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Sample records for 6th nerve palsy

  1. Benign recurrent abducens (6th) nerve palsy in two children.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Christopher M; Gottlob, Irene

    2004-03-01

    Benign recurrent abducens (6th) nerve palsy is rare. We found 23 cases in children reported in the literature; however, many of these cases followed immunization or were associated with viral illness. Here we report two cases of recurrent abducens nerve palsy with no obvious etiology. The diagnosis should be considered in any child who experiences abducens nerve palsy in the absence of any underlying pathology or precipitating factors.

  2. Recurrent 6th nerve palsy in a child following different live attenuated vaccines: case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recurrent benign 6th nerve palsy in the paediatric age group is uncommon, but has been described following viral and bacterial infections. It has also been temporally associated with immunization, but has not been previously described following two different live attenuated vaccines. Case presentation A case is presented of a 12 month old Caucasian boy with recurrent benign 6th nerve palsy following measles-mumps-rubella and varicella vaccines, given on separate occasions with complete recovery following each episode. No alternate underlying etiology was identified despite extensive investigations and review. Conclusions The majority of benign 6th nerve palsies do not have a sinister cause and have an excellent prognosis, with recovery expected in most cases. The exact pathophysiology is unknown, although hypotheses including autoimmune mechanisms and direct viral invasion could explain the pathophysiology behind immunization related nerve palsies. It is important to rule out other aetiologies with thorough history, physical examination and investigations. There is limited information in the literature regarding the safety of a repeat dose of a live vaccine in this setting. Future immunizations should be considered on a case-by-case basis. PMID:22545865

  3. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at ...

  4. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM, Weill Cornell Medical College; ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  5. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, C J; Godoy, F; ALQahtani, E

    2015-01-01

    We review ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in childhood and highlight many of the features that differentiate these from their occurrence in adulthood. The clinical characteristics of cranial nerve palsies in childhood are affected by the child's impressive ability to repair and regenerate after injury. Thus, aberrant regeneration is very common after congenital III palsy; Duane syndrome, the result of early repair after congenital VI palsy, is invariably associated with retraction of the globe in adduction related to the innervation of the lateral rectus by the III nerve causing co-contraction in adduction. Clinical features that may be of concern in adulthood may not be relevant in childhood; whereas the presence of mydriasis in III palsy suggests a compressive aetiology in adults, this is not the case in children. However, the frequency of associated CNS abnormalities in III palsy and the risk of tumour in VI palsy can be indications for early neuroimaging depending on presenting features elicited through a careful history and clinical examination. The latter should include the neighbouring cranial nerves. We discuss the impact of our evolving knowledge of congenital cranial dysinnervation syndromes on this field. PMID:25572578

  6. Abducens nerve palsy due to inferior petrosal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Siddiqui, Junaid; Katirji, Bashar

    2017-02-24

    Isolated unilateral abducens nerve palsy is usually due to ischemia, trauma or neoplasm. Dorello's canal is the space between the petrous apex and superolateral portion of the clivus, bound superiorly by Gruber's ligament. The abducens nerve travels with inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) though the Dorello's canal before entering the cavernous sinus. A 31-year-old man presented with neck pain, and binocular horizontal diplopia, worse looking towards left and at distance. He had a history of intravenous drug abuse but no history of hypertension or diabetes. On examination, he had complete left 6th nerve palsy with normal fundi, pupils, and other cranial nerves. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was detected with naïve tricuspid valve endocarditis and multiple septic emboli to lungs with infarcts. His cerebrospinal fluid was normal. MRI of the brain was normal. MRV of head and neck showed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein, left sigmoid sinus and left inferior petrosal sinus with normal cavernous sinus and no evidence of mastoiditis. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics. He was not anticoagulated for fear of pulmonary hemorrhage from pulmonary infarcts. Although cerebral venous sinus thrombosis commonly presents with elevated intracranial pressure, isolated ipsilateral 6th nerve palsy from its compression in Dorello's canal due to thrombosis of the ipsilateral inferior petrosal sinus is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only two patients have been reported with isolated abducens palsy due to IPS thrombosis; one caused by septic emboli and the other developed it during IPS cortisol level sampling.

  7. Accessory nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Olarte, M; Adams, D

    1977-11-01

    After apparently uncomplicated excision of benign lesions in the posterior cervical triangle, two patients had shoulder pain. In one, neck pain and trapezius weakness were not prominent until one month after surgery. Inability to elevate the arm above the horizontal without externally rotating it, and prominent scapular displacement on arm abduction, but not on forward pushing movements, highlighted the trapezius dysfunction and differentiated it from serratus anterior weakness. Spinal accessory nerve lesions should be considered when minor surgical procedures, lymphadenitis, minor trauma, or tumours involved the posterior triangle of the neck.

  8. Surgical management of third nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anupam; Bahuguna, Chirag; Nagpal, Ritu; Kumar, Barun

    2016-01-01

    Third nerve paralysis has been known to be associated with a wide spectrum of presentation and other associated factors such as the presence of ptosis, pupillary involvement, amblyopia, aberrant regeneration, poor bell's phenomenon, superior oblique (SO) overaction, and lateral rectus (LR) contracture. Correction of strabismus due to third nerve palsy can be complex as four out of the six extraocular muscles are involved and therefore should be approached differently. Third nerve palsy can be congenital or acquired. The common causes of isolated third nerve palsy in children are congenital (43%), trauma (20%), inflammation (13%), aneurysm (7%), and ophthalmoplegic migraine. Whereas, in adult population, common etiologies are vasculopathic disorders (diabetes mellitus, hypertension), aneurysm, and trauma. Treatment can be both nonsurgical and surgical. As nonsurgical modalities are not of much help, surgery remains the main-stay of treatment. Surgical strategies are different for complete and partial third nerve palsy. Surgery for complete third nerve palsy may involve supra-maximal recession - resection of the recti. This may be combined with SO transposition and augmented by surgery on the other eye. For partial third nerve, palsy surgery is determined according to nature and extent of involvement of extraocular muscles. PMID:27433033

  9. Facial nerve palsy aboard a commercial aircraft.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Ulanovski, David; Barenboim, Erez; Azaria, Bella; Goldstein, Liav

    2004-12-01

    Facial baroparesis is facial nerve palsy secondary to barotrauma. This phenomenon is frequently seen in divers, but is under-reported there and has rarely been described in aviators or passengers aboard commercial aircraft. We describe a 24-yr-old healthy aviator who experienced an episode of facial nerve palsy during ascent while traveling as a passenger aboard a commercial flight. The probable pathogenesis of this phenomenon in this case is described.

  10. [Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy in children].

    PubMed

    Tabarki, B

    2014-10-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy may (secondary) or may not have a detectable cause (idiopathic facial palsy or Bell's palsy). Idiopathic facial palsy is the common form of facial palsy. It remains diagnosis by exclusion. The prognosis is more favourable in children than in adults. We present current diagnostic procedures and recommendations regarding treatment in children.

  11. A 3-Year Review of Cranial Nerve Palsies from the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Pedro-Egbe, Chinyere Nnenne; Fiebai, Bassey; Awoyesuku, Elizabeth Akon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide the types, frequency and clinical information on common cranial nerve palsies seen at the Eye Clinic at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: A chart review was performed of patients who presented with cranial nerve palsy at the Eye Clinic over a 3-year period (January 2009-December 2011). Data were collected on age, sex, type of cranial nerve palsy, a history of systemic disease such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension and cerebrovascular disease. Exclusion criteria included medical charts with incomplete data. Data was analyzed using Epi-info Version 6.04D. Statistical significance was indicated by P < 0.05. Results: Twenty-four patients had cranial nerve palsies. There were 11 males and 13 females with a mean age of 34.50 ± 18.41 years. Four patients (26.6%) had exotropia while three patients (20%) had esotropia. Complete ophthalmoplegia was noted in two patients (13.3%). The 3rd and 6th cranial nerves were affected in seven patients each (29.2%) and five patients (20.8%) had 7th cranial nerve palsy. Approximately 38% of patients with cranial nerve palsies had systemic disorders (16.7% systemic hypertension; 12.5% DM). The relationship between cranial nerve palsy and systemic disorder was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: This is the first study in the literature on ocular cranial nerve palsies in Southern Nigeria. Third and sixth cranial nerve palsies were the most common cases to present to the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic. There was a statistically significant association to systemic disorders such as hypertension and DM and majority of cases with 6th cranial nerve palsy. PMID:24791110

  12. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-07-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell's palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell's palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell's palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell's palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell's palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae.

  13. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity.

  14. [Third cranial nerve palsy in sphenoid sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dores, Luís Almeida; Simão, Marco Alveirinho; Marques, Marta Canas; Dias, Éscar

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus disease is particular not only for its clinical presentation, as well as their complications. Although rare, these may present as cranial nerve deficits, so it is important to have a high index of suspicion and be familiar with its diagnosis and management. Symptoms are often nonspecific, but the most common are headache, changes in visual acuity and diplopia due to dysfunction of one or more ocular motor nerves. The authors report a case of a 59 years-old male, who was referred to the ENT emergency department with frontal headaches for one week which had progressively worsened and were associated, since the last 12 hours, with diplopia caused by left third cranial nerve palsy. Neurologic examination was normal aside from the left third cranial nerve palsy. Anterior and posterior rhinoscopy excluded the presence of nasal masses and purulent rhinorrhea. The CT scan revealed a soft tissue component and erosion of the roof of the left sphenoid sinus. Patient was admitted for intravenous antibiotics and steroids treatment without any benefit after 48 hours. He was submitted to endoscopic sinus surgery with resolution of the symptoms 10 days after surgery. The authors present this case for its rarity focusing on the importance of differential diagnosis in patients with headaches and cranial nerves palsies.

  15. Benign recurrent VI nerve palsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Bixenman, W W; von Noorden, G K

    1981-01-01

    The case of a child with six documented episodes of benign recurrent unilateral VI nerve palsy between the ages of 2 1/2 months and 3 years is presented. Despite the recognized self-limiting course of this disorder, its possible evolution into a comitant esotropia makes close follow-up mandatory. The practical aspects of management including maintenance occlusion therapy are stressed as well as the need for prompt surgical intervention once the acquired stabismus has become stabilized. The etiology of benign VI nerve palsy of childhood may have the same immunological basis as other cases of para-infectious neuropathy. This isolated postinfective cranial mononeuropathy easily blends into the continuum of neurological involvement seen with the Landry-Guillian-Barre syndrome. With recovery from the initial episode, the abducens nerve may have become predisposed to recurrent inflammatory episodes and recurrent loss of function. Most often these recurrences are triggered by febrile illnesses of childhood.

  16. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Julia E.; Reem, Rachel E.; Aylward, Shawn C.; Rogers, David L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3–18) were found to have a unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral (n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (n = 2) and infection (n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H2O (range: 21–65 cm H2O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension. PMID:27928378

  17. Sixth Nerve Palsy from Cholesterol Granuloma of the Petrous Apex

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, Ségolène; Maeder, Philippe; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Kawasaki, Aki

    2017-01-01

    Herein, we report a patient who had an isolated sixth nerve palsy due to a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma. The sixth nerve palsy appeared acutely and then spontaneously resolved over several months, initially suggesting a microvascular origin of the palsy. Subsequent recurrences of the palsy indicated a different pathophysiologic etiology and MRI revealed the lesion at the petrous apex. Surgical resection improved the compressive effect of the lesion at Dorello’s canal and clinical improvement was observed. A relapsing–remitting sixth nerve palsy is an unusual presentation of this rare lesion. PMID:28261154

  18. Facial nerve palsy and hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Valls-Solé, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Facial nerve lesions are usually benign conditions even though patients may present with emotional distress. Facial palsy usually resolves in 3-6 weeks, but if axonal degeneration takes place, it is likely that the patient will end up with a postparalytic facial syndrome featuring synkinesis, myokymic discharges, and hemifacial mass contractions after abnormal reinnervation. Essential hemifacial spasm is one form of facial hyperactivity that must be distinguished from synkinesis after facial palsy and also from other forms of facial dyskinesias. In this condition, there can be ectopic discharges, ephaptic transmission, and lateral spread of excitation among nerve fibers, giving rise to involuntary muscle twitching and spasms. Electrodiagnostic assessment is of relevance for the diagnosis and prognosis of peripheral facial palsy and hemifacial spasm. In this chapter the most relevant clinical and electrodiagnostic aspects of the two disorders are reviewed, with emphasis on the various stages of facial palsy after axonal degeneration, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the various features of hemifacial spasm, and the cues for differential diagnosis between the two entities.

  19. Peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Hyun; Kim, Won Il; Kim, Ji Yeon; Choe, Won Joo

    2016-01-01

    Peroneal nerve palsy can be caused by various etiology. We report unilateral peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application. A 64-year-old man underwent off-pump coronary bypass graft. Surgeon did not use saphenous vein for the bypass graft. Sedation was stopped after 3 h postoperative. After 16 h, for prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis, knee-high elastic stocking was applied. After 1 h, he took off right stocking because of numbness but left stocking was kept. After 24 h postoperative, (8 h after stocking application) patient complained suddenly left foot drop. Manual muscle test revealed 0/5 of ankle dorsiflexion, ankle eversion, and toe extension. Sensory was decreased to 70% in lower half of anterolateral aspect of tibia, foot dorsum, and toes. Foot drop and sensory abnormality decreased in 3 weeks. Cardiac surgery patients already have many risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Clinicians should be careful when applying stockings on those patients. PMID:27833497

  20. Peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Hyun; Kim, Won Il; Kim, Ji Yeon; Choe, Won Joo

    2016-01-01

    Peroneal nerve palsy can be caused by various etiology. We report unilateral peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application. A 64-year-old man underwent off-pump coronary bypass graft. Surgeon did not use saphenous vein for the bypass graft. Sedation was stopped after 3 h postoperative. After 16 h, for prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis, knee-high elastic stocking was applied. After 1 h, he took off right stocking because of numbness but left stocking was kept. After 24 h postoperative, (8 h after stocking application) patient complained suddenly left foot drop. Manual muscle test revealed 0/5 of ankle dorsiflexion, ankle eversion, and toe extension. Sensory was decreased to 70% in lower half of anterolateral aspect of tibia, foot dorsum, and toes. Foot drop and sensory abnormality decreased in 3 weeks. Cardiac surgery patients already have many risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Clinicians should be careful when applying stockings on those patients.

  1. Abducens Nerve Palsy in Pregnancy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Sayedeh Reyhaneh

    2016-01-01

    Headache, blurring of vision and confusion are neurologic symptoms of preeclampsia. Whereas abducens nerve palsy during pregnancy is an extremely rare condition, we report here a 40-year-old patient with diplopia, blurring of vision and abducens nerve palsy in the 39th week of pregnancy with history of hypertension (HTN). No specific pathology was found. Symptoms of abducens nerve palsy were resolved spontaneously by controlling blood pressure after delivery. PMID:28208948

  2. Peripheral facial nerve palsy after therapeutic endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal dissection. This case is the first report of the development of peripheral FNP in a patient undergoing therapeutic endoscopy. We emphasize the fact that physicians should be attentive to the development of peripheral FNP following therapeutic endoscopy.

  3. Nerve Transfer in Delayed Obstetrical Palsy Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sénès, Filippo; Catena, Nunzio; Sénès, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    Objective  When root avulsions are detected in children suffering from obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP), neurotization procedures of different nerve trunks are commonly applied in primary brachial plexus repair, to connect distally the nerves of the upper limbs using healthy nerve structures. This article aims to outline our experience of neurotization procedures in OBPP, which involves nerve transfers in the event of delayed repair, when a primary repair has not occurred or has failed. In addition, we propose the opportunity for late repair, focusing on extending the time limit for nerve surgery beyond that which is usually recommended. Although, according to different authors, the time limit is still unclear, it is generally estimated that nerve repair should take place within the first months of life. In fact, microsurgical repair of OBPP is the technique of choice for young children with the condition who would otherwise have an unfavorable outcome. However, in certain cases the recovery process is not clearly defined so not all the patients are direct candidates for primary nerve surgery. Methods  In the period spanning January 2005 through January 2011, among a group of 105 patients suffering from OBPP, ranging from 1 month to 7 years of age, the authors have identified a group of 32 partially recovered patients. All these patients underwent selective neurotization surgery, which was performed in a period ranging from 5 months to 6.6 years of age. Results  Late neurotization of muscular groups achieved considerable functional recovery in these patients, who presented with reduced motor function during early childhood. The said patients, with the exception of five, would initially have avoided surgery because they had not met the criteria for nerve surgery. Conclusion  We have concluded that the execution of late nerve surgical procedures can be effective in children affected by OBPP. PMID:27917233

  4. Common peroneal nerve palsy in a UH-60 aviator.

    PubMed

    McGrail, M A

    1999-06-01

    A case of common peroneal nerve palsy in a UH-60 Blackhawk U.S. Army helicopter pilot is reported. A review of the literature revealed several reports of common peroneal nerve palsy, although there were no published reports of this injury secondary to performing flight duties in the UH-60 cockpit. A common practice among Blackhawk pilots is to brace the "collective" with their left knee, subjecting the common peroneal nerve to possible injury. This action should be considered as a possible cause of common peroneal nerve palsy in this select group of aviators.

  5. Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yu; Toda, Masahiro; Shibao, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to consider the mechanism of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy after minor head trauma. Case Description: We report a rare case of delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. A 19-year-old boy complained of double vision 1 day after a minor head trauma. Neuro-ophthalmic examination showed isolated left oculomotor nerve palsy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination revealed no abnormal findings and steroid therapy was administered for a week. Three months after the injury, the ptosis and extraocular movements had fully resolved, although the pupillary light reflex was still abnormal. Conclusions: Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy may be caused by an injury at the point where the oculomotor nerve runs over the posterior petroclinoid ligament. Because edema of the damaged oculomotor nerve might result in constriction at the point where the nerve pierces the dura of the cavernous sinus, symptoms of oculomotor nerve palsy appeared late after trauma. Steroid treatment reducing edema could be effective for delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. PMID:28217399

  6. Fracture of skull base with delayed multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Altan; Gurelik, Mustafa; Gumus, Cesur; Kunt, Tanfer

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a pediatric case of delayed glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, and facial nerve palsies after a head injury. Computed tomography scan of the skull base revealed the fracture of the petrous part of the temporal bone, and the fracture involved the tip of petrous pyramid, in front of the jugular foramen. The anatomical features, mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed.

  7. Alternating Hemiplegia with Ipsilateral Supranuclear Facial Palsy and Abducens Nerve Palsy Caused by Pontine Infarction.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Shinichiro; Tsunoda, Tetsuya; Okamoto, Sayaka; Ozeki, Yasunori; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old right-handed man was diagnosed with a cerebral infarction in the ventromedial region of the left lower pons. He showed left abducens nerve palsy, left-sided supranuclear palsy of the lower part of the face and right hemiparesis. We hypothesized that the mechanism underlying the patient's ipsilateral supranuclear facial palsy involved the corticofacial fibers after they crossed the midline.

  8. Neuralgic Amyotrophy Manifesting as Mimicking Posterior Interosseous Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin Seo; Kang, Suk Hyung; Choi, Eun Hi

    2015-01-01

    The upper trunk of the brachial plexus is the most common area affected by neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), and paresis of the shoulder girdle muscle is the most prevalent manifestation. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy is a rare presentation in patients with NA. It results in dropped finger on the affected side and may be misdiagnosed as entrapment syndrome or compressive neuropathy. We report an unusual case of NA manifested as PIN palsy and suggest that knowledge of clinical NA phenotypes is crucial for early diagnosis of peripheral nerve palsies. PMID:26713154

  9. [Case of pontine infarction causing alternating hemiplegia with ipsilateral abducens nerve palsy and contralateral supranuclear facial nerve palsy].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Katsuhiko; Tougou, Masaki; Oishi, Minoru; Kamei, Satoshi; Mizutani, Tomohiko

    2008-02-01

    We report a 73-year-old man with alternating abducent hemiplegia (Raymond syndrome) and contralateral supranuclear facial nerve palsy. On admission, he showed lateral gaze palsy of the right eye, left supranuclear facial nerve palsy, dysarthria and left hemiparesis. Brain MRI showed an infarct that was located in the paramedian and lateral area in the base of the caudal pons on the right side. MRA showed a mild stenosis of the basilar artery. Hemiplegia and supranuclear facial nerve palsy were considered to be caused by the involvement of corticospinal tract and corticobulbar tract that run at the ventromedial area of the pons. Abducens nerve palsy was considered to be caused by the involvement of infranuclear abducens nerve fibers. There has been one previously reported case of Raymond syndrome in which MRI determined the precise location of the lesion. In this case, a small hematoma was found at the ventral and medial pontomedullary junction, whereas the infarct in our case was located in the pontine base. We considered that documentation of our case was an important contribution to determine the pathogenesis of supranuclear facial nerve palsy due to caudal pontine lesions.

  10. Recurrent unilateral facial nerve palsy in a child with dehiscent facial nerve canal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Christopher; Ulualp, Seckin O; Koral, Korgun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The dehiscent facial nerve canal has been well documented in histopathological studies of temporal bones as well as in clinical setting. We describe clinical and radiologic features of a child with recurrent facial nerve palsy and dehiscent facial nerve canal. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: A 5-year-old male was referred to the otolaryngology clinic for evaluation of recurrent acute otitis media and hearing loss. He also developed recurrent left peripheral FN palsy associated with episodes of bilateral acute otitis media. High resolution computed tomography of the temporal bones revealed incomplete bony coverage of the tympanic segment of the left facial nerve. Conclusions: Recurrent peripheral FN palsy may occur in children with recurrent acute otitis media in the presence of a dehiscent facial nerve canal. Facial nerve canal dehiscence should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with recurrent peripheral FN palsy. PMID:28228958

  11. Complete Spinal Accessory Nerve Palsy From Carrying Climbing Gear.

    PubMed

    Coulter, Jess M; Warme, Winston J

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of spinal accessory nerve palsy sustained while transporting climbing gear. Spinal accessory nerve injury is commonly a result of iatrogenic surgical trauma during lymph node excision. This particular nerve is less frequently injured by blunt trauma. The case reported here results from compression of the spinal accessory nerve for a sustained period-that is, carrying a load over the shoulder using a single nylon rope for 2.5 hours. This highlights the importance of using proper load-carrying equipment to distribute weight over a greater surface area to avoid nerve compression in the posterior triangle of the neck. The signs and symptoms of spinal accessory nerve palsy and its etiology are discussed. This report is particularly relevant to individuals involved in mountaineering and rock climbing but can be extended to anyone carrying a load with a strap over one shoulder and across the body.

  12. Two-level motor nerve transfer for the treatment of long thoracic nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Ray, Wilson Z; Pet, Mitchell A; Nicoson, Michael C; Yee, Andrew; Kahn, Lorna C; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2011-10-01

    The authors report a case of long thoracic nerve (LTN) palsy treated with two-level motor nerve transfers of a pectoral fascicle of the middle trunk, and a branch of the thoracodorsal nerve. This procedure resulted in near-total improvement of the winged scapula deformity, and a return of excellent shoulder function. A detailed account of the postoperative physical therapy regimen is included, as this critical component of the favorable result cannot be overlooked. This case establishes the two-level motor nerve transfer as a new option for treating LTN palsy, and demonstrates that nerve transfers should be considered in the therapeutic algorithm of an idiopathic mononeuritis.

  13. Phrenic Nerve Palsy as Initial Presentation of Large Retrosternal Goitre.

    PubMed

    Hakeem, Arsheed Hussain; Hakeem, Imtiyaz Hussain; Wani, Fozia Jeelani

    2016-12-01

    Unilateral phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is extremely rare event. This is a case report of a 57-year-old woman with history of cough and breathlessness of 3 months duration, unaware of the thyroid mass. She had large cervico-mediastinal goiter and chest radiograph revealed raised left sided hemidiaphragm. Chest CT scan did not reveal any lung parenchymal or mediastinal pathology. The patient underwent a total thyroidectomy through a cervical approach. The final pathology was in favor of multinodular goitre. Even after 1 year of follow up, phrenic nerve palsy did not improve indicating permanent damage. Phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is unusual event. This case is reported not only because of the rare nature of presentation, but also to make clinicians aware of the entity so that early intervention may prevent attendant morbidity.

  14. Acute peripheral facial palsy: is there a trigeminal nerve involvement?

    PubMed

    Uluduz, Derya; Kiziltan, Meral E; Akalin, Mehmet Ali

    2010-07-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate trigeminal nerve involvement in patients with peripheral facial palsy. In total, 25 patients with facial nerve palsy and 19 controls were tested by electrophysiological methods regarding their facial and trigeminal nerve functions within 1 month after disease onset. The presence of an abnormal blink reflex was determined in patients with peripheral facial palsy by comparing paralytic and non-paralytic sides (12.3+/-1.1 and 10.8+/-1.3, respectively; p=0.001). However, the average masseter inhibitory reflex difference between the paretic and non-paralytic sides of patients compared with the corresponding side-to-side comparison for controls was not statistically significant. The masseter inhibitory reflex response was abnormal in some cases. These findings suggest that the masseter inhibitory reflex, a trigemino-trigeminal reflex, was normal in most of our patients with peripheral facial palsy, but may be abnormal in individual cases. Our study showed that subclinical disorders affecting the trigeminal pathways occur in individual patients with idiopathic facial palsy, while the majority of patients have no trigeminal nerve involvement.

  15. Causes of Secondary Radial Nerve Palsy and Results of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Wnukiewicz, Witold; Witkowski, Jarosław; Bocheńska, Aneta; Mizia, Sylwia; Gosk, Jerzy; Zimmer, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the causes that lead to secondary damage of the radial nerve and to discuss the results of reconstructive treatment. Material/Methods The study group consisted of 33 patients treated for radial nerve palsy after humeral fractures. Patients were diagnosed based on clinical examinations, ultrasonography, electromyography, or nerve conduction velocity. During each operation, the location and type of nerve damage were analyzed. During the reconstructive treatment, neurolysis, direct neurorrhaphy, or reconstruction with a sural nerve graft was used. The outcomes were evaluated using the Medical Research Council (MRC) scales and the quick DASH score. Results Secondary radial nerve palsy occurs after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) by plate, as well as by closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF) by nail. In the case of ORIF, it most often occurs when the lateral approach is used, as in the case of CRIF with an insertion interlocking screws. The results of the surgical treatment were statistically significant and depended on the time between nerve injury and revision (reconstruction) surgery, type of damage to the radial nerve, surgery treatment, and type of fixation. Treatment results were not statistically significant, depending on the type of fracture or location of the nerve injury. Conclusions The potential risk of radial nerve neurotmesis justifies an operative intervention to treat neurological complications after a humeral fracture. Adequate surgical treatment in many of these cases allows for functional recovery of the radial nerve. PMID:26895570

  16. Skull base osteomyelitis presenting with an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kasfiki, Eirini Vasileiou; Kelly, Ciaran; Smith, John; Nicolaides, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This is the first case of skull base osteomyelitis presenting with isolated bilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy reported in the literature. A 75-year-old man presented with tongue paralysis without any other cranial nerve palsy. He was otherwise well apart from recently having a high prostate-specific antigen level recorded. Investigations for malignancy or cerebrovascular insult were negative with the diagnosis of skull base osteomyelitis confirmed using CT. Following treatment with intravenous antibiotics for 6 weeks, symptoms resolved. PMID:23853016

  17. Surgical treatment of a long thoracic nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Novak, Christine B; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2002-05-01

    A 17-year-old patient presented with a long thoracic nerve palsy following an idiopathic onset of weakness to the serratus anterior muscle. With no evidence of recovery 3.5 months following onset of serratus anterior weakness, the patient underwent a thoracodorsal to long thoracic nerve transfer to reinnervate the serratus anterior muscle. Follow-up examination 6.5 years following the nerve transfer revealed no scapular winging, full range of motion of the shoulder and no reported functional shoulder restriction. We conclude that a thoracodorsal to long thoracic nerve transfer results in good functional recovery of the serratus anterior muscle.

  18. Peroneal palsy after bariatric surgery; is nerve decompresion always necessary?

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Guerrero, Antonio; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Rubio, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    We present two patients who underwent successful bariatric surgery and developed peroneal nerve palsy six months after the procedure. This is an unusual complication which determines a significant functional limitation, mainly because of foot drop, and its presence may be a hallmark of excessive and rapid weight loss. We discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic options, and we emphasize the important role of an adequate nutritional management, in order to avoid the need for a surgical nerve decompression.

  19. Pudendal nerve palsy in trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Ioannis; Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Oussedik, Sam

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of pudendal nerve palsy following routine trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery procedures ranges from 1.9% to 27.6%. Excessive and/or prolonged traction against the perineal post of a traction table, leading to direct compression and localised ischaemia to the nerve are suggested mechanisms of injury. Misuse of traction and the inappropriate placement of the perineal post, leading to crushing and stretching of the pudendal nerve, are two main contributing factors leading to its postoperative palsy. The sequelae may be sensory, motor or mixed. In most cases, these injuries are transient and tend to resolve within several weeks or months. However, complete neurological recovery may be unpredictable and the effects of ongoing dysfunction potentially disastrous for the individual. In terms of preventative measures, magnitude and duration of traction time should be minimised; traction should be limited to the critical operative steps only. Additionally, the perineal post should be placed between the genitalia and the contralateral leg. A well-padded, large-diameter perineal post should be used (>10cm). Adequate muscle relaxation during anaesthesia is particularly important in young men who have strong muscles and thus require larger traction forces when compared to elderly patients. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the pathophysiology behind the development of this palsy and the measures that can be employed to reduce its occurrence. In procedures where a traction table is employed, consenting for pudendal nerve palsy should be considered by the surgical team.

  20. [Sixth nerve palsies in children. Presentation of four cases].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann-Paiz, Martin A; Fang-Sung, Jen Wen

    2008-10-01

    The etiology of the sixth nerve palsy in children includes multiple causes, being the acquired ones the most frequent. Due to the importance of the adequate management and possible implications of this pathology, four patients are presented for analysis and discussion.

  1. [Treatment of idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy)].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin Willy; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2013-01-28

    Bell's palsy is defined as an idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis of sudden onset. It affects 11-40 persons per 100,000 per annum. Many patients recover without intervention; however, up to 30% have poor recovery of facial muscle control and experience facial disfigurement. The aim of this study was to make an overview of which pharmacological treatments have been used to improve outcomes. The available evidence from randomized controlled trials shows significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids but shows no benefit from antivirals.

  2. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell’s palsy, Ramsay–Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell’s phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell’s palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration

  3. [Invasive aspergillosis of sphenoidal sinus in a patient in Djibouti, revealed by palsy of cranial nerves: a case report].

    PubMed

    Crambert, A; Gauthier, J; Vignal, R; Conessa, C; Lombard, B

    2013-05-01

    The authors report a case of invasive aspergillosis of a sphenoid sinus mucocele revealed in a patient with diabetes in Djibouti by homolateral palsy of the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th nerves. This rare condition occurs preferentially in immunodeficient subjects. Because of its clinical polymorphism, its diagnosis is difficult and is often not made until complications develop. Endonasal surgery with anatomopathological and mycological examination is both a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. It must be performed early, to avoid functional or even life-threatening complications.

  4. Medial rectus muscle anchoring in complete oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Hyung; Chang, Jee Ho

    2015-10-01

    The management of exotropia resulting from complete oculomotor nerve palsy is challenging. Conventional therapeutic interventions, including supramaximal resection and recession, superior oblique tendon resection and transposition, and several ocular anchoring procedures have yielded less-than-adequate results. Here we describe a novel surgical technique of anchoring the medial rectus muscle to the medial orbital wall in combination with lateral rectus disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall.

  5. Sudden peroneal nerve palsy in an osteoarthritic knee: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Nayak, Mayur; Ansari, Tahir; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Peroneal nerve injuries have been reported in association with various causes around the knee such as traumatic varus injury, traumatic dislocation, upper tibial osteotomy, knee arthroscopy and total knee arthroplasty. Two instances of varus arthritic knee associated with a peroneal nerve palsy have been reported so far. One presented with gradual onset peroneal nerve palsy that recovered with time and the other with sudden onset peroneal nerve palsy that did not recover. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man who presented with a symptomatic varus arthritic knee and sudden onset peroneal nerve palsy with synovial cysts over the lateral aspect of the knee. We performed a total knee arthroplasty with decompression of the synovial cyst in the same patient. Three months following the surgery the patient was walking pain free with a completely recovered nerve palsy. PMID:28287389

  6. Femoral Nerve Palsy with Patella Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyoung; Lee, Tong Joo; Woo, Min Su

    2013-01-01

    Femoral neuropathy may be associated with various etiologies and can cause severe walking disability. We present the case of a 25-year-old woman who underwent surgical repair for a patella fracture and complained of lower extremity pain, paresthesia, and weakness postoperatively. Electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed partial peripheral neuropathy of the left femoral nerve associated with the patella fracture. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of femoral neuropathy associated with a patella fracture. PMID:24369003

  7. Common peroneal nerve palsy caused by compression stockings after surgery.

    PubMed

    Güzelküçük, Ümüt; Skempes, Dimitrios; Kumnerddee, Wipoo

    2014-07-01

    Peroneal nerve palsy is one of the more common entrapment neuropathies of the lower limb and can be a result of a multitude of causes. Compression stockings are commonly used for prophylaxis of deep venous thromboembolism after surgery. The entrapment on the head and the neck of the fibula caused by compression stockings is uncommon. In this article, the authors report a 46-yr-old male patient who was operated on for postauricular squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. On the third postoperative day, it was noticed that compression stockings had rolled down, and a linear impression mark was observed under its upper edge at the proximal part of the left cruris. He had left foot drop and difficulty in walking during gait assessment. The needle electromyography confirmed total axonal degeneration of the left peroneal nerve with denervation potentials. The aim of this report was to emphasize the importance of the size and length of the compression stockings and regular skin control in avoiding the risk for peroneal nerve palsy.

  8. Unusual insidious spinal accessory nerve palsy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Isolated spinal accessory nerve dysfunction has a major detrimental impact on the functional performance of the shoulder girdle, and is a well-documented complication of surgical procedures in the posterior triangle of the neck. To the best of our knowledge, the natural course and the most effective way of handling spontaneous spinal accessory nerve palsy has been described in only a few instances in the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 36-year-old Caucasian, Greek man with spontaneous unilateral trapezius palsy with an insidious course. To the best of our knowledge, few such cases have been documented in the literature. The unusual clinical presentation and functional performance mismatch with the imaging findings were also observed. Our patient showed a deterioration that was different from the usual course of this pathology, with an early onset of irreversible trapezius muscle dysfunction two months after the first clinical signs started to manifest. A surgical reconstruction was proposed as the most efficient treatment, but our patient declined this. Although he failed to recover fully after conservative treatment for eight months, he regained moderate function and is currently virtually pain-free. Conclusion Clinicians have to be aware that due to anatomical variation and the potential for compensation by the levator scapulae, the clinical consequences of any injury to the spinal accessory nerve may vary. PMID:20507553

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of isolated abducent nerve palsy induced by vascular compression of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2017-01-01

    If the origin of isolated abducent nerve palsy cannot be found on neuroradiological examinations, diabetes mellitus is known as a probable cause; however, some cases show no potential causes of isolated abducent nerve palsy. Here, we report a 74-year-old male who suffered from diplopia due to isolated left abducent nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance angiography and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition imaging clearly showed a dolichoectasic vertebrobasilar artery compressing the left abducent nerve upward and outward. There were no abnormal lesions in the brain stem, cavernous sinus, or orbital cavity. Laboratory data showed no abnormal findings. We concluded that neurovascular compression of the left abducent nerve might cause isolated left abducent nerve palsy. We observed him without surgical treatment considering his general condition with angina pectoris and old age. His symptom due to the left abducent nerve palsy persisted. From previous reports, conservative treatment could not improve abducent nerve palsy. Microvascular decompression should be considered for abducent nerve palsy due to vascular compression if patients are young, and their general condition is good. We also discuss interesting characteristics with a review of the literature. PMID:28149097

  10. Corneal edema induced by cold in trigeminal nerve palsy

    SciTech Connect

    Thorgaard, G.L.; Holland, E.J.; Krachmer, J.H.

    1987-05-15

    We examined a 34-year-old man who complained of decreased visual acuity in the right eye when exposed to cold environmental temperatures. Although examination at room temperature was unremarkable, he developed prominent unilateral corneal edema of the right eye when placed in a cold room at 4 C. Corneal thickness increased from 525 to 789 microns in the affected eye. Further examination disclosed a right-sided trigeminal nerve palsy. He was eventually found to have a 3 X 2-cm tentorial ridge meningioma on the right.

  11. Median nerve entrapment and ulnar nerve palsy following elbow dislocation in a child.

    PubMed

    Petratos, Dimitrios V; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Morakis, Emmanouil A; Matsinos, George S

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a rare case of a child who presented with neglected intra-articular entrapment of the median nerve, ulnar nerve palsy, and intra-articular incarceration of the medial epicondyle following closed reduction of an elbow dislocation. In the present case, as in most other cases, the diagnosis and treatment were delayed. Careful initial and postreduction neurological examination, as well as careful interpretation of the plain radiographs, is necessary for early detection of any nerve complications and associated fractures of an elbow dislocation. The authors' opinion is that a child with an elbow dislocation, which is initially neurologically intact but advances to a median or ulnar nerve deficit after the reduction, must undergo early surgical exploration, especially when the dislocation is associated with a medial epicondyle fracture.

  12. Nerve transfers in brachial plexus birth palsies: indications, techniques, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H

    2008-11-01

    The advent of nerve transfers has greatly increased surgical options for children who have brachial plexus birth palsies. Nerve transfers have considerable advantages, including easier surgical techniques, avoidance of neuroma resection, and direct motor and sensory reinnervation. Therefore, any functioning nerve fibers within the neuroma are preserved. Furthermore, a carefully selected donor nerve results in little or no clinical deficit. However, some disadvantages and unanswered questions remain. Because of a lack of head-to-head comparison between nerve transfers and nerve grafting, the window of opportunity for nerve grafting may be missed, which may degrade the ultimate outcome. Time will tell the ultimate role of nerve transfer or nerve grafting.

  13. Unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies associated with posterior fossa exploration surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Ayman; Clerkin, James; Mandiwanza, Tafadzwa; Green, Sandra; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Multiple cranial nerves palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment is a rare clinical presentation. This case report describes a young man who developed a unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment. There are different theories to explain this presentation, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We propose that this patient cranial nerve palsies developed following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, potentially as a consequence of rapid change in CSF dynamics. PMID:26951144

  14. Isolated glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves palsy due to fracture involving the left jugular foramen.

    PubMed

    Alberio, N; Cultrera, F; Antonelli, V; Servadei, F

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a case of delayed post-traumatic glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves palsy (i.e. dysphonia and swallowing dysfunction). A high resolution CT study of the cranial base detected a fracture rim encroaching on the left jugular foramen. Treatment consisted in supportive measures with incomplete recovery during a one-year follow-up period. Lower cranial nerves palsies after head trauma are rare and, should they occur, a thorough investigation in search of posterior cranial base and cranio-cervical lesions is warranted. The presumptive mechanism in our case is a fracture-related oedema and ischemic damage to the nerves leading to the delayed occurrence of the palsy.

  15. Facial palsy after inferior alveolar nerve block: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, V; Arbab-Chirani, R; Tea, S H; Roux, M

    2010-11-01

    Bell's palsy is an idiopathic and acute, peripheral nerve palsy resulting in inability to control facial muscles on the affected side because of the involvement of the facial nerve. This study describes a case of Bell's palsy that developed after dental anaesthesia. A 34-year-old pregnant woman at 35 weeks of amenorrhea, with no history of systemic disease, was referred by her dentist for treatment of a mandibular left molar in pulpitis. An inferior alveolar nerve block was made prior to the access cavity preparation. 2h later, the patient felt the onset of a complete paralysis of the left-sided facial muscles. The medical history, the physical examination and the complementary exams led neurologists to the diagnosis of Bell's palsy. The treatment and results of the 1-year follow-up are presented and discussed. Bell's palsy is a rare complication of maxillofacial surgery or dental procedures, the mechanisms of which remain uncertain.

  16. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) following administration of hepatitis B recombinant vaccine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paul, R; Stassen, L F A

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral transient paralysis of facial muscles resulting from dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve. Presented here is a 26-year-old female patient with right lower motor neurone facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers' attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's palsy, as a possible rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination, and steps taken to manage such a presentation.

  17. Modulation of parkinsonian tremor by radial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Pullman, S L; Elibol, B; Fahn, S

    1994-10-01

    We analyzed rest and postural hand tremors in a Parkinson's disease patient who developed and recovered from a right radial nerve palsy at the spiral groove, and found that, despite complete paralysis of all extensors below the elbow, tremor frequencies remained unchanged while tremor amplitudes actually increased. This provides compelling evidence for a central generation of parkinsonian tremor frequency that is not influenced by the effects of peripheral modulation. In addition, the increase in tremor amplitudes may be due to disinhibited flexor activity caused by normally operating spinal segmental mechanisms interacting with central tremor generators programmed to alternate between antagonist muscles. Peripheral treatment of tremors--with muscle paralysis or botulinum toxin, for example--therefore may not be effective in stopping tremor oscillations in Parkinson's disease and may even worsen tremor amplitudes if all antagonists of a tremoring joint are not treated equally.

  18. Familial long thoracic nerve palsy: a manifestation of brachial plexus neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L H

    1986-09-01

    Long thoracic nerve palsy causes weakness of the serratus anterior muscle and winging of the scapula. It is usually traumatic in origin. Isolated long thoracic nerve palsy has not been recognized as the major manifestation of familial brachial plexus neuropathy, but I have studied the syndrome in four members of three generations of one family. One individual suffered an episode of facial paresis. The inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant.

  19. Motor palsies of cranial nerves (excluding VII) after vaccination: reports to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Woo, Emily Jane; Winiecki, Scott K; Ou, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed cranial nerve palsies, other than VII, that have been reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We examined patterns for differences in vaccine types, seriousness, age, and clinical characteristics. We identified 68 reports of cranial nerve palsies, most commonly involving the oculomotor (III), trochlear (IV), and abducens (VI) nerves. Isolated cranial nerve palsies, as well as palsies occurring as part of a broader clinical entity, were reported. Forty reports (59%) were classified as serious, suggesting that a cranial nerve palsy may sometimes be the harbinger of a broader and more ominous clinical entity, such as a stroke or encephalomyelitis. There was no conspicuous clustering of live vs. inactivated vaccines. The patient age range spanned the spectrum from infants to the elderly. Independent data may help to clarify whether, when, and to what extent the rates of cranial nerve palsies following particular vaccines may exceed background levels.

  20. Facial nerve palsy following intra-oral surgery performed with local anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Cousin, G C

    2000-10-01

    The precise cause of Bell's palsy remains unclear. A variety of mechanisms have been linked to this palsy, including viral re-activation, demyelination, oedema, vasopasm and trauma. A link with dental treatment has been suggested previously, and a series of seven cases of facial nerve palsy following intra-oral surgery are reported. All of the patients had local anaesthetic solution containing adrenaline as the vasoconstrictor administered. There may be under-reporting of this association, as patients with facial nerve palsy are treated by specialists from several disciplines, not only maxillofacial surgeons. An association with local anaesthesia administered to permit dental treatment would have important medicolegal consequences, and perhaps go some way to explaining the pathophysiology of Bell's palsy.

  1. Bell's palsy and partial hypoglossal to facial nerve transfer: Case presentation and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Páez, Miguel Domínguez; Masi, Gilda Di; Molina, Gonzalo; Fernández, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy) is a very common condition that affects active population. Despite its generally benign course, a minority of patients can remain with permanent and severe sequelae, including facial palsy or dyskinesia. Hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis is rarely used to reinnervate the mimic muscle in these patients. In this paper, we present a case where a direct partial hypoglossal to facial nerve transfer was used to reinnervate the upper and lower face. We also discuss the indications of this procedure. Case Description: A 53-year-old woman presenting a spontaneous complete (House and Brackmann grade 6) facial palsy on her left side showed no improvement after 13 months of conservative treatment. Electromyography (EMG) showed complete denervation of the mimic muscles. A direct partial hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis was performed, including dissection of the facial nerve at the fallopian canal. One year after the procedure, the patient showed House and Brackmann grade 3 function in her affected face. Conclusions: Partial hypoglossal–facial anastomosis with intratemporal drilling of the facial nerve is a viable technique in the rare cases in which severe Bell's palsy does not recover spontaneously. Only carefully selected patients can really benefit from this technique. PMID:22574255

  2. Bungee jumper's foot drop peroneal nerve palsy caused by bungee cord jumping.

    PubMed

    Torre, P R; Williams, G G; Blackwell, T; Davis, C P

    1993-11-01

    Peroneal nerve injury is a common peripheral neuropathy from a variety of conditions and injuries. We encountered a case of peroneal nerve palsy in a professional bungee cord jumper. Review of the literature showed no previous report of this particular injury in bungee cord jumping.

  3. An unusual case of multiple cranial nerve palsies in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Daderian, A. D.; Chayasirisobhon, S.

    2000-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of Wegener's granulomatosis, which initially caused fulminant palsies affecting cranial nerves II, V, VI, VII, and VIII during a brief episode of the disease. The patient was successfully treated with immunosuppressive therapy. Wegener's granulomatosis should be suspected when multiple cranial nerves are initially affected. PMID:11052460

  4. Ischemic paralysis of the facial nerve: a possible etiologic factor in Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, T C; Rand, R W; Bentson, J R

    1976-01-01

    Numerous causes of peripheral facial nerve paralyses have been described; however, none has satisfactorily explained the genesis of the most common type of paralysis, Bell's palsy. Two patients undergoing an experimental embolization of vascular intracranial tumors suffered a total peripheral facial nerve paralysis when occlusion of the middle meningeal artery had been accomplished. It is speculated that this paralysis resulted from ischemia of the horizontal portion of the facial nerve, an observation that has not previously been described and that might be applicable as well to the etiology of Bell's palsy.

  5. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient's clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor. PMID:27752378

  6. Plasmacytoma of the Clivus Presenting as Bilateral Sixth Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kalwani, Neil; Remenschneider, Aaron K.; Faquin, William; Ferry, Judith; Holbrook, Eric H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Importance Plasmacytomas are monoclonal proliferations of plasma cells that may arise within soft tissue or bone. The skull base is a rare site for plasmacytomas to occur, and few cases have been reported in the literature. When present in the skull base, plasmacytomas may result in cranial neuropathies and often progress to multiple myeloma more rapidly than other intracranial or skeletal plasmacytomas. Clinical Presentation A 69-year-old man presented with a primary complaint of diplopia and an examination consistent with bilateral abducens nerve palsy. No other deficits were noted. Magnetic resonance imaging of the skull base demonstrated a large T1 isointense moderately enhancing lesion centered within the clivus. Endoscopic biopsy of the mass revealed sheets and aggregates of mature monoclonal plasma cells. The patient's initial systemic work-up revealed that this was a solitary lesion, and he was treated with radiation therapy to the skull base with a durable local effect at 18-month follow-up. Unfortunately he progressed to multiple myeloma with peripheral osteolytic lesions but has been stabilized on chemotherapeutics. Conclusion The clivus is an unusual site for intracranial plasmacytomas, and enhancing lesions must be differentiated from chordoma. Characteristic findings on histopathology include an immunoglobulin light-chain restricted clonal proliferation of plasma cells. Treatment is most commonly radiotherapy with surgery reserved for biopsy and palliation. Clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of progression to multiple myeloma in skull base plasmacytomas. PMID:26251795

  7. Vertical muscle transposition with silicone band belting in VI nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    A woman aged 60 years developed a Millard-Gubler syndrome after a diagnosis of a cavernous angioma in the median and paramedian areas of the pons. In this context, she presented a right VI nerve palsy, right conjugate gaze palsy, facial palsy and left hemiparesis. To improve the complete VI nerve palsy, we planned a modified transposition approach, in which procedure we made a partial transposition of vertical rectus with a silicone band that was fixated posteriorly. After the procedure, the patient gained the ability to slightly abduct the right eye. We found no compensatory torticollis in the primary position of gaze. There was also an improvement of elevation and depression movements of the right eye. We obtained satisfactory results with a theoretically reversible technique, which is adjustable intraoperatively with no need of muscle detachment, preventing anterior segment ischaemia and allowing simultaneous recession of the medial rectus muscles, if necessary. PMID:27974341

  8. Rhomboid nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve for shoulder reanimation in brachial plexus palsy: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Goubier, J-N; Teboul, F

    2016-10-01

    Recovery of shoulder function is a real challenge in cases of partial brachial plexus palsy. Currently, in C5-C6 root injuries, transfer of the long head of the triceps brachii branch is done to revive the deltoid muscle. Spinal accessory nerve transfer is typically used for reanimation of the suprascapular nerve. We propose an alternative technique in which the nerve of the rhomboid muscles is transferred to the suprascapular nerve. A 33-year-old male patient with a C5-C6 brachial plexus injury with shoulder and elbow flexion palsy underwent surgery 7 months after the injury. The rhomboid nerve was transferred to the suprascapular nerve and the long head of the triceps brachii branch to the axillary nerve for shoulder reanimation. A double transfer of fascicles was performed, from the ulnar and median nerves to the biceps brachii branch and brachialis branch, respectively, for elbow flexion. At 14 months' follow-up, elbow flexion was rated M4. Shoulder elevation was 85 degrees and rated M4, and external rotation was 80 degrees and rated M4. After performing a cadaver study showing that transfer of the rhomboid nerve to the suprascapular nerve is technically possible, here we report and discuss the clinical outcomes of this new transfer technique.

  9. Fibular nerve palsy after hip replacement: Not only surgeon responsibility. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) a rare cause of nerve liability.

    PubMed

    Logroscino, G; Del Tedesco, F; Cambise, C; Coraci, D; Donati, F; Santilli, V; Padua, L

    2016-06-01

    Mononeuropathy after surgery may occur and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a possible pathological condition related to paresis after hip surgery. We present a case of 66-year-old man presenting severe weakness at inferior limb muscles after hip prosthesis revision. Clinic and electrophysiology showed severe right fibular nerve damage and ultrasound found a marked enlargement of the same nerve, associated with focal enlargements in other nerves. A diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies was suspected and confirmed by genetic test. The patient gradually recovered returning to a normal daily active life. Ultrasound was crucial for diagnosis. The suspicion and diagnosis of latent neuropathy, which can occur after surgical intervention, may lead to a better understand of the risks of the surgery, specific for the patient, and avoid the wrong attribution to surgical malpractice.

  10. Scapular Winging Secondary to Apparent Long Thoracic Nerve Palsy in a Young Female Swimmer

    PubMed Central

    Nawa, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Background  In neurological diseases, winging of the scapula occurs because of serratus anterior muscle dysfunction due to long thoracic nerve palsy, or trapezius muscle dysfunction due to accessory nerve palsy. Several sports can cause long thoracic nerve palsy, including archery and tennis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of long thoracic nerve palsy in an aquatic sport. Objective  The present study is a rare case of winging of the scapula that occurred during synchronized swimming practice. Methods  The patient's history with the present illness, examination findings, rehabilitation progress, and related medical literature are presented. Results  A 14-year-old female synchronized swimmer had chief complaints of muscle weakness, pain, and paresthesia in the right scapula. Upon examination, marked winging of the scapula appeared during anterior arm elevation, as did floating of the superior angle. After 1 year of therapy, right shoulder girdle pain and paresthesia had disappeared; however, winging of the scapula remained. Conclusions  Based on this observation and the severe pain in the vicinity of the second dorsal rib, we believe the cause was damage to the nerve proximal to the branch arising from the upper nerve trunk that innervates the serratus anterior. PMID:27917241

  11. Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with zoster meningitis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Kim, Ji-Soo; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2013-12-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with diplopia following painful skin eruptions on the right upper extremity. On presentation, she was found to have 35 prism diopters of esotropia and an abduction limitation in the left eye. Two weeks later, she developed blepharoptosis and anisocoria with a smaller pupil in the right eye, which increased in the darkness. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and a positive result for immunoglobulin G antibody to varicella zoster virus. She was diagnosed to have zoster meningitis with Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy. After intravenous antiviral and steroid treatments, the vesicular eruptions and abducens nerve palsy improved. Horner's syndrome and diplopia resolved after six months. Here we present the first report of Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with zoster meningitis.

  12. ANCA-negative Wegener's granulomatosis with multiple lower cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Park, Jin; Bae, Jung Ho; Cho, Min-Sun; Park, Kee Duk; Jeong, Jee Hyang

    2013-11-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a systemic vasculitis affecting small and medium-sized vessels with granulomatous formation. Though it is known for respiratory tract and kidney involvement, neurologic manifestation has been also reported. Herein we report a patient who suffered pansinusitis with multiple lower cranial nerve palsies but reached remission by immunosuppressant after the diagnosis of WG. A 54-yr-old female visited with headache, hearing difficulty, and progressive bulbar symptoms. She experienced endoscopic sinus surgeries due to refractory sinusitis. Neurologic examination revealed multiple lower cranial nerve palsies. Vasculitic markers showed no abnormality. Nasal biopsy revealed granulomatous inflammation and vasculitis involving small vessels. Given cyclophosphamide and prednisolone, her symptoms were prominently improved. WG should be considered in the patient with multiple cranial nerve palsies, especially those with paranasal sinus disease. Because WG can be lethal if delayed in treatment, prompt immunosuppressant is warranted after the diagnostic tissue biopsy.

  13. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from acute traumatic tentorial subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (SDH) resulting from head trauma is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires expedient diagnosis and intervention to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Rapidly expanding or large hematomas, elevated intracranial pressure, and associated complications of brain herniation are associated with high mortality rates and poor recovery of neurological function. However, smaller bleeds (clot thickness <10 mm) or hematomas occurring in infrequent locations, such as the tentorium cerebelli, may be difficult to recognize and patients may present with unusual or subtle signs and symptoms, including isolated cranial nerve palsies. Knowledge of neuroanatomy supported by modern neuroimaging can greatly aid in recognition and diagnosis of such lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from compressive tentorial SDH following blunt head trauma, review the literature concerning similar cases, and make recommendations regarding the diagnosis of SDH in patients presenting with isolated cranial nerve palsies. PMID:27843362

  14. Characteristics of the perception for unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Mun, Sue Jean; Park, Kyung Tae; Kim, Yoonjoong; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-11-01

    Patients with facial nerve palsy (FNP) are actually evaluated by other people rather than doctors or the patients themselves. This study was performed to investigate the characteristics of the perception of unilateral FNP in Korean people. A questionnaire using photographs of four patients with four different grades (House-Brackmann) of FNP was given to two hundred people with no FNP. Subjects of each gender, ranging from 20 to 69 years of age, participated. The questionnaire, showing facial expressions of resting, smiling, whistling, eye closing, and frowning, consisted of questions concerning the identification and the involved side of FNP, the unnatural areas of the face, and the unnaturalness of the facial expressions. The overall identification rate of FNP was 75.0%. The identification rate increased according to the increase in the grade of the patient's FNP (p < .001). The overall detection rate of the involved side was 54.5%, and that rate decreased with increasing subject age (p < .001). The area of the most unnatural facial expression was reported to be the mouth, followed by the eyes and cheeks. The most unnatural facial expression was also reported to be smiling, followed by eye closing and whistling. There was no difference in the identification rate of FNP according to education level. However, the overall detection rate of the involved side was higher in the high-education group (p < .001). The detection rate for the involved side of FNP was lower than the rate of identification of FNP and was significantly low in the middle-aged/elderly and low-education level groups.

  15. A guide to the evaluation of fourth cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Lee; Hayman; Beaver; Prager; Kelder; Scasta; Avilla; von Noorden GK; Tang

    1998-12-01

    PURPOSE To devise a cost-effective guide for the evaluation of fourth nerve palsies (FNP). METHODS A review of the pertinent English language literature was performed to devise a guide for the evaluation (including neuroimaging) of FNP. The authors report a retrospective review of imaging studies performed on 206 patients with FNP. RESULTS The literature was used to develop the imaging guide. In the retrospective chart review of 206 patients from two tertiary care centers, 28 patients (13.6%) underwent a computed tomography scan and/or a magnetic resonance scan. Of these patients, five had associated neurological symptoms (non-isolated), one was traumatic, five were congenital, four were vasculopathic, eleven were non-vasculopathic, and two were progressive. Following the recommendations of the imaging guide, the five isolated congenital FNP and the four isolated vasculopathic FNP would not have undergone neuroimaging studies. The total costs of these neuroimaging studies in these nine patients were 19,000 dollars. Four patients in the retrospective review with associated neurological deficits (non-isolated) should have undergone neuroimaging according to the guide, but did not. CONCLUSIONS Although the evaluation of FNP can be difficult, the decision to order neuroimaging can be improved by using an imaging guide. An imaging guide for the evaluation of FNP may allow more appropriate and cost-effective imaging of these patients. Isolated congenital, old traumatic, or vasculopathic FNP do not require neuroimaging studies. Patients with non-isolated FNP should have directed neuroimaging studies based upon the results of clinical examination.

  16. Distal Ulna Fracture With Delayed Ulnar Nerve Palsy in a Baseball Player.

    PubMed

    Pasque, Charles B; Pearson, Clark; Margo, Bradley; Ethel, Robert

    2016-02-01

    We present a case report of a college baseball player who sustained a blunt-trauma, distal-third ulna fracture from a thrown ball with delayed presentation of ulnar nerve palsy. Even after his ulna fracture had healed, the nerve injury made it difficult for the athlete to control a baseball while throwing, resulting in a delayed return to full baseball activity for 3 to 4 months. He had almost complete nerve recovery by 6 months after his injury and complete nerve recovery by 1 year after his injury.

  17. Bell palsy in lyme disease-endemic regions of canada: a cautionary case of occult bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Karen; Melanson, Michel; Desai, Jamsheed A

    2012-09-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a multisystem disorder characterized by three clinical stages: dermatologic, neurologic, and rheumatologic. The number of known Lyme disease-endemic areas in Canada is increasing as the range of the vector Ixodes scapularis expands into the eastern and central provinces. Southern Ontario, Nova Scotia, southern Manitoba, New Brunswick, and southern Quebec are now considered Lyme disease-endemic regions in Canada. The use of field surveillance to map risk and endemic regions suggests that these geographic areas are growing, in part due to the effects of climate warming. Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the most common neurologic abnormality in the second stage of Lyme borreliosis, with up to 25% of Bell palsy (idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy) occurring due to Lyme disease. Here we present a case of occult bilateral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. In Lyme disease-endemic regions of Canada, patients presenting with unilateral or bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy should be evaluated for Lyme disease with serologic testing to avoid misdiagnosis. Serologic testing should not delay initiation of appropriate treatment for presumed Bell palsy.

  18. Postpartum pituitary apoplexy with isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: A rare medical emergency

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Sujeet; Jearth, Vaneet; Sharma, Ashish; Sharma, Rajesh; Mistry, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome characterized by sudden onset headache, visual deficits, ophthalmoplegia, altered mental status, and hormonal dysfunction due to an expanding mass within the sella turcica resulting from hemorrhage or infarction of pituitary gland. We report a case of pituitary apoplexy that developed in postpartum period following postpartum hemorrhage and presented with isolated third cranial nerve palsy. PMID:26752912

  19. Waveform changes in antidromic facial nerve responses in patients with Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hiroaki; Iwai, Mitsuru; Takeda, Taizo; Hamada, Masashi; Kakigi, Akinobu; Nakahira, Mitsuhiko

    2002-02-01

    We repeatedly tested the antidromic facial nerve response within 7 days after onset of paralysis in patients with Bell's palsy. None of 109 patients showed the triphasic waveform that reflects normal conduction of the facial nerve action potential. The waves recorded from patients showed biphasic, monophasic, or flat waveforms. Eighty-two of 88 patients with complete recovery showed biphasic waves, whereas half of the patients with nerve degeneration had monophasic or flat waves. Most patients with complete recovery maintained biphasic waves, but in patients with incomplete recovery, the waveforms changed to monophasic or flat, except in 1 case. The presence of monophasic or flat waves with a low facial score strongly suggests nerve degeneration. The antidromic facial nerve response is recommended as a method of diagnosing paralysis and monitoring the progression of intratemporal facial nerve damage during its early stages.

  20. Rare encounter of unilateral facial nerve palsy in an adolescent with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mehtab; Sharma, Parnika; Charadva, Creana; Prasad, Manish

    2016-01-28

    Unilateral facial nerve palsy is rarely encountered in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). We report a case of an adolescent girl who presented with peripheral ascending weakness, preceded by Campylobacter jejuni infection. After treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, the peripheral weakness improved. Electro-diagnostic testing confirmed axonal dysfunction and the patient was positive for antiganglioside antibodies. However, the patient developed unilateral left-sided facial weakness. She was managed with further intravenous immunoglobulin and intensive physiotherapy. The outcome for facial palsy was very good, with almost complete resolution after 2 weeks.

  1. The use of cromolyn sodium in the prevention of nerve degeneration in Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    McGovern, F H; Estevez, J

    1980-10-01

    Clinical use by inhalation of cromolyn sulphate, a mast cell degranulator inhibitor, within four days after the onset of Bell's palsy will prevent nerve degeneration and provide complete recovery within a range of two weeks. The successful administration of the drug supports our experimental concept of Bell's palsy as an immunological disease. The triggering action of the mast cell as a part of IgE antibody cell mediator system is postulated as the key role on controlling the neural edema. In this paper we contrast the difference in disease duration time and degree of recovery in a group of patients using high dose prednisone therapy and a group using cromolyn sulphate.

  2. Bilateral Cranial IX and X Nerve Palsies After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Don; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Seung Ah; Joo, Hye In; Yeo, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    We report a 57-year-old man with bilateral cranial nerve IX and X palsies who presented with severe dysphagia. After a mild head injury, the patient complained of difficult swallowing. Physical examination revealed normal tongue motion and no uvular deviation. Cervical X-ray findings were negative, but a brain computed tomography revealed a skull fracture involving bilateral jugular foramen. Laryngoscopy indicated bilateral vocal cord palsy. In a videofluoroscopic swallowing study, food residue remained in the vallecula and pyriform sinus, and there was reduced motion of the pharynx and larynx. Electromyography confirmed bilateral superior and recurrent laryngeal neuropathy. PMID:26949684

  3. A rare presentation of spontaneous internal carotid artery dissection with Horner's syndrome, VIIth, Xth and XIIth nerve palsies

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Azer; Ribeiro, Nuno Pedro Lobato; Ali, Asem; Hijazi, Mohsen; Farook, Hina

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous internal carotid artery dissection (sICAD) is an uncommon cause of isolated cranial nerve palsies. Commonly patients present with stroke, headache, facial pain and Horner's syndrome, with upto 16% having cranial nerve palsies. We present the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with hoarseness, dysphagia and tongue swelling, mimicking a tongue base tumor. He was found to have unilateral VIIth, Xth and XIIth nerve palsies with Horner's syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal changes and loss of signal void in right internal carotid artery, later confirmed by Angiography as a dissection with pseudo-aneurysm. He was started on anticoagulation and made a good recovery on discharge. This case presents a unique combination of cranial nerve palsies due to internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) and to our knowledge is the first reported case in the literature. Early recognition and institution of appropriate therapy is critical to prevention of ischemic stroke. PMID:27699055

  4. Nerve Palsy after Total Hip Arthroplasty without Subtrochanteric Femoral Shortening Osteotomy for a Completely Dislocated Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Sonohata, Motoki; Kitajima, Masaru; Kawano, Shunsuke; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurological injuries are a rare but devastating complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the frequency of nerve palsy after THA without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy in patients with a completely dislocated hip joint without pseudo-articulation between the femoral head and iliac bone. Methods: Between October 1999 and September 2001, nine primary THAs were performed for patients with a completely dislocated hip joint. The limb lengths, neurological abnormalities, and the extent of their neurological recovery were evaluated. Three THAs were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy, and six THAs were combined without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Results: The mean length of the operation was 4.8 cm (range, 3.0-6.5 cm). Sciatic nerve palsy developed in four of the nine patients after THA. None of the cases with sciatic nerve palsy were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Three of four patients did not completely recover from sciatic nerve palsy. Conclusions: THA for patients with a completely dislocated hip was associated with a high risk of nerve palsy due to excessive limb lengthening; the potential for recovery from nerve palsy was observed to be poor. Subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy should be used in combination with THA in patients with a completely dislocated hip. PMID:28217204

  5. C5 Nerve root palsies following cervical spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Hollingsworth, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical C5 nerve root palsies may occur in between 0% and 30% of routine anterior or posterior cervical spine operations. They are largely attributed to traction injuries/increased cord migration following anterior/posterior decompressions. Of interest, almost all studies cite spontaneous resolution of these deficits without surgery with 3–24 postoperative months. Methods: Different studies cite various frequencies for C5 root palsies following anterior or posterior cervical spine surgery. In their combined anterior/posterior series involving C4-C5 level decompressions, Libelski et al. cited up to a 12% incidence of C5 palsies. In Gu et al. series, C5 root palsies occurred in 3.1% of double-door laminoplasty, 4.5% of open-door laminoplasty, and 11.3% of laminectomy. Miller et al. observed an intermediate 6.9% frequency of C5 palsies followed by posterior cervical decompressions and fusions (PCDF). Results: Gu et al. also identified multiple risk factors for developing C5 palsies following posterior surgery; male gender, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), narrower foramina, laminectomy, and marked dorsal spinal cord drift. Miller et al. also identified an average $1918 increased cost for physical/occupational therapy for patients with C5 palsies. Conclusions: The incidence of C5 root deficits for anterior/posterior cervical surgery at C4-C5 was 12% in one series, and ranged up to 11.3% for laminectomies, while others cited 0–30%. Although identification of preoperative risk factors for C5 root deficits may help educate patients regarding these risks, there is no clear method for their avoidance at this time. PMID:26005577

  6. Prosthetic ambulation in a paraplegic patient with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Shin, J C; Park, C; Kim, D Y; Choi, Y S; Kim, Y K; Seong, Y J

    2000-08-01

    Great importance and caution should be placed on prosthetic fitting for a paraplegic patient with an anesthetic residual limb if functional ambulation is to be achieved. The combination of paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy is a complex injury that makes the rehabilitation process difficult. This article describes a case of L2 paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy on the right side. Following the rehabilitation course, the patient independently walked using a walker at indoor level with a transfemoral prosthesis with ischial containment socket, polycentric knee assembly, endoskeletal shank and multiaxis foot assembly and a knee ankle foot orthosis on the sound side. The difficulties of fitting a functional prosthesis to an insensate limb and the rehabilitation stages leading to functional ambulation are reviewed.

  7. Cranial Sixth-Nerve Palsy and Eosinophilia in an Outbreak of Mycoplasma Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Howard J.; Lindzon, Martin

    1987-01-01

    The authors discuss a case in which three siblings presented with Mycoplasma pneumonia. All three had a typical rise in complement fixation antibody titres. However, the sibling with the highest titre also developed cranial sixth-nerve palsy; in addition, she was the only one of the three who did not have an eosinophilia. The authors review the symptomatology of Mycoplasma pneumonia and the involvement of the central nervous system. PMID:21263943

  8. Isolated Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Following Minor Head Trauma; a Case report

    PubMed Central

    GoliKhatir, Iraj; Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Motamed Motlagh, Hasan; Heidari, Seyed Farshad

    2017-01-01

    Isolated third nerve palsy develops in numerous intracranial pathologies such as closed head trauma, tumor, and aneurysm. This report describes a 61 years old female with an abrasion on the left forehead and ptosis of the left eye. Initial computed tomography did not reveal any causative cerebral and vascular lesions or orbital and cranial fractures. High-resolution and multi-axial enhanced Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be helpful in diagnosis and monitoring of patients with this rare phenomenon. PMID:28286849

  9. A Case of Wegener's Granulomatosis Presenting with Unilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ujjawal, Roy; Koushik, Pan; Ajay, Panwar; Subrata, Chakrabarti

    2016-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis or granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a necrotizing vasculitis affecting both arterioles and venules. The disease is characterized by the classical triad involving acute inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tracts with renal involvement. However, the disease pathology can affect any organ system. This case presents Wegener's granulomatosis presenting with facial nerve palsy as the first manifestation of the disease, which is rarely reported in medical literature. PMID:27110249

  10. Palsy of the rear limbs in Mycobacterium lepraemurium-infected mice results from bone damage and not from nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Becerril-Villanueva, E; Wek-Rodríguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P; Reyes-Maldonado, E

    2005-06-01

    A small but relatively constant proportion (3-5%) of mice chronically infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) develops bilateral paralysis of the rear limbs. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not the bilateral leg palsy results from nerve involvement. Direct bacterial nerve infection or acute/delayed inflammation might possibly affect the nerves. Therefore, palsied animals were investigated for the presence of: (a) histopathological changes in the leg tissues including nerves, bones and annexes, and (b) serum antibodies to M. lepraemurium and M. leprae lipids, including phenolic glycolipid I from M. leprae. Histopathological study of the palsied legs revealed that the paralysis was not the result of direct involvement of the limb nerves, as neither bacilli nor inflammatory cells were observed in the nerve branches studied. Antibodies to brain lipids and cardiolipin were not detected in the serum of the palsied animals, thus ruling out an immune response to self-lipids as the basis for the paralysis. Although high levels of antibodies to MLM lipids were detected in the serum of palsied animals they were not related to limb paralysis, as the nerves of the palsied legs showed no evidence of inflammatory damage. In fact, nerves showed no evidence of damage. Paralysis resulted from severe damage of the leg bones. Within the bones the bone marrow became replaced by extended bacilli-laden granulomas that frequently eroded the bone wall, altering the normal architecture of the bone and its annexes, namely muscle, tendons and connective tissue. Although this study rules out definitively the infectious or inflammatory damage of nerves in murine leprosy, it opens a new avenue of research into the factors that participate in the involvement or the sparing of nerves in human and murine leprosy, respectively.

  11. Palsy of the rear limbs in Mycobacterium lepraemurium-infected mice results from bone damage and not from nerve involvement

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Becerril-Villanueva, E; Wek-Rodríguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P; Reyes-Maldonado, E

    2005-01-01

    A small but relatively constant proportion (3–5%) of mice chronically infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) develops bilateral paralysis of the rear limbs. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not the bilateral leg palsy results from nerve involvement. Direct bacterial nerve infection or acute/delayed inflammation might possibly affect the nerves. Therefore, palsied animals were investigated for the presence of: (a) histopathological changes in the leg tissues including nerves, bones and annexes, and (b) serum antibodies to M. lepraemurium and M. leprae lipids, including phenolic glycolipid I from M. leprae. Histopathological study of the palsied legs revealed that the paralysis was not the result of direct involvement of the limb nerves, as neither bacilli nor inflammatory cells were observed in the nerve branches studied. Antibodies to brain lipids and cardiolipin were not detected in the serum of the palsied animals, thus ruling out an immune response to self-lipids as the basis for the paralysis. Although high levels of antibodies to MLM lipids were detected in the serum of palsied animals they were not related to limb paralysis, as the nerves of the palsied legs showed no evidence of inflammatory damage. In fact, nerves showed no evidence of damage. Paralysis resulted from severe damage of the leg bones. Within the bones the bone marrow became replaced by extended bacilli-laden granulomas that frequently eroded the bone wall, altering the normal architecture of the bone and its annexes, namely muscle, tendons and connective tissue. Although this study rules out definitively the infectious or inflammatory damage of nerves in murine leprosy, it opens a new avenue of research into the factors that participate in the involvement or the sparing of nerves in human and murine leprosy, respectively. PMID:15932504

  12. Peroneal nerve branching suggests compression palsy in the deformities of Charcot-Marie Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Gregory P

    2006-10-01

    Altered expression of the PMP-22 protein may be implicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and the much rarer disease, hereditary liability to pressure palsy. An element of chronic pressure palsy may explain the unique distribution of motor imbalance in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. If this is the case, innervation of the lateral leg motor units should show sufficient anatomic segregation to explain the variable disease patterns. Twelve fresh cadaver specimens were dissected to examine the innervation of the anterior and lateral compartment muscles from the peroneal nerve. Nine specimens had a branch to the peroneus longus at or proximal to nerve passage of the posterior fibular neck. The first branch to the peroneus longus was 2.1 +/- 6.7 mm proximal, and the first branch to the peroneus brevis was 110.9 +/- 19 mm distal. The nerve to the tibialis anterior originated within 5 mm of the reference point and wrapped transversely along the fibular neck for 17.2 +/- 1.4 mm. These discrete pathways to the individual motor units in the anterolateral leg were consistent with the possible implication of chronic pressure palsy in the patterns of atrophy in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  13. Superior Oblique Anterior Transposition with Horizontal Recti Recession-Resection for Total Third-Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Eraslan, Muhsin; Cerman, Eren; Onal, Sumru; Ogut, Mehdi Suha

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To report the results of lateral rectus muscle recession, medial rectus muscle resection, and superior oblique muscle transposition in the restoration and maintenance of ocular alignment in primary position for patients with total third-nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of patients who underwent surgery between March 2007 and September 2011 for total third-nerve palsy were reviewed. All patients underwent a preoperative assessment, including a detailed ophthalmologic examination. Results. A total of 6 patients (age range, 14–45 years) were included. The median preoperative horizontal deviation was 67.5 Prism Diopter (PD) (interquartile range [IQR] 57.5–70) and vertical deviation was 13.5 PD (IQR 10–20). The median postoperative horizontal residual exodeviation was 8.0 PD (IQR 1–16), and the vertical deviation was 0 PD (IQR 0–4). The median correction of hypotropia following superior oblique transposition was 13.5 ± 2.9 PD (range, 10–16). All cases were vertically aligned within 5 PD. Four of the six cases were aligned within 10 PD of the horizontal deviation. Adduction and head posture were improved in all patients. All patients gained new area of binocular single vision in the primary position after the operation. Conclusion. Lateral rectus recession, medial rectus resection, and superior oblique transposition may be used to achieve satisfactory cosmetic and functional results in total third-nerve palsy. PMID:26640703

  14. Abducens nerve palsy caused by basilar impression associated with atlanto-occipital assimilation.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Y; Sagoh, M; Mayanagi, K; Murakami, H

    1998-06-01

    A 47-year-old male presented with abducens nerve palsy due to basilar impression associated with atlanto-occipital assimilation manifesting as slowly progressive bilateral trigeminal neuralgia and diplopia in the right lateral gaze. X-ray and computed tomography of the skull confirmed the diagnosis of basilar impression and atlanto-occipital assimilation, and magnetic resonance imaging disclosed tightness of the posterior cranial fossa. Surgical suboccipital decompression resulted in gradual resolution of the patient's complaints, and no additional symptoms were recognized. Impairment of the sixth cranial nerve is a rare symptom compared to those of the fifth or the eighth cranial nerve in a patient with a craniocervical malformation. However, the present case shows the possibility of cranial nerve dysfunction due to tightness of the posterior cranial fossa, and suggests that surgical treatment for basilar impression with atlanto-occipital assimilation should be considered in patients with uncommon and unusual symptoms.

  15. Role of Kabat rehabilitation in facial nerve palsy: a randomised study on severe cases of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Monini, S; Iacolucci, C M; Di Traglia, M; Lazzarino, A I; Barbara, M

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of Bell's palsy (BP), based on steroids and/or antiviral drugs, may still leave a certain percentage of affected subjects with disfiguring sequelae due to incomplete recovery. The different procedures of physical rehabilitation have not been demonstrated to play a favourable role in this disorder. The aim of the present study was to compare functional outcomes in severe cases of Bell's palsy when treated by steroids alone or by steroids accompanied by Kabat physical rehabilitation. This prospective study included 94 subjects who showed sudden facial nerve (FN) palsy with House-Brackmann grade IV or V and who were divided into two groups on the basis of the therapeutic approach: one group (a) was treated by steroids, and the other (b) received steroids in combination with physical rehabilitation. Medical treatment consisted in administration of steroids at a dosage of 60 mg per day for 15 days; physical rehabilitative treatment consisted in proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation according to Kabat, and was administered to one of the two groups of subjects. Recovery rate, degree of recovery and time for recovery were compared between the two groups using the Mann-Whitney and univariate logistic regression statistical tests (Ward test). Kabat patients (group b) had about 20 times the odds of improving by three HB grades or more (OR = 17.73, 95% CI = 5.72 to 54.98, p < 0.001) than patients who did not receive physical treatment (group a). The mean speed of recovery in group b was the half of that recorded for group a (non-Kabat subjects). No difference was observed in the incidence of synkineses between the two groups. Steroid treatment appears to provide better and faster recovery in severe cases (HB IV and V) of BP when complemented with Kabat physical rehabilitation.

  16. Bilateral abducens and facial nerve palsies as a localizing sign due to reduction in intracranial pressure after fourth ventriculoperitoneal shunting

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Panikar, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    A trapped fourth ventricle often requires fourth ventriculoperitoneal shunting (4VP). Complications of this procedure include shunt blockage, infection, shunt migration, and overdrainage. Cranial nerve palsies are very rare after 4VP shunting and have been described with over drainage and brainstem distortion. We present an unusual case of bilateral abducens and facial nerve palsies after 4VP shunting after normalization of 4th ventricular parameters. Measurement of various brainstem angles presented us with a plausible hypothesis to explain the cranial nerve dysfunction. PMID:27994363

  17. A case of possible paraneoplastic neurological syndrome presenting as multiple cranial nerve palsies associated with gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaido, Misako; Yuasa, Yoshihito; Yamamoto, Tameyoshi; Munakata, Satoru; Tagawa, Naohiro; Tanaka, Keiko

    2016-09-29

    We report the case of a patient who had developed multiple cranial nerve palsies in the course of possible paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS) associated with gallbladder cancer. Twelve days prior to visiting our hospital, a 69-year-old man began experiencing neurological symptoms, beginning with diplopia and progressing to ptosis of the left palpebra and subsequent complete closure of the eye within 8 days. Results of the initial medical examination indicated paresis of left oculomotor (III) and abducens (VI) nerves. MRI of the brain revealed no focal lesion that could have resulted in compression of the affected nerves, while further examination ruled out diabetes mellitus, infection, vasculitis, and other systemic autoimmune diseases as potential causes. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI revealed high intensity located in the oculomotor nerves, and steroid pulse therapy was performed based on the assumption of inflammatory diseases. Although slight improvement was observed with respect to the left extraocular paresis, subsequent emergence of bilateral facial nerve (VII) palsy, right abducens nerve palsy, and right oculomotor nerve palsy occurred in succession. PET/CT performed under suspicion of PNS, confirmed the presence of gallbladder cancer. Surgical extirpation of the cancer occurred 3 months following the appearance of left oculomotor paralysis, after which the patient underwent postoperative chemotherapy. All cranial nerve palsies resolved within 2 months after the operation, and both cancer and PNS have shown no recurrence for over 5 years. Pathological examination of the resected tumor revealed well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma showing some signs of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, typically an indicator of a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, lymph node metastasis did not progress beyond N2, and the cancer was completely removed by lymph node dissection. Therefore, the presence of multiple cranial palsies in this patient led to early detection of

  18. Idiopathic Ninth, Tenth, and Twelfth Cranial Nerve Palsy with Ipsilateral Headache: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Seung-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This case report is to report the effect of Korean traditional treatment for idiopathic ninth, tenth, and twelfth cranial nerve palsy with ipsilateral headache. Methods: The medical history and imaging and laboratory test of a 39-year-old man with cranial palsy were tested to identify the cause of disease. A 0.2-mL dosage of Hwangyeonhaedoktang pharmacopuncture was administered at CV23 and CV17, respectively. Acupuncture was applied at P06, Li05, TE05, and G37 on the right side of the body. Zhuapiandutongbang (左 偏頭痛方) was administered at 30 minutes to 1 hour after mealtime three times a day. The symptoms were investigated using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results: The results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and laboratory tests were normal. The medical history showed no trauma, other illnesses, family history of diseases, medications, smoking, drinking and so on. All symptoms disappeared at the 10th day of treatment. Conclusion: Korean traditional treatment such as acupuncture, pharmcopuncture, and herbal medicine for the treatment of ninth, tenth, and twelfth cranial nerve palsy of unknown origin is suggested to be effective even though this conclusion is based on a single. PMID:25780655

  19. Prognostic value of facial nerve antidromic evoked potentials in bell palsy: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wenhao, Zhang; Minjie, Chen; Chi, Yang; Weijie, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the value of facial nerve antidromic evoked potentials (FNAEPs) in predicting recovery from Bell palsy. Study Design. Retrospective study using electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review. Methods. A series of 46 patients with unilateral Bell palsy treated were included. According to taste test, 26 cases were associated with taste disorder (Group 1) and 20 cases were not (Group 2). Facial function was established clinically by the Stennert system after monthly follow-up. The result was evaluated with clinical recovery rate (CRR) and FNAEP. FNAEPs were recorded at the posterior wall of the external auditory meatus of both sides. Results. Mean CRR of Group 1 and Group 2 was 61.63% and 75.50%. We discovered a statistical difference between two groups and also in the amplitude difference (AD) of FNAEP. Mean ± SD of AD was -6.96% ± 12.66% in patients with excellent result, -27.67% ± 27.70% with good result, and -66.05% ± 31.76% with poor result. Conclusions. FNAEP should be monitored in patients with intratemporal facial palsy at the early stage. FNAEP at posterior wall of external auditory meatus was sensitive to detect signs of taste disorder. There was close relativity between FNAEPs and facial nerve recovery.

  20. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy after lumbar epidural steroid injection in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Gozal, Yair M.; Atchley, Kristine; Curt, Bradford A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with diabetes mellitus, epidural steroid injections (ESI) have been noted to cause significant elevation of blood glucose levels, typically lasting 1–3 days. Here, we describe a previously unreported complication of a diabetic third nerve palsy associated with an ESI. Case Description: A 66-year-old man with a history of coronary artery disease, hypertension, and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus presented with low back pain and left lower extremity radiculopathy. The lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed mild spondylosis, most severe at the L4-5 level, accompanied by a broad based disc protrusion resulting in mild central and moderate biforaminal stenosis. The patient underwent a left-sided L4-L5 transforaminal ESI resulting in transient elevation of his blood glucose levels. On post-procedure day 2, he developed a frontal headache and a complete right third nerve palsy with partial pupillary involvement. The MRI and MR angiography (MRA) of the brain revealed no compressive lesions or oculomotor abnormalities. Ophthalmoplegia and pupillary dysfunction resolved spontaneously over 4 months. Conclusions: Although rare, a history of a recent ESI should be considered as the etiology of an isolated oculomotor palsy in diabetic patients. PMID:28144494

  1. Contralateral Spinal Accessory Nerve Transfer: A New Technique in Panavulsive Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    PubMed

    Zermeño-Rivera, Jaime; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel

    2015-06-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion results from excessive stretching and can occur secondary to motor vehicle accidents, mainly in motorcyclists. In a 28-year-old man with panavulsive brachial plexus palsy, we describe an alternative technique to repair brachial plexus avulsion and to stabilize and preserve shoulder function by transferring the contralateral spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve. We observed positive clinical and electromyographic results in sternocleidomastoid, trapezius, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis, triceps, and biceps, with good outcome and prognosis for shoulder function at 12 months after surgery. This technique provides a unique opportunity for patients suffering from severe brachial plexus injuries and lacking enough donor nerves to obtain shoulder stability and mobility while avoiding bone fusion and preserving functionality of the contralateral shoulder with favorable postoperative outcomes.

  2. Clinical studies of photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors: facial nerve palsy after temporal fossa photoillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lilge, Lothar D.; Varma, Abhay; Bogaards, Arjen; Fullagar, Tim; Fenstermaker, Robert; Selker, Robert; Abrams, Judith

    2003-06-01

    In two randomized prospective studies of brain tumor PDT more than 180 patients have been accrued. At the Toronto site we recognized two patients who developed a lower motor neuron (LMN) facial paralysis in the week following the PDT treatment. In both cases a temporal lobectomy was undertaken and the residual tumor cavity was photo-illuminated. The surface illuminated included the temporal fossa floor, thus potentially exposing the facial nerve to the effect of PDT. The number of frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital tumors in this cohort was 39, 24, 12 and 4, respectively. Of the 24 temporal tumors 18 were randomized to Photofrin-PDT. Of these 18 a temporal lobectomy was carried out exposing the middle fossa floor as part of the tumor resection. In two of the 10 patients where the lobectomy was carried out and the fossa floor was exposed to light there occurred a postoperative facial palsy. Both patients recovered facial nerve function in 6 and 12 weeks, respectively. 46 J/cm2 were used in the former and 130 J/cm2 in the latter. We did not encounter a single post-operative LMN facial plasy in the 101 phase 2 patients treated with Photofrin-PDT. Among 688 supratentorial brain tumor operations in the last decade involving all pathologies and all locations no case of early post-operative LMN facial palsy was identified in the absence of PDT. One further patient who had a with post-PDT facial palsy was identified at the Denver site. Although it is possible that these patients had incidental Bell's palsy, we now recommend shielding the temporal fossa floor during PDT.

  3. [Dermoid Cyst in Meckel's Cave Presenting with Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Trigeminal Neuralgia:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Nozomu; Tomita, Takahiro; Nagai, Shoichi; Kuwayama, Naoya; Noguchi, Kyo; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The authors report a rare case of an intracranial dermoid cyst found in Meckel's cave. A 63-year-old woman developed left oculomotor nerve palsy and was referred to their hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion in the left Meckel's cave and prepontine cistern, but her symptoms gradually improved during conservative observation. However, three years later she complained of left facial pain in the territory of the second branch of the trigeminal nerve. The left oculomotor nerve palsy exacerbated again. Although her trigeminal neuralgia improved after carbamazepine administration, her oculomotor nerve palsy did not recover. Therefore, she underwent direct surgery through the anterior transpetrosal approach, and the fat-containing tumor cyst was completely resected. The tumor was strongly compressing the left trigeminal nerve and its ganglion in Meckel's cave. After surgery, her facial pain completely resolved and her oculomotor nerve palsy gradually improved. Histological examination revealed that the cyst wall was composed of a single layer of squamous epithelium and contained hair and keratin. A pathological diagnosis of a dermoid cyst was made.

  4. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status. PMID:27478579

  5. Post Traumatic Delayed Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy (FNP): Diagnostic Dilemma of Expressionless Face.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2015-04-01

    Bilateral facial nerve palsy [FNP] is a rare condition. Mostly it is idiopathic. Post traumatic bilateral FNP is even more rare and having unique neurosurgical considerations. Post traumatic delayed presentation of bilateral FNP is socially debilitating and also having diagnostic challenge. Due to lack of facial asymmetry as present in unilateral facial paralysis, it is difficult to recognize. We are presenting a case of delayed onset bilateral FNP who developed FNP after 12 days of head injury with a brief discussion of its diagnostic dilemma and management along with literature review.

  6. Nerve growth factor for Bell’s palsy: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    SU, YIPENG; DONG, XIAOMENG; LIU, JUAN; HU, YAOZHI; CHEN, JINBO

    2015-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the treatment of Bell’s palsy. PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase and a number of Chinese databases, including the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biology Medicine disc, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals and Wan Fang Data, were used to collect randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of NGF for Bell’s palsy. The span of the search covered data from the date of database establishment until December 2013. The included trials were screened comprehensively and rigorously. The efficacies of NGF were pooled via meta-analysis performed using Review Manager 5.2 software. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the fixed-effects model. The meta-analysis of eight RCTs showed favorable effects of NGF on the disease response rate (n=642; OR, 3.87; 95% CI, 2.13–7.03; P<0.01; I2=0%). However, evidence supporting the effectiveness of NGF for the treatment of Bell’s palsy is limited. The number and quality of trials are too low to form solid conclusions. Further meticulous RCTs are required to overcome the limitations identified in the present study. PMID:25574223

  7. Management of Synkinesis and Asymmetry in Facial Nerve Palsy: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Pourmomeny, Abbas Ali; Asadi, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The important sequelae of facial nerve palsy are synkinesis, asymmetry, hypertension and contracture; all of which have psychosocial effects on patients. Synkinesis due to mal regeneration causes involuntary movements during a voluntary movement. Previous studies have advocated treatment using physiotherapy modalities alone or with exercise therapy, but no consensus exists on the optimal approach. Thus, this review summarizes clinical controlled studies in the management of synkinesis and asymmetry in facial nerve palsy. Materials and Methods: Case-controlled clinical studies of patients at the acute stage of injury were selected for this review article. Data were obtained from English-language databases from 1980 until mid-2013. Results: Among 124 articles initially captured, six randomized controlled trials involving 269 patients were identified with appropriate inclusion criteria. The results of all these studies emphasized the benefit of exercise therapy. Four studies considered electromyogram (EMG) biofeedback to be effective through neuromuscular re-education. Conclusion: Synkinesis and inconsistency of facial muscles could be treated with educational exercise therapy. EMG biofeedback is a suitable tool for this exercise therapy. PMID:25320703

  8. Spontaneous resolution of a Meckel's cave arachnoid cyst causing sixth cranial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Maud; Gujar, Sachin; Trobe, Jonathan; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2008-09-01

    A 32-year-old pregnant woman developed a progressive right sixth cranial nerve palsy as an isolated finding. Brain MRI disclosed a discrete lobulated lesion centered in the right Meckel's cave with intermediate signal on T1, high signal on T2, and diffusion characteristics similar to those of cerebrospinal fluid on apparent diffusion coefficient mapping. The initial radiologic diagnosis was schwannoma or meningioma. No intervention occurred. Shortly after cesarean delivery, the abduction deficit began to lessen spontaneously. One month later, the abduction deficit had further improved; 7 months later it had completely resolved. Repeat MRI after delivery failed to disclose the lesion, which was now interpreted as consistent with an arachnoid cyst arising within Meckel's cave. Twenty-one similar cases of Meckel's cave arachnoid cyst or meningocele have been reported, 7 found incidentally and 14 causing symptoms, 2 of which produced ipsilateral sixth cranial nerve palsies. All previously reported symptomatic patients were treated surgically. This is the first report of an arachnoid cyst arising from Meckel's cave in pregnancy and having spontaneous resolution.

  9. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cranial nerve palsy: The importance of MRI for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joseph T.-C.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, T.-M.; Kang, C.-J.; Ng, S.-H.; Chen, I.-H.; Wang, H.-M.; Cheng, A.-J.; Liao, C.-T. . E-mail: cgmhnog@yahoo.com

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate various prognostic factors and the impact of imaging modalities on tumor control in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) with cranial nerve (China) palsy. Material and Methods: Between September 1979 and December 2000, 330 NPC patients with CN palsy received radical radiotherapy (RT) by the conventional opposing technique at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou. Imaging methods used varied over that period, and included conventional tomography (Tm) for 47 patients, computerized tomography (CT) for 195 patients, and magnetic resonance image (MRI) for 88 patients. Upper CN (II-VI) palsy was found in 268 patients, lower CN (IX-XII) in 13, and 49 patients had both. The most commonly involved CN were V or VI or both (23%, 12%, and 16%, respectively). All patients had good performance status (World Health Organization <2). The median external RT dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-77.5 Gy). Brachytherapy was also given to 156 patients in addition to external RT, delivered by the remote after-loading, high-dose-rate technique. A total of 139 patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy, in 115 received as neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy and in 24 concomitant with RT. Recovery from CN palsy occurred in 171 patients during or after radiotherapy. Patients who died without a specific cause identified were regarded as having died with persistent disease. Results: The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year overall survival was 47.1%, 34.4%, and 22.2%. The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 50.4%, 37.8%, and 25.9%. The 5-year DSS for patients staged with MRI, CT, and Tm were 46.9%, 36.7%, and 21.9%, respectively (p = 0.016). The difference between MRI and CT was significant (p = 0.015). The 3-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 53%, respectively. The 5-year local control was 68.2% if excluding patients who died without a specific cause. Patients who had an MRI had a significantly better tumor control rate than those

  10. Radiation-induced lower cranial nerve palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    JANSSEN, STEFAN; GLANZMANN, CHRISTOPH; YOUSEFI, BITA; LOEWENICH, KARL; HUBER, GERHARD; SCHMID, STEPHAN; STUDER, GABRIELA

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (RICNP) is a severe long-term complication in patients with head and neck cancer following high-dose radiation therapy (RT). We present the case report of a patient with bilateral RICNP of the hypoglossal and vagus cranial nerves (XII/X) following postoperative RT in the era prior to the introduction of intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and an analysis of our IMRT patient cohort at risk including the case of a XII RICNP. A total of 201 patients whose glosso-pharyngeal (IX), X and XII cranial nerves had been exposed to >65 Gy definitive IMRT in our institution between January, 2002 and December, 2012 with or without systemic therapy, were retrospectively identified. A total of 151 patients out of 201 fulfilling the following criteria were included in the analysis: Locoregionally controlled disease, with a follow-up (FU) of >24 months and >65 Gy exposure of the nerves of interest. So far, one of the assessed 151 IMRT patients at risk exhibited symptoms of RICNP after 6 years. The mean/median FU of the entire cohort was 71/68 months (range, 27–145). The results were compared with literature reports. In conclusion, RICNP appears to be a rare complication. However, a longer FU and a larger sample size are required to draw reliable conclusions on the incidence of RICNP in the era of IMRT. PMID:26171186

  11. Tourniquet-Related Iatrogenic Femoral Nerve Palsy after Knee Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mingo-Robinet, Juan; Castañeda-Cabrero, Carlos; Alvarez, Vicente; León Alonso-Cortés, José Miguel; Monge-Casares, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Tourniquet-induced nerve injuries have been reported in the literature, but even if electromyography abnormalities in knee surgery are frequent, only two cases of permanent femoral nerve palsies have been reported, both after prolonged tourniquet time. We report a case of tourniquet-related permanent femoral nerve palsy after knee surgery. Case Report. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent surgical treatment of a patella fracture. Tourniquet was inflated to 310 mmHg for 45 minutes. After surgery, patient complained about paralysis of the quadriceps femoris with inability to extend the knee. Electromyography and nerve conduction study showed a severe axonal neuropathy of the left femoral nerve, without clinical remission after several months. Discussion. Even if complications are not rare, safe duration and pressure for tourniquet use remain a controversy. Nevertheless, subtle clinical lesions of the femoral nerve or even subclinical lesions only detectable by nerve conduction and EMG activity are frequent, so persistent neurologic dysfunction, even if rare, may be an underreported complication of tourniquet application. Elderly persons with muscle atrophy and flaccid, loose skin might be in risk for iatrogenic nerve injury secondary to tourniquet. PMID:24371536

  12. A Rare Combination Open Fracture Dislocation of Elbow with Open Fracture both Bones Forearm with Radial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Deepak; Aski, Bahubali; Manjunath, Dayanand; Bhatnagar, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The injury pattern of open fracture dislocation of elbow with fracture both bones forearm with radial nerve injury is very rare. Very few reports are there in literature related to this kind of injury. However this combination is first of its kind. This rare injury needs special attention by early intervention and biological fixation to achieve good results. Case Report: A 22 year old female presented to us with history of road traffic accident. On evaluation patient had combination of open fracture dislocation of elbow with open diaphyseal fracture of both forearm bones with radial nerve palsy. The patient was treated in emergency and followed for 2 years. Conclusion: Open fracture dislocation of elbow is a rare entity. Our case additionally had open fracture both the bones forearm with radial nerve palsy. Early intervention and biological fixation with minimal invasion gives good results in terms of range of movements and patient satisfaction. PMID:27298951

  13. Outcome of patients presenting with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) in a tertiary centre--a five year experience.

    PubMed

    Tang, I P; Lee, S C; Shashinder, S; Raman, R

    2009-06-01

    This is a retrospective study. The objective of this study is to review the factors influencing the outcome of treatment for the patients presented with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis. The demographic data, clinical presentation and management of 84 patients with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) were collected from the medical record office, reviewed and analyzed from 2000 to 2005. Thirty-four (72.3%) out of 47 patients who were treated with oral prednisolone alone, fully recovered from Bell's palsy meanwhile 36 (97%) out of 37 patients who were treated with combination of oral prednisolone and acyclovir fully recovered. The difference was statistically significant. 42 (93.3%) out of 45 patients who presented within three days to our clinic, fully recovered while 28 (71.8%) out of 39 patients presented later then three days had full recovery from Bell's palsy. The difference was statistically significant. The outcome of full recovery is better with the patients treated with combined acyclovir and prednisolone compared with prednisolone alone. The patients who were treated after three days of clinical presentation, who were more than 50 years of age, who had concurrent chronic medical illness and facial nerve paralysis HB Grade IV to VI during initial presentation have reduced chance of full recovery of facial nerve paralysis.

  14. Oculofacialbulbar palsy in mother and son: review of 26 reports of familial transmission within the 'Möbius spectrum of defects'.

    PubMed Central

    MacDermot, K D; Winter, R M; Taylor, D; Baraitser, M

    1991-01-01

    We report a mother and son with 5th, 6th, 7th, and bulbar cranial nerve paralysis, who had two similarly affected relatives. None of them had primary skeletal defects. Twenty-six previous reports of familial cases within the heterogeneous 'Möbius spectrum of defects' were reviewed. When cranial nerve palsies were associated with a primary skeletal defect, familial transmission was not found. No recurrence was noted in 31 cases with cranial nerve palsies associated with oral abnormalities and limb defects. The term Möbius syndrome should be restricted to cases with congenital 6th and 7th nerve paralysis with skeletal defects, who have a low recurrence risk (2%). The features in an index case which may indicate a higher risk of recurrence are the absence of skeletal defects, isolated facial palsy, deafness, ophthalmoplegia, and digital contractures. A recurrence risk of 25 to 30% in these cases appears reasonable. Images PMID:1999828

  15. [A case of long thoracic nerve palsy, with winged scapula, as a result of prolonged exertion on practicing archery].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, J; Nishiyama, K; Takeda, K; Ichiba, T; Sakuta, M

    1990-08-01

    Reports of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy are rare in Japan. We reported a case of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy, resulted from recurrent injury to the nerve. Muscle CT and electrodiagnostic study were useful for confirming diagnosis of this cases. This patient was a student aged 20 years, with nothing of importance in his family or past history. After he started practicing archery, winging of left scapula was gradually developed. Physical examination revealed weakness and atrophy of left serratus anterior muscle. There was no wasting and weakness of other should girdle muscles. Hematochemical tests were normal, except slight hyperthyroidism. Radiography and myelography of the cervical spine were normal. Muscle CT of upper thoracic level demonstrated atrophy of left serratus anterior muscle, and no abnormality were found in other muscles. Electromyogram of the left serratus anterior revealed discrete activity of reduced amplitude, and fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves. Conduction time for left long thoracic nerve was prolonged, and amplitude of the evoked response was small and there were temporal dispersion. Muscle CT and electrodiagnostic studies were suggestive of neuroapraxia of left long thoracic nerve. Over stretching or compression during exercises may be responsible for the damage to the long thoracic nerve.

  16. [Delayed paresis of the femoral nerve after total hip arthroplasty associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP)].

    PubMed

    Schuh, A; Dürr, V; Weier, H; Zeiler, G; Winterholler, M

    2004-07-01

    Delayed lesions of the femoral or sciatic nerve are a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty. Several cases in association with cement edges, scar tissue, broken cerclages, deep hematoma, or reinforcement rings have been published. We report about a 62-year-old female who developed a pure motor paresis of the quadriceps muscle 2 weeks after total hip arthroplasty. After electrophysiological evaluation had revealed an isolated femoral nerve lesion, revision of the femoral nerve was performed. During operative revision no pathologic findings could be seen. One week later the patient developed paralysis of the left wrist and finger extensors after using crutches. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed several nerve conduction blocks in physiological entrapments and the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) was established. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a rare disease with increased vulnerability of the peripheral nerve system with mostly reversible sensorimotor deficits. It should be taken into consideration in cases of atypical findings of compression syndromes of peripheral nerves or delayed neuropathy, e. g., after total hip arthroplasty.

  17. Facial nerve palsy, headache, peripheral neuropathy and Kaposi’s sarcoma in an elderly man

    PubMed Central

    Daoussis, Dimitrios; Chroni, Elisabeth; Tsamandas, Athanassios C; Andonopoulos, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of an elderly man, who initially presented with right facial nerve palsy, ipsilateral headache, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and no fever. A presumptive diagnosis of giant cell arteritis was made and the patient was treated with high-dose steroids. A temporal artery biopsy was negative. Several months later, while on 16 mg of methylprednisolone daily, he presented with severe sensorimotor peripheral symmetric neuropathy, muscle wasting and inability to walk, uncontrolled blood sugar and psychosis. A work-up for malignancy was initiated with the suspicion of a paraneoplastic process. At the same time a biopsy of the macular skin lesions that had appeared on the skin of the left elbow and right knee almost simultaneously was inconclusive, whereas a repeat biopsy from the same area of the lesions that had become nodular, a month later, was indicative of Kaposi’s sarcoma. Finally, a third biopsy of a similar lesion, after spreading of the skin process, confirmed the diagnosis of Kaposi’s sarcoma. He was treated with interferon α and later was seen in very satisfactory condition, with no clinical evidence of neuropathy, normal muscle strength, no headache, normal electrophysiologic nerve studies, involution of Kaposi’s lesions and a normal ESR. PMID:24945015

  18. Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy After Airway Management for General Anesthesia: An Analysis of 69 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aalap C.; Barnes, Christopher; Spiekerman, Charles F.; Bollag, Laurent A.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy (HNP), or neurapraxia, a rare postoperative complication after airway management, causes ipsilateral tongue deviation, dysarthria, and dysphagia. We reviewed the pathophysiological causes of hypoglossal nerve injury and discuss the associated clinical and procedural characteristics of affected patients. Furthermore, we identified procedural factors potentially affecting HNP recovery duration and propose several measures that may reduce the risk of HNP. While HNP can occur after a variety of surgeries, most cases in the literature were reported after orthopedic and otolaryngology operations, typically in males. The diagnosis is frequently missed by the anesthesia care team in the recovery room due to the delayed symptomatic onset and often requires neurology and otolaryngology evaluations to exclude serious etiologies. Signs and symptoms are self-limited, with resolution occurring within 2 months in 50% of patients, and 80% resolving within 4 months. Currently, there are no specific preventive or therapeutic recommendations. We found 69 cases of HNP after procedural airway management reported in the literature from 1926–2013. PMID:25625257

  19. [Facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  20. Successful endovascular management of brain aneurysms presenting with mass effect and cranial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Tamer; Hamimi, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysms presented with mass effect are traditionally treated by surgical clipping to decompress their mass effect. The aim of this work is to discuss the efficiency of endovascular techniques in treating 47 patients with variable sizes of intracranial aneurysms presented with mass effect and/or cranial nerve palsy. There were 47 patients with 47 unruptured aneurysms. Group I includes 28 giant aneurysms; all are treated by parent vessel occlusion with or without intra-aneurysmal occlusion depending on anatomical locations. Group II includes 19 small and large aneurysms; all are treated by selective endosaccular occlusion with coils. Clinical presentations were ocular cranial nerve dysfunction (82.9%), optic nerve or chiasmatic dysfunction (21.2%), brain stem compression (8.5%), embolic (6%), epistaksis (4%), proptosis (2%), and bleeding per ear (2%). Out of 47 patients, symptoms were resolved in 31 cases (66%), improved in 10 cases (21%), and unchanged in six cases (13%). Out of 28 giant aneurysms, symptoms were resolved in 19 (68%), improved in four (14%), and unchanged in five (18%). Only four (14%) patients out of the 19 giant aneurysms with complete symptoms resolution showed significant mass reduction in MRI. Out of 19 non-giant aneurysm cases treated by selective endovascular occlusion with coils, symptoms were resolved in 12 cases (63%), improved in six (32%), and unchanged in one (5%). No complications from the treatment were observed. The longer the duration of symptoms before endovascular treatment is, the longer the duration till improvement or resolution postoperative in both groups. Recovery of aneurysm-induced mass effect occurs in most patients both after parent vessel occlusion and after selective coiling, and is comparable to results after surgical clipping. The improvement starts independent of aneurysmal shrinkage in postoperative MRI follow-ups. The arrest of pulsations and partial shrinkage within the aneurysms after endovascular treatment may

  1. Contralateral facial nerve palsy following mandibular second molar removal: is there co-relation or just coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Zalagh, Mohammed; Boukhari, Ali; Attifi, Hicham; Hmidi, Mounir; Messary, Abdelhamid

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is the most common cranial nerves neuropathy. It is very rare during dental treatment. Classically, it begins immediately after the injection of local anaesthetic into the region of inferior dental foramen and it's homolateral to the injection. Recovery takes a few hours, normally as long the anaesthetic lasts. The authors present a 44-year-old patient who presented a contralateral delayed-onset facial paralysis arising from dental procedure and discuss the plausible pathogenesis mechanism of happen and a possible relationship between dental procedure and contralateral FNP. PMID:25419300

  2. Bell's Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that cause injuries and damage to nerves. Knowledge gained from this research may help scientists find the definitive cause of Bell's palsy, leading to the discovery of new effective treatments for the disorder. Other ...

  3. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - common peroneal nerve; Peroneal nerve injury; Peroneal nerve palsy ... type of peripheral neuropathy (damage to nerves outside the brain ... nerve injuries. Damage to the nerve disrupts the myelin sheath ...

  4. Sonographic evaluation of the peripheral nerves in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hwa; Yang, Seung Nam; Yoon, Joon Shik; Park, Bum Jun

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that affects peripheral nerves by repeated focal pressure. HNPP can be diagnosed by clinical findings, electrodiagnostic studies, histopathological features, and genetic analysis. Ultrasonography is increasingly used for the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases; however, sonographic features of HNPP have not been clearly defined. We report the sonographic findings and comparative electrodiagnostic data in a 73-year-old woman with HNPP, confirmed by genetic analysis. The cross-sectional areas of peripheral nerves were enlarged at typical nerve entrapment sites, but enlargement at non-entrapment sites was uncommon. These sonographic features may be helpful for diagnosis of HNPP when electrodiagnostic studies are suspicious of HNPP and/or gene study is not compatible.

  5. Sonographic Evaluation of the Peripheral Nerves in Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hwa; Yoon, Joon Shik; Park, Bum Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that affects peripheral nerves by repeated focal pressure. HNPP can be diagnosed by clinical findings, electrodiagnostic studies, histopathological features, and genetic analysis. Ultrasonography is increasingly used for the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases; however, sonographic features of HNPP have not been clearly defined. We report the sonographic findings and comparative electrodiagnostic data in a 73-year-old woman with HNPP, confirmed by genetic analysis. The cross-sectional areas of peripheral nerves were enlarged at typical nerve entrapment sites, but enlargement at non-entrapment sites was uncommon. These sonographic features may be helpful for diagnosis of HNPP when electrodiagnostic studies are suspicious of HNPP and/or gene study is not compatible. PMID:24639934

  6. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... compressed in the elbow, a problem called cubital tunnel syndrome may result. When damage destroys the nerve ...

  7. Laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Cortese, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Schreiber, A; Callegari, I; Moglia, A; Alfonsi, E; Pareyson, D

    2016-07-01

    Lower cranial and phrenic nerve involvement is exceptional in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Here we report the occurrence of reversible laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with HNPP. The patient recalled several episodes of reversible weakness and numbness of his feet and hands since the age of 30 years. His medical history was uneventful, apart from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). At age 44, following severe weight loss, he presented with progressive dysphonia and hoarseness. EMG of cricoarytenoid and thyroarytenoid muscles and laryngeal fibroscopy confirmed vocal cord paralysis. These speech disturbances gradually regressed. Two years later, he reported rapidly worsening dyspnea. Electroneurography showed increased distal latency of the right phrenic nerve and diaphragm ultrasonography documented reduced right hemi-diaphragm excursion. Six months later and after optimization of CODP treatment, his respiratory function had improved and both phrenic nerve conduction and diaphragm excursion were completely restored. We hypothesize that chronic cough and nerve stretching in the context of CODP, together with severe weight loss, may have triggered the nerve paralysis in this patient. Our report highlights the need for optimal management of comorbidities such as CODP as well as careful control of weight in HNPP patients to avoid potentially harmful complications.

  8. Unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy and abnormal enhancement of extraocular muscles on magnetic resonance imaging of orbit after the ingestion of methanol.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; Park, Yoo Seok; Park, Incheol

    2010-05-01

    Methanol is generally known to cause visual impairment and various systemic manifestations. There are a few reported specific findings for methanol intoxication on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. A case is reported of unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy oculus sinister (OS) after the ingestion of methanol. Unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve were confirmed by fundoscopy, flourescein angiography, visual evoked potential and electroretinogram. The optic nerve and extraocular muscles (superior rectus, medial rectus, inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscle) were enhanced by gadolinium-DTPA on MRI of the orbit. This is the first case report of permanent monocular blindness with confirmed unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve, combined with third cranial nerve palsy after methanol ingestion.

  9. Occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Ziahosseini, K; Venables, V; Neville, C; Nduka, C; Patel, B; Malhotra, R

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo describe the occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy (FNP).MethodsWe enroled consecutive patients with unilateral FNP into this study. Patients with previous upper eyelid surgery for either side were excluded. We developed a standardised technique to measure the distance between the upper eyelid margin and the lower border of brow (LMBD). FNP was graded using the Sunnybrook grading scale. Its aetiology, duration, and treatment were noted. Upper and lower marginal reflex distance and lagophthalmos were also noted.ResultsSixty-six patients (mean age 51 years) were included. FNP was owing to a variety of aetiologies. LMBD on the paralytic side was shorter than the normal contralateral side in 47 (71%), equal in 15 (23%), and larger in four (6%) patients. The mean contracture was 3.4 mm (median: 3, range: 1-12) with 11 (17%) patients showing 5 mm or more of skin contracture. The mean LMBD on the paralytic side in all patients was significantly smaller than the contralateral side; 30±3.7 (median: 30; 95% CI 29-31) compared with 32±3.7 (median: 32; 95% CI 32-33), respectively, P<0.0001, two-tailed paired t-test.ConclusionTo our knowledge, this is the first study that quantitatively demonstrates contraction of the upper eyelid skin in FNP. This finding is valuable in directing optimal early management to minimise skin contracture and to caution surgeons against unnecessary upper eyelid skin excision.

  10. [A 55-year-old man with prostate cancer, papilledema, and multiple cranial nerve palsies].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Y; Matsubayashi, S; Fukushima, T; Honda, S; Yubiide, K; Arakawa, A; Mori, H; Suda, K; Imai, H; Fujime, M

    1994-08-01

    We report a 55-year-old man with papilledema and multiple cranial nerve palsies. He was well until 52 years of age when there was an onset of progressive difficulty in initiating urination; he visited the urology service of our hospital where a diagnosis of prostate cancer was made; the cancer was invading the bladder and was metastasizing to lymph nodes and bones. He was treated with oochiectomy and estrogen preparations with some improvement in his symptoms. Two years later, he developed difficulty in urination again, and transurethral resection of the tumor was performed in 1991. In December 1991, he noted tingling and numb sensation in his left face, which had become progressive worse within the next one month, and he developed blepharoptosis and deafness all on the left side. He was admitted to the urology service on February 4, 1992, and a neurological consultation was asked. On physical examination, general findings were unremarkable, except for lymph node enlargements of about 0.5 to 1.0 mm in size in cervical and inguinal regions. On neurologic examination, he was alert with normal mental activities; higher cerebral functions were intact. He had normal vision and visual fields, however, papilledema was present bilaterally; pupils and light reactions were normal. Extraocular muscles were intact on the right side, however, moderate restriction was noted in the left eye in that all the extraocular muscles except for the medial rectus were weak; blepharoptosis was noted on the left; no nystagmus was present. The sensation was diminished in the left face, and left facial paresis of the peripheral type was also noted; the taste sensation was also diminished in the left anterior two thirds of the tongue. He had sensorineural deafness on the left side. The other cranial nerves appeared intact. He walked normally; no weakness or muscle atrophy was noted; muscle tone was normal and no ataxia was observed. Deep reflexes were normally elicited and symmetric; the

  11. Treatment of Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Spontaneous Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm and Unilateral Lower Cranial Nerves Palsy by Two Silk Flow Diverters

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Zelenakova, Jana; DeRiggo, Julius; Kurca, Egon; Kantorova, Ema; Polacek, Hubert

    2013-08-01

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) lesions in the parapharyngeal space (a dissection and a pseudoaneurysm) may present as isolated lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XI, and XII) palsy (Collet-Sicard syndrome). Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Extreme vessel tortuosity makes the treatment by a stent graft impossible. Two Silk stents were used in a 46 year-old man with left lower cranial nerves (IX-XII) palsy for the treatment of left ICA spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm. A follow-up angiogram 5 months later confirmed pseudoaneurysm thrombosis and patency of the left ICA. The patient recovered completely from the deficits.

  12. Noninvasive and painless magnetic stimulation of nerves improved brain motor function and mobility in a cerebral palsy case.

    PubMed

    Flamand, Véronique H; Schneider, Cyril

    2014-10-01

    Motor deficits in cerebral palsy disturb functional independence. This study tested whether noninvasive and painless repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation could improve motor function in a 7-year-old boy with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Stimulation was applied over different nerves of the lower limbs for 5 sessions. We measured the concurrent aftereffects of this intervention on ankle motor control, gait (walking velocity, stride length, cadence, cycle duration), and function of brain motor pathways. We observed a decrease of ankle plantar flexors resistance to stretch, an increase of active dorsiflexion range of movement, and improvements of corticospinal control of ankle dorsiflexors. Joint mobility changes were still present 15 days after the end of stimulation, when all gait parameters were also improved. Resistance to stretch was still lower than prestimulation values 45 days after the end of stimulation. This case illustrates the sustained effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation on brain plasticity, motor function, and gait. It suggests a potential impact for physical rehabilitation in cerebral palsy.

  13. 6th International Microbeam Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Kevin M. Prise

    2004-01-01

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology.

  14. [The bilateral long thoracic nerve palsy presenting with "scapula alata", as a result of weight training. A case report].

    PubMed

    Ebata, Atsuko; Kokubun, Norito; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2005-04-01

    A 28-year-old male barber with no similar disease in his family admitted to our hospital because of difficulty of raising his arms in March 2003. When he was 18 years old, he broke his left clavicle. He started weight training from January 2003, then he gradually felt difficulty to raise his arms. Physical examination on admission showed weakness and atrophy of both serratus anterior muscles and there was no weakness in the other muscles. Serum CK level was 806 IU/l and CT scan of the upper thoracic levels revealed atrophy of the serratus anterior muscles on the both sides. Needle electromyography showed neurogenic change in the right serratus anterior muscle. Thus the diagnosis of bilateral long thoracic nerve palsy was made. Bilateral scapular winging (scapula alata) is commonly caused by systemic disease, especially muscular dystrophy or spinal muscular atrophy. Bilateral long thoracic nerve palsy by weight training should be known as one of the cause for the "scapula alata".

  15. Surgical Outcomes of Inferior Oblique Myectomy in Unilateral Congenital Superior Oblique Palsy with or without Trochlear Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the surgical outcomes of inferior oblique (IO) myectomy in congenital superior oblique palsy (SOP) according to the presence of the trochlear nerve identified with high-resolution MRI. Data Extraction Forty-one congenital SOP patients without a trochlear nerve (absent group) and 23 patients with a trochlear nerve (present group) who underwent IO myectomy as the primary surgical treatment were retrospectively reviewed. “Motor success” was defined as postoperative ipsilateral hypertropia ≤ 4 prism diopter (PD). “Head tilt improvement” was regarded as postoperative angle of head tilt < 5 degrees (°). Success rates for motor alignment and head tilt improvement, cumulative probabilities of success, and factors influencing surgical responses were evaluated. Results The cumulative probabilities of motor success at 2 years after IO myectomy were 92% in patients with a trochlear nerve and 86% in patients without a trochlear nerve (P = 0.138). The cumulative probabilities of undercorrection and recurrence of hypertropia after 2 years were 0% in the present group versus 21% in the absent group (P = 0.014). The cumulative probabilities of persistent head tilt after 2 years were 14% in the present group and 20% in the absent group (P = 0.486). A younger age at operation was associated with reduced probabilities of motor success and head tilt improvement (P = 0.009, P = 0.022 respectively). A greater preoperative angle of head tilt was associated with persistent head tilt after surgery (P = 0.038). Conclusions Congenital SOP without a trochlear nerve had a higher risk of hypertropia undercorrection after IO myectomy compared to patients with a trochlear nerve. A younger age at operation and larger preoperative head tilt was related to poor outcomes. PMID:27391445

  16. Ptosis as partial oculomotor nerve palsy due to compression by infundibular dilatation of posterior communicating artery, visualized with three-dimensional computer graphics: case report.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yuta; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Takasago, Megumi; Saito, Kuniaki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) due to internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysm generally manifests as partial nerve palsy including pupillary dysfunction. In contrast, infundibular dilatation (ID) of the PcomA has no pathogenic significance, and mechanical compression of the cranial nerve is extremely rare. We describe a 60-year-old woman who presented with progressive ptosis due to mechanical compression of the oculomotor nerve by an ID of the PcomA. Three-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) accurately visualized the mechanical compression by the ID, and her ptosis was improved after clipping of the ID. ID of the PcomA may cause ONP by mechanical compression and is treatable surgically. 3DCG are effective for the diagnosis and preoperative simulation.

  17. Prophylactic cross-face nerve flap for muscle protection prior to facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Koshima, Isao; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Mihara, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Iida, Takuya; Uchida, Gentaro

    2011-02-01

    The facial muscles of a 28-year-old woman with left acoustic neuroma were successfully protected with a vascularised cross-face nerve flap using a vascularised lateral femoral cutaneous nerve along with a perforator of the lateral circumflex femoral system. It was transferred as a vascularised cross-face nerve flap to bridge a 15-cm-long defect between the bilateral buccal branches. Three months after the nerve flap transfer, the total tumour including the facial nerve was resected. Postoperatively, rapid nerve sprouting through the nerve flap and excellent facial reanimation were obtained 3-6 months after resection. This method is a one-stage reconstruction procedure, has minimal donor-site morbidity and results in strong postoperative muscle contraction. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a prophylactic cross-face nerve flap technique for the protection of facial muscles before facial nerve transection, and also the usefulness of vascularised lateral femoral cutaneous nerve flap.

  18. Nerve sources for facial reanimation with muscle transplant in patients with unilateral facial palsy: clinical analysis of 3 techniques.

    PubMed

    Faria, Jose Carlos M; Scopel, Gean P; Busnardo, Fabio F; Ferreira, Marcus C

    2007-07-01

    Ninety-one patients with long-standing unilateral facial palsy and submitted to reanimation of the face with muscle transplant were divided into 3 nonrandomized groups: group I: 2-stage facial reanimation, cross face followed by gracilis muscle transplant, 58 patients; group II: 1-stage reanimation with latissimus dorsi muscle transplant, 11 patients (a branch of the facial nerve on the nonparalyzed side of the face was used as the nerve source for reanimation in groups I and II); group III: 1-stage reanimation with gracilis muscle transplant and neural coaptation of the respective nerve and the ipsilateral masseteric branch of the trigeminal nerve, 22 patients. No microvascular complications were observed. The average interval between surgery and initial muscle contractions was 11.1 months, 7.2 months, and 3.7 months in group I, group II, and group III, respectively. The quality (intensity and shape) of the smile, voluntary or involuntary, obtained on the reanimated side in relation to the unaffected side was considered good or excellent in 53.4%, 54.5%, and 86.3% of the patients in groups I, II, and III, respectively. In group I, the average age of the patients with excellent or good results (19.8 + 10.5 years) was significantly lower than that of the patients with fair or poor results or absence of movement (36.5 + 13.3 years). The smile was considered emotional or involuntary in 34% of the patients in group I and 45% in group II. Most of the patients in each group were only able to produce "voluntary smiles". Crossed synkinesis with lip puckering was observed in 48% of the patients in group I and 90% in group II. The results obtained with 1-stage facial reanimation with masseteric nerve were more uniform and predictable than those obtained with the other techniques evaluated in this study.

  19. Sphenoid sinus mucocele presenting with oculomotor nerve palsy and affecting the functions of trigeminal nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wei-Wei; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Bao, Yang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of first-episode sphenoid mucocele successfully treated via transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele. A 55 year-old female presented with persistent right-side facial numbness (in the areas of the first and second branches of the trigeminal nerve) and right-side ptosis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed opacification and expansion of the right-side sphenoid sinus lesion. The lesion was diagnosed as right-side sphenoid mucocele affecting the functions of the trigeminal (first and second branches), and oculomotor nerves. Transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele result in rapid regression of these symptoms. PMID:26629234

  20. Review: oculomotor cranial nerve palsies: symptoms, problems and non-surgical preoperative management of the resultant complex incomitant strabismus and monocular and binocular vision disturbances.

    PubMed

    Khawam, Edward; Fahed, Daoud

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is first to describe the symptoms and problems encountered in cranial nerve palsies (CNP). The purpose is also to describe the different means of treatment during the observational preoperative period and their positive or negative impact on each of the symptoms and problems. Finally, we will present our way of handling these patients in their preoperative period: practical, inexpensive, and unsophisticated means that keep the patient comfortable and prevent the secondary untoward effects that can take place.

  1. Radiation-Induced Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients After Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Lin; Lu, Jiade J.; Liss, Adam L.; Hu Chaosu; Guo Xiaomao; Wu Yongru; Zhang Youwang

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To address the characteristics and the causative factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with an extensive period of followed-up. Patients and Methods: A total of 317 consecutive and nonselected patients treated with definitive external-beam radiotherapy between November 1962 and February 1995 participated in this study. The median doses to the nasopharynx and upper neck were 71 Gy (range, 55-86 Gy) and 61 Gy (range, 34-72 Gy), respectively. Conventional fractionation was used in 287 patients (90.5%). Forty-five patients (14.2%) received chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 11.4 years (range, 5.1-38.0 years). Ninety-eight patients (30.9%) developed CNP, with a median latent period of 7.6 years (range, 0.3-34 years). Patients had a higher rate of CNP (81 cases, 25.5%) in lower-group cranial nerves compared with upper group (44 cases, 13.9%) ({chi}{sup 2} = 34.444, p < 0.001). Fifty-nine cases experienced CNP in more than one cranial nerve. Twenty-two of 27 cases (68.8%) of intragroup CNP and 11 of 32 cases (40.7%) of intergroup CNP occurred synchronously ({chi}{sup 2} = 4.661, p = 0.031). The cumulative incidences of CNP were 10.4%, 22.4%, 35.5%, and 44.5% at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that CNP at diagnosis, chemotherapy, total radiation dose to the nasopharynx, and upper neck fibrosis were independent risk factors for developing radiation-induced CNP. Conclusion: Radiation-induced fibrosis may play an important role in radiation-induced CNP. The incidence of CNP after definitive radiotherapy for NPC remains high after long-term follow-up and is dose and fractionation dependent.

  2. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis with isolated sixth nerve palsy in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shraddha; Kumar, Sunil; Kaushal, Amit

    2011-10-01

    We report a case of rhinocerebral mucormycosis in a 31 year old immunocompetent female presenting initially like acute rhinosinusitis with nasal stuffiness, severe headache, vomiting who soon developed isolated right lateral rectus palsy. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the Post-Nasal Spaces(PNS) showed an ill defined expansile heterogenous density mass in the sphenoid with extension into the ethmoids, nasal cavity, optic canal, superior orbital fissure, clivus and right temporal lobe with signal void in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The debris and polypoid mucosa obtained on nasal endoscopy revealed mucormycosis on histopathologic examination. The patient was managed with urgent surgical debridement and medical management.

  3. Superficial radial neuropathy and brachioradial motor nerve palsy associated with proximal radius osteochondroma.

    PubMed

    Oz, Oğuzhan; Yücel, Mehmet; Ulaş, Umit; Eroğlu, Erdal; Odabaşi, Zeki

    2010-01-01

    The cutaneous branch of the radial nerve (superficial radial nerve, SRN) might be compressed or injured at various anatomical sites along its course in the forearm. Compression of the SRN occurring at the proximal third of the forearm is unusual. A 22-year-old man was admitted with pain and paraesthesia over the lateral aspect of his right wrist and thumb and pain at the elbow for six months. In electrodiagnostic testing, a sensory nerve action potential from the right SRN could not be recorded, while it was normal on the left. In a needle electromyography study, denervation potentials have been seen in the right brachioradial muscle and a decrease in interference pattern signals was also found. An exophytic lesion of the proximal radius was observed in radiographs. Computed tomography evaluation revealed an osteochondroma of the proximal radius. Neuropathies of the SRN and the brachioradial motor branch of the radial nerve are thought to be associated with proximal radial osteochondroma.

  4. Functional and anatomical basis for brain plasticity in facial palsy rehabilitation using the masseteric nerve.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Javier; Loayza, Francis R; Luis, Elkin O; Celorrio, Marta; Pastor, Maria A; Hontanilla, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Several techniques have been described for smile restoration after facial nerve paralysis. When a nerve other than the contralateral facial nerve is used to restore the smile, some controversy appears because of the nonphysiological mechanism of smile recovering. Different authors have reported natural results with the masseter nerve. The physiological pathways which determine whether this is achieved continue to remain unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activation pattern measuring blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal during smiling and jaw clenching was recorded in a group of 24 healthy subjects (11 females). Effective connectivity of premotor regions was also compared in both tasks. The brain activation pattern was similar for smile and jaw-clenching tasks. Smile activations showed topographic overlap though more extended for smile than clenching. Gender comparisons during facial movements, according to kinematics and BOLD signal, did not reveal significant differences. Effective connectivity results of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) from the same seeds located in bilateral facial premotor regions showed significant task and gender differences (p < 0.001). The hypothesis of brain plasticity between the facial nerve and masseter nerve areas is supported by the broad cortical overlap in the representation of facial and masseter muscles.

  5. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema.

  6. Recurrent Bell's palsy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, A D

    1990-09-01

    A case of recurrent Bell's palsy occurring in two successive pregnancies in a 37-year-old woman is presented. The causes of facial nerve paralysis of the lower motor neurone type are discussed. The rate of recurrence of Bell's palsy during pregnancy is unknown. Treatment with corticosteroids of Bell's palsy during pregnancy poses the threat of possible side effects on the fetus.

  7. Suprascapular nerve palsy after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Sergi; Peidro, Lluis; Méndez, Anna; Calvo, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    The Bristow and Latarjet procedures have become popular among orthopaedic surgeons thanks to the development of new instruments that allow the use of arthroscopic techniques to treat cases of glenohumeral instability with bone defects or capsular deficiency. Nonetheless, several complications have been reported after Latarjet procedures, including neurological injuries. This report describes surgical damage to the suprascapular nerve, an unusual complication. Level of evidence Expert opinion, Level V.

  8. Bell's palsy with ipsilateral numbness.

    PubMed

    Vanopdenbosch, L J; Verhoeven, K; Casselman, J W

    2005-07-01

    Bell's palsy is an idiopathic facial palsy of the peripheral type. A herpes virus is the most likely mechanism. We report a patient with the often encountered combination of a facial palsy with ipsilateral sensory changes. Magnetic resonance imaging showed had contrast enhancement in the greater petrosal nerve. Viral spread through anatomical connections could be an explanation for the association of facial palsy with numbness.

  9. 6th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the 6th workshop is on lysine, arginine, and related amino acids. Functions, metabolic pathways, clinical uses, and upper tolerance intakes are emphasized in the articles that follow. Lysine is arguably the most deficient amino acid in the food supply of countries where poverty exists, ...

  10. Facial Nerve Palsy: An Unusual Presenting Feature of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Ozcan; Buyuktas, Deram; Ekiz, Esra; Selcukbiricik, Fatih; Papila, Irfan; Papila, Cigdem

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world and is the most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women; it is responsible for 1.3 million deaths annually worldwide. It can metastasize to any organ. The most common site of metastasis in the head and neck region is the brain; however, it can also metastasize to the oral cavity, gingiva, tongue, parotid gland and lymph nodes. This article reports a case of small cell lung cancer presenting with metastasis to the facial nerve. PMID:21526004

  11. Cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of an early onset distal hereditary motor neuropathy--a new distal hereditary motor neuropathy phenotype.

    PubMed

    Haberlová, J; Claeys, K G; De Jonghe, P; Seeman, P

    2009-06-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by a pure motor axonal neuropathy. It is occasionally associated with additional signs such as facial weakness, vocal cord paralysis, weakness of the diaphragm, and pyramidal signs. Although predominantly the inheritance is autosomal dominant, all types of inheritance have been described. Here we report a Czech family with cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of a non progressive infantile onset dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy. This family may represent a new subtype of distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

  12. Restoration of hand function in C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies using a staged approach with nerve and tendon transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Gang; Dong, Zhen; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2014-11-01

    Brachial plexus palsies of C7-T1 result in the complete loss of hand function, including finger and thumb flexion and extension as well as intrinsic muscle function. The task of reanimating such a hand remains challenging, and so far there has been no reliable neurological reconstructive method for restoring hand function. The authors aimed to establish a reliable strategy to reanimate the paralyzed hand. Two patients had sustained C7-T1 complete lesions. In the first stage of the operative procedure, a supinator motor branch to posterior interosseous nerve transfer was performed with brachialis motor branch transfer to the median nerve to restore finger and thumb extension and flexion. In the second stage, the intact brachioradialis muscle was used for abductorplasty to restore thumb opposition. Both patients regained good finger extension and flexion. Thumb opposition was also attained, and overall hand function was satisfactory. The described strategy proved effective and reliable in restoring hand function after C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies.

  13. Bilateral internal superior laryngeal nerve palsy of traumatic cervical injury patient who presented as loss of cough reflex after anterior cervical discectomy with fusion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Uk; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Nam, Kyung-Hun; Cho, Dae-Chul

    2012-09-01

    Injury to the bilateral internal branch of superior laryngeal nerve (ibSLN) brings on an impairment of the laryngeal cough reflex that could potentially result in aspiration pneumonia and other respiratory illnesses. We describe a patient with traumatic cervical injury who underwent bilateral ibSLN palsy after anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF). An 75-year-old man visited with cervical spine fracture and he underwent ACDF through a right side approach. During the post-operative days, he complained of high pitched tone defect, and occasional coughing during meals. With a suspicion of SLN injury and for the work up for the cause of aspiration, we performed several studies. According to the study results, he was diagnosed as right SLN and left ibSLN palsy. We managed him for protecting from silent aspiration. Swallowing study was repeated and no evidence of aspiration was found. The patient was discharged with incomplete recovery of a high pitched tone and improved state of neurologic status. The SLN is an important structure; therefore, spine surgeons need to be concerned and be cautious about SLN injury during high cervical neck dissection, especially around the level of C3-C4 and a suspicious condition of a contralateral nerve injury.

  14. Detection of third and sixth cranial nerve palsies with a novel method for eye tracking while watching a short film clip

    PubMed Central

    Samadani, Uzma; Farooq, Sameer; Ritlop, Robert; Warren, Floyd; Reyes, Marleen; Lamm, Elizabeth; Alex, Anastasia; Nehrbass, Elena; Kolecki, Radek; Jureller, Michael; Schneider, Julia; Chen, Agnes; Shi, Chen; Mendhiratta, Neil; Huang, Jason H.; Qian, Meng; Kwak, Roy; Mikheev, Artem; Rusinek, Henry; George, Ajax; Fergus, Robert; Kondziolka, Douglas; Huang, Paul P.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT Automated eye movement tracking may provide clues to nervous system function at many levels. Spatial calibration of the eye tracking device requires the subject to have relatively intact ocular motility that implies function of cranial nerves (CNs) III (oculomotor), IV (trochlear), and VI (abducent) and their associated nuclei, along with the multiple regions of the brain imparting cognition and volition. The authors have developed a technique for eye tracking that uses temporal rather than spatial calibration, enabling detection of impaired ability to move the pupil relative to normal (neurologically healthy) control volunteers. This work was performed to demonstrate that this technique may detect CN palsies related to brain compression and to provide insight into how the technique may be of value for evaluating neuropathological conditions associated with CN palsy, such as hydrocephalus or acute mass effect. METHODS The authors recorded subjects’ eye movements by using an Eyelink 1000 eye tracker sampling at 500 Hz over 200 seconds while the subject viewed a music video playing inside an aperture on a computer monitor. The aperture moved in a rectangular pattern over a fixed time period. This technique was used to assess ocular motility in 157 neurologically healthy control subjects and 12 patients with either clinical CN III or VI palsy confirmed by neuro-ophthalmological examination, or surgically treatable pathological conditions potentially impacting these nerves. The authors compared the ratio of vertical to horizontal eye movement (height/width defined as aspect ratio) in normal and test subjects. RESULTS In 157 normal controls, the aspect ratio (height/width) for the left eye had a mean value ± SD of 1.0117 ± 0.0706. For the right eye, the aspect ratio had a mean of 1.0077 ± 0.0679 in these 157 subjects. There was no difference between sexes or ages. A patient with known CN VI palsy had a significantly increased aspect ratio (1.39), whereas 2

  15. [A case of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 1 complicated by diabetes mellitus (DM) showing bilateral phrenic nerve palsy].

    PubMed

    Takakura, Yuka; Furuya, Hirokazu; Yamashita, Ken-ichiro; Murai, Hiroyuki; Araki, Takehisa; Kikuchi, Hitoshi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Yamada, Takeshi; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2002-04-01

    We here report a 44-year-old woman with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 1 who showed severe bilateral phrenic nerve palsy (PNP). She had chronic progressive distal dominant muscle weakness and atrophy since early in her second decade and had been unable to walk by herself due to weakness of the legs since she was 40-years old. At that time, she was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM). She also had difficulty breathing when she was in a supine position. On admission, sural nerve biopsy showed a marked decrease of large and small myelinated fibers and numerous onion bulb formations, which are compatible with CMT type 1. Chest X-ray showed bilateral elevation of the diaphragm, which was more marked on the right side, indicating bilateral PNP. Since it is reported that CMT patients show demyelination of the phrenic nerve subclinically, and DM itself may facilitate the development of PNP, periodic evaluations of respiratory function may thus be useful for preventing respiratory failure in patients with CMT, especially when it is complicated with DM.

  16. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses ...

  17. Quantifying deficits in the 3D force capabilities of a digit caused by selective paralysis: application to the thumb with simulated low ulnar nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Kuxhaus, Laurel; Roach, Stephanie S; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2005-04-01

    We present the development of a vision-feedback method to characterize how selective paralysis distorts the three-dimensional (3D) volume representing digit-tip force production capability and its application to healthy individuals producing thumb-tip force with and without simulated low ulnar nerve palsy (LUNP). Subjects produced maximal static voluntary force spanning the transverse, sagittal and frontal planes of the thumb (16, 15 and 10 subjects, respectively). Subjects produced thumb-tip force tasks in guided and self-selected directions. The envelope (convex hull) of extreme forces in each plane approximated that cross-section of the 3D volume of force capability. Some subjects repeated the tasks with a temporary ulnar nerve block applied at the wrist to simulate complete acute LUNP. Three geometric properties of the force convex hull characterized each cross-section's shape: the ratios of its principal moments of inertia (RPMIs), the orientation of its principal axis (OPA), and its centroid location. Our results show that force production in the thumb's sagittal plane may be a reproducible and objective test to grade motor impairment in LUNP: paired t-tests of the larger RPMI in this plane best distinguished the nerve-blocked cases from the control cases in the guided task (p = 0.012), and Discriminant Analysis of the centroid location for the self-selected task in this plane correctly classified 94.7% of subjects into the control and ulnar nerve-blocked groups. We show that our method measures and detects changes in a digit's force production capabilities. Towards a clinical test of motor impairment in LUNP, this biomechanical study dictates which 3D thumb-tip forces to measure (those in the sagittal plane) and how to measure them (using the self-selected task).

  18. Delayed diagnosed intermuscular lipoma causing a posterior interosseous nerve palsy in a patient with cervical spondylosis: the “priceless” value of the clinical examination in the technological era

    PubMed Central

    COLASANTI, R.; IACOANGELI, M.; DI RIENZO, A.; DOBRAN, M.; DI SOMMA, L.; NOCCHI, N.; SCERRATI, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy may present with various symptoms, and may resemble cervical spondylosis. Case report We report about a 59-year-old patient with cervical spondylosis which delayed the diagnosis of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy due to an intermuscular lipoma. Initial right hand paraesthesias and clumsiness, together with MR findings of right C5–C6 and C6–C7 foraminal stenosis, misled the diagnostic investigation. The progressive loss of extension of all right hand fingers brought to detect a painless mass compressing the PIN. Electrophysiological studies confirmed a right radial motor neuropathy at the level of the forearm. Results Surgical tumor removal and nerve decompression resulted in a gradual motor deficits recovery. Conclusions A thorough clinical examination is paramount, and electrophysiology may differentiate between cervical and peripheral nerve lesions. Ultrasonography and MR offer an effective evaluation of lipomas, which represent a rare cause of PIN palsy. Surgical decompression and lipoma removal generally determine excellent prognoses, with very few recurrences. PMID:27142825

  19. 6th International Meshing Roundtable '97

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.

    1997-09-01

    The goal of the 6th International Meshing Roundtable is to bring together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government labs in a stimulating, open environment for the exchange of technical information related to the meshing process. In the pas~ the Roundtable has enjoyed significant participation born each of these groups from a wide variety of countries. The Roundtable will consist of technical presentations from contributed papers and abstracts, two invited speakers, and two invited panels of experts discussing topics related to the development and use of automatic mesh generation tools. In addition, this year we will feature a "Bring Your Best Mesh" competition and poster session to encourage discussion and participation from a wide variety of mesh generation tool users. The schedule and evening social events are designed to provide numerous opportunities for informal dialog. A proceedings will be published by Sandia National Laboratories and distributed at the Roundtable. In addition, papers of exceptionally high quaIity will be submitted to a special issue of the International Journal of Computational Geometry and Applications. Papers and one page abstracts were sought that present original results on the meshing process. Potential topics include but are got limited to: Unstructured triangular and tetrahedral mesh generation Unstructured quadrilateral and hexahedral mesh generation Automated blocking and structured mesh generation Mixed element meshing Surface mesh generation Geometry decomposition and clean-up techniques Geometry modification techniques related to meshing Adaptive mesh refinement and mesh quality control Mesh visualization Special purpose meshing algorithms for particular applications Theoretical or novel ideas with practical potential Technical presentations from industrial researchers.

  20. 6th International Conference on Emerging Zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Kahn, R E; Morozov, I; Feldmann, H; Richt, J A

    2012-09-01

    The 6th International Conference on Emerging Zoonoses, held at Cancun, Mexico, 24-27 February 2011, offered 84 participants from 18 countries, a snapshot of current research in numerous zoonoses caused by viruses, bacteria or prions. Co-chaired by Professors Heinz Feldmann and Jürgen Richt, the conference explored 10 topics: (i) The ecology of emerging zoonotic diseases; (ii) The role of wildlife in emerging zoonoses; (iii) Cross-species transmission of zoonotic pathogens; (iv) Emerging and neglected influenza viruses; (v) Haemorrhagic fever viruses; (vi) Emerging bacterial diseases; (vii) Outbreak responses to zoonotic diseases; (viii) Food-borne zoonotic diseases; (ix) Prion diseases; and (x) Modelling and prediction of emergence of zoonoses. Human medicine, veterinary medicine and environmental challenges are viewed as a unity, which must be considered under the umbrella of 'One Health'. Several presentations attempted to integrate the insights gained from field data with mathematical models in the search for effective control measures of specific zoonoses. The overriding objective of the research presentations was to create, improve and use the tools essential to address the risk of contagions in a globalized society. In seeking to fulfil this objective, a three-step approach has often been applied: (i) use cultured cells, model and natural animal hosts and human clinical models to study infection; (ii) combine traditional histopathological and biochemical approaches with functional genomics, proteomics and computational biology; and (iii) obtain signatures of virulence and insights into mechanisms of host defense response, immune evasion and pathogenesis. This meeting review summarizes 39 of the conference presentations and mentions briefly the 16 articles in this Special Supplement, most of which were presented at the conference in earlier versions. The full affiliations of all presenters and many colleagues have been included to facilitate further inquiries

  1. 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium: poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cruz, E; Kaveri, S V; Peter, H-H; Durandy, A; Cantoni, N; Quinti, I; Sorensen, R; Bussel, J B; Danieli, M G; Winkelmann, A; Bayry, J; Käsermann, F; Späth, P; Helbert, M; Salama, A; van Schaik, I N; Yuki, N

    2009-12-01

    The posters presented at the 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium covered a wide range of fields and included both basic science and clinical research. From the abstracts accepted for poster presentation, 12 abstracts were selected for oral presentations in three parallel sessions on immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity and basic research. The immunodeficiency presentations dealt with novel, rare class-switch recombination (CSR) deficiencies, attenuation of adverse events following IVIg treatment, association of immunoglobulin (Ig)G trough levels and protection against acute infection in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and the reduction of class-switched memory B cells in patients with specific antibody deficiency (SAD). The impact of intravenous immunoglobulin on fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, pregnancy and postpartum-related relapses in multiple sclerosis and refractory myositis, as well as experiences with subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with multi-focal motor neuropathy, were the topics presented in the autoimmunity session. The interaction of dendritic cell (DC)-SIGN and alpha2,6-sialylated IgG Fc and its impact on human DCs, the enrichment of sialylated IgG in plasma-derived IgG, as wells as prion surveillance and monitoring of anti-measles titres in immunoglobulin products, were covered in the basic science session. In summary, the presentations illustrated the breadth of immunoglobulin therapy usage and highlighted the progress that is being made in diverse areas of basic and clinical research, extending our understanding of the mechanisms of immunoglobulin action and contributing to improved patient care.

  2. [Patient with MPO-ANCA-associated disease with interstitial pneumonia and lower cranial nerves palsy who was previously exposed to asbestos].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kenji; Fukuzumi, Munehisa; Aizawa, Toyoaki; Shibata, Masahiko; Sakai, Toshihiko; Tojima, Hirokazu

    2010-11-01

    A 65-year-old man who was occupationally exposed to asbestos for 40 years was admitted to our hospital with fever and cough. Chest CT revealed paraseptal emphysema, subpleural fibrosis in both lungs, and pleural plaques. On bronchoalveolar lavage fluid contained elevated levels of lymphocytes and neutrophils (15% and 17%, respectively), and asbestos bodies were also found. Because serum MPO-ANCA titer was elevated to 188 EU, we suspected ANCA-associated disease with interstitial pneumonia. Prednisolone was begun at 30 mg/day and his lung opacities partially disappeared. Six weeks later, he complained of headache, dysphagia and hoarseness, and was admitted to the neurology department of the hospital. Under a diagnosis of either hypertrophic pachymeningitis or neuritis due to angiitis of the lower cranial nerves, steroid pulse therapy was performed. Asbestos exposure may have been a contributing factor for ANCA generation in this case. Furthermore, the fact that cranial nerves palsy occurred in spite of steroid therapy may also be important.

  3. 6th Annual European Antibody Congress 2010

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The 6th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapinn Ltd., was held in Geneva, Switzerland, which was also the location of the 4th and 5th EAC.1,2 As was the case in 2008 and 2009, the EAC was again the largest antibody congress held in Europe, drawing nearly 250 delegates in 2010. Numerous pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies active in the field of therapeutic antibody development were represented, as were start-up and academic organizations and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The global trends in antibody research and development were discussed, including success stories of recent marketing authorizations of golimumab (Simponi®) and canakinumab (Ilaris®) by Johnson & Johnson and Novartis, respectively, updates on antibodies in late clinical development (obinutuzumab/GA101, farletuzumab/MORAb-003 and itolizumab/T1 h, by Glycart/Roche, Morphotek and Biocon, respectively) and success rates for this fast-expanding class of therapeutics (Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development). Case studies covering clinical progress of girentuximab (Wilex), evaluation of panobacumab (Kenta Biotech), characterization of therapeutic antibody candidates by protein microarrays (Protagen), antibody-drug conjugates (sanofi-aventis, ImmunoGen, Seattle Genetics, Wyeth/Pfizer), radio-immunoconjugates (Bayer Schering Pharma, Université de Nantes) and new scaffolds (Ablynx, AdAlta, Domantis/GlaxoSmithKline, Fresenius, Molecular Partners, Pieris, Scil Proteins, Pfizer, University of Zurich) were presented. Major antibody structural improvements were showcased, including the latest selection engineering of the best isotypes (Abbott, Pfizer, Pierre Fabre), hinge domain (Pierre Fabre), dual antibodies (Abbott), IgG-like bispecific antibodies (Biogen Idec), antibody epitope mapping case studies (Eli Lilly), insights in FcγRII receptor (University of Cambridge), as well as novel tools for antibody fragmentation (Genovis). Improvements

  4. Early and reliable detection of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella zoster virus DNAs in oral fluid of patients with idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy: Decision support regarding antiviral treatment?

    PubMed

    Lackner, Andreas; Kessler, Harald H; Walch, Christian; Quasthoff, Stefan; Raggam, Reinhard B

    2010-09-01

    Idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy has been associated with the reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). In recent studies, detection rates were found to vary strongly which may be caused by the use of different oral fluid collection devices in combination with molecular assays lacking standardization. In this single-center pilot study, liquid phase-based and absorption-based oral fluid collection was compared. Samples were collected with both systems from 10 patients with acute idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy, 10 with herpes labialis or with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, and 10 healthy controls. Commercially available IVD/CE-labeled molecular assays based on fully automated DNA extraction and real-time PCR were employed. With the liquid phase-based oral fluid collection system, three patients with idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy tested positive for HSV-1 DNA and another two tested positive for VZV DNA. All patients with herpes labialis tested positive for HSV-1 DNA and all patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome tested positive for VZV DNA. With the absorption-based oral fluid collection system, detections rates and viral loads were found to be significantly lower when compared to those obtained with the liquid phase-based collection system. Collection of oral fluid with a liquid phase-based system and the use of automated and standardized molecular methods allow early and reliable detection of HSV-1 and VZV DNAs in patients with acute idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy and may provide a valuable decision support regarding start of antiviral treatment at the first clinical visit.

  5. Vincristine-induced polyneuropathy in a child with stage I Wilms' tumour presenting with unilateral abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Panjawatanan, Panadeekarn; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Katanyuwong, Kamornwan; Choeyprasert, Worawut

    2014-06-25

    A 4-year-old boy presented with right esotropia while receiving vincristine and dactinomycin for stage I Wilms' tumour according to the National Wilms Tumour Study-5 protocol. On examination, he had isolated limitation of his right lateral gaze. CT of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid examination were normal. A nerve conduction velocity study which was performed on the peripheral nerves revealed predominant motor polyneuropathy compatible with axonal loss involving the upper limbs. The patient had received a cumulative vincristine dose of 17 mg/m(2) before developing esotropia. Vincristine-induced abducens nerve mononeuropathy and subclinical motor polyneuropathy was suspected. Unilateral esotropia markedly improved after the discontinuation of vincristine and a short course of oral pyridoxine treatment.

  6. Bell's Palsy following acupuncture treatment--a case report.

    PubMed

    Rosted, Palle; Woolley, David R

    2007-06-01

    A case of Bell's palsy after acupuncture is presented. It concerns a healthy 47 year old man who developed Bell's palsy less than 24 hours after local acupuncture treatment for temporomandibular dysfunction. The Bell's palsy recovered within two weeks, and may have been caused by a haematoma around the facial nerve.

  7. Bell's Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. It usually affects just one side of the ... become inflamed. You are most likely to get Bell's palsy if you are pregnant, diabetic or sick with ...

  8. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  9. Bilateral conjugacy of movement initiation is retained at the eye but not at the mouth following long-term unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Susan E; O'Dwyer, Nicholas J; Adams, Roger D; Croxson, Glen R

    2006-08-01

    Voluntary eyelid closure and smiling were studied in 11 normal subjects and 11 patients with long-term unilateral facial nerve palsy (FNP). The conjugacy of eyelid movements shown previously for blinks was maintained for voluntary eye closures in normal subjects, with movement onset being synchronous in both eyes. Bilateral onset synchrony of the sides of the mouth was also observed in smiling movements in normal subjects. In FNP patients, initiation of movement of the paretic and non-paretic eyelids was also synchronous, but markedly delayed relative to normal (by 136 ms = 32%). The initiation of bilateral movements at the mouth was similarly delayed, but in contrast to the eyes, it was not synchronous. Central neural processing in the FNP subjects was normal, however, since unilateral movements at the mouth were not delayed. The delays therefore point to considerable additional information processing needed for initiating bilateral facial movements after FNP. The maintenance of bilateral onset synchrony in eyelid closure and its loss in smiling following FNP is an important difference in the neural control of these facial regions. Bilateral conjugacy of eyelid movements is probably crucial for coordinating visual input and was achieved apparently without conscious effort on the part of the patients. Bilateral conjugacy of movements at the sides of the mouth may be less critical for normal function, although patients would very much like to achieve it in order to improve the appearance of their smile. Since the everyday frequency of eyelid movements is considerably greater than that of smiling, it is possible that the preserved eyelid conjugacy in these patients with long-term FNP is merely a product of greater experience. However, if synchrony of movement onset is found to be preserved in patients with acute FNP, then it would suggest that eyelid conjugacy has a privileged status in the neural organisation of the face.

  10. Student Solutions Manual to accompany Physics, 6th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutnell, John D.; Johnson, Kenneth W.

    2003-07-01

    Work more effectively and check solutions as you go along with the text! Written by the authors, this indispensable Student Solutions Manual provides complete worked-out solutions to 25% of the end-of-chapter problems in Cutnell & Johnson's Physics, 6th Edition. These problems are specifically indicated in the text. For the 6th Edition of their best-selling Physics, the authors have added both print and online material to encourage readers to engage in the material more interactively. Physics research clearly shows that active learning is much more effective than passive learning. The 6th edition helps readers understand the interrelationships among basic physics concepts and how they fit together to describe our physical world. Throughout the text, the authors emphasize the relevance of physics to our everyday lives.

  11. Partial relapse of Bell's palsy following superficial radiotherapy to a basal cell carcinoma in the temple.

    PubMed

    Brincat, S; Mantell, B S

    1986-07-01

    A patient who developed a partial relapse of Bell's palsy following superficial radiotherapy to a basal cell carcinoma in the temple is reported. Nerves injured by Bell's palsy may be more susceptible to radiation induced damage.

  12. Environmental Problem Perception of 6th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Murat; Genc, Tulin; Ergenc, Mustafa; Erkuz, Neslihan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to examine and compare the 6th grade students' perception of environmental issues through different techniques. For this purpose, we have tried to establish the students' perception of environmental issues by studying the pictures they drew and the written texts they wrote. In this study, where we have conducted with 62 students in…

  13. The 6th International Earth Science Olympiad: A Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlett, Luke; Cathro, Darcy; Mellow, Maddi; Tate, Clara

    2014-01-01

    In October 2012, two students from the Australian Science and Mathematics School and two from Yankalilla Area School were selected to travel to Olavarria, Argentina in order to compete in the 6th International Earth Science Olympiad (IESO). It was an opportunity for individuals with a passion for Earth science to come together from 17 countries to…

  14. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Romaña, M C; Rogier, A

    2013-01-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is considered to be the result of a trauma during the delivery, even if there remains some controversy surrounding the causes. Although most babies recover spontaneously in the first 3 months of life, a small number remains with poor recovery which requires surgical brachial plexus exploration. Surgical indications depend on the type of lesion (producing total or partial palsy) and particularly the nonrecovery of biceps function by the age of 3 months. In a global palsy, microsurgery will be mandatory and the strategy for restoration will focus first on hand reinnervation and secondarily on providing elbow flexion and shoulder stability. Further procedures may be necessary during growth in order to avoid fixed contractured deformities or to give or increase strength of important muscle functions like elbow flexion or wrist extension. The author reviews the history of obstetrical brachial plexus injury, epidemiology, and the specifics of descriptive and functional anatomy in babies and children. Clinical manifestations at birth are directly correlated with the anatomical lesion. Finally, operative procedures are considered, including strategies of reconstruction with nerve grafting in infants and secondary surgery to increase functional capacity at later ages. However, normal function is usually not recovered, particularly in total brachial plexus palsy.

  15. Conference Report: The 6th International Symposium on Waterborne Pathogens

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A review of current literature on the occurrence of waterborne pathogens in DW systems.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Rochelle, P., P. Klonicki, G. DiGiovanni, V. Hill, Y. Akagi, and E. Villegas. Conference Report: The 6th International Symposium on Waterborne Pathogens ISWP 2015. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION. American Water Works Association, Denver, CO, USA, 107(10): 24-32, (2015).

  16. Bell's Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Bell's Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Bell's Palsy Print A A ... usually goes away on its own. What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's palsy weakens or paralyzes the muscles on ...

  17. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  18. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  19. Bell's Palsy.

    PubMed

    Vakharia, Kavita; Vakharia, Kalpesh

    2016-02-01

    Bell's palsy is unilateral, acute onset facial paralysis that is a common condition. One in every 65 people experiences Bell's palsy in the course of their lifetime. The majority of patients afflicted with this idiopathic disorder recover facial function. Initial treatment involves oral corticosteroids, possible antiviral drugs, and protection of the eye from desiccation. A small subset of patients may be left with incomplete recovery, synkinesis, facial contracture, or hemifacial spasm. A combination of medical and surgical treatment options exist to treat the long-term sequelae of Bell's palsy.

  20. 6th ESO/OHP Summer School in Astrophysical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron, M.-P.; Meylan, G.

    1998-09-01

    The 6th ESO/OHP Summer School was hosted again at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP) from 15 to 25 July 1998. The school, held only every second years, selects 18 of Europe's most promising young doctoral students in astronomy. Courses of lectures, observations, and analysis form the intellectual menu which is aimed at teaching the process of extracting astrophysically digestible results from the photons harvested at the telescopes, such as the ESO VLT, whose four telescopes will become available to the community in turn during the next few years.

  1. Low Dimensional Dynamics in the Crayfish 6th Ganglion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Xing; Moss, Frank

    1996-03-01

    Finding low dimensional dynamical behavior in biological preparations has received much attention. Neurons are, however, subject to random processes, or "noise". Thus specific dynamical behavior is evidenced by well defined signatures embedded in noisy data files(D. Pierson and F. Moss Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2124 (1995)). We report the results of a statistical search for unstable periodic orbits in the periodically stimulated 6th ganglion of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Electrophysiological recordings from the caudal photoreceptor neuron within the ganglion provide the data. We discuss the results in terms of the cyclic theory of chaos.

  2. Bell's Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bell's palsy, some people with the condition may benefit from the following: Relaxation techniques. Relaxing by using techniques such as meditation and yoga may relieve muscle tension and chronic pain. Acupuncture. ...

  3. Bell's palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brackmann DE, Shelton CS, Arriaga MA, eds. Otologic Surgery . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 27. Gronseth GS, Paduga R; American Academy of Neurology. Evidence-based guideline update: steroids and antivirals for Bell palsy: ...

  4. Bell's palsy and herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Schirm, J; Mulkens, P S

    1997-11-01

    Bell's palsy, which is defined as idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis of sudden onset, accounts for > 50% of all cases of facial paralysis. Different theories on the etiology of Bell's palsy have been proposed and investigated. Various clinical studies have suggested an etiological link between Bell's palsy and herpes simplex virus (HSV). In addition, animal experiments have shown the ability of HSV to induce facial paralysis. In our opinion, the possible link between Bell's palsy and HSV can only be explored properly by studying the human facial nerve, and especially the geniculate ganglion itself. Different groups have tried to detect hypothetically reactivated and hypothetically latent HSV in the facial nerves of Bell's palsy patients and control patients, respectively. The isolation of infectious HSV from facial nerve tissue by conventional cell culture methods appeared to be very difficult, also when Bell's palsy patients were tested. Instead, modern molecular methods, such as in situ hybridization and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could easily detect HSV DNA in geniculate ganglia. The detection of HSV-specific latency-associated transcripts in the ganglia of control patients provided further evidence for the hypothetically latent state of HSV in the geniculate ganglia in these patients. Recent PCR experiments performed by a Japanese group strongly suggest that the area adjacent to the geniculate ganglia does not usually contain any HSV at all, except in patients with Bell's palsy. This well-controlled study provides conclusive evidence that reactivation of HSV genomes from the geniculate ganglia is the most important cause of Bell's palsy. Consequently, it has been suggested that "Bell's palsy" be renamed as "herpetic facial paralysis".

  5. Gait Trainer for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    teachers. Keywords - Gait Trainer, Celebral Force Measurement, Biofeedback T I. INTRODU Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a phys brain damage. Cerebral...means a palsy refers to faulty links betw nerves. Generally brain damage is variety of causes before and durin birth. Some of the variety causes...carbon monoxide poisoning, smok and tumors of the brain. W The University GAIT TRAINER FOR CHILDREN ITH SPASTIC CEREBRAL PALSY Oğuzhan URHAN, Hasan

  6. 6th Japan Bioanalysis Forum Symposium: challenge of regulated bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Harue

    2015-01-01

    Biomarker measurement and LC-MS analysis of large molecule pharmaceuticals (LM-MS) are becoming increasingly important in pharmaceutical development, although they are not included in the existing bioanalytical method validation guidelines in Japan. The 6th Japan Bioanalysis Forum symposium presented challenges regarding biomarkers and LM-MS, as well as the current circumstances for regulated bioanalysis, by inviting speakers from Japan, the USA, European Union and Asia-pacific. Japan Bioanalysis Forum discussion groups also presented their outcomes and openly discussed these with the attendees - over 200 dedicated individuals from industry, regulatory agencies and academia. The symposium successfully reinforced the idea that fit-for-purpose approaches are necessary, and that science should drive any judgments and actions throughout drug development.

  7. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Colver, Allan; Fairhurst, Charles; Pharoah, Peter O D

    2014-04-05

    The syndrome of cerebral palsy encompasses a large group of childhood movement and posture disorders. Severity, patterns of motor involvement, and associated impairments such as those of communication, intellectual ability, and epilepsy vary widely. Overall prevalence has remained stable in the past 40 years at 2-3·5 cases per 1000 livebirths, despite changes in antenatal and perinatal care. The few studies available from developing countries suggest prevalence of comparable magnitude. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder; approaches to intervention, whether at an individual or environmental level, should recognise that quality of life and social participation throughout life are what individuals with cerebral palsy seek, not improved physical function for its own sake. In the past few years, the cerebral palsy community has learned that the evidence of benefit for the numerous drugs, surgery, and therapies used over previous decades is weak. Improved understanding of the role of multiple gestation in pathogenesis, of gene environment interaction, and how to influence brain plasticity could yield significant advances in treatment of the disorder. Reduction in the prevalence of post-neonatal cerebral palsy, especially in developing countries, should be possible through improved nutrition, infection control, and accident prevention.

  8. Bell's palsy: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Tiemstra, Jeffrey D; Khatkhate, Nandini

    2007-10-01

    Bell's palsy is a peripheral palsy of the facial nerve that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. Affected patients develop unilateral facial paralysis over one to three days with forehead involvement and no other neurologic abnormalities. Symptoms typically peak in the first week and then gradually resolve over three weeks to three months. Bell's palsy is more common in patients with diabetes, and although it can affect persons of any age, incidence peaks in the 40s. Bell's palsy has been traditionally defined as idiopathic; however, one possible etiology is infection with herpes simplex virus type 1. Laboratory evaluation, when indicated by history or risk factors, may include testing for diabetes mellitus and Lyme disease. A common short-term complication of Bell's palsy is incomplete eyelid closure with resultant dry eye. A less common long-term complication is permanent facial weakness with muscle contractures. Approximately 70 to 80 percent of patients will recover spontaneously; however, treatment with a seven-day course of acyclovir or valacyclovir and a tapering course of prednisone, initiated within three days of the onset of symptoms, is recommended to reduce the time to full recovery and increase the likelihood of complete recuperation.

  9. Fundamentals of Physics, 6th Edition Enhanced Problems Version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2002-04-01

    No other text on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics. This text continues to outperform the competition year after year, and the new edition will be no exception. Intended for Calculus-based Physics courses, the 6th edition of this extraordinary text is a major redesign of the best-selling 5th edition, which still maintains many of the elements that led to its enormous success. Jearl Walker adds his unique style to this edition with the addition of new problems designed to capture, and keep, students' attention. Nearly all changes are based on suggestions from instructors and students using the 5th edition, from reviewer comments, and from research done on the process of learning. The primary goal of this text is to provide students with a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and to help them apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving. The principal goal of Halliday-Resnick-Walker is to provide instructors with a tool by which they can teach students how to effectively read scientific material and successfully reason through scientific questions. To sharpen this tool, the Enhanced Problems Version of the sixth edition of Fundamentals of Physics contains over 1000 new, high-quality problems that require thought and reasoning rather than simplistic plugging of data into formulas.

  10. A case of myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with multiple cranial nerve palsies and diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Ken; Sainouchi, Makoto; Goto, Masahiro; Murase, Nagako; Ohtani, Ryo; Nakamura, Michikazu

    2016-05-31

    A 61-year-old woman developed hearing difficulties and became thirsty after experiencing cold symptoms. A neurological examination revealed a loss of odor sensation, facial palsy, dysphasia, and dysarthria. Vocal cord palsy was observed during pharyngoscopy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a thickened pituitary stalk and swelling of the pituitary gland, but no high signal intensity regions were seen in the posterior portion of the pituitary gland. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI demonstrated a thickened dura mater over the anterior cranial fossa. A biopsy specimen of the thickened dura mater showed fibrosis, granulomatous inflammation, and necrotic foci. Blood tests detected myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). The patient's urine osmolarity was low even though she exhibited hypernatremia. We diagnosed her with hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with MPO-ANCA and diabetes insipidus. The patient received two courses of 5-day high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (1.0 g/day), and was subsequently administered oral prednisolone, which gradually relieved her symptoms. However, the patient's symptoms recurred despite the high-dose prednisolone treatment. It was difficult to control the patient's symptoms in this case with oral prednisolone monotherapy, but combined treatment with cyclosporine resulted in sustained remission. It is considered that patients with MPO-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis require combination therapy with prednisolone and immunosuppressive agents at an early stage.

  11. PREFACE: 6th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwat, David; Ayadi, Zoubir; Jamart, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    The 6th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2011) was held at the European School of Materials Engineering (EEIGM) on the 7-8 November 2011 in Nancy, France. This biennial conference organized by the EEIGM is a wonderful opportunity for all scientists involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE), to present their research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering. This conference is also open to other universities who have strong links with the EEIGM and provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, co-operation and future orientations by means of regular presentations, posters and a round-table discussion. This edition of the conference included a round-table discussion on composite materials within the Interreg IVA project '+Composite'. Following the publication of the proceedings of AMR 2009 in Volume 5 of this journal, it is with great pleasure that we present this selection of articles to the readers of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. Once again it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering, covering basic and applicative research on organic and composite materials, metallic materials and ceramics, and characterization methods. The editors are indebted to all the reviewers for reviewing the papers at very short notice. Special thanks are offered to the sponsors of the conference including EEIGM-Université de Lorraine, AMASE, DocMASE, Grand Nancy, Ville de Nancy, Region Lorraine, Fédération Jacques Villermaux, Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle, Casden and '+Composite'. Zoubir Ayadi, David Horwat and Brigitte Jamart

  12. Bell's Palsy and Herpes Zoster Oticus.

    PubMed

    Morrow

    2000-09-01

    Normal facial movement is required for chewing, swallowing, speaking, and protecting the eye. Bell's palsy causes most cases of acute, unilateral facial palsy; infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 may be its major cause. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation (Ramsay Hunt syndrome) is less common, but may appear without skin lesions in a form indistinguishable from Bell's palsy. Symptoms improve in nearly all patients with Bell's palsy, and most patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, but many are left with functional and cosmetic deficits. Steroids are frequently used to optimize outcomes in Bell's palsy, but proof of their effectiveness is marginal. Oral prednisone has been studied extensively, although some reports have suggested a higher recovery rate with intravenous steroids. Given the existing data, we support the use of oral prednisone in those patients with complete facial palsy, and no contraindications to their use (Fig. 1). In this author's opinion, the greatly increased cost and inconvenience of intravenous steroids cannot be justified by the data available. Antiviral agents may also be effective in treatment of Bell's palsy; HSV is susceptible to acyclovir and related agents. There have been few investigations of acyclovir treatment in Bell's palsy, but one controlled study showed added benefit when the drug was used with prednisone. The risk and cost of acyclovir is low enough that we support its use, with oral steroids, in those patients with complete facial paralysis. Several small studies have implied that oral acyclovir improves the outcome of facial palsy for patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Although these studies do not prove efficacy, evidence for the benefits of antiviral agents in other forms of zoster is strong enough to recommend their use when the facial nerve is involved. VZV is less sensitive to acyclovir than HSV, so higher doses are recommended to treat Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Because some Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients

  13. Diagnosis and management of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Renata de Faria; Brasileiro, Bernardo Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Bell's palsy (BP) is an idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis of sudden onset. Its most alarming symptom is unilateral facial weakness, which can result in the inability to close the eyelids, smile, or whistle. The pathogenesis of BP is controversial and is believed to be caused by inflammation of the facial nerve at the geniculate ganglion. Many viruses, especially herpes simplex and herpes zoster, have been suggested as initiators of this inflammatory process; however, this has not been proven. This report describes the case of a 14-year-old girl with right hemifacial palsy who sought treatment one month after the onset of palsy. The patient experienced a satisfactory recovery within 30 days of treatment and has maintained a stable physical outcome after 15 months of follow-up. Early treatment based on careful investigation of BP, with particular attention given to the differential diagnosis of BP, can improve the patient's function and esthetics.

  14. The role and modulation of CCR6+ Th17 cell populations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Paulissen, Sandra M J; van Hamburg, Jan Piet; Dankers, Wendy; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-07-01

    The IL-17A producing T-helper-17 (Th17) cell population plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and has gained wide interest as treatment target. IL-17A expressing Th cells are characterized by the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6 and the transcription factor RORC. In RA, CCR6+ Th cells were identified in peripheral blood, synovial fluid and inflamed synovial tissue. CCR6+ Th cells might drive the progression of an early inflammation towards a persistent arthritis. The CCR6+ Th cell population is heterogeneous and several subpopulations can be distinguished, including Th17, Th22, Th17.1 (also called non-classic Th1 cells), and unclassified or intermediate populations. Interestingly, some of these populations produce low levels of IL-17A but are still very pathogenic. Furthermore, the CCR6+ Th cells phenotype is unstable and plasticity exists between CCR6+ Th cells and T-regulatory (Treg) cells and within the CCR6+ Th cell subpopulations. In this review, characteristics of the different CCR6+ Th cell populations, their plasticity, and their potential impact on rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. Moreover, current approaches to target CCR6+ Th cells and future directions of research to find specific CCR6+ Th cell targets in the treatment of patients with RA and other CCR6+ Th cell mediated autoimmune diseases are highlighted.

  15. Proceedings of the 6th European VLBI Network Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Eduardo; Porcas, Richard W.; Lobanov, Andrei P.; Zensus, J. Anton

    This volume contains the papers presented at the 6th Symposium of the European VLBI Network, held in Bonn on 25-28 June 2002. The initial aim of these biennial gatherings of European VLBI practitioners was to review in a timely manner new results and technical developments related to Very Long Baseline Interferometry. Now, however, interest and participation in the EVN Symposia reaches far beyond Europe, reflecting the fact that scientific research and development programs are carried out to a high degree in international and often truly global collaborations. More than 120 scientists from around the world registered for participation in the Symposium. The Symposium was hosted by the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie and was held at the Gustav Stresemann Institut. In addition to the scientific sessions and poster presentations, the program included an EVN Users Meeting, an MPIfR versus Rest-of-the-World football match (highly appropriate given the competing World Cup event!), a visit to the MPIfR's 100m radio telescope in Effelsberg, and a Conference Dinner held in the nearby old walled town of Bad Müunstereifel. To maximize the usefulness of these proceedings (and possibly as a daring precedent) the Editors decided to demand the written versions of talks and posters and to complete the editorial work before the meeting, and to deliver the book to the participants at the beginning of the Symposium. We thank the authors for their cooperation in delivering publication-ready electronic manuscripts and for meeting the strict deadlines. It is highly gratifying that only a handful of the 100 presentations are not represented in this volume. The editors have made minor changes to some of the contributions in order to improve readability, and take responsibility for any errors arising from these changes. Besides the authors, many individuals have contributed to the preparation of the meeting and its proceedings. In addition to many members of the MPIfR staff, we

  16. Pathophysiology of facial nerve paralysis induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Honda, Nobumitu; Hato, Naohito; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Wakisaka, Hiroyuki; Kisaki, Hisanobu; Murakami, Shingo; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2002-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has been proven to be a cause of Bell's palsy; however, the underlying pathophysiology of the facial nerve paralysis is not fully understood. We established a mouse model with facial nerve paralysis induced by HSV-1 infection simulating Bell's palsy and investigated the pathophysiology of the facial nerve paralysis. The time course of the R1 latency in the blink reflex tests paralleled the recovery of the facial nerve paralysis well, whereas electroneurographic recovery tended to be delayed, compared to that of the paralysis; these responses are usually seen in Bell's palsy. On histopathologic analysis, intact, demyelinated, and degenerated nerves were intermingled in the facial nerve in the model. The similarity of the time course of facial nerve paralysis and the electrophysiological results in Bell's palsy and the model strongly suggest that the pathophysiological basis of Bell's palsy is a mixed lesion of various nerve injuries.

  17. Bell's Palsy (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Bell's Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Bell's Palsy Print A A ... Yourself en español Parálisis de Bell What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's palsy is a temporary weakness or paralysis ...

  18. Common questions about Bell palsy.

    PubMed

    Albers, Janet R; Tamang, Stephen

    2014-02-01

    Bell palsy is an acute affliction of the facial nerve, resulting in sudden paralysis or weakness of the muscles on one side of the face. Testing patients with unilateral facial paralysis for diabetes mellitus or Lyme disease is not routinely recommended. Patients with Lyme disease typically present with additional manifestations, such as arthritis, rash, or facial swelling. Diabetes may be a comorbidity of Bell palsy, but testing is not needed in the absence of other indications, such as hypertension. In patients with atypical symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging with contrast enhancement can be used to rule out cranial mass effect and to add prognostic value. Steroids improve resolution of symptoms in patients with Bell palsy and remain the preferred treatment. Antiviral agents have a limited role, and may improve outcomes when combined with steroids in patients with severe symptoms. When facial paralysis is prolonged, surgery may be indicated to prevent ocular desiccation secondary to incomplete eyelid closure. Facial nerve decompression is rarely indicated or performed. Physical therapy modalities, including electrostimulation, exercise, and massage, are neither beneficial nor harmful.

  19. PREFACE: The 6th Nordic Meeting on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhøiden, G.; Thorsteinsen, T. F.; Vaagen, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    After an unintended time gap of five years, the series of regular Nordic meetings on nuclear physics was continued with the 6th Nordic Meeting, August 10-15, 1989. The site was Utgarden in the outskirts of Kopervik, the administration center for the Saga island of Karmøy on the west-coast of Norway. Utgarden, a "peoples high-school'' with a kitchen, housing facility and a neighboring modern gymnasium with fine lecture halls, proved to be an inexpensive and adequate site for the meeting. From the time of the Vikings, the sound between Karmøyy and the mainland has been a vital part of the way to the north. Mobility and international orientation is still a signature of an area where today essential parts of Norway's oil- and metal industry are located. The conference program included a session on nuclear physics in industry and society, with contributed talks from a number of companies and technology/research institutions, which also sponsored the meeting. Lunch visits to Hydro's aluminium plant on Karmøy or alternatively to Statoil's gas terminal on the mainland, were included in the program. The scientific program gives a cross section of nuclear physics activities in which researchers from the Nordic countries are involved nowadays. The spectrum is rich, and the emphasis has shifted to higher energies than was the case five years ago. We appreciate the possibility to present this overview in a separate volume of Physica Scripta. The present issue covers nearly all the talks given at the meeting. The order deviates, however, somewhat from that of the conference program. The organizing committee tried to encourage in various ways the participation of young physicists; this effort was truely rewarded. The young participants put their imprint on the activities in the lecture halls and even more on the soccer arena. The meeting was sponsored by The University of Bergen, The Nordic Accelerator Committee, NORDITA, The Norwegian Research Council for Science and the

  20. Anterior opercular cortex lesions cause dissociated lower cranial nerve palsies and anarthria but no aphasia: Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome and "automatic voluntary dissociation" revisited.

    PubMed

    Weller, M

    1993-01-01

    Anarthria and bilateral central facio-linguovelo-pharyngeo-masticatory paralysis with "automatic voluntary dissociation" are the clinical hallmarks of Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome (FCMS), the corticosubcortial type of suprabulbar palsy. A literature review of 62 FCMS reports allowed the differentiation of five clinical types of FCMS: (a) the classical and most common form associated with cerebrovascular disease, (b) a subacute form caused by central nervous system infections, (c) a developmental form probably most often related to neuronal migration disorders, (d) a reversible form in children with epilepsy, and (e) a rare type associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Bilateral opercular lesions were confirmed in 31 of 41 patients who had CT or MRI performed, and by necropsy in 7 of 10 patients. FCMS could be attributed to unilateral lesions in 2 patients. The typical presentation and differential diagnosis of FCMS provide important clues to lesion localization in clinical neurology. FCMS is a paretic and not an apraxic disorder and is not characterized by language disturbances. Its clinical features prove divergent corticobulbar pathways for voluntary and automatic motor control of craniofacial muscles. Precise clinico-neuroradiological correlations should facilitate the identification of the structural substrate of "automatic voluntary dissociation" in FCMS.

  1. [Trigeminal sensory involvement in Bell's palsy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lapresle, J; Fernandez Manchola, I; Lasjaunias, P

    1980-01-26

    Trigeminal sensory involvement was noted in 14 out of 24 cases of Bell's palsy. The authors describe its characteristics and its chronology with regard to the facial paralysis. Then they propose a vascular mechanism for this association on the basis of two kinds of data. First it is known that there is a common arterial supply of the VIIth and Vth cranial nerves through the middle meningeal vascular system. Secondly some exceptional complications of embolisation within that system have included involvement of both VIIth and Vth sensory nerves. These facts support the vascular basis of Bell's palsy and present an example of a vascular territorial pathology in cranial nerve involvement.

  2. Significant changes in the 6th edition of FACT-JACIE standards affecting apheresis facilities.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joseph

    2017-02-01

    FACT-JACIE cellular therapy standards are being revised every 3years and currently in their 6th edition. Significant changes in the 6th edition of the standards that affect apheresis facilities participating in cellular therapy product collections are presented.

  3. 169. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 6TH AVE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST DOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    169. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 6TH AVE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST DOWN 6TH AVE. SHOWING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, BUILDING 8 (HOSPITAL) WITH PART OF ONE OF ITS 1-STORY WARD WINGS, AND THE 3 ORIGINAL DORMITORY WINGS OF BUILDING 9 (BOQ). - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  4. Laser Phototherapy As Modality of Clinical Treatment in Bell's Palsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. M. C.; Soares, L. G. P.; Marques, R. C.; Pinheiro, A. L. B.; Dent, M.

    2011-08-01

    Bell's palsy is defined as a peripheral facial nerve palsy, idiophatic, and sudden onset and is considered the most common cause of this pathology. It is caused by damage to cranial nerves VII, resulting in complete or partial paralysis of the facial mimic. May be associated with taste disturbances, salivation, tearing and hyperacusis. It is diagnosed after ruling out all possible etiologies, because its cause is not fully understood.Some researches shows that herpes virus may cause this type of palsy due to reactivation of the virus or by imunnomediated post-viral nerve demielinization. Physical therapy, corticosteroids and antiviral therapy have become the most widely accepted treatments for Bell's palsy. Therapy with low-level laser (LLLT) may induce the metabolism of injured nerve tissue for the production of proteins associated with its growth and to improve nerve regeneration. The success of the treatment of Bell's palsy by using laser phototherapy isolated or in association with other therapeutic approach has been reported on the literature. In most cases, the recovery occurs without uneventfully (complications), the acute illness is not associated with serious disorders. We will present a clinical approach for treating this condition.

  5. Do oral steroids aid recovery in children with Bell's palsy?

    PubMed

    Ismail, Abdul Qader; Alake, Oluwaseyi; Kallappa, Chetana

    2014-10-01

    There is growing evidence that steroids are not beneficial for treatment of paediatric patients with Bell's palsy. To investigate, we conducted a retrospective longitudinal study examining notes of 100 children, over 12 years coded for facial nerve palsy. Of the 79 diagnosed with Bell's palsy, all recovered, and for 46 patients we had data on interval from onset of symptoms to resolution (median duration in treated group = 5 weeks, range = 39; median duration in untreated group = 6 weeks, range = 11; P = .86). From our results, we conclude that all children with Bell's palsy recovered, with or without steroid treatment, with no statistically significant difference in symptoms duration. Complications of unresolved Bell's palsy can have important long-term functional and psychosocial consequences. Therefore, we need further research on use of steroids in children with complete/severe cases; it would be a shame to omit treatment due to "absence of evidence" rather than "evidence of absence."

  6. Bell's palsy following primary tooth extraction. A case report.

    PubMed

    Owsley, David; Goldsmith, Jay P

    2012-04-01

    Bell's palsy is characterized by acute peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Unilateral paralysis of CN 7 is reported in 20 to 30 people out of 100,000 in the general population. It affects individuals of all ages. Most cases are idiopathic, while a few are identified as resulting from infectious or non-infectious causes. The association between herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and Bell's palsy has been considered since the 1970s. Few cases have been reported after tooth extraction.

  7. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... palsy — causes a problem with balance and depth perception Since cerebral palsy affects muscle control and coordination, ... fluid into the lungs) gastroesophageal reflux (spitting up) speech problems drooling tooth decay sleep disorders osteoporosis (weak, ...

  8. Bell's Palsy (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or the flu . Someone who is infected with Lyme disease also can develop Bell's palsy. Of course, this ... that everyone who has a viral infection or Lyme disease will get Bell's palsy — most people don't. ...

  9. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  10. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  11. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  12. 3. BUILDING 522, EAST SIDE, FROM ACROSS 6TH STREET AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. BUILDING 522, EAST SIDE, FROM ACROSS 6TH STREET AT ITS INTERSECTION WITH G STREET, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Aeronautical Materials Storehouses, Between E & G Streets, between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  13. Conference summary: 6th International conference on hyperons, charm, and beauty hadrons (BEACH04)

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Joel N.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The 6th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm, and Beauty Hadrons (BEACH04) treated us to a wonderful array of new results. Here the author attempts to summarize the talks and discuss the conference highlights.

  14. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies occurring during military training.

    PubMed

    Delacour, H; Bompaire, F; Biale, L; Sallansonnet-Froment, M; Ceppa, F; Burnat, P

    2012-03-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal-dominant peripheral neuropathy characterized by recurrent isolated nerve palsies, which are precipitated by trivial compression and trauma. Although HNPP has been well-described in literature, it often goes unrecognized. We report a case of HNPP occurring during military training to promote recognition and proper management of this entity.

  15. Bell's Palsy in Children: Role of the School Nurse in Early Recognition and Referral

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Shirley C.

    2008-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common condition affecting facial nerves. It is an acute, rapidly progressing, idiopathic, unilateral facial paralysis that is generally self-limiting and non-life threatening that occurs in all age groups (Okuwobi, Omole, & Griffith, 2003). The school nurse may be the first person to assess facial palsy and muscle…

  16. Bell's palsy: data from a study of 70 cases.

    PubMed

    Cirpaciu, D; Goanta, C M

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a condition that affects the facial nerve, which is one of the twelve cranial nerves. Its main function is to control all the muscles of the facial expression. It is a unilateral, acute, partial or complete paralysis of the facial nerve. Bell's palsy remains the most common cause of facial nerve paralysis, more often encountered in females aged 17 to 30 years, recurrent in many cases and with poor associations with other pathologic conditions. In modern literature, the suspected etiology could be due to the reactivation of the latent herpes viral infections in the geniculate ganglia, and their subsequent migration to the facial nerve but, favorable outcome by using vasodilators, neurotrophic and corticosteroid therapy was recorded.

  17. Bell's palsy and herpes viruses: to (acyclo)vir or not to (acyclo)vir?

    PubMed

    Steiner, I; Mattan, Y

    1999-11-15

    The majority of peripheral seventh cranial nerve palsy cases remain without an identified etiology and will eventually be diagnosed as idiopathic or Bell's palsy. Some features of this condition may be characteristic of a viral infection. Indeed, several herpes viruses have been implicated as potential causative pathogens. Besides varicella-zoster virus, shown to cause Bell's palsy under the Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, recent years have seen an increased interest and focus on the possible herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) etiology in idiopathic facial paralysis. We review the clinical, biological and virological basis for the potential herpetic cause of Bell's palsy and the rational for antiviral therapy in this condition.

  18. [Circulatory effects of stellate ganglion block in idiopathic facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Murakawa, K; Ishimoto, E; Noma, K; Ishida, K; Nishijima, M; Izumi, R

    1994-03-01

    The circulatory effects of stellate ganglion block (SGB) on the blood flow through the common carotid artery were determined in 35 patients in acute phase of idiopathic facial palsy (Bell's palsy). SGB was performed by para-tracheal approach with 8 ml of 1% mepivacaine. The blood flow was measured with an ultrasonic blood flowmeter before and 30 minutes after SGB at both sides of the common carotid artery in 20 cases. Measurement was performed continuously for 90 minutes on the palsy side in the other 15 patients. Before SGB, there were no significant differences between the blood flow of the palsy side and the intact side. Thirty minutes after SGB, the blood flow markedly increased to 169.4 +/- 6.2% on the performed side with no change on the non-performed side in 20 cases. In the other 15 patients, the blood flow increased significantly 5 minutes after SGB and reached its peak of 179.7 +/- 11.1% at 20 minutes later. This increase continued for 75 minutes after SGB. It is well known that impaired microcirculation in the facial nerve has an important role in the pathophysiology of Bell's palsy. In view of the fact that the nutrient arteries for the facial nerve are the peripheral branches of the external carotid artery, we believe that SGB which causes significant increase in the blood flow through the common carotid artery is an effective treatment in Bell's palsy.

  19. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  20. Rehabilitation of Bell's palsy patient with complete dentures

    PubMed Central

    Muthuvignesh, J.; Kumar, N. Suman; Reddy, D. Narayana; Rathinavelu, Pradeep; Egammai, S.; Adarsh, A.

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve disorders may be of sudden onset and more often of unknown etiology. Edema of the facial nerve within the fallopian canal results in Bell's palsy. This causes compression of the nerve and affects the microcirculation. Many authors have suggested treatment for facial nerve paralysis ranging from simple physiotherapy to complicated microvascular decompression. It more often results in symptoms like synkinesis and muscle spasm after the decompression surgery of the nerve because of the inability to arrange the nerve fibers within the canal. The treatment choice also depends on patient's age, extent of the nerve damage, and patient's needs and desires. Many patients who cannot be rehabilitated functionally can be treated for esthetics of the involved muscles. This case report elaborates about a patient who was rehabilitated for esthetics and to some extent for function. PMID:26538967

  1. Diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Tracy

    Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis) is the most common cause of acute unilateral facial nerve paralysis. Although it is usually a self-limiting condition, it can be distressing for the patient. Many people who experience one-sided facial paralysis fear that it is a symptom of stroke. However, there are subtle differences between Bell's palsy and stroke. This article discusses potential causes of the condition and identifies the differences between Bell's palsy and stroke. In addition, appropriate strategies for the care of patients with the condition are suggested. Management includes antiviral medication, corticosteroid therapy, eye care, botulinum toxin type A injection, physiotherapy, surgery and acupuncture. Psychological and emotional care of these patients is also important because any facial disability caused by facial nerve paralysis can result in anxiety and stress.

  2. An Analysis of Writing Dispositions of 6th Grade Students in Terms of Different Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabak, Gurkan; Topuzkanamis, Ersoy

    2014-01-01

    This research was conducted with an aim to analyze the writing dispositions of the 6th grade students in terms of different variables. The research was carried out based on the descriptive survey model. The participants of the research are composed of a total of 672 students as 342 male students and 330 female students from Ankara, Balikesir,…

  3. Parental Stress with Homeschooling K-6th Grade Children in a South Florida District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    Parental Stress With Homeschooling K-6th Grade Children in a South Florida District. Jennifer A. Myers, 2015: Applied Dissertation, Nova Southeastern University, Abraham S. Fischler College of Education. ERIC Descriptors: Homeschooling, Stress, Stress Management, Coping This applied dissertation study was designed to inform and advance knowledge…

  4. The Roles of School Readiness and Poverty-Related Risk for 6th Grade Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pressler, Emily; Raver, C. Cybele; Friedman-Krauss, Allison H.; Roy, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Low-income students are at increased risk for grade retention and suspension, which dampens their chances of high school graduation, college attendance, and future success. Drawing from a sample of 357 children and their families who participated in the Chicago School Readiness Project, we examine whether greater exposure to cumulative poverty-related risk from preschool through 5th grade is associated with greater risk of student retention and suspension in 6th grade. Logistic regression results indicate that exposure to higher levels of cumulative risk across the elementary school years is associated with students’ increased risk of retention in 6th grade, even after controlling for child school readiness skills and other covariates. Importantly, findings of the association between average cumulative risk exposure and student suspension are more complex; the role of poverty-related risk is reduced to non-significance once early indicators of child school readiness and other covariates are included in regression models. While, children’s early externalizing behavior prior to kindergarten places children at greater risk of suspension 7 years later, children’s higher levels of internalizing behaviors and early math skills are associated with significantly decreased risk of suspension in the 6th grade. Together, findings from the study suggest the complex ways that both early school readiness and subsequent exposure to poverty-related risk may both serve as compelling predictors of children’s likelihood of “staying on track” academically in the 6th grade. PMID:27867447

  5. Curriculum Reform Movements and Science Textbooks: A Retrospective Examination of 6th Grade Science Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpaslan, Muhammet Mustafa; Yalvac, Bugrahan; Loving, Cathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Over 50 years, two major reform efforts in science education took place. The purpose of the present study is to explore how the educational reforms were reflected in nine 6th grade science textbooks published in 1975, in 1985 and in 1997 in terms of (a) the materials used, (b) the contexts to which the electricity concept was related, (c) the type…

  6. 10. 'Southern Pacific Company, 6th Crossing of Sacramento River, One ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 'Southern Pacific Company, 6th Crossing of Sacramento River, One 208'-10-1/2' C. to C. End Pins S. Tr. Thro. Skew Span, Scale 1' = 10', The Phoenix Bridge Co., Phoenixville, Pa., April 12, 1901, Drg. 45' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 301.85, Milepost 301.85, Pollard Flat, Shasta County, CA

  7. Sneak Preview of Berkeley Lab's Science at the Theatre on June 6th, 2011

    ScienceCinema

    Sanii, Babak

    2016-07-12

    Babak Sanii provides a sneak preview of Berkeley Lab's next Science at the Theater Event: Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience. Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Berkeley Repertory Theatre on June 6th, 2011

  8. Sneak Preview of Berkeley Lab's Science at the Theatre on June 6th, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Sanii, Babak

    2011-01-01

    Babak Sanii provides a sneak preview of Berkeley Lab's next Science at the Theater Event: Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience. Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Berkeley Repertory Theatre on June 6th, 2011

  9. Summary of the National Technicians' Conference ASE/NSLC York--5/6th July 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostock, Julia, Comp.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a summary of the National Technicians' Conference ASE/NSLC York from July 5th to July 6th 2012. Approximately 160 technicians attended the Conference on both days. The programme included workshops and lectures and was repeated on the Friday, so that technicians who stayed for both days were able to take part in a variety of…

  10. Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies: A Single-Center Experience in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni, Paulo José; Kay, Cláudia Suemi Kamoi; Cavalet, Cristiane; Arndt, Raquel C.; Werneck, Lineu Cesar; Scola, Rosana Herminia

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of clinical and electrophysiological features in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is broad. We analyze a series of Brazilian patients with HNPP. Correlations between clinical manifestations, laboratory features, electrophysiological analyze, histological and molecular findings were done. In five cases, more than one episode occurred before diagnosis. Median nerve in the carpal tunnel at the wrist, ulnar nerve in its groove at the elbow, fibular nerve in the head of the fibula at the knee, radial nerve in its groove of the humerus and suprascapular nerve in its notch at the supraspinous fossa were found as focal neuropathies. One patient presented with persistent writer’s cramp after ulnar nerve palsy. Nerve conduction studies showed focal neuropathy in all patients and concomitant generalized symmetrical neuropathy in eight patients. Molecular analysis of the PMP22 gene detected deletion of the 1.5-Mb fragment in all patients. PMID:27761228

  11. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  12. Prevalence of Elevated Blood Pressure in Hispanic versus Non-Hispanic 6th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarlton, Patricia A.

    2007-01-01

    Blood pressure screening was conducted on 4,311 (Hispanic n = 763 [17.7%], White n = 2,566 [59.5%], African American n = 610 [14.1%], Asian n = 136 [3.2%], Multiracial n = 231 [5.4%], and Native American n = 5 [0.1%]) 6th-grade students enrolled in Seminole County, Florida, Public Schools from August to December 2005. Prevalence of obesity was 21%…

  13. Multiwavelength observations of XTE J1859+226 on 1999, November 6th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haswell, C. A.; Chaty, S.; Norton, A. J.; Chen, W.; Hynes, R. I.

    1999-11-01

    Further simultaneous HST and RXTE observations (visit #3) of the new X-ray transient XTE J1859+226 are scheduled for November 6th 1999 19:37 - 22:22 UT. Coordinated multi-wavelength observations (simultaneous, near-simultaneous, and following the evolution over days/weeks) would be extremely helpful. If you can observe simultaneously with HST and/or RXTE, high time-resolution data (< 10 seconds) will be particularly useful.

  14. Congenital facial nerve aplasia: MR depiction of a rare anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ishan; Verma, Ashish; Ojha, Ritu; Aggarwal, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    We report two infants presenting with unilateral congenital facial palsy since birth. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in both the cases revealed complete unilateral aplasia of facial nerve. To our knowledge, this is the first reported MR depiction of nonsyndromic isolated facial nerve aplasia. Imaging features and the pertinent anatomy is discussed along with a brief review of literature. PMID:28104950

  15. Isolated long thoracic nerve paralysis - a rare complication of anterior spinal surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Isolated long thoracic nerve injury causes paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle. Patients with serratus anterior palsy may present with periscapular pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation and scapular winging. Case presentation We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who sustained isolated long thoracic nerve palsy during anterior spinal surgery which caused external compressive force on the nerve. Conclusion During positioning of patients into the lateral decubitus position, the course of the long thoracic nerve must be attended to carefully and the nerve should be protected from any external pressure. PMID:19830192

  16. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a rare brain disease. It affects brain cells that control the movement of your eyes. This leads to ... speech, vision and swallowing problems. Doctors sometimes confuse PSP with Parkinson's disease or Alzheimer's disease. PSP has ...

  17. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed.

  18. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  19. The asymmetric facial skin perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy discovered by laser speckle imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han; Chen, Yi; Zhong, Weizheng; Yu, Haibo; Li, Zhifeng; He, Yuhai; Yu, Wenlong; Jin, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a kind of peripheral neural disease that cause abrupt onset of unilateral facial weakness. In the pathologic study, it was evidenced that ischemia of facial nerve at the affected side of face existed in Bell's palsy patients. Since the direction of facial nerve blood flow is primarily proximal to distal, facial skin microcirculation would also be affected after the onset of Bell's palsy. Therefore, monitoring the full area of facial skin microcirculation would help to identify the condition of Bell's palsy patients. In this study, a non-invasive, real time and full field imaging technology - laser speckle imaging (LSI) technology was applied for measuring facial skin blood perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy patients. 85 participants with different stage of Bell's palsy were included. Results showed that Bell's palsy patients' facial skin perfusion of affected side was lower than that of the normal side at the region of eyelid, and that the asymmetric distribution of the facial skin perfusion between two sides of eyelid is positively related to the stage of the disease (P <  0.001). During the recovery, the perfusion of affected side of eyelid was increasing to nearly the same with the normal side. This study was a novel application of LSI in evaluating the facial skin perfusion of Bell's palsy patients, and we discovered that the facial skin blood perfusion could reflect the stage of Bell's palsy, which suggested that microcirculation should be investigated in patients with this neurological deficit. It was also suggested LSI as potential diagnostic tool for Bell's palsy.

  20. [Bell's palsy: from viral aetiology to diagnostic reality].

    PubMed

    Tankéré, F; Bernat, I

    2009-09-01

    Peripheral injury of the facial nerve is a frequent disorder. It is a stressful situation for the patient and it is functionally hazardous for the cornea. Facial palsy is due to a lesion involving the facial pontine nucleus or the nerve trunk in its route from the pontocerebellar angle to the parotid. The idiopathic facial paralysis or Bell's palsy (BP) is the most common cause but acute facial palsy can also be due to tumors. A rigorous clinical history and examination must be performed to guide the additional biological, radiological and cochleovestibular investigations in order to reach the diagnosis. The pathophysiology of BP remains unclear, but seems to be due to the reactivation of Herpes simplex virus type 1 within the intrapetrous pathway of facial nerve. The treatment remains controversial but, for most of the authors, consists of early administration of corticosteroids with or without antiviral agents. Ninety percent of the patients recover normal facial function with this treatment. The severe BP resulting in hemifacial spasm must be quickly identified by electrophysiological testing. They need appropriate rehabilitation and for some authors facial nerve surgical decompression in emergency.

  1. Extracranial spinal accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Donner, T R; Kline, D G

    1993-06-01

    Eighty-three consecutive patients with extracranial accessory nerve injury seen over a 12-year period are reviewed. The most common etiology was iatrogenic injury to the nerve at the time of previous surgery. Such operations were usually minor in nature and often related to lymph node or benign tumor removal. Examination usually distinguished winging due to trapezius weakness from that of serratus anterior palsy. Trapezius weakness was seen in all cases. Sternocleidomastoid weakness was unusual. Patients with accessory palsy were evaluated by both clinical and electromyographic studies. Patients who exhibited no clinical or electrical evidence of regeneration were operated on (44 cases). Based on intraoperative nerve action potential studies, 8 lesions in continuity had neurolysis alone. Resection with repair either by end-to-end suture or by grafts was necessary in 31 cases. One case had suture removed from nerve, two had nerve placed into target muscle, and two had more proximal neurotization. Function was usually improved in both operative and nonoperative patients. Related anatomy is discussed.

  2. A Regiment Like No Other: The 6th Marine Regiment at Belleau Wood

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    academic crucible type of setting. They had been through the pressure of academia and, for some, the stress of post-graduation jobs. With athletes, he was...ready for war.76 Col Catlin described the drill sergeant best when he said, “Much of the recruit’s progress is due to the labours of the drill Sergeant...between these two regiments, “[the 6th Regiment’s] early training was somewhat more difficult, but it soon found itself, and when the stress of battle

  3. Improving 6th Grade Climate Literacy using New Media (CLINM) and Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G.; Schmidt, C.; Metzger, E. P.; Cordero, E. C.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA-funded project, Improving 6th Grade Climate Literacy using New Media (CLINM), is designed to improve the climate literacy of California's 450,000 6th-grade students through teacher professional development that presents climate change as an engaging context for teaching earth science standards. The project fosters experience-based interaction among learners and encourages expressive creativity and idea-exchange via the web and social media. The heart of the CLINM project is the development of an online educator-friendly experience that provides content expert-reviewed, teacher-tested, standards-based educational resources, classroom activities and lessons that make meaningful connections to NASA data and images as well as new media tools (videos, web, and phone applications) based on the Green Ninja, a climate-action superhero who fights global warming by inspiring personal action (www.greenninja.info). In this session, we will discuss this approach to professional development and share a collection of teacher-tested CLINM resources. CLINM resources are grounded in earth system science; classroom activities and lessons engage students in exploration of connections between natural systems and human systems with a particular focus on how climate change relates to everyone's need for food, water, and energy. CLINM uses a team-based approach to resource development, and partners faculty in San José State University's (SJSU) colleges of Science, Education, and Humanities and the Arts with 6th-grade teachers from local school districts, a scientist from NASA Ames Research Center and climate change education projects at Stanford University, the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, and the University of Idaho. Climate scientists and other content experts identify relevant concepts and work with science educators to develop and/or refine classroom activities to elucidate those concepts; activities are piloted in pre-service science methods courses at SJSU and in

  4. Newborn with congenital facial palsy and bilateral anotia/atresia of external auditory canal: Rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Mehta, Anish; John, Aju Abraham; Buddaraju, Kiran; Shankar, Abhinandan K.; Rangasetty, Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Congenital facial palsy (CFP) is clinically defined as facial palsy of the seventh cranial nerve which is present at birth or shortly thereafter. It is generally considered to be either developmental or acquired in origin. Facial palsy of developmental origin is associated with other anomalies including those of pinna and external auditory canal, which range from mild defects to severe microtia and atresia. We report a 2-day-old male newborn that had right CFP with bilateral anotia and atresia of external auditory canals which is rare. PMID:27857806

  5. Cutaneous Sensibility Changes in Bell's Palsy Patients.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas Palacio, Carlos Andrés; Múnera Galarza, Francisco Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    Objective Bell's palsy is a cranial nerve VII dysfunction that renders the patient unable to control facial muscles from the affected side. Nevertheless, some patients have reported cutaneous changes in the paretic area. Therefore, cutaneous sensibility changes might be possible additional symptoms within the clinical presentation of this disorder. Accordingly, the aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between cutaneous sensibility and facial paralysis severity in these patients. Study Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Settings Tertiary care medical center. Subjects and Methods Twelve acute-onset Bell's palsy patients were enrolled from March to September 2009. In addition, 12 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers were tested. Cutaneous sensibility was evaluated with pressure threshold and 2-point discrimination at 6 areas of the face. Facial paralysis severity was evaluated with the House-Brackmann scale. Results Statistically significant correlations based on the Spearman's test were found between facial paralysis severity and cutaneous sensitivity on forehead, eyelid, cheek, nose, and lip ( P < .05). Additionally, significant differences based on the Student's t test were observed between both sides of the face in 2-point discrimination on eyelid, cheek, and lip ( P < .05) in Bell's palsy patients but not in healthy subjects. Conclusion Such results suggest a possible relationship between the loss of motor control of the face and changes in facial sensory information processing. Such findings are worth further research about the neurophysiologic changes associated with the cutaneous sensibility disturbances of these patients.

  6. High-frequency ultrasound as an adjunct to neural electrophysiology: Evaluation and prognosis of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Guo, Rui-Jun; Liang, Xiao-Ning; Wu, Yue; Cao, Wen; Zhang, Zhen-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Liang, Hai-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a form of temporary facial nerve paralysis that occurs primarily in young adults. Previously, various methods were used to assess outcomes in facial nerve disease. The aim of the present study was to characterize the main branches of the normal and abnormal facial nerve using high-frequency ultrasonography (HFUS). A total of 104 healthy volunteers, 40 patients with acute onset of Bell's palsy and 30 patients who underwent 3-month routine therapy for Bell's palsy disease were included in the study. The healthy volunteers and patients were selected for HFUS examination and VII nerve conduction. The results showed significant differences in nerve diameter, echogenicity, delitescence and amplitude in different groups. Statistically significant correlations were identified for severity grading in one of the experimental groups during HFUS examinations. In conclusion, HFUS as a complementary technique paired with neural electrophysiology may establish the normal values of facial nerve. Additionally, HFUS was beneficial in the process of evaluation and prognosis of Bell's palsy disease.

  7. High-frequency ultrasound as an adjunct to neural electrophysiology: Evaluation and prognosis of Bell's palsy

    PubMed Central

    LI, SHUO; GUO, RUI-JUN; LIANG, XIAO-NING; WU, YUE; CAO, WEN; ZHANG, ZHEN-PING; ZHAO, WEI; LIANG, HAI-DONG

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a form of temporary facial nerve paralysis that occurs primarily in young adults. Previously, various methods were used to assess outcomes in facial nerve disease. The aim of the present study was to characterize the main branches of the normal and abnormal facial nerve using high-frequency ultrasonography (HFUS). A total of 104 healthy volunteers, 40 patients with acute onset of Bell's palsy and 30 patients who underwent 3-month routine therapy for Bell's palsy disease were included in the study. The healthy volunteers and patients were selected for HFUS examination and VII nerve conduction. The results showed significant differences in nerve diameter, echogenicity, delitescence and amplitude in different groups. Statistically significant correlations were identified for severity grading in one of the experimental groups during HFUS examinations. In conclusion, HFUS as a complementary technique paired with neural electrophysiology may establish the normal values of facial nerve. Additionally, HFUS was beneficial in the process of evaluation and prognosis of Bell's palsy disease. PMID:26889221

  8. Bone Lose of the Ancient Mediterranean lumbar vertebrae : Iasos, 6th century ad.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Serdar; Solmaz, Ilker; Ilıca, A. Turan; Karaçalıoğlu, Özgür; Damla Yılmaz, Nalan; Başoğlu, Okşan; Kılıc, Selim; Izci, Yusuf

    Evaluation of bone mineral density (BMD) of the ancient peoples has received great interest by anthropologists. The aims of this study are to investigate the lumbar vertebrae of the Iasos people during the Byzantine period, in order to determine the prevalence of bone loss and to interpret dietary conditions of ancient Mediterranean populations. Lumbar vertebrae belonging to twenty eight skeletons of the 6th c AD were analyzed by radiographs and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The BMD values for each biologic sex and age group were compared. The correlation between the BMD and radiological features was also analyzed. The mean BMD was 0.940 g/cm2. BMD was decreased by aging in both sexes, but it was not significant. Osteopenia was found in 11 (39%) and osteoporosis in 4 (14.3%) out 28 vertebrae. The BMD was normal in 13 (46%) out of 28 vertebrae. Osteopenia was present in 7 (38%) of 18 male vertebrae and 4 (40%) of 10 female vertebrae. The spine score was high in the male group and there was a strong positive correlation between the BMD and spine score for both sexes. This study revealed that the BMD decreased by aging and that osteopenia was a problem in both sexes of the Iasos people during the 6th c AD. There was no correlation between the BMD and radiological features for age groups and biological sexes.

  9. Bell's palsy: an update on idiopathic facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Billue, J S

    1997-08-01

    Patients with Bell's palsy, or idiopathic facial paralysis, present sporadically in the primary care setting. New evidence implicates reactivated herpes simplex virus (HSV) as the etiologic agent in greater than 70% of cases diagnosed as Bell's palsy. Careful evaluation of the patient with facial paralysis, including history, physical examination, and diagnostic assessment, may mandate the expeditious treatment of facial paralysis to prevent faulty nerve regeneration during the recovery period. Using the results of an objective tool for grading resting facial symmetry, symmetry of voluntary movement, and synkinesis can provide a quantitative measurement for decision making. These data are also useful in documenting progression or regression of the patient's facial paralysis. Administration of acyclovir with prednisone improves the recovery of complete facial functioning following an episode of Bell's palsy. During the acute and convalescent stages, the eye on the affected side must be protected until function is restored to the facial nerve. Residual effects of Bell's palsy lasting more than 6 months may indicate another diagnosis and the need to refer the patient to a specialist.

  10. Medical treatment of Bell's palsy. Oral vs. intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Tani, M; Kinishi, M; Takahara, T; Hosomi, H; Amatsu, M

    1988-01-01

    Infusion therapy using low-molecular dextran in combination with high-dose cortisone was modified from Stennert's original protocol and indicated in 50 cases of Bell's palsy. The effects of infusion were compared with the outcome in 36 cases treated by orally-administered steroids and vasodilators. In the case of incomplete palsy, the recovery rate was excellent regardless of the mode of treatment. If the palsy is not progressive, it is not necessary for patients with this condition to have infusion therapy. In the case of complete palsy, 95% of those with normal nerve excitability (NE) experienced complete recovery when treated by infusion. However, only 71% of this group experienced complete recovery when treated with oral administration. In the group with diminished or absent NE, complete recovery was obtained in 58% of the patients treated with infusion, whereas only 18% recovered completely when given oral administration. Thus, the recovery rate increased sharply in the case of infusion therapy. Therefore, the above-mentioned method of infusion therapy is indicated in cases of complete or progressively incomplete Bell's palsy except in those cases where its use is contra-indicated for some other reason.

  11. Bell's palsy may have relations to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaqiang; Li, Yongming; Yuan, Xiao; Lin, Zhu

    2009-02-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common acute facial paralysis with its causes still unclear. At present, the most widely accepted causes are viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. Unclear causes lead to unidentified treatments. Most therapeutic methods are simply symptomatic treatment. Fortunately, the pathomechanism of Bell's palsy is relative clear, involving herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation within the geniculate ganglion, followed by inflammation and entrapment of the nerve in the bony foramen. This makes symptomatic treatment possible. But the therapeutic effects are not quite satisfactory. Therefore, novel etiological and therapeutic concepts are urgently needed. According to our clinical observation and some facts that do not favor the viral infections theory, we can conclude that all Bell's palsy is not related to viral infections, some even may have relations to bacterial infection. As far as blood routine examination is concerned, though lymphocyte increasing can be seen in most patients with Bell's palsy, there are cases with normal lymphocyte but increased neutrophil. Also, antibiotic treatment in these patients could accelerate recovery to some extent. These results indicate that Bell's palsy in these patients may be caused by bacterial infection.

  12. Imaging the Facial Nerve: A Contemporary Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Mends, Francine; Hagiwara, Mari; Fatterpekar, Girish; Roehm, Pamela C.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of a number of facial nerve disorders. The facial nerve has a complex anatomical course; thus, a thorough understanding of the course of the facial nerve is essential to localize the sites of pathology. Facial nerve dysfunction can occur from a variety of causes, which can often be identified on imaging. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful for identifying bony facial canal and soft tissue abnormalities, respectively. Ultrasound of the facial nerve has been used to predict functional outcomes in patients with Bell's palsy. More recently, diffusion tensor tractography has appeared as a new modality which allows three-dimensional display of facial nerve fibers. PMID:23766904

  13. Transient unilateral combined paresis of the hypoglossal nerve and lingual nerve following intubation anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Hulya; Besir, Ahmet; Cekic, Bahanur; Kosucu, Muge; Geze, Sukran

    2014-01-01

    Nerve damage may occur in the pharyngolaryngeal region during general anesthesia. The most frequently injured nerves are the hypoglossal, lingual and recurrent laryngeal. These injuries may arise in association with several factors, such as laryngoscopy, endotracheal intubation and tube insertion, cuff pressure, mask ventilation, the triple airway maneuver, the oropharyngeal airway, manner of intubation tube insertion, head and neck position and aspiration. Nerve injuries in this region may take the form of an isolated single nerve or of paresis of two nerves together in the form of hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (Tapia's syndrome). However, combined injury of the lingual and hypoglossal nerves following intubation anesthesia is a much rarer condition. The risk of this damage can be reduced with precautionary measures. We describe a case of combined unilateral nervus hypoglossus and nervus lingualis paresis developing after intubation anesthesia.

  14. Reconciling the clinical practice guidelines on Bell's palsy from the AAO-HNSF and the AAN.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Seth R; Jones, Stephanie L; Getchius, Thomas S D; Gronseth, Gary S

    2014-05-01

    Bell's palsy, named after the Scottish anatomist, Sir Charles Bell, is the most common acute mononeuropathy, or disorder affecting a single nerve, and is the most common diagnosis associated with facial nerve weakness/paralysis. In the past 2 years, both the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) have published clinical practice guidelines aimed to improve the quality of care and outcomes for patients diagnosed with Bell's palsy. This commentary aims to address the similarities and differences in the scope and final recommendations made by each guideline development group.

  15. An integrated exploration model for Council Run field analogs: Regional geology and seismic stratigraphy of Devonian 6th Elk sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, G.; Johnson, R. )

    1991-08-01

    A geologic study of the Devonian Lock Haven 6th Elk formation along the structural front of Pennsylvania and Maryland suggest that present-day structures were active at the time of deposition. These structures barred deposition to the west and helped to localize sands in a northeast-southwest fairway. The 6th Elk sandstones occur in two major depositional lobes (located in Centre and Somerset counties in Pennsylvania, and Garret County, Maryland) and were deposited on a shallow-marine shelf by turbidity currents and later modified by storm-generated currents. Deposition of 6th Elk sands may also have been influenced by cross-strike discontinuities. A seismic study of the Council Run field aids in subsurface identification of the 6th Elk. A high-amplitude seismic anomaly across the Council Run field is correlated with increasing san thickness. Two dimensional modeling suggests that the seismic response is extremely sensitive to specific acquisition and processing techniques including filter and phase variability. Additional attribute analysis integrates the seismic data with the forward models. This results in a predictive method for potentially identifying 6th Elk sandstone development from seismic data. Applying the results of the seismic modeling at Council Run field to a seismic grid across the previously defined 6th Elk depositional fairway has identified many exploratory prospects in Lycoming and Bradford counties, Pennsylvania. This area coincides with the site of a third, previously documented, Upper Devonian depositional lobe.

  16. Bell's palsy and herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stan C

    2002-12-01

    A growing body of evidence links reactivation of herpesviruses (primarily varicella zoster virus and herpes simplex virus type 1) with the development of a large proportion of cases of acute peripheral facial palsy, a syndrome commonly known by its eponym, Bell's palsy. This article reviews the definition and natural history of the disease, its underlying anatomy and pathophysiology, the data linking herpetic reactivation with development of signs and symptoms, and therapeutic trials utilizing antiviral therapy. In addition, it poses the question, would earlier intervention with antivirals make a larger impact on outcomes?

  17. Treatment of peroneal nerve injuries with simultaneous tendon transfer and nerve exploration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Common peroneal nerve palsy leading to foot drop is difficult to manage and has historically been treated with extended bracing with expectant waiting for return of nerve function. Peroneal nerve exploration has traditionally been avoided except in cases of known traumatic or iatrogenic injury, with tendon transfers being performed in a delayed fashion after exhausting conservative treatment. We present a new strategy for management of foot drop with nerve exploration and concomitant tendon transfer. Method We retrospectively reviewed a series of 12 patients with peroneal nerve palsies that were treated with tendon transfer from 2005 to 2011. Of these patients, seven were treated with simultaneous peroneal nerve exploration and repair at the time of tendon transfer. Results Patients with both nerve repair and tendon transfer had superior functional results with active dorsiflexion in all patients, compared to dorsiflexion in 40% of patients treated with tendon transfers alone. Additionally, 57% of patients treated with nerve repair and tendon transfer were able to achieve enough function to return to running, compared to 20% in patients with tendon transfer alone. No patient had full return of native motor function resulting in excessive dorsiflexion strength. Conclusion The results of our limited case series for this rare condition indicate that simultaneous nerve repair and tendon transfer showed no detrimental results and may provide improved function over tendon transfer alone. PMID:25099247

  18. Uranium groundwater anomalies and L'Aquila earthquake, 6th April 2009 (Italy).

    PubMed

    Plastino, Wolfango; Povinec, Pavel P; De Luca, Gaetano; Doglioni, Carlo; Nisi, Stefano; Ioannucci, Luca; Balata, Marco; Laubenstein, Matthias; Bella, Francesco; Coccia, Eugenio

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of chemical and physical groundwater parameters has been carried out worldwide in seismogenic areas with the aim to test possible correlations between their spatial and temporal variations and strain processes. Uranium (U) groundwater anomalies were observed during the preparation phases of the recent L'Aquila earthquake of 6th April 2009 in the cataclastic rocks near the overthrust fault crossing the deep underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The results suggest that U may be used as a potential strain indicator of geodynamic processes occurring before the seismic swarm and the main earthquake shock. Moreover, this justifies the different radon patterns before and after the main shock: the radon releases during and after the earthquake are much than more during the preparatory period because the process does not include only the microfracturing induced by stress-strain activation, but also radon increases accompanying groundwater U anomalies.

  19. Statistical Analysis of CFD Solutions from the 6th AIAA CFD Drag Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derlaga, Joseph M.; Morrison, Joseph H.

    2017-01-01

    A graphical framework is used for statistical analysis of the results from an extensive N- version test of a collection of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational uid dynam- ics codes. The solutions were obtained by code developers and users from North America, Europe, Asia, and South America using both common and custom grid sequencees as well as multiple turbulence models for the June 2016 6th AIAA CFD Drag Prediction Workshop sponsored by the AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Technical Committee. The aerodynamic con guration for this workshop was the Common Research Model subsonic transport wing- body previously used for both the 4th and 5th Drag Prediction Workshops. This work continues the statistical analysis begun in the earlier workshops and compares the results from the grid convergence study of the most recent workshop with previous workshops.

  20. Rapid landscape change in 6th century northern Jordan: interdisciplinary geoarchaeological perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucke, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Landscapes of the ancient fertile crescent are considered affected by soil degradation as result of long-term farming since the Neolithic, and impressive ruins of antiquity led to assumptions that their abandonment must have been conntected with reduced agricultural productivity. In this context, a valley fill near the site of Abila of the Decapolis in northern Jordan was apparently deposited largely during the 6th century AD, and provides evidence for a rapid and intense landscape change during the Late Byzantine period. However, an interdisciplinary case study of land use, soil development, and sediments found that the valley fill cannot be connected with large-scale soil erosion in the vicinity of the site. On the one hand, this is indicated by the distribution of soil development and archaeological material as marker of past land use activity in the past, which suggests that the best soils were and still are used intensively. On the other hand, the sediments seem to point to the occurrence of climatic extremes such as heavy floods, the occurrence of soil creep after water saturation, but also a significant shift to aridity which may have triggered socio-economic changes of subsistence strategies from agriculture to pastoralism. The dates of sediments which are available so far indicate that the climatic change seemingly occurred rapidly within approximately 100 years during the late 6th and early 7th century AD, possibly connected with the "year without sun" or 'Mystery Veil' which the Byzantine historian Procopius described in the year 536 AD. Modern analogies of the Pinatubo eruption in 1991 let it seem possible that a volcanic event, perhaps the outbreak of the Ilopango volcano, was connected with these environmental turbulences. Such events cannot be understood by isolated studies: without a broad interdisciplinary framework, single archives are prone to misinterpretation, and our understanding of the environmental history of Abila is still very limited.

  1. Reanimation surgery in patients with acquired bilateral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Butler, D P; Johal, K S; Harrison, D H; Grobbelaar, A O

    2017-04-01

    Acquired bilateral facial palsy is rare and causes difficulty with speech and eating, but dynamic reanimation of the face can reduce the effect of these problems. Of 712 patients who had these procedures during our study period, two had an acquired bilateral facial paralysis. In both, reanimation was completed in a single operation using a free-functional transfer of the latissimus dorsi muscle that was coapted to the masseteric branch of the trigeminal nerve. Both patients achieved excellent non-spontaneous excursion and an improvement in function. Careful evaluation of the available donor nerves including thorough examination and electromyographic testing should always be completed before operation.

  2. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter ! Affiliate Network UCP affiliates provide services and support on a community-by-community basis, serving the unique needs of people with disabilities in their region. Find your ... and their networks. Individuals with cerebral palsy and other disabilities deserve ...

  3. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain is affected and which parts of the body that section of the brain controls. If CP affects both arms and both legs, ... the case of spastic CP) or to help control seizures. And some might have special surgeries to keep their arms or legs straighter and more ... Coping With Cerebral Palsy Puberty can ...

  4. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  5. FOREWORD: 6th International Conference on Pumps and Fans with Compressors and Wind Turbines (ICPF2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin; Wang, Zhengwei; Yuan, Shouqi; Shi, Weidong; Liu, Shuhong; Luo, Xingqi; Wang, Fujun

    2013-12-01

    The 6th International Conference on Pumps and Fans with Compressors and Wind Turbines (ICPF 2013) was held in Beijing, China, 19-22 September 2013, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University and Jiangsu University. The co-organizers were Zhejiang University, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, The State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, The State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy and Beijing International Science and Technology Cooperation Base for CO2 Utilization and Reduction. The sponsor of the conference was Concepts NREC. The First International Conference on Pumps and Systems (May 1992), the Second International Conference on Pumps and Fans (October 1995), the Third International Conference on Pumps and Fans (October 1998), and the Fourth International Conference on Pumps and Fans (26-29 August 2002) were all held in Beijing and were organized by the late famous Chinese professor on fluid machinery and engineering, Professor Zuyan Mei of Tsinghua University. The conference was interrupted by the death of Professor Mei in 2003. In order to commemorate Professor Mei, the organizing committee of ICPF decided to continue organizing the conference series. The Fifth Conference on Pumps and Systems (2010 ICPF) took place in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China, 18-21 October 2010, and it was jointly organized by Zhejiang University and Tsinghua University. With the development of renewable energy and new energy in China and in the world, some small types of compressor and some types of pump, as well as wind turbines are developing very fast; therefore the ICPF2013 conference included compressors and wind turbines. The theme of the conference was the application of renewable energy of pumps, compressors, fans and blowers. The content of the conference was the basic study, design and experimental study of compressors, fans, blowers and pumps; the CFD application on pumps and fans, their transient behavior, unsteady flows and multi-phase flow

  6. Peripheral nerve injuries in athletes. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lorei, M P; Hershman, E B

    1993-08-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions are uncommon but serious injuries which may delay or preclude an athlete's safe return to sports. Early, accurate anatomical diagnosis is essential. Nerve lesions may be due to acute injury (e.g. from a direct blow) or chronic injury secondary to repetitive microtrauma (entrapment). Accurate diagnosis is based upon physical examination and a knowledge of the relative anatomy. Palpation, neurological testing and provocative manoeuvres are mainstays of physical diagnosis. Diagnostic suspicion can be confirmed by electrophysiological testing, including electromyography and nerve conduction studies. Proper equipment, technique and conditioning are the keys to prevention. Rest, anti-inflammatories, physical therapy and appropriate splinting are the mainstays of treatment. In the shoulder, spinal accessory nerve injury is caused by a blow to the neck and results in trapezius paralysis with sparing of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Scapular winging results from paralysis of the serratus anterior because of long thoracic nerve palsy. A lesion of the suprascapular nerve may mimic a rotator cuff tear with pain a weakness of the rotator cuff. Axillary nerve injury often follows anterior shoulder dislocation. In the elbow region, musculocutaneous nerve palsy is seen in weightlifters with weakness of the elbow flexors and dysesthesias of the lateral forearm. Pronator syndrome is a median nerve lesion occurring in the proximal forearm which is diagnosed by several provocative manoeuvres. Posterior interosseous nerve entrapment is common among tennis players and occurs at the Arcade of Froshe--it results in weakness of the wrist and metacarpophalangeal extensors. Ulnar neuritis at the elbow is common amongst baseball pitchers. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common neuropathy seen in sport and is caused by median nerve compression in the carpal tunnel. Paralysis of the ulnar nerve at the wrist is seen among bicyclists resulting in weakness of grip and

  7. Vulnerability of the Femoral Nerve During Complex Anterior and Posterior Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Naroji, Swetha; Belin, Laurence J; Maltenfort, Mitchell Gil; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Schwartz, Daniel; Harrop, James S; Weinstein, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background: Femoral nerve palsy is not a common adverse effect of lumbar spinal surgery. Objective: To report 3 unique cases of femoral nerve neuropathy due to instrumentation and positioning during complex anterior and posterior spinal surgery. Methods: Case series Results: All 3 patients demonstrated femoral nerve neuropathy. The first patient presented postoperatively but after 6 months, the palsy resolved. Femoral nerve malfunctioning was documented in the second and third patients intraoperatively; however, with rapid patient repositioning and removal of offending instrumentation, postoperative palsy was avoided. Conclusions: Use of motor evoked potential monitoring of the femoral nerve during surgery is vital for the prevention of future neuropathies, an avoidable complication of spinal surgery. PMID:19777866

  8. 1/6TH SCALE STRIP EFFLUENT FEED TANK-MIXING RESULTS USING MCU SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this task was to determine if mixing was an issue for the entrainment and dispersion of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) solvent in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Strip Effluent Feed Tank (SEFT). The MCU strip effluent stream containing the Cs removed during salt processing will be transferred to the DWPF for immobilization in HLW glass. In lab-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing, mixing of the solvent in the dilute nitric acid solution proved problematic, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to perform scaled SEFT mixing tests to evaluate whether the problem was symptomatic of the lab-scale set-up or of the solvent. The solvent levels tested were 228 and 235 ppm, which represented levels near the estimated DWPF solvent limit of 239 ppm in 0.001M HNO{sub 3} solution. The 239 ppm limit was calculated by Norato in X-CLC-S-00141. The general approach for the mixing investigation was to: (1) Investigate the use of fluorescent dyes to aid in observing the mixing behavior. Evaluate and compare the physical properties of the fluorescent dyed MCU solvents to the baseline Oak Ridge CSSX solvent. Based on the data, use the dyed MCU solvent that best approximates the physical properties. (2) Use approximately a 1/6th linear scale of the SEFT to replicate the internal configuration for DWPF mixing. (3) Determine agitator speed(s) for scaled testing based on the DWPF SEFT mixing speed. (4) Perform mixing tests using the 1/6th SEFT and determine any mixing issues (entrainment/dispersion, accumulation, adhesion) through visual observations and by pulling samples to assess uniformity. The mixing tests used MCU solvent fabricated at SRNL blended with Risk Reactor DFSB-K43 fluorescent dye. This dyed SRNL MCU solvent had equivalent physical properties important to mixing as compared to the Oak Ridge baseline solvent, blended easily with the MCU solvent, and provided an excellent visual aid.

  9. Latina girls' identities-in-practice in 6th grade science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Edna

    Inequalities and achievement gaps in science education among students from different racial and socioeconomic backgrounds as well as between genders in the United States are due to not just access to resources, but also to the incongruence between identities of school science with identities salient to minority students. Minority girls are especially portrayed to be estranged from prototypical school science Discourse, often characterized as white, middle class, and masculine. This dissertation, based on a two-year ethnographic study in an urban middle school in New York City, describes the authoring of novel identities-in-practice of minority girls in a 6th grade science classroom. The findings indicate that minority girls draw from out-of-school identities salient to them to author novel identities-in-practice in the various figured worlds of the 6th grade science classroom. Through taking such authorial stances, minority girls exhibit agency in negotiating for wider boundaries in their school science participation and broker for hybrid spaces of school science where the school science Discourse was destabilized and challenged to be more inclusive of everyday funds of knowledge and Discourses important to the students. The findings also highlight the dialectic relationship between an individual students' learning and participation and the school science community-of-practice and the implications such a relationship has on the learning of both individual students and the collective community-of-practice. From year one findings, curricular adaptations were enacted, with teacher and student input, on lessons centering on food and nutrition. The adapted curriculum specifically solicited for nontraditional funds of knowledge and Discourse from students and were grounded strongly in relevance to students' out of school lives. The hybrid spaces collectively brokered for by the community-of-practice were transformed in three ways: physically, politically, and

  10. PREFACE: 6th International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis (MURPHYS2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimian, Mihai; Rachinskii, Dmitrii

    2015-02-01

    The International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis (MURPHYS) conference series focuses on multiple scale systems, singular perturbation problems, phase transitions and hysteresis phenomena occurring in physical, biological, chemical, economical, engineering and information systems. The 6th edition was hosted by Stefan cel Mare University in the city of Suceava located in the beautiful multicultural land of Bukovina, Romania, from May 21 to 24, 2012. This continued the series of biennial multidisciplinary conferences organized in Cork, Ireland from 2002 to 2008 and in Pécs, Hungary in 2010. The MURPHYS 2012 Workshop brought together more than 50 researchers in hysteresis and multi-scale phenomena from the United State of America, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Ireland, Czech Republic, Hungary, Greece, Ukraine, and Romania. Participants shared and discussed new developments of analytical techniques and numerical methods along with a variety of their applications in various areas, including material sciences, electrical and electronics engineering, mechanical engineering and civil structures, biological and eco-systems, economics and finance. The Workshop was sponsored by the European Social Fund through Sectoral Operational Program Human Resources 2007-2013 (PRO-DOCT) and Stefan cel Mare University, Suceava. The Organizing Committee was co-chaired by Mihai Dimian from Stefan cel Mare University, Suceava (Romania), Amalia Ivanyi from the University of Pecs (Hungary), and Dmitrii Rachinskii from the University College Cork (Ireland). All papers published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series have been peer reviewed through processes administered by the Editors. Reviews were conducted by expert referees to the professional and scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. The Guest Editors wish to place on record their sincere gratitude to Miss Sarah Toms for the assistance she provided

  11. Leather material found on a 6th B.C. Chinese bronze sword: a technical study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wugan; Si, Yi; Wang, Hongmin; Qin, Ying; Huang, Fengchun; Wang, Changsui

    2011-09-01

    During July to November, 2006, an important archaeological excavation was conducted in Yun country, Hubei province, southern China. Chinese archaeologists found some remnant of leather materials, covered with red pigments, on a 6th century B.C. Chinese bronze sword. To understand the technology/ies that may have been utilized for manufacturing the leathers, a combined of Raman spectroscopy, FT-IR and XRF was thus applied to the remnant of leather materials. Raman analyses showed that red pigment on the leather was cinnabar (HgS). FT-IR and XRF analyses indicated that the content of some elements, such as Ca (existing as CaCO3) and Fe (existing as Fe2O3), were much higher than those in the surrounding grave soil. The results inferred an application of lime depilation and retting, and the Fe-Al compound salt as tanning agent. And it was furthermore implicated that the Fe-Al salt tanning technique had been developed in the middle and late Spring and Autumn Period of China.

  12. The relationship between snack intake and its availability of 4th-6th graders in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hang, Chi-Ming; Lin, Wei; Yang, Hsiao-Chi; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the snack intake and snack availability of elementary school children. Data analyzed were from 722 4th to 6th graders' food availability and food intake questionnaires collected in the Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan Elementary School Children 2001-2002. The snacks commonly eaten were divided into two groups. Healthy snacks included dairy products, 100% fruit juice and fresh fruits. Unhealthy snacks included high fat/sugar snacks, cookies, candy, carbonated/sugared beverages and fast food. Structural equating modeling was used to test the models that describe the availability and intake of two snack groups. Results indicated that parents' intake and children's preference were major predictors of children intake of both healthy and unhealthy snacks. Other than that, the intake of unhealthy snacks was positively associated with "purchase by children themselves" but not the intake of healthy snacks, which was influenced predominantly by "present in home". The results support the perception that a positive family food environment is important for improving children's diet quality. To build a healthy family food environment, parents have to not only provide healthy snacks but also limit the unhealthy snacks in home. In addition to that, the role modeling of parents as eating healthy snacks instead of unhealthy snacks themselves may help children to develop similar behaviors.

  13. Summary of the 6th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank: new directions in urologic research.

    PubMed

    Svatek, Robert S; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Galsky, Matthew D; Lee, Cheryl T; Latini, David M; Bochner, Bernard H; Weizer, Alon Z; Apolo, Andrea B; Sridhar, Srikala S; Kamat, Ashish M; Hansel, Donna; Flaig, Thomas W; Smith, Norm D; Lotan, Yair

    2013-10-01

    The 6th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and representatives from the National Cancer Institute and Industry in an effort to advance bladder cancer research efforts. This year's meeting comprised panel discussions and research involving 5 separate working groups, including the Survivorship, Clinical Trials, Standardization of Care, Data Mining, and Translational Science working groups. In this manuscript, the accomplishments and objectives of the working groups are summarized. Notable efforts include: (1) the development of a survivorship care plan for early and late-stage bladder cancer; (2) the development of consensus criteria for eligibility and endpoints for bladder cancer clinical trials; (3) an improved understanding of current practice patterns regarding the use of perioperative chemotherapy in an effort to standardize care; (4) creation of a comprehensive handbook to assist researchers with developing bladder cancer databases; and (5) identification of response to therapy of high-grade non muscle invasive disease through a collaborative exchange of expertise and resources.

  14. Prevention and Treatment of Cancer: Hypes and Hopes 6th International Translational Cancer Research Conference.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prabhudas; Vora, Hemangini; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gandhi, Varsha; Mehta, Kapil; Pathak, Sen

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is primarily an "old-age" disease that has an "age-old" history. The overall incidence of cancer is much higher in Western countries, but is rapidly growing in Eastern countries perhaps due to change in life-style. Almost three million studies published to date indicate that cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder that arises from dysregulation of multiple cell signaling pathways. The cancer genome landscape indicates that approximately 140 genes and 12 cell signaling pathways drive almost all cancers. "Targeted therapy," a buzz word in cancer treatment for the past two decades, has provided antibodies, as well as small-molecule inhibitors. These therapies have been successful only in few instances. However, in most cases, minor increase in overall survival has been reported at the cost of huge expense. An alternative strategy is to prevent cancer or to diagnose and treat the disease at an early stage to gain survival benefits. Such interventions are also cost-effective. To address some of these issues, the 6th International Translational Cancer Research Conference was held during February 4-7th, 2016, in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India; the homeland of Mahatma Gandhi. This conference was focused on utilizing multidisciplinary approaches for prevention and early treatment that would likely simultaneously or sequentially target many key pathways. Several distinguished speakers were invited from around the world. This article highlights primary features of this conference.

  15. Prevalence of elevated blood pressure in Hispanic versus non-Hispanic 6th graders.

    PubMed

    Tarlton, Patricia A

    2007-02-01

    Blood pressure screening was conducted on 4,311 (Hispanic n = 763 [17.7%], White n = 2,566 [59.5%], African American n = 610 [14.1%], Asian n = 136 [3.2%], Multiracial n = 231 [5.4%], and Native American n = 5 [0.1%]) 6th-grade students enrolled in Seminole County, Florida, Public Schools from August to December 2005. Prevalence of obesity was 21% for the overall population, with Hispanics n = 218 (28.6%) having a greater prevalence than non-Hispanics n = 630 (19.0%). Following a second screening, overall prevalence of elevated blood pressure was 1.9%, with Hispanics at 2.6% versus 1.6% for non-Hispanics. This was found to be significant when Hispanics were further compared to the White population. However, when adjusted for obesity, elevated blood pressure was not significant for Hispanics. Results confirm the presence of elevated blood pressure and obesity in all population groups, with an elevated risk for both among the Hispanic population.

  16. Leather material found on a 6th B.C. Chinese bronze sword: A technical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wugan; Si, Yi; Wang, Hongmin; Qin, Ying; Huang, Fengchun; Wang, Changsui

    2011-09-01

    During July to November, 2006, an important archaeological excavation was conducted in Yun country, Hubei province, southern China. Chinese archaeologists found some remnant of leather materials, covered with red pigments, on a 6th century B.C. Chinese bronze sword. To understand the technology/ies that may have been utilized for manufacturing the leathers, a combined of Raman spectroscopy, FT-IR and XRF was thus applied to the remnant of leather materials. Raman analyses showed that red pigment on the leather was cinnabar (HgS). FT-IR and XRF analyses indicated that the content of some elements, such as Ca (existing as CaCO 3) and Fe (existing as Fe 2O 3), were much higher than those in the surrounding grave soil. The results inferred an application of lime depilation and retting, and the Fe-Al compound salt as tanning agent. And it was furthermore implicated that the Fe-Al salt tanning technique had been developed in the middle and late Spring and Autumn Period of China.

  17. FOREWORD: 6th International Symposium on Electronic Beam Ion Sources and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljeby, L.

    1997-01-01

    The 6th International Symposium on Electron Beam Ion sources and their Applications was held at the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory at Stockholm University, June 20-23, 1994. A symposium in this series is held every three years. The next one will be organised by Professor Reinhard Becker at the J. W. Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. The Stockholm symposium had a total of 65 participants from 9 countries. 43 oral presentations were given and 7 posters were exhibited. For the first time in this series the proceedings have been refereed. The symposium was given generous support by the Marcus Wallbenberg Foundation for International Co-operation in Science, a support mainly used for inviting delegates from Russia and students. The organisation of the symposium was led by Dr. Carl Johan Herrlander. His efficiency, organising skill and never ending attention to all the aspects of the symposium were of the utmost importance for carrying it through. We deeply regret that the proceedings have been very much delayed. Physica Scripta has no part in causing the delay which is solely a result of my inability to enforce deadlines. We think though that the contents still is of interest in particular as a full documentation of the conference.

  18. Proceedings of the 6th US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Francis D.; Walter Steininger; Wilhelm Bollingerfehr

    2016-01-11

    The 6th US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation was held in Dresden. Germany on September 7-9, 2015. Over seventy participants helped advance the technical basis for salt disposal of radioactive waste. The number of collaborative efforts continues to grow and to produce useful documentation, as well as to define the state of the art for research areas. These Proceedings are divided into Chapters, and a list of authors is included in the Acknowledgement Section. Also in this document are the Technical Agenda, List of Participants, Biographical Information, Abstracts, and Presentations. Proceedings of all workshops and other pertinent information are posted on websites hosted by Sandia National Laboratories and the Nuclear Energy Agency Salt Club. The US/German workshops provide continuity for long-term research, summarize and publish status of mature areas, and develop appropriate research by consensus in a workshop environment. As before, major areas and findings are highlighted, which constitute topical Chapters in these Proceedings. In total, the scientific breadth is substantial and while not all subject matter is elaborated into chapter format, all presentations and abstracts are published in this document. In the following Proceedings, six selected topics are developed in detail.

  19. PREFACE: The 6th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglio, Ruggero; Donaldson, Gordon

    2004-05-01

    This special issue of Superconductor Science and Technology contains papers presented at the 6th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS), which was held in Sorrento, Italy, 14--18 September 2003. This important biennial event followed previous successful meetings held in Gottingen, Germany; Edinburgh, Scotland; Eindhoven, the Netherlands; Sitges (Barcelona), Spain; and Copenhagen, Denmark. Following tradition, this EUCAS conference focused on the role of superconductivity in bridging various aspects of research with a variety of concrete advanced applications. EUCAS 2003 attracted about 1000 participants from all around the world with large participation from non-European countries. This conference benefited the worldwide superconductivity community tremendously as scientists operating internationally were able to share their knowledge and experience with one another. We are grateful to all those who submitted papers to the Conference Proceedings, which will be published in an Institute of Physics Conference Series, and also to those who contributed to this special issue. Unfortunately we could not consider every one of the large number of papers submitted to this issue and we express our regret to those whose work could not be included.

  20. Facial Palsy, a Disorder Belonging to Influential Neurological Dynasty: Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Newadkar, Ujwala R.; Chaudhari, Lalit; Khalekar, Yogita K.

    2016-01-01

    Facial paralysis is one of the common problem leading to facial deformation. Bell's palsy (BP) is defined as a lower motor neuron palsy of acute onset and idiopathic origin. BP is regarded as a benign common neurological disorder of unknown cause. It has an acute onset and is almost always a mononeuritis. The facial nerve is a mixed cranial nerve with a predominant motor component, which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Knowledge of its course is vital for anatomic localization and clinical correlation. BP accounts for approximately 72% of facial palsies. Almost a century later, the management and etiology of BP is still a subject of controversy. Here, we present a review of literature on this neurologically significant entity. PMID:27583233

  1. Eyelid reanimation, neurotisation, and transplantation of the cornea in a patient with facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Allevi, Fabiana; Fogagnolo, Paolo; Rossetti, Luca; Biglioli, Federico

    2014-08-19

    Patients affected by facial palsy suffer from failure to fully close the eyelids; the resulting eye exposure can lead to dry eye syndrome, loss of epithelial integrity, corneal ulceration and infections. Corneal anaesthesia exacerbates risk of corneal damage in these patients. Eyelid paralysis-associated corneal lesions may induce severe visual impairment, for which the ideal treatment is corneal transplantation, a procedure contraindicated in patients with corneal sensitivity and inadequate eyelid closure. We present the case of a patient affected by unilateral facial palsy associated with corneal anaesthesia, due to seventh and fifth cranial nerve damage following homolateral eighth cranial nerve surgery. The patient underwent surgery to re-establish eyelid and corneal competence, and then received a corneal graft with consequent amelioration of visual acuity. This is the first case of associated corneal anaesthesia and facial palsy that was comprehensively treated with a set of surgical procedures, including a corneal transplant.

  2. Distinctive abnormalities of facial reflexes in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Valls-Solé, J; Valldeoriola, F; Tolosa, E; Marti, M J

    1997-10-01

    Spontaneous and voluntary eyelid motility is often abnormal in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy. In contrast, their eyelid reflex responses are relatively preserved, and only those generated by an acoustic startle have been found absent or severely reduced. We hypothesized that, because of their relevant brainstem pathology, patients with progressive supranuclear palsy might have other brainstem reflex abnormalities which, on detection, could help with their neurophysiological characterization. In this study, we examined facial reflex responses in 14 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, 12 patients with multisystem atrophy, 10 patients with Parkinson's disease, six patients with corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, 11 patients with various non-parkinsonian neurological illnesses and 10 normal subjects. EMG activity was simultaneously recorded from the orbicularis oculi and mentalis muscles following electrical stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist. Mentalis responses were obtained in two normal subjects and in all patients except one with Parkinson's disease, one with progressive supranuclear palsy and one with corticobasal ganglionic degeneration; there were no differences between groups of subjects regarding latency or peak amplitude. Orbicularis oculi responses were always present in control subjects and patients who exhibited mentalis responses, with the significant exception of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, in whom only the response of mentalis was obtained. Blink-reflex responses to supraorbital nerve electrical stimuli were present at a normal latency and amplitude in all patients. An abnormally enhanced blink-reflex excitability recovery curve to paired stimuli was found in a similar percentage of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, multisystem atrophy and Parkinson's disease, but in only two patients with corticobasal ganglionic degeneration. Patients with progressive supranuclear palsy have a

  3. Progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Kent, Anna

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), or Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome, is a rare, progressive neurodegenerative condition with cognitive and motor involvement. Diagnosis can be challenging as some people do not display the classic symptoms of the condition and there are no specific investigations to confirm diagnosis. Timely discussions and access to symptom management and palliative care services need to be provided from diagnosis throughout the disease trajectory to ensure holistic care of people with PSP.

  4. Schwannoma originating from lower cranial nerves: report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Noda, Tomoyuki; Wada, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    Four cases of schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves are presented. Case 1 is a schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the parapharyngeal space. The operation was performed by the transcervical approach. Although the tumor capsule was not dissected from the vagus nerve, hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Case 2 is a schwannoma in the jugular foramen. The operation was performed by the infralabyrinthine approach. Although only the intracapsular tumor was enucleated, facial palsy, hoarseness, dysphagia and paresis of the deltoid muscle occurred transiently after the operation. The patient's hearing had also slightly deteriorated. Case 3 is a dumbbell-typed schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal canal was markedly enlarged by the tumor. As the hypoglossal nerves were embedded in the tumor, the tumor around the hypoglossal nerves was not resected. The tumor was significantly enlarged for a while after stereotactic irradiation. Case 4 is an intracranial cystic schwannoma originating from the IXth or Xth cranial nerves. The tumor was resected through the cerebello-medullary fissure. The tumor capsule attached to the brain stem was not removed. Hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Cranial nerve palsy readily occurs after the removal of the schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves. Mechanical injury caused by retraction, extension and compression of the nerve and heat injury during the drilling of the petrous bone should be cautiously avoided.

  5. Prosthodontic Rehabilitation of Patients with Bell's Palsy: Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Rajapur, Anand; Mitra, Nirban; Prakash, V Jeevan; Rah, Sajad Ahmad; Thumar, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Bell's palsy is an idiopathic unilateral lower motor neuron paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve of sudden onset. It involves loss of muscular control on the affected side of the face. This paper reports the prosthodontic management of patients with Bell's palsy and also describes a technique to stabilize the jaw movements in complete denture patients using interim dentures. A 65-year-old male edentulous patient and a 55-year-old female edentulous patient reported to the department of prosthodontics to get their missing teeth replaced. They both gave history of facial paralysis and were diagnosed for Bell's palsy. Interim training dentures with flat occlusal tables were fabricated first to correct and stabilize their mandibular movements. During initial 4 weeks, there was poor functioning of the interim dentures. Gradually by 8(th) week the patients started stabilizing the interim dentures and were functional. After observing the improvement when the patients had no pain and could stabilize and use the treatment dentures successfully, definitive complete dentures were fabricated. This case report presents a systematic approach to successively rehabilitate edentulous patients with Bell's palsy.

  6. Human Evolution: The Real Cause for Birth Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sreekanth, R; Thomas, BP

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Birth palsy, otherwise known as obstetric brachial plexus paralysis (OBPP), is a closed stretch injury to the brachial plexus of nerves during the birth process resulting in varying degree of paralysis and contractures of the upper limb. The study aimed to find out the susceptibility of humans and small-bodied primates to birth palsy. Method: A comparative study on parturition in modern humans, hominoids, hominids, small-bodied primates and great apes was done to determine if changes in the female pelvis and neonatal head and shoulder during human evolution is the real cause for OBPP. Results: During evolution, the morphology of the female pelvis and birth canal changed into a narrow and twisted one and also the size of the fetal head increased. Thus, the narrow and twisted pelvis of the mother, and the relatively large head and broad shoulders of the newborn has made the birthing process of modern human and small bodied primates a precarious fine-tuned act with a very narrow margin for error. This has necessitated proper obstetric care to reduce or even at times obviate the incidence of birth injuries like OBPP. Conclusion: Human evolution has made human babies susceptible to birth palsy and thus is the real cause of birth palsy. PMID:26624599

  7. PREFACE: 6th International Workshop on Pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fring, Andreas; Jones, Hugh; Znojil, Miloslav

    2008-06-01

    Attempts to understand the quantum mechanics of non-Hermitian Hamiltonian systems can be traced back to the early days, one example being Heisenberg's endeavour to formulate a consistent model involving an indefinite metric. Over the years non-Hermitian Hamiltonians whose spectra were believed to be real have appeared from time to time in the literature, for instance in the study of strong interactions at high energies via Regge models, in condensed matter physics in the context of the XXZ-spin chain, in interacting boson models in nuclear physics, in integrable quantum field theories as Toda field theories with complex coupling constants, and also very recently in a field theoretical scenario in the quantization procedure of strings on an AdS5 x S5 background. Concrete experimental realizations of these types of systems in the form of optical lattices have been proposed in 2007. In the area of mathematical physics similar non-systematic results appeared sporadically over the years. However, intensive and more systematic investigation of these types of non- Hermitian Hamiltonians with real eigenvalue spectra only began about ten years ago, when the surprising discovery was made that a large class of one-particle systems perturbed by a simple non-Hermitian potential term possesses a real energy spectrum. Since then regular international workshops devoted to this theme have taken place. This special issue is centred around the 6th International Workshop on Pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics held in July 2007 at City University London. All the contributions contain significant new results or alternatively provide a survey of the state of the art of the subject or a critical assessment of the present understanding of the topic and a discussion of open problems. Original contributions from non-participants were also invited. Meanwhile many interesting results have been obtained and consensus has been reached on various central conceptual issues in the

  8. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  9. Sevoflurane affects evoked electromyography monitoring in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Xu, Lufeng; Wang, Yuanlin; Xu, Feng; Du, Yemu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background To explore the effect of sevoflurane inhalation anesthesia on evoked electromyography monitoring of spinal nerve root in children associated with cerebral palsy. Methodology Children with cerebral palsy (n=40) were selected and further divided into 1MAC (minimum alveolar concentration) sevoflurane group and 2MAC sevoflurane group. Following the induction of anesthesia, Nicolet Endeavor-CR16 channel electrophysiological monitor was used to implement three times of successive electrical stimulation with interval of 5 sec at 3.50 mA. Results Our results suggested a statistical significance of amplitude retention ratio and latency in the sevoflurane inhalation time (P<0.01), with an interaction effect between the sevoflurane inhalation time and concentration for amplitude retention ratio (P<0.01), while there is no interaction effect between the sevoflurane inhalation time and concentration for latency (P>0.05). Compared to 1MAC sevoflurane group, the amplitude retention ratio of 2MAC sevoflurane group decreased remarkably (P<0.01) and the latency of 2MAC sevoflurane group extended at T3 and T4 (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusions In evoked electromyography monitoring of spinal nerve root in children with cerebral palsy, with the increasing of concentration and duration of sevoflurane inhalation, evoked electromyogram retention ratio reduces gradually, latency extends and the retention ratio has more changes than the latency. PMID:28352782

  10. Modern concepts in facial nerve reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reconstructive surgery of the facial nerve is not daily routine for most head and neck surgeons. The published experience on strategies to ensure optimal functional results for the patients are based on small case series with a large variety of surgical techniques. On this background it is worthwhile to develop a standardized approach for diagnosis and treatment of patients asking for facial rehabilitation. Conclusion A standardized approach is feasible: Patients with chronic facial palsy first need an exact classification of the palsy's aetiology. A step-by-step clinical examination, if necessary MRI imaging and electromyographic examination allow a classification of the palsy's aetiology as well as the determination of the severity of the palsy and the functional deficits. Considering the patient's desire, age and life expectancy, an individual surgical concept is applicable using three main approaches: a) early extratemporal reconstruction, b) early reconstruction of proximal lesions if extratemporal reconstruction is not possible, c) late reconstruction or in cases of congenital palsy. Twelve to 24 months after the last step of surgical reconstruction a standardized evaluation of the therapeutic results is recommended to evaluate the necessity for adjuvant surgical procedures or other adjuvant procedures, e.g. botulinum toxin application. Up to now controlled trials on the value of physiotherapy and other adjuvant measures are missing to give recommendation for optimal application of adjuvant therapies. PMID:21040532

  11. Cross-Face Nerve Grafting with Infraorbital Nerve Pathway Protection: Anatomic and Histomorphometric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Catapano, Joseph; Demsey, Daniel R.B.; Ho, Emily S.; Zuker, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Smiling is an important aspect of emotional expression and social interaction, leaving facial palsy patients with impaired social functioning and decreased overall quality of life. Although there are several techniques available for facial reanimation, staged facial reanimation using donor nerve branches from the contralateral, functioning facial nerve connected to a cross-face nerve graft (CFNG) is the only technique that can reliably reproduce an emotionally spontaneous smile. Although CFNGs provide spontaneity, they typically produce less smile excursion than when the subsequent free functioning muscle flap is innervated with the motor nerve to the masseter muscle. This may be explained in part by the larger number of donor motor axons when using the masseter nerve, as studies have shown that only 20% to 50% of facial nerve donor axons successfully cross the nerve graft to innervate their targets. As demonstrated in our animal studies, increasing the number of donor axons that grow into and traverse the CFNG to innervate the free muscle transfer increases muscle movement, and this phenomenon may provide patients with the benefit of improved smile excursion. We have previously shown in animal studies that sensory nerves, when coapted to a nerve graft, improve axonal growth through the nerve graft and improve muscle excursion. Here, we describe the feasibility of and our experience in translating these results clinically by coapting the distal portion of the CFNG to branches of the infraorbital nerve. PMID:27757349

  12. Gender Representations in the Illustrations of the 6th Grade Language Textbook Used in Greek Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karintzaidis, Nikolaos; Christodoulou, Anastasia; Kyridis, Argyris; Vamvakidou, Ifigeneia

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the way in which the two sexes are presented in education and particularly in the illustration of the language textbook used in the 6th Grade of Greek elementary school. In a society where gender equality is constitutionally enshrined and displayed as an educational policy objective, it attempts to examine if school textbook…

  13. A Critical Analysis of Academic & Recreational Reading Motivation and Its Correlation to Reading FCAT Performance for 6th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBella, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the motivation for academic and recreational reading of 6th grade students in a middle school located in southwest Florida using the Elementary Reading Attitude Survey (ERAS). In this mixed methods study, motivation for both types of reading were measured, individual demographics of the population, such as…

  14. Environmental Attitudes of the 6th Grade Students from Rural and Urban Areas: A Case Study for Ankara

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuncer, Gaye; Sungur, Semra; Tekkaya, Ceren; Ertepinar, Hamide

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated environmental attitude of 6th grade students living in rural and urban areas in Ankara. Hundred and thirty-eight students were selected from four schools located in these areas. A 45-item questionnaire consisting of four dimensions was used to measure students' environmental attitude. Results of the study revealed that,…

  15. From Cooks to Carpenters: Measuring - A Saleable Work Skill. Occupation Simulation Packet. Grades 5th-6th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Helena

    This teacher's guide contains simulated work experiences for 5th and 6th grade students using the isolated skill concept - measuring. Teacher instructions include objectives, evaluation, and sequence of activities. The guide contains pre-tests and post-tests with instructions and answer keys. Three pre-skill activities are suggested, such as…

  16. Story Telling: Research and Action to Improve 6th Grade Students' Views about Certain Aspects of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahraman, Feray; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    This study is a four-week section of ongoing attempts that aim to improve 6th grade students' understandings of the nature of science. The study was carried out in a sixth grade science and technology class at a rural middle school with 15 students on the basis of action research methodology. During the study, four different stories based on the…

  17. The Effects of a Traditional and Technology-Based After-School Program on 6th Grade Student's Mathematics Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Xiangen; Craig, Scotty D.; Bargagliotti, Anna E.; Graesser, Arthur C.; Okwumabua, Theresa; Anderson, Celia; Cheney, Kyle R.; Sterbinsky, Allan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of the Assessment and LEarning in Knowledge Spaces (ALEKS) system as a method of strategic intervention in after-school settings to improve the mathematical skills of struggling 6th grade students. Students were randomly assigned to after-school classrooms in which they either worked with ALEKS to improve…

  18. An Early Warning System: Predicting 10th Grade FCAT Success from 6th Grade FCAT Performance. Research Brief. Volume 0711

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froman, Terry; Brown, Shelly; Lapadula, Maria

    2008-01-01

    This Research Brief presents a method for predicting 10th grade Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) success from 6th grade FCAT performance. A simple equation provides the most probable single score prediction, and give-or-take error margins define high and low probability zones for expected 10th grade scores. In addition, a double-entry…

  19. Assessment of 6th Grade Elementary School Students, Their Parents' and Branch Teachers' Perspective on Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyraz, Sirin; Ozbar, Nurper; Yetgin, Meral Kucuk; Koksalan, Burke

    2015-01-01

    A total of 437 volunteers including 54 teachers, 218 6th grade students and 102 parents from Beykoz Elementary Schools participated in this study to understand the perspectives of students, families and teachers on Physical Education classes. The perspectives of students, families and teachers of other branches are identified by survey method.…

  20. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Review Date 6/1/2015 ...

  1. In vitro Comparative Evaluation of Tensile Bond Strength of 6th, 7th and 8th Generation Dentin Bonding Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Suresh S; Kandasamy, Baburajan; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Goyal, Nitin Kumar; Talukdar, Pratim; Seal, Mukut

    2015-01-01

    Background: Newer dentin bonding agents were developed to improve the quality of composite restoration and to reduce time consumption in its application. The aim of the present study was to evaluate tensile bond strength of 6th, 7th and 8th generation bonding agents by in vitro method. Materials and Methods: Selected 60 permanent teeth were assigned into 20 in each group (Group I: 6th generation bonding agent-Adper SE plus 3M ESPE, Group II: 7th generation bonding agent-G-Bond GC Corp Japan and Group III: 8th generation dentin adhesives-FuturaBond, DC, Voco, Germany). With high-speed diamond disc, coronal dentin was exposed, and selected dentin bonding agents were applied, followed by composite restoration. All samples were saved in saline for 24 h and tensile bond strength testing was done using a universal testing machine. The obtained data were tabulated and statistically analyzed using ANOVA test. Results: The tensile bond strength readings for 6th generation bonding agent was 32.2465, for 7th generation was 31.6734, and for 8th-generation dentine bonding agent was 34.74431. The highest tensile bond strength was seen in 8th generation bonding agent compared to 6th and 7th generation bonding agents. Conclusion: From the present study it can be conclude that 8th generation dentine adhesive (Futura DC, Voco, Germany) resulted in highest tensile bond strength compared to 6th (Adper SE plus, 3M ESPE) and 7th generation (G-Bond) dentin bonding agents. PMID:26028901

  2. Bilateral Facial Nerve Paralysis as First Presentation of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamouri, Shadi; Al Shorafat, Duha

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is rare, and its precise incidence is unknown. It is associated with a wide spectrum of solid and hematological malignancies. To complicate its diagnosis, the clinical presentation of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis can be variable. We report a case of a 38-year-old male with bilateral facial nerve paralysis as first presentation of lung adenocarcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the only case describing bilateral facial nerve palsy as the first and only manifestation of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:28101027

  3. Storm Peak Laboratory 5th-6th Grade Climate and Weather Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, I. B.; Hallar, A. G.

    2008-12-01

    science. At the end of the day each student has a data sheet with measurements recorded from 5 locations of different elevations to take back to the classroom. Following the field trip, SPL scientists and educators visit the school for a follow-up to help children grasp concepts, represent their data set collected in graphical formats, answer questions, and evaluate students" learning. Currently, approximately 250 students annually participate in the SPL 5th and 6th grade climate education program.

  4. 6th Annual European Antibody Congress 2010: November 29-December 1, 2010, Geneva, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Beck, Alain; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M

    2011-01-01

    The 6th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapinn Ltd., was held in Geneva, Switzerland, which was also the location of the 4th and 5th EAC. As was the case in 2008 and 2009, the EAC was again the largest antibody congress held in Europe, drawing nearly 250 delegates in 2010. Numerous pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies active in the field of therapeutic antibody development were represented, as were start-up and academic organizations and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration FDA. The global trends in antibody research and development were discussed, including success stories of recent marketing authorizations of golimumab (Simponi®) and canakinumab (Ilaris®) by Johnson & Johnson and Novartis, respectively, updates on antibodies in late clinical development (obinutuzumab/GA101, farletuzumab/MORAb-003 and itolizumab/T1 h, by Glycart/Roche, Morphotek and Biocon, respectively) and success rates for this fast-expanding class of therapeutics (Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development). Case studies covering clinical progress of girentuximab (Wilex), evaluation of panobacumab (Kenta Biotech), characterization of therapeutic antibody candidates by protein microarrays (Protagen), antibody-drug conjugates (sanofi-aventis, ImmunoGen, Seattle Genetics, Wyeth/Pfizer), radio-immunoconjugates (Bayer Schering Pharma, Université de Nantes) and new scaffolds (Ablynx, AdAlta, Domantis/GlaxoSmithKline, Fresenius, Molecular Partners, Pieris, Scil Proteins, Pfizer, University of Zurich) were presented. Major antibody structural improvements were showcased, including the latest selection engineering of the best isotypes (Abbott, Pfizer, Pierre Fabre), hinge domain (Pierre Fabre), dual antibodies (Abbott), IgG-like bispecific antibodies (Biogen Idec), antibody epitope mapping case studies (Eli Lilly), insights in FcγRII receptor (University of Cambridge), as well as novel tools for antibody fragmentation (Genovis). Improvements of

  5. Proceedings from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jodie I; Beatty, Jennifer K; Peplowski, Michael A; Keough, Michael B; Yipp, Bryan G; Hollenberg, Morley D; Beck, Paul L

    2015-12-04

    On November 14, 2014, the Leaders in Medicine (LIM) program at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary hosted its 6th Annual Research Symposium. Dr. Danuta Skowronski, Epidemiology Lead for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), was the keynote speaker and presented a lecture entitled "Rapid response research during emerging public health crises: influenza and reflections from the five year anniversary of the 2009 pandemic". The LIM symposium provides a forum for both LIM and non-LIM medical students to present their research work, either as an oral or poster presentation. There were a total of six oral presentations and 77 posters presented. 
The oral presentations included: Swathi Damaraju, "The role of cell communication and 3D Cell-Matrix environment in a stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for bone repair"; Menglin Yang, "The proteolytic activity of Nepenthes pitcher fluid as a therapeutic for the treatment of celiac disease"; Amelia Kellar, "Monitoring pediatric inflammatory bowel disease - a retrospective analysis of transabdominal ultrasound"; Monica M. Faria-Crowder, "The design and application of a molecular profiling strategy to identify polymicrobial acute sepsis infections"; Waleed Rahmani, "Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla and modulate hair type"; and, Laura Palmer, "A novel role for amyloid beta protein during hypoxia/ischemia". 
The article on the University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Program, "A Prescription that Addresses the Decline of Basic Science Education in Medical School," in a previous issue of CIM (2014 37(5):E292) provides more details on the program. Briefly, the LIM Research Symposium has the following objectives: (1) to showcase the impressive variety of projects undertaken by students in the LIM Program as well as University of Calgary medical students; (2) to encourage medical

  6. Bell's palsy during interferon therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection in patients with haemorrhagic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogundipe, O; Smith, M

    2000-03-01

    Two adult patients with life-long severe haemorrhagic disorders commenced on interferon-alpha2b therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection. Both developed Bell's palsy several weeks after commencing therapy, They were started on steroids and, in addition, the first patient discontinued interferon-alpha2b therapy while the second patient elected to continue with therapy. In both cases facial paralysis improved over the ensuing weeks. Bell's palsy is often idiopathic but has been reported. in association with herpesviruses. It is not a recognised complication of chronic hepatitis B or C infection, or interferon-alpha2b therapy. However, the interferons are associated with numerous adverse reactions including various neuropsychiatric manifestations and neurological syndromes. There are several reports of nerve palsies, including optic tract neuropathy, occurring during interferon therapy, and immune-based mechanisms are thought to play a role in the aetiopathogenesis. No reports of Bell's palsy in association with interferon therapy were identified in our literature search, although one possible case has been reported to the Committee of Safety in Medicine. Although Bell's palsy in our patients may have occurred by chance, a neuropathic effect of interferon-alpha2b on the facial nerve cannot be excluded and we urge physicians using interferons to be aware of this potential side-effect.

  7. Involvement of MAPK ERK activation in upregulation of water channel protein aquaporin 1 in a mouse model of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fan; Liu, Cai-Yue; Zhang, Jie; Zhu, Lie; Qian, Yu-Xin; Yi, Jing; Xiang, Zheng-Hua; Wang, Hui; Jiang, Hua

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to immunolocalize the aquaporin 1 water channel protein (AQP1) in Schwann cells of idiopathic facial nerve and explore its possible role during the development of facial palsy induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). HSV-1 was inoculated into the surface of posterior auricle of mouse to establish a paralyzed animal model. In HSV-1-induced facial palsy mice, protein levels of AQP1 significantly increased on the 9th to 16th day after inoculation of HSV-1. The upregulation of AQP1 was closely related to the intratemporal facial nerve edema in facial nerve canal, which was also consistent with the symptom of facial palsy in mice. In a hypoxia model of Schwann cells in vitro, we found that U0126, an ERK antagonist, inhibited not only morphological changes of cultures Schwann cells but also upregulation of both AQP1 and phosphorylated ERK. Combined with increased phosphorylated ERK in HSV-1-induced facial palsy mice, we inferred that ERK MAPK pathway might also be involved in increased AQP1 in mouse model of Bell's palsy. Although the precise mechanism needs to be further explored, our findings suggest that AQP1 in Schwann cells of intratemporal facial nerve is involved in the evolution of facial palsy induced by HSV-1 and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. AQP1 might be a potential target, and the ERK antagonist U0126 could be a new drug for the treatment of HSV-1-induced Bell's palsy in an early stage.

  8. [Detection of oculomotor nerve compression by 3D-FIESTA MRI in a patient with pituitary apoplexy and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Takahiro; Kitai, Ryuhei; Neishi, Hiroyuki; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Matsuda, Ken; Arishima, Hidetaka; Kodera, Toshiaki; Arai, Yoshikazu; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2014-02-01

    We report the usefulness of 3D-FIESTA magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)for the detection of oculomotor nerve palsy in a case of pituitary apoplexy. A 69-year-old man with diabetes mellitus presented with complete left-side blepharoptosis. Computed tomography of the brain showed an intrasellar mass with hemorrhage. MRI demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with a cyst toward the left cavernous sinus, which was diagnosed as pituitary apoplexy. 3D-FIESTA revealed that the left oculomotor nerve was compressed by the cyst. He underwent trans-sphenoid tumor resection at 5 days after his hospitalization. Post-operative 3D-FIESTA MRI revealed decrease in compression of the left oculomotor nerve by the cyst. His left oculomotor palsy recovered completely within a few months. Oculomotor nerve palsy can occur due to various diseases, and 3D-FIESTA MRI is useful for detection of oculomotor nerve compression, especially in the field of parasellar lesions.

  9. Incidence, recovery, and management of serratus anterior muscle palsy after axillary node dissection.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M A; Lotze, M T; Gerber, L H; Rosenberg, S A

    1983-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the occurrence of serratus anterior muscle weakness after axillary node dissection, to monitor the recovery of serratus anterior muscle strength, and to compare shoulder range of motion in palsied and nonpalsied groups. Thirty-six patients were studied who had 40 axillary node dissections for breast carcinoma or malignant melanoma. Range of motion and manual muscle tests were done preoperatively and at specific postoperative intervals by two observers. To regain range of motion, all subjects were treated daily while hospitalized and as needed when outpatients. Twelve of the 40 dissections (30%) resulted in serratus anterior muscle palsy after surgery. Strength was normal in all the palsied shoulders by the sixth month after surgery. Both the palsied and nonpalsied groups had comparable range of motion at each assessment. The mechanism of long thoracic nerve injury and the clinical significance of serratus anterior muscle palsy are discussed as well as the rationale for early detection and proper physical therapy management. This study suggests that serratus anterior muscle palsy is a frequent but reversible event after axillary node dissection.

  10. PREFACE: 6th Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA-6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan Bhatti, Javaid; Hussain, Talib; Khan, Wakil

    2013-06-01

    The Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA) conference series has been organized to create a new forum in Asia and Australia to discuss vacuum, surface and related sciences, techniques and applications. The conference series is officially endorsed by the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technique and Application (IUVSTA). The International Steering Committee of VASSCAA is comprised of Vacuum Societies in seven countries: Australia, China, India, Iran, Japan, South Korea and Pakistan. VASSCAA-1 was organized by the Vacuum Society of Japan in 1999 in Tokyo, Japan. VASSCAA-2 was held in 2002 in Hong Kong, VASSCAA-3 in Singapore in 2005. VASSCAA-4 was held in Matsue, Japan in 2008 and VASSCAA-5 in 2010 in Beijing, China. The 6th Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA-6) was held from 9-13 October 2012 in the beautiful city of Islamabad, Pakistan. The venue of the conference was the Pak-China Friendship Centre, Islamabad. More than six hundred local delgates and around seventy delegates from different countries participated in this mega event. These delegates included scientists, researchers, engineers, professors, plant operators, designers, vendors, industrialists, businessmen and students from various research organizations, technical institutions, universities, industries and companies from Pakistan and abroad. The focal point of the event was to enhance cooperation between Pakistan and the international community in the fields of vacuum, surface science and other applied technologies. At VASSCAA-6 85 oral presentations were delivered by local and foreign speakers. These were divided into different sessions according to their fields. A poster session was organized at which over 70 researchers and students displayed their posters. The best three posters won prizes. In parallel to the main conference sessions four technical short courses were held. The participants showed keen interest in all these

  11. Treatment of Peroneal Nerve Injuries in the Multiligament Injured/Dislocated Knee.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Michael P; Pareek, Ayoosh; Reardon, Patrick; Krych, Aaron; Stuart, Michael J; Levy, Bruce A

    2016-05-01

    Tibiofemoral knee dislocations are typically a consequence of high-energy mechanisms, causing significant damage to the soft tissue and osseous structures of the knee. Concomitant neurovascular injuries such as popliteal artery and peroneal nerve injuries are also common and can have significant long-term consequences. The mechanism typically involves a traction injury to the peroneal nerve subsequent to an extreme varus moment applied to the knee. Complete nerve injuries typically hold a worse prognosis than incomplete palsies. Rates of functional recovery in the setting of a complete palsy following a knee dislocation event have been dismal. A period of observation and nonoperative treatment is initially performed, utilizing orthotic devices to assist with lower extremity deficits. Surgical treatment options include neurolysis, nerve grafting, tendon transfer, arthrodesis, and direct motor nerve transfers. Motor nerve transfers continue to be explored with initial reports showing promising results.

  12. Long thoracic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wiater, J M; Flatow, E L

    1999-11-01

    Injury to the long thoracic nerve causing paralysis or weakness of the serratus anterior muscle can be disabling. Patients with serratus palsy may present with pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation, and scapular winging with medial translation of the scapula, rotation of the inferior angle toward the midline, and prominence of the vertebral border. Long thoracic nerve dysfunction may result from trauma or may occur without injury. Fortunately, most patients experience a return of serratus anterior function with conservative treatment, but recovery may take as many as 2 years. Bracing often is tolerated poorly. Patients with severe symptoms in whom 12 months of conservative treatment has failed may benefit from surgical reconstruction. Although many surgical procedures have been described, the current preferred treatment is transfer of the sternal head of the pectoralis major tendon to the inferior angle of the scapula reinforced with fascia or tendon autograft. Many series have shown good to excellent results, with consistent improvement in function, elimination of winging, and reduction of pain.

  13. Progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Golbe, Lawrence I

    2014-04-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy is a disorder of tau protein aggregation. Its clinical spectrum is now known to be wider than originally described, with a phenotype resembling Parkinson disease accounting for a third of cases. However, at least half of the patients with PSP exhibit the classic bradykinesia with disproportionate postural instability, erect posture with nuchal rigidity, frontal behavioral and cognitive changes, vertical gaze palsy, and other disabling brainstem deficits. Nonmendelian genetic risk factors exist, but PSP is almost entirely sporadic, with a prevalence of five to six persons per 100,000, mean onset age of 63, and median survival of 7 years. Clinical diagnostic criteria with excellent specificity and a clinical rating scale sensitive to progression are available. Diagnosis remains clinical, although magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measures are showing promise as early-stage screening tools. Multiple candidate neuroprotective medications have proven ineffective to date. Treatment remains supportive, although coenzyme Q-10 has shown preliminary symptomatic efficacy and levodopa may provide transient, modest benefit.

  14. Scrub Typhus Presenting with Bilateral Lateral Rectus Palsy in A Female

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Jaya; Barman, Bhupen; Mondal, Sumantro; Sivam, Rondeep Kumar Nath

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus, a rickettsial disease is endemic in several parts of India usually presenting with acute symptoms. Fever, maculopapular rash, eschar, history of tick exposure and supportive diagnostic tests usually leads to diagnosis. Scrub typhus should be included in the differential diagnosis in occasions when a patient presents with fever with or without eschar and isolated cranial nerve palsy. Here we are reporting a case of Scrub typhus who presented with fever and altered sensorium of short duration, eschar formation and bilateral lateral rectus palsy. Patient was treated with doxycycline with complete reversal of neurodeficit. PMID:27190871

  15. Bell's palsy and choreiform movements during peginterferon alpha and ribavirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Barut, Sener; Karaer, Hatice; Oksuz, Erol; Eken, Asli Gündoğdu; Basak, Ayse Nazli

    2009-08-07

    Neuropsychiatric side effects of long-term recombinant interferon-alpha therapy consist of a large spectrum of symptoms. In the literature, cranial neuropathy, especially Bell's palsy, and movement disorders, have been reported much less often than other neurotoxic effects. We report a case of Bell's palsy in a patient with chronic hepatitis C during peginterferon-alpha and ribavirin therapy. The patient subsequently developed clinically inapparent facial nerve involvement on the contralateral side and showed an increase in choreic movements related to Huntington's disease during treatment.

  16. Association of Bell's Palsy with Hepatitis E Virus Infection: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ashish K; Nijhawan, Sandeep; Nepalia, Subhash; Suchismita, Arya

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a common cause of acute hepatitis in India and other developing countries. The data regarding the neurologic manifestation of HEV infection are limited. The neurologic disorders including Guillain–Barré syndrome, polyradiculopathy, neuralgic amyotrophy, encephalitis, bilateral brachial neuritis, ataxia/proximal myopathy, and acute transverse myelitis have been described. Bell's palsy and other cranial nerve involvement in hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HEV infection are rare. We present the second case of Bell's palsy associated with HEV. PMID:25755411

  17. Association of Bell's Palsy with Hepatitis E Virus Infection: A Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ashish K; Nijhawan, Sandeep; Nepalia, Subhash; Suchismita, Arya

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a common cause of acute hepatitis in India and other developing countries. The data regarding the neurologic manifestation of HEV infection are limited. The neurologic disorders including Guillain-Barré syndrome, polyradiculopathy, neuralgic amyotrophy, encephalitis, bilateral brachial neuritis, ataxia/proximal myopathy, and acute transverse myelitis have been described. Bell's palsy and other cranial nerve involvement in hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HEV infection are rare. We present the second case of Bell's palsy associated with HEV.

  18. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    PubMed

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  19. [Anniversary of FSI "The 6th Central Military Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Defense of Russian Federation"].

    PubMed

    Budko, A A; Ovechkin, I G

    2009-08-01

    The 6th Central Military Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Defense of Russian Federation celebrates the 20th anniversary in September of 2009. The hospital is one of the greatest and well-known in the world specialized science-practical rehabilitation centers, equipped by original and unique methods, based on modern knowledge-intensive technologies. It permits resolve the most difficult tasks of reconstructive treatment of military service men of Russian Army.

  20. The Efficiency of Cluster Method in Improving the Creative Writing Skill of 6th Grade Students of Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahbaz, Namik Kemal; Duran, Gozde

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to search the effect of the cluster method on the creative writing skill of 6th grade students. In this paper, the students of 6-A, studying at Ulas Primary School in 2010-2011 academic year, were divided into two groups as experiment and control. Taking into consideration the various variants, pre-test and last-test…

  1. [Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) in hand surgery: reminds and warn against a usually unrecognised disease].

    PubMed

    Lazar, C-C; Auquit-Auckbur, I; Milliez, P-Y

    2007-12-01

    Tomacula is a rare hereditary disease due to a deletion on chromosome 17. Clinical presentation varies but patients usually complain of recurrent paraesthesiaes and palsies related to compression or trauma of a peripheral nerve. Diagnosis is based on electrophysiological studies, nerve biopsies and genetic tests. Implications for the patient and family members are a genetic counselling and some simple preventive measures. Although there is no curative treatment for this neuropathy, surgery can be useful for decompression of nerves and neurolysis. However, the surgical act increases the risk of nerve damage. Knowing about the diagnosis can help the patient and the surgical team avoid causing lesions.

  2. Neurocysticercosis presenting as pseudobulbar palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arinaganahalli Subbanna Praveen; Subrahmanyam, Dharanitragada Krishna Suri

    2014-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common helminthic infestation of the central nervous system (CNS) and a leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. The common manifestations of NCC are seizures and headache. The NCC as a cause of pseudobulbar palsy is very unusual and not reported yet in the literature. A pseudobulbar palsy can occur in any disorder that causes bilateral corticobulbar disease. The common etiologies of pseudobulbar palsy are vascular, demyelinative, or motor neuron disease. We report a 38-year-old female patient who presented with partial seizures and pseudobulbar palsy. The MRI brain showed multiple small cysts with scolex in both the cerebral hemispheres and a giant intraparenchymal cyst. Our patient responded well to standard treatment of neurocysticercosis and antiepileptics. PMID:24741260

  3. A comparison of transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroneuronography as a predictive test in patients with Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Laranne, J; Rimpiläinen, I; Karma, P; Eskola, H; Häkkinen, V; Laippala, P

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the neuronographic findings of electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the facial nerve and to compare their ability to predict clinical recovery from idiopathic facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy). Eighty-six patients were examined clinically and neurophysiologically immediately on presentation to Tampere University Hospital. Electroneuronography (ENoG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were performed 1-6 times for each patient. The time interval between each examination varied from 2 to 7 days. Seventy-eight patients were followed for a median period of 13 months after the onset of palsy. Facial nerve function was graded according to the House-Brackmann grading system. Relative amplitude differences of ENoG and TMS during the acute phase were then correlated with clinical outcome. Statistical analysis of the results showed that a TMS response elicitable during the first 5 days of the palsy was correlatable with a good prognosis. ENoG results correlated with clinical outcome at a later time from onset of symptoms. TMS was well tolerated and no adverse effects were seen. These results indicate that TMS is a useful method for the early prediction of outcome in patients with Bell's palsy.

  4. [Facial palsy and leontiasis ossea of the pyramid (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Aesch, B

    1977-01-01

    The author presents a boy which has repeated facial palsies since his second year of life. The clinical examination showed: conduction deafness, radiological sclerosis of the bones of the basis of the skull, normal values of chemical blood analysis. Both facial nerves are operated in the mastoid and middle ear portions. The histological examination of the mastoid bone reveals a leontiasis ossea. The histological structure of the bone are described in detail and the differential diagnosis with other bone diseases of the cranial bones is discussed.

  5. Surgical outcomes of lateral approach for jugular foramen schwannoma: postoperative facial nerve and lower cranial nerve functions.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yang-Sun; So, Yoon Kyoung; Park, Kwan; Baek, Chung-Hwan; Jeong, Han-Sin; Hong, Sung Hwa; Chung, Won-Ho

    2009-01-01

    The lateral surgical approach to jugular foramen schwannomas (JFS) may result in complications such as temporary facial nerve palsy (FNP) and hearing loss due to the complicated anatomical location. Ten patients with JFS surgically treated by variable methods of lateral approach were retrospectively reviewed with emphasis on surgical methods, postoperative FNP, and lower cranial nerve status. Gross total removal of the tumors was achieved in eight patients. Facial nerves were rerouted at the first genu (1G) in six patients and at the second genu in four patients. FNP of House-Brackmann (HB) grade III or worse developed immediately postoperatively in six patients regardless of the extent of rerouting. The FNP of HB grade III persisted for more than a year in one patient managed with rerouting at 1G. Among the lower cranial nerves, the vagus nerve was most frequently paralyzed preoperatively and lower cranial nerve palsies were newly developed in two patients. The methods of the surgical approach to JFS can be modified depending on the size and location of tumors to reduce injury of the facial nerve and loss of hearing. Careful manipulation and caution are also required for short facial nerve rerouting as well as for long rerouting to avoid immediately postoperative FNP.

  6. Acupuncture-induced changes in functional connectivity of the primary somatosensory cortex varied with pathological stages of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxuan; Zhu, Yifang; Li, Chuanfu; Park, Kyungmo; Mohamed, Abdalla Z; Wu, Hongli; Xu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Linying; Yang, Jun; Qiu, Bensheng

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of acute facial nerve paralysis. In China, Bell's palsy is frequently treated with acupuncture. However, its efficacy and underlying mechanism are still controversial. In this study, we used functional MRI to investigate the effect of acupuncture on the functional connectivity of the brain in Bell's palsy patients and healthy individuals. The patients were further grouped according to disease duration and facial motor performance. The results of resting-state functional MRI connectivity show that acupuncture induces significant connectivity changes in the primary somatosensory region of both early and late recovery groups, but no significant changes in either the healthy control group or the recovered group. In the recovery group, the changes also varied with regions and disease duration. Therefore, we propose that the effect of acupuncture stimulation may depend on the functional connectivity status of patients with Bell's palsy.

  7. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus complicated by ipsilateral isolated Bell's palsy: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wakil, Susan M; Ajlan, Radwan; Arthurs, Bryan

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to present a unique case of unilateral facial nerve palsy as an isolated complication of herpes zoster ophthalmicus. An 82-year-old immunocompetent male presented with a 1-week history of painful left scalp lesions. The diagnosis of left herpes zoster ophthalmicus with associated keratoconjunctivitis was established. A 7-day course of oral acyclovir (800 mg/day) along with topical prednisolone acetate 1% and moxifloxacin were started. Three weeks later, the ocular zoster involvement resolved and the vesicular lesions of the skin had regressed. However, the patient developed an isolated left Bell's palsy that gradually improved with conservative therapy. To the best of our knowledge, we present an unusual case of herpes zoster ophthalmicus complicated by an isolated ipsilateral Bell's palsy. The patient has had a near complete resolution of all symptoms after antiviral therapy for the zoster ophthalmicus component along with conservative management for the Bell's palsy.

  8. PREFACE: 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Marc

    2008-07-01

    The 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice (ICIPE 2008) belongs to a successful series of conferences held up to now following a three-year cycle. Previous conferences took place in Palm Coast, Florida, USA (1993), Le Croisic, France (1996), Port Ludlow, Washington, USA (1999), Angra dos Reis, Brazil (2002), and Cambridge, UK (2005). The conference has its roots on the informal seminars organized by Professor J V Beck at Michigan State University, which were initiated in 1987. The organization of this Conference, which took place in Dourdan (Paris) France, 15-19 June 2008, was made possible through a joint effort by four research departments from four different universities: LEMTA (Laboratoire de Mécanique Théorique et Appliquée, Nancy-Université) LMS (Laboratoire de Mécanique des Solides, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris) LMAC (Laboratoire de Mathématiques Appliquées, UTC Compiègne) LTN (Laboratoire de Thermocinétique, Université de Nantes) It received support from three organizations: SFT (Société Française de Thermique: French Heat Transfer Association) ACSM (Association Calcul de Structures et Simulation : Computational Structural Mechanics Association) GdR Ondes - CNRS (`Waves' Network, French National Center for Scientific Research) The objective of the conference was to provide the opportunity for interaction and cross-fertilization between designers of inverse methods and practitioners. The delegates came from very different fields, such as applied mathematics, heat transfer, solid mechanics, tomography.... Consequently the sessions were organised along mostly methodological topics in order to facilitate interaction among participants who might not meet otherwise. The present proceedings, published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series, gathers the four plenary invited lectures and the full-length versions of 103 presentations. The latter have been reviewed by the scientific committee (see

  9. Efficacy of Low-Dose Corticosteroid Therapy Versus High-Dose Corticosteroid Therapy in Bell's Palsy in Children.

    PubMed

    Arican, Pinar; Dundar, Nihal Olgac; Gencpinar, Pinar; Cavusoglu, Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of acute peripheral facial nerve paralysis, but the optimal dose of corticosteroids in pediatric patients is still unclear. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose corticosteroid therapy compared with high-dose corticosteroid therapy in children with Bell's palsy. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the dose of oral prednisolone regimen initiated. The severity of idiopathic facial nerve paralysis was graded according to the House-Brackmann Grading Scale. The patients were re-assessed in terms of recovery rate at the first, third, and sixth months of treatment. There was no significant difference in complete recovery between the 2 groups after 1, 3, and 6 months of treatment. In our study, we concluded that even at a dose of 1 mg/kg/d, oral prednisolone was highly effective in the treatment of Bell's palsy in children.

  10. Diaphragmatic palsy after cardiac surgical procedures in patients with congenital heart

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Sachin; Agarwala, Sandeep; Mittal, Chander Mohan; Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Airan, Balram

    2010-01-01

    Paralysis of diaphragm on one or, exceptionally, both sides is a common cause of delayed recovery and excessive morbidity following pediatric cardiac surgery. The consequences of this complication after all forms of congenital heart surgery in newborns and young infants can be potentially serious. The impact of diaphragmatic palsy on the physiology after single ventricle palliations is particularly significant. It is necessary for all professionals taking care of children with heart disease to be familiar with the etiology, diagnosis, and management of this condition. Early recognition and prompt management of diaphragmatic palsy can potentially reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and intensive care in those who develop this complication. This review summarizes the anatomy of the phrenic nerves, reasons behind the occurrence of diaphragmatic palsy, and suggests practical guidelines for management. PMID:20814476

  11. Is there benefit adding antivirals to corticosteroids for Bell’s palsy in adults?

    PubMed

    Walbaum, Benjamín; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-08-21

    Bell’s palsy is the first cause of unilateral facial palsy. The likely etiologic mechanism is facial nerve inflammation secondary to viral reactivation, most probably due to herpes simplex and Varicella Zoster. Corticosteroids are considered the mainstay of treatment, but it is not clear whether adding antivirals would further increase the benefit. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified 10 systematic reviews including 15 pertinent randomized controlled trials overall. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded that adding antivirals to the treatment with corticosteroids probably reduces the risk of incomplete recovery in patients with Bell’s palsy.

  12. [Pharmacological treatment of Bell's palsy: favourable effects of prednisolone-based therapy now demonstrated].

    PubMed

    Opstelten, W; Portegies, P

    2008-02-16

    Bell's palsy accounts for two-thirds ofall acute facial palsies. Presumed reactivation of the herpes simplex virus and concurrent swelling of the facial nerve prompted the use of antivirals in combination with corticosteroids, although evidence supporting the effectiveness of this approach was weak. A recently published randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial assessed the effectiveness of adding valacyclovir to prednisolone; another larger primary-care-based study compared treatment with prednisolone, acyclovir or both with placebo. In patients with severe or complete facial palsy, the addition of valacyclovir improved the chance of complete recovery, but as this study was single-blinded, results should be interpreted with caution. Early treatment with prednisolone (25 mg twice daily for to days) significantly improved the chance of complete recovery at 3 and 9 months. Acyclovir, given alone or in addition to prednisolone, did not show any benefit.

  13. A conduction block in sciatic nerves can be detected by magnetic motor root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Konoma, Yuko; Fujii, Kengo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-15

    Useful diagnostic techniques for the acute phase of sciatic nerve palsy, an entrapment neuropathy, are not well established. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of magnetic sacral motor root stimulation for sciatic nerve palsy. We analyzed the peripheral nerves innervating the abductor hallucis muscle using both electrical stimulations at the ankle and knee and magnetic stimulations at the neuro-foramina and conus medullaris levels in a patient with sciatic nerve palsy at the level of the piriformis muscle due to gluteal compression related to alcohol consumption. On the fourth day after onset, magnetic sacral motor root stimulation using a MATS coil (the MATS coil stimulation method) clearly revealed a conduction block between the knee and the sacral neuro-foramina. Two weeks after onset, needle electromyography supported the existence of the focal lesion. The MATS coil stimulation method clearly revealed a conduction block in the sciatic nerve and is therefore a useful diagnostic tool for the abnormal neurophysiological findings associated with sciatic nerve palsy even at the acute phase.

  14. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  15. Behaviour Problems Amongst Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswin, Maureen

    Based on 6 years of work with cerebral palsied children, the thesis considers types and causes of cerebral palsy, the life pattern of the child with cerebral palsy from early years to adolescence, and the effect of the handicapped child on his parents and family. Literature on behavior disorders is reviewed, and kinds of behavior problems are…

  16. Wood - An Innovative Component of High-tech Products? 6th Wädenswil Day of Chemistry 2014.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Elsbeth

    2014-10-01

    Wood is a multifunctional renewable material that could replace oil-based and other non-renewable resources in many applications. In the Swiss National Science Foundation project NFP 66, entitled 'Wood as a resource', researchers are attempting to find ways to use wood more efficiently in the future. The 6th Wädenswil Day of Chemistry, which was organised by the Institute of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry at Zurich University of Applied Sciences in Wädenswil, gave an overview of the innovative activities currently being undertaken in this field.

  17. Childbirth in the Greek island of Chois in the 6th century B.C., 1780, and 1914.

    PubMed

    Argenti, P

    1944-01-01

    Terracottas from the 6th century B.C.; a description of a delivery written in 1780; and a description of a labor chair used until 1914 give an historical picture of childbirth on the Greek island of Chios. The terracottas establish the fact that women were delivered in an upright perpendicular position in classical times. The upright labor chair seems to have continued in use until 1914. Midwives have historically at deliveries. In Chios, doctors seem to have taken over from midwives only around 1914.

  18. The masseteric nerve: a versatile power source in facial animation techniques.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, B; Ferri, A; Ferrari, S; Copelli, C; Salvagni, L; Sesenna, E

    2014-03-01

    The masseteric nerve has many advantages including low morbidity, its proximity to the facial nerve, the strong motor impulse, its reliability, and the fast reinnervation that is achievable in most patients. Reinnervation of a neuromuscular transplant is the main indication for its use, but it has been used for the treatment of recent facial palsies with satisfactory results. We have retrospectively evaluated 60 patients who had facial animation procedures using the masseteric nerve during the last 10 years. The patients included those with recent, and established or congenital, unilateral and bilateral palsies. The masseteric nerve was used for coaptation of the facial nerve either alone or in association with crossfacial nerve grafting, or for the reinnervation of gracilis neuromuscular transplants. Reinnervation was successful in all cases, the mean (range) time being 4 (2-5) months for facial nerve coaptation and 4 (3-7) months for neuromuscular transplants. Cosmesis was evaluated (moderate, n=10, good, n=30, and excellent, n=20) as was functional outcome (no case of impairment of masticatory function, all patients able to smile, and achievement of a smile independent from biting). The masseteric nerve has many uses, including in both recent, and established or congenital, cases. In some conditions it is the first line of treatment. The combination of combined techniques gives excellent results in unilateral palsies and should therefore be considered a valid option.

  19. Treatment of the spasticity in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Meholjić-Fetahović, Ajsa

    2007-11-01

    Botulinum toxin is a natural purified protein and one of the strongest biological poisons--neurotoxin. It is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Its medical usage started in USA in 1981 and in Europe in 1992. There are seven different immune types of the toxin: A, B, C1, D, E, F and G. Toxin types A and B are used to decrease muscular spasticity. Botulinum toxin prevents the formation of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve tissues in muscles, which in the end irreversibly destroys neuromuscular synapses. It is called temporary local chemodenervation. It does not affect the synthesis of acetylcholine. As it affects neuromuscular bond it also affects one of the symptoms of cerebral palsy--spasticity. Decreasing the spasticity of children with cerebral palsy leads to the improvement of conscious movements, muscles are less toned, passive mobility is improved, orthosis tolerance is also improved, and the child is enabled to perform easier and better motor functions such as crawling, standing and walking. Since the action of Botulinum toxin is limited to 2-6 months, new neural collaterals are formed and neuromuscular conductivity is reestablished which in the end once again develops a muscular spasm. This leads to a conclusion that botulinum toxin should again be applied into spastic muscles. It is very important for good effect of Botulinum toxin to set the goals of the therapy in advance. The goals include improvement of a function, prevention of contractions and deformities, ease of care and decrease of pain for children with cerebral palsy. After application of botulinum toxin, it is necessary to perform adequate and intensive physical treatment with regular monitoring of effects. This work shows a case of a boy with spastic form of cerebral palsy. After being rehabilitated using Vojta therapy and Bobath concept and the conduct of certain physical procedures, botulinum toxin is administered into his lower limbs' muscles and kinesiotherapy is

  20. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically require cross-sectional imaging. Physical examination is also the best modality to determine candidates for microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The key finding on physical examination that determines need for microsurgery is recovery of antigravity elbow flexion by 3-6 months of age. When indicated, both microsurgery and secondary shoulder and elbow procedures are effective and can substantially improve functional outcomes. These procedures include nerve transfers and nerve grafting in infants and secondary procedures in children, such as botulinum toxin injection, shoulder tendon transfers, and humeral derotational osteotomy.

  1. Pectoralis major to scapula transfer for patients with serratus anterior palsy.

    PubMed

    Borges, Cristian Stein; Ruschel, Paulo Henrique; Ferreira, Marco Tonding

    2011-09-01

    Serratus anterior palsy can be a very disabling condition. However, not much has been written about many other upper limb palsies and the surgical approaches for them. In contrast, not much has been published about this particular muscle palsy. Most investigators engaged in the treatment of peripheral nerve palsies are focused on the restoration of elbow flexion/extension and shoulder abduction/external rotation. Nevertheless, scapulothoracic stability is of utmost importance for shoulder function inasmuch as it offers a stable base for arm motion--mostly forward flexion. As a result, serratus anterior palsy leads to loss of strength, range of motion, and pain due to fatigue of synergistic muscles--an issue disabling enough to warrant surgical intervention. Many investigators have suggested a variety of techniques including muscle transfers, fascial slings, or scapulothoracic fusion. The last option leads to obvious limitations in the final range of motion and should be avoided in young high-demand patients. Fascial slings have a tendency to attenuate over time.

  2. Bell's palsy associated with linezolid therapy: case report and review of neuropathic adverse events.

    PubMed

    Thai, Xia C; Bruno-Murtha, Lou Ann

    2006-08-01

    Bell's palsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders affecting the seventh cranial nerve. Several disease states have been associated with facial paralysis. Drugs, however, have been rarely implicated as an etiology. We describe a 49-year-old man who developed peripheral facial paralysis after 3 weeks of linezolid therapy, along with recurrence of symptoms on rechallenge. He had insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and a longstanding history of bilateral diabetes-related foot problems. After hospitalization, debridement, and vancomycin therapy for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis, the patient was discharged to home with oral linezolid therapy. On day 23 of linezolid therapy, he developed signs and symptoms that were consistent with Bell's palsy. Linezolid was discontinued; the Bell's palsy gradually improved, with complete resolution occurring at month 3. On rechallenge with linezolid for recurrent osteomyelitis, the patient developed a second episode of Bell's palsy within a similar time frame as in the first episode. Assessment of causality using the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale revealed a probable relationship between this adverse drug event and linezolid therapy. Clinicians should be aware that Bell's palsy may be another neuropathic adverse effect associated with linezolid.

  3. [Treatment of congenital facial paralysis with crossed innervation of facial nerve and electric field stimulation].

    PubMed

    Ysunza-Rivera, A; Iñigo-Muñoz, F; Drucker-Colín, R; Ortiz-Monasterio, F; Pesqueira, T

    1992-04-01

    Congenital facial palsy is a devastating deformity. At present time there are no reports of the early treatment of this disorder. The treatment may be to supply contralateral auto reinnervation to the affected muscles through a sural-facial nerve graft enhanced by electric field stimulation. The purpose of this paper is to report 5 cases of congenital facial palsy treated by a crossed sural-facial nerve graft, enhanced by electric field stimulation. One year after surgery, clinical and electrodiagnostic examinations indicate appropriate reinnervation activity in all the patients.

  4. What predicts the selection of nursing as a career choice in 5th and 6th year school students?

    PubMed

    Neilson, Gavin R; Jones, Martyn C

    2012-07-01

    Demand for nursing care, and nurses, is growing in the United Kingdom given an increasingly ageing patient population with long-term co-morbidities. An ageing nursing workforce and fewer school leavers entering nursing are key barriers to student nurse recruitment. This paper aims to identify the socio-demographic and correlates nursing as a career choice in 5th and 6th year school students. This cross-sectional descriptive study gathered self-administered questionnaires from a total cohort of 5th and 6th year school students (n=1059) in one educational authority in Scotland. A response rate of 100% was achieved, with 702 students expressing a career choice. Some 71.7% (n=503) of students providing a full data set would never consider nursing, even if they obtained poor grades. Only 28.3% (n=199) would ever consider nursing. Students cited nursing as a career choice if they were female, of average to below average academic ability/achievement, expressed a positive attitude to nursing as a degree subject which was shared by their career guidance teacher. Each additional higher reduced the likelihood of nursing as a career choice by 22%. Nursing is an unpopular career choice amongst school students. Strategies are required to improve the occupational image of nursing in secondary education.

  5. Digestive disease management in Japan: a report on the 6th diagnostic pathology summer fest in 2012.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Kazuhito; Fujimori, Takahiro; Moriya, Takuya; Ochiai, Atsushi; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Kushima, Ryouji; Nagahama, Ryuji; Ohkura, Yasuo; Tanaka, Shinji; Ajioka, Yoichi; Hirata, Ichiro; Tanaka, Masanori; Hoshihara, Yoshio; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Sasano, Hironobu; Iwashita, Akinori; Tomita, Shigeki; Hirota, Seiichi; Yao, Takashi; Fujii, Shigehiko; Matsuda, Takahisa; Ueno, Hideki; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Takubo, Kaiyo; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Sugai, Tamotsu; Iwafuchi, Mitsuya; Imura, Jhoji; Manabe, Toshiaki; Fukayama, Masahisa

    2013-01-01

    The 6th Diagnostic Pathology Summer Fest, held in Tokyo on August 25-26, 2012, opened its gates for everyone in the medical profession. Basic pathology training can contribute to the improvement of algorithms for diagnosis and treatment. The 6th Summer Fest with the theme 'Pathology and Clinical Treatment of Gastrointestinal Diseases' was held at the Ito International Research Center, The University of Tokyo. On August 25, 'Treatment of Early Gastrointestinal Cancer and New Guidelines' was discussed in the first session, followed by 'Biopsy Diagnosis of Digestive Tract: Key Points of Pathological Diagnosis for Inflammation and Their Clinical Significance' in the second session. On August 26, cases were discussed in the third session, and issues on pathological diagnosis and classification of neuroendorcrine tumor in the fourth session. The summaries of speeches and discussions are introduced along with the statements of each speaker. This meeting was not a formal evidence-based consensus conference, and 20 experts gave talks on their areas of specialty. Discussion was focused on how the management strategy should be standardized on the algorithm of patient care.

  6. Is the onset of the 6th century 'dark age' in Maya history related to explosive volcanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooren, Kees; Hoek, Wim Z.; Van der Plicht, Hans; Sigl, Michael; Galop, Didier; Torrescano-Valle, Nuria; Islebe, Gerald; Huizinga, Annika; Winkels, Tim; Middelkoop, Hans; Van Bergen, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Maya societies in Southern Mexico, Guatemala and Belize experienced a 'dark age' during the second half of the 6th century. This period, also known as the 'Maya Hiatus', is characterized by cultural downturn, political instability and abandonment of many sites in the Central Maya Lowlands. Many theories have been postulated to explain the occurrence of this 'dark age' in Maya history. A possible key role of a large volcanic eruption in the onset of this 'dark age' will be discussed. Volcanic deposits recovered from the sedimentary archive of lake Tuspán and the Usumacinta-Grijalva delta were studied in detail and the combination of multiple dating techniques allowed the reconstruction of the timing of a large 6th century eruption. Volcanic glass shards were fingerprinted to indicate the source volcano and high resolution pollen records were constructed to indicate the environmental impact of the eruption. Results are compared with available archaeological data and causality with the disruption of Maya civilization will be evaluated.

  7. Nerve Blocks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sometimes the needle has to be inserted fairly deep to reach the nerve causing your problem. This ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  8. Maternal Bilateral Radial Neuropathy During Childbirth in Hereditary Neuropathy With a Predisposition to Pressure Palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Molloy, F M; Raynor, E M; Rutkove, S B

    2000-03-01

    A 30-year-old woman developed severe bilateral radial neuropathies during vaginal delivery of twins, likely secondary to positioning and muscular effort. Subsequent evaluation led to the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with predisposition to pressure palsies. Avoidance of prolonged muscular effort in the arms in conjunction with medial intervention to shorten the second stage of labor may help prevent debilitating radial nerve injury in women with this disorder.

  9. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  10. Isolated neurosarcoidosis presenting with multiple cranial nerve palsies

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kiyoharu; Yuki, Kiyoshi; Sadatomo, Takashi; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Background: As an extremely rare subtype of sarcoidosis that develops exclusively in the nervous system, isolated neurosarcoidosis is difficult to diagnose. In addition, its exact clinical features are not known. Case Description: A 61-year-old man presented with right ear hearing loss, diplopia, and fever. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed mass lesions in the right cerebellum and left side body of the lateral ventricle. Neither systemic CT nor positron emission tomography revealed extracranial lesions. A neuroendoscopic biopsy was performed on the lateral ventricle lesion, and a histopathology analysis revealed epithelioid granulomatous inflammation. By systematic exclusion of other possible granulomatous diseases, isolated neurosarcoidosis was diagnosed. The lesions disappeared immediately upon corticosteroid (methylprednisolone) treatment and had not recurred as of a 12-month follow-up examination. Conclusions: Isolated neurosarcoidosis is difficult to diagnose. Successful diagnosis requires compatible clinical findings, histological demonstration of noncaseating granulomas, and exclusion of other granulomatous diseases. Isolated neurosarcoidosis has a relatively good clinical prognosis, which could be characteristic of the disease. PMID:27168947

  11. Femoral Nerve Palsy due to Anticoagulant Induced Retroperitoneal Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Gurbuz, Orcun; Ercan, Abdulkadir; Kumtepe, Gencehan; Karal, İlker Hasan; Velioglu, Yusuf; Ener, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    A forty-one-year-old man who, sought evaluation for a sudden hip flexion contracture and groin pain with a history of mechanical mitral valve replacement, had been misdiagnosed and treated as having lumbar discopathy for two days. This patient finally was diagnosed with compressive femoral neuropathy due to warfarin-induced retroperitoneal hematoma and successfully managed nonoperatively. This case is reported in order to draw attention to this rare presentation. PMID:25386195

  12. Intramuscular nerve distribution patterns of anterior forearm muscles in children: a guide for botulinum toxin injection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fangjiu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xie, Xiadan; Yang, Shengbo; Xu, Yan; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) can relieve muscle spasticity by blocking axon terminals acetylcholine release at the motor endplate (MEP) and is the safest and most effective agent for the treatment of muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. In order to achieve maximum effect with minimum effective dose of BoNT, one needs to choose an injection site as near to the MEP zone as possible. This requires a detailed understanding about the nerve terminal distributions within the muscles targeted for BoNT injection. This study focuses on BoNT treatment in children with muscle spasms caused by cerebral palsy. Considering the differences between children and adults in anatomy, we used child cadavers and measured both the nerve entry points and nerve terminal sense zones in three deep muscles of the anterior forearm: flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and pronator quadratus (PQ). We measured the nerve entry points by using the forearm midline as a reference and demonstrated intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones by using a modified Sihler's nerve staining technique. The locations of the nerve entry points and that of the nerve terminal dense zones in the muscles were compared. We found that all nerve entry points are away from the corresponding intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones. Simply selecting nerve entry points as the sites for BoNT injection may not be an optimal choice for best effects in blocking muscle spasm. We propose that the location of the nerve terminal dense zones in each individual muscle should be used as the optimal target sites for BoNT injection when treating muscle spasms in children with cerebral palsy.

  13. Intramuscular nerve distribution patterns of anterior forearm muscles in children: a guide for botulinum toxin injection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fangjiu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xie, Xiadan; Yang, Shengbo; Xu, Yan; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) can relieve muscle spasticity by blocking axon terminals acetylcholine release at the motor endplate (MEP) and is the safest and most effective agent for the treatment of muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. In order to achieve maximum effect with minimum effective dose of BoNT, one needs to choose an injection site as near to the MEP zone as possible. This requires a detailed understanding about the nerve terminal distributions within the muscles targeted for BoNT injection. This study focuses on BoNT treatment in children with muscle spasms caused by cerebral palsy. Considering the differences between children and adults in anatomy, we used child cadavers and measured both the nerve entry points and nerve terminal sense zones in three deep muscles of the anterior forearm: flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and pronator quadratus (PQ). We measured the nerve entry points by using the forearm midline as a reference and demonstrated intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones by using a modified Sihler’s nerve staining technique. The locations of the nerve entry points and that of the nerve terminal dense zones in the muscles were compared. We found that all nerve entry points are away from the corresponding intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones. Simply selecting nerve entry points as the sites for BoNT injection may not be an optimal choice for best effects in blocking muscle spasm. We propose that the location of the nerve terminal dense zones in each individual muscle should be used as the optimal target sites for BoNT injection when treating muscle spasms in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:28078019

  14. Early collection of saliva specimens from Bell's palsy patients: quantitative analysis of HHV-6, HSV-1, and VZV.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Ombretta; Falasca, Francesca; Maida, Paola; Gaeta, Aurelia; De Vito, Corrado; Mancini, Patrizia; De Seta, Daniele; Covelli, Edoardo; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. Although it has been associated with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pregnancy, and preeclampsia, the etiology of Bell's palsy remains unknown. The reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella-zoster virus (VZV) with subsequent inflammation and entrapment of the facial nerve in the narrow labyrinthine segment has been implicated as a cause of facial paralysis, but the active role of these viruses in Bell's palsy is still discussed. This study quantified HSV-1 DNA, VZV DNA, and HHV-6 DNA in 95 saliva samples collected from patients within 48 hr from the onset of paralysis. HSV-1, VZV, and HHV-6 were detected in 13%, 3%, and 61% of patients, respectively. The detection rate did not differ significantly between patients and a control group of healthy donors. Interestingly, however, the value of HHV-6 DNA copies was significantly higher than that detected in healthy donors. In addition, the mean value of HHV-6 DNA recorded in patients who had at least a one grade improvement of palsy at the first visit was significantly lower than that detected in patients who showed no change in facial palsy grade or an increase of at least one grade. These findings call into question the role of HSV-1 and VZV in the etiology of Bell's palsy, and suggest that HHV-6 may be involved in the development of the disease or that the underlying disease mechanism might predispose patients to HHV-6 reactivation.

  15. Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adult (13 to 21)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adults KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young ... plan healthy meals. continue Step 3: Explore Young-Adult Education Young adults with cerebral palsy are entitled ...

  16. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Optic Nerve Decompression John Lee, MD Introduction Optic nerve decompression is a surgical procedure aimed at ...

  17. Publication of Proceedings for the 6th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF (RF 2003)

    SciTech Connect

    Victor L. Granatstein

    2004-08-08

    The 6th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF (RF 2003) was held from June 22 to June 26 at the Coolfont Resort and Conference Center in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. The Workshop was hosted by the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (IREAP) of the University of Maryland, College Park and by the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC. As its name implies this was the sixth in a series of biennial workshops devoted to exchanging information and ideas on high power microwave sources and components. The applications addressed included particle accelerators, radar, HPM, space exploration, neutron sources and plasma heating and current driven in controlled thermonuclear fusion research. This Final Report includes a brief description of the RF 2003 Workshop and the distribution of the published proceedings.

  18. IR and py/GC/MS examination of amber relics excavated from 6th century royal tomb in Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongseo; Yun, Eunyoung; Kang, Hyungtae; Ahn, Jooyoung; Kim, Gyuho

    2016-08-01

    Relics of amber were excavated from King Muryeong's tomb constructed in the 6th century on the Korean peninsula. To estimate the provenance, FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and py/GC/MS (pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) analysis were utilized. The reference Baltic amber sample was also analyzed with the same method for comparison. The relics were confirmed to be amber from the FTIR analysis where an absorption band near 1150 cm- 1, characteristic one in Baltic amber, was also observed. In py/GC/MS analysis, pyrolyzed products like butanedioic acid and dehydroabietic acid, known constituents of amber, were observed. In addition, D-fenchyl alcohol, camphor, borneol and butanedioic acid, typical constituents of Baltic amber, were observed in some samples. From this, it appears that some of relics were made from Baltic amber and that Baltic amber was transported to the Korean peninsula in the time of tomb construction.

  19. 6th Annual Midwest Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics, January 18-20, 2013, Urbana, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, Kevin T.

    2016-04-28

    This document is the program for the 6th Annual Midwest Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics, which was held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on January 18-20, 2013. The goals of the conference were to foster a culture in which undergraduate women are encouraged and supported to pursue, and also to succeed in, higher education in physics; to provide career information to students in physics and related fields; to give women the resources, motivation, and confidence to apply to graduate school and successfully complete a Ph.D. program in Physics; to provide information and dispel misconceptions about the application process for graduate school and the diverse employment opportunities in physics and related fields, enabling women to make more informed decisions about their goals and attain them; and to connect female physics students with successful female physicists to whom they can relate and who can act as inspirational role models and mentors.

  20. Preauricular transparotid approach to mandibular condylar fractures without dissecting facial nerves.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Tetsuji; Tsuda, Tomoyuki; Hirose, Shunsuke; Ozawa, Toshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    Preauricular transparotid approach without dissecting the facial nerve was used for surgical treatment of 15 condylar fractures in 14 patients. The parotid fascia was opened just above the fracture site, and by dissecting the parotid gland and masseter muscle, the fracture was directly exposed. The facial nerve itself was not dissected expressly. All fractures could be reduced accurately and fixed firmly with miniplates. A direct approach just above the fracture site provided good vision of the fracture, avoiding facial nerve palsy caused by strong retraction. Moreover, by not dissecting the facial nerve, the operation time was shortened. This approach was useful for surgical treatment of both condylar neck and subcondylar fractures.

  1. An unusual presentation of whiplash injury: long thoracic and spinal accessory nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Omar, N.; Srinivasan, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Whiplash injuries from motor vehicle accidents are very common. The usual presentation and course of this condition normally results in resolution of symptoms within a few weeks. Brachial plexus traction injuries without any bone or joint lesion of the cervical spine have been reported before. We report a case where a gentleman was involved in a rear end vehicle collision, sustained a whiplash injury and was later found to have a long thoracic nerve palsy and spinal accessory nerve palsy. Although isolated injuries of both nerves following a whiplash injury have been reported, combined injury of the two nerves following a whiplash injury is very uncommon and is being reported for the first time. PMID:17587067

  2. Overview of pediatric peripheral facial nerve paralysis: analysis of 40 patients.

    PubMed

    Özkale, Yasemin; Erol, İlknur; Saygı, Semra; Yılmaz, İsmail

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis in children might be an alarming sign of serious disease such as malignancy, systemic disease, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, middle ear surgery, and hypertension. The cases of 40 consecutive children and adolescents who were diagnosed with peripheral facial nerve paralysis at Baskent University Adana Hospital Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology Unit between January 2010 and January 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. We determined that the most common cause was Bell palsy, followed by infection, tumor lesion, and suspected chemotherapy toxicity. We noted that younger patients had generally poorer outcome than older patients regardless of disease etiology. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis has been reported in many countries in America and Europe; however, knowledge about its clinical features, microbiology, neuroimaging, and treatment in Turkey is incomplete. The present study demonstrated that Bell palsy and infection were the most common etiologies of peripheral facial nerve paralysis.

  3. Is There a Relationship Between Bell's Palsy and Internal Auditory Canal?

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Hüseyin Baki; Safak Yalcin, Kadihan; Çakan, Doğan; Paksoy, Mustafa; Erdogan, Banu Atalay; Sanli, Arif

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the diameter of internal acoustic canal in patients with Bells palsy to investigate the role of anatomical differences of the temporal bone in etiology of Bell's palsy. Sixty-four patients who were diagnosed as Bells Palsy and temporal bone computed tomography imagings of them were included into the study group (Group 1). The control group (Group 2) was consisted of 35 healthy subjects without Bell's Palsy. All patients had temporal bone computed tomography imaging. The internal auditory canal inlet, mid-canal, outlet and canal lengths were measured at the most distinctive cross-section of the seventh and eighth cranial nerves bifurcation. In the study group, Bells palsy was on the right side in 26 patients (40.6 %) and on the left side in 38 patients (59.4 %). Initial House-Brackmann (HB) score was HB-2 in 29 patients (45.3 %), HB-3 in 18 patients (28.1 %), HB-4 in 13 patients (20.3 %) and HB-5 in 4 patients (6.2 %). At 6-month evaluation, HB-score of the patients were HB-1 in 37 patients (57.8 %), HB-2 in 25 patients (39.1 %) and HB-3 in 2 patients (3.1 %). Internal auditory canal (IAC) measurements of the groups showed that there were no significant differences between the measurements of right-mid canal, right canal length; and left canal outlet and left canal length of the study and control groups. Right inlet and outlet; and left inlet and mid-canal values of the study group (Bell's palsy) were significantly lower than those of the control group. In Bell's palsy group, left inlet, outlet and canal length values were significantly higher than those of the right ones. Correlation analysis showed that there were no significant correlation between paralysis side; initial HB stage; and IAC measurement results. In patients with higher initial HB score, their 6-month later HB-score was also higher. In patients with higher 6-month HB score; R canal inlet, R mid-canal, L-canal inlet, and L-mid canal values were lower. Lower

  4. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  5. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  6. Endoscopic laryngeal patterns in vagus nerve stimulation therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Felisati, Giovanni; Gardella, Elena; Schiavo, Paolo; Saibene, Alberto Maria; Pipolo, Carlotta; Bertazzoli, Manuela; Chiesa, Valentina; Maccari, Alberto; Franzini, Angelo; Canevini, Maria Paola

    2014-01-01

    In 30% of patients with epilepsy seizure control cannot be achieved with medications. When medical therapy is not effective, and epilepsy surgery cannot be performed, vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) implantation is a therapeutic option. Laryngeal patterns in vagus nerve stimulation have not been extensively studied yet. The objective was to evaluate laryngeal patterns in a cohort of patients affected by drug-resistant epilepsy after implantation and activation of a vagus nerve stimulation therapy device. 14 consecutive patients underwent a systematic otolaryngologic examination between 6 months and 5 years after implantation and activation of a vagus nerve stimulation therapy device. All patients underwent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation, which was recorded on a portable device allowing a convenient slow-motion analysis of laryngeal patterns. All recordings were blindly evaluated by two of the authors. We observed three different laryngeal patterns. Four patients showed left vocal cord palsy at the baseline and during vagus nerve stimulation; seven showed left vocal cord palsy at the baseline and left vocal cord adduction during vagus nerve stimulation; and three patients showed a symmetric pattern at the baseline and constant left vocal cord adduction during vagus nerve stimulation. These laryngeal findings are here described for the first time in the literature and can be only partially explained by existing knowledge of laryngeal muscles and vagus nerve physiology. This might represent a new starting point for studies concerning laryngeal physiology and phonation, while the vagus nerve stimulation therapy could act as a new and ethical experimental model for human laryngeal physiology.

  7. Long thoracic nerve paralysis associated with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuchi, Y; Saitoh, S; Hosaka, M; Uchiyama, S

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of long thoracic nerve palsy associated with thoracic outlet syndrome are reported. Both patients had abnormal posture, with low-set shoulders and winged scapulae. Clinically there was weakness of the serratus anterior muscle with partial denervotion on electromyography. The diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome was based on positive vascular tests and brachial plexus nerve compression symptoms induced by the vascular testing positions. An orthosis that held the shoulder in an elevated position was used in both cases. Complete recovery of shoulder function and relief of the symptoms was achieved in both cases at 8 and 13 months, respectively, after application of the orthosis.

  8. Delayed recurrent nerve paralysis following post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mesolella, Massimo; Ricciardiello, Filippo; Tafuri, Domenico; Varriale, Roberto; Testa, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the neck or to the chest are increasingly observed in the emergency clinical practice. They usually follow motor vehicle accidents or may be work or sports related. A wide pattern of clinical presentation can be potentially encountered. We report the uncommon case of a patient who was referred to our observation presenting with hoarseness and disphagia. Twenty days before he had sustained a car accident with trauma to the chest, neck and the mandible. Laryngoscopy showed a left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Further otolaryngo-logical examination showed no other abnormality. At CT and MR imaging a post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm was revealed. The aortic pseudoaneurysm was consequently repaired by implantation of an endovascular stent graft under local anesthesia. The patient was discharged 10 days later. At 30-days follow-up laryngoscopy the left vocal cord palsy was completely resolved. Hoarseness associated with a dilated left atrium in a patient with mitral valve stenosis was initially described by Ortner more than a century ago. Since then several non malignant, cardiovascular, intrathoracic disease that results in embarrassment from recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy usually by stretching, pulling or compression; thus, the correlations of these pathologies was termed as cardiovocal syndrome or Ortner's syndrome. The reported case illustrates that life-threatening cardiovascular comorbidities can cause hoarseness and that an impaired recurrent laryngeal nerve might be correctable.

  9. Delayed recurrent nerve paralysis following post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ricciardiello, Filippo; Tafuri, Domenico; Varriale, Roberto; Testa, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Blunt trauma to the neck or to the chest are increasingly observed in the emergency clinical practice. They usually follow motor vehicle accidents or may be work or sports related. A wide pattern of clinical presentation can be potentially encountered. We report the uncommon case of a patient who was referred to our observation presenting with hoarseness and disphagia. Twenty days before he had sustained a car accident with trauma to the chest, neck and the mandible. Laryngoscopy showed a left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Further otolaryngo-logical examination showed no other abnormality. At CT and MR imaging a post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm was revealed. The aortic pseudoaneurysm was consequently repaired by implantation of an endovascular stent graft under local anesthesia. The patient was discharged 10 days later. At 30-days follow-up laryngoscopy the left vocal cord palsy was completely resolved. Hoarseness associated with a dilated left atrium in a patient with mitral valve stenosis was initially described by Ortner more than a century ago. Since then several non malignant, cardiovascular, intrathoracic disease that results in embarrassment from recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy usually by stretching, pulling or compression; thus, the correlations of these pathologies was termed as cardiovocal syndrome or Ortner’s syndrome. The reported case illustrates that life-threatening cardiovascular comorbidities can cause hoarseness and that an impaired recurrent laryngeal nerve might be correctable. PMID:28352797

  10. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy: a recurrent and bilateral foot drop case report.

    PubMed

    Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Macedo, Liliana; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Rodrigues, Maria Lurdes

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy is characterized by acute, painless, recurrent mononeuropathies secondary to minor trauma or compression. A 16-year-old boy had the first episode of right foot drop after minor motorcycle accident. Electromyography revealed conduction block and slowing velocity conduction of the right deep peroneal nerve at the fibular head. After motor rehabilitation, he fully recovered. Six months later he had the second episode of foot drop in the opposite site after prolonged squatting position. Electromyography revealed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of left peroneal, sural, posterior tibial, and deep peroneal nerves and also of ulnar, radial, and median nerves of both upper limbs. Histological examination revealed sensory nerve demyelination and focal thickenings of myelin fibers. The diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy was confirmed by PMP22 deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. He started motor rehabilitation and avoidance of stressing factors with progressive recovery. After one-year followup, he was completely asymptomatic. Recurrent bilateral foot drop history, "sausage-like" swellings of myelin in histological examination, and the results of electromyography led the authors to consider the diagnosis despite negative family history. The authors highlight this rare disease in pediatric population and the importance of high index of clinical suspicion for its diagnosis.

  11. Photometric and Spectroscopic Footprint Corrections in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s 6th Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specian, Mike A.; Szalay, Alex S.

    2016-04-01

    We identify and correct numerous errors within the photometric and spectroscopic footprints (SFs) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s (SDSS) 6th data release (DR6). Within the SDSS’s boundaries hundreds of millions of objects have been detected. Yet we present evidence that the boundaries themselves contain a significant number of mistakes that are being revealed for the first time within this paper. Left unaddressed, these can introduce systematic biases into galaxy clustering statistics. Using the DR6 Main Galaxy Sample (MGS) targets as tracers, we reveal inconsistencies between the photometric and SF definitions provided in the Catalog Archive Server (CAS), and the measurements of targets therein. First, we find that 19.7 deg2 of the DR6 photometric footprint are devoid of MGS targets. In volumes of radii 7 {h}-1 {Mpc}, this can cause errors in the expected number of galaxies to exceed 60%. Second, we identify seven areas that were erroneously included or excluded from the SF. Moreover, the tiling algorithm that positioned spectroscopic fibers during and between DRs caused many areas along the edge of the SF to be significantly undersampled relative to the footprint’s interior. Through our corrections, we increase the completeness 2.2% by trimming 3.6% of the area from the existing SF. The sum total of these efforts has generated the most accurate description of the SDSS DR6 footprints ever created.

  12. Bond Strength of 5th, 6th and 7th Generation Bonding Agents to Intracanal Dentin of Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Baradaran Nakhjavani, Yahya; Rahro Taban, Sedighe; Baniameri, Zahra; Nahvi, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study sought to assess the push-out bond strength of a total etch and 2 self-etch bonding systems to intracanal dentin of primary anterior teeth (PAT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-six primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 5th generation (Single Bond 2), 6th generation (Clearfil SE) and 7th generation (Single Bond Universal) bonding agents. The canal orifice was restored with composite resin and the push-out test was carried out to assess the bond strength. After applying the push-out load, specimens were evaluated under a light microscope at 40X magnification. One-way ANOVA and log-rank test on Kaplan-Meier curves were applied for the comparison of bond strength among the 3 groups. Results: The mean± standard deviation (SD) bond strength was 13.6±5.33 MPa for Single Bond 2, 13.85±5.86 MPa for Clearfil SE and 12.28±5.24 MPa for Single Bond Universal. The differences in bond strength among the 3 groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: All three bonding agents are recommended for use with composite posts in PAT. However, due to high technical sensitivity of the Total Etch system, single or two-step self etch systems may be preferred for uncooperative children. PMID:26056518

  13. Yersinia pestis DNA from skeletal remains from the 6(th) century AD reveals insights into Justinianic Plague.

    PubMed

    Harbeck, Michaela; Seifert, Lisa; Hänsch, Stephanie; Wagner, David M; Birdsell, Dawn; Parise, Katy L; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Grupe, Gisela; Thomas, Astrid; Keim, Paul; Zöller, Lothar; Bramanti, Barbara; Riehm, Julia M; Scholz, Holger C

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of the disease plague, has been implicated in three historical pandemics. These include the third pandemic of the 19(th) and 20(th) centuries, during which plague was spread around the world, and the second pandemic of the 14(th)-17(th) centuries, which included the infamous epidemic known as the Black Death. Previous studies have confirmed that Y. pestis caused these two more recent pandemics. However, a highly spirited debate still continues as to whether Y. pestis caused the so-called Justinianic Plague of the 6(th)-8(th) centuries AD. By analyzing ancient DNA in two independent ancient DNA laboratories, we confirmed unambiguously the presence of Y. pestis DNA in human skeletal remains from an Early Medieval cemetery. In addition, we narrowed the phylogenetic position of the responsible strain down to major branch 0 on the Y. pestis phylogeny, specifically between nodes N03 and N05. Our findings confirm that Y. pestis was responsible for the Justinianic Plague, which should end the controversy regarding the etiology of this pandemic. The first genotype of a Y. pestis strain that caused the Late Antique plague provides important information about the history of the plague bacillus and suggests that the first pandemic also originated in Asia, similar to the other two plague pandemics.

  14. Ethical, legal, and social aspects of farm animal cloning in the 6th Framework Programme for Research.

    PubMed

    Claxton, John; Sachez, Elena; Matthiessen-Guyader, Line

    2004-01-01

    Cloned livestock have potential importance in the provision of improved medicine as well as in the development of livestock production. The public is, however, increasingly concerned about the social and ethical consequences of these advances in knowledge and techniques. There is unevenness throughout Europe in different Member States' attitudes to research into livestock cloning. Although there is EU legislation controlling the use of animals for research purposes, there is no legislation specifically governing cloning in livestock production. The main EU reference is the 9th Opinion of the European Group on Ethics, which states "Cloning of farm animals may prove to be of medical and agricultural as well as economic benefit. It is acceptable only when the aims and methods are ethically justified and when carried out under ethical conditions." The ethical justification includes the avoidance of suffering, the use of the 3Rs principle and a lack of better alternatives. The Commission addresses these issues in the 6th Framework Programme by promoting the integration of ethical, legal and social aspects in all proposals where they are relevant, by fostering ethical awareness and foresight in the proposals, by encouraging public dialogue, and by supporting specific actions to promote the debate. Research must respect fundamental ethical principles, including animal welfare requirements.

  15. Bone age in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Palmieri, Maurício D'arc; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the chronological age and bone age among cerebral palsy patients in the outpatient clinic and its correlation with the type of neurological involvement, gender and functional status. Methods 401 patients with spastic cerebral palsy, and ages ranging from three months to 20 years old, submitted to radiological examination for bone age and analyzed by two independent observers according Greulich & Pyle. Results In the topographic distribution, there was a significant delay (p<0.005) in tetraparetic (17.7 months), hemiparetic (10.1 months), and diparetic patients (7.9 months). In the hemiparetic group, the mean bone age in the affected side was 96.88 months and the uncompromised side was 101.13 months (p<0.005). Regarding functional status, the ambulatory group showed a delay of 18.73 months in bone age (p<0.005). Comparing bone age between genders, it was observed a greater delay in males (13.59 months) than in females (9.63 months), but not statistically significant (p = 0.54). Conclusion There is a delay in bone age compared to chronological age influenced by the topography of spasticity, functional level and gender in patients with cerebral palsy. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453693

  16. Raising the suborbicularis oculi fat (SOOF): its role in chronic facial palsy

    PubMed Central

    Olver, J.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the adjuvant role of unilateral suborbicularis oculi fat (SOOF) lift in the periorbital rehabilitation of patients with chronic facial palsy.
METHODS—In a non-comparative prospective case series nine adult patients (seven male, two female) aged 34-90 years (mean 60.5) with chronic unrecovered facial palsy (over 1 year), who had not had any previous rehabilitative periorbital surgery, were studied. Lateral tarsal strip and adjuvant transconjunctival approach subperiosteal SOOF lift under local or general anaesthesia were performed; medial canthoplasty was performed where indicated. There was clinical observation of the long term (over 1 year) effect on the ptotic palpebral-malar sulcus and lower eyelid retraction.
RESULTS—The patients were followed up for 12-24 months (mean 16). Seven patients (77%) had sustained clinical reduction of palpebral-malar sulcus ptosis. All patients had sustained reduction of lagophthalmos. Early postoperative complications included conjunctival cheimosis in 77%. Three patients with persistent keratitis required further surgical procedures on their upper eyelid to reduce the palpebral aperture. There were no cases of infraorbital nerve anaesthesia or recurrent lower eyelid retraction.
CONCLUSIONS—The SOOF lift has an adjuvant role in chronic facial palsy with lower eyelid retraction and ptotic-palpebral malar sulcus. It supports the lower eyelid elevation and tightening achieved with the lateral tarsal strip. The best results were obtained in congenital facial palsy.

 PMID:11090482

  17. The treatment of facial palsy from the point of view of physical and rehabilitation medicine.

    PubMed

    Shafshak, T S

    2006-03-01

    There are evidences to support recommending the early intake of prednisone (in its appropriate dose of 1 mg/kg body weight for up to 70 or 80 mg/day) or the combined use of prednisone and acyclovir (or valacyclovir) within 72 h following the onset of paralysis in order to improve the outcome of Bell's palsy (BP). Although there may be a controversy about the role of physiotherapy in BP or facial palsy, it seemed that local superficial heat therapy, massage, exercises, electrical stimulation and biofeedback training have a place in the treatment of lower motor facial palsy. However, each modality has its indications. Moreover, some rehabilitative surgical methods might be of benefit for some patients with traumatic facial injuries or long standing paralysis without recovery, but early surgery in BP is usually not recommended. However, few may recommend early surgery in BP when there is 90-100% facial nerve degeneration. The efficacy of acupuncture, magnetic pellets and other modalities of physiotherapy needs further investigation. The general principles and the different opinions in treating and rehabilitating facial palsy are discussed and the need for further research in this field is suggested.

  18. Prosthodontic Rehabilitation of Patients with Bell’s Palsy: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rajapur, Anand; Mitra, Nirban; Prakash, V Jeevan; Rah, Sajad Ahmad; Thumar, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Bell’s palsy is an idiopathic unilateral lower motor neuron paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve of sudden onset. It involves loss of muscular control on the affected side of the face. This paper reports the prosthodontic management of patients with Bell’s palsy and also describes a technique to stabilize the jaw movements in complete denture patients using interim dentures. A 65-year-old male edentulous patient and a 55-year-old female edentulous patient reported to the department of prosthodontics to get their missing teeth replaced. They both gave history of facial paralysis and were diagnosed for Bell’s palsy. Interim training dentures with flat occlusal tables were fabricated first to correct and stabilize their mandibular movements. During initial 4 weeks, there was poor functioning of the interim dentures. Gradually by 8th week the patients started stabilizing the interim dentures and were functional. After observing the improvement when the patients had no pain and could stabilize and use the treatment dentures successfully, definitive complete dentures were fabricated. This case report presents a systematic approach to successively rehabilitate edentulous patients with Bell’s palsy. PMID:26668488

  19. Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lynn K

    2016-10-28

    Optic nerve diseases arise from many different etiologies including inflammatory, neoplastic, genetic, infectious, ischemic, and idiopathic. Understanding some of the characteristics of the most common optic neuropathies along with therapeutic approaches to these diseases is helpful in designing recommendations for individual patients. Although many optic neuropathies have no specific treatment, some do, and it is those potentially treatable or preventable conditions which need to be recognized in order to help patients regain their sight or develop a better understanding of their own prognosis. In this chapter several diseases are discussed including idiopathic intracranial hypertension, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathies, hereditary optic neuropathies, trauma, and primary tumors of the optic nerve. For each condition there is a presentation of the signs and symptoms of the disease, in some conditions the evaluation and diagnostic criteria are highlighted, and where possible, current therapy or past trials are discussed.

  20. Mouse model of Bell's palsy induced by reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Hitsumoto, Y; Honda, N; Hato, N; Mizobuchi, M; Murakami, S; Kisaki, H; Wakisaka, H; Gyo, K

    2001-06-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of Bell's palsy, we developed an animal model of facial nerve paralysis induced by the reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Eight weeks after recovery from facial nerve paralysis caused by inoculation with HSV-1, the mice were treated with auricular skin scratch at the site of the previous inoculation, or with intraperitoneal injection of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), or combination of both procedures. No mice developed facial nerve paralysis when they were treated with either auricular scratch or mAb injection alone. In contrast, 20% of mice developed facial nerve paralysis with the combined treatment. With one exception, no mouse treated with either auricular scratch or mAb injection showed HSV-I DNA in their facial nerve tissue, whereas 4 out of 6 mice receiving both treatments showed HSV-1 DNA on day 10 after treatment. Histopathological findings showed neuronal degeneration in the geniculate ganglion and demyelination of the facial motor nerve in paralyzed mice. These findings suggest that a combination of stimuli, local skin irritation, and general immunosuppression is essential for successfully inducing facial nerve paralysis in mice with latent HSV-1 infection.

  1. Caring for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormans, John P., Ed.; Pellegrino, Louis, Ed.

    Twenty-one papers on caring for children with cerebral palsy are organized into four sections, including: (1) cerebral palsy and the interdisciplinary team approach; (2) management of impairments related to cerebral palsy; (3) preventing disability by optimizing function of the child with cerebral palsy; and (4) preventing handicap by creating…

  2. [Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies in childhood: Report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Bar, C; Villéga, F; Espil, C; Husson, M; Pedespan, J-M; Rouanet, M-F

    2017-03-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant neuropathy. It is characterized by recurrent sensory and motor nerve palsies, usually precipitated by minor trauma or compression. Even though rare in childhood, this disorder is probably underdiagnosed given its wide spectrum of clinical symptoms. We review three separate cases of HNPP diagnosed in children with various phenotypes: fluctuating and distal paresthesias disrupting learning at school, cramps related to intensive piano practice, and discrete muscle weakness with no functional complaint. Family history should be carefully reviewed to identify potential undiagnosed HNPP cases, as in our three reports. Electrophysiological study is essential for the diagnosis, with a double advantage: to confirm the presence of focal abnormalities in clinically symptomatic areas and to guide molecular biology by revealing an underlying demyelinating polyneuropathy. The diagnosis of HNPP is confirmed by genetic testing, which in 90% of cases shows a 1.5-Mb deletion of chromosome 17p11.2 including the PMP22 gene. Patients are expected to make a full recovery after each relapse. However, it is very important for both the patient and his or her family to establish a diagnosis in order to prevent recurrent palsy brought on by situations involving prolonged immobilizations leading to nerve compression.

  3. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies in childhood: Case series and literature update.

    PubMed

    Chrestian, Nicolas; McMillan, Hugh; Poulin, Chantal; Campbell, Craig; Vajsar, Jiri

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy (HNPP) is a rare condition in childhood with a diverse range of clinical presentations. We analyzed the clinical presentation and electrophysiological data of 12 children with a confirmed PMP22 gene deletion and reviewed the published reports of HNPP in children and compared our data with the reports from the literature review. Peroneal palsy was the most common presentation (42%) followed by brachial plexus palsy in 25% of our cases. Nerve conduction studies were always suggestive of the diagnosis demonstrating 3 major patterns: multifocal demyelination at the area of entrapment, generalized sensory-motor polyneuropathy and a combination of the two first patterns in a vast majority (60%). Surprisingly, there was bilateral or unilateral electrophysiological entrapment of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel in all our patients. The clinical presentation of HNPP in childhood is heterogeneous and electrophysiological findings are helpful in establishing the diagnosis. Any unexplained mononeuropathy or multifocal neuropathy should lead to PMP22 gene testing to look for the deletion. Early diagnosis is important in order to facilitate appropriate genetic counseling and also for the appropriate care for these patients.

  4. Highlights from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium and the Keynote Address by Dr. Danuta Skowronski.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jodie I; Beatty, Jennifer K; Peplowski, Michael A; Keough, Michael B; Yipp, Bryan G; Hollenberg, Morley D; Beck, Paul L

    2015-12-04

    The Leaders in Medicine (LIM) Program at the University of Calgary hosted its 6th Annual Research Symposium on November 14, 2014, showcasing the quality and breadth of work performed by students at the Cumming School of Medicine. Participation at this year's event was our most successful to date, with a total of six oral and 77 poster presentations during the afternoon symposium. For a detailed description of the work presented at the symposium, please see the Proceedings from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium published in this issue of Clinical and Investigative Medicine.

  5. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's Palsy executive summary.

    PubMed

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 11 recommendations developed encourage accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitate patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy; some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, there are numerous diagnostic tests available that are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have an unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.

  6. New Hope for Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obringer, S. John

    This paper explains the use of a unique experimental therapy for students with a type of cerebral palsy specifically called Botox. Botulinum Toxin Type A has been tried on a sizable number of students with cerebral palsy in clinical settings to reduce spastic and dystonic movements. By injecting Botox into overly tight heel cords, a normal or near…

  7. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  8. Valacyclovir for the treatment of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Hato, Naohito; Sawai, Naoki; Teraoka, Masato; Wakisaka, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Hinohira, Yasuyuki; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2008-10-01

    Despite recent evidence suggesting that Bell's palsy is associated with reactivation of alfa-herpes viruses, the disease has been treated empirically, and the use of valacyclovir has not been definitively established. In 2007, two prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled trials evaluating valacyclovir were reported in patients with Bell's palsy. One demonstrated that valacyclovir/prednisolone therapy was statistically more effective than placebo/prednisolone therapy in improving the recovery of patients with Bell's palsy, excluding zoster sine herpete. However, considering the cost-benefit ratio of this treatment and the limitations of virological diagnoses, we recommend that valacyclovir should be used in cases of severe palsy within 3 days after the onset of Bell's palsy.

  9. The preparatory phase of the April 6th 2009, Mw 6.3, L’Aquila earthquake: Seismological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucente, F. P.; de Gori, P.; Margheriti, L.; Piccinini, D.; Dibona, M.; Chiarabba, C.; Piana Agostinetti, N.

    2009-12-01

    Few decades ago, the dilatancy-diffusion hypothesis held great promise as a physical basis for developing earthquakes prediction techniques, but the potential never become reality, as the result of too few observations consistent with the theory. One of the main problems has been the lack of detailed monitoring records of small earthquakes swarms spatio-temporally close to the incoming major earthquakes. In fact, the recognition of dilatancy-related effects requires the use of very dense network of three-component seismographs, which, in turn, implies the a-priori knowledge of major earthquakes location, i.e., actually a paradox. The deterministic prediction of earthquakes remains a long time, hard task to accomplish. Nevertheless, for seismologists, the understanding of the processes that preside over the earthquakes nucleation and the mechanics of faulting represents a big step toward the ability to predict earthquakes. Here we describe a set of seismological observations done on the foreshock sequence that preceded the April 6th 2009, Mw 6.3, L’Aquila earthquake. In this occasion, the dense configuration of the seismic network in the area gave us the unique opportunity for a detailed reconstruction of the preparatory phase of the main shock. We show that measurable precursory effects, as changes of the seismic waves velocity and of the anisotropic parameters in the crust, occurred before the main shock. From our observations we infer that fluids play a key role in the fault failure process, and, most significantly, that the elastic properties of the rock volume surrounding the main shock nucleation area undergo a dramatic change about a week before the main shock occurrence.

  10. [The IASLC lung cancer staging project. Comparing the current 6(th) TNM edition with the proposed 7(th) edition].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Lina; Cardoso, Edgar; Nunes, Henrique; Baptista, Victor; Gomes, Ana; Couceiro, Patrícia

    2009-01-01

    The future 7th edition of TNM classification for lung cancer will be published in 2009 and comprises the IASLC recommendations for TNM parameters. The general staging of lung cancer includes the new parameters: reclassification of tumours larger than 7 cm from T2 to T3; extra tumoral nodules will change their category to T3, T4 and M1 when in the same, ipsilateral or contralateral lobe, respectively; pleural effusion will be M1a. With these alterations, cases staged as IB - T2b N0 M0 will be IIA, cases staged IIB - T2a N1 M0 will be IIA and cases IIIB- T4 N0- -1 M0 will be IIIA. The 7(th) TNM edition recommendations were applied to 203 broncho -pulmonary carcinomas, concerning epidermoid carcinomas (83) and adenocarcinomas (120) registered in the archive of the Serviço de Anatomia Patológica of the Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra - Portugal, previously submitted to surgical resection and lymph node excision. The following alterations will be kept as the application of the future 7(th) TNM edition: 20 cases in stage IB will move to stage IIA (17) and stage IIB (3); 18 cases will change from stage IIB to stage IIA (17) and 1 case to stage IIIA; 2 cases from stage IIIB will move to stage IV; 6 cases in stage IV will move to stage IIIA (5) and 1 case to stage IIIB. In this translational adaptation from 6th to 7th TNM staging, 51 out of the 203 analysed cases change their staging, corresponding to 25.1%.

  11. Morphological abnormalities of embryonic cranial nerves after in utero exposure to valproic acid: implications for the pathogenesis of autism with multiple developmental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yasura; Oyabu, Akiko; Imura, Yoshio; Uchida, Atsuko; Narita, Naoko; Narita, Masaaki

    2011-06-01

    Autism is often associated with multiple developmental anomalies including asymmetric facial palsy. In order to establish the etiology of autism with facial palsy, research into developmental abnormalities of the peripheral facial nerves is necessary. In the present study, to investigate the development of peripheral cranial nerves for use in an animal model of autism, rat embryos were treated with valproic acid (VPA) in utero and their cranial nerves were visualized by immunostaining. Treatment with VPA after embryonic day 9 had a significant effect on the peripheral fibers of several cranial nerves. Following VPA treatment, immunoreactivity within the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves was significantly reduced. Additionally, abnormal axonal pathways were observed in the peripheral facial nerves. Thus, the morphology of several cranial nerves, including the facial nerve, can be affected by prenatal VPA exposure as early as E13. Our findings indicate that disruption of early facial nerve development is involved in the etiology of asymmetric facial palsy, and may suggest a link to the etiology of autism.

  12. Laryngeal nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ... and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, ...

  13. The Hetu'u Global Network: Measuring the Distance to the Sun Using the June 5th/6th Transit of Venus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Rodriguez, David R.; Miller, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    In the spirit of historic astronomical endeavors, we invited school groups across the globe to collaborate in a solar distance measurement using the rare June 5/6th transit of Venus. In total, we recruited 19 school groups spread over 6 continents and 10 countries to participate in our Hetu'u Global Network. Applying the methods of French…

  14. Trends in Substance Use among 6th-to 10th-Grade Students from 1998 to 2010: Findings from a National Probability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Russell, Ashley; Farhat, Tilda; Haynie, Denise; Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Of the handful of national studies tracking trends in adolescent substance use in the United States, only the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study collects data from 6th through 10th graders. The purpose of this study was to examine trends from 1998 to 2010 (four time points) in the prevalence of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use…

  15. The Effect of the Van Hiele Model Based Instruction on the Creative Thinking Levels of 6th Grade Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Tolga; Akkaya, Recai; Celebi Akkaya, Sibel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of the Van Hiele model based instruction process on the creative thinking levels of 6th grade primary school students. Pre test-post test matching control group quasi-experimental design was used in the study. Fifty five students enrolled in sixth grades during the 2005-2006 educational year formed…

  16. Proceedings of the Office of Special Education Programs' Annual Technical Assistance and Dissemination Meeting (6th, Washington, DC, January 16-18, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Education Programs (ED/OSERS), Washington, DC.

    This document presents the proceedings for the Office of Special Education Programs' 6th Annual Technical Assistance and Dissemination Meeting held on January 16-18, 1996, in Washington, DC. Conference discussions centered around changing expectations for local and state education agencies and technical assistance and dissemination (TA&D)…

  17. Facial nerve paralysis after impacted lower third molar surgery: a literature review and case report.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Belmiro Cavalcanti do Egito; Bessa-Nogueira, Ricardo Viana; Maurette, Paul Edward; Carneiro, Suzana Célia Soares de Aguiar

    2006-03-01

    Facial nerve paralysis (FNP) is the most common cranial nerve disorders and it results in a characteristic facial distortion that is determined in part by the nerves branches involved. With multiples etiologies, these included trauma, tumor formation, idiopathic conditions, cerebral infarct, pseudobulbar palsy and viruses. FNP during dental treatment is very rare and can be associated with the injection of local anesthetic, prolonged attempt to remove a mandibular third molar and subsequent infection. We report a case of a 21 years-old black woman who developed a Bell's palsy after an impacted third molar surgery under local anaesthesia, present a FNP classified like a grade IV by the House-Brackmann's grading system. The treatment was based of prescription of a cytidine and uridine complex (NUCLEO CMP tm) one tablet twice per day and a close follow up. Three months later that had beginning the treatment, the patient recovery her normal facial muscle activity.

  18. Study of Preoperative Predictive Signs in Management of Facial Nerve in Parotid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    CHIRILA, Magdalena; MURESAN, Mihaela; BOLBOACA, Sorana D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To find preoperative predictive signs for better surgical planning of the facial nerve in parotid tumors. Methods: Prospective study in patients with primary parotid malignancies. Patients with primary parotid malignant tumor were investigated for preoperative clinical signs in correlation with histological findings and surgical management of the facial nerve. Outcomes: The study included 47 patients. Several clinical findings as facial pain, paresthesia, and rapid growth of tumor might suggest the risk of malignancy. Paresis/palsy of the facial nerve was correlates with direct neural involvement. Conclusion: There are several predictive clinical signs that might suggest malignancy of a parotid tumor. PMID:25553124

  19. Interventions in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Koros, Christos; Stamelou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) an atypical parkinsonian with a common phenotype comprising early falls, the characteristic slowing of vertical saccades and a frontal syndrome with marked apathy (Richardson's syndrome). Currently, no effective symptomatic or neuroprotective treatment is available for PSP. Current medical have a limited role in PSP. Novel experimental treatments include davunetide or tideglusib, both inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) that failed to improve the clinical outcome of PSP patients in two recent studies. Future interventions aiming at tau dysfunction and passive or active immunization are ongoing or underway.

  20. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... polyneuropathy Tibial nerve dysfunction Ulnar nerve dysfunction Any peripheral neuropathy can cause abnormal results. Damage to the spinal ... Herniated disk Lambert-Eaton syndrome Mononeuropathy Multiple ... azotemia Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sciatica ...

  1. [Surgical treatment of benign recurrent goiter with pre-existing unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis--a report of experiences].

    PubMed

    Wasiak, J; Pohle, T

    1996-01-01

    Operations for recurrent goiter are considered to range among the most difficult procedures in thyroid surgery, because the risk of a permanent recurrent nerve palsy increases to 10 or 30%. In case of pre-existing unilateral lesion of the nerve the danger of bilateral paralysis of the vocal chord will become even larger. The results from 29 patients with an intracapsular resection (nearly total removement of the thyroid tissue without the preparation of the recurrent nerve) are presented and compared with those found in 4 patients with an extracapsular approach. All four patients, where the operation was performed extracapsularly, must be tracheotomized although the palsy did recover within 21 days till 14 months. After an intracapsular resection of the recurrence at the side of an intact nerve (29 patients) a tracheotomy had not been necessary.

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and Bell's palsy-a current assessment of the controversy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Peter Ge

    2010-02-01

    Bell's palsy causes about two thirds of cases of acute peripheral facial weakness. Although the majority of cases completely recover spontaneously, about 30% of cases do not and are at risk from persisting severe facial paralysis and pain. It has been suggested that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) may be the etiological agent that causes Bell's palsy. Although corticosteroid therapy is now universally recognized as improving the outcome of Bell's palsy, the question as to whether or not a combination of antiviral agents and corticosteroids result in a better rate of complete facial recovery compared with corticosteroids alone is now a highly contentious issue. The evidence obtained from laboratory studies of animals and humans that HSV-1 may be linked to facial nerve paralysis is first outlined. The discussion then focuses on the results of different clinical trials of the efficacy of antiviral agents combined with corticosteroids in increasing the rate of complete recovery in Bell's palsy. These have often given different results leading to opposite conclusions as to the efficacy of antivirals. Of three recent meta-analyses of previous trials, two concluded that antivirals produce no added benefit to corticosteroids alone in producing complete facial recovery, and one concluded that such combined therapy may be associated with additional benefit. Although it is probably not justified at the present time to treat patients with Bell's palsy with antiviral agents in addition to corticosteroids, it remains to be shown whether antivirals may be beneficial in treating patients who present with severe or complete facial paralysis.

  3. Delayed lateral rectus palsy following resection of a pineal cyst in sitting position: direct or indirect compressive phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Qualls E; Colen, Chaim B; Ham, Steven D; Kattner, Keith A; Sood, Sandeep

    2007-12-01

    A rare case of delayed lateral rectus palsy in a patient following resection of a pineal lesion in the sitting position is presented. Postoperative pneumocephalus is common following craniospinal surgical intervention in the sitting position. The sixth cranial nerve is frequently injured because of its prolonged intracranial course. A 13-year-old girl was evaluated for unremitting headaches. No focal deficits were demonstrated on neurological examination. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystlike pineal region mass with peripheral enhancement following intravenous contrast administration. A supracerebellar infratentorial craniotomy was performed in the sitting position, and complete resection of the lesion was achieved. Her postoperative course was complicated by sixth nerve palsy on the third postoperative day. Her symptoms improved with conservative management. The occurrence of sixth cranial nerve palsy secondary to pneumocephalus is a rare entity. Even rarer is the report of this anomaly following craniotomy in the sitting position. This patient's symptoms manifested in a delayed fashion. Although uncommon, this complication should be considered in patients undergoing cranial or spinal surgical interventions in this position.

  4. Integration of physical activity and technology motion devices within a combined 5th and 6th grade science curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Kevin Eugene

    Background: National recommendations to increase school-based physical activity and promote academic success advise incorporating movement into traditional classroom lessons. Classroom-based physical activities have favorable associations with indicators of cognitive functioning, academic behaviors, and academic achievement. Purpose: This study analyzed the Active Science framework, which incorporated school-based physical activity within interactive science classroom lessons. Specifically, the study measured the effects of the Active Science framework on student physical activity levels in the classroom, student learning of science inquiry skills and content knowledge, and student perceptions of physical activity and science. A secondary purpose was to evaluate the teachers' perceptions on the implementation of the framework. Subjects: Participants were 37 Hispanic girls (age=11.1 +/-0.8 yr) in mixed 5th/6th grade science classes in a private, urban middle school. Methods: Physical activity levels of the students during the Active Science framework were measured using pedometers and heart rate monitors. Pre- and post-tests were used to assess the levels of learning achieved by the students in science inquiry skills and content during the Active Science framework. Student perceptions and attitudes toward science and physical activity were measured during student focus groups and pre-post perception surveys. Lesson plan evaluations completed by the teachers and structured interviews provided data on implementation of the framework. Results: Physical activity results showed heart rate (146 +/-9 bpm); maximal heart rate (196 +/-10.6 bpm); time (35 +/-2.5 mins); steps (3050 +/-402.7); calories (99 +/-8.4 kcal); and distance (1.1 +/-0.2 miles) while performing the activity portion of the science lessons were consistent with national recommendations for accumulating school-based physical activity. Significant increases in science content and skills test scores with a 22

  5. Bone loss during partial weight bearing (1/6th gravity) is mitigated by resistance and aerobic exercise in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreaux, R. D.; Metzger, C. E.; Macias, B. R.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Hogan, H. A.; Bloomfield, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Astronauts on long duration missions continue to experience bone loss, as much as 1-2% each month, for up to 4.5 years after a mission. Mechanical loading of bone with exercise has been shown to increase bone formation, mass, and geometry. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two exercise protocols during a period of reduced gravitational loading (1/6th body weight) in mice. Since muscle contractions via resistance exercise impart the largest physiological loads on the skeleton, we hypothesized that resistance training (via vertical tower climbing) would better protect against the deleterious musculoskeletal effects of reduced gravitational weight bearing when compared to endurance exercise (treadmill running). Young adult female BALB/cBYJ mice were randomly assigned to three groups: 1/6 g (G/6; n=6), 1/6 g with treadmill running (G/6+RUN; n=8), or 1/6 g with vertical tower climbing (G/6+CLB; n=9). Exercise was performed five times per week. Reduced weight bearing for 21 days was achieved through a novel harness suspension system. Treadmill velocity (12-20 m/min) and daily run time duration (32-51 min) increased incrementally throughout the study. Bone geometry and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) at proximal metaphysis and mid-diaphysis tibia were assessed by in vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) on days 0 and 21 and standard dynamic histomorphometry was performed on undemineralized sections of the mid-diaphysis after tissue harvest. G/6 caused a significant decrease (P<0.001) in proximal tibia metaphysis total vBMD (-9.6%). These reductions of tibia metaphyseal vBMD in G/6 mice were mitigated in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB groups (P<0.05). After 21 days of G/6, we saw an absolute increase in tibia mid-diaphysis vBMD and in distal metaphysis femur vBMD in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB mice (P<0.05). Substantial increases in endocortical and periosteal mineralizing surface (MS/BS) at mid-diaphysis tibia in G/6+CLB demonstrate that

  6. Conference scene: Summary of the 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories with international participation.

    PubMed

    Carasevici, Eugen

    2011-10-01

    The Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories (RAML) conferences have acquired a reputation for standing out as the most prominent and efficient meetings in the national community of laboratory medicine, being a landmark of the development in this field in Romania and an active affiliation to international forums. This year, the conference setting was Piatra Neamt, in the northeast part of Romania, which produced a friendly and stimulating professional environment. As in previous years, leading experts in the fields of laboratory medicine attended the event. This year, we enjoyed the opportunity to have such distinguished guests as the members of the executive board of International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC); Graham Beastall, IFCC President; Päivi Hannele Laitinen, IFCC secretary; and Grazyna Sypniewska, IFCC Communication and Publication Division, and editor of the electronic journal of the IFCC. As usual, the conference program included all aspects of clinical laboratory activity, with a special focus on technology development, instrumentation and laboratory management. Fully aware of the fact that the complexity and depth of laboratory practice have undergone an impressive and rapid evolution, the specific goals of the event were to increase knowledge in the fundamentals of new molecular investigation, areas which show the tendency to become routine in our daily activity. In addition, laboratory management and the place of medical laboratories in the process of translational medicine were subjects of focus. The 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories was held from Wednesday 1st to Saturday 4th of June 2011. A total of 273 participants from all local branches of the Association attended. The scientific program included seven plenary sessions where 22 lectures and 18 short communications were delivered, and three poster sessions with 44 poster presentations. Session topics covered issues of

  7. 3D-Ultrasonography for evaluation of facial muscles in patients with chronic facial palsy or defective healing: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While standardized methods are established to examine the pathway from motorcortex to the peripheral nerve in patients with facial palsy, a reliable method to evaluate the facial muscles in patients with long-term palsy for therapy planning is lacking. Methods A 3D ultrasonographic (US) acquisition system driven by a motorized linear mover combined with conventional US probe was used to acquire 3D data sets of several facial muscles on both sides of the face in a healthy subject and seven patients with different types of unilateral degenerative facial nerve lesions. Results The US results were correlated to the duration of palsy and the electromyography results. Consistent 3D US based volumetry through bilateral comparison was feasible for parts of the frontalis muscle, orbicularis oculi muscle, depressor anguli oris muscle, depressor labii inferioris muscle, and mentalis muscle. With the exception of the frontal muscle, the facial muscles volumes were much smaller on the palsy side (minimum: 3% for the depressor labii inferior muscle) than on the healthy side in patients with severe facial nerve lesion. In contrast, the frontal muscles did not show a side difference. In the two patients with defective healing after spontaneous regeneration a decrease in muscle volume was not seen. Synkinesis and hyperkinesis was even more correlated to muscle hypertrophy on the palsy compared with the healthy side. Conclusion 3D ultrasonography seems to be a promising tool for regional and quantitative evaluation of facial muscles in patients with facial palsy receiving a facial reconstructive surgery or conservative treatment. PMID:24782657

  8. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  9. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies Masked by Previous Gunshots and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gencik, Martin; Finsterer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Although hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) presents with a distinct phenotype on history, clinical exam, and nerve conduction studies, it may be masked if diagnostic work-up suggests other causes. Case Report. In a 37-year-old male with pseudoradicular lumbar pain, neurological exam revealed sore neck muscles, peripheral facial nerve palsy, right anacusis and left hypoacusis, hemihypesthesia of the right face, mild distal quadriparesis, diffuse wasting, and generally reduced tendon reflexes. He had a history of skull fracture due to a gunshot behind the right ear and tuberculosis for which he had received adequate treatment for 3 years; MRI revealed a disc prolapse at C6/7 and Th11/12. Nerve conduction studies were indicative of demyelinating polyneuropathy with conduction blocks. Despite elevated antinuclear antibodies and elevated CSF-protein, HNPP was diagnosed genetically after having excluded vasculitis, CIDP, radiculopathy, and the side effects of antituberculous treatment. Conclusions. HNPP may manifest with mild, painless, distal quadriparesis. The diagnosis of HNPP may be blurred by a history of tuberculosis, tuberculostatic treatment, hepatitis, and the presence of elevated CSF-protein. PMID:26640726

  10. A report of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy: the value of complete electrodiagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Bulusu, Srinivas; McMillan, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    Patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) typically present with a mononeuropathy (particularly peroneal or ulnar palsy) or a brachial plexopathy. Careful electrodiagnostic testing has an important role in establishing the diagnosis of HNPP differentiating this condition from other inherited or acquired neuropathies as well as obviating the need for unnecessary surgeries. We present a case of a patient who presented with a painless brachial plexopathy who was found to have multiple sites of segmental demyelination on nerve conduction studies, consistent with HNPP. We review the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of HNPP including the key electrodiagnostic findings to screen for this disorder.

  11. Results of nerve grafting in radial nerve injuries occurring proximal to the humerus, including those within the posterior cord.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Results of radial nerve grafting are largely unknown for lesions of the radial nerve that occur proximal to the humerus, including those within the posterior cord. METHODS The authors describe 13 patients with proximal radial nerve injuries who were surgically treated and then followed for at least 24 months. The patients' average age was 26 years and the average time between accident and surgery was 6 months. Sural nerve graft length averaged 12 cm. Recovery was scored according to the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) scale, which ranges from M0 to M5 (normal muscle strength). RESULTS After grafting, all 7 patients with an elbow extension palsy recovered elbow extension, scoring M4. Six of the 13 recovered M4 wrist extension, 6 had M3, and 1 had M2. Thumb and finger extension was scored M4 in 3 patients, M3 in 2, M2 in 2, and M0 in 6. CONCLUSIONS The authors consider levels of strength of M4 for elbow and wrist extension and M3 for thumb and finger extension to be good results. Based on these criteria, overall good results were obtained in only 5 of the 13 patients. In proximal radial nerve lesions, the authors now advocate combining nerve grafts with nerve or tendon transfers to reconstruct wrist, thumb, and finger extension.

  12. Bell's palsy: a summary of current evidence and referral algorithm.

    PubMed

    Glass, Graeme E; Tzafetta, Kallirroi

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous idiopathic facial nerve (Bell's) palsy leaves residual hemifacial weakness in 29% which is severe and disfiguring in over half of these cases. Acute medical management remains the best way to improve outcomes. Reconstructive surgery can improve long term disfigurement. However, acute and surgical options are time-dependent. As family practitioners see, on average, one case every 2 years, a summary of this condition based on common clinical questions may improve acute management and guide referral for those who need specialist input. We formulated a series of clinical questions likely to be of use to family practitioners on encountering this condition and sought evidence from the literature to answer them. The lifetime risk is 1 in 60, and is more common in pregnancy and diabetes mellitus. Patients often present with facial pain or paraesthesia, altered taste and intolerance to loud noise in addition to facial droop. It is probably caused by ischaemic compression of the facial nerve within the meatal segment of the facial canal probably as a result of viral inflammation. When given early, high dose corticosteroids can improve outcomes. Neither antiviral therapy nor other adjuvant therapies are supported by evidence. As the facial muscles remain viable re-innervation targets for up to 2 years, late referrals require more complex reconstructions. Early recognition, steroid therapy and early referral for facial reanimation (when the diagnosis is secure) are important features of good management when encountering these complex cases.

  13. Segmental masseteric flap for dynamic reanimation of facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Marco; Lim, Yee Jun; Fogg, Quentin; Morley, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    The masseter muscle is one of the major chewing muscles and contributes to define facial contour. It is an important landmark for aesthetic and functional surgery and has been used for facial palsy reanimation or as source of donor motor nerve. We present an anatomic study to evaluate the possibility of using a muscle subunit for dynamic eye reanimation. Sixteen head halves were dissected under magnification to study the neurovascular distribution and determine safe muscle subunits; areas of safe/dangerous dissection were investigated. Once isolated, the arc of rotation of the muscular subunit was measured on fresh body to verify the reach to the lateral canthus. The patterns of neurovascular distribution and areas of safe dissection were identified; the anterior third of the muscle represents an ideal subunit with constant nerve and artery distribution. The muscle is too short to reach the lateral canthus; a fascia graft extension is needed. The information provided identified the main neurovascular branches and confirms the feasibility of a dynamic segmental flap. The need of efficient motor units for facial reanimation demands for different surgical options. A detailed anatomic description of the neurovascular bundle is mandatory to safely raise a functional motor subunit.

  14. SB6.0: The 6th International meeting on Synthetic Biology, July 9-11, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, Linda J.

    2015-04-23

    The Synthetic Biology conference series (SBx.0) is the preeminent academic meeting in synthetic biology. Organized by the BioBricks Foundation, the SBx.0 conference series brings together leading researchers, students, industry executives, and policy makers from around the world to share, consider, debate, and plan efforts to make biology easier to engineer. Historically held every two years, the SBx.0 conferences are held in alternating locations in the United States, Europe, and Asia to encourage global participation and collaboration so that the ramifications of synthetic biology research and development are most likely to be safe ethical, and beneficial. On 9-11 July 2013, the 6th installment of the synthetic biology conference series (SB6.0) was held on the campus of Imperial College London (http://sb6.biobricks.org). The SB6.0 conference was attended by over 700 people, and many more were able to participate via video digital conference (http://sb6.biobricks.org/digital-conference/). Over the course of three days, the SB6.0 conference agenda included plenary sessions, workshops, and poster presentations covering topics ranging from the infrastructure needs arising when “Systematic Engineering Meets Biological Complexity” and design-led considerations for “Connecting People and Technologies” to discussions on “Engineering Biology for New Materials,” “Assessing Risk and Managing Biocontainment,” and “New Directions for Energy and Sustainability.” The $10,150 grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-SC0010233) to the BioBricks Foundation was used to provide partial reimbursement for the travel expenses of leading researchers from the United States to speak at the SB6.0 conference. A total of $9,450 was used to reimburse U.S. speakers for actual expenses related to the SB6.0 conference, including airfare (economy or coach only), ground transportation, hotel, and registration fees. In addition, $700 of the grant was used to offset

  15. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2003: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichling, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Direct nanoscale and atomic resolution imaging is a key issue in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The invention of the dynamic force microscope in the early 1990s was an important step forward in this direction as this instrument provides a universal tool for measuring the topography and many other physical and chemical properties of surfaces at the nanoscale. Operation in the so-called non-contact mode now allows direct atomic resolution imaging of electrically insulating surfaces and nanostructures which has been an unsolved problem during the first decade of nanotechnology. Today, we face a most rapid development of the technique and an extension of its capabilities far beyond imaging; atomically resolved force spectroscopy provides information about local binding properties and researchers now develop sophisticated schemes of force controlled atomic manipulation with the tip of the force microscope. Progress in the field of non-contact force microscopy is discussed at the annually held NC-AFM conferences that are part of a series started in 1998 with a meeting in Osaka, Japan. The 6th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy took place in Dingle, Ireland, from 31 August to 3 September 2003 and this special issue is a compilation of the original publications of work presented at this meeting. The papers published here well reflect recent achievements, current trends and some of the challenging new directions in non-contact force microscopy that have been discussed during the most stimulating conference days in Dingle. Fundamental aspects of forces and dissipation relevant in imaging and spectroscopy have been covered by experimental and theoretical contributions yielding a more detailed understanding of tip--surface interaction in force microscopy. Novel and improved imaging and spectroscopy techniques have been introduced that either improve the performance of force microscopy or pave the way towards new functionalities and applications

  16. 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emails CDC Features 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... and families living with CP. Early Signs of CP From birth to 5 years of age, a ...

  17. Bell's palsy syndrome: mimics and chameleons.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Geraint; Morgan, Cathy

    2016-12-01

    In this article we will explore the mimics and chameleons of Bell's palsy and in addition argue that we should use the term 'Bell's palsy syndrome' to help guide clinical reasoning when thinking about patients with facial weakness. The diagnosis of Bell's palsy can usually be made on clinical grounds without the need for further investigations. This is because the diagnosis is not one of exclusion (despite this being commonly how it is described), a lower motor neurone facial weakness where all alternative causes have been eliminated, but rather a positive recognition of a clinical syndrome, with a number of exclusions, which are described below. This perhaps would be more accurately referred to a 'Bell's palsy syndrome'. Treatment with corticosteroids improves outcome; adding an antiviral probably reduces the rates of long-term complications.

  18. The radio-radial nerve transfer for elbow extension restoration in C5 to C7 nerve root injury.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2012-01-01

    Extension of the elbow is required to oppose gravity; however, activation of the triceps brachii is frequently underestimated during the surgical planning for brachial plexus injuries. This report aims to describe a novel technique of distal nerve transfer designed for elbow extension reconstruction in patients sustaining a C5-C7 nerve root injury. We report a patient sustaining a brachial plexus injury with triceps palsy and preserved finger extension motion; after careful intraneural dissection of the radial nerve, a fascicle innervating the extensor digitorum communis muscle was sectioned, derouted and connected to a motor branch to the lateral head of the triceps. Eleven months after surgery, elbow extension strength scored MRC M4. No deficits on finger extension were observed.

  19. [Current concepts in perinatal brachial plexus palsy. Part 2: late phase. Shoulder deformities].

    PubMed

    Dogliotti, Andrés Alejandro

    2011-10-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial palsy is high and their sequelaes are frequent. Physiotherapy, microsurgical nerve reconstruction and secondary corrections are used together to improve the shoulder function. The most common posture is shoulder in internal rotation and adduction, because of the antagonist weakness. The muscle forces imbalance over the osteoarticular system, will result in a progressive glenohumeral joint deformity which can be recognized with a magnetic resonance image. Tendon transfers of the internal rotators towards the external abductor/rotator muscles, has good results, but has to be combined with antero-inferior soft-tissue releases, if passive range of motion is limited.

  20. Delayed facial palsy after head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Puvanendran, K; Vitharana, M; Wong, P K

    1977-01-01

    Where facial palsy follows head injury after many days, the mechanism is not clear, and there has been no detailed study on this condition. In this prospective study, an attempt is made to estimate this complication of head injury, and to study its pathogenesis, natural history, prognosis, and sequelae which differ markedly from Bell's palsy. It has a much worse prognosis and so surgical decompression should be considered early in this condition. Images PMID:301556

  1. Update on the U.S. Army TARDEC Power and Energy P&E SIL Program: Progress since the 6th AECV (June 2005 to Present)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    energy dissipaters were installed and the diagnostics and data acquisition system was upgraded. Since one of the two traction motor- dyno pairs was...ion system identical to one installed in HERMIT. New energy dissipaters were installed and the diagnostics and data acquisition system was upgraded...UPDATE ON THE U.S. ARMY TARDEC POWER AND ENERGY P&E SIL PROGRAM Progress since the 6th AECV (June 2005 to Present) Nancy Saxon*, Eugene

  2. Prognostic Discrepancy of the 6th and 7th UICC N Classification for Lymph Node Staging in Gastric Cancer Patients after Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung Jin; Suh, Byoung Jo; Park, Jong Kwon; Oh, Sung Don; Yu, Hang Jong

    2017-01-01

    Background The validity of N classification of the 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging system is still under debate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic efficacy of the 7th edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system (focusing on N stage), in comparison with the 6th edition, at a single Eastern institution. Methods We analyzed 1,435 patients with gastric cancer who underwent curative resection performed from September 1998 to August 2003 at the Memorial Jin-Pok Kim Korea Gastric Cancer Center. We analyzed the survival rate of the patients according to the AJCC/UICC 6th and 7th editions, and compared each stage, focusing on N stage. Results Significant differences in the 5-year survival rates were observed between the 6th and the 7th AJCC/UICC staging system. In the 6th edition staging system, the Kaplan-Meier curves discriminated each N stage significantly. In contrast, there was no difference in terms of survival curves for N stage according to the 7th edition, especially between N1 and N2: the Kaplan-Meier plots of survival curves between N1 (77.0%) and N2 (78.1%) stages overlapped significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusion Although the 7th UICC staging system is a more detailed and sophisticated system in the T category, there was no prognostic significance between the pN1 and pN2 stages according to our data. Therefore, we suggest establishing a new UICC staging system taking into consideration the application of the N stage. PMID:28203165

  3. Breaching the Devil’s Garden- The 6th New Zealand Brigade in Operation Lightfoot. The Second Battle of El Alamein, 23 October 1942. Appendices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    Force (And Related Elements) Appendix K Chronology Of Events, 6th New Zealand Brigade Zone Appendix L Other Breaches Conducted As Part Of The Overall...extra positions will be used as alternate positions. All new positions will be placed in the minefields. A part of each combat outpost, in the old...Aber auch den eing6e3etztefl Verbaenden wfrd si ~ch txn~itteltsaz l4ntor der - Front Gelegenhoit bieten, in beochraenktom Rahmen eauszibilden

  4. Archeomagnetic Intensity Variations During the 6th Millennium BC in the Middle East: New Data from Yarim Tepe II (Northern Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimova, S.; Gallet, Y.; Amirov, S.

    2015-12-01

    During the seventies, Soviet archeologists conducted in Northern Iraq excavations of several ancient settlements dated from the Pottery Late Neolithic period (7th and 6th millennia BC). A very large collection of artifacts unearthed from these sites, in particular several thousands of well-documented pottery fragments, is now stored at the Archeological Institute in Moscow. We collected a time-sequential series of groups of potsherds from the multilayered settlement called Yarim Tepe II dated to the Halaf period (6th millennium BC). Each group comprises a minimum of 3 potsherds (up to 10) found within a same archeological layer, typically a thickness of about 20 cm. Altogether, the fragment groups encompass the entire 7-m thick stratigraphic sequence of Yarim Tepe II. We will present our first archeointensity results obtained using the experimental protocol developed for the Triaxe magnetometer, taking into account the effects of both the thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) anisotropy and the cooling rate dependence on TRM acquisition. The new data help to better constrain the geomagnetic field intensity variations in the Middle East during the 6th millennium BC. Thanks to the comparison with other datasets from Bulgaria and Syria, the new archeointensity results provide evidence for the occurrence of very rapid geomagnetic field intensity variations around 5500 BC.

  5. Cerebral Palsy Gait, Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    TUGUI, Raluca Dana; ANTONESCU, Dinu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy refers to a lesion on an immature brain, that determines permanent neurological disorders. Knowing the exact cause of the disease does not alter the treatment management. The etiology is 2-2.5/1000 births and the rate is constant in the last 40-50 years because advances in medical technologies have permitted the survival of smaller and premature new born children. Gait analysis has four directions: kinematics (represents body movements analysis without calculating the forces), kinetics (represents body moments and forces), energy consumption (measured by oximetry), and neuromuscular activity (measured by EMG). Gait analysis can observe specific deviations in a patient, allowing us to be more accurate in motor diagnoses and treatment solutions: surgery intervention, botulinum toxin injection, use of orthosis, physical kinetic therapy, oral medications, baclofen pump. PMID:24790675

  6. Genetics of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

    PubMed

    Im, Sun Young; Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yun Joong

    2015-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is clinically characterized by progressive postural instability, supranuclear gaze palsy, parkinsonism and cognitive decline. Pathologically, diagnosis of PSP is based on characteristic features, such as neurofibrillary tangles, neutrophil threads, tau-positive astrocytes and their processes in basal ganglia and brainstem, and the accumulation of 4 repeat tau protein. PSP is generally recognized as a sporadic disorder; however, understanding of genetic background of PSP has been expanding rapidly. Here we review relevant publications to outline the genetics of PSP. Although only small number of familial PSP cases have been reported, the recognition of familial PSP has been increasing. In some familial cases of clinically probable PSP, PSP pathologies were confirmed based on NINDS neuropathological diagnostic criteria. Several mutations in MAPT, the gene that causes a form of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tauopathy, have been identified in both sporadic and familial PSP cases. The H1 haplotype of MAPT is a risk haplotype for PSP, and within H1, a sub-haplotype (H1c) is associated with PSP. A recent genome-wide association study on autopsyproven PSP revealed additional PSP risk alleles in STX6 and EIF2AK3. Several heredodegenerative parkinsonian disorders are referred to as PSP-look-alikes because their clinical phenotype, but not their pathology, mimics PSP. Due to the fast development of genomics and bioinformatics, more genetic factors related to PSP are expected to be discovered. Undoubtedly, these studies will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PSP and clues for developing therapeutic strategies.

  7. [Progressive supranuclear palsy: what's new?].

    PubMed

    Levy, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) has been described as a clinical syndrome characterized by an impairment of voluntary control of gaze (supranuclear palsy), postural and gait instability, and behavioral and cognitive deficits including a frontal syndrome and psychic retardation. However, in the recent years, at least four other clinical forms of PSP have been recognized: PSP-Parkinsonism, "pure akinesia with gait freezing", PSP with cortico-basal syndrome, and PSP with speech apraxia. PSP-Parkinsonism mimics the signs and symptoms of idiopathic Parkinson's disease, including a significant reactivity to levodopa. "Pure akinesia with gait freezing" is characterized by a difficulty of self-initiation of motor programs, usually walking program. PSP with cortico-basal syndrome mimics cortico-basal degeneration (CBD) in that unilateral or asymmetric limb dystonia and apraxia are prominent signs. PSP with speech apraxia is an isolated syndrome of progressive anarthria. All these clinical syndromes are due to brain accumulation of phosphorylated tau protein. The differences in clinical expression within the framework of PSP can be explained by the differences in the topographical distribution of the lesions. PSP is considered as a primary tau disease ("tauopathy") such as CBD and some forms of fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. At the level of neuropathology, the pattern of tau abnormal inclusions differentiates PSP from other tau diseases, but some overlaps are reported. Moreover, several of the clinical forms of PSP partially or fully overlap with the other tauopathies. As a whole, the emergence of new clinical forms of PSP challenges the nosology of tauopathies and our understanding of these diseases.

  8. Genetics of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sun Young; Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yun Joong

    2015-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is clinically characterized by progressive postural instability, supranuclear gaze palsy, parkinsonism and cognitive decline. Pathologically, diagnosis of PSP is based on characteristic features, such as neurofibrillary tangles, neutrophil threads, tau-positive astrocytes and their processes in basal ganglia and brainstem, and the accumulation of 4 repeat tau protein. PSP is generally recognized as a sporadic disorder; however, understanding of genetic background of PSP has been expanding rapidly. Here we review relevant publications to outline the genetics of PSP. Although only small number of familial PSP cases have been reported, the recognition of familial PSP has been increasing. In some familial cases of clinically probable PSP, PSP pathologies were confirmed based on NINDS neuropathological diagnostic criteria. Several mutations in MAPT, the gene that causes a form of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tauopathy, have been identified in both sporadic and familial PSP cases. The H1 haplotype of MAPT is a risk haplotype for PSP, and within H1, a sub-haplotype (H1c) is associated with PSP. A recent genome-wide association study on autopsyproven PSP revealed additional PSP risk alleles in STX6 and EIF2AK3. Several heredodegenerative parkinsonian disorders are referred to as PSP-look-alikes because their clinical phenotype, but not their pathology, mimics PSP. Due to the fast development of genomics and bioinformatics, more genetic factors related to PSP are expected to be discovered. Undoubtedly, these studies will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PSP and clues for developing therapeutic strategies. PMID:26413239

  9. Obesity in Pregnancy Tied to Cerebral Palsy Risk in Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163962.html Obesity in Pregnancy Tied to Cerebral Palsy Risk in Kids But study authors stress that ... chances that their baby could be born with cerebral palsy, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at information ...

  10. Attitudes and Needs of Parents of Cerebral Palsied Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, Gladys P.

    1979-01-01

    The article reviews the literature in the following five areas of concern for parents of cerebral palsied children: causes and effects of cerebral palsy, family dynamics, counseling, educational and vocational programs, and employment. (PHR)

  11. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies in a Turkish patient (HNPP): a rare cause of entrapment neuropathies in young adults.

    PubMed

    Celik, Yahya; Kilinçer, Cumhur; Hamamcioğlu, M Kemal; Balci, Kemal; Birgili, Bariş; Cobanoğlu, Sebahattin; Utku, Ufuk

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant nerve disease usually caused by 1,5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2.2-p12, the region where the PMP-22 gene is located. The patients with HNPP usually have relapsing and remitting entrapment neuropathies due to compression. We present a 14-year-old male who had acute onset, right-sided ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow. He had electrophysiological findings of bilateral ulnar nerve entrapments (more severe at the right side) at the elbow and bilateral median nerve entrapment at the wrist. Genetic tests of the patient demonstrated deletions in the 17p11.2 region. The patient underwent decompressive surgery for ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow and completely recovered two months after the event. Although HNPP is extremely rare, it should be taken into consideration in young adults with entrapment neuropathies.

  12. [Intraneural ganglion of the peroneal nerve. A case report].

    PubMed

    Bischoff, J; Kortmann, K-B; Engelhardt, M

    2010-09-01

    This is a report of a 70-year-old patient with spontaneous pain of the dorsum area of the left foot. A few days later there was a sudden onset of foot drop. First, an idiopathic peroneal palsy was assessed but an MRI showed a cystic tumour near the fibular head. These findings resulted in the patient attending our clinic for surgical treatment. During the operation we found an intraneural ganglion of the deep peroneal nerve and the common peroneal nerve. There was no connection with the superior tibiofibular joint. The ganglion was therefore removed. Two months after the operation the patient reported an improvement of the pain but no improvement of movement of the foot. An intraneural ganglion of the peroneal nerve derives from the superior tibiofibular joint. Given access to the articular branch, the cyst typically spreads out proximally from the deep peroneal nerve to the common peroneal nerve and to the point of the sciatic nerve. The clinical symptoms are correlated with the extent of cyst propagation. Recommended therapy would include the ligation of the aricular branch, or synovectomy, or resection of the superior tibiofibular joint and decompression of the cyst.

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen as a therapy of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Racic, G; Denoble, P J; Sprem, N; Bojic, L; Bota, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the therapeutic effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) to the effects of prednisone treatment in 79 subjects with Bell's palsy. Patients were randomly assigned either to the HBO2-treated group (n = 42) or to the prednisone-treated group (n = 37). The HBO2 group was exposed to 2.8 atm abs of 100% oxygen for 60 min, twice a day, 5 days a week and was given a placebo orally. The prednisone group was exposed to 2.8 atm abs of 7% O2 (equivalent to 21% O2 in air at normal pressure) following the same schedule as the HBO2 group; prednisone was given orally (total of 450 mg in 8 days). Subjects from both groups were treated in the hyperbaric chamber for up to 30 sessions or to complete recovery, and were followed up for 9 mo. At the end of the follow-up period, 95.2% of subjects treated with HBO2, and 75.7% of subjects treated with prednisone recovered completely. The average time to complete the recovery in the HBO2 group was 22 days as opposed to 34.4 days in the control group (P < 0.001). In the HBO2-treated group, at the beginning, the altered nerve excitability test (NET) was abnormal in five subjects; three of them had normal NET by the end of the follow-up period. In the prednisone group the NET was abnormal in nine subjects at the beginning and they had not recovered by the end of the follow-up (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that HBO2 is more effective than prednisone in treatment of Bell's palsy.

  14. Can intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring during cervical spine decompression predict post-operative segmental C5 palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Blaskiewicz, Donald J.; Ramirez, Bertha; Zhang, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background C5 nerve root palsy is a known complication after cervical laminectomy or laminoplasty, characterized by weakness of the deltoid and bicep brachii muscles. The efficacy of intraoperative monitoring of these muscles is currently unclear. In the current prospective study, intraoperative monitoring through somatosensory (SSEPs), motor (TcMEPs) evoked potentials and real-time electromyography activity (EMG) were analyzed for their ability to detect or prevent deltoid muscle weakness after surgery. Methods One hundred consecutive patients undergoing laminectomy/laminoplasty with or without fusion were enrolled. Intraoperative SSEPs, TcMEPs and EMGs from each patient were studied and analyzed. Results Intraoperative EMG activity of the C5 nerve root was detected in 34 cases, 10 of which demonstrated a sustained and repetitive EMG activity lasting 5 or more minutes. Paresis of the unilateral deltoid muscle developed in 5 patients, all from the group with sustained C5 EMG activity. None of the patients with weakness of deltoid muscle after surgery demonstrated any abnormal change in TcMEP or SSEP. Conclusions Real-time EMG recordings were sensitive to C5 nerve root irritation, whilst SSEPs and TcMEPs were not. Sustained EMG activity of the C5 nerve root during surgery is a possible warning sign of irritation or injury to the nerve. PMID:27757428

  15. The effect of the photobiomodulation in the treatment of Bell's palsy: clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Fabio; Marques, Aparecida Maria C.; Carvalho, Carolina M.; Paraguassu, Gardenia M.; de Sousa, José A. C.; Magalhaes, Edival; Cangussu, Maria Cristina T.; de A. Reis, Silvia Regina; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B.

    2012-03-01

    The Bell's palsy (G51) consists of a unilateral face paralysis that sudden begins with unknown cause and can result in complete mimic loss or partial paralysis of the face. Damage to the VII cranial nerve can be found in the pathology, promoting mussel's inactivity. The light Photobiomodulation (LPBM) has presented ability of rush the tissue repair, favoring the regeneration of neural structures. The present study aimed to assess the effectiveness use of the 780nm laser and 850nm LED (light-emitting diode) in the treatment of the face paralysis. Were evaluated 14 patients that suffer of Bell's palsy whom were submitted to the light administration, on the Laser Clinic of the UFBA between 2005 and 2010. The treatment was performed by infrared Laser in 11 patients (78.57%), and by LED in 3 patients (21.42%). At the end of the 12 sections, 11 patients (78.57%) had presented themselves cure or with substantial improvement of the initial picture, however 3 patients (21.42%) dealt with infra-red Laser λ780nm had not evolution. The light presented as an effective method for the treatment of Bell's palsy, but the association with the physiotherapy and medications is important.

  16. The effects of deefferentation without deafferentation on functional connectivity in patients with facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Klingner, Carsten M; Volk, Gerd F; Brodoehl, Stefan; Witte, Otto W; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral plasticity includes the adaptation of anatomical and functional connections between parts of the involved brain network. However, little is known about the network dynamics of these connectivity changes. This study investigates the impact of a pure deefferentation, without deafferentation or brain damage, on the functional connectivity of the brain. To investigate this issue, functional MRI was performed on 31 patients in the acute state of Bell's palsy (idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy). All of the patients performed a motor paradigm to identify seed regions involved in motor control. The functional connectivity of the resting state within this network of brain regions was compared to a healthy control group. We found decreased connectivity in patients, mainly in areas responsible for sensorimotor integration and supervision (SII, insula, thalamus and cerebellum). However, we did not find decreased connectivity in areas of the primary or secondary motor cortex. The decreased connectivity for the SII and the insula significantly correlated to the severity of the facial palsy. Our results indicate that a pure deefferentation leads the brain to adapt to the current compromised state during rest. The motor system did not make a major attempt to solve the sensorimotor discrepancy by modulating the motor program.

  17. Extracranial Facial Nerve Schwannoma Treated by Hypo-fractionated CyberKnife Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2016-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannoma is a rare intracranial tumor. Treatment for this benign tumor has been controversial. Here, we report a case of extracranial facial nerve schwannoma treated successfully by hypo-fractionated CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) radiosurgery and discuss the efficacy of this treatment. A 34-year-old female noticed a swelling in her right mastoid process. The lesion enlarged over a seven-month period, and she experienced facial spasm on the right side. She was diagnosed with a facial schwannoma via a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head and neck and was told to wait until the facial nerve palsy subsides. She was referred to our hospital for radiation therapy. We planned a fractionated CyberKnife radiosurgery for three consecutive days. After CyberKnife radiosurgery, the mass in the right parotid gradually decreased in size, and the facial nerve palsy disappeared. At her eight-month follow-up, her facial spasm had completely disappeared. There has been no recurrence and the facial nerve function has been normal. We successfully demonstrated the efficacy of CyberKnife radiosurgery as an alternative treatment that also preserves neurofunction for facial nerve schwannomas. PMID:27774363

  18. Extracranial Facial Nerve Schwannoma Treated by Hypo-fractionated CyberKnife Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ayaka; Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2016-09-21

    Facial nerve schwannoma is a rare intracranial tumor. Treatment for this benign tumor has been controversial. Here, we report a case of extracranial facial nerve schwannoma treated successfully by hypo-fractionated CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) radiosurgery and discuss the efficacy of this treatment. A 34-year-old female noticed a swelling in her right mastoid process. The lesion enlarged over a seven-month period, and she experienced facial spasm on the right side. She was diagnosed with a facial schwannoma via a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head and neck and was told to wait until the facial nerve palsy subsides. She was referred to our hospital for radiation therapy. We planned a fractionated CyberKnife radiosurgery for three consecutive days. After CyberKnife radiosurgery, the mass in the right parotid gradually decreased in size, and the facial nerve palsy disappeared. At her eight-month follow-up, her facial spasm had completely disappeared. There has been no recurrence and the facial nerve function has been normal. We successfully demonstrated the efficacy of CyberKnife radiosurgery as an alternative treatment that also preserves neurofunction for facial nerve schwannomas.

  19. Extraocular Muscle Compartments in Superior Oblique Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Soh Youn; Clark, Robert A.; Le, Alan; Demer, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate changes in volumes of extraocular muscle (EOM) compartments in unilateral superior oblique (SO) palsy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods High-resolution, surface-coil MRI was obtained in 19 patients with unilateral SO palsy and 19 age-matched orthotropic control subjects. Rectus EOMs and the SO were divided into two anatomic compartments for volume analysis in patients with unilateral SO palsy, allowing comparison of total compartmental volumes versus controls. Medial and lateral compartmental volumes of the SO muscle were compared in patients with isotropic (round shape) versus anisotropic (elongated shape) SO atrophy. Results The medial and lateral compartments of the ipsilesional SO muscles were equally atrophic in isotropic SO palsy, whereas the lateral compartment was significantly smaller than the medial in anisotropic SO palsy (P = 0.01). In contrast to the SO, there were no differential compartmental volume changes in rectus EOMs; however, there was significant total muscle hypertrophy in the ipsilesional inferior rectus (IR) and lateral rectus (LR) muscles and contralesional superior rectus (SR) muscles. Medial rectus (MR) volume was normal both ipsi- and contralesionally. Conclusions A subset of patients with SO palsy exhibit selective atrophy of the lateral, predominantly vertically acting SO compartment. Superior oblique atrophy is associated with whole-muscle volume changes in the ipsilesional IR, ipsilesional LR, and contralesional SR; however, SO muscle atrophy is not associated with compartmentally selective volume changes in the rectus EOMs. Selective compartmental SO pathology may provide an anatomic mechanism that explains some of the variability in clinical presentations of SO palsy. PMID:27768791

  20. Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Thomas Michael

    2008-12-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most prevalent cause of persisting motor function impairment with a frequency of about 1/500 births. In developed countries, the prevalence rose after introduction of neonatal intensive care, but in the past decade, this trend has reversed. A recent international workshop defined cerebral palsy as "a group of permanent disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to non-progressive disturbances that occurred in the developing fetal or infant brain." In a majority of cases, the predominant motor abnormality is spasticity; other forms of cerebral palsy include dyskinetic (dystonia or choreo-athetosis) and ataxic cerebral palsy. In preterm infants, about one-half of the cases have neuroimaging abnormalities, such as echolucency in the periventricular white matter or ventricular enlargement on cranial ultrasound. Among children born at or near term, about two-thirds have neuroimaging abnormalities, including focal infarction, brain malformations, and periventricular leukomalacia. In addition to the motor impairment, individuals with cerebral palsy may have sensory impairments, cognitive impairment, and epilepsy. Ambulation status, intelligence quotient, quality of speech, and hand function together are predictive of employment status. Mortality risk increases incrementally with increasing number of impairments, including intellectual, limb function, hearing, and vision. The care of individuals with cerebral palsy should include the provision of a primary care medical home for care coordination and support; diagnostic evaluations to identify brain abnormalities, severity of neurologic and functional abnormalities, and associated impairments; management of spasticity; and care for associated problems such as nutritional deficiencies, pain, dental care, bowel and bladder continence, and orthopedic complications. Current strategies to decrease the risk of cerebral palsy include interventions to

  1. Mental Imagery Abilities in Adolescents with Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courbois, Yanick; Coello, Yann; Bouchart, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    Four visual imagery tasks were presented to three groups of adolescents with or without spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. The first group was composed of six adolescents with cerebral palsy who had associated visual-perceptual deficits (CP-PD), the second group was composed of five adolescents with cerebral palsy and no associated visual-perceptual…

  2. Auditory Selective Attention in Cerebral-Palsied Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laraway, Lee Ann

    1985-01-01

    To examine differences between auditory selective attention abilities of normal and cerebral-palsied individuals, 23 cerebral-palsied and 23 normal subjects (5-21) were asked to repeat a series of 30 items in presence of intermittent white noise. Results indicated that cerebral-palsied individuals perform significantly more poorly when the…

  3. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis and facial palsy: Literature review and insight in the autoimmune pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Greco, Antonio; Granata, Guido; Manno, Alessandra; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Angeletti, Diletta; Didona, Dario; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is an autoimmune systemic necrotizing small-vessel vasculitis associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Oto-neurological manifestations of ANCA-associated vasculitis according to PR3-ANCA positivity and MPO-ANCA positivity are usually reported. Facial nerve palsy is usually reported during the clinical course of the disease but it might appear as the presenting sign of GPA. Necrotizing vasculitis of the facial nerve 'vasa nervorum' is nowadays the most widely accepted etiopathogenetic theory to explain facial damage in GPA patients. A central role for PR3-ANCA in the pathophysiology of vasculitis in GPA patients with oto-neurological manifestation is reported. GPA requires prompt, effective management of the acute and chronic manifestations. Once the diagnosis of GPA has been established, clinicians should devise an appropriate treatment strategy for each individual patient, based on current clinical evidence, treatment guidelines and recommendations.

  4. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies presenting with sciatic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Topakian, Raffi; Wimmer, Sibylle; Pischinger, Barbara; Pichler, Robert

    2014-10-17

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal-dominant disorder associated with recurrent mononeuropathies following compression or trivial trauma. Reports on sciatic neuropathy as the presenting manifestation of HNPP are very scarce. We report on a 21-year-old previously healthy man who was admitted with sensorimotor deficits in his left leg. He had no history of preceding transient episodes of weakness or sensory loss. Clinical and electrophysiological examinations were consistent with sciatic neuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid investigation and MRI of the nerve roots, plexus, and sciatic nerve did not indicate the underlying aetiology. When extended electrophysiological tests revealed multiple subclinical compression neuropathies in the upper limbs, HNPP was contemplated and eventually confirmed by genetic testing.

  5. Moving toes and myoclonus associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Shaibani, A; Gooch, C; Harati, Y

    1997-07-01

    A 22-year-old male awoke with right foot drop and numbness. Nerve conduction studies, sural nerve biopsy, and molecular genetic analysis were consistent with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). Two months later he developed involuntary flexion/extension movements of the right toes with associated intermittent dystonic flexion of the right foot. Over the next 2 months these movements spread to the left foot and hand and myoclonus of the left trapezius and rhomboid appeared. This is the first case report of moving toes syndrome and segmental myoclonus in association with HNPP. The temporal and topographic patterns of spread of the abnormal movements suggest a central mechanism probably induced by peripheral pathology.

  6. Masseteric-facial nerve neurorrhaphy: results of a case series.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, Federico; Colombo, Valeria; Rabbiosi, Dimitri; Tarabbia, Filippo; Giovanditto, Federica; Lozza, Alessandro; Cupello, Silvia; Mortini, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Facial palsy is a well-known functional and esthetic problem that bothers most patients and affects their social relationships. When the time between the onset of paralysis and patient presentation is less than 18 months and the proximal stump of the injured facial nerve is not available, another nerve must be anastomosed to the facial nerve to reactivate its function. The masseteric nerve has recently gained popularity over the classic hypoglossus nerve as a new motor source because of its lower associated morbidity rate and the relative ease with which the patient can activate it. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of masseteric-facial nerve neurorrhaphy for early facial reanimation. METHODS Thirty-four consecutive patients (21 females, 13 males) with early unilateral facial paralysis underwent masseteric-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in which an interpositional nerve graft of the great auricular or sural nerve was placed. The time between the onset of paralysis and surgery ranged from 2 to 18 months (mean 13.3 months). Electromyography revealed mimetic muscle fibrillations in all the patients. Before surgery, all patients had House-Brackmann Grade VI facial nerve dysfunction. Twelve months after the onset of postoperative facial nerve reactivation, each patient underwent a clinical examination using the modified House-Brackmann grading scale as a guide. RESULTS Overall, 91.2% of the patients experienced facial nerve function reactivation. Facial recovery began within 2-12 months (mean 6.3 months) with the restoration of facial symmetry at rest. According to the modified House-Brackmann grading scale, 5.9% of the patients had Grade I function, 61.8% Grade II, 20.6% Grade III, 2.9% Grade V, and 8.8% Grade VI. The morbidity rate was low; none of the patients could feel the loss of masseteric nerve function. There were only a few complications, including 1 case of postoperative bleeding (2.9%) and 2 local infections (5.9%), and a few

  7. Intracapsular microenucleation technique in a case of intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma. Technical notes for a conservative approach.

    PubMed

    Rigante, M; Petrelli, L; DE Corso, E; Paludetti, G

    2015-02-01

    We report a rare case of a large intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma (IFNS) in a 51-year-old female who presented with a painless, slow growing left parotid mass without peripheral facial nerve palsy, with non-specific findings at preoperative diagnostic work-up, that was treated with conservative surgery. Management of IFNS is very challenging because the diagnosis is often made intra-operatively, and in most cases resection may lead to severe facial nerve paralysis, with important aesthetic sequelae. Our experience suggests a new surgical option, namely intra-capsular enucleation using a microscope, currently used for schwannomas arising from a major peripheral nerve, which should be a safe and reliable treatment for IFNS. This surgical technique is the first experience of intracapsular microenucleation of facial nerve schwannoma described in the literature and allows preservation of the nerve without resection and reconstruction.

  8. Case Report of Lewis and Sumner Syndrome with Bilateral Vagus Nerves Paralysis for 16 Years.

    PubMed

    Vasaghi, Attiyeh; Ashraf, Alireza; Shirzadi, Alireza; Petramfar, Peyman

    2016-12-01

    This report describes a patient with dysphonia for 16 years in combination with asymmetric and progressive decrease in sense and power of both upper and lower extremities for the past 3 years. Electrophysiological study revealed asymmetric conduction block and abnormal sensory action potential in 4 limbs. The vagus nerves palsy and abnormal electrodiagnosis of the limbs led us to diagnose the disease as Lewis and Sumner syndrome, also called multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy diagnosis, which improved by corticosteroid consumption to some extent. This case is uncommon by its long time presentation and progression. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral vagus nerve palsy in combination with upper and lower limbs' demyelinating neuropathy. In conclusion, persistent dysphonia can be a part of the presentation of demyelinating neuropathy.

  9. Vocal cords palsy in systemic lupus erythematosus patient: diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties.

    PubMed

    Leszczynski, Piotr; Pawlak-Bus, Katarzyna

    2013-06-01

    Vocal cords palsy is a rare complication in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A 38-year-old female patient with a history of SLE presented with chronic voice hoarseness resistant to standard treatment. High levels of antinuclear antibodies including dsDNA, Ro52, SSA, SSB were confirmed, while antiphospholipid antibodies were absent. While other causes of voice hoarseness were excluded, bilateral vocal cords palsy was diagnosed. Moreover, the patient revealed features of obvious Hashimoto thyroiditis with high levels of antithyroid antibodies and also developed a convergent squint as a result of fatigability of oculomotor muscles. Electrophysiology test of peripheral nerves detected myasthenic type nerve-muscle conduction impairment which was suspected as the cause of reported symptoms. Possible reasons for emerging signs and symptoms of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus were discussed as well as the presence of vasculitis, neuropathy, significance of thyroiditis and coexistence of myasthenia. All that reasons of similar autoimmune background were also raised in this case report.

  10. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy Presenting as an Acute Brachial Plexopathy: A Lover's Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Wedderburn, Sarah; Pateria, Puraskar; Panegyres, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally regarded that patients with hereditary neuropathy to pressure palsies, due to a deletion in the PMP22 gene, show recurrent pressure palsy and generalised peripheral neuropathy (pes cavus and hammer toes sometimes develop). Brachial plexopathy is rarely identified as a first presentation of hereditary neuropathy to pressure palsies. We describe a young man who developed a painless flail upper limb with a clinical diagnosis of a brachial plexopathy after his partner slept on his arm – a PMP22 deletion was found. His father, who had a symmetrical polyneuropathy without recurrent mononeuropathies, shared the PMP22 deletion. PMID:25685136

  11. Clinical, electrophysiological and magnetic resonance findings in a family with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies caused by a novel PMP22 mutation.

    PubMed

    Yurrebaso, Izaskun; Casado, Oscar L; Barcena, Joseba; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Aguirre, Urko

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a disorder mainly caused by a 1.5-Mb deletion at 17p11.2-12 (and in some rare cases by point mutations) and clinically associated with recurrent painless palsies. Here, we performed electrophysiological (motor, sensory and terminal latency index), MRI and genetic studies in a family referred for ulnar neuropathy with pain. Surprisingly, we found typical neurophysiological features of HNPP (prolongation of distal motor latencies and diffuse SNCV slowing with significant slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities). Besides, the proband presented conduction block in left ulnar, left median and both peroneal nerves. MRI findings were consistent with an underlying neuropathy. Molecular studies identified a novel frameshift mutation in PMP22 confirming the diagnosis of HNPP. Our data suggest that neurophysiological studies are essential to characterize underdiagnosed HNPP patients referred for peripheral neuropathy. Our experience shows that MRI could be a complementary tool for the diagnosis of these patients.

  12. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  13. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  14. 6(th) Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) applications and beyond, April 25-27, 2013, Riga, Latvia.

    PubMed

    Alzaid, Aus; Schlaeger, Christof; Hinzmann, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    International experts in the fields of diabetes, diabetes technology, endocrinology, and pediatrics gathered for the 6(th) Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Applications and beyond. The aim of this meeting was to continue setting up a global network of experts in this field and provide an international platform for exchange of ideas to improve life for people with diabetes. The 2013 meeting comprised a comprehensive scientific program, parallel interactive workshops, and two keynote lectures. All these discussions were intended to help identify gaps and areas where further scientific work and clinical studies are warranted.

  15. 6th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Applications and Beyond, April 25–27, 2013, Riga, Latvia

    PubMed Central

    Schlaeger, Christof; Hinzmann, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Abstract International experts in the fields of diabetes, diabetes technology, endocrinology, and pediatrics gathered for the 6th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Applications and beyond. The aim of this meeting was to continue setting up a global network of experts in this field and provide an international platform for exchange of ideas to improve life for people with diabetes. The 2013 meeting comprised a comprehensive scientific program, parallel interactive workshops, and two keynote lectures. All these discussions were intended to help identify gaps and areas where further scientific work and clinical studies are warranted. PMID:24074038

  16. Managing cognition in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Rittman, Timothy; Coyle-Gilchrist, Ian Ts; Rowe, James B

    2016-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is integral to the syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy. It is most commonly described as a frontal dysexecutive syndrome but other impairments include apathy, impulsivity, visuospatial and memory functions. Cognitive dysfunction may be exacerbated by mood disturbance, medication and communication problems. In this review we advocate an individualized approach to managing cognitive impairment in progressive supranuclear palsy with the education of caregivers as a central component. Specific cognitive and behavioral treatments are complemented by treatment of mood disturbances, rationalizing medications and a patient-centered approach to communication. This aims to improve patients' quality of life, reduce carer burden and assist people with progressive supranuclear palsy in decisions about their life and health, including discussions of feeding and end-of-life issues.

  17. The phenotypic spectrum of progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Respondek, G; Höglinger, G U

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the clinical picture of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) was defined by early postural instability with falls, supranuclear vertical gaze palsy, symmetric akinesia and rigidity, frontal and subcortical dementia, and pseudobulbar palsy, leading to death after a mean disease duration of approximately six years. A definite diagnosis of PSP depends on neuropathological confirmation. In recent years, clinico-pathological studies have drawn attention to various "atypical" clinical manifestations of PSP. In these, a clinical diagnosis of PSP is delayed or never accomplished. Comprehensive understanding of the natural history of PSP is required to permit an early and accurate diagnosis. Based on current evidence, this review provides an update on the clinical spectrum of PSP.

  18. Lyme Disease Presenting with Multiple Cranial Nerve Deficits: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Baker, Keith; Jeanmonod, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted multisystem inflammatory disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. With more than 25,000 CDC reported cases annually, it has become the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. We report a case of 38-year-old man with Lyme disease presenting with simultaneous palsy of 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves. PMID:27635267

  19. Treatment of Combined Injuries of the Axillary and Suprascapular Nerves with Scapulothoracic Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kazufumi; Ozeki, Satoru

    2015-12-01

    A 20-year-old man suffered the combined axillary and suprascapular nerve palsies associated with scapulothoracic dissociation by motorcycle accident. The dislocated shoulder girdle was reduced and stabilized with osteosynthesis of the fractured clavicle and reattachment of the trapezius avulsed from the scapular spine for removal of continuous traction force to these damaged nerves. Because of no evidence of recovery on manual muscle test and electromyogram, exploration for these nerves was administered 6 weeks after injury. Although neurolysis of both nerves revealed neural continuity, excessive tension still existed on the suprascapular nerve. It was thought that previous operation in which the shoulder girdle had been reduced and stabilized as much as possible could not achieve complete anatomical reduction of the scapula. As an additional treatment, medial walls of the suprascapular and spinoglenoid notches were shaven to relax the suprascapular nerve. After a year, complete recovery of both the axillary and suprascapular nerve was identified. Although scapulothoracic dissociation is commonly recognized as massive injury of the shoulder girdle with poor prognosis because of existence of accompanied severe neurovascular injuries, there are more than a few cases in which partial damage on the infraclavicular brachial plexus is only accompanied. In case of them, there is the possibility of lesions in continuity of the nerves in which good prognosis might be expected with surgical intervention including early reduction of the shoulder girdle for removal of excessive tension to the damaged nerve.

  20. [Regeneration and repair of peripheral nerves: clinical implications in facial paralysis surgery].

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, B; Vidal, A

    2000-01-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions are one of the most frequent causes of chronic incapacity. Upper or lower limb palsies due to brachial or lumbar plexus injuries, facial paralysis and nerve lesions caused by systemic diseases are one of the major goals of plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, the poor results obtained in repaired peripheral nerves during the Second World War lead to a pessimist vision of peripheral nerve repair. Nevertheless, a well understanding of microsurgical principles in reconstruction and molecular biology of nerve regeneration have improved the clinical results. Thus, although the results obtained are quite far from perfect, these procedures give to patients a hope in the recuperation of their lesions and then on function. Technical aspects in nerve repair are well established; the next step is to manipulate the biology. In this article we will comment the biological processes which appear in peripheral nerve regeneration, we will establish the main concepts on peripheral nerve repair applied in facial paralysis cases and, finally, we will proportionate some ideas about how clinical practice could be affected by manipulation of the peripheral nerve biology.

  1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) in a toddler presenting with toe-walking, pain and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lönnqvist, Tuula; Pihko, Helena

    2003-12-01

    The typical clinical presentation of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is an adult-onset recurrent, painless monoparesis. Electrophysiological abnormalities--decreased nerve conduction velocities and delayed distal latencies--can be detected even in asymptomatic patients. We describe a toddler, who presented with asymmetric toe walking, painful cramps and stiffness in the legs. He had calf hypertrophy, brisk tendon reflexes and bilateral Babinski signs and the electrophysiological examination was normal. The unlikely diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies was reached 5 years later, when the boy started to complain of episodic numbness and weakness in the upper extremities. His father, paternal aunt and grandmother had similar symptoms, but they had never been investigated. The typical 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2-12 was found in our patient and his affected relatives.

  2. Oral baclofen increases maximal voluntary neuromuscular activation of ankle plantar flexors in children with spasticity due to cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    van Doornik, Johan; Kukke, Sahana; McGill, Kevin; Rose, Jessica; Sherman-Levine, Sara; Sanger, Terence D

    2008-06-01

    Although spasticity is a common symptom in children with cerebral palsy, weakness may be a much greater contributor to disability. We explore whether a treatment that reduces spasticity may also have potential benefit for improving strength. Ten children with cerebral palsy and spasticity in the ankle plantar flexor muscles were treated with oral baclofen for 4 weeks. We tested voluntary ability to activate ankle plantar flexor muscles using the ratio of the surface electromyographic signal during isometric maximal voluntary contraction to the M-wave during supramaximal electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve and tested muscle strength using maximal isometric plantar flexion torque. Mean maximal voluntary neuromuscular activation increased from 1.13 +/- 1.02 to 1.60 +/- 1.30 ( P < .05) after treatment, corresponding to an increase in 9 of 10 subjects. Mean maximal plantar flexion torque did not change. We conjecture that antispasticity agents could facilitate strength training by increasing the ability to voluntarily activate muscle.

  3. Optic Nerve Pit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  4. Cerebral palsy. A pediatric developmentalist's overview.

    PubMed

    Vining, E P; Accardo, P J; Rubenstein, J E; Farrell, S E; Roizen, N J

    1976-06-01

    Exploration of the history, terminology, and classification of cerebral palsy reveals it as a complex entity. Criteria exist that may make early diagnosis and appropriate intervention possible. Dealing with patients who have cerebral palsy requires recognition of the associated problems and deficits. Comprehensive management usually requires a multidisciplinary setting, which is used to outline the contributions of many therapeutic modalities--developmental pediatrics, occupational and physical therapy, hearing and speech, psychology, social services, special education, ophthalamology, neurology, orthopedics and neurosurgery. The poor prognosis for full function within the community is recognized, as are areas of research that require investigation.

  5. A rare case of concomitant sicca keratopathy and ipsilateral central facial palsy in Wallenberg’s dorsolateral medullary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyn, Deborah; Van Aken, Elisabeth; Herman, Kristien

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe a patient with a right-sided supranuclear facial palsy and concomitant sicca keratopathy of the right eye following right-sided dorsolateral medullary infarction. Methods: Our patient underwent a complete ophthalmologic and neurologic examination including biomicroscopy, fundus examination, cranial nerve examination, Shirmer I test, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Results: A 61-year-old woman presented in emergency with a central facial nerve palsy on the right side and truncal ataxia. Neurologic assessment revealed a concurrent dysphagia, dysarthria, hypoesthesia of the right face, and weakness of the right upper limb. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed an old left-sided cerebellar infarction, but a recent ischemic infarction at the level of the right dorsolateral medulla oblongata was the cause of our patient’s current problems. One month after diagnosis of the right-sided dorsolateral medullary syndrome, there were complaints of ocular irritation and a diminished visual acuity in the right eye. Biomicroscopy showed a sicca keratopathy with nearly complete absence of tear secretion on the Shirmer I test, but with normal eye closure and preserved corneal reflexes and sensitivity. Conclusion: A dorsolateral medullary syndrome can have a variable expression in symptomatology. Our case is special because of the combination of an ipsilateral supranuclear facial palsy with normal upper facial muscle function together with an ipsilateral sicca keratopathy as a result of a nearly absent tear secretion. We hypothesized that the mechanism underlying the patient’s sicca keratopathy ipsilateral to the supranuclear facial palsy involved the superior salivatory nucleus, which is situated in the caudal pons inferiorly of the motor facial nucleus and is most probably affected by a superior extension of the infarcted area in the right medulla oblongata. PMID:28293537

  6. Smoking practices, risk perception of smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure among 6th-grade students in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bird, Yelena; Moraros, John; Olsen, Larry K; Forster-Cox, Sue; Staines-Orozco, Hugo; Buckingham, Robert W

    2007-02-01

    This study assessed the smoking practices, risk perception of smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure among adolescents in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. We used a cross-sectional method to examine the smoking practices, risk perception of smoking, and ETS exposure of 6th-grade students (N=506), aged 11-13 years, attending six randomly selected middle schools. Schools were classified by school setting (i.e., public vs. private) and socioeconomic status (SES; i.e., low, middle, or high). The results indicated that 6th-grade students attending a public, low-SES school setting in Ciudad Juárez not only exhibited significantly higher rates of ETS exposure at home and in public places (p<.01) but also were more likely to have tried smoking (p<.01) and to be current smokers (p<.01), and were less likely to support a ban on smoking in public places (p<.01), compared with students who attended a private school or a public, middle- or high-SES school setting. These results provide further evidence that public health interventions to prevent initiation of smoking and to assist in smoking cessation among adolescents and to reduce their ETS exposure at home and in public need to target all school-aged students, especially those attending school in a low-SES settings.

  7. Metastatic lymph node ratio, 6th or 7th AJCC edition: witch is the best lymph node classification for esophageal cancer? Prognosis factor analysis in 487 patients

    PubMed Central

    CORAL, Roberto V.; BIGOLIN, André V.; CORAL, Roberto P.; HARTMANN, Antonio; DRANKA, Carolina; ROEHE, Adriana V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The esophageal cancer is one of the most common and aggressive worldwide. Recently, the AJCC changed the staging system, considering, among others, the important role of the lymph node metastasis on the prognosis. Aim To discuss the applicability of different forms of lymph node staging in a western surgical center. Methods Four hundred eighty seven patients with esophageal cancer were enrolled. Three staging systems were evaluated, the 6th and the 7th AJCC editions and the Lymph Node Metastatic Ratio. Results The majority of the cases were squamous cell carcinoma. The mean lymph node sample was eight. Considering the survival, there was no significant difference between the patients when they were classified by the 7th AJCC edition. Analysis of the Lymph Node Metastatic Ratio, just on the group of patients with 0 to 25%, has shown significant difference (p=0,01). The 6th AJCC edition shows the major significant difference between among the classifications evaluated. Conclusion In this specific population, the 7th AJCC edition for esophageal cancer was not able to find differences in survival when just the lymph node analysis was considered. PMID:26176242

  8. Rabies vaccine standards: comparison of the 5th and 6th WHO international reference standards to the USDA veterinary reference standard.

    PubMed

    Hermann, J; Fry, A; Reising, M; Patterson, P; Siev, D; Gatewood, D

    2012-11-06

    Ensuring rabies vaccines are potent and effective is paramount in preventing transmission of this deadly disease and safeguarding public health. Efficacy of human and veterinary vaccines is ensured by evaluating relative potency estimates of the vaccine compared to a rabies reference standard using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) test. Reference vaccines are based on the International Standard for Rabies Vaccine provided by the World Health Organization (WHO). A comparison study was conducted to determine the relative potency of the 5th WHO, 6th WHO, and United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) 08-14 reference standards using the NIH test. Results from the study demonstrate that the 6th WHO reference standard is approximately twice as potent as the 5th WHO reference when reconstituted to contain 1 IU per ml. Based on these results, the Center for Veterinary Biologics (CVB) doubled the reconstitution volume of USDA veterinary reference 08-14 from 13 ml to 26 ml, for an initial use dilution of 0.7 IU per ml for use by veterinary biologics manufacturers in the NIH test. This study emphasizes the importance of reference standard calibration for use in the National Institutes of Health test.

  9. Finger movement at birth in brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Benyahia, Mohamed; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the finger movement at birth is a better predictor of the brachial plexus birth injury. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study reviewing pre-surgical records of 87 patients with residual obstetric brachial plexus palsy in study 1. Posterior subluxation of the humeral head (PHHA), and glenoid retroversion were measured from computed tomography or Magnetic resonance imaging, and correlated with the finger movement at birth. The study 2 consisted of 141 obstetric brachial plexus injury patients, who underwent primary surgeries and/or secondary surgery at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Information regarding finger movement was obtained from the patient’s parent or guardian during the initial evaluation. RESULTS: Among 87 patients, 9 (10.3%) patients who lacked finger movement at birth had a PHHA > 40%, and glenoid retroversion < -12°, whereas only 1 patient (1.1%) with finger movement had a PHHA > 40%, and retroversion < -8° in study 1. The improvement in glenohumeral deformity (PHHA, 31.8% ± 14.3%; and glenoid retroversion 22.0° ± 15.0°) was significantly higher in patients, who have not had any primary surgeries and had finger movement at birth (group 1), when compared to those patients, who had primary surgeries (nerve and muscle surgeries), and lacked finger movement at birth (group 2), (PHHA 10.7% ± 15.8%; Version -8.0° ± 8.4°, P = 0.005 and P = 0.030, respectively) in study 2. No finger movement at birth was observed in 55% of the patients in this study group. CONCLUSION: Posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion measurements indicated significantly severe shoulder deformities in children with finger movement at birth, in comparison with those lacked finger movement. However, the improvement after triangle tilt surgery was higher in patients who had finger movement at birth. PMID:23362472

  10. Excitability properties of motor axons in adults with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Cliff S.; Zhou, Ping; Marciniak, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a permanent disorder caused by a lesion to the developing brain that significantly impairs motor function. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying motor impairment are not well understood. Specifically, few have addressed whether motoneuron or peripheral axon properties are altered in CP, even though disruption of descending inputs to the spinal cord may cause them to change. In the present study, we have compared nerve excitability properties in seven adults with CP and fourteen healthy controls using threshold tracking techniques by stimulating the median nerve at the wrist and recording the compound muscle action potential over the abductor pollicis brevis. The excitability properties in the CP subjects were found to be abnormal. Early and late depolarizing and hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus was significantly larger (i.e., fanning out), and resting current–threshold (I/V) slope was smaller, in CP compared to control. In addition resting threshold and rheobase tended to be larger in CP. According to a modeling analysis of the data, an increase in leakage current under or through the myelin sheath, i.e., the Barrett–Barrett conductance, combined with a slight hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential, best explained the group differences in excitability properties. There was a trend for those with greater impairment in gross motor function to have more abnormal axon properties. The findings indicate plasticity of motor axon properties far removed from the site of the lesion. We suspect that this plasticity is caused by disruption of descending inputs to the motoneurons at an early age around the time of their injury. PMID:26089791

  11. Masseteric-facial nerve transposition for reanimation of the smile in incomplete facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Incomplete facial paralysis occurs in about a third of patients with Bell's palsy. Although their faces are symmetrical at rest, when they smile they have varying degrees of disfigurement. Currently, cross-face nerve grafting is one of the most useful techniques for reanimation. Transfer of the masseteric nerve, although widely used for complete paralysis, has not to our knowledge been reported for incomplete palsy. Between December 2008 and November 2013, we reanimated the faces of 9 patients (2 men and 7 women) with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis with transposition of the masseteric nerve. Sex, age at operation, cause of paralysis, duration of denervation, recipient nerves used, and duration of follow-up were recorded. Commissural excursion, velocity, and patients' satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. The mean (SD) age at operation was 39 (±6) years and the duration of denervation was 29 (±19) months. There were no complications that required further intervention. Duration of follow-up ranged from 6-26 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement in both commissural excursion and velocity of more than two thirds in 6 patients, more than one half in 2 patients and less than one half in one. Qualitative evaluation showed a slight or pronounced improvement in 7/9 patients. The masseteric nerve is a reliable alternative for reanimation of the smile in patients with incomplete facial paralysis. Its main advantages include its consistent anatomy, a one-stage operation, and low morbidity at the donor site.

  12. [Malignant lymphoma in a perineural spreading along trigeminal nerve, which developed as trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Mano, Tomoo; Matsuo, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Arakawa, Toshinao

    2014-01-01

    A rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia is malignant lymphoma which spread along the trigeminal nerve. We report a 79-year-old male presented with 4-month history of neuralgic pain in right cheek. He was diagnosed as classical trigeminal neuralgia. It had improved through medication of carbamazepine. Four months later, the dull pain unlike neuralgia complicated on the right cheeks, it was ineffective with the medication. Furthermore, diplopia and facial palsy as the other cranial nerve symptoms appeared. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed contrast-enhanced mass lesion extend both external pterygoid muscle and brainstem through the swelling trigeminal nerve. The patient was pathological diagnosed of diffuse large B cell lymphoma by biopsy. Malignant lymphoma should be considered in the different diagnosis of cases with a minimal single cranial nerve symptom.

  13. Paediatric medial epicondyle fracture without elbow dislocation associated with intra-articular ulnar nerve entrapment.

    PubMed

    Elbashir, Mohamed; Domos, Peter; Latimer, Mark

    2015-11-05

    Elbow fractures are not uncommon in children, and some are associated with neurovascular injuries. Having a nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation is rare and was not described in the literature. Here, we have reported probably the first case of an ulnar nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation. A 9-year-old female presented to the emergency department after falling off a monkey bar. She had a painful, swollen and tender right elbow with no history or clinical signs of an elbow dislocation but had complete ulnar nerve palsy. She was managed initially with analgesia and plaster application and was taken directly to the operating theatre. Examination under anaesthesia revealed no elbow joint instability. The ulnar nerve was found entrapped between the trochlea and proximal ulna, intra-articularly. The medial epicondyle was also found avulsed from the humerus, with an incarcerated medial epicondylar fragment in the elbow joint.

  14. Unusual Presentation of Radial Nerve Entrapment with Lateral Humeral Condyle Fracture – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Muthulingam, Manoharan

    2016-01-01

    Lateral humeral condyle fracture is the second most common fracture around the elbow in pediatric age group. Acute neurological deficit as a consequence of nerve injury associated with lateral humeral condyle fractures is very uncommon. We report a rare presentation of a case of lateral humeral condyle fracture in a 13-year-old boy with acute radial nerve palsy. Patient was operated through a modified anterolateral approach to the elbow with, exploration of the radial nerve and internal fixation of the fracture. Complete fracture union at 6 weeks with good range of movements and full neurological recovery at 12 weeks was seen. We report this case due to rare combination of radial nerve injury and lateral humeral condyle fracture. Importance should be given to a thorough neurological examination during initial clinical examination and proper pre-operative planning. PMID:27891411

  15. Paediatric medial epicondyle fracture without elbow dislocation associated with intra-articular ulnar nerve entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Elbashir, Mohamed; Domos, Peter; Latimer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Elbow fractures are not uncommon in children, and some are associated with neurovascular injuries. Having a nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation is rare and was not described in the literature. Here, we have reported probably the first case of an ulnar nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation. A 9-year-old female presented to the emergency department after falling off a monkey bar. She had a painful, swollen and tender right elbow with no history or clinical signs of an elbow dislocation but had complete ulnar nerve palsy. She was managed initially with analgesia and plaster application and was taken directly to the operating theatre. Examination under anaesthesia revealed no elbow joint instability. The ulnar nerve was found entrapped between the trochlea and proximal ulna, intra-articularly. The medial epicondyle was also found avulsed from the humerus, with an incarcerated medial epicondylar fragment in the elbow joint. PMID:26546588

  16. Optic Nerve Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Aijaz; Janecka, Ivo P.; Kapadia, Silloo; Johnson, Bruce L.; McVay, William

    1996-01-01

    The length of the optic nerves is a reflection of normal postnatal cranio-orbital development. Unilateral elongation of an optic nerve has been observed in two patients with orbital and skull base neoplasms. In the first case as compared to the patient's opposite, normal optic nerve, an elongated length of the involved optic nerve of 45 mm was present. The involved optic nerve in the second patient was 10 mm longer than the normal opposite optic nerve. The visual and extraocular function was preserved in the second patient. The first patient had only light perception in the affected eye. In this paper, the embryology, anatomy, and physiology of the optic nerve and its mechanisms of stretch and repair are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 13 PMID:17170975

  17. Sensorimotor Cortical Neuroplasticity in the Early Stage of Bell's Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Minhui; Xuan, Lihua; Cao, Zhijian; Zhou, Sisi; Lang, Courtney; Lv, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Neuroplasticity is a common phenomenon in the human brain following nerve injury. It is defined as the brain's ability to reorganize by creating new neural pathways in order to adapt to change. Here, we use task-related and resting-state fMRI to investigate neuroplasticity in the primary sensory (S1) and motor cortex (M1) in patients with acute Bell's palsy (BP). We found that the period directly following the onset of BP (less than 14 days) is associated with significant decreases in regional homogeneity (ReHo), fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF), and intrinsic connectivity contrast (ICC) values in the contralateral S1/M1 and in ReHo and ICC values in the ipsilateral S1/M1, compared to healthy controls. The regions with decreased ReHo, fALFF, and ICC values were in both the face and hand region of S1/M1 as indicated by resting-state fMRI but not task-related fMRI. Our results suggest that the early stages of BP are associated with functional neuroplasticity in both the face and hand regions of S1/M1 and that resting-state functional fMRI may be a sensitive tool to detect these early stages of plasticity in patient populations. PMID:28299208

  18. Assessment of nerve morphology in nerve activation during electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-10-01

    The distance between nerve and stimulation electrode is fundamental for nerve activation in Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation (TES). However, it is not clear the need to have an approximate representation of the morphology of peripheral nerves in simulation models and its influence in the nerve activation. In this work, depth and curvature of a nerve are investigated around the middle thigh. As preliminary result, the curvature of the nerve helps to reduce the simulation amplitude necessary for nerve activation from far field stimulation.

  19. A rare genetic disorder in the differential diagnosis of the entrapment neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Koc, Filiz; Güzel, Rengin; Benlidayi, Ilke Coskun; Yerdelen, Deniz; Güzel, Irfan; Sarica, Yakup

    2006-04-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal-dominant, slowly progressive neuromuscular disorder, which is characterized by recurrent acute peripheral nerve palsies. Electrophysiological studies show decreased motor and sensory conduction velocities in both clinically affected and unaffected nerves. Focal thickening of myelin sheath with sausage-like formation, also called tomacula, is seen in nerve biopsies. In genetic studies, 1.5-Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2 is detected in approximately 85% of HNPP cases and point mutations are determined in some cases. We describe a 26-year-old man who had a 6-month history of paresthesia in the little fingers of his hands. He was diagnosed with HNPP by neurologic examination, and electrophysiological and histopathologic studies. Studies in his mother and one brother also showed entrapment neuropathy. However, no deletions or point mutations were determined in this family. Other genetic defects apart from the known ones might be present in this disease. The most frequent entrapment syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, is also seen in this disease, so physicians dealing with musculoskeletal problems should be alert about this subject. Awareness of HNPP may help avoid unnecessary operative interventions.

  20. Orthostatic tremor in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    de Bie, Rob M A; Chen, Robert; Lang, Anthony E

    2007-06-15

    Patients with orthostatic tremor (OT) can be classified as having "primary OT," with or without postural arm tremor but no other abnormal neurological features, or "OT plus." We describe a patient with OT, with postural tremor of the arms and restless legs syndrome (RLS), who developed features typical of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). PSP can be accompanied by OT.

  1. Bell's palsy and infection with rubella virus.

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, G A; Al-Husaini, A

    1983-01-01

    Viral antibody-titres were measured in 28 patients with Bell's palsy seen in Baghdad. These cases were selected to include only those seen within 24 hours from onset. No association with recent viral infection other than rubella virus was demonstrated. Four cases showed immunological evidence of simultaneous rubella virus infection but without other clinical evidence of the disease. PMID:6886708

  2. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  3. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptak, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    The optimal practice of medicine includes integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. This article reviews nine treatment modalities used for children who have cerebral palsy (CP), including hyperbaric oxygen, the Adeli Suit, patterning, electrical stimulation, conductive education,…

  4. Pretend Play of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; Pacciulio, Amanda Mota; dos Santos, Camila Abrao; dos Santos, Jair Licio; Stagnitti, Karen Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Evaluate self-initiated pretend play of children with cerebral palsy. Method: Twenty preschool children participated in the study. Pretend play ability was measured by using the child-initiated pretend play assessment culturally adapted to Brazil. Results: There were significant negative correlations between the children's…

  5. Paraneoplastic syndrome mimicking progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Dash, Deepa; Choudhary, Rima; Ramanujam, Bhargavi; Vasantha, Padma M; Tripathi, Manjari

    2016-10-01

    Paraneoplastic syndrome presenting with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) phenotype is extremely rare. We report a patient who presented with features of rapidly progressive parkinsonism similar to PSP and was found to have small cell carcinoma of the lung along with seropositivity for onconeural antigen. The patient was treated with immunomodulation and was given chemotherapy for the malignancy and subsequently improved.

  6. Narrative Ability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holck, Pernille; Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren; Nettelbladt, Ulrika

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study a group of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were found to have considerable difficulties with narratives, performing several standard deviations below the criteria for the Information score of the Bus Story Test (BST). To examine in depth the performance of children with CP and a control group with typically developing (TD)…

  7. New archeointensity data from French Early Medieval pottery production (6th-10th century AD). Tracing 1500 years of geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevey, Agnès; Gallet, Yves; Jesset, Sébastien; Thébault, Erwan; Bouillon, Jérôme; Lefèvre, Annie; Le Goff, Maxime

    2016-08-01

    Nineteen new archeointensity results were obtained from the analysis of groups of French pottery fragments dated to the Early Middle Ages (6th to 10th centuries AD). They are from several medieval ceramic production sites, excavated mainly in Saran (Central France), and their precise dating was established based on typo-chronological characteristics. Intensity measurements were performed using the Triaxe protocol, which takes into account the effects on the intensity determinations of both thermoremanent magnetization anisotropy and cooling rate. Intensity analyses were also carried out on modern pottery produced at Saran during an experimental firing. The results show very good agreement with the geomagnetic field intensity directly measured inside and around the kiln, thus reasserting the reliability of the Triaxe protocol and the relevance of the quality criteria used. They further demonstrate the potential of the Saran pottery production for archeomagnetism. The new archeointensity results allow a precise and coherent description of the geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe during the Early Medieval period, which was until now poorly documented. They show a significant increase in intensity during the 6th century AD, high intensity values from the 7th to the 9th century, with a minimum of small amplitude at the transition between the 7th and the 8th centuries and finally an important decrease until the beginning of the 11th century. Together with published intensity results available within a radius of 700 km around Paris, the new data were used to compute a master curve of the Western European geomagnetic intensity variations over the past 1500 years. This curve clearly exhibits five intensity maxima: at the transition between the 6th and 7th century AD, at the middle of the 9th century, during the 12th century, in the second part of the 14th century and at the very beginning of the 17th century AD. Some of these peaks are smoothed, or

  8. Comparison of Values in 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Grade Primary Education Music Class Students'? Workbooks According to Rokeach?s and Akbas's Value Classifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çakirer, H. Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the values in the songs of 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education music classes students? workbooks according to the value categorizations proposed by Rockeach and Akbas and which values among the categories mentioned are taught to the students in the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education…

  9. Facial Reanimation: Basic Surgical Tools and Creation of an Effective Toolbox for Treating Patients with Facial Paralysis. Part A: Functional Muscle Transfers in the Long-Term Facial Palsy Patient.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Shai M

    2017-02-01

    The literature on facial paralysis is vast; however, detailed videos of the basic tools of dynamic reanimation within the context of patient scenarios accompanied by detailed narrative emphasizing both technique and thought processes are not common. Although not all scenarios of facial paralysis can be discussed in one setting, videographic visualization of basic surgical procedures, including facial marking, facial dissection, donor nerve preparation, cross-facial nerve graft, nerve transfers, and muscle harvest and inset, may provide a strong toolbox. Using these tools in various combinations depending on the unique case details enables the surgeon to treat a great majority of facial palsy patients. Part A, with the first of two videos, concentrates on free functional muscle transfer in the setting of longstanding facial paralysis. It includes preoperative markings, preparation of the patient in the operating room before incision, facial dissection including exposure of the masseter nerve, partial gracilis muscle harvest, and perhaps most importantly, the inset of the muscle on the paralyzed side. Part B (with the second video) concentrates on the cross-facial nerve graft and nerve transfers, used in the context of acute facial palsy, providing the short-term goal of mimetic musculature salvage in addition to longer term specific regional reinnervation by means of cross-facial nerve grafting. We hope that these videos provide a strong learning tool for enthusiastic novice medical students, residents, and fellows wishing to prepare for their cases, and faculty level physicians who wish to use them as a refresher before surgery.

  10. The adductor part of the adductor magnus is innervated by both obturator and sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Megumi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ito, Hajime; Fujimiya, Mineko; Uchiyama, Eiichi

    2014-07-01

    The hip adductor group, innervated predominantly by the obturator nerve, occupies a large volume of the lower limb. However, case reports of patients with obturator nerve palsy or denervation have described no more than minimal gait disturbance. Those facts are surprising, given the architectural characteristics of the hip adductors. Our aim was to investigate which regions of the adductor magnus are innervated by the obturator nerve and by which sciatic nerve and to consider the clinical implications. Twenty-one lower limbs were examined from 21 formalin-fixed cadavers, 18 males and 3 females. The adductor magnus was dissected and was divided into four parts (AM1-AM4) based on the locations of the perforating arteries and the adductor hiatus. AM1 was supplied solely by the obturator nerve. AM2, AM3, and AM4 received innervation from both the posterior branch of the obturator nerve and the tibial nerve portion of the sciatic nerve in 2 (9.5%), 20 (95.2%), and 6 (28.6%) of the cadavers, respectively. The double innervation in more than 90% of the AM3s is especially noteworthy. Generally, AM1-AM3 corresponds to the adductor part, traditionally characterized as innervated by the obturator nerve, and AM4 corresponds to the hamstrings part, innervated by the sciatic nerve. Here, we showed that the sciatic nerve supplies not only the hamstrings part but also the adductor part. These two nerves spread more widely than has generally been believed, which could have practical implications for the assessment and treatment of motor disability.

  11. Advances in the biology and therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia: proceedings from the 6th Post-ASH International Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Workshop.

    PubMed

    Van Etten, Richard A; Mauro, Michael; Radich, Jerald P; Goldman, John M; Saglio, Giuseppe; Jamieson, Catriona; Soverini, Simona; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Martinelli, Giovanni; Perrotti, Danilo; Scadden, David T; Skorski, Tomasz; Tefferi, Ayalew; Mughal, Tariq I

    2013-06-01

    Following the 53rd annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Diego in December 2011, a group of clinical and laboratory investigators convened for the 6th Post-ASH International Workshop on Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN). The Workshop took place on 13-14 December at the Estancia, La Jolla, California, USA. This report summarizes the most recent advances in the biology and therapy of CML that were presented at the ASH meeting and discussed at the Workshop. Preclinical studies focused on the CML stem cell and its niche, and on early results of deep sequencing of CML genomes. Clinical advances include updates on second- and third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), molecular monitoring, TKI discontinuation studies and new therapeutic agents. A report summarizing the pertinent advances in MPN has been published separately.

  12. Islet cell research brings hope for a diabetes cure: meeting report from the 6(th) annual islet society meeting in Stellenbosch, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Tchokonte-Nana, V; Cockburn, I L; Manda, J K; Kotze, P C; Johnson, J D

    2014-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation predicts that, over the next twenty years, the largest increase in the prevalence of diabetes will be in the Africa region. Recognizing an unmet need for more focus on Africa and engagement with African scholars, the Islet Society held its 6th annual meeting July 20-21, 2014 in Stellenbosch, South Africa. Here, we present a report that covers the presentations and discussion points from that meeting. Work was presented on a variety of topics and included presentations by a significant proportion of Africa diabetes researchers. Overall, it was an excellent conference, with many new international collaborations initiated. We hope that other groups will also respond to the need for more conferences in Africa and focused on Africa.

  13. Climate Change and the Water Cycle: A New Southwest Regional Climate Hub Curriculum Unit for 6th-12th Grade Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, E.; Steele, C. M.; Bestelmeyer, S.; Haan-Amato, S.; Deswood, H.; Rango, A.; Havstad, K.

    2015-12-01

    As climate change intensifies, increased temperatures and altered precipitation will make water, a limited resource in the arid southwestern United States, even scarcer in many locations. The USDA Southwest Regional Climate Hub (SWRCH) developed Climate Change and the Water Cycle, an engaging and scientifically rigorous education unit for 6th -12th grade students. The unit is aligned with Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards. Nine activities can be conducted over 10 instruction hours. Each activity can also stand alone. In partnership with SWRCH, the Asombro Institute for Science Education developed the unit. Each activity was reviewed by an educator for educational practices and by a scientist for scientific accuracy. The unit was pilot tested with 524 students in 2014, and pre- and post-tests were administered. Ninety-one percent of students were able to name a greenhouse gas on the post-test, compared to only 48% on the pre-test. On the post-test, 86% of students identified the relationship between average global temperature and carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, compared to only 52% on the pre-test. A student commented: "I loved all of the activities! They are fun and help us understand about what goes on in the world." Educators who participated in pilot testing said: "the entire curriculum is great, but I was particularly impressed with the progression of ideas and the variety of lessons," and "students could see the relevance and importance of these real life issues." Anyone interested in using the unit to host workshops for teachers in southwestern states should contact Asombro for more information (information@asombro.org). The Climate Change and the Water Cycle 6th-12th grade curriculum unit is available online: www.swclimatehub.info/education/climate-change-and-water-cycle

  14. The 6th FDR prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakoshi, Mitsuaki

    2013-06-01

    From the 58 papers published in 2012 in Fluid Dynamics Research, the following paper has been selected for the sixth FDR prize: The finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method and its application in computational aero-acoustics by Michihisa Tsutahara (Professor Emeritus, Kobe University, Japan), published in volume 44 (August 2012) 045507. This is a review paper of the author's recent work on the finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM). In this paper, the author introduces a modified FDLBM and its application to aero-acoustics. To solve the discrete Bhatnager, Gross and Krook equation for simulating fluid flow, the FDLBM applies a stable finite-difference scheme on a curvilinear coordinate system, whereas the ordinary lattice Boltzmann method uses regular lattices. It is known that for the lattice Boltzmann methods, there is difficulty in simulating high Mach number compressible flows in principle. To alleviate this, the author proposed the modified FDLBM, expanding the flexibility of setting time increments. With this FDLBM, the author has shown that it is possible to simulate compressible flows efficiently around complex bluff bodies and with complex aero-acoustic behaviour. The author summarizes all those works, including studies only available in Japanese up to now, in this review paper. After discussing the details of the FDLBM proposed by the author, example results of simulating the Aeolian tone generated from a circular cylinder at the Mach number M = 0.7 are shown. Then, the scheme is expanded for moving bodies by combining with the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation. Using this moving mesh scheme, the author shows the simulation results of the very strong sound pressure generated by a high-speed train in a tunnel. For issues of sound propagation in compressible two-phase flows whose density ratio is high, the two-particle model is introduced. Also, techniques to reduce noise generation from the flow velocity and pressure at gas-liquid interfaces are shown. Finally, the scattering of sound waves by water droplets is discussed. In thick fog, the sound coming from a distance becomes faint due to the sound-scattering effects of micro water droplets. The author gives an example of successfully solving such an issue by the FDLBM. It is highly admirable that the author developed the new FDLBM for aero-acoustic issues and has summarized it with sub-schemes to overcome several difficulties of engineering aeroacoustics in this review. It will certainly contribute to further development of fluid dynamics through computational aero-acoustics. Consequently, this paper was selected as the winner of the sixth FDR prize.

  15. Bell's palsy associated with herpes simplex gingivostomatitis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nasatzky, E; Katz, J

    1998-09-01

    Bell's palsy is a sudden, isolated, peripheral facial paralysis caused by various known and sometimes unknown factors. The case of an 18-year-old man who developed Bell's palsy after onset of primary herpetic gingivostomatitis is presented. Although Bell's palsy has already been associated with herpes simplex virus type 1, the described case is the first in the literature in which enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for immunoglobulin G to herpes simplex virus type 1 and herpes simplex virus type 1 culture were both positive. The recent literature regarding the possible relationship between herpes simplex virus type 1 and Bell's palsy is reviewed and discussed.

  16. Inherited focal, episodic neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    PubMed

    Chance, Phillip F

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP; also called tomaculous neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder that produces a painless episodic, recurrent, focal demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP generally develops during adolescence, and may cause attacks of numbness, muscular weakness, and atrophy. Peroneal palsies, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other entrapment neuropathies may be frequent manifestations of HNPP. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities may be reduced in clinically affected patients, as well as in asymptomatic gene carriers. The histopathological changes observed in peripheral nerves of HNPP patients include segmental demyelination and tomaculous or "sausage-like" formations. Mild overlap of clinical features with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1 (CMT1) may lead patients with HNPP to be misdiagnosed as having CMT1. HNPP and CMT1 are both demyelinating neuropathies, however, their clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological features are quite distinct. HNPP is most frequently associated with a 1.4-Mb pair deletion on chromosome 17p12. A duplication of the identical region leads to CMT1A. Both HNPP and CMT1A result from a dosage effect of the PMP22 gene, which is contained within the deleted/duplicated region. This is reflected in reduced mRNA and protein levels in sural nerve biopsy samples from HNPP patients. Treatment for HNPP consists of preventative and symptom-easing measures. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA; also called familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder causing episodes of paralysis and muscle weakness initiated by severe pain. Individuals with HNA may suffer repeated episodes of intense pain, paralysis, and sensory disturbances in an affected limb. The onset of HNA is at birth or later in childhood with prognosis for recovery usually favorable; however, persons with HNA may have permanent residual neurological dysfunction following attack(s). Episodes are often

  17. Treatment and Prognosis of Facial Palsy on Ramsay Hunt Syndrome: Results Based on a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Monsanto, Rafael da Costa; Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Bobato Neto, Natal José; Beilke, Silvia Carolina Almeida; Lorenzetti, Fabio Tadeu Moura; Salomone, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ramsay Hunt syndrome is the second most common cause of facial palsy. Early and correct treatment should be performed to avoid complications, such as permanent facial nerve dysfunction. Objective The objective of this study is to review the prognosis of the facial palsy on Ramsay Hunt syndrome, considering the different treatments proposed in the literature. Data Synthesis We read the abstract of 78 studies; we selected 31 studies and read them in full. We selected 19 studies for appraisal. Among the 882 selected patients, 621 (70.4%) achieved a House-Brackmann score of I or II; 68% of the patients treated only with steroids achieved HB I or II, versus 70.5% when treated with steroids plus antiviral agents. Among patients with complete facial palsy (grades V or VI), 51.4% recovered to grades I or II. The rate of complete recovery varied considering the steroid associated with acyclovir: 81.3% for methylprednisolone, 69.2% for prednisone; 61.4% for prednisolone; and 76.3% for hydrocortisone. Conclusions Patients with Ramsay-hunt syndrome, when early diagnosed and treated, achieve high rates of complete recovery. The association of steroids and acyclovir is better than steroids used in monotherapy. PMID:27746846

  18. Treatment and Prognosis of Facial Palsy on Ramsay Hunt Syndrome: Results Based on a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Monsanto, Rafael da Costa; Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Bobato Neto, Natal José; Beilke, Silvia Carolina Almeida; Lorenzetti, Fabio Tadeu Moura; Salomone, Raquel

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Ramsay Hunt syndrome is the second most common cause of facial palsy. Early and correct treatment should be performed to avoid complications, such as permanent facial nerve dysfunction. Objective The objective of this study is to review the prognosis of the facial palsy on Ramsay Hunt syndrome, considering the different treatments proposed in the literature. Data Synthesis We read the abstract of 78 studies; we selected 31 studies and read them in full. We selected 19 studies for appraisal. Among the 882 selected patients, 621 (70.4%) achieved a House-Brackmann score of I or II; 68% of the patients treated only with steroids achieved HB I or II, versus 70.5% when treated with steroids plus antiviral agents. Among patients with complete facial palsy (grades V or VI), 51.4% recovered to grades I or II. The rate of complete recovery varied considering the steroid associated with acyclovir: 81.3% for methylprednisolone, 69.2% for prednisone; 61.4% for prednisolone; and 76.3% for hydrocortisone. Conclusions Patients with Ramsay-hunt syndrome, when early diagnosed and treated, achieve high rates of complete recovery. The association of steroids and acyclovir is better than steroids used in monotherapy.

  19. The alteration of SHARPIN expression in the mouse brainstem during herpes simplex virus 1-induced facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Li, Jianfeng; Mao, Yanyan; Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Wenwen; Xu, Lei; Han, Yuechen; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-23

    Bell's palsy presents a unilateral weakness or paralysis of the face due to acute dysfunction of the peripheral facial nerve with no readily identifiable cause. Although data show that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) may be the possible causative agent of Bell's palsy, the precise mechanism of the paralysis is still unknown. SHANK-associated RH domain-interacting protein (SHARPIN) is thought to play a role in the control of inflammatory responses. In order to clarify the molecular pathway of SHARPIN involved in the facial palsy caused by HSV-1 in mice and the inhibitory effect of corticosteroids, we used 4-week-old Balb/c mice inoculated with HSV-1 for experiments. The expression and location of SHARPIN in the facial nucleus of brainstem were detected respectively by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunofluorescence. Expression level of SHARPIN increased and peaked at 2 days and then decreased in the facial nucleus of brainstem after the manifestation of the facial paralysis. After the administration of MPSS, the protein expression of SHARPIN at the peak point was down-regulated. Our results suggest that SHRPIN were activated during the inflammatory reaction in the HSV-1-induced facial paralysis. MPSS can effectively inhibit the expression of SHARPIN that may contribute to attenuate HSV-1-mediated nervous system damage.

  20. Minor congenital anomalies and ataxic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, G

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of minor congenital anomalies was examined in 36 patients with ataxic cerebral palsy, in unaffected family members, and in 100 unrelated control subjects. None of the control subjects or family members had more than four anomalies, and 25 of 36 (69%) of the patients had more than four. The distribution of anomalies differed considerably, with 60% of the index cases having seven or more, and 94% of the controls having three or less. The number occurring in the patients was significantly more than in their relatives. Of the 25 patients with more than four anomalies, 16 (64%) had undergone potentially adverse perinatal or early postnatal events. Thus minor congenital anomalies were considerably more frequent in those with ataxic cerebral palsy than in related or unrelated control subjects. These anomalies may be markers of early prenatal factors that contributed to the adverse outcome either directly or by predisposing to perinatal difficulties. PMID:2751330