community engaged in a wide spectrum of fuel cell activities. Discussions addressing R&D of fuel cell technologies, manufacturing and marketing of fuel cells, and experiences of fuel cell users took place through oral and poster presentations. For the first time, the seminar included commercial exhibits, further evidence that commercial fuel cell technology has arrived. A total of 205 papers is included in this volume.

  17. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Tasks were undertaken in support of two objectives. They are: (1) to carry out electrophoresis experiments on cells in microgravity; and (2) assess the feasibility of using purified kidney cells from embryonic kidney cultures as a source of important cell products. Investigations were carried out in the following areas: (1) ground based electrophoresis technology; (2) cell culture technology; (3) electrophoresis of cells; (4) urokinase assay research; (5) zero-g electrophoresis; and (6) flow cytometry.

  18. Stem cell biobanks.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Silvana

    2010-04-01

    Stem cells contribute to innate healing and harbor a promising role for regenerative medicine. Stem cell banking through long-term storage of different stem cell platforms represents a fundamental source to preserve original features of stem cells for patient-specific clinical applications. Stem cell research and clinical translation constitute fundamental and indivisible modules catalyzed through biobanking activity, generating a return of investment. PMID:20560026

  19. Generation of iPS Cells from Granulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Various types of somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Somatic stem cells may generate iPS cells more efficiently than do differentiated cells. We show that granulosa cells exhibit characteristic of somatic stem cells and can be reprogrammed to iPS cells more efficiently or with few factors. Here, we describe generation of mouse and pig iPS cells from granulosa cells with high efficiency.

  20. Screening of solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    Because solar cells in a production batch are not identical, screening is performed to obtain similar cells for aggregation into arrays. A common technique for screening is based on a single operating point of the I-V characteristic of the cell, usually the maximum power point. As a result, inferior cell matching may occur at the actual operating points. Screening solar cells based on the entire I-V characteristic will inherently result in more similar cells in the array. An array consisting of more similar cells is likely to have better overall characteristics and more predictable performance. Solar cell screening methods and cell ranking are discussed. The concept of a mean cell is defined as a cell 'best' representing all the cells in the production batch. The screening and ranking of all cells are performed with respect to the mean cell. The comparative results of different screening methods are illustrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells of the Space Station Freedom.

  1. Screening of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Because solar cells in a production batch are not identical, screening is performed to obtain similar cells for aggregation into arrays. A common technique for screening is based on a single operating point of the I-V characteristic of the cell, usually the maximum power point. As a result, inferior cell matching may occur at the actual operating points. Screening solar cells based on the entire I-V characteristic will inherently result in more similar cells in the array. An array consisting of more similar cells is likely to have better overall characteristics and more predictable performance. Solar cell screening methods and cell ranking are discussed. The concept of a mean cell is defined as a cell 'best' representing all the cells in the production batch. The screening and ranking of all cells are performed with respect to the mean cell. The comparative results of different screening methods are illustrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells of the Space Station Freedom.

  2. Allergenicity potential of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) proteins in orally treated BALB/c mice and passively sensitized RBL-2H3 cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Sharma, Akanksha; Verma, Alok K; Chaudhari, B P; Das, Mukul; Jain, S K; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2013-01-01

    Red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is one the most commonly consumed legumes that requires an in depth understanding of its allergenicity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the allergenicity of red kidney bean proteins following oral exposure in BALB/c mice and elucidate the levels of Th1/Th2 transcription factors induced by red kidney bean proteins in rat basophilic leukemia cells (RBL-2H3 cells) passively sensitized with the sera of red kidney bean sensitized mice. Red kidney bean proteins showed enhanced levels of total and specific IgE, anaphylactic symptoms, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and peritoneal albumin over control. Enhanced release of β-hexosaminidase along with up regulated expressions of GATA-3, STAT-6, T-bet, c-MAF and NFAT were observed in the RBL-2H3 cells exposed with red kidney bean proteins when compared to that of the controls. Taken together, exposure of red kidney bean proteins may cause allergic symptoms in mice and the ambivalent effect on Th2/Th1 transcription factors in RBL-2H3 cells. PMID:23916877

  3. Analytical pyrolysis of cells and cell fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Faix, O.; Bertelt, E.

    1995-12-01

    Wood of spruce, beech and birch was disintegrated without chemical pretreatment after 10 minutes of steaming at 110{degrees}C in a laboratory defibrator. Fibers, vessels, and fragments of secondary wall were separated by wet screening. A hydrocylon was used for separation of middle lamellae. By using analytical pyrolysis-GC/MS, parenchymatic cells were found to be richer in lignin than the other cells. The lignin content of middle lamellae was 35% (beech, spruce) and 39% (birch). In agreement with the literature, the S/G ratios of the vessels and middle lamellae was lower than those of the other cells and cell fragments.

  4. The cell biology of planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the coordinated alignment of cell polarity across the tissue plane. Key to the establishment of PCP is asymmetric partitioning of cortical PCP components and intercellular communication to coordinate polarity between neighboring cells. Recent progress has been made toward understanding how protein transport, endocytosis, and intercellular interactions contribute to asymmetric PCP protein localization. Additionally, the functions of gradients and mechanical forces as global cues that bias PCP orientation are beginning to be elucidated. Together, these findings are shedding light on how global cues integrate with local cell interactions to organize cellular polarity at the tissue level. PMID:25349257

  5. Single cell mechanics of keratinocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Lulevich, Valentin; Yang, Hsin-ya; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Liu, Gang-yu

    2010-11-01

    Keratinocytes represent the major cell type of the uppermost layer of human skin, the epidermis. Using AFM-based single cell compression, the ability of individual keratinocytes to resist external pressure and global rupturing forces is investigated and compared with various cell types. Keratinocytes are found to be 6-70 times stiffer than other cell types, such as white blood, breast epithelial, fibroblast, or neuronal cells, and in contrast to other cell types they retain high mechanic strength even after the cell's death. The absence of membrane rupturing peaks in the force-deformation profiles of keratinocytes and their high stiffness during a second load cycle suggests that their unique mechanical resistance is dictated by the cytoskeleton. A simple analytical model enables the quantification of Young's modulus of keratinocyte cytoskeleton, as high as 120-340 Pa. Selective disruption of the two major cytoskeletal networks, actin filaments and microtubules, does not significantly affect keratinocyte mechanics. F-actin is found to impact cell deformation under pressure. During keratinocyte compression, the plasma membrane stretches to form peripheral blebs. Instead of blebbing, cells with depolymerized F-actin respond to pressure by detaching the plasma membrane from the cytoskeleton underneath. On the other hand, the compression force of keratinocytes expressing a mutated keratin (cell line, KEB-7) is 1.6-2.2 times less than that for the control cell line that has normal keratin networks. Therefore, we infer that the keratin intermediate filament network is responsible for the extremely high keratinocyte stiffness and resilience. This could manifest into the rugged protective nature of the human epidermis. PMID:20728993

  6. Microscale Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Jamie D.; Viswanathan, Vish V.

    2005-11-03

    Perhaprs some of the most innovative work on fuel cells has been the research dedicated to applying silicon fabrication techniques to fuel cells technology creating low power microscale fuel cells applicable to microelectro mechanical systems (MEMS), microsensors, cell phones, PDA’s, and other low power (0.001 to 5 We) applications. In this small power range, fuel cells offer the decoupling of the energy converter from the energy storage which may enable longer operating times and instant or near instant charging. To date, most of the microscale fuel cells being developed have been based on proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology. This section will discuss requirements and considerations that need to be addressed in the development of microscale fuel cells, as well as some proposed designs and fabrication strategies.

  7. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  8. Plant stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  9. Artificial Stem Cell Niches

    PubMed Central

    Lutolf, Matthias P.; Blau, Helen M.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their dual ability to reproduce themselves (self-renew) and specialize (differentiate), yielding a plethora of daughter cells that maintain and regenerate tissues. In contrast to their embryonic counterparts, adult stem cells retain their unique functions only if they are in intimate contact with an instructive microenvironment, termed stem cell niche. In these niches, stem cells integrate a complex array of molecular signals that, in concert with induced cell-intrinsic regulatory networks, control their function and balance their numbers in response to physiologic demands. This progress report provides a perspective on how advanced materials technologies could be used (i) to engineer and systematically analyze specific aspects of functional stem cells niches in a controlled fashion in vitro and (ii) to target stem cell niches in vivo. Such “artificial niches” constitute potent tools for elucidating stem cell regulatory mechanisms with the capacity to directly impact the development of novel therapeutic strategies for tissue regeneration. PMID:20882496

  10. Aquaporins and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, M C; Saadoun, S; Verkman, A S

    2008-07-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) water channels are expressed primarily in cell plasma membranes. In this paper, we review recent evidence that AQPs facilitate cell migration. AQP-dependent cell migration has been found in a variety of cell types in vitro and in mice in vivo. AQP1 deletion reduces endothelial cell migration, limiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. AQP4 deletion slows the migration of reactive astrocytes, impairing glial scarring after brain stab injury. AQP1-expressing tumor cells have enhanced metastatic potential and local infiltration. Impaired cell migration has also been seen in AQP1-deficient proximal tubule epithelial cells, and AQP3-deficient corneal epithelial cells, enterocytes, and skin keratinocytes. The mechanisms by which AQPs enhance cell migration are under investigation. We propose that, as a consequence of actin polymerization/depolymerization and transmembrane ionic fluxes, the cytoplasm adjacent to the leading edge of migrating cells undergoes rapid changes in osmolality. AQPs could thus facilitate osmotic water flow across the plasma membrane in cell protrusions that form during migration. AQP-dependent cell migration has potentially broad implications in angiogenesis, tumor metastasis, wound healing, glial scarring, and other events requiring rapid, directed cell movement. AQP inhibitors may thus have therapeutic potential in modulating these events, such as slowing tumor growth and spread, and reducing glial scarring after injury to allow neuronal regeneration. PMID:17968585

  11. Stem cells in urology.

    PubMed

    Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony

    2008-11-01

    The shortage of donors for organ transplantation has stimulated research on stem cells as a potential resource for cell-based therapy in all human tissues. Stem cells have been used for regenerative medicine applications in many organ systems, including the genitourinary system. The potential applications for stem cell therapy have, however, been restricted by the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cell research. Instead, scientists have explored other cell sources, including progenitor and stem cells derived from adult tissues and stem cells derived from the amniotic fluid and placenta. In addition, novel techniques for generating stem cells in the laboratory are being developed. These techniques include somatic cell nuclear transfer, in which the nucleus of an adult somatic cell is placed into an oocyte, and reprogramming of adult cells to induce stem-cell-like behavior. Such techniques are now being used in tissue engineering applications, and some of the most successful experiments have been in the field of urology. Techniques to regenerate bladder tissue have reached the clinic, and exciting progress is being made in other areas, such as regeneration of the kidney and urethra. Cell therapy as a treatment for incontinence and infertility might soon become a reality. Physicians should be optimistic that regenerative medicine and tissue engineering will one day provide mainstream treatment options for urologic disorders.

  12. Induction of Functional Hair-Cell-Like Cells from Mouse Cochlear Multipotent Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanwen; Shen, Yi; Chen, Jiarong; Ding, Jie; Tang, Zihua; Zhang, Cui; Chen, Jianling; Li, Liang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a two-step-induction method of generating functional hair cells from inner ear multipotent cells. Multipotent cells from the inner ear were established and induced initially into progenitor cells committed to the inner ear cell lineage on the poly-L-lysine substratum. Subsequently, the committed progenitor cells were cultured on the mitotically inactivated chicken utricle stromal cells and induced into hair-cell-like cells containing characteristic stereocilia bundles. The hair-cell-like cells exhibited rapid permeation of FM1-43FX. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to measure the membrane currents of cells differentiated for 7 days on chicken utricle stromal cells and analyze the biophysical properties of the hair-cell-like cells by recording membrane properties of cells. The results suggested that the hair-cell-like cells derived from inner ear multipotent cells were functional following differentiation in an enabling environment.

  13. Induction of Functional Hair-Cell-Like Cells from Mouse Cochlear Multipotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanwen; Shen, Yi; Chen, Jiarong; Ding, Jie; Tang, Zihua; Zhang, Cui; Chen, Jianling; Li, Liang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a two-step-induction method of generating functional hair cells from inner ear multipotent cells. Multipotent cells from the inner ear were established and induced initially into progenitor cells committed to the inner ear cell lineage on the poly-L-lysine substratum. Subsequently, the committed progenitor cells were cultured on the mitotically inactivated chicken utricle stromal cells and induced into hair-cell-like cells containing characteristic stereocilia bundles. The hair-cell-like cells exhibited rapid permeation of FM1-43FX. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to measure the membrane currents of cells differentiated for 7 days on chicken utricle stromal cells and analyze the biophysical properties of the hair-cell-like cells by recording membrane properties of cells. The results suggested that the hair-cell-like cells derived from inner ear multipotent cells were functional following differentiation in an enabling environment. PMID:27057177

  14. Lithium cell test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Three lithium SO2 cells, two lithium CF cells, and a vinyl chloride cell, all with crimped seals, and all strictly experimental, were independently discharged on resistors. Three temperatures were used and several different storage temperatures. Discharge rate generally on the nominal discharges were 0.1 amp, 0.5 amp, and 1 amp. Tests results show that the crimp seals are inadequate, especially for the SO2 cells. Normal discharges present no hazards. All cells discharge to zero. The problem of lithium cell explosions, such as occurred during off-limits testing, is discussed.

  15. Natural Killer Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-10-20

    Natural killer (NK) cells have historically been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens and tumors in an antigen-independent manner and then undergo cell death. Recently, however, NK cells have been shown to possess traits of adaptive immunity and can acquire immunological memory in a manner similar to that of T and B cells. In this review, we discuss evidence of NK cell memory and the mechanisms involved in the generation and survival of these innate lymphocytes.

  16. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  17. Assessment of pancreas cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoss, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Pancreatic islets were obtained from guinea pig pancreas by the collagenase method and kept alive in tissue culture prior to further studies. Pancreas cell morphology was studied by standard histochemical techniques using light microscopy. Preparative vertical electrophoresis-levitation of dispersed fetal guinea pig pancreas cells was conducted in phosphate buffer containing a heavy water (D20) gradient which does not cause clumping of cells or alter the osmolarity of the buffers. The faster migrating fractions tended to be enriched in beta-cell content. Alpha and delta cells were found to some degree in most fractions. A histogram showing the cell count distribution is included.

  18. Microfluidics for manipulating cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xuan; Zheng, Wenfu; Sun, Jiashu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-01-14

    Microfluidics, a toolbox comprising methods for precise manipulation of fluids at small length scales (micrometers to millimeters), has become useful for manipulating cells. Its uses range from dynamic management of cellular interactions to high-throughput screening of cells, and to precise analysis of chemical contents in single cells. Microfluidics demonstrates a completely new perspective and an excellent practical way to manipulate cells for solving various needs in biology and medicine. This review introduces and comments on recent achievements and challenges of using microfluidics to manipulate and analyze cells. It is believed that microfluidics will assume an even greater role in the mechanistic understanding of cell biology and, eventually, in clinical applications.

  19. Urinary volatile organic compounds as potential biomarkers for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, DONGCHUN; WANG, CHANGSONG; PI, XIN; GUO, LEI; WANG, YUE; LI, MINGJUAN; FENG, YUE; LIN, ZIWEI; HOU, WEI; LI, ENYOU

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no adequate, sensitive, reproducible, specific and noninvasive biomarker that can reliably be used to detect renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Previous studies have elucidated the urinary non-volatile metabolic profile of RCC. However, whether urinary volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles are able to identify RCC remains to be elucidated. In the present study, urine was collected from 22 patients with RCC and 25 healthy subjects. Principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least square discriminant analysis were used to compare the data of patients and healthy subjects, and preoperative and postoperative patients undergoing radical nephrectomy. In total, 11 VOC biomarkers were elevated in the RCC patients compared to the healthy subjects, which were phenol; decanal; 1,6-dioxacyclododecane-7,12-dione; 1-bromo-1-(3-methyl-1-pentenylidene)-2,2,3,3-tetramethyl-cyclopropane; nonanal; 3-ethyl-3-methylheptane; isolongifolene-5-ol; 2,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-dione, 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl); tetradecane; aniline; and 2,6,10,14-tetramethyl-pentadecane. Three biomarkers were decreased in RCC patients: styrene, 4-heptanone and dimethylsilanediol. In preoperative patients, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and cyclohexanone were elevated, while 6-t-butyl-2,2,9,9-tetramethyl-3,5-decadien-7-yne were decreased when compared to postoperative patients. Compared with the healthy subjects, RCC has a unique VOC profile, suggesting that VOC profiles may be a useful diagnostic assay for RCC. PMID:27347408

  20. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  1. CD8+IL-17+ T Cells Mediate Neutrophilic Airway Obliteration in T-bet–Deficient Mouse Lung Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Dodd-o, Jeffrey M.; Coon, Tiffany A.; Miller, Hannah L.; Ganguly, Sudipto; Popescu, Iulia; O'Donnell, Christopher P.; Cardenes, Nayra; Levine, Melanie; Rojas, Mauricio; Weathington, Nathaniel M.; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; McDyer, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute cellular rejection is a known risk factor for the development of obliterative bronchiolitis, which limits the long-term survival of lung transplant recipients. However, the T cell effector mechanisms in both of these processes remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse orthotopic lung transplant model, we investigated whether C57BL/6 T-bet−/− recipients of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched BALB/c lung grafts develop rejection pathology and allospecific cytokine responses that differ from wild-type mice. T-bet−/− recipients demonstrated vigorous allograft rejection at 10 days, characterized by neutrophilic inflammation and predominantly CD8+ T cells producing allospecific IL-17 and/or IFN-γ, in contrast to IFN-γ–dominant responses in WT mice. CD4+ T cells produced IL-17 but not IFN-γ responses in T-bet−/− recipients, in contrast to WT controls. Costimulation blockade using anti-CD154 Ab significantly reduced allospecific CD8+IFN-γ+ responses in both T-bet−/− and WT mice but had no attenuating effect on lung rejection pathology in T-bet−/− recipients or on the development of obliterative airway inflammation that occurred only in T-bet−/− recipients. However, neutralization of IL-17A significantly attenuated costimulation blockade–resistant rejection pathology and airway inflammation in T-bet−/− recipients. In addition, CXCL1 (neutrophil chemokine) was increased in T-bet−/− allografts, and IL-17 induced CXCL1 from mouse lung epithelial cells in vitro. Taken together, our data show that T-bet–deficient recipients of complete MHC-mismatched lung allografts develop costimulation blockade–resistant rejection characterized by neutrophilia and obliterative airway inflammation that is predominantly mediated by CD8+IL-17+ T cells. Our data support T-bet–deficient mouse recipients of lung allografts as a viable animal model to study the immunopathogenesis of small airway injury in lung transplantation

  2. What Are Islet Cells?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Derived Stem Cells MichCanSka 2010 Benefits DRI Wounded Soldier Gets Standing Ovation Video New Website Launches Journal ... Derived Stem Cells MichCanSka 2010 Benefits DRI Wounded Soldier Gets Standing Ovation Video New Website Launches Journal ...

  3. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive than other types of basal ... to treat them early and with slightly more aggressive techniques. Excision – The basal cell carcinoma is cut ...

  4. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  5. Amphibia Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Sichel, Giovanni; Scalia, Marina; Corsaro, Concetta

    2002-06-15

    Amphibia Kupffer cells (i.e., liver resident macrophages) show many common characteristics when compared with Mammalia Kupffer cells: filopodia, microvillous-like structures, lamellipodia, fuzzy coat, coated vesicles, bristled vacuoles, nonspecific esterase activity, and pinocytotic and phagocytic activity are present both in Amphibia and Mammalia Kupffer cells. On the other hand, some differences are present between Kupffer cells of both zoological classes: phagocytosed red cells and their derivatives, iron-protein complexes, and lipofuscin bodies are normally present in Amphibia Kupffer cells, but absent in the same cells of healthy mammals. Worm-like structures are not seen in Amphibia and endogenous peroxidase activity is very weak in these animals compared with Mammalia. The most important difference lies in the ability of Amphibia Kupffer cells to produce melanins: in fact the tyrosinase gene is expressed, "melanosome centers" are present, and dopa oxidase activity is demonstrable.

  6. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  7. Islet Cell Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body use glucose for energy. Islet cell transplantation transfers cells from an organ donor into the ... to make and release insulin. Researchers hope islet transplantation will help people with type 1 diabetes live ...

  8. Sickle Cell Trait

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Sickle Cell Trait Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... the trait on to their children. How Sickle Cell Trait is Inherited If both parents have SCT, ...

  9. Galvanic cell separator

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, K.; Osawa, K.; Takeda, Y.; Yabumoto, T.

    1981-07-07

    A galvanic cell separator is disclosed that is composed of polyvinyl alcohol having a crystallinity of 0.4 or more to be used with a galvanic cell containing alkaline electrolyte, and a method of manufacturing the same.

  10. Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Squamous cell carcinoma typically develops in sun-damaged skin in fair-skinned patients. Overview Squamous ... skin cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially in light-skinned individuals with ...

  11. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , White ...

  12. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview of CDC’s work. Advancements in Sickle Cell Disease New supplement from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine describes the state of sickle cell disease related care in the United States. Read Supplement ...

  13. Isolation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, K; Swiggard, W J; Steinman, R M; Romani, N; Schuler, G

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents two methods for preparing dendritic cells (DCs), a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell (APC). The first method involves the isolation of DCs from mouse spleen, resulting in a cell population that is highly enriched in accessory cell and APC function. A support protocol for collagenase digestion of splenocyte suspensions is described to increase the yield of dendritic cells. The second method involves generating large numbers of DCs from mouse bone marrow progenitor cells. In that technique, bone marrow cells are cultured in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to yield 5-10 10(6) cells, 60% of which express DC surface markers (e.g., B-7-2/CD86). Additional techniques for isolating DCs from mouse spleens or other mouse tissues, as well as from human tissues, are also discussed.

  14. Isolation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kayo; Swiggard, William J; Steinman, Ralph M; Romani, Nikolaus; Schuler, Gerold; Brinster, Carine

    2009-08-01

    This unit presents two methods for preparing dendritic cells (DCs), a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell (APC). The first method involves the isolation of DCs from mouse spleen, resulting in a cell population that is highly enriched in accessory cell and APC function. A support protocol for collagenase digestion of splenocyte suspensions is described to increase the yield of dendritic cells. The second method involves generating large numbers of DCs from mouse bone marrow progenitor cells. In that technique, bone marrow cells are cultured in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to yield 5-10 x 10(6) cells, 60% of which express DC surface markers (e.g., B-7-2/CD86). Additional techniques for isolating DCs from mouse spleens or other mouse tissues, as well as from human tissues, are also discussed.

  15. Renal cell carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Renal cancer; Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 57. National Cancer Institute: PDQ renal cell cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. ...

  16. Diagram of Cell to Cell Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Diagram depicts the importance of cell-cell communication as central to the understanding of cancer growth and progression, the focus of the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05) investigation. Microgravity studies will allow us to unravel the signaling and communication between these cells with the host and potential development of therapies for the treatment of cancer metastasis. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  17. Increased voltage photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell, such as a solar cell, is provided which has a higher output voltage than prior cells. The improved cell includes a substrate of doped silicon, a first layer of silicon disposed on the substrate and having opposite doping, and a second layer of silicon carbide disposed on the first layer. The silicon carbide preferably has the same type of doping as the first layer.

  18. Single cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Batoul Y; Horne, Steven D; Stevens, Joshua B; Liu, Guo; Ying, Andrew Y; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Krawetz, Stephen A; Gorelick, Root; Heng, Henry HQ

    2013-01-01

    Multi-level heterogeneity is a fundamental but underappreciated feature of cancer. Most technical and analytical methods either completely ignore heterogeneity or do not fully account for it, as heterogeneity has been considered noise that needs to be eliminated. We have used single-cell and population-based assays to describe an instability-mediated mechanism where genome heterogeneity drastically affects cell growth and cannot be accurately measured using conventional averages. First, we show that most unstable cancer cell populations exhibit high levels of karyotype heterogeneity, where it is difficult, if not impossible, to karyotypically clone cells. Second, by comparing stable and unstable cell populations, we show that instability-mediated karyotype heterogeneity leads to growth heterogeneity, where outliers dominantly contribute to population growth and exhibit shorter cell cycles. Predictability of population growth is more difficult for heterogeneous cell populations than for homogenous cell populations. Since “outliers” play an important role in cancer evolution, where genome instability is the key feature, averaging methods used to characterize cell populations are misleading. Variances quantify heterogeneity; means (averages) smooth heterogeneity, invariably hiding it. Cell populations of pathological conditions with high genome instability, like cancer, behave differently than karyotypically homogeneous cell populations. Single-cell analysis is thus needed when cells are not genomically identical. Despite increased attention given to single-cell variation mediated heterogeneity of cancer cells, continued use of average-based methods is not only inaccurate but deceptive, as the “average” cancer cell clearly does not exist. Genome-level heterogeneity also may explain population heterogeneity, drug resistance, and cancer evolution. PMID:24091732

  19. Fuel cells feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, D.; Charng, T.

    1981-01-01

    The technical and economic status of fuel cells is assessed with emphasis on their potential benefits to the Deep Space Network. The fuel cell, what it is, how it operates, and what its outputs are, is reviewed. Major technical problems of the fuel cell and its components are highlighted. Due to these problems and economic considerations it is concluded that fuel cells will not become commercially viable until the early 1990s.

  20. Fish stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-04-13

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on "Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer", we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  1. Kidney Cell Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and procedures for microgravity electrophoresis of living human embryonic kidney cells were evaluated, ground support in the form of analytical cell electrophoresis and flow cytometry was provided and cells returned from space flight were analyzed. Preflight culture media, electrophoresis buffer, fraction collection media, temperature profiles, and urokinase assay procedures were tested prior to flight. Electrophoretic mobility distributions of aliquots of the cell population to be fractionated in flight were obtained. The protocol established and utilized is given.

  2. Stem Cell Research.

    PubMed

    Trounson, Alan; Kolaja, Kyle; Petersen, Thomas; Weber, Klaus; McVean, Maralee; Funk, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have great potential in basic research and are being slowly integrated into toxicological research. This symposium provided an overview of the state of the field, stem cell models, described allogenic stem cell treatments and issues of immunogenicity associated with protein therapeutics, and tehn concentrated on stem cell uses in regenerative medicine focusing on lung and testing strategies on engineered tissues from a pathologist's perspective.

  3. Cross Cell Sandwich Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A sandwich core comprises two faceplates separated by a plurality of cells. The cells are comprised of walls positioned at oblique angles relative to a perpendicular axis extending through the faceplates. The walls preferably form open cells and are constructed from open cells and are constructed from rows of ribbons. The walls may be obliquely angled relative to more than one plane extending through the perpendicular axis.

  4. Endothelial cells enhance migration of meniscus cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaoning; Eng, George M.; Arkonac, Derya E.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the interactions between vascular endothelial cells and meniscal fibrochondrocytes from the inner avascular and outer vascular regions of the meniscus, and identify angiogenic factors that enhance cell migration and integrative repair. Methods Bovine meniscal fibrochondrocytes (bMFCs) from the inner and outer regions of meniscus were cultured for seven days with and without human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a micropatterned three-dimensional hydrogel system for cell migration. Angiogenic factors secreted by HUVECs were probed for their role in paracrine mechanisms governing bMFC migration, and applied to a full-thickness defect model of meniscal repair in explants from the inner and outer regions over four weeks. Results Endothelial cells enhanced migration of inner and outer bMFCs in the micropatterned system via endothelin-1 (ET-1) signaling. Supplementation of ET-1 significantly enhanced integration strength of full-thickness defects in inner and outer explants, and cell migration at the macro-scale, compared to controls without ET-1 treatment. Conclusion We report for the first time that bMFCs from both the avascular and vascular regions respond to the presence of endothelial cells with increased migration. Paracrine signaling by endothelial cells regulates the bMFCs differentially by region, but we identify ET-1 as an angiogenic factor that stimulates migration of inner and outer cells at the micro-scale, and integrative repair of inner and outer explants at the macro-scale. These findings reveal the regional interactions between vasculature and MFCs, and suggest ET-1 as a potential new treatment modality for avascular meniscal injuries, in order to prevent the development of osteoarthritis. PMID:25307081

  5. An event-based neural network architecture with an asynchronous programmable synaptic memory.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Saber; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2014-02-01

    We present a hybrid analog/digital very large scale integration (VLSI) implementation of a spiking neural network with programmable synaptic weights. The synaptic weight values are stored in an asynchronous Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) module, which is interfaced to a fast current-mode event-driven DAC for producing synaptic currents with the appropriate amplitude values. These currents are further integrated by current-mode integrator synapses to produce biophysically realistic temporal dynamics. The synapse output currents are then integrated by compact and efficient integrate and fire silicon neuron circuits with spike-frequency adaptation and adjustable refractory period and spike-reset voltage settings. The fabricated chip comprises a total of 32 × 32 SRAM cells, 4 × 32 synapse circuits and 32 × 1 silicon neurons. It acts as a transceiver, receiving asynchronous events in input, performing neural computation with hybrid analog/digital circuits on the input spikes, and eventually producing digital asynchronous events in output. Input, output, and synaptic weight values are transmitted to/from the chip using a common communication protocol based on the Address Event Representation (AER). Using this representation it is possible to interface the device to a workstation or a micro-controller and explore the effect of different types of Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP) learning algorithms for updating the synaptic weights values in the SRAM module. We present experimental results demonstrating the correct operation of all the circuits present on the chip.

  6. Solar cell device

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M.; Haruki, H.; Miyagi, M.; Sakai, H.; Uchida, Y.

    1984-06-26

    A solar cell array is equipped with serially or parallel connected reverse polarity diodes formed simultaneously with the array. The diodes are constituted by one or more solar cells of the array which may be shaded to prevent photoelectric conversion, and which are electrically connected in reverse polarity with respect to the remaining cells.

  7. The Langerhans cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, K.; Stingl, G.

    1983-06-01

    Langerhans cells are the bone-marrow-derived immune cells of the epidermis; they express Ia antigens and receptors for the Fc portion of IgG and complement components and are required for epidermal-cell-induced antigen-specific, syngeneic and allogeneic T-cell activitation and the generation of epidermal-cell-induced cytotoxic T cells. Their presence within the epidermis and functional integrity determine whether topical application of haptens leads to specific sensitization or unresponsiveness, and in skin grafts of only I region disparate donors, they represent the cells responsible for the critical allosensitizing signal. UV radiation abrogates most of Langerhans cell functions in vitro; under certain conditions in vivo, it prevents contact sensitization favoring the development of specific unresponsiveness. UV radiation abrogates antigen-presenting capacities of epidermal cells by interfering both with the processing of antigen by Langerhans cells and the production of the epidermal-cell-derived thymocyte activating factor required for optimal T-cell responses.

  8. Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, John T.

    1984-01-01

    This introduction to photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells reviews topics pertaining to solar energy conversion and demonstrates the ease with which a working PEC cell can be prepared with n-type silicon as the photoanode and a platinum counter electrode (both immersed in ethanolic ferrocene/ferricenium solutions). Experiments using the cell are…

  9. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dirmi, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

  10. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dimri, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

    1998-08-18

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

  11. Advanced Cell Technology, Inc.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, William M

    2007-03-01

    Advanced Cell Technology, Inc. (OTCBB: ACTC) is a biotechnology company applying novel human embryonic stem cell technologies in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. We believe that regenerative medicine has the potential to revolutionize the field by enabling scientists to produce human cells of any kind for use in a wide array of therapies.

  12. Adventures with Cell Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Teachers are finding creative ways to turn the basic cell phone from a digital distraction into a versatile learning tool. In this article, the author explains why cell phones are important in learning and suggests rather than banning them that they be integrated into learning. She presents activities that can be done on a basic cell phone with a…

  13. Cell phones and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  14. Plasma Cell Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... microorganisms to which the body is exposed. In plasma cell disorders, one clone of plasma cells multiplies uncontrollably. As a result, this clone ... a light chain and heavy chain). These abnormal plasma cells and the ... produce are limited to one type, and levels of other types of antibodies ...

  15. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  16. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  17. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dimri, Goberdhan P.; Campisi, Judith; Peacocke, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

  18. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dirmi, Goberdhan P.; Campisi, Judith; Peacocke, Monica

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

  19. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen to the body’s tissues in exchange for carbon dioxide, which is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of bones. Stem cells in the red bone marrow called hemocytoblasts ...

  20. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Joy, Richard W.

    1983-01-01

    This invention is directed to a metal-air fuel cell where the consumable metal anode is movably positioned in the cell and an expandable enclosure, or bladder, is used to press the anode into contact with separating spacers between the cell electrodes. The bladder may be depressurized to allow replacement of the anode when consumed.

  1. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K.

    2016-01-01

    The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4+ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1) polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2) cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation. PMID:27005656

  3. 17 CFR 240.15Ba2-6T - Temporary registration as a municipal advisor; required amendments; and withdrawal from temporary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... information set forth on Form MA-T (17 CFR 249.1300T) electronically through the Commission's Internet Web... Form MA-T (17 CFR 249.1300T) have become inaccurate in any way; and (2) Whenever a municipal advisor...(a) (15 U.S.C. 78ff(a)) and other applicable provisions of the Act. (d) Each Form MA-T (17 CFR...

  4. 26 CFR 1.642(c)-6T - Valuation of a remainder interest in property transferred to a pooled income fund (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Valuation. The present value of the remainder interest in property transferred to a pooled income fund on or after May 1, 2009, is determined under paragraph (e) of this section. The present value of the remainder... value of the remainder interest in the case of transfers to pooled income funds for which the...

  5. 26 CFR 1.274-6T - Substantiation with respect to certain types of listed property for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for purposes of the employer's substantiation requirements under section 274(d) with respect to use of... (3) of this section are met. (2) Vehicles not used for personal purposes—(i) Employers. A policy... would be taxable to the employee, may use the vehicle for personal purposes, except for de...

  6. 26 CFR 1.274-6T - Substantiation with respect to certain types of listed property for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for purposes of the employer's substantiation requirements under section 274(d) with respect to use of... (3) of this section are met. (2) Vehicles not used for personal purposes—(i) Employers. A policy... would be taxable to the employee, may use the vehicle for personal purposes, except for de...

  7. 26 CFR 301.9100-6T - Time and manner of making certain elections under the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (o) Election with respect to subchapter S passive investment income rules. For the election provided... the investment tax credit at risk rules as modified by the Tax Reform Act of 1984 to all transactions... for making the election for investment tax credit at risk rules. The election under section...

  8. 26 CFR 301.9100-6T - Time and manner of making certain elections under the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (o) Election with respect to subchapter S passive investment income rules. For the election provided... the investment tax credit at risk rules as modified by the Tax Reform Act of 1984 to all transactions... for making the election for investment tax credit at risk rules. The election under section...

  9. 26 CFR 301.9100-6T - Time and manner of making certain elections under the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (o) Election with respect to subchapter S passive investment income rules. For the election provided... the investment tax credit at risk rules as modified by the Tax Reform Act of 1984 to all transactions... for making the election for investment tax credit at risk rules. The election under section...

  10. 26 CFR 301.9100-6T - Time and manner of making certain elections under the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (o) Election with respect to subchapter S passive investment income rules. For the election provided... the investment tax credit at risk rules as modified by the Tax Reform Act of 1984 to all transactions... for making the election for investment tax credit at risk rules. The election under section...

  11. Mitochondrial ND6 T14502C variant may modulate the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated G11778A mutation in four Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Zhou, Xiangtian; Zhou, Jian; Li, Chengwu; Zhao, Fuxin; Wang, Yan; Meng, Yanzi; Wang, Jiying; Yuan, Meixia; Cai, Wanshi; Tong, Yi; Sun, Yan-Hong; Yang, Li; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2010-09-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular evaluations of four Han Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Thirty-one (20 males/11 females) of 83 matrilineal relatives in these families exhibited the variable severity and age-at-onset in visual impairment. The average age-of-onset of vision loss was 22years old. Strikingly, these penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families were higher than those in other 11 Chinese pedigrees carrying the only ND4 G11778A mutation. Molecular analysis identified the known G11778A mutation and distinct sets of variants belonging to the Asian haplogroups M10a and M7c2. Of these, the T14502C mutation caused the substitution of a highly conserved isoleucine for valine at position 58 in ND6. This mutation has been associated with LHON in other Chinese families with very low penetrance of LHON. Thus, the deficient activities of complex I, caused by G11778A mutation, would be worsened by the T14502C mutation in these four Chinese families. As a result, mitochondrial dysfunctions would lead to the high penetrance and expressivity of visual loss in these Chinese families carrying both G11778A and T14502C mutations than other 11 Chinese families carrying only G11778A mutation. These data suggested that the T14502C variant may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the G11778A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  12. 26 CFR 1.642(c)-6T - Valuation of a remainder interest in property transferred to a pooled income fund (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... interest that is dependent on the termination of the life of one individual is computed by the use of Table... computed on the basis of— (i) Life contingencies determined from the values of lx that are set forth in... life of one individual is the factor from Table S in paragraph (e)(6) of this section under...

  13. Cycloid spirals and cycloid cone transition in the HoMn6-xCrxGe6 (T, x) magnetic phase diagramm by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobinger-Papamantellos, P.; Rodríguez-Carvajal, J.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    2016-06-01

    The structures and magnetic properties of the antiferromagnetic hexagonal pseudo ternary compounds HoMn6-xCrxGe6 (x=1, 1.5 and 2) are studied by neutron diffraction in the temperature range 1.5-300 K. The substitution of nonmagnetic Cr for Mn greatly affects the magnetic properties of HoMn6Ge6 by reducing the ordering temperature from 466 K to 278 K, 205 K and 130 K for (x=0, 1, 1.5 and 2) respectively, increasing the c/a ratio, suppressing the high temperature (HT) commensurate phase with q2=(0, 0, 1/2) and changing the high temperature (LT) q1=(0, 0, q1z) skew spiral rotation plane. HoMn5CrGe6 and HoMn4Cr2Ge6 display in the entire magnetically ordered regime cycloid spiral structures with the wave vector: q=(0, 0, qz), qz≈0.18(3) r.l.u. and Φs≈64.8° turn angle. The Ho and Mn/Cr (001) layers have ferromagnetic arrangements coupled antiferromagnetically. The Ho moments in the z=0 layer are oriented in a direction opposite to the line bisecting the angle 2φMn≈2×28° of the Mn layers at z=±∼0.25. This triple unit changes orientation collectively in the direction of q within the (b, c) plane containing the wave vector. Above 50 K, the wave vector length increases linearly from 0.24 to 0.28(1) r.l.u. below TN. The HT HoMn4.5Cr1.5Ge6 cycloid spiral, is stable in the range Tt

  14. Microfluidic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeang, Erik

    Microfluidic fuel cell architectures are presented in this thesis. This work represents the mechanical and microfluidic portion of a microfluidic biofuel cell project. While the microfluidic fuel cells developed here are targeted to eventual integration with biocatalysts, the contributions of this thesis have more general applicability. The cell architectures are developed and evaluated based on conventional non-biological electrocatalysts. The fuel cells employ co-laminar flow of fuel and oxidant streams that do not require a membrane for physical separation, and comprise carbon or gold electrodes compatible with most enzyme immobilization schemes developed to date. The demonstrated microfluidic fuel cell architectures include the following: a single cell with planar gold electrodes and a grooved channel architecture that accommodates gaseous product evolution while preventing crossover effects; a single cell with planar carbon electrodes based on graphite rods; a three-dimensional hexagonal array cell based on multiple graphite rod electrodes with unique scale-up opportunities; a single cell with porous carbon electrodes that provides enhanced power output mainly attributed to the increased active area; a single cell with flow-through porous carbon electrodes that provides improved performance and overall energy conversion efficiency; and a single cell with flow-through porous gold electrodes with similar capabilities and reduced ohmic resistance. As compared to previous results, the microfluidic fuel cells developed in this work show improved fuel cell performance (both in terms of power density and efficiency). In addition, this dissertation includes the development of an integrated electrochemical velocimetry approach for microfluidic devices, and a computational modeling study of strategic enzyme patterning for microfluidic biofuel cells with consecutive reactions.

  15. Regulation of Th2 Cell Immunity by Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyeongjin; Cho, Minkyoung; Chung, Yeonseok

    2016-02-01

    Th2 cell immunity is required for host defense against helminths, but it is detrimental in allergic diseases in humans. Unlike Th1 cell and Th17 cell subsets, the mechanism by which dendritic cells modulate Th2 cell responses has been obscure, in part because of the inability of dendritic cells to provide IL-4, which is indispensable for Th2 cell lineage commitment. In this regard, immune cells other than dendritic cells, such as basophils and innate lymphoid cells, have been suggested as Th2 cell inducers. More recently, multiple independent researchers have shown that specialized subsets of dendritic cells mediate Th2 cell responses. This review will discuss the current understanding related to the regulation of Th2 cell responses by dendritic cells and other immune cells. PMID:26937227

  16. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future. PMID:26872163

  17. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  18. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  19. Fuel Cell Handbook update

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, W.R.; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Engleman, R.R. Jr.; Stauffer, D.B.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of this work was to update the 1988 version of DOE`s Fuel Cell Handbook. Significant developments in the various fuel cell technologies required revisions to reflect state-of-the-art configurations and performance. The theoretical presentation was refined in order to make the handbook more useful to both the casual reader and fuel cell or systems analyst. In order to further emphasize the practical application of fuel cell technologies, the system integration information was expanded. In addition, practical elements, such as suggestions and guidelines to approximate fuel cell performance, were provided.

  20. Making Ultrathin Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, George W.; Christel, Lee A.; Merchant, J. Thomas; Gibbons, James F.

    1991-01-01

    Process produces extremely thin silicon solar cells - only 50 micrometers or less in thickness. Electrons and holes have less opportunity to recombine before collected at cell surfaces. Efficiency higher and because volume of silicon small, less chance of radiation damage in new cells. Initial steps carried out at normal thickness to reduce breakage and avoid extra cost of special handling. Cells then thinned mechanically and chemically. Final cell includes reflective layer on back surface. Layer bounces unabsorbed light back into bulk silicon so it absorbs and produces useful electrical output.

  1. Fuel Cell/Electrochemical Cell Voltage Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a new fuel cell individual-cell-voltage monitor that can be directly connected to a multi-cell fuel cell stack for direct substack power provisioning. It can also provide voltage isolation for applications in high-voltage fuel cell stacks. The technology consists of basic modules, each with an 8- to 16-cell input electrical measurement connection port. For each basic module, a power input connection would be provided for direct connection to a sub-stack of fuel cells in series within the larger stack. This power connection would allow for module power to be available in the range of 9-15 volts DC. The relatively low voltage differences that the module would encounter from the input electrical measurement connection port, coupled with the fact that the module's operating power is supplied by the same substack voltage input (and so will be at similar voltage), provides for elimination of high-commonmode voltage issues within each module. Within each module, there would be options for analog-to-digital conversion and data transfer schemes. Each module would also include a data-output/communication port. Each of these ports would be required to be either non-electrical (e.g., optically isolated) or electrically isolated. This is necessary to account for the fact that the plurality of modules attached to the stack will normally be at a range of voltages approaching the full range of the fuel cell stack operating voltages. A communications/ data bus could interface with the several basic modules. Options have been identified for command inputs from the spacecraft vehicle controller, and for output-status/data feeds to the vehicle.

  2. Schwann cells promote endothelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Tiago; Ahmed, Maqsood; Wieringa, Paul; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Directed cell migration is a crucial orchestrated process in embryonic development, wound healing, and immune response. The underlying substrate can provide physical and/or chemical cues that promote directed cell migration. Here, using electrospinning we developed substrates of aligned poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanofibres to study the influence of glial cells on endothelial cells (ECs) in a 3-dimensional (3D) co-culture model. ECs build blood vessels and regulate their plasticity in coordination with neurons. Likewise, neurons construct nerves and regulate their circuits in coordination with ECs. In our model, the neuro-vascular cross-talk was assessed using a direct co-culture model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat Schwann cells (rSCs). The effect of rSCs on ECs behavior was demonstrated by earlier and higher velocity values and genetic expression profiles different of those of HUVECs when seeded alone. We observed 2 different gene expression trends in the co-culture models: (i) a later gene expression of angiogenic factors, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and (ii) an higher gene expression of genes involved in actin filaments rearrangement, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 13 (MAPKAPK13), Vinculin (VCL), and Profilin (PROF). These results suggested that the higher ECs migration is mainly due to proteins involved in the actin filaments rearrangement and in the directed cell migration rather than the effect of angiogenic factors. This co-culture model provides an approach to enlighten the neurovascular interactions, with particular focus on endothelial cell migration. PMID:26491999

  3. Parameterization of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D.

    1992-10-01

    The aggregation (sorting) of the individual solar cells into an array is commonly based on a single operating point on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve. An alternative approach for cell performance prediction and cell screening is provided by modeling the cell using an equivalent electrical circuit, in which the parameters involved are related to the physical phenomena in the device. These analytical models may be represented by a double exponential I-V characteristic with seven parameters, by a double exponential model with five parameters, or by a single exponential equation with four or five parameters. In this article we address issues concerning methodologies for the determination of solar cell parameters based on measured data points of the I-V characteristic, and introduce a procedure for screening of solar cells for arrays. We show that common curve fitting techniques, e.g., least squares, may produce many combinations of parameter values while maintaining a good fit between the fitted and measured I-V characteristics of the cell. Therefore, techniques relying on curve fitting criteria alone cannot be directly used for cell parameterization. We propose a consistent procedure which takes into account the entire set of parameter values for a batch of cells. This procedure is based on a definition of a mean cell representing the batch, and takes into account the relative contribution of each parameter to the overall goodness of fit. The procedure is demonstrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells for Space Station Freedom.

  4. Mast cells and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Theoharides, Theoharis C.; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Delivanis, Danae-Anastasia; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Zhang, Bodi; Asadi, Shahrzad; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Weng, Zuyi; Miniati, Alexandra; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are well known for their role in allergic and anaphylactic reactions, as well as their involvement in acquired and innate immunity. Increasing evidence now implicates mast cells in inflammatory diseases where they are activated by non-allergic triggers, such as neuropeptides and cytokines, often exerting synergistic effects as in the case of IL-33. Mast cells can also release pro-inflammatory mediators selectively without degranulation. In particular, IL-1 induces selective release of IL-6, while corticotropin-releasing hormone secreted under stress induces the release of vascular endothelial growth factor. Many inflammatory diseases involve mast cells in cross-talk with T cells, such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, which all worsen by stress. How mast cell differential responses are regulated is still unresolved. Preliminary evidence suggests that mitochondrial function and dynamics control mast cell degranulation, but not selective release. Recent findings also indicate that mast cells have immunomodulatory properties. Understanding selective release of mediators could explain how mast cells participate in numerous diverse biologic processes, and how they exert both immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive actions. Unraveling selective mast cell secretion could also help develop unique mast cell inhibitors with novel therapeutic applications. PMID:21185371

  5. Parameterization of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D.

    1992-01-01

    The aggregation (sorting) of the individual solar cells into an array is commonly based on a single operating point on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve. An alternative approach for cell performance prediction and cell screening is provided by modeling the cell using an equivalent electrical circuit, in which the parameters involved are related to the physical phenomena in the device. These analytical models may be represented by a double exponential I-V characteristic with seven parameters, by a double exponential model with five parameters, or by a single exponential equation with four or five parameters. In this article we address issues concerning methodologies for the determination of solar cell parameters based on measured data points of the I-V characteristic, and introduce a procedure for screening of solar cells for arrays. We show that common curve fitting techniques, e.g., least squares, may produce many combinations of parameter values while maintaining a good fit between the fitted and measured I-V characteristics of the cell. Therefore, techniques relying on curve fitting criteria alone cannot be directly used for cell parameterization. We propose a consistent procedure which takes into account the entire set of parameter values for a batch of cells. This procedure is based on a definition of a mean cell representing the batch, and takes into account the relative contribution of each parameter to the overall goodness of fit. The procedure is demonstrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells for Space Station Freedom.

  6. Stem cells and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongling; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the latest developments in reproductive tract stem cell biology. Recent findings In 2004, two studies indicated that ovaries contain stem cells which form oocytes in adults and that can be cultured in vitro into mature oocytes. A live birth after orthotopic transplantation of cyropreserved ovarian tissue in a woman whose ovaries were damaged by chemotherapy demonstrates the clinical potential of these cells. In the same year, another study provided novel evidence of endometrial regeneration by stem cells in women who received bone marrow transplants. This finding has potential for the use in treatment of uterine disorders. It also supports a new theory for the cause of endometriosis, which may have its origin in ectopic transdifferentiation of stem cells. Several recent studies have demonstrated that fetal cells enter the maternal circulation and generate microchimerism in the mother. The uterus is a dynamic organ permeable to fetal stem cells, capable of transdifferentiation and an end organ in which bone marrow stem cells may differentiate. Finally stem cell transformation can be an underlying cause of ovarian cancer. Summary Whereas we are just beginning to understand stem cells, the potential implications of stem cells to reproductive biology and medicine are apparent. PMID:20305558

  7. Synchronization of cells.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Eiichiro

    2006-01-01

    Synchronization of cells is essential to study cell cycle specific events. If, for example, one suspects that a given DNA repair pathway is used in a particular cell cycle phase, the protocol can be used to enrich cells in each phase of the cell cycle and analyze the cellular response to DNA damage. Synchronization is also useful, when a gene is essential for a particular phase of the cell cycle. If a gene is, for example, essential for mitosis, synchronization of the cells in G1 phase with concomitant inactivation of the gene enables us to study the function of the gene in interphase, and to follow synchronous cell cycle progression to M phase. Two synchronization methods: centrifugal elutriation to enrich G1, S or G2 phase cells and nocodazole-mimocine sequential treatment to enrich cells at the G1/S boundary are described. Centrifugal elutriation can be achieved in less time (0.5-2 h) and with very little physiological stress to the cells whereas synchronization by drugs, such as nocodazole and mimocine, may result in unfavorable side effects.

  8. Cell(s) of Origin of LCH

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Matthew; Bigley, Venetia; McClain, Kenneth L; Allen, Carl E

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a diagnosis encompassing a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, characterized by the common finding of inflammatory lesions containing clonal CD1a+ Langerin+ (CD207) histiocytes or LCH cells. Based on phenotypic similarity of LCH cells and epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), models of pathogenesis have focused on aberrations in the differentiation of epidermal LCs. Recently, activating somatic mutations in the MAPK pathway have been discovered in the majority of cases of LCH and ERK phosphorylation appears to be universal in LCH cells. Using the BRAF V600E mutation as a lineage marker, emerging data support a model in which MAPK activation in self-renewing hematopoietic progenitors may drive disseminated high-risk disease, whereas MAPK activation in more differentiated committed myeloid precursors or peripheral tissue myeloid populations may induce multifocal or unifocal low-risk LCH. The heterogeneous clinical manifestations with shared histology may therefore represent the final common pathway of an acquired defect of differentiation, initiated at more than one point. Implications of this model include re-definition of LCH as a myeloid neoplasia and re-focusing therapeutic strategies on the cells and lineages of origin. PMID:26461145

  9. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    PubMed

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  10. Biosensing with cell phones.

    PubMed

    Preechaburana, Pakorn; Suska, Anke; Filippini, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Continued progress in cell-phone devices has made them powerful mobile computers, equipped with sophisticated, permanent physical sensors embedded as the default configuration. By contrast, the incorporation of permanent biosensors in cell-phone units has been prevented by the multivocal nature of the stimuli and the reactions involved in biosensing and chemical sensing. Biosensing with cell phones entails the complementation of biosensing devices with the physical sensors and communication and processing capabilities of modern cell phones. Biosensing, chemical-sensing, environmental-sensing, and diagnostic capabilities would thus be supported and run on the residual capacity of existing cell-phone infrastructure. The technologies necessary to materialize such a scenario have emerged in different fields and applications. This article addresses the progress on cell-phone biosensing, the specific compromises, and the blend of technologies required to craft biosensing on cell phones.

  11. Cell wall integrity

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The plant cell wall, a dynamic network of polysaccharides and glycoproteins of significant compositional and structural complexity, functions in plant growth, development and stress responses. In recent years, the existence of plant cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance mechanisms has been demonstrated, but little is known about the signaling pathways involved, or their components. Examination of key mutants has shed light on the relationships between cell wall remodeling and plant cell responses, indicating a central role for the regulatory network that monitors and controls cell wall performance and integrity. In this review, we present a short overview of cell wall composition and discuss post-synthetic cell wall modification as a valuable approach for studying CWI perception and signaling pathways. PMID:23857352

  12. Cell sorting apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Polymeric functional microspheres containing metal or metal compounds are formed by addition polymerization of a covalently bondable olefinic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate in the presence of finely divided metal or metal oxide particles, such as iron, gold, platinum or magnetite, which are embedded in the resulting microspheres. The microspheres can be covalently bonded to chemotherapeutic agents, antibodies, or other proteins providing a means for labeling or separating labeled cells. Labeled cells or microspheres can be concentrated at a specific body location such as in the vicinity of a malignant tumor by applying a magnetic field to the location and then introducing the magnetically attractable microspheres or cells into the circulatory system of the subject. Labeled cells can be separated from a cell mixture by applying a predetermined magnetic field to a tube in which the mixture is flowing. After collection of the labeled cells, the magnetic field is discontinued and the labeled sub-cell population recovered.

  13. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  14. Live cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Freedberg, Darón I; Selenko, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Ever since scientists realized that cells are the basic building blocks of all life, they have been developing tools to look inside them to reveal the architectures and mechanisms that define their biological functions. Whereas "looking into cells" is typically said in reference to optical microscopy, high-resolution in-cell and on-cell nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful method that offers exciting new possibilities for structural and functional studies in and on live cells. In contrast to conventional imaging techniques, in- and on-cell NMR methods do not provide spatial information on cellular biomolecules. Instead, they enable atomic-resolution insights into the native cell states of proteins, nucleic acids, glycans, and lipids. Here we review recent advances and developments in both fields and discuss emerging concepts that have been delineated with these methods.

  15. Tuning cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Kami, Daisuke; Gojo, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic interventions are required to induce reprogramming from one cell type to another. At present, various cellular reprogramming methods such as somatic cell nuclear transfer, cell fusion, and direct reprogramming using transcription factors have been reported. In particular, direct reprogramming from somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has been achieved using defined factors that play important epigenetic roles. Although the mechanisms underlying cellular reprogramming and vertebrate regeneration, including appendage regeneration, remain unknown, dedifferentiation occurs at an early phase in both the events, and both events are contrasting with regard to cell death. We compared the current status of changes in cell fate of iPSCs with that of vertebrate regeneration and suggested that substantial insights into vertebrate regeneration should be helpful for safe applications of iPSCs to medicine. PMID:24736602

  16. Cell(s) of Origin of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Collin, Matthew; Bigley, Venetia; McClain, Kenneth L; Allen, Carl E

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is heterogeneous disease characterized by common histology of inflammatory lesions containing Langerin(+) (CD207) histiocytes. Emerging data support a model in which MAPK activation in self-renewing hematopoietic progenitors may drive disseminated high-risk disease, whereas MAPK activation in more differentiated committed myeloid populations may induce low-risk LCH. The heterogeneous clinical manifestations with shared histology may represent the final common pathway of an acquired defect of differentiation, initiated at more than one point. Implications of this model include re-definition of LCH as a myeloid neoplasia and re-focusing therapeutic strategies on the cells and lineages of origin. PMID:26461145

  17. Cell(s) of Origin of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Collin, Matthew; Bigley, Venetia; McClain, Kenneth L; Allen, Carl E

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is heterogeneous disease characterized by common histology of inflammatory lesions containing Langerin(+) (CD207) histiocytes. Emerging data support a model in which MAPK activation in self-renewing hematopoietic progenitors may drive disseminated high-risk disease, whereas MAPK activation in more differentiated committed myeloid populations may induce low-risk LCH. The heterogeneous clinical manifestations with shared histology may represent the final common pathway of an acquired defect of differentiation, initiated at more than one point. Implications of this model include re-definition of LCH as a myeloid neoplasia and re-focusing therapeutic strategies on the cells and lineages of origin.

  18. Involvement of Plant Stem Cells or Stem Cell-Like Cells in Dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fangwei; Feng, Zhenhua; Liu, Hailiang; Zhu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells) are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation. PMID:26635851

  19. Membrane Cells for Brine Electrolysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tingle, M.

    1982-01-01

    Membrane cells were developed as alternatives to mercury and diaphragm cells for the electrolysis of brine. Compares the three types of cells, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of membrane cells. (JN)

  20. Information on Stem Cell Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Information on Stem Cell Research Research @ NINDS Stem Cell Highlights Submit a hESC ... found here: Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells NINDS Stem Cell Research on Campus The Intramural Research Program of NINDS ...

  1. Nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin(+) cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin(+) cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin(+) cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin(+) stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin(+) cells-but not in endothelial cells only- increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  2. Energetics of cell-cell and cell-biopolymer interactions.

    PubMed

    van Oss, C J

    1989-02-01

    The energy vs distance balance of cell suspensions (in the presence and in the absence of extracellular biopolymer solutions) is studied, not only in the light of the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory (which considered just the electrostatic (EL) and Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) interactions), but also by taking electron-acceptor/electron-donor, or Lewis acid-base (AB) and osmotic (OS) interactions into account. Since cell surfaces, as well as many biopolymers tend to have strong monopolar electron-donor properties, they are able to engage in a strong mutual AB repulsion when immersed in a polar liquid such as water. The effects of that repulsion have been observed earlier in the guise of hydration pressure. The AB repulsion is, at close range, typically one or two orders of magnitude stronger than the EL repulsion, but its rate of decay is much steeper. In most cases, AB interactions are quantitatively the dominant factor in cell stability (when repulsive) and in "hydrophobic interactions" (when attractive). OS interactions exerted by extracellularly dissolved biopolymers are weak, but their rate of decay is very gradual, so OS repulsions engendered by biopolymer solutions may be of importance in certain long-range interactions. OS interactions exerted by biopolymers attached to cells or particles (e.g., by glycocalix glycoproteins), are very short-ranged and usually are negligibly small in comparison with the other interaction forces, in aqueous media.

  3. T follicular regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Sage, Peter T; Sharpe, Arlene H

    2016-05-01

    Pathogen exposure elicits production of high-affinity antibodies stimulated by T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in the germinal center reaction. Tfh cells provide both costimulation and stimulatory cytokines to B cells to facilitate affinity maturation, class switch recombination, and plasma cell differentiation within the germinal center. Under normal circumstances, the germinal center reaction results in antibodies that precisely target foreign pathogens while limiting autoimmunity and excessive inflammation. In order to have this degree of control, the immune system ensures Tfh-mediated B-cell help is regulated locally in the germinal center. The recently identified T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cell subset can migrate to the germinal center and inhibit Tfh-mediated B-cell activation and antibody production. Although many aspects of Tfr cell biology are still unclear, recent data have begun to delineate the specialized roles of Tfr cells in controlling the germinal center reaction. Here we discuss the current understanding of Tfr-cell differentiation and function and how this knowledge is providing new insights into the dynamic regulation of germinal centers, and suggesting more efficacious vaccine strategies and ways to treat antibody-mediated diseases.

  4. T Cells in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    Cartilaginous and bony fish are the most primitive vertebrates with a thymus, and possess T cells equivalent to those in mammals. There are a number of studies in fish demonstrating that the thymus is the essential organ for development of T lymphocytes from early thymocyte progenitors to functionally competent T cells. A high number of T cells in the intestine and gills has been reported in several fish species. Involvement of CD4+ and CD8α+ T cells in allograft rejection and graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Conservation of CD4+ helper T cell functions among teleost fishes has been suggested in a number studies employing mixed leukocyte culture (MLC) and hapten/carrier effect. Alloantigen- and virus-specific cytotoxicity has also been demonstrated in ginbuna and rainbow trout. Furthermore, the important role of cell-mediated immunity rather than humoral immunity has been reported in the protection against intracellular bacterial infection. Recently, the direct antibacterial activity of CD8α+, CD4+ T-cells and sIgM+ cells in fish has been reported. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in T cell research focusing on the tissue distribution and function of fish T cells. PMID:26426066

  5. Fragmentation of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, Siva; Kamyabi, Nabiollah

    Tumor cells have to travel through blood capillaries to be able to metastasize and colonize in distant organs. Among the numerous cells that are shed by the primary tumor, very few survive in circulation. In vivo studies have shown that tumor cells can undergo breakup at microcapillary junctions affecting their survival. It is currently unclear what hydrodynamic and biomechanical factors contribute to fragmentation and moreover how different are the breakup dynamics of highly and weakly metastatic cells. In this study, we use microfluidics to investigate flow-induced breakup of prostate and breast cancer cells. We observe several different modes of breakup of cancer cells, which have striking similarities with breakup of viscous drops. We quantify the breakup time and find that highly metastatic cancer cells take longer to breakup than lowly metastatic cells suggesting that tumor cells may dynamically modify their deformability to avoid fragmentation. We also identify the role that cytoskeleton and membrane plays in the breakup process. Our study highlights the important role that tumor cell fragmentation plays in cancer metastasis. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

  6. Simple Cell Balance Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven D.; Byers, Jerry W.; Martin, James A.

    2012-01-01

    A method has been developed for continuous cell voltage balancing for rechargeable batteries (e.g. lithium ion batteries). A resistor divider chain is provided that generates a set of voltages representing the ideal cell voltage (the voltage of each cell should be as if the cells were perfectly balanced). An operational amplifier circuit with an added current buffer stage generates the ideal voltage with a very high degree of accuracy, using the concept of negative feedback. The ideal voltages are each connected to the corresponding cell through a current- limiting resistance. Over time, having the cell connected to the ideal voltage provides a balancing current that moves the cell voltage very close to that ideal level. In effect, it adjusts the current of each cell during charging, discharging, and standby periods to force the cell voltages to be equal to the ideal voltages generated by the resistor divider. The device also includes solid-state switches that disconnect the circuit from the battery so that it will not discharge the battery during storage. This solution requires relatively few parts and is, therefore, of lower cost and of increased reliability due to the fewer failure modes. Additionally, this design uses very little power. A preliminary model predicts a power usage of 0.18 W for an 8-cell battery. This approach is applicable to a wide range of battery capacities and voltages.

  7. Mast Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2014-01-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role. PMID:25062998

  8. Brain tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies.

  9. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Cross, Frederick R; Umen, James G

    2015-05-01

    The position of Chlamydomonas within the eukaryotic phylogeny makes it a unique model in at least two important ways: as a representative of the critically important, early-diverging lineage leading to plants; and as a microbe retaining important features of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) that has been lost in the highly studied yeast lineages. Its cell biology has been studied for many decades and it has well-developed experimental genetic tools, both classical (Mendelian) and molecular. Unlike land plants, it is a haploid with very few gene duplicates, making it ideal for loss-of-function genetic studies. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle has a striking temporal and functional separation between cell growth and rapid cell division, probably connected to the interplay between diurnal cycles that drive photosynthetic cell growth and the cell division cycle; it also exhibits a highly choreographed interaction between the cell cycle and its centriole-basal body-flagellar cycle. Here, we review the current status of studies of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. We begin with an overview of cell-cycle control in the well-studied yeast and animal systems, which has yielded a canonical, well-supported model. We discuss briefly what is known about similarities and differences in plant cell-cycle control, compared with this model. We next review the cytology and cell biology of the multiple-fission cell cycle of Chlamydomonas. Lastly, we review recent genetic approaches and insights into Chlamydomonas cell-cycle regulation that have been enabled by a new generation of genomics-based tools.

  10. Successful differentiation to T cells, but unsuccessful B-cell generation, from B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kojo, Satoshi; Kusama, Chie; Okamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yorino; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Forced expression of certain transcription factors in somatic cells results in generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which differentiate into various cell types. We investigated T-cell and B-cell lineage differentiation from iPS cells in vitro. To evaluate the impact of iPS cell source, murine splenic B-cell-derived iPS (B-iPS) cells were generated after retroviral transduction of four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). B-iPS cells were identical to embryonic stem (ES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived iPS cells in morphology, ES cell marker expression as well as teratoma and chimera mouse formation. Both B-iPS and MEF-derived iPS cells differentiated into lymphocytes in OP9 co-culture systems. Both efficiently differentiated into T-cell lineage that produced IFN-γ on T-cell receptor stimulation. However, iPS cells including B-iPS cells were relatively resistant to B-cell lineage differentiation. One of the reasons of the failure of B-cell lineage differentiation seemed due to a defect of Pax5 expression in the differentiated cells. Therefore, current in vitro differentiation systems using iPS cells are sufficient for inducing T-cell but not B-cell lineage. PMID:21135032

  11. New cell sources for T cell engineering and adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Themeli, Maria; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The promising clinical results obtained with engineered T cells, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy, call for further advancements to facilitate and broaden their applicability. One potentially beneficial innovation is to exploit new T cell sources that reduce the need for autologous cell manufacturing and enable cell transfer across histocompatibility barriers. Here we review emerging T cell engineering approaches that utilize alternative T cell sources, which include virus-specific or T cell receptor-less allogeneic T cells, expanded lymphoid progenitors, and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived T lymphocytes. The latter offer the prospect for true off-the-shelf, genetically enhanced, histocompatible cell therapy products.

  12. Cell-Substrate Adhesion by Amoeboid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Panta, Krishna

    Amoeboid migration is a rapid (10 μm min-1) mode of migration that some tumor cells exhibit. To permit such rapid movement, the adhesive contacts between the cell and the substrate must be relatively short-lived and weak. In this study, we investigate the basic adhesive character of amoeboid cells (D. discoideum) in contact with silanized glass substrates. We observe the initiation and spreading of the adhesive contacts that these cells establish as they settle under gravity onto the substrate and relax towards mechanical equilibrium. The use of interference reflection microscopy and cellular tethering measurements have allowed us to determine the basic adhesive properties of the cell: the membrane-medium interfacial energy; the bending modulus; the equilibrium contact angle; and the work of adhesion. We find the time scale on which settling occurs to be longer than expected. Implications of these results on adhesion and migration will be discussed. The authors are grateful for support from NSF (CBET-1451903) and NIH (1R21EY026392).

  13. Oral Rigosertib for Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  14. Concentrator silicon cell research

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A.

    1992-04-01

    This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

  15. Solar cell shingle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Ratajczak, A. F.; Sidorak, L. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A solar cell shingle was made of an array of solar cells on a lower portion of a substantially rectangular shingle substrate made of fiberglass cloth or the like. The solar cells may be encapsulated in flourinated ethylene propylene or some other weatherproof translucent or transparent encapsulant to form a combined electrical module and a roof shingle. The interconnected solar cells were connected to connectors at the edge of the substrate through a connection to a common electrical bus or busses. An overlap area was arranged to receive the overlap of a cooperating similar shingle so that the cell portion of the cooperating shingle may overlie the overlap area of the roof shingle. Accordingly, the same shingle serves the double function of an ordinary roof shingle which may be applied in the usual way and an array of cooperating solar cells from which electrical energy may be collected.

  16. Mechanical plasticity of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, Navid; Gerum, Richard; Kuhn, Michael; Spörrer, Marina; Lippert, Anna; Schneider, Werner; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Under mechanical loading, most living cells show a viscoelastic deformation that follows a power law in time. After removal of the mechanical load, the cell shape recovers only incompletely to its original undeformed configuration. Here, we show that incomplete shape recovery is due to an additive plastic deformation that displays the same power-law dynamics as the fully reversible viscoelastic deformation response. Moreover, the plastic deformation is a constant fraction of the total cell deformation and originates from bond ruptures within the cytoskeleton. A simple extension of the prevailing viscoelastic power-law response theory with a plastic element correctly predicts the cell behaviour under cyclic loading. Our findings show that plastic energy dissipation during cell deformation is tightly linked to elastic cytoskeletal stresses, which suggests the existence of an adaptive mechanism that protects the cell against mechanical damage.

  17. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  18. [Stem cells and cancer].

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Cotte, Carlos; Sojo, Felipe

    2014-12-01

    Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of the cells that form the tumor. The discovery of these human cancer cells opens a perspective for understanding tumor recurrence, drug resistance and metastasis; and opens up new research directions on how cancer cells are capable of switching from dormancy to malignancy. Therapeutic alternatives emerge from a better understanding of the biology and the environment of tumor stem cells. The present paper aims to summarize the characteristics and properties of cancer stem cells, the ongoing research, as well as the best strategies for prevention and control of the mechanisms of tumor recurrence.

  19. Integral diode solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mardesich, W.; Gillanders, M.S.

    1984-05-01

    To achieve high power at minimum weight, innovative array designs are needed. In the case where shadows fall across a series element in a simple circuit, the effective power will be reduced or eliminated. The conventional method of eliminating this loss is the introduction of bypass diodes. This method increases cost and weight and reduces available surface area. An alternative solution to the shadowing problem is to use integral diode solar cells. The integral diode cell has a built-in diode on the back that protects the adjacent cell and passes the current if it is shadowed. This paper will describe the effort to produce the integral diode cells in a production facility with a minimum cost impact. The electrical characterization of the cell as well as the diode will be presented. These cells can be readily manufactured in a production facility using photoresist defined contacting process.

  20. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to reality. However, as somatic cells might have accumulated various chromosomal abnormalities, including aneuploidies throughout their lives, the resulting IPSCs might no longer carry the perfect blueprint for the tissue to be generated, or worse, become at risk of adopting a malignant fate. In this review, we discuss the contribution of aneuploidy to healthy tissues and how aneuploidy can lead to disease. Furthermore, we review the differences between how somatic cells and stem cells respond to aneuploidy. PMID:27354891

  1. Myoepithelial cells in pathology.

    PubMed

    Balachander, N; Masthan, K M K; Babu, N Aravindha; Anbazhagan, V

    2015-04-01

    Myoepithelial cells are a normal constituent of the salivary acini and ducts and are found between the epithelial cells and the basement membrane. Microscopically myoepithelial cells are thin and spindle-shaped and ultrastructurally they possess a number of Cytoplasmic processes that extend between and over the acinar and ductal-lining cells, and they show features of both smooth muscle and epithelium. They play a vital role during expulsion of saliva and regulates the electrolytic exchange. They also perform as tumor suppressors and are considered to play a very important role in differentiation of various salivary gland tumors and help in the diagnosis of tumors. Neoplastic myoepithelial cells in both benign and malignant tumors can take numerous forms including epithelioid, plasmacytoid, spindle and clear cell variant, and this variability largely accounts for difficulties in histopathological diagnosis.

  2. Entosis and Related Forms of Cell Death within Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Wang, X-D

    2015-01-01

    By eliminating the unneeded or mutant cells, programmed cell death actively participates in a wide range of biological processes from embryonic development to homeostasis maintenance in adult. Continuing efforts have identified multiple cell death pathways, with apoptosis, necrosis and autophage the mostly studied. Recently a unique cell death pathway called "cell-in-cell death" has been defined. Unlike traditional cell death pathways, cell-in-cell death, characterized by cell death within another cell, is triggered by the invasion of one cell into its neighbor and executed by either lysosome-dependent degradation or caspase-dependent apoptosis. With remarkable progresses on cell-in-cell over past few years, multiple mechanisms, including entosis, cannibalism and emperitosis, are found to be responsible for cell-in-cell death. Some key questions, such as specific biochemical markers to distinguish precisely the properties of different cell-in-cell structures and the physiological and pathological relevance, remain to be addressed. In light of this situation and a surge of interests, leading scientists in this field intend to share with readers current research progresses on cell-in-cell structures from different model systems through this special edition on cell-in-cell. The mechanistic advances will be highlighted while the future researches be speculated. PMID:26511710

  3. Traction in smooth muscle cells varies with cell spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cell shape regulate cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been suggested that the regulation of cell function by the cell shape is a result of the tension in the cytoskeleton and the distortion of the cell. Here we explore the association between cell-generated mechanical forces and the cell morphology. We hypothesized that the cell contractile force is associated with the degree of cell spreading, in particular with the cell length. We measured traction fields of single human airway smooth muscle cells plated on a polyacrylamide gel, in which fluorescent microbeads were embedded to serve as markers of gel deformation. The traction exerted by the cells at the cell-substrate interface was determined from the measured deformation of the gel. The traction was measured before and after treatment with the contractile agonist histamine, or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The relative increase in traction induced by histamine was negatively correlated with the baseline traction. On the contrary, the relative decrease in traction due to isoproterenol was independent of the baseline traction, but it was associated with cell shape: traction decreased more in elongated than in round cells. Maximum cell width, mean cell width, and projected area of the cell were the parameters most tightly coupled to both baseline and histamine-induced traction in this study. Wide and well-spread cells exerted larger traction than slim cells. These results suggest that cell contractility is controlled by cell spreading.

  4. Quantitative methods for analyzing cell-cell adhesion in development.

    PubMed

    Kashef, Jubin; Franz, Clemens M

    2015-05-01

    During development cell-cell adhesion is not only crucial to maintain tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, it also activates signalling pathways important for the regulation of different cellular processes including cell survival, gene expression, collective cell migration and differentiation. Importantly, gene mutations of adhesion receptors can cause developmental disorders and different diseases. Quantitative methods to measure cell adhesion are therefore necessary to understand how cells regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and how aberrations in cell-cell adhesion contribute to disease. Different in vitro adhesion assays have been developed in the past, but not all of them are suitable to study developmentally-related cell-cell adhesion processes, which usually requires working with low numbers of primary cells. In this review, we provide an overview of different in vitro techniques to study cell-cell adhesion during development, including a semi-quantitative cell flipping assay, and quantitative single-cell methods based on atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) or dual micropipette aspiration (DPA). Furthermore, we review applications of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based molecular tension sensors to visualize intracellular mechanical forces acting on cell adhesion sites. Finally, we describe a recently introduced method to quantitate cell-generated forces directly in living tissues based on the deformation of oil microdroplets functionalized with adhesion receptor ligands. Together, these techniques provide a comprehensive toolbox to characterize different cell-cell adhesion phenomena during development.

  5. NK cell depletion diminish tumour-specific B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Markus; Tawadros, Samir; Sedlacek, Hans-Harald; Schultze, Joachim L; Berthold, Frank

    2004-05-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells can exercise immediate cytotoxicity against malignant cells and thus far modulate the development of tumour directed T cell immunity. To investigate the impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell immunity mice were immunised with IMR5-75 human neuroblastoma cells with or without prior in vivo NK cell depletion. Flow cytometry analyses gave evidence for an impaired IgG response against the cells immunised with. Dissection of Th1 (IgG2a) and Th2 (IgG1) oriented B cell responses revealed Th1 responses as primarily affected, while Th2 oriented B cell responses as measured by flow cytometry and GD2 ganglioside-specific ELISA were enforced. The data reveal an unexpected impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell responses. Consequently, NK cell function has also to be taken into account when developing B cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin+ cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin+ cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin+ cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin+ stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin+ cells—but not in endothelial cells only— increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  7. Improving Cell Engraftment in Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) affects millions of people worldwide. MI causes massive cardiac cell death and heart function decrease. However, heart tissue cannot effectively regenerate by itself. While stem cell therapy has been considered an effective approach for regeneration, the efficacy of cardiac stem cell therapy remains low due to inferior cell engraftment in the infarcted region. This is mainly a result of low cell retention in the tissue and poor cell survival under ischemic, immune rejection and inflammatory conditions. Various approaches have been explored to improve cell engraftment: increase of cell retention using biomaterials as cell carriers; augmentation of cell survival under ischemic conditions by preconditioning cells, genetic modification of cells, and controlled release of growth factors and oxygen; and enhancement of cell survival by protecting cells from excessive inflammation and immune surveillance. In this paper, we review current progress, advantages, disadvantages, and potential solutions of these approaches. PMID:26783405

  8. Rechargeable Magnesium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Orsini, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Rechargeable power cells based on magnesium anodes developed as safer alternatives to high-energy-density cells like those based on lithium and sodium anodes. At cost of some reduction in energy density, magnesium-based cells safer because less susceptible to catastrophic meltdown followed by flames and venting of toxic fumes. Other advantages include ease of handling, machining, and disposal, and relatively low cost.

  9. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  10. Insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Insa S; Kania, Gabriela; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Wobus, Anna M

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells offer great potential for cell replacement and tissue engineering therapies because of their almost unlimited proliferation capacity and the potential to differentiate into cellular derivatives of all three primary germ layers. This chapter describes a strategy for the in vitro differentiation of mouse ES cells into insulin-producing cells. The three-step protocol does not select for nestin-expressing cells as performed in previous differentiation systems. It includes (1) the spontaneous differentiation of ES cells via embryoid bodies and (2) the formation of progenitor cells of all three primary germ layers (multilineage progenitors) followed by (3) directed differentiation into the pancreatic lineage. The application of growth and extracellular matrix factors, including laminin, nicotinamide, and insulin, leads to the development of committed pancreatic progenitors, which subsequently differentiate into islet-like clusters that release insulin in response to glucose. During differentiation, transcript levels of pancreas-specific transcription factors (i.e., Pdx1, Pax4) and of genes specific for early and mature beta cells, including insulin, islet amyloid pancreatic peptide, somatostatin, and glucagon, are upregulated. C-peptide/insulin-positive islet-like clusters are formed, which release insulin in response to high glucose concentrations at terminal stages. The differentiated cells reveal functional properties with respect to voltage-activated Na+ and ATP-modulated K+ channels and normalize blood glucose levels in streptozotocin-treated diabetic mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate the efficient differentiation of murine ES cells into insulin-producing cells, which may help in the future to establish ES cell-based therapies in diabetes mellitus.

  11. Systems cell biology.

    PubMed

    Mast, Fred D; Ratushny, Alexander V; Aitchison, John D

    2014-09-15

    Systems cell biology melds high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modeling to understand many critical processes that contribute to cellular organization and dynamics. Recently, there have been several advances in technology and in the application of modeling approaches that enable the exploration of the dynamic properties of cells. Merging technology and computation offers an opportunity to objectively address unsolved cellular mechanisms, and has revealed emergent properties and helped to gain a more comprehensive and fundamental understanding of cell biology.

  12. Solar cell encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A polymer syrup for encapsulating solar cell assemblies. The syrup includes uncrosslinked poly(n-butyl)acrylate dissolved in n-butyl acrylate monomer. Preparation of the poly(n-butyl)acrylate and preparation of the polymer syrup is disclosed. Methods for applying the polymer syrup to solar cell assemblies as an encapsulating pottant are described. Also included is a method for solar cell construction utilizing the polymer syrup as a dual purpose adhesive and encapsulating material.

  13. Systems cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Fred D.; Ratushny, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Systems cell biology melds high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modeling to understand many critical processes that contribute to cellular organization and dynamics. Recently, there have been several advances in technology and in the application of modeling approaches that enable the exploration of the dynamic properties of cells. Merging technology and computation offers an opportunity to objectively address unsolved cellular mechanisms, and has revealed emergent properties and helped to gain a more comprehensive and fundamental understanding of cell biology. PMID:25225336

  14. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.

    1994-08-30

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer. 1 fig.

  15. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion effiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer.

  16. Characterization of amniotic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koike, Chika; Zhou, Kaixuan; Takeda, Yuji; Fathy, Moustafa; Okabe, Motonori; Yoshida, Toshiko; Nakamura, Yukio; Kato, Yukio; Nikaido, Toshio

    2014-08-01

    The amnion membrane is developed from embryo-derived cells, and amniotic cells have been shown to exhibit multidifferentiation potential. These cells represent a desirable source for stem cells for a variety of reasons. However, to date very few molecular analyses of amnion-derived cells have been reported, and efficient markers for isolating the stem cells remain unclear. This paper assesses the characterization of amnion-derived cells as stem cells by examining stemness marker expressions for amnion-derived epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative PCR. Flow cytometry revealed that amnion epithelial cells expressed CD133, CD 271, and TRA-1-60, whereas mecenchymal cells expressed CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105. Immunohistochemistry showed that both cells expressed the stemness markers Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and SSEA4. Stemness genes' expression in amnion epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, fibroblast, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was compared by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Amnion-derived epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells expressed Oct3/4, Nanog, and Klf4 more than bone marrow-derived MSCs. The sorted TRA1-60-positive cells expressed Oct3/4, Nanog, and Klf4 more than unsorted cells or TRA1-60-negative cells. TRA1-60 can be a marker for isolating amnion epithelial stem cells.

  17. The mast cell: a multifunctional effector cell.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico; Mallardi, Franco; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are recognized key cells of type I hypersensitivity reactions. Several lines of evidence, however, indicate that MC not only express critical effector functions in classic IgE-associated allergic disorders, but also play important roles in host defence against parasites, bacteria and perhaps even viruses. Indeed, it is now clear that MC can contribute to host defence in the context of either acquired or innate immune responses through the release of a myriad of pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory molecules and the expression of a wide spectrum of surface receptors for cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, there is growing evidence that MC exert distinct nonimmunological functions, playing a relevant role in tissue homeostasis, remodeling and fibrosis as well as in the processes of tissue angiogenesis. In this review, we provide a small insight into the biology of mast cells and their potential implications in human pathology.

  18. Cell-in-cell structures are involved in the competition between cells in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Huang, Hongyan; Overholtzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The engulfment of live cells may represent a mechanism of cell death. We reported that E-cadherin (epithelial cadherin) expression in human cancer cells favors the formation of cell-in-cell structures through the mechanism known as entosis, and that entosis contributes to a form of cellular competition in heterogeneous cancer cell populations. PMID:27308493

  19. Electron tomography of cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Jensen, Grant J

    2012-02-01

    The electron microscope has contributed deep insights into biological structure since its invention nearly 80 years ago. Advances in instrumentation and methodology in recent decades have now enabled electron tomography to become the highest resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique available for unique objects such as cells. Cells can be imaged either plastic-embedded or frozen-hydrated. Then the series of projection images are aligned and back-projected to generate a 3D reconstruction or 'tomogram'. Here, we review how electron tomography has begun to reveal the molecular organization of cells and how the existing and upcoming technologies promise even greater insights into structural cell biology. PMID:22082691

  20. Red cell enzymes.

    PubMed

    Paniker, N V

    1975-03-01

    As compared to other cells of the body, the mammalian red cell has one of the simplest structural organizations. As a result, this cell has been extensively used in studies involving the structure, function, and integrity of cell membranes as well as cytoplasmic events. Additionally, the metabolic activities of the red blood cell are also relatively simple. During the past quarter century or so, an ocean of knowledge has been gathered on various aspects of red cell metabolism and function. The fields of enzymes, hemoglobin, membrane, and metabolic products comprise the major portion of this knowledge. These advances have made valuable contributions to biochemistry and medicine. Despite these favorable aspects of this simple, anucleated cell, it must be conceded that our knowledge about the red cell is far from complete. We are still in the dark concerning the mechanism involved in several aspects of its membrane, hemoglobin, enzymes, and a large number of other constituents. For example, a large number of enzymes with known catalytic activity but with unknown function have eluded investigators despite active pursuit. This review will be a consolidation of our present knowledge of human red cell enzymes, with particular reference to their usefulness in the diagnosis and therapy of disease. Owing to the multitude of publications by prominent investigators on each of the approximately 50 enzymes discussed in this review, it was impossible to cite a majority of them.

  1. Stem cells in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huei-Wen; Lin, Chun-Che; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic techniques have been recently developed for cell-based assays. In microfluidic systems, the objective is for these microenvironments to mimic in vivo surroundings. With advantageous characteristics such as optical transparency and the capability for automating protocols, different types of cells can be cultured, screened, and monitored in real time to systematically investigate their morphology and functions under well-controlled microenvironments in response to various stimuli. Recently, the study of stem cells using microfluidic platforms has attracted considerable interest. Even though stem cells have been studied extensively using bench-top systems, an understanding of their behavior in in vivo-like microenvironments which stimulate cell proliferation and differentiation is still lacking. In this paper, recent cell studies using microfluidic systems are first introduced. The various miniature systems for cell culture, sorting and isolation, and stimulation are then systematically reviewed. The main focus of this review is on papers published in recent years studying stem cells by using microfluidic technology. This review aims to provide experts in microfluidics an overview of various microfluidic systems for stem cell research. PMID:21522491

  2. Single cell dynamic phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Patsch, Katherin; Chiu, Chi-Li; Engeln, Mark; Agus, David B.; Mallick, Parag; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; Ruderman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging has improved our ability to measure phenotypic heterogeneity. However, bottlenecks in imaging and image processing often make it difficult to differentiate interesting biological behavior from technical artifact. Thus there is a need for new methods that improve data quality without sacrificing throughput. Here we present a 3-step workflow to improve dynamic phenotype measurements of heterogeneous cell populations. We provide guidelines for image acquisition, phenotype tracking, and data filtering to remove erroneous cell tracks using the novel Tracking Aberration Measure (TrAM). Our workflow is broadly applicable across imaging platforms and analysis software. By applying this workflow to cancer cell assays, we reduced aberrant cell track prevalence from 17% to 2%. The cost of this improvement was removing 15% of the well-tracked cells. This enabled detection of significant motility differences between cell lines. Similarly, we avoided detecting a false change in translocation kinetics by eliminating the true cause: varied proportions of unresponsive cells. Finally, by systematically seeking heterogeneous behaviors, we detected subpopulations that otherwise could have been missed, including early apoptotic events and pre-mitotic cells. We provide optimized protocols for specific applications and step-by-step guidelines for adapting them to a variety of biological systems. PMID:27708391

  3. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  4. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Solar cell theory cells are manufactured, and how they are modeled mathematically is reviewed. The interaction of energetic charged particle radiation with solar cells is discussed in detail and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Finally, an extensive body of data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence is presented.

  5. Viral Entry into Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2010-09-01

    Successful viral infection of a healthy cell requires complex host-pathogen interactions. In this talk we focus on the dynamics specific to the HIV virus entering a eucaryotic cell. We model viral entry as a stochastic engagement of receptors and coreceptors on the cell surface. We also consider the transport of virus material to the cell nucleus by coupling microtubular motion to the concurrent biochemical transformations that render the viral material competent for nuclear entry. We discuss both mathematical and biological consequences of our model, such as the formulation of an effective integrodifferential boundary condition embodying a memory kernel and optimal timing in maximizing viral probabilities.

  6. Multiple granular cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Jones, J K; Kuo, T T; Griffiths, C M; Itharat, S

    1980-10-01

    Eleven cases of granular cell tumor were reviewed. In two of the cases multiple sites of involvement were seen. The tumor occurred in the oral cavity in both of these cases and each was initially wrongly diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. The most common site was the subcutaneous tissue (nine patients) and the tongue was involved in three cases. In one patient the parotid gland was involved. Eight of the patients were females and three were males; seven were black and four were white. The importance of differentiating between squamous cell carcinoma and granular cell tumor is stressed, as is the need for a simple wide surgical excision. PMID:7421377

  7. Endocrine taste cells.

    PubMed

    Kokrashvili, Zaza; Yee, Karen K; Ilegems, Erwin; Iwatsuki, Ken; Li, Yan; Mosinger, Bedrich; Margolskee, Robert F

    2014-06-01

    In taste cells, taste receptors, their coupled G proteins and downstream signalling elements mediate the detection and transduction of sweet, bitter and umami compounds. In some intestinal endocrine cells, taste receptors and gustducin contribute to the release of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and other gut hormones in response to glucose and non-energetic sweeteners. Conversely, taste cells have been found to express multiple hormones typically found in intestinal endocrine cells, e.g. GLP-1, glucagon, somatostatin and ghrelin. In the present study, by immunohistochemistry, multiple subsets of taste cells were found to express GLP-1. The release of GLP-1 from 'endocrine taste cells' into the bloodstream was examined. In wild-type mice, even after oesophagectomy and vagotomy, oral stimulation with glucose induced an elevation of GLP-1 levels in the bloodstream within 10 min. Stimulation of taste cell explants from wild-type mice with glucose led to the release of GLP-1 into the medium. Knocking out of the Tas1r3 gene did not eliminate glucose-stimulated GLP-1 release from taste cells in vivo. The present results indicate that a portion of the cephalic-phase rise in circulating GLP-1 levels is mediated by the direct release of GLP-1 from taste cells into the bloodstream.

  8. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  9. Autophagic cell death exists

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Peter G.H.; Puyal, Julien

    2012-01-01

    The term autophagic cell death (ACD) initially referred to cell death with greatly enhanced autophagy, but is increasingly used to imply a death-mediating role of autophagy, as shown by a protective effect of autophagy inhibition. In addition, many authors require that autophagic cell death must not involve apoptosis or necrosis. Adopting these new and restrictive criteria, and emphasizing their own failure to protect human osteosarcoma cells by autophagy inhibition, the authors of a recent Editor’s Corner article in this journal argued for the extreme rarity or nonexistence of autophagic cell death. We here maintain that, even with the more stringent recent criteria, autophagic cell death exists in several situations, some of which were ignored by the Editor’s Corner authors. We reject their additional criterion that the autophagy in ACD must be the agent of ultimate cell dismantlement. And we argue that rapidly dividing mammalian cells such as cancer cells are not the most likely situation for finding pure ACD. PMID:22652592

  10. Micro fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, L.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Hockaday, R.

    1998-12-31

    An ambient temperature, liquid feed, direct methanol fuel cell device is under development. A metal barrier layer was used to block methanol crossover from the anode to the cathode side while still allowing for the transport of protons from the anode to the cathode. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical engine that converts chemical energy into clean electrical power by the direct oxidation of methanol at the fuel cell anode. This direct use of a liquid fuel eliminates the need for a reformer to convert the fuel to hydrogen before it is fed into the fuel cell.

  11. Fuel cell technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A fuel cell technology program was established to advance the state-of-the-art of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells using low temperature, potassium hydroxide electrolyte technology as the base. Program tasks are described consisting of baseline cell design and stack testing, hydrogen pump design and testing, and DM-2 powerplant testing and technology extension efforts. A baseline cell configuration capable of a minimum of 2000 hours of life was defined. A 6-cell prototype stack, incorporating most of the scheme cell features, was tested for a total of 10,497 hours. A 6-cell stack incorporating all of the design features was tested. The DM-2 powerplant with a 34 cell stack, an accessory section packaged in the basic configuration anticipated for the space shuttle powerplant and a powerplant control unit, was defined, assembled, and tested. Cells were used in the stack and a drag-type hydrogen pump was installed in the accessory section. A test program was established, in conjunction with NASA/JSC, based on space shuttle orbiter mission. A 2000-hour minimum endurance test and a 5000-hour goal were set and the test started on August 8, 1972. The 2000-hour milestone was completed on November 3, 1972. On 13 March 1973, at the end of the thirty-first simulated seven-day mission and 5072 load hours, the test was concluded, all goals having been met. At this time, the DM-2 was in excellent condition and capable of additional endurance.

  12. The quantified cell

    PubMed Central

    Flamholz, Avi; Phillips, Rob; Milo, Ron

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic world of a cell can be as alien to our human-centered intuition as the confinement of quarks within protons or the event horizon of a black hole. We are prone to thinking by analogy—Golgi cisternae stack like pancakes, red blood cells look like donuts—but very little in our human experience is truly comparable to the immensely crowded, membrane-subdivided interior of a eukaryotic cell or the intricately layered structures of a mammalian tissue. So in our daily efforts to understand how cells work, we are faced with a challenge: how do we develop intuition that works at the microscopic scale? PMID:25368429

  13. Microencapsulation Of Living Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium; Kendall, James M.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental technique, living cells and other biological materials encapsulated within submillimeter-diameter liquid-filled spheres. Sphere material biocompatible, tough, and compliant. Semipermeable, permitting relatively small molecules to move into and out of sphere core but preventing passage of large molecules. New technique promises to make such spherical capsules at high rates and in uniform, controllable sizes. Capsules injected into patient through ordinary hypodermic needle. Promising application for technique in treatment of diabetes. Also used to encapsulate pituitary cells and thyroid hormone adrenocortical cells for treatment of other hormonal disorders, to encapsulate other secreting cells for transplantation, and to package variety of pharmaceutical products and agricultural chemicals for controlled release.

  14. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  15. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  16. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  17. [Dendritic cells and interaction with other cell types. Immune tolerance].

    PubMed

    Guerder, S

    2001-07-01

    T cell tolerance to self antigen is mainly established in the thymus were self-reactive T cells are deleted. Interdigitating dendritic cells and medulary epithelial cells are directly involved in the deletion process. Some self-reactive T cells escape, however this thymic censorship and enter the peripheral pool of naive T cells. Multiple mechanisms are also at play in the periphery to control this potentially armfull T cells, this include deletion and immune deviation.

  18. "Pelled-film" solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Cells are lighter and less expensive than conventional cells. GaAs cells are deposited on GaAs substrate coated with thin etchable layer that allows completed cell film to be peeled away from substrate. At estimated conversion of 18 percent, array of cells delivers about 1 kW of electricity per kilogram of cell material. Blanket of cells delivers energy at power-to-weight ratio about 4 times that of conventional 2-mil (0.5-mm) silicon solar cells. GaAs solar cells have better radiation resistance than silicon cells.

  19. Autophagy in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jun-Lin; Simon, Anna Katharina; Prescott, Mark; Menendez, Javier A.; Liu, Fei; Wang, Fen; Wang, Chenran; Wolvetang, Ernst; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Zhang, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved cellular process by which cytoplasmic components are sequestered in autophagosomes and delivered to lysosomes for degradation. As a major intracellular degradation and recycling pathway, autophagy is crucial for maintaining cellular homeostasis as well as remodeling during normal development, and dysfunctions in autophagy have been associated with a variety of pathologies including cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and neurodegenerative disease. Stem cells are unique in their ability to self-renew and differentiate into various cells in the body, which are important in development, tissue renewal and a range of disease processes. Therefore, it is predicted that autophagy would be crucial for the quality control mechanisms and maintenance of cellular homeostasis in various stem cells given their relatively long life in the organisms. In contrast to the extensive body of knowledge available for somatic cells, the role of autophagy in the maintenance and function of stem cells is only beginning to be revealed as a result of recent studies. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the current understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of autophagy in embryonic stem cells, several tissue stem cells (particularly hematopoietic stem cells), as well as a number of cancer stem cells. We discuss how recent studies of different knockout mice models have defined the roles of various autophagy genes and related pathways in the regulation of the maintenance, expansion and differentiation of various stem cells. We also highlight the many unanswered questions that will help to drive further research at the intersection of autophagy and stem cell biology in the near future. PMID:23486312

  20. Cardiac side population cells and Sca-1-positive cells.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Toshio; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Komuro, Issei

    2013-01-01

    Since the resident cardiac stem/progenitor cells were discovered, their ability to maintain the architecture and functional integrity of adult heart has been broadly explored. The methods for isolation and purification of the cardiac stem cells are crucial for the precise analysis of their developmental origin and intrinsic potential as tissue stem cells. Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is one of the useful cell surface markers to purify the cardiac progenitor cells. Another purification strategy is based on the high efflux ability of the dye, which is a common feature of tissue stem cells. These dye-extruding cells have been called side population cells because they locate in the side of dye-retaining cells after fluorescent cell sorting. In this chapter, we describe the methodology for the isolation of cardiac SP cells and Sca-1 positive cells.

  1. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways.

  2. Single-cell sequencing in stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lu; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-04-15

    Cell-to-cell variation and heterogeneity are fundamental and intrinsic characteristics of stem cell populations, but these differences are masked when bulk cells are used for omic analysis. Single-cell sequencing technologies serve as powerful tools to dissect cellular heterogeneity comprehensively and to identify distinct phenotypic cell types, even within a 'homogeneous' stem cell population. These technologies, including single-cell genome, epigenome, and transcriptome sequencing technologies, have been developing rapidly in recent years. The application of these methods to different types of stem cells, including pluripotent stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells, has led to exciting new findings in the stem cell field. In this review, we discuss the recent progress as well as future perspectives in the methodologies and applications of single-cell omic sequencing technologies.

  3. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways. PMID:27590152

  4. Scalable production of embryonic stem cell-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Dang, Stephen M; Zandstra, Peter W

    2005-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have the ability to self-renew as well as differentiate into any cell type in the body. These traits make ES cells an attractive "raw material" for a variety of cell-based technologies. However, uncontrolled cell aggregation in ES cell differentiation culture inhibits cell proliferation and differentiation and thwarts the use of stirred suspension bioreactors. Encapsulation of ES cells in agarose microdrops prevents physical interaction between developing embryoid bodies (EBs) that, in turn, prevents EB agglomeration. This enables use of stirred suspension bioreactors that can generate large numbers of ES-derived cells under controlled conditions.

  5. Fuel cells and fuel cell catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Rice, Cynthia A.; Waszczuk, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2006-11-07

    A direct organic fuel cell includes a formic acid fuel solution having between about 10% and about 95% formic acid. The formic acid is oxidized at an anode. The anode may include a Pt/Pd catalyst that promotes the direct oxidation of the formic acid via a direct reaction path that does not include formation of a CO intermediate.

  6. Tracking Down Mutations Cell by Cell.

    PubMed

    Kosik, Kenneth S

    2016-03-16

    Using somatic cell nuclear transfer, Hazen et al. (2016) examined clonally expanded single neurons for mutations and found ∼100 mutations from a variety of classes. Post-mitotic mutations in individual neurons represent an exploratory direction for finding fundamental origins of neurodegeneration. PMID:26985720

  7. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Høyem, Marte Rørvik; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-09-01

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells. PMID:25997796

  8. Cell Proliferation in Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Stafman, Laura L.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, continues to carry a dismal prognosis for children diagnosed with advanced stage or relapsed disease. This review focuses upon factors responsible for cell proliferation in neuroblastoma including transcription factors, kinases, and regulators of the cell cycle. Novel therapeutic strategies directed toward these targets in neuroblastoma are discussed. PMID:26771642

  9. Competition among leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Aflalo, E; Weinstein, Y

    1990-01-01

    We investigated competition among leukemic cells induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoLV) in order to understand the mechanisms involved in the generation of leukemia. We used six leukemic cells lines from Balb/C mice infected with MoLV. Each line had a unique genetic marker which enabled us to trace it in mixtures of cells either in vivo or in vitro. The markers were a unique rearrangement of T-cell receptors, the integration sites of the retrovirus and rearrangements in the Pim-1 oncogene. A mixture of two cell lines (1:1) injected into intact Balb/C mice usually produced a monoclonal tumor originating from one cell line. In most cases, the cell lines that were aggressive in vivo were also dominant in mixing experiments in vitro. In some lines, we could correlate the aggressiveness of the tumor to its superior growth rate and lower requirement for serum factors in vitro. In others, this correlation did not hold, and we assumed that host factors like the immune system contribute to the malignant potential of the leukemic cell.

  10. Mesangial cell biology

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, Hanna E.

    2012-05-15

    Mesangial cells originate from the metanephric mesenchyme and maintain structural integrity of the glomerular microvascular bed and mesangial matrix homeostasis. In response to metabolic, immunologic or hemodynamic injury, these cells undergo apoptosis or acquire an activated phenotype and undergo hypertrophy, proliferation with excessive production of matrix proteins, growth factors, chemokines and cytokines. These soluble factors exert autocrine and paracrine effects on the cells or on other glomerular cells, respectively. MCs are primary targets of immune-mediated glomerular diseases such as IGA nephropathy or metabolic diseases such as diabetes. MCs may also respond to injury that primarily involves podocytes and endothelial cells or to structural and genetic abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane. Signal transduction and oxidant stress pathways are activated in MCs and likely represent integrated input from multiple mediators. Such responses are convenient targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies in cultured MCs should be supplemented with in vivo studies as well as examination of freshly isolated cells from normal and diseases glomeruli. In addition to ex vivo morphologic studies in kidney cortex, cells should be studied in their natural environment, isolated glomeruli or even tissue slices. Identification of a specific marker of MCs should help genetic manipulation as well as selective therapeutic targeting of these cells. Identification of biological responses of MCs that are not mediated by the renin–angiotensin system should help development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies to treat diseases characterized by MC pathology.

  11. Playing the Cell Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrazo, Gerry M., Jr.; Wood, Carol A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the use of games to facilitate learning scientific concepts and principles. Describes the Cell Game, which simulates plant and animal cells; the Energy Quest, which requires players to buy property that generates largest amounts of electricity; the Blood Flow Game, which illustrates circulation of blood through the human body. (CS)

  12. Stem cells in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ogliari, Karolyn Sassi; Marinowic, Daniel; Brum, Dario Eduardo; Loth, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical research have shown that stem cell therapy could be a promising therapeutic option for many diseases in which current medical treatments do not achieve satisfying results or cure. This article describes stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications in dermatology today.

  13. Cell Phones for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, James H.; Hagevik, Rita A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell phones are fast becoming an integral part of students' everyday lives. They are regarded as important companions and tools for personal expression. School-age children are integrating the cell phone as such, and thus placing a high value on them. Educators endeavor to instill in students a high value for education, but often meet with…

  14. The Constitution by Cell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhut, Stephanie; Jones, Megan

    2010-01-01

    On their visit to the National Archives Experience in Washington, D.C., students in Jenni Ashley and Gay Brock's U.S. history classes at the Potomac School in McLean, Virginia, participated in a pilot program called "The Constitution by Cell." Armed with their cell phones, a basic understanding of the Constitution, and a willingness to participate…

  15. Fuel cells: Operating flexibly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Moo

    2016-09-01

    Fuel cells typically function well only in rather limited temperature and humidity ranges. Now, a proton exchange membrane consisting of ion pair complexes is shown to enable improved fuel cell performance under a wide range of conditions that are unattainable with conventional approaches.

  16. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  17. Cells and Hypotonic Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bery, Julia

    1985-01-01

    Describes a demonstration designed to help students better understand the response of plant and animal cells to hypotonic solutions. The demonstration uses a balloon inside a flexible, thin-walled cardboard box. Air going in corresponds to water entering by osmosis, and, like real cells, if stretched enough, the balloon will burst. (DH)

  18. Cell Growth and Division

    PubMed Central

    Bell, George I.

    1968-01-01

    In a previous paper, we proposed a model in which the volume growth rate and probability of division of a cell were assumed to be determined by the cell's age and volume. Some further mathematical implications of the model are here explored. In particular we seek properties of the growth and division functions which are required for the balanced exponential growth of a cell population. Integral equations are derived which relate the distribution of birth volumes in successive generations and in which the existence of balanced exponential growth can be treated as an eigenvalue problem. The special case in which all cells divide at the same age is treated in some detail and conditions are derived for the existence of a balanced exponential solution and for its stability or instability. The special case of growth rate proportional to cell volume is seen to have neutral stability. More generally when the division probability depends on age only and growth rate is proportional to cell volume, there is no possibility of balanced exponential growth. Some comparisons are made with experimental results. It is noted that the model permits the appearance of differentiated cells. A generalization of the model is formulated in which cells may be described by many state variables instead of just age and volume. PMID:5643273

  19. Primary galvanic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, P.; Coffey, J.P.; Wilson, J.W.

    1981-03-03

    A primary galvanic cell displaying superior leak-resistant characteristics is described. A molded battery container having one open end is sealed by an end cap having both insulating and conducting properties. An electrode, integrally affixed to the end cap and in electrical registry therewith, is disposed within the cell.

  20. PLATINUM AND FUEL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Platinum requirements for fuel cell vehicles (FCVS) have been identified as a concern and possible problem with FCV market penetration. Platinum is a necessary component of the electrodes of fuel cell engines that power the vehicles. The platinum is deposited on porous electrodes...

  1. CSF cell count

    MedlinePlus

    The normal white blood cell count is between 0 and 5. The normal red blood cell count is 0. Note: Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about ... use different measurements or may test different specimens.

  2. Electrochemical cell stack assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-06-22

    Multiple stacks of tubular electrochemical cells having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films arranged in parallel on stamped conductive interconnect sheets or ferrules. The stack allows one or more electrochemical cell to malfunction without disabling the entire stack. Stack efficiency is enhanced through simplified gas manifolding, gas recycling, reduced operating temperature and improved heat distribution.

  3. Solar cell power scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    System locates high- and low-output regions in cadmium sulfide thin film photovoltaic cells. High resolution photograph shows conversion efficiency of each scanned area. X-Y recorder fed by amplified signal from solar cell also produces power contour map. Photo and map reveal high- and low-conversion-efficiency regions.

  4. Fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1983-01-01

    High temperature solid oxide electrolyte fuel cell generators which allow controlled leakage among plural chambers in a sealed housing. Depleted oxidant and fuel are directly reacted in one chamber to combust remaining fuel and preheat incoming reactants. The cells are preferably electrically arranged in a series-parallel configuration.

  5. Closed Small Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... (right)   The structure of tightly packed "closed cells" in a layer of marine stratocumulus over the southeastern Pacific Ocean ... into interesting structures such as those shown here. These cells are notably small, with diameters ranging from 10-15 kilometers, instead ...

  6. Programmed cell death

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  7. Tilted fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine; Krueger, Roger L.

    2005-04-12

    Bipolar, tilted embodiments of high temperature, molten electrolyte electrochemical cells capable of directly converting carbon fuel to electrical energy are disclosed herein. The bipolar, tilted configurations minimize the electrical resistance between one cell and others connected in electrical series. The tilted configuration also allows continuous refueling of carbon fuel.

  8. Cell-in-Cell Death Is Not Restricted by Caspase-3 Deficiency in MCF-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; He, Meifang; Li, Linmei; Liang, Zhihua; Zou, Zehong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cell-in-cell structures are created by one living cell entering another homotypic or heterotypic living cell, which usually leads to the death of the internalized cell, specifically through caspase-dependent cell death (emperitosis) or lysosome-dependent cell death (entosis). Although entosis has attracted great attention, its occurrence is controversial, because one cell line used in its study (MCF-7) is deficient in caspase-3. Methods We investigated this issue using MCF-7 and A431 cell lines, which often display cell-in-cell invasion, and have different levels of caspase-3 expression. Cell-in-cell death morphology, microstructures, and signaling pathways were compared in the two cell lines. Results Our results confirmed that MCF-7 cells are caspase-3 deficient with a partial deletion in the CASP-3 gene. These cells underwent cell death that lacked typical apoptotic properties after staurosporine treatment, whereas caspase-3-sufficient A431 cells displayed typical apoptosis. The presence of caspase-3 was related neither to the lysosome-dependent nor to the caspase-dependent cell-in-cell death pathway. However, the existence of caspase-3 was associated with a switch from lysosome-dependent cell-in-cell death to the apoptotic cell-in-cell death pathway during entosis. Moreover, cellular hypoxia, mitochondrial swelling, release of cytochrome C, and autophagy were observed in internalized cells during entosis. Conclusion The occurrence of caspase-independent entosis is not a cell-specific process. In addition, entosis actually represents a cellular self-repair system, functioning through autophagy, to degrade damaged mitochondria resulting from cellular hypoxia in cell-in-cell structures. However, sustained autophagy-associated signal activation, without reduction in cellular hypoxia, eventually leads to lysosome-dependent intracellular cell death. PMID:27721872

  9. Fifty cell test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Arntzen, J. D.; Kolba, V. M.; Miller, W. E.; Gay, E. C.

    1980-07-01

    This report describes the design of a facility capable of the simultaneous testing of up to 50 high-temperature (400 to 500/sup 0/C) lithium alloy/iron sulfide cells; this facility is located in the Chemical Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The emphasis will be on the lifetime testing of cells fabricated by ANL and industrial contractors to acquire statistical data on the performance of cells of various designs. A computer-based data-acquisition system processes the cell performance data generated from the cells on test. The terminals and part of the data-acquisition equipment are housed in an air-conditioned enclosure adjacent to the testing facility; the computer is located remotely.

  10. Cell Radiation Experiment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    The cell radiation experiment system (CRES) is a perfused-cell culture apparatus, within which cells from humans or other animals can (1) be maintained in homeostasis while (2) being exposed to ionizing radiation during controlled intervals and (3) being monitored to determine the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage. The CRES can be used, for example, to determine effects of drug, radiation, and combined drug and radiation treatments on both normal and tumor cells. The CRES can also be used to analyze the effects of radiosensitive or radioprotectant drugs on cells subjected to radiation. The knowledge gained by use of the CRES is expected to contribute to the development of better cancer treatments and of better protection for astronauts, medical-equipment operators, and nuclear-power-plant workers, and others exposed frequently to ionizing radiation.

  11. PEM regenerative fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, Larry L.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Mccatty, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper will update the progress in developing electrocatalyst systems and electrode structures primarily for the positive electrode of single-unit solid polymer proton exchange membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cells. The work was done with DuPont Nafion 117 in complete fuel cells (40 sq cm electrodes). The cells were operated alternately in fuel cell mode and electrolysis mode at 80 C. In fuel cell mode, humidified hydrogen and oxygen were supplied at 207 kPa (30 psi); in electrolysis mode, water was pumped over the positive electrode and the gases were evolved at ambient pressure. Cycling data will be presented for Pt-Ir catalysts and limited bifunctional data will be presented for Pt, Ir, Ru, Rh, and Na(x)Pt3O4 catalysts as well as for electrode structure variations.

  12. Whole-cell biocomputing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, M. L.; Sayler, G. S.; Fleming, J. T.; Applegate, B.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to manipulate systems on the molecular scale naturally leads to speculation about the rational design of molecular-scale machines. Cells might be the ultimate molecular-scale machines and our ability to engineer them is relatively advanced when compared with our ability to control the synthesis and direct the assembly of man-made materials. Indeed, engineered whole cells deployed in biosensors can be considered one of the practical successes of molecular-scale devices. However, these devices explore only a small portion of cellular functionality. Individual cells or self-organized groups of cells perform extremely complex functions that include sensing, communication, navigation, cooperation and even fabrication of synthetic nanoscopic materials. In natural systems, these capabilities are controlled by complex genetic regulatory circuits, which are only partially understood and not readily accessible for use in engineered systems. Here, we focus on efforts to mimic the functionality of man-made information-processing systems within whole cells.

  13. Electromagnetic fields and cells.

    PubMed

    Goodman, R; Chizmadzhev, Y; Shirley-Henderson, A

    1993-04-01

    There is strong public interest in the possibility of health effects associated with exposure to extremely low frequency (elf) electromagnetic (EM) fields. Epidemiological studies suggest a probable, but controversial, link between exposure to elf EM fields and increased incidence of some cancers in both children and adults. There are hundreds of scientific studies that have tested the effects of elf EM fields on cells and whole animals. A growing number of reports show that exposure to elf EM fields can produce a large array of effects on cells. Of interest is an increase in specific transcripts in cultured cells exposed to EM fields. The interaction mechanism with cells, however, remains elusive. Evidence is presented for a model based on cell surface interactions with EM fields.

  14. Multiciliated cells: a review

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Eric R.; Wallingford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule based cellular projections that serve a wide variety of essential functions in animal cells. Defects in cilia structure or function have recently emerged as etiological mechanisms underpinning diverse human diseases. While many eukaryotic cells possess only one or two cilia, some cells, including those of many unicellular organisms, exhibit extensive multiciliation. In vertebrates, multiciliated cells (MCCs) are a specialized population of post-mitotic cells decorated with dozens of motile cilia that beat in a polarized and synchronized fashion to drive directed fluid flow across an epithelium. Dysfunction of human MCCs is associated with diseases of the brain, airway and reproductive tracts. Despite their importance, MCCs are relatively poorly studied and we are only beginning to understand the mechanisms underlying their development and function. Here, we briefly review the general phylogeny and physiology of multiciliation and detail our current understanding of the developmental and cellular events underlying the formation, maturation, and function of MCCs in vertebrates. PMID:25291643

  15. Solar cell grid patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasui, R. K.; Berman, P. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A grid pattern is described for a solar cell of the type which includes a semiconductive layer doped to a first polarity and a top counter-doped layer. The grid pattern comprises a plurality of concentric conductive grids of selected geometric shapes which are centered about the center of the exposed active surface of the counter-doped layer. Connected to the grids is one or more conductors which extend to the cell's periphery. For the pattern area, the grids and conductors are arranged in the pattern to minimize the maximum distance which any injected majority carriers have to travel to reach any of the grids or conductors. The pattern has a multiaxes symmetry with respect to the cell center to minimize the maximum temperature differentials between points on the cell surface and to provide a more uniform temperature distribution across the cell face.

  16. Progress toward synthetic cells.

    PubMed

    Blain, J Craig; Szostak, Jack W

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of even the simplest known life forms makes efforts to synthesize living cells from inanimate components seem like a daunting task. However, recent progress toward the creation of synthetic cells, ranging from simple protocells to artificial cells approaching the complexity of bacteria, suggests that the synthesis of life is now a realistic goal. Protocell research, fueled by advances in the biophysics of primitive membranes and the chemistry of nucleic acid replication, is providing new insights into the origin of cellular life. Parallel efforts to construct more complex artificial cells, incorporating translational machinery and protein enzymes, are providing information about the requirements for protein-based life. We discuss recent advances and remaining challenges in the synthesis of artificial cells, the possibility of creating new forms of life distinct from existing biology, and the promise of this research for gaining a deeper understanding of the nature of living systems. PMID:24606140

  17. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  18. Cell interactions with Polymersomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis; Photos, Peter; Dan, Nily

    2002-03-01

    Polymersomes are liposome-like vesicles assembled in various aqueous media using PEO-based diblock copolymers. Injection into rats show clearance times comparable to PEO-decorated 'stealth' liposomes and end-distributions consistent with cell-based (i.e. phagocytic) removal. In vitro studies suggest the PEO brush successfully delays plasma protein adsorption over short time scales but not over tens of hours. The interfacial 'fouling' that occurs with such protein adsorption mediates interactions with phagocytic white cells. Similar fouling occurs with cells such as red cells as well, but these and other cells appear to possess specific proteins that turn off phagocytic responses. The results obtained with a wide range of copolymers thus suggest a default clearance pathway that cannot be avoided by passive means so much as turned off by specific interactions.

  19. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  20. Dynamics of cell orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel A.

    2007-09-01

    Many physiological processes depend on the response of biological cells to mechanical forces generated by the contractile activity of the cell or by external stresses. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitivity of cells and the elasticity of the matrix, we predict the dynamics and orientation of cells in both the absence and presence of applied stresses. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the cellular forces in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency.