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Sample records for 6th postoperative day

  1. 6th Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Day: pharmacogenomics and individualized therapy.

    PubMed

    Stojiljkovic, Maja; Fazlagic, Amira; Dokmanovic-Krivokapic, Lidija; Nikcevic, Gordana; Patrinos, George P; Pavlovic, Sonja; Zukic, Branka

    2012-09-25

    The Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days are international scientific meetings aiming to educate healthcare professionals and biomedical scientists about pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. In this meeting report, we provide an overview of the scientific lectures and the topics discussed during the 6th Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Day that was held in Belgrade, Serbia last June 5, 2012. The scientific program included lectures by the local and international speakers from Europe and the United States.

  2. Wood - An Innovative Component of High-tech Products? 6th Wädenswil Day of Chemistry 2014.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Elsbeth

    2014-10-01

    Wood is a multifunctional renewable material that could replace oil-based and other non-renewable resources in many applications. In the Swiss National Science Foundation project NFP 66, entitled 'Wood as a resource', researchers are attempting to find ways to use wood more efficiently in the future. The 6th Wädenswil Day of Chemistry, which was organised by the Institute of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry at Zurich University of Applied Sciences in Wädenswil, gave an overview of the innovative activities currently being undertaken in this field.

  3. Air leakage on the postoperative day: powerful factor of postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyun Woo; Kye, Yeo Kon; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is a relatively common disorder in young patients. Although various surgical techniques have been introduced, recurrence after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) remains high. The aim of study was to identify the risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy in the spontaneous pneumothorax. Methods From January 2011 through March 2013, two hundreds and thirty two patients underwent surgery because of pneumothorax. Patients with a secondary pneumothorax, as well as cases of single port surgery, an open procedure, additional pleural procedure (pleurectomy, pleural abrasion) or lack of medical records were excluded. The records of 147 patients with PSP undergoing 3-port video-assisted thoracoscopic bullectomy with staple line coverage using an absorbable polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheet were retrospectively reviewed. Results The median age was 19 years (range, 11−34 years) with male predominance (87.8%). Median postoperative hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1−10 days) without mortality. Complications were developed in five patients. A total of 24 patients showed postoperative recurrence (16.3%). Younger age less than 17 years old and immediate postoperative air leakage were risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy by multivariate analysis. Conclusions Immediate postoperative air leakage was the risk factor for postoperative recurrence. However, further study will be required for the correlation of air leakage with recurrence. PMID:26904217

  4. 6th International Microbeam Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Kevin M. Prise

    2004-01-01

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology.

  5. Anastomotic leaks after colorectal anastomosis occurring more than 30 days postoperatively: a single-institution evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei Phin; Hong, En Yaw; Phillips, Benjamin; Isenberg, Gerald A; Goldstein, Scott D

    2014-09-01

    National hospital registries only report colorectal anastomotic leaks (ALs) within 30 days postoperatively. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence and significance of ALs that occur beyond 30 days postoperatively. We performed a retrospective review of our prospective database from June 2008 to August 2012. A total of 504 patients were included. These patients were operated on by two surgeons. Any clinical or radiographic abnormalities were considered to be an anastomotic imperfection. A total of 504 patients were reviewed with a total of 18 (3.6%) anastomotic leaks. Six leaks (31.6% of leaks) were diagnosed more than 30 days postoperatively (P < 0.001). Of the 18 leaks, interventional radiology drainage was performed for four cases and 14 patients required reoperation. All six delayed leaks required reoperation. There was one leak that occurred under 30 days, which was discovered on autopsy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1 to 4 months). All the delayed leak patients presented with fistulas, whereas 58 per cent of typical leak patients presented with the triad of leukocytosis, fever, and abdominal pain. Colorectal anastomotic leaks can occur after the 30-day postoperative period. In patients with vague and atypical abdominal findings, anastomotic leak must be suspected. More systematic, prospective studies are required to help us further understand the risk factors and natural history of anastomotic failures in elective colorectal surgery.

  6. Music Benefits on Postoperative Distress and Pain in Pediatric Day Care Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Ostuni, Selene; Bonomelli, Irene; Mencherini, Simonetta; Brunero, Marco; Zambaiti, Elisa; Mannarino, Savina; Larizza, Daniela; Albertini, Riccardo; Tinelli, Carmine; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period) or the non-music group (standard postoperative care). Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (P<0.001). Positive impact on reactions to pain was noted using the FLACC scale. Music improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age. PMID:25635217

  7. Music benefits on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Ostuni, Selene; Bonomelli, Irene; Mencherini, Simonetta; Brunero, Marco; Zambaiti, Elisa; Mannarino, Savina; Larizza, Daniela; Albertini, Riccardo; Tinelli, Carmine; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2014-08-12

    Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period) or the non-music group (standard postoperative care). Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (P<0.001). Positive impact on reactions to pain was noted using the FLACC scale. Music improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age. PMID:25635217

  8. PREFACE: 6th Liquid Matter Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René; Vroege, Gert Jan; Lekkerkerker, Henk; Frenkel, Daan

    2005-11-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains the Proceedings of the 6th Liquid Matter Conference held in Utrecht, The Netherlands, 2-6 July 2005. The three-yearly Liquid Matter Conference is organized by the Liquids Section of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society. This series of meetings began in Lyon in 1990. The most recent meeting was held in 2003 in Konstanz. The aim of the Liquid Matter Conferences is to bring together scientists working on the liquid state of matter. This rapidly growing field includes the physics, chemistry, biology and chemical engineering of liquid matter as well as various applied research areas. In fact, the Utrecht meeting had, for the first time, a special session devoted to Fundamental Challenges in Applied Liquid Physics and Microfluidics. The Utrecht meeting had 760 registered participants from four continents. An important event at this meeting was the award of the First Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society to Professor Jean-Pierre Hansen FRS, of Cambridge University. In addition to a plenary speech by the recipient of the Liquid Matter Prize, the scientific programme consisted of 10 plenary lectures, 117 symposia talks, 25 of which were keynote lectures and some 650 poster contributions. The meeting also hosted a one-day symposium of the Division of Liquids and Interfaces of the Chemical Sciences division of NWO. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains 61 of the oral communications. Liquid state physics is at the interface of many fields of research. As a consequence, many of the attendants come from adjacent fields and find in the Liquid Matter Conference a forum to meet experts from other areas of research. This aspect of the Liquid Matter Conference makes it an exciting meeting as it not only offers the participants an up-to-date picture of the status of research into the liquid state of matter, but it also allows them to establish new

  9. 6th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the 6th workshop is on lysine, arginine, and related amino acids. Functions, metabolic pathways, clinical uses, and upper tolerance intakes are emphasized in the articles that follow. Lysine is arguably the most deficient amino acid in the food supply of countries where poverty exists, ...

  10. Increased intraocular pressure on the first postoperative day following resident-performed cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J Y; Jo, M-W; Brauner, S C; Ferrufino-Ponce, Z; Ali, R; Cremers, S L; An Henderson, B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation after resident-performed cataract surgery and to determine variables, which influence postoperative day 1 (POD1) IOP. Methods In all, 1111 consecutive cataract surgeries performed only by training residents between 1 July 2001 and 30 June 2006 were included. Elevated IOP was defined as ≥23 mm Hg. Surgeries were classified according to the presence of POD1-IOP elevation. Fisher's exact test and Student t-test were used to compare both groups. Multivariate analyses using generalized estimating equations were performed to investigate predictor variables associated with POD1-IOP elevation. Results The average preoperative IOP was 16.0±3.2 mm Hg and the average POD1-IOP was 19.3±7.1 mm Hg, reflecting a significant increase in IOP (P<0.001, paired t-test). The incidence of POD1-IOP elevation ≥23 mm Hg was 22.0% (244/1111). Presence of glaucoma and ocular hypertension, higher preoperative IOP, and longer axial length were frequently encountered variables in the POD1-IOP elevation group (all P<0.05). Using a multivariate analysis, presence of glaucoma (P=0.004, OR=2.38; 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=1.31–4.30), presence of ocular hypertension (P=0.003, OR=6.09; 95% CI=1.81–20.47), higher preoperative IOP (P<0.001, OR=3.73; 95% CI=1.92–7.25), and longer axial length (P=0.01, OR=1.15; 95% CI=1.03–1.29) were significant predictive factors for POD1-IOP elevation. Conclusions IOP elevation on the first postoperative day following resident-performed cataract surgery occurred frequently (22.0%). Increased early postoperative IOP was associated with presence of glaucoma and ocular hypertension, higher preoperative IOP, and longer axial length. PMID:21527959

  11. Postoperative Morbidity by Procedure and Patient Factors Influencing Major Complications Within 30 Days Following Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Edward; Iannuzzi, James C.; Thorsness, Robert; Noyes, Katia; Voloshin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little data are available to prioritize quality improvement initiatives in shoulder surgery. Purpose: To stratify the risk for 30-day postoperative morbidity in commonly performed surgical procedures about the shoulder completed in a hospital setting and to determine patient factors associated with major complications. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This retrospective study utilized the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from the years 2005 to 2010. Using Current Procedural Terminology codes, the database was queried for shoulder cases that were divided into 7 groups: arthroscopy without repair; arthroscopy with repair; arthroplasty; clavicle/acromioclavicular joint (AC) open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF)/repair; ORIF of proximal humeral fracture; open tendon release/repair; and open shoulder stabilization. The primary end point was any major complication, with secondary end points of incisional infection, return to the operating room, and venothromboembolism (VTE), all within 30 days of surgery. Results: Overall, 11,086 cases were analyzed. The overall major complication rate was 2.1% (n = 234). Factors associated with major complications on multivariate analysis included: procedure performed (P < .001), emergency case (P < .001), pulmonary comorbidity (P < .001), preoperative blood transfusion (P = .033), transfer from an outside institution (P = .03), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P = .006), wound class (P < .001), dependent functional status (P = .027), and age older than 60 years (P = .01). After risk adjustment, open shoulder stabilization was associated with the greatest risk of major complications relative to arthroscopy without repair (odds ratio [OR], 5.56; P = .001), followed by ORIF of proximal humerus fracture (OR, 4.90; P < .001) and arthroplasty (OR, 4.40; P < .001). These 3 groups generated over 60% of all major complications. Open shoulder

  12. Influence of depression, catastrophizing, anxiety, and resilience on postoperative pain at the first day after otolaryngological surgery

    PubMed Central

    Suffeda, Alexander; Meissner, Winfried; Rosendahl, Jenny; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to assess the association between objectified preoperative psychological factors and postoperative pain at the first day after otolaryngological surgery in accordance with other predictors of postoperative pain. Eighty-two (82) patients (59% male, median age 56 years) were included between January and May 2015. The psychological assessment the day before surgery included the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), pain catastrophizing scale (PCS), State-Trait Operation Anxiety (STOA) inventory, and the resilience scale (RS-13). On first postoperative day, patients were rated their pain using the questionnaires of the German-wide project Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Treatment (QUIPS) including a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0–10) for determination of patient's maximal pain. QUIPS allowed standardized assessment of patients’ characteristics, pain parameters, and outcome. The influence of preoperative and postoperative parameters on patients’ maximal postoperative pain was estimated by univariate and multivariate statistical analysis. The mean maximal pain was 3.2 ± 2.9. In univariate analysis, higher PHQ-9 score more than 4 (P = 0.010), higher STOA trait anxiety (P = 0.044), and higher STOA total score (P = 0.043) were associated to more postoperative pain. In multivariate analysis higher PHQ-9 score remained an independent predictor for severe pain (beta = 0.302; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.054–0.473; P = 0.014). When all parameters were included into multivariate analysis, 2 of all somatic, psychological, and treatment factors were associated with severe maximal pain: more depression (PHQ-9; beta = 0.256; 95% CI: 0.042–0.404; P = 0.017), and use of opioids in the recovery room (beta = 0.371; 95% CI: 0.108–0.481; P = 0.002). Otolaryngological surgery covers the spectrum from low to severe postoperative pain and is therefore a good model for pain management studies. A set of somatic and psychological parameters seems

  13. Postoperative analgesia for day-case herniorrhaphy patients. A comparison of cryoanalgesia, paravertebral blockade and oral analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wood, G J; Lloyd, J W; Bullingham, R E; Britton, B J; Finch, D R

    1981-06-01

    Patients were admitted as day-cases for inguinal herniorrhaphy under epidural anaesthesia and chlormethiazole sedation. The patients were given oral analgesia, and in addition, some were given either a paravertebral block with a dextran/bupivacaine mixture or cryoanalgesia of the ilio-inguinal nerve for postoperative pain relief. These anaesthetic and analgesic techniques are discussed in relation to day-case herniorrhaphy. PMID:7270829

  14. [Onset and significance of postoperative bacteriuria].

    PubMed

    Riss, P; Schieder, K; Bartl, W

    1984-06-01

    In 52 patients an indwelling transurethral catheter was inserted after gynaecological surgery for 5 days; no patient received antibiotics. At the time of removal of the catheter on the 6th postoperative day and 2 days later (8th postoperative day) a urine culture was set up. At the time of removal of the catheter on the 6th day, 26/52 patients (50%) had significant bacteriuria greater than or equal to 10(5)/ml. In 11 out of the 26 patients with bacteriuria the urine cleared spontaneously within 2 days; on the other hand, 10/26 patients with a negative culture at the time of removal of the catheter had significant bacteriuria 2 days later. As a group these women also had delayed spontaneous onset of voiding and persistence of residual urine. Younger patients (less than 45 years) had significantly fewer bacteriurias on the 6th day than older patients. A positive urine culture at the time of removal of the catheter should be treated with antibiotics; a negative urine culture should be repeated whenever spontaneous voiding is delayed, when there is persistent residual urine, or when the clinical signs of urinary tract infection are present.

  15. 6th International Meshing Roundtable '97

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.

    1997-09-01

    The goal of the 6th International Meshing Roundtable is to bring together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government labs in a stimulating, open environment for the exchange of technical information related to the meshing process. In the pas~ the Roundtable has enjoyed significant participation born each of these groups from a wide variety of countries. The Roundtable will consist of technical presentations from contributed papers and abstracts, two invited speakers, and two invited panels of experts discussing topics related to the development and use of automatic mesh generation tools. In addition, this year we will feature a "Bring Your Best Mesh" competition and poster session to encourage discussion and participation from a wide variety of mesh generation tool users. The schedule and evening social events are designed to provide numerous opportunities for informal dialog. A proceedings will be published by Sandia National Laboratories and distributed at the Roundtable. In addition, papers of exceptionally high quaIity will be submitted to a special issue of the International Journal of Computational Geometry and Applications. Papers and one page abstracts were sought that present original results on the meshing process. Potential topics include but are got limited to: Unstructured triangular and tetrahedral mesh generation Unstructured quadrilateral and hexahedral mesh generation Automated blocking and structured mesh generation Mixed element meshing Surface mesh generation Geometry decomposition and clean-up techniques Geometry modification techniques related to meshing Adaptive mesh refinement and mesh quality control Mesh visualization Special purpose meshing algorithms for particular applications Theoretical or novel ideas with practical potential Technical presentations from industrial researchers.

  16. Summary of the National Technicians' Conference ASE/NSLC York--5/6th July 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostock, Julia, Comp.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a summary of the National Technicians' Conference ASE/NSLC York from July 5th to July 6th 2012. Approximately 160 technicians attended the Conference on both days. The programme included workshops and lectures and was repeated on the Friday, so that technicians who stayed for both days were able to take part in a variety of…

  17. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Pancreatic Amylase Value on Postoperative Day 1 After Pancreatic Resection to Predict Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiongxiong; Wang, Xinjing; Fang, Yuan; Chen, Hao; Peng, Chenghong; Li, Hongwei; Deng, Xiaxing; Shen, Baiyong

    2016-02-01

    Early detection of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) may help to improve the outcome following pancreatic surgery, and exclusion of POPF may allow early drain removal which can accelerate recovery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of drain/plasma pancreatic amylase values on postoperative day 1 (DPA1/PPA1) in POPF by means of a systemic review and meta-analysis.Online journal databases and a manual search up to March 2015 were used. Studies clearly documenting DPA1 or PPA1 in predicting overall POPF (Grade 0 vs A+B+C) or clinically relevant POPF (Grade 0+A vs B+C) following pancreatic surgery were selected. Pooled predictive parameters were performed using STATA 12.0.Fifteen studies were finally identified with a total of 4331 patients. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of DPA1 were 0.92 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81-0.96) and 0.77 (95% CI 0.64-0.86) for predicting overall POPF and 0.79 (95% CI 0.61-0.90) and 0.83 (95% CI 0.74-0.89) for predicting clinically relevant POPF. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of PPA1 were 0.74 (95% CI 0.63-0.82) and 0.62 (95% CI 0.55-0.70) for overall POPF. After the DPA1 at/over cutoff values for overall POPF or clinically relevant POPF, corresponding post-test probability (Post-test (+)) (if pretest probability was 50%) was 80% and 82% respectively, while, if values were below the cutoff values, the post-test probability (Post-test (-)) was 10% and 20% respectively. Post-test (+) and Post-test (-) of PPA1 for overall POPF were 66% and 30% respectively. In subgroup analysis, the summary sensitivities of cutoff <1000 group and cutoff >1000 group were 0.96 (0.92-0.98) and 0.85 (0.64-0.95), respectively; the summary specificities were 0.59 (0.44-0.72) and 0.86 (0.80-0.91) respectively. Positive LR were 2.3 (1.7-3.3) and 6.2 (3.7-10.2) respectively. Negative LR were 0.06 (0.03-0.14) and 0.18 (0.07-0.47) respectively.DPA1 is a useful predictive test for overall POPF and clinically

  18. Thirty-Day Postoperative Mortality Among Individuals With HIV Infection Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy and Procedure-Matched, Uninfected Comparators

    PubMed Central

    King, Joseph T.; Perkal, Melissa F.; Rosenthal, Ronnie A.; Gordon, Adam J.; Crystal, Stephen; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Butt, Adeel A.; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Rimland, David; Simberkoff, Michael S.; Justice, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has converted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic condition, and patients now undergo a variety of surgical procedures, but current surgical outcomes are inadequately characterized. OBJECTIVE To compare 30-day postoperative mortality in patients with HIV infection receiving ART with the rates in uninfected individuals. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective analysis of nationwide electronic medical record data from the US Veterans Health Administration Healthcare System, October 1, 1996, to September 30, 2010. Common inpatient surgical procedures were grouped using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Clinical Classification System to match HIV-infected and uninfected patients in a 1:2 ratio. Data on 1641 patients with HIV infection receiving combination ART who were undergoing inpatient surgery were compared with data on 3282 procedure-matched, uninfected comparators. Poisson regression models of 30-day postoperative mortality were adjusted for procedure year, age, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, hemoglobin level, albumin level, HIV infection, CD4 cell count, and HIV-1 RNA level. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES All-cause 30-day postoperative mortality. RESULTS The most common procedures in both groups were cholecystectomy (10.5%), hip arthroplasty (10.5%), spine surgery (9.8%), herniorrhaphy (7.4%), and coronary artery bypass grafting (7.0%). In patients with HIV infection, CD4 cell distributions were 80.0% with 200/µL or more, 16.3% with 50/µL to 199/µL, and 3.7% with less than 50/µL; 74.1% of patients with HIV infection had undetectable HIV-1 RNA. Human immunodeficiency virus infection was associated with higher 30-day postoperative mortality compared with the mortality in uninfected patients (3.4% [56 patients]) vs 1.6% [53]); incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.11; 95% CI, 1.41–3.17; P < .001). CD4 cell count was inversely associated with mortality, but HIV-1 RNA provided no

  19. Perceived quality in Day Surgery Units Proposal of an enquiry postoperative questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Piergaspare; Perotti, Bruno; Amatucci, Chiara; Pangrazi, Maria Pia; Leuzzi, Barbara; Vietri, Francesco; Illuminati, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    La soddisfazione dei pazienti assume particolare importanza nell’attività chirurgica in Day Surgery, al fine di mantenere ed incrementare la domanda di prestazioni da parte dell’utenza ed inoltre di valutare le abilità e le competenze dello staff clinico dedicato. Sono stati valutati i risultati di un questionario somministrato dal 2007 al 2012, divisi in due gruppi, alla dimissione e a 30 giorni dall’intervento. Tali risultati hanno permesso di valutare i principali vantaggi e limiti del questionario in termini di comprensibilità, di corretto timing di somministrazione, e di utilità per lo staff clinico.

  20. Lymphopenia and Elevated Blood C-Reactive Protein Levels at Four Days Postoperatively Are Useful Markers for Early Detection of Surgical Site Infection Following Posterior Lumbar Instrumentation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shigematsu, Hideki; Koizumi, Munehisa; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Okuda, Akinori; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Purpose To identify the characteristics of candidate indexes for early detection of surgical site infection (SSI). Overview of Literature SSI is a serious complication of spinal instrumentation surgery. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for the welfare of the patient postoperation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed laboratory data of patients who underwent posterior lumbar instrumentation surgery for degenerative spine disease. The sensitivity and specificity of six laboratory markers for early detection of SSI were calculated: greater elevation of the white blood cell count at day 7 than at day 4 postoperatively, greater elevation of the C-reactive protein (CRP) level at day 7 than at day 4 postoperatively, a CRP level of >10 mg/dL at 4 days postoperatively, neutrophil percentage of >75% at 4 days postoperatively, a lymphocyte percentage of <10% at 4 days postoperatively, and a lymphocyte count of <1,000/µL at 4 days postoperatively. Statistical analysis was via Fisher's exact test and a p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results In total, 85 patients were enrolled. Of these, five patients developed deep SSI. The sensitivity and specificity of each index were as follows: index 1, 20.0% and 77.5%; index 2, 20.0% and 83.8%; index 3, 40.0% and 97.5%; index 4, 40.0% and 86.3%; index 5, 0% and 96.3%; and index 6, 80.0% and 80.0%. A significant difference was noted for indexes 3 and 6. Conclusions A CRP level of >10 mg/dL at 4 days postoperatively would be useful for definitive diagnosis of SSI, and a lymphocyte count of <1,000/µL at 4 days postoperatively would be a useful screening test for SSI. Although laboratory markers for early detection of SSI have been frequently reported, we believe that it is important to understand the characteristics of each index for a precise diagnosis. PMID:27114760

  1. Present-day challenges and future solutions in postoperative pain management: results from PainForum 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kuusniemi, Kristiina; Pöyhiä, Reino

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a summary of presentations on postoperative pain control by the authors at the 2014 PainForum meeting in People’s Republic of China. Postoperative pain is often untreated or undertreated and may lead to subsequent chronic pain syndromes. As more procedures migrate to the outpatient setting, postoperative pain control will become increasingly more challenging. Evidence-based guidelines for postoperative pain control recommend pain assessment using validated tools on a consistent basis. In this regard, consistency may be more important than the specific tool selected. Many hospitals have introduced a multidisciplinary acute pain service (APS), which has been associated with improved patient satisfaction and fewer adverse events. Patient education is an important component of postoperative pain control, which may be most effective when clinicians chose a multimodal approach, such as paracetamol (acetaminophen) and opioids. Opioids are a mainstay of postoperative pain control but require careful monitoring and management of side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and somnolence. Opioids may be administered using patient-controlled analgesia systems. Protocols for postoperative pain control can be very helpful to establish benchmarks for pain management and assure that clinicians adhere to evidence-based standards. The future of postoperative pain control around the world will likely involve more and better established APSs and greater communication between patients and clinicians about postoperative pain. The changes necessary to implement and move forward with APSs is not a single step but rather one of continuous improvement and ongoing change. PMID:26893579

  2. The 6th International Earth Science Olympiad: A Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlett, Luke; Cathro, Darcy; Mellow, Maddi; Tate, Clara

    2014-01-01

    In October 2012, two students from the Australian Science and Mathematics School and two from Yankalilla Area School were selected to travel to Olavarria, Argentina in order to compete in the 6th International Earth Science Olympiad (IESO). It was an opportunity for individuals with a passion for Earth science to come together from 17 countries to…

  3. The NACVE 6th Report: An Interpretation of Its Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Kenneth B.

    The author comments on the meaning of the 16 recommendations of NACVE's 6th Report (Counseling and Guidance: A Call for Change), and emphasizes their basic consistency with policies of both the APGA and the AVA. The remainder of the paper addresses the questions now facing counselors, such as why nothing more is being done to implement these…

  4. Removal of Foley Catheters in Live Donor Kidney Transplant Recipients on Postoperative Day 1 Does Not Increase the Incidence of Urine Leaks

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Eric; Sameyah, Emil; Goncharuk, Edwin; Olsen, Elizabeth M.; Feldman, Joshua; Giovinazzo, Katie; Blum, Mark; Tyrell, Richard; Evans, Cory; Kuncewitch, Michael; Alexander, Mohini; Israel, Ezra; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Calderon, Kellie; Jhaveri, Kenar D.; Sachdeva, Mala; Bellucci, Alessandro; Mattana, Joseph; Fishbane, Steven; D'Agostino, Catherine; Coppa, Gene; Molmenti, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Catheterization of the urinary bladder during kidney transplantation is essential. The optimal time to remove the Foley catheter postoperatively is not universally defined. It is our practice to remove the Foley catheter on postoperative day 1 in live donor kidney transplant recipients who meet our standardized protocol criteria. We believe that early removal of Foley catheters increases patient comfort and mobility, decreases the risk of catheter associated urinary tract infections, and allows for decreased hospital length of stay. The hypothetical risk of early removal of Foley catheters would be the increased risk of urine leak. We reviewed 120 consecutive live donor kidney transplant recipients and found that there was not an increased incidence of urine leaks in patients whose Foley catheters were removed on postoperative day 1. PMID:24436583

  5. Influence of depression, catastrophizing, anxiety, and resilience on postoperative pain at the first day after otolaryngological surgery: A prospective single center cohort observational study.

    PubMed

    Suffeda, Alexander; Meissner, Winfried; Rosendahl, Jenny; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2016-07-01

    The aim was to assess the association between objectified preoperative psychological factors and postoperative pain at the first day after otolaryngological surgery in accordance with other predictors of postoperative pain. Eighty-two (82) patients (59% male, median age 56 years) were included between January and May 2015. The psychological assessment the day before surgery included the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), pain catastrophizing scale (PCS), State-Trait Operation Anxiety (STOA) inventory, and the resilience scale (RS-13). On first postoperative day, patients were rated their pain using the questionnaires of the German-wide project Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Treatment (QUIPS) including a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0-10) for determination of patient's maximal pain. QUIPS allowed standardized assessment of patients' characteristics, pain parameters, and outcome. The influence of preoperative and postoperative parameters on patients' maximal postoperative pain was estimated by univariate and multivariate statistical analysis. The mean maximal pain was 3.2 ± 2.9. In univariate analysis, higher PHQ-9 score more than 4 (P = 0.010), higher STOA trait anxiety (P = 0.044), and higher STOA total score (P = 0.043) were associated to more postoperative pain. In multivariate analysis higher PHQ-9 score remained an independent predictor for severe pain (beta = 0.302; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.054-0.473; P = 0.014). When all parameters were included into multivariate analysis, 2 of all somatic, psychological, and treatment factors were associated with severe maximal pain: more depression (PHQ-9; beta = 0.256; 95% CI: 0.042-0.404; P = 0.017), and use of opioids in the recovery room (beta = 0.371; 95% CI: 0.108-0.481; P = 0.002). Otolaryngological surgery covers the spectrum from low to severe postoperative pain and is therefore a good model for pain management studies. A set of somatic and psychological parameters seems to allow the

  6. An integrated exploration model for Council Run field analogs: Regional geology and seismic stratigraphy of Devonian 6th Elk sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, G.; Johnson, R. )

    1991-08-01

    A geologic study of the Devonian Lock Haven 6th Elk formation along the structural front of Pennsylvania and Maryland suggest that present-day structures were active at the time of deposition. These structures barred deposition to the west and helped to localize sands in a northeast-southwest fairway. The 6th Elk sandstones occur in two major depositional lobes (located in Centre and Somerset counties in Pennsylvania, and Garret County, Maryland) and were deposited on a shallow-marine shelf by turbidity currents and later modified by storm-generated currents. Deposition of 6th Elk sands may also have been influenced by cross-strike discontinuities. A seismic study of the Council Run field aids in subsurface identification of the 6th Elk. A high-amplitude seismic anomaly across the Council Run field is correlated with increasing san thickness. Two dimensional modeling suggests that the seismic response is extremely sensitive to specific acquisition and processing techniques including filter and phase variability. Additional attribute analysis integrates the seismic data with the forward models. This results in a predictive method for potentially identifying 6th Elk sandstone development from seismic data. Applying the results of the seismic modeling at Council Run field to a seismic grid across the previously defined 6th Elk depositional fairway has identified many exploratory prospects in Lycoming and Bradford counties, Pennsylvania. This area coincides with the site of a third, previously documented, Upper Devonian depositional lobe.

  7. Naproxen 500 mg bid versus acetaminophen 1000 mg qid: effect on swelling and other acute postoperative events after bilateral third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Bjørnsson, G A; Haanaes, H R; Skoglund, L A

    2003-08-01

    A controlled, randomized, double-blind crossover study, in which the patients acted as their own controls, was carried out to test the efficacy of naproxen 500 mg x 2 versus acetaminophen 1000 mg x 4 for 3 days on the postoperative course following third molar surgery. Acetaminophen reduced the mean swelling on the 3rd postoperative day by 22.4% (p = 0.023) compared to that after naproxen. On the 6th postoperative day, there was 20.9% less mean swelling with naproxen (p = 0.44), although the total swelling measurements were much less than those measured on the 3rd postoperative day. Summed pain intensity (SUMPI3.5-11) on the day of surgery revealed no statistically significant difference between the acetaminophen or naproxen regimen with the exception of 0.5 hours (p = 0.002) and 1 hour (p = 0.009) after first medication when acetaminophen gave less pain than naproxen. Since the drug regimens were different, summed PI for the first acetaminophen dose interval (SUMPI3.5-6) and the first naproxen dose interval (SUMPI3.5-9) was calculated. There was a tendency toward a statistically significant difference in favor of acetaminophen for SUMPI3.5-6 (p = 0.055) but no statistically significant difference (p = 0.41) between the treatments with respect to SUMPI3.5-9. Naproxen was statistically superior (p < or = 0.002) to acetaminophen at 08:00, 12:00, and 16:00 hours on the 1st postoperative day and at 08:00 hours on the 2nd postoperative day, when the pain intensity level was lower than that on the day of surgery. A 3-day acetaminophen regimen reduces acute postoperative swelling better than naproxen on the 3rd postoperative day after third molar surgery but not on the 6th postoperative day when the total swelling is less. PMID:12953342

  8. Age Discrimination--Notice--Filing Notice of Intent to Sue Within 180 Days After the Alleged Violation Is a Jurisdictional Prerequisite to an Action Under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act. Hiscott v. General Elec. Co., 521 F. 2d 632 (6th Cir. 1975)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiltner, L. Del

    1976-01-01

    The Hiscott decision indicates that the court will require notice to meet specific standards before an individual's right to maintain a civil action under the ADEA becomes operative. It also suggests that strict compliance with the 180-day notice provision will continue to be a condition precedent to suit. (Author/LBH)

  9. Fundamentals of Physics, 6th Edition Enhanced Problems Version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2002-04-01

    No other text on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics. This text continues to outperform the competition year after year, and the new edition will be no exception. Intended for Calculus-based Physics courses, the 6th edition of this extraordinary text is a major redesign of the best-selling 5th edition, which still maintains many of the elements that led to its enormous success. Jearl Walker adds his unique style to this edition with the addition of new problems designed to capture, and keep, students' attention. Nearly all changes are based on suggestions from instructors and students using the 5th edition, from reviewer comments, and from research done on the process of learning. The primary goal of this text is to provide students with a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and to help them apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving. The principal goal of Halliday-Resnick-Walker is to provide instructors with a tool by which they can teach students how to effectively read scientific material and successfully reason through scientific questions. To sharpen this tool, the Enhanced Problems Version of the sixth edition of Fundamentals of Physics contains over 1000 new, high-quality problems that require thought and reasoning rather than simplistic plugging of data into formulas.

  10. PREFACE: 6th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwat, David; Ayadi, Zoubir; Jamart, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    The 6th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2011) was held at the European School of Materials Engineering (EEIGM) on the 7-8 November 2011 in Nancy, France. This biennial conference organized by the EEIGM is a wonderful opportunity for all scientists involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE), to present their research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering. This conference is also open to other universities who have strong links with the EEIGM and provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, co-operation and future orientations by means of regular presentations, posters and a round-table discussion. This edition of the conference included a round-table discussion on composite materials within the Interreg IVA project '+Composite'. Following the publication of the proceedings of AMR 2009 in Volume 5 of this journal, it is with great pleasure that we present this selection of articles to the readers of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. Once again it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering, covering basic and applicative research on organic and composite materials, metallic materials and ceramics, and characterization methods. The editors are indebted to all the reviewers for reviewing the papers at very short notice. Special thanks are offered to the sponsors of the conference including EEIGM-Université de Lorraine, AMASE, DocMASE, Grand Nancy, Ville de Nancy, Region Lorraine, Fédération Jacques Villermaux, Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle, Casden and '+Composite'. Zoubir Ayadi, David Horwat and Brigitte Jamart

  11. TAOK3, a novel genome-wide association study locus associated with morphine requirement and postoperative pain in a retrospective pediatric day surgery population

    PubMed Central

    Cook-Sather, Scott D.; Li, Jin; Goebel, Theodora K.; Sussman, Emily M.; Rehman, Mohamed A.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Candidate gene studies have revealed limited genetic bases for opioid analgesic response variability. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) facilitate impartial queries of common genetic variants, allowing identification of novel genetic contributions to drug effect. Illumina single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays were used to investigate SNP associations with total morphine requirement as a quantitative trait locus and with postoperative pain in a retrospective population of opioid-naïve children age 4 – 18 y who had undergone day surgery tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. In an independent replication cohort, significant GWAS-identified SNPs were assayed using Taqman probes. Among 617 comprehensively phenotyped children, the 277 subjects of European Caucasian (EC) ancestry demonstrated nominal association between morphine dose and a series of novel SNPs (top rs795484, p=1.01×10-6 and rs1277441, p=2.77×10-6) at the TAOK3 locus. Age, body mass index, and physical status were included covariates. Morphine requirement averaged 132.4 mcg/kg (SD 40.9). Each minor allele at rs795484 (G>A) contributed +17.6 mcg/kg (95% CI=10.7-24.4) to dose. Effect direction and magnitude were replicated in an independent cohort of 75 EC children (p<0.05). No association with morphine dose was detected in African Americans (AA) (n=241). Postoperative pain scores ≥ 7/10 were associated with rs795484 (G>A) in the EC cohort (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.56-3.52, p<0.00005) and this association replicated in AA children (OR=1.76, 95% CI=1.14-2.71, p<0.01). Variants in TAOK3 encoding the serine/threonine-protein kinase, TAO3, are associated with increased morphine requirement in children of EC ancestry and with increased acute postoperative pain in both EC and AA subjects. PMID:24909733

  12. The role and modulation of CCR6+ Th17 cell populations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Paulissen, Sandra M J; van Hamburg, Jan Piet; Dankers, Wendy; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-07-01

    The IL-17A producing T-helper-17 (Th17) cell population plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and has gained wide interest as treatment target. IL-17A expressing Th cells are characterized by the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6 and the transcription factor RORC. In RA, CCR6+ Th cells were identified in peripheral blood, synovial fluid and inflamed synovial tissue. CCR6+ Th cells might drive the progression of an early inflammation towards a persistent arthritis. The CCR6+ Th cell population is heterogeneous and several subpopulations can be distinguished, including Th17, Th22, Th17.1 (also called non-classic Th1 cells), and unclassified or intermediate populations. Interestingly, some of these populations produce low levels of IL-17A but are still very pathogenic. Furthermore, the CCR6+ Th cells phenotype is unstable and plasticity exists between CCR6+ Th cells and T-regulatory (Treg) cells and within the CCR6+ Th cell subpopulations. In this review, characteristics of the different CCR6+ Th cell populations, their plasticity, and their potential impact on rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. Moreover, current approaches to target CCR6+ Th cells and future directions of research to find specific CCR6+ Th cell targets in the treatment of patients with RA and other CCR6+ Th cell mediated autoimmune diseases are highlighted.

  13. Proceedings of the 6th European VLBI Network Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Eduardo; Porcas, Richard W.; Lobanov, Andrei P.; Zensus, J. Anton

    This volume contains the papers presented at the 6th Symposium of the European VLBI Network, held in Bonn on 25-28 June 2002. The initial aim of these biennial gatherings of European VLBI practitioners was to review in a timely manner new results and technical developments related to Very Long Baseline Interferometry. Now, however, interest and participation in the EVN Symposia reaches far beyond Europe, reflecting the fact that scientific research and development programs are carried out to a high degree in international and often truly global collaborations. More than 120 scientists from around the world registered for participation in the Symposium. The Symposium was hosted by the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie and was held at the Gustav Stresemann Institut. In addition to the scientific sessions and poster presentations, the program included an EVN Users Meeting, an MPIfR versus Rest-of-the-World football match (highly appropriate given the competing World Cup event!), a visit to the MPIfR's 100m radio telescope in Effelsberg, and a Conference Dinner held in the nearby old walled town of Bad Müunstereifel. To maximize the usefulness of these proceedings (and possibly as a daring precedent) the Editors decided to demand the written versions of talks and posters and to complete the editorial work before the meeting, and to deliver the book to the participants at the beginning of the Symposium. We thank the authors for their cooperation in delivering publication-ready electronic manuscripts and for meeting the strict deadlines. It is highly gratifying that only a handful of the 100 presentations are not represented in this volume. The editors have made minor changes to some of the contributions in order to improve readability, and take responsibility for any errors arising from these changes. Besides the authors, many individuals have contributed to the preparation of the meeting and its proceedings. In addition to many members of the MPIfR staff, we

  14. Information for Industry; Proceedings of a One Day Seminar, (Univ. of Newcastle, 6th December 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcastle Public Library, New South Wales (Australia).

    The objective of this seminar was to increase the awareness of the importance of information to industry and the availability of informational resources in Newcastle. It is directed toward management, research and technical executives. The four papers presented for discussion are: (1) "The importance of information to industry," (2) "The mechanics…

  15. Oral fluids prior to day surgery. The effect of shortening the pre-operative fluid fast on postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, A P; Rowe, W L; Ogg, T W; Samaan, A

    1991-12-01

    One hundred day surgical patients undergoing first trimester termination of pregnancy were randomly allocated to receive either 150 ml of clear fluid 1.5-2 hours before anaesthesia or to remain fasted from midnight the night before. Patients were anaesthetised using a total intravenous technique which consisted of propofol and alfentanil. No adverse intra-operative events were noted in either group. There were no significant differences in immediate recovery time, or pain, nausea and headache scores at 30 or 120 minutes following recovery. The fasted group had less pain (p less than 0.05) at 60 minutes after recovery than the fluid group, although the mean pain scores in both groups were low. Eighty two per cent of the patients returned questionnaires about pain, nausea and headache scores on arriving home, and at 12 and 24 hours after surgery. There were no significant differences between the two groups. In conclusion, pain, nausea and headache scores are low following total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol and alfentanil for termination of pregnancy and these were unaffected by the administration of 150 ml of clear fluid given approximately 1.5 hours pre-operatively.

  16. PREFACE: The 6th Nordic Meeting on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhøiden, G.; Thorsteinsen, T. F.; Vaagen, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    After an unintended time gap of five years, the series of regular Nordic meetings on nuclear physics was continued with the 6th Nordic Meeting, August 10-15, 1989. The site was Utgarden in the outskirts of Kopervik, the administration center for the Saga island of Karmøy on the west-coast of Norway. Utgarden, a "peoples high-school'' with a kitchen, housing facility and a neighboring modern gymnasium with fine lecture halls, proved to be an inexpensive and adequate site for the meeting. From the time of the Vikings, the sound between Karmøyy and the mainland has been a vital part of the way to the north. Mobility and international orientation is still a signature of an area where today essential parts of Norway's oil- and metal industry are located. The conference program included a session on nuclear physics in industry and society, with contributed talks from a number of companies and technology/research institutions, which also sponsored the meeting. Lunch visits to Hydro's aluminium plant on Karmøy or alternatively to Statoil's gas terminal on the mainland, were included in the program. The scientific program gives a cross section of nuclear physics activities in which researchers from the Nordic countries are involved nowadays. The spectrum is rich, and the emphasis has shifted to higher energies than was the case five years ago. We appreciate the possibility to present this overview in a separate volume of Physica Scripta. The present issue covers nearly all the talks given at the meeting. The order deviates, however, somewhat from that of the conference program. The organizing committee tried to encourage in various ways the participation of young physicists; this effort was truely rewarded. The young participants put their imprint on the activities in the lecture halls and even more on the soccer arena. The meeting was sponsored by The University of Bergen, The Nordic Accelerator Committee, NORDITA, The Norwegian Research Council for Science and the

  17. 169. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 6TH AVE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST DOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    169. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 6TH AVE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST DOWN 6TH AVE. SHOWING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, BUILDING 8 (HOSPITAL) WITH PART OF ONE OF ITS 1-STORY WARD WINGS, AND THE 3 ORIGINAL DORMITORY WINGS OF BUILDING 9 (BOQ). - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  18. Effects of Flurbiprofen on CRP, TNF-α, IL-6, and Postoperative Pain of Thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Esme, Hidir; Kesli, Recep; Apiliogullari, Burhan; Duran, Ferdane Melike; Yoldas, Banu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate serum levels of acute phase reactants, such as CRP and cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) in patients who have undergone thoracotomy and to investigate the effects of flurbiprofen on postoperative inflammatory response. Methods: Forty patients undergoing posterolateral thoracotomy were randomly divided into 2 groups of 20 each. Control group received tramadol (4 x 100 mg) intravenously for four days, and flurbiprofen group received both tramadol (4 x 100 mg) and flurbiprofen (2 x 100 mg). Blood samples were collected before surgery and at the 3th and 168th hours after surgical procedure to measure serum CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α. Pain visual analog scales were recorded daily during the first four postoperative days. Spirometric measurement of forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV 1) was done before and four days after the operation. Results: The serum CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α levels in both groups increased significantly at 3th hour after thoracotomy. Serum TNF-α levels did not differ significantly between the groups at postoperative 4th day. However, IL-6 and CRP were significantly lower in flurbiprofen group than in control group at the same day (p<0.05). Visual analog scale was significantly lower in flurbiprofen group at 6th, 12th, 48th, 72th, and 96th hours postoperatively (p<0.05). The patients receiving flurbiprofen had higher FEV 1 values when compared with control group at postoperative 4th day. Conclusions: Patients undergoing thoracotomy showed reduced postoperative pain, mean additional analgesic consumption, and serum IL-6 and CRP levels, when flurbiprofen was added to systemic analgesic therapy. Analgesia with anti-inflammatory drug may contribute to the attenuation of the postoperative inflammatory response and prevent postoperative pain in patients undergoing thoracotomy. PMID:21448308

  19. Highlights of the ATS 6th Annual Convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breyer, Walter

    The convention began with a keynote by Michael Tubridy, the engineer in charge of the restoration of the Birr Castle Leviathan of Parsonstown. The convention then moved up to Mount Wilson, where talks were heard by Christ Plicht, Peter Abrahams, John Briggs, Don Osterbrock, Robert Ariail, Gayle Riggsbee, and Walt Breyer. Tours were made of the 100-inch and 60-inch telescopes, and observing through the 60-inch finished the day. Sunday, talks were heard by Paul O'Leary, Kevin Johnson, Eugene Rudd, E.J. Hysom, Edward Young, and Rolf Willach. Tours were made of the Hale Solar Laboratory, George Ellery Hale's home, the Huntington Library, Pasadena City College Observatory's 20-inch reflector, and Griffith Observatory's 12-inch Zeiss. On Monday, a tour was made to Mount Palomar and the 200-inch Hale Telescope.

  20. RAPP, a systematic e-assessment of postoperative recovery in patients undergoing day surgery: study protocol for a mixed-methods study design including a multicentre, two-group, parallel, single-blind randomised controlled trial and qualitative interview studies

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, K; Odencrants, S; Hagberg, L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Day surgery is a well-established practice in many European countries, but only limited information is available regarding postoperative recovery at home though there is a current lack of a standard procedure regarding postoperative follow-up. Furthermore, there is also a need for improvement of modern technology in assessing patient-related outcomes such as mobile applications. This article describes the Recovery Assessment by Phone Points (RAPP) study protocol, a mixed-methods study to evaluate if a systematic e-assessment follow-up in patients undergoing day surgery is cost-effective and improves postoperative recovery, health and quality of life. Methods and analysis This study has a mixed-methods study design that includes a multicentre, two-group, parallel, single-blind randomised controlled trial and qualitative interview studies. 1000 patients >17 years of age who are undergoing day surgery will be randomly assigned to either e-assessed postoperative recovery follow-up daily in 14 days measured via smartphone app including the Swedish web-version of Quality of Recovery (SwQoR) or to standard care (ie, no follow-up). The primary aim is cost-effectiveness. Secondary aims are (A) to explore whether a systematic e-assessment follow-up after day surgery has a positive effect on postoperative recovery, health-related quality of life (QoL) and overall health; (B) to determine whether differences in postoperative recovery have an association with patient characteristic, type of surgery and anaesthesia; (C) to determine whether differences in health literacy have a substantial and distinct effect on postoperative recovery, health and QoL; and (D) to describe day surgery patient and staff experiences with a systematic e-assessment follow-up after day surgery. The primary aim will be measured at 2 weeks postoperatively and secondary outcomes (A–C) at 1 and 2 weeks and (D) at 1 and 4 months. Trial registration number NCT02492191; Pre

  1. 3. BUILDING 522, EAST SIDE, FROM ACROSS 6TH STREET AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. BUILDING 522, EAST SIDE, FROM ACROSS 6TH STREET AT ITS INTERSECTION WITH G STREET, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Aeronautical Materials Storehouses, Between E & G Streets, between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  2. Conference summary: 6th International conference on hyperons, charm, and beauty hadrons (BEACH04)

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Joel N.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The 6th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm, and Beauty Hadrons (BEACH04) treated us to a wonderful array of new results. Here the author attempts to summarize the talks and discuss the conference highlights.

  3. 11. Interior view, working house, elevator head floor (6th of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior view, working house, elevator head floor (6th of top level); view facing east, toward head of no. 2 leg and ropedrive sheave. - Saint Anthony Elevator No. 3, 620 Malcom Avenue, Southeast, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  4. Storm Peak Laboratory 5th-6th Grade Climate and Weather Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, I. B.; Hallar, A. G.

    2008-12-01

    science. At the end of the day each student has a data sheet with measurements recorded from 5 locations of different elevations to take back to the classroom. Following the field trip, SPL scientists and educators visit the school for a follow-up to help children grasp concepts, represent their data set collected in graphical formats, answer questions, and evaluate students" learning. Currently, approximately 250 students annually participate in the SPL 5th and 6th grade climate education program.

  5. [Benign retroperitoneal cystic teratoma with postoperative chylous ascites--a case report].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, O; Nakajima, K; Nakashima, T; Ohkawa, M; Hisazumi, H; Matsubara, F

    1988-09-01

    A case of benign retroperitoneal cystic teratoma in a 62-year-old female is reported. The patient was admitted to our hospital for the purpose of extensive examination of a left abdominal mass. Radiological examinations including CT scanning revealed a large retroperitoneal mass arising in the left upper quadrant superior to the left kidney, containing cystic areas. The mass was removed by the thoracoabdominal approach under the diagnosis of cystic teratoma or liposarcoma. The margin of the mass was well demarcated and completely separated from other adjacent structures. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of benign cystic teratoma. From the 6th postoperative day, the discharge from a drainage tube, placed in the left retroperitoneal space, increased gradually and the discharge fluid became lipemic. The amount of daily discharge had a peak of approximately 400 ml on the 15th postoperative day. Total parenteral hyperalimentation was started on the 17th postoperative day under a diagnosis of chylous ascites. The amount of the discharge decreased and the drainage tube was removed on the 21st postoperative day.

  6. PREFACE: 6th International Workshop on Pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fring, Andreas; Jones, Hugh; Znojil, Miloslav

    2008-06-01

    Attempts to understand the quantum mechanics of non-Hermitian Hamiltonian systems can be traced back to the early days, one example being Heisenberg's endeavour to formulate a consistent model involving an indefinite metric. Over the years non-Hermitian Hamiltonians whose spectra were believed to be real have appeared from time to time in the literature, for instance in the study of strong interactions at high energies via Regge models, in condensed matter physics in the context of the XXZ-spin chain, in interacting boson models in nuclear physics, in integrable quantum field theories as Toda field theories with complex coupling constants, and also very recently in a field theoretical scenario in the quantization procedure of strings on an AdS5 x S5 background. Concrete experimental realizations of these types of systems in the form of optical lattices have been proposed in 2007. In the area of mathematical physics similar non-systematic results appeared sporadically over the years. However, intensive and more systematic investigation of these types of non- Hermitian Hamiltonians with real eigenvalue spectra only began about ten years ago, when the surprising discovery was made that a large class of one-particle systems perturbed by a simple non-Hermitian potential term possesses a real energy spectrum. Since then regular international workshops devoted to this theme have taken place. This special issue is centred around the 6th International Workshop on Pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics held in July 2007 at City University London. All the contributions contain significant new results or alternatively provide a survey of the state of the art of the subject or a critical assessment of the present understanding of the topic and a discussion of open problems. Original contributions from non-participants were also invited. Meanwhile many interesting results have been obtained and consensus has been reached on various central conceptual issues in the

  7. Curriculum Reform Movements and Science Textbooks: A Retrospective Examination of 6th Grade Science Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpaslan, Muhammet Mustafa; Yalvac, Bugrahan; Loving, Cathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Over 50 years, two major reform efforts in science education took place. The purpose of the present study is to explore how the educational reforms were reflected in nine 6th grade science textbooks published in 1975, in 1985 and in 1997 in terms of (a) the materials used, (b) the contexts to which the electricity concept was related, (c) the type…

  8. Oral Persuasion: A Saleable Work Skill. Occupation Simulation Packet. Grades 5th-6th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Dennis W.

    This teacher's guide contains simulated work experiences for 5th and 6th grade students using the isolated skill concept - oral persuasion. Teacher instructions include objectives, evaluation, and sequence of activities. The guide contains pre-tests and post-tests with instructions and answer keys. Two pre-skill activities are suggested, such as…

  9. Proceedings of the 6th national conference on hazardous wastes and hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book contained the proceedings of the 6th national Conference on Hazardous wastes and Hazardous materials. Topics covered include: federal and state policy papers, risk assessment, health and endangerment, contaminated groundwater control, treatment, spill control management and tank leakage control.

  10. Sneak Preview of Berkeley Lab's Science at the Theatre on June 6th, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Sanii, Babak

    2011-01-01

    Babak Sanii provides a sneak preview of Berkeley Lab's next Science at the Theater Event: Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience. Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Berkeley Repertory Theatre on June 6th, 2011

  11. Sneak Preview of Berkeley Lab's Science at the Theatre on June 6th, 2011

    ScienceCinema

    Sanii, Babak

    2016-07-12

    Babak Sanii provides a sneak preview of Berkeley Lab's next Science at the Theater Event: Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience. Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Berkeley Repertory Theatre on June 6th, 2011

  12. 10. 'Southern Pacific Company, 6th Crossing of Sacramento River, One ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 'Southern Pacific Company, 6th Crossing of Sacramento River, One 208'-10-1/2' C. to C. End Pins S. Tr. Thro. Skew Span, Scale 1' = 10', The Phoenix Bridge Co., Phoenixville, Pa., April 12, 1901, Drg. 45' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 301.85, Milepost 301.85, Pollard Flat, Shasta County, CA

  13. Prevalence of Elevated Blood Pressure in Hispanic versus Non-Hispanic 6th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarlton, Patricia A.

    2007-01-01

    Blood pressure screening was conducted on 4,311 (Hispanic n = 763 [17.7%], White n = 2,566 [59.5%], African American n = 610 [14.1%], Asian n = 136 [3.2%], Multiracial n = 231 [5.4%], and Native American n = 5 [0.1%]) 6th-grade students enrolled in Seminole County, Florida, Public Schools from August to December 2005. Prevalence of obesity was 21%…

  14. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (P<0.0001) as compared with group B. The combination of tramadol-diclofenac resulted in few mild to moderate adverse events (nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  15. [Postoperative pain in craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Peón, Andréa Ungaro; Diccini, Solange

    2005-01-01

    In the postoperative period, 47% to 75% of the patients report some degree of pain. This study aimed to evaluate pain in the pre and postoperative period of patients submitted to craniotomy. This prospective research was carried out at the neurosurgery unit of a large Brazilian hospital. For a quantitative evaluation of pain, the verbal numeric 0-10 rating scale was used. Forty patients with a mean age of 36 years were evaluated. In the preoperative period, 34 (85%) patients indicated headache as the main cause of pain. In the postoperative period, 37 (93%) patients complained of pain while three (7%) reported absence of pain. Pain peaks were observed on the 2nd postoperative day, when 12 (32%) of the patients reported severe pain and 10 (27%) moderate pain. Absence of severe pain occurred after the 8th postoperative day. It was concluded that protocols of analgesia in craniotomy are needed, such as training nurses to better evaluate and handle pain. PMID:16211171

  16. Postoperative management.

    PubMed

    Schraag, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Most patients undergoing major aortic surgery have multiple comorbidities and are at high risk of postoperative complications that affect multiple organ systems. Different aortic pathologies and surgical repair techniques have specific impact on the postoperative course. Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the common denominator in aortic surgery and influences the integrity of end-organ function. Common postoperative problems include hemodynamic instability due to the immediate inflammatory response, renal impairment, spinal cord ischemia, respiratory failure with prolonged mechanical ventilation, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as ileus or mesenteric ischemia. Focused care bundles to establish homeostasis and a team working toward an early functional recovery determine the success of effective rehabilitation and outcomes after aortic surgery. PMID:27650347

  17. Improving 6th Grade Climate Literacy using New Media (CLINM) and Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G.; Schmidt, C.; Metzger, E. P.; Cordero, E. C.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA-funded project, Improving 6th Grade Climate Literacy using New Media (CLINM), is designed to improve the climate literacy of California's 450,000 6th-grade students through teacher professional development that presents climate change as an engaging context for teaching earth science standards. The project fosters experience-based interaction among learners and encourages expressive creativity and idea-exchange via the web and social media. The heart of the CLINM project is the development of an online educator-friendly experience that provides content expert-reviewed, teacher-tested, standards-based educational resources, classroom activities and lessons that make meaningful connections to NASA data and images as well as new media tools (videos, web, and phone applications) based on the Green Ninja, a climate-action superhero who fights global warming by inspiring personal action (www.greenninja.info). In this session, we will discuss this approach to professional development and share a collection of teacher-tested CLINM resources. CLINM resources are grounded in earth system science; classroom activities and lessons engage students in exploration of connections between natural systems and human systems with a particular focus on how climate change relates to everyone's need for food, water, and energy. CLINM uses a team-based approach to resource development, and partners faculty in San José State University's (SJSU) colleges of Science, Education, and Humanities and the Arts with 6th-grade teachers from local school districts, a scientist from NASA Ames Research Center and climate change education projects at Stanford University, the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, and the University of Idaho. Climate scientists and other content experts identify relevant concepts and work with science educators to develop and/or refine classroom activities to elucidate those concepts; activities are piloted in pre-service science methods courses at SJSU and in

  18. Bone Lose of the Ancient Mediterranean lumbar vertebrae : Iasos, 6th century ad.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Serdar; Solmaz, Ilker; Ilıca, A. Turan; Karaçalıoğlu, Özgür; Damla Yılmaz, Nalan; Başoğlu, Okşan; Kılıc, Selim; Izci, Yusuf

    Evaluation of bone mineral density (BMD) of the ancient peoples has received great interest by anthropologists. The aims of this study are to investigate the lumbar vertebrae of the Iasos people during the Byzantine period, in order to determine the prevalence of bone loss and to interpret dietary conditions of ancient Mediterranean populations. Lumbar vertebrae belonging to twenty eight skeletons of the 6th c AD were analyzed by radiographs and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The BMD values for each biologic sex and age group were compared. The correlation between the BMD and radiological features was also analyzed. The mean BMD was 0.940 g/cm2. BMD was decreased by aging in both sexes, but it was not significant. Osteopenia was found in 11 (39%) and osteoporosis in 4 (14.3%) out 28 vertebrae. The BMD was normal in 13 (46%) out of 28 vertebrae. Osteopenia was present in 7 (38%) of 18 male vertebrae and 4 (40%) of 10 female vertebrae. The spine score was high in the male group and there was a strong positive correlation between the BMD and spine score for both sexes. This study revealed that the BMD decreased by aging and that osteopenia was a problem in both sexes of the Iasos people during the 6th c AD. There was no correlation between the BMD and radiological features for age groups and biological sexes.

  19. [Modification of postoperative wound healing by showering].

    PubMed

    Neues, C; Haas, E

    2000-02-01

    Usually postoperative wounds are kept dry until the stitches are removed. In a prospective randomized study early water contact was allowed in order to test postoperative wound healing in 817 patients operated on for varicose veins. Regardless of whether the wounds were kept dry or had water contact with or without shower foam from the second postoperative day, no infection was registered.

  20. Epidemic waves during Justinian's plague in the Byzantine Empire (6th-8th c. AD).

    PubMed

    Tsiamis, C; Poulakou-Rebelakou, E; Tsakris, A; Petridou, E

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to collect the epidemic outbreaks and the epidemic waves of the bubonic plague of the Byzantine Empire during the first pandemic (541-751 AD). Human activities, such as trade and military movements have been speculated as underlying factors for the causation of the pandemic. Historical data combined with geographical spreading of the plague, allows an alternative speculation of suspicious enzootic areas in the Middle East. We conclude that the possible existence of enzootic areas in that region might have been responsible for the causation of the numerous outbreaks of the bubonic plague in the Eastern provinces of the Byzantine Empire during the 6th-8th century period.

  1. Rapid landscape change in 6th century northern Jordan: interdisciplinary geoarchaeological perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucke, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Landscapes of the ancient fertile crescent are considered affected by soil degradation as result of long-term farming since the Neolithic, and impressive ruins of antiquity led to assumptions that their abandonment must have been conntected with reduced agricultural productivity. In this context, a valley fill near the site of Abila of the Decapolis in northern Jordan was apparently deposited largely during the 6th century AD, and provides evidence for a rapid and intense landscape change during the Late Byzantine period. However, an interdisciplinary case study of land use, soil development, and sediments found that the valley fill cannot be connected with large-scale soil erosion in the vicinity of the site. On the one hand, this is indicated by the distribution of soil development and archaeological material as marker of past land use activity in the past, which suggests that the best soils were and still are used intensively. On the other hand, the sediments seem to point to the occurrence of climatic extremes such as heavy floods, the occurrence of soil creep after water saturation, but also a significant shift to aridity which may have triggered socio-economic changes of subsistence strategies from agriculture to pastoralism. The dates of sediments which are available so far indicate that the climatic change seemingly occurred rapidly within approximately 100 years during the late 6th and early 7th century AD, possibly connected with the "year without sun" or 'Mystery Veil' which the Byzantine historian Procopius described in the year 536 AD. Modern analogies of the Pinatubo eruption in 1991 let it seem possible that a volcanic event, perhaps the outbreak of the Ilopango volcano, was connected with these environmental turbulences. Such events cannot be understood by isolated studies: without a broad interdisciplinary framework, single archives are prone to misinterpretation, and our understanding of the environmental history of Abila is still very limited.

  2. CfDS 2006: the 6th European Dark-Skies Symposium, Portsmouth, 2006 September 15-16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizon, R.

    2006-12-01

    The BAA's Campaign for Dark Skies took its turn in 2006 to stage the 6th European Dark-Skies Symposium, similar events having been held in previous years in Switzerland, Germany, France and Belgium. The event was the best attended to date, with more than 150 delegates from eleven European countries, the USA and even South Africa. Between sessions, delegates were given a tour of the night skies of the world in the South Downs Planetarium, where Dr John Mason simulated the effects of light pollution. This was followed by a visit to the Clanfield Observatory, courtesy of the Hampshire Astronomical Group, later in the evening, where the real night sky and a little real light pollution (!) were observed. The whole event was kindly sponsored by the BAA and Abacus Lighting Ltd. A principal aim of the two-day symposium was to advise planners and other decision-makers, and those who make, choose and install lighting, about the legal and moral issues surrounding light pollution. It is not, of course, the Campaign's intention to ban lighting, but to ensure that where outdoor lighting is required, it is designed and installed correctly, thereby causing little or no nuisance and reducing energy costs. These non-astronomical aspects were very much to the fore on the first day of the conference, which was opened by one of CfDS' best allies in Parliament, Lembit Opik MP. Mr Opik expressed his delight at seeing so many delegates, and confirmed his continuing support for the initiatives CfDS pursues within Parliament: for example its discussions with DEFRA on the subject of the proposed planning directive (PPS 23) on light pollution

  3. FOREWORD: 6th International Conference on Pumps and Fans with Compressors and Wind Turbines (ICPF2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin; Wang, Zhengwei; Yuan, Shouqi; Shi, Weidong; Liu, Shuhong; Luo, Xingqi; Wang, Fujun

    2013-12-01

    The 6th International Conference on Pumps and Fans with Compressors and Wind Turbines (ICPF 2013) was held in Beijing, China, 19-22 September 2013, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University and Jiangsu University. The co-organizers were Zhejiang University, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, The State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, The State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy and Beijing International Science and Technology Cooperation Base for CO2 Utilization and Reduction. The sponsor of the conference was Concepts NREC. The First International Conference on Pumps and Systems (May 1992), the Second International Conference on Pumps and Fans (October 1995), the Third International Conference on Pumps and Fans (October 1998), and the Fourth International Conference on Pumps and Fans (26-29 August 2002) were all held in Beijing and were organized by the late famous Chinese professor on fluid machinery and engineering, Professor Zuyan Mei of Tsinghua University. The conference was interrupted by the death of Professor Mei in 2003. In order to commemorate Professor Mei, the organizing committee of ICPF decided to continue organizing the conference series. The Fifth Conference on Pumps and Systems (2010 ICPF) took place in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China, 18-21 October 2010, and it was jointly organized by Zhejiang University and Tsinghua University. With the development of renewable energy and new energy in China and in the world, some small types of compressor and some types of pump, as well as wind turbines are developing very fast; therefore the ICPF2013 conference included compressors and wind turbines. The theme of the conference was the application of renewable energy of pumps, compressors, fans and blowers. The content of the conference was the basic study, design and experimental study of compressors, fans, blowers and pumps; the CFD application on pumps and fans, their transient behavior, unsteady flows and multi-phase flow

  4. PREFACE: The 6th International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Murai, Yuichi

    2009-02-01

    Research on multi-phase flows is very important for industrial applications, including power stations, vehicles, engines, food processing, and so on. Also, from the environmental viewpoint, multi-phase flows need to be investigated to overcome global warming. Multi-phase flows originally have non-linear features because they are multi-phased. The interaction between the phases plays a very interesting role in the flows. The non-linear interaction causes the multi-phase flows to be very difficult to understand phenomena. The International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multi-phase Flows (ISMTMF) is a unique symposium. The target of the symposium is to exchange the state-of-the-art knowledge on the measurement techniques for non-linear multi-phase flows. Measurement technique is the key technology to understanding non-linear phenomena. The ISMTMF began in 1995 in Nanjing, China. The symposium has continuously been held every two or three years. The ISMTMF-2008 was held in Okinawa, Japan as the 6th symposium of ISMTMF on 15-17 December 2008. Okinawa has a long history as the Ryukyus Kingdom. China and Japan have had cultural and economic exchanges through Okinawa for more than 1000 years. Please enjoy Okinawa and experience its history to enhance our international communication. The present symposium was attended by 124 participants, the program included 107 contributions with 5 plenary lectures, 2 keynote lectures, and 100 oral regular paper presentations. The topics include, besides the ordinary measurement techniques for multiphase flows, acoustic and electric sensors, bubbles and microbubbles, computed tomography, gas-liquid interface, laser-imaging and PIV, oil/coal/drop and spray, solid and powder, spectral and multi-physics. This volume includes the presented papers at ISMTMF-2008. In addition to this volume, ten selected papers will be published in a special issue of Measurement Science and Technology. We would like to express special thanks to all

  5. PREFACE: 6th International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis (MURPHYS2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimian, Mihai; Rachinskii, Dmitrii

    2015-02-01

    The International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis (MURPHYS) conference series focuses on multiple scale systems, singular perturbation problems, phase transitions and hysteresis phenomena occurring in physical, biological, chemical, economical, engineering and information systems. The 6th edition was hosted by Stefan cel Mare University in the city of Suceava located in the beautiful multicultural land of Bukovina, Romania, from May 21 to 24, 2012. This continued the series of biennial multidisciplinary conferences organized in Cork, Ireland from 2002 to 2008 and in Pécs, Hungary in 2010. The MURPHYS 2012 Workshop brought together more than 50 researchers in hysteresis and multi-scale phenomena from the United State of America, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Ireland, Czech Republic, Hungary, Greece, Ukraine, and Romania. Participants shared and discussed new developments of analytical techniques and numerical methods along with a variety of their applications in various areas, including material sciences, electrical and electronics engineering, mechanical engineering and civil structures, biological and eco-systems, economics and finance. The Workshop was sponsored by the European Social Fund through Sectoral Operational Program Human Resources 2007-2013 (PRO-DOCT) and Stefan cel Mare University, Suceava. The Organizing Committee was co-chaired by Mihai Dimian from Stefan cel Mare University, Suceava (Romania), Amalia Ivanyi from the University of Pecs (Hungary), and Dmitrii Rachinskii from the University College Cork (Ireland). All papers published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series have been peer reviewed through processes administered by the Editors. Reviews were conducted by expert referees to the professional and scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. The Guest Editors wish to place on record their sincere gratitude to Miss Sarah Toms for the assistance she provided

  6. 1/6TH SCALE STRIP EFFLUENT FEED TANK-MIXING RESULTS USING MCU SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this task was to determine if mixing was an issue for the entrainment and dispersion of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) solvent in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Strip Effluent Feed Tank (SEFT). The MCU strip effluent stream containing the Cs removed during salt processing will be transferred to the DWPF for immobilization in HLW glass. In lab-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing, mixing of the solvent in the dilute nitric acid solution proved problematic, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to perform scaled SEFT mixing tests to evaluate whether the problem was symptomatic of the lab-scale set-up or of the solvent. The solvent levels tested were 228 and 235 ppm, which represented levels near the estimated DWPF solvent limit of 239 ppm in 0.001M HNO{sub 3} solution. The 239 ppm limit was calculated by Norato in X-CLC-S-00141. The general approach for the mixing investigation was to: (1) Investigate the use of fluorescent dyes to aid in observing the mixing behavior. Evaluate and compare the physical properties of the fluorescent dyed MCU solvents to the baseline Oak Ridge CSSX solvent. Based on the data, use the dyed MCU solvent that best approximates the physical properties. (2) Use approximately a 1/6th linear scale of the SEFT to replicate the internal configuration for DWPF mixing. (3) Determine agitator speed(s) for scaled testing based on the DWPF SEFT mixing speed. (4) Perform mixing tests using the 1/6th SEFT and determine any mixing issues (entrainment/dispersion, accumulation, adhesion) through visual observations and by pulling samples to assess uniformity. The mixing tests used MCU solvent fabricated at SRNL blended with Risk Reactor DFSB-K43 fluorescent dye. This dyed SRNL MCU solvent had equivalent physical properties important to mixing as compared to the Oak Ridge baseline solvent, blended easily with the MCU solvent, and provided an excellent visual aid.

  7. Latina girls' identities-in-practice in 6th grade science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Edna

    Inequalities and achievement gaps in science education among students from different racial and socioeconomic backgrounds as well as between genders in the United States are due to not just access to resources, but also to the incongruence between identities of school science with identities salient to minority students. Minority girls are especially portrayed to be estranged from prototypical school science Discourse, often characterized as white, middle class, and masculine. This dissertation, based on a two-year ethnographic study in an urban middle school in New York City, describes the authoring of novel identities-in-practice of minority girls in a 6th grade science classroom. The findings indicate that minority girls draw from out-of-school identities salient to them to author novel identities-in-practice in the various figured worlds of the 6th grade science classroom. Through taking such authorial stances, minority girls exhibit agency in negotiating for wider boundaries in their school science participation and broker for hybrid spaces of school science where the school science Discourse was destabilized and challenged to be more inclusive of everyday funds of knowledge and Discourses important to the students. The findings also highlight the dialectic relationship between an individual students' learning and participation and the school science community-of-practice and the implications such a relationship has on the learning of both individual students and the collective community-of-practice. From year one findings, curricular adaptations were enacted, with teacher and student input, on lessons centering on food and nutrition. The adapted curriculum specifically solicited for nontraditional funds of knowledge and Discourse from students and were grounded strongly in relevance to students' out of school lives. The hybrid spaces collectively brokered for by the community-of-practice were transformed in three ways: physically, politically, and

  8. Bone loss during partial weight bearing (1/6th gravity) is mitigated by resistance and aerobic exercise in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreaux, R. D.; Metzger, C. E.; Macias, B. R.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Hogan, H. A.; Bloomfield, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Astronauts on long duration missions continue to experience bone loss, as much as 1-2% each month, for up to 4.5 years after a mission. Mechanical loading of bone with exercise has been shown to increase bone formation, mass, and geometry. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two exercise protocols during a period of reduced gravitational loading (1/6th body weight) in mice. Since muscle contractions via resistance exercise impart the largest physiological loads on the skeleton, we hypothesized that resistance training (via vertical tower climbing) would better protect against the deleterious musculoskeletal effects of reduced gravitational weight bearing when compared to endurance exercise (treadmill running). Young adult female BALB/cBYJ mice were randomly assigned to three groups: 1/6 g (G/6; n=6), 1/6 g with treadmill running (G/6+RUN; n=8), or 1/6 g with vertical tower climbing (G/6+CLB; n=9). Exercise was performed five times per week. Reduced weight bearing for 21 days was achieved through a novel harness suspension system. Treadmill velocity (12-20 m/min) and daily run time duration (32-51 min) increased incrementally throughout the study. Bone geometry and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) at proximal metaphysis and mid-diaphysis tibia were assessed by in vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) on days 0 and 21 and standard dynamic histomorphometry was performed on undemineralized sections of the mid-diaphysis after tissue harvest. G/6 caused a significant decrease (P<0.001) in proximal tibia metaphysis total vBMD (-9.6%). These reductions of tibia metaphyseal vBMD in G/6 mice were mitigated in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB groups (P<0.05). After 21 days of G/6, we saw an absolute increase in tibia mid-diaphysis vBMD and in distal metaphysis femur vBMD in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB mice (P<0.05). Substantial increases in endocortical and periosteal mineralizing surface (MS/BS) at mid-diaphysis tibia in G/6+CLB demonstrate that

  9. Leather material found on a 6th B.C. Chinese bronze sword: A technical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wugan; Si, Yi; Wang, Hongmin; Qin, Ying; Huang, Fengchun; Wang, Changsui

    2011-09-01

    During July to November, 2006, an important archaeological excavation was conducted in Yun country, Hubei province, southern China. Chinese archaeologists found some remnant of leather materials, covered with red pigments, on a 6th century B.C. Chinese bronze sword. To understand the technology/ies that may have been utilized for manufacturing the leathers, a combined of Raman spectroscopy, FT-IR and XRF was thus applied to the remnant of leather materials. Raman analyses showed that red pigment on the leather was cinnabar (HgS). FT-IR and XRF analyses indicated that the content of some elements, such as Ca (existing as CaCO 3) and Fe (existing as Fe 2O 3), were much higher than those in the surrounding grave soil. The results inferred an application of lime depilation and retting, and the Fe-Al compound salt as tanning agent. And it was furthermore implicated that the Fe-Al salt tanning technique had been developed in the middle and late Spring and Autumn Period of China.

  10. 6th Circuit: insurance policies are not covered by the ADA.

    PubMed

    1997-08-22

    The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) does not cover the products that an insurer offers. The ADA only covers the physical premises of an insurance company. The court also ruled that the ADA does not mandate equality in employer-provider insurance coverage between people with varying types of disabilities. According to the court, the ADA only requires that all eligible employees be able to enroll in the plan. The case was brought by [name removed], a former employee of Schering-Plough Corporation, who complained that the long-term disability plan sponsored by the company and operated by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, violated the ADA. The plan limited mental illness disability benefits to two years but did not place a similar cap on physical conditions. The ruling, binding in Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, and Michigan, contradicts earlier opinions which held that insurance products are subject to Title III of the ADA. The ruling states that Title III does not control the content of a long-term disability policy offered by an employer. Previous precedents set by the 1st Circuit Court in 1994 that had been viewed as protecting persons living with AIDS (PWAs) from discrimination in insurance programs and products were rejected by this ruling.

  11. Prevention and Treatment of Cancer: Hypes and Hopes 6th International Translational Cancer Research Conference.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prabhudas; Vora, Hemangini; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gandhi, Varsha; Mehta, Kapil; Pathak, Sen

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is primarily an "old-age" disease that has an "age-old" history. The overall incidence of cancer is much higher in Western countries, but is rapidly growing in Eastern countries perhaps due to change in life-style. Almost three million studies published to date indicate that cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder that arises from dysregulation of multiple cell signaling pathways. The cancer genome landscape indicates that approximately 140 genes and 12 cell signaling pathways drive almost all cancers. "Targeted therapy," a buzz word in cancer treatment for the past two decades, has provided antibodies, as well as small-molecule inhibitors. These therapies have been successful only in few instances. However, in most cases, minor increase in overall survival has been reported at the cost of huge expense. An alternative strategy is to prevent cancer or to diagnose and treat the disease at an early stage to gain survival benefits. Such interventions are also cost-effective. To address some of these issues, the 6th International Translational Cancer Research Conference was held during February 4-7th, 2016, in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India; the homeland of Mahatma Gandhi. This conference was focused on utilizing multidisciplinary approaches for prevention and early treatment that would likely simultaneously or sequentially target many key pathways. Several distinguished speakers were invited from around the world. This article highlights primary features of this conference. PMID:27630358

  12. [Psychometric performance of the 6th version of the Addiction Severity Index in Spanish (ASI-6)].

    PubMed

    Díaz Mesa, Eva M; García-Portilla, Paz; Sáiz, Pilar A; Bobes Bascarán, Teresa; Casares, María José; Fonseca, Eduardo; Carreño, Eduardo; Flórez, Gerardo; Guardia, Josep; Ochoa, Enriqueta; Pereiro, César; Rubio, Gabriel; Terán, Antonio; Fernández Hermida, José Ramón; Bobes, Julio

    2010-08-01

    This work analysed the psychometric properties of the 6th version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6) translated and adapted to the Spanish language. A multicentre, observational and prospective design was used. A total of 258 participants were included, 217 were patients (35 stable patients and 182 unstable patients), and 41 were controls. The results show satisfactory psychometric performance of the ASI-6. The degree of the internal consistency of the standardized objective scores ranged between .47 and .95. As for test-retest reliability, the values were acceptable, varying from .36 to 1. The study of the internal structure revealed a good fit to a unidimensional solution for all scales taken independently. Regarding convergent-discriminant validity, the correlations between the primary and secondary scales of the ASI-6 and the Clinic Global Impression score were low, with values from .01 to .26. Likewise, 8 of the 15 scales differentiated between controls and unstable patients. The psychometric properties of the ASI-6 Spanish version seem to be acceptable, though it is necessary to carry out new studies to test metric quality with independent samples of patients.

  13. FOREWORD: 6th International Symposium on Electronic Beam Ion Sources and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljeby, L.

    1997-01-01

    The 6th International Symposium on Electron Beam Ion sources and their Applications was held at the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory at Stockholm University, June 20-23, 1994. A symposium in this series is held every three years. The next one will be organised by Professor Reinhard Becker at the J. W. Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. The Stockholm symposium had a total of 65 participants from 9 countries. 43 oral presentations were given and 7 posters were exhibited. For the first time in this series the proceedings have been refereed. The symposium was given generous support by the Marcus Wallbenberg Foundation for International Co-operation in Science, a support mainly used for inviting delegates from Russia and students. The organisation of the symposium was led by Dr. Carl Johan Herrlander. His efficiency, organising skill and never ending attention to all the aspects of the symposium were of the utmost importance for carrying it through. We deeply regret that the proceedings have been very much delayed. Physica Scripta has no part in causing the delay which is solely a result of my inability to enforce deadlines. We think though that the contents still is of interest in particular as a full documentation of the conference.

  14. Comparing independent observations at the time of Abruzzo April 6th 2009 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramutoli, Valerio; Corrado, Rosita; Pia Faruolo, Maria; Filizzola, Carolina; Genzano, Nicola; Grimaldi, Caterina Livia Sara; Lacava, Teodosio; Lisi, Mariano; Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Pergola, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    The idea that EQs have no precursors at all (that seems to justify purely statistical EQ forecast approaches based only on the analysis of seismic data) has discouraged for long time the investments in multi-parametric observation networks and related research activities. Even if never demonstrated such assumptions have been not without consequences. For instance, even in presence of several months long seismic crisis, most of the observations available for the Abruzzo April 6th 2009 earthquake are concentrated in the co-post seismic phases and relatively poor (mainly due to occasional/individual researchers initiatives) are the observational data collected in the pre-event phase. In this very particular scientific context satellite sensors offering continuity of Earth Observation at the global scale can play a particularly important role. In this work results achieved by applying the general RST (Robust Satellite Technique) approach to 30 years of different satellite thermal infrared data (NOAA-AVHRR, EOS-MODIS, MSG-SEVIRI) during the Abruzzo March-April 2009 seismic sequence will be discussed also for comparison with other ground based observation performed before and after the main shock in order to understand if a careful analysis of independent observations, also in this field, can produce (at least) some small improvements of our knowledge on EQ preparatory phases.

  15. Prevention and Treatment of Cancer: Hypes and Hopes 6th International Translational Cancer Research Conference.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prabhudas; Vora, Hemangini; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gandhi, Varsha; Mehta, Kapil; Pathak, Sen

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is primarily an "old-age" disease that has an "age-old" history. The overall incidence of cancer is much higher in Western countries, but is rapidly growing in Eastern countries perhaps due to change in life-style. Almost three million studies published to date indicate that cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder that arises from dysregulation of multiple cell signaling pathways. The cancer genome landscape indicates that approximately 140 genes and 12 cell signaling pathways drive almost all cancers. "Targeted therapy," a buzz word in cancer treatment for the past two decades, has provided antibodies, as well as small-molecule inhibitors. These therapies have been successful only in few instances. However, in most cases, minor increase in overall survival has been reported at the cost of huge expense. An alternative strategy is to prevent cancer or to diagnose and treat the disease at an early stage to gain survival benefits. Such interventions are also cost-effective. To address some of these issues, the 6th International Translational Cancer Research Conference was held during February 4-7th, 2016, in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India; the homeland of Mahatma Gandhi. This conference was focused on utilizing multidisciplinary approaches for prevention and early treatment that would likely simultaneously or sequentially target many key pathways. Several distinguished speakers were invited from around the world. This article highlights primary features of this conference.

  16. A school-based, peer leadership physical activity intervention for 6th graders

    PubMed Central

    Barr-Anderson, Daheia J.; Laska, Melissa N.; Veblen-Mortenson, Sara; Dudovitz, Bonnie; Farbarksh, Kian; Story, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to promote physical activity in 6th graders by developing and testing the feasibility of an enhanced Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA) program comprised of a peer leadership component and innovative exercise resource toolkit including DVDs. Method A racially/ethnically diverse sample of students received the standard PALA program (2 control schools, n=61) or enhanced PALA+Peers program (2 intervention schools, n=87) during 2006–2007 academic year. Results Compared to the control condition, the intervention was successful in increasing moderate physical activity in all students (p=0.02) and moderate and hard physical activity among girls (p=0.03 and p=0.04, respectively). Teachers and students reported a high level of satisfaction and receptivity with the intervention. All teachers thought the DVDs were well-received, and 87% of students reported that they would recommend the enhanced program to peers. Conclusion Coupling peer leadership and DVDs that promote physical activity may be an effective way to increase youth physical activity. PMID:21945980

  17. Breakfast patterns among low-income, ethnically-diverse 4th-6th grade children in an urban area

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing school breakfast participation has been advocated as a method to prevent childhood obesity. However, little is known about children’s breakfast patterns outside of school (e.g., home, corner store). Policies that increase school breakfast participation without an understanding of children’s breakfast habits outside of school may result in children consuming multiple breakfasts and may undermine efforts to prevent obesity. The aim of the current study was to describe morning food and drink consumption patterns among low-income, urban children and their associations with relative weight. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of data obtained from 651 4th-6th graders (51.7% female, 61.2% African American, 10.7 years) in 2012. Students completed surveys at school that included all foods eaten and their locations that morning. Height and weight were measured by trained research staff. Results On the day surveyed, 12.4% of youth reported not eating breakfast, 49.8% reported eating one breakfast, 25.5% reported eating two breakfasts, and 12.3% reported eating three or more breakfasts. The number of breakfasts consumed and BMI percentile showed a significant curvilinear relationship, with higher mean BMI percentiles observed among children who did not consume any breakfast and those who consumed ≥ 3 breakfasts. Sixth graders were significantly less likely to have consumed breakfast compared to younger children. A greater proportion of obese youth had no breakfast (18.0%) compared to healthy weight (10.1%) and overweight youth (10.7%, p = .01). Conclusions When promoting school breakfast, policies will need to be mindful of both over- and under-consumption to effectively address childhood obesity and food insecurity. Clinical trial registration NCT01924130 from http://clinicaltrials.gov/. PMID:24928474

  18. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  19. Probiotic amelioration of azotemia in 5/6th nephrectomized Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Natarajan; Patel, Beena; Ranganathan, Pari; Marczely, Joseph; Dheer, Rahul; Chordia, Tushar; Dunn, Stephen R; Friedman, Eli A

    2005-08-24

    The present study was to test the hypothesis that, selected bacteria instilled into the gastrointestinal tract could help in converting nitrogenous wastes accumulated due to renal insufficiency into non-toxic compounds; thereby, ameliorating the biochemical imbalance. Herein we describe a prospective, blinded, placebo controlled pilot-study, using 5/6th nephrectomized Sprague Dawley rat, as a chronic renal failure model. The study group consisted of 36 nephrectomized and 7 non-nephrectomized (control) rats. After two-week nephrectomy stabilization, cohorts of six nephrectomized rats were fed casein-based diet plus one of the following regimens: (A) Control, (B) Placebo (casein-based diet without probiotics), (C) Bacillus pasteurii, (D) Sporolac(R), (E) Kibow cocktail, (F) CHR Hansen Cocktail, and (G) ECONORM. Subsequently, blood (retro-orbital) and urine (collected for measurements of blood urea-nitrogen and creatinine respectively), body weight and bacterial counts (feces) were obtained at regular intervals. The study end-points were to determine if any of the probiotic dietary supplements facilitated, (1) decreased blood concentrations of uremic toxins, (2) altered renal function, and (3) prolonged survival. After 16 weeks of treatment, regimens C and D significantly prolonged the life span of uremic rats, in addition to showing a reduction in blood urea-nitrogen levels, concluding that supplementation of probiotic formulation to uremic rats slows the progression of azotemia, which may correlate with prolonged life span of uremic rats. Derivative trials of probiotic treatment of larger animals and humans will further assess the potential role of probiotic formulations in delaying the onset and clinical severity of clinical illness at different stages of renal failure. PMID:16127597

  20. Face lift postoperative recovery.

    PubMed

    Mottura, A Aldo

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe what I have studied and experienced, mainly regarding the control and prediction of the postoperative edema; how to achieve an agreeable recovery and give positive support to the patient, who in turn will receive pleasant sensations that neutralize the negative consequences of the surgery.After the skin is lifted, the drainage flow to the flaps is reversed abruptly toward the medial part of the face, where the flap bases are located. The thickness and extension of the flap determines the magnitude of the post-op edema, which is also augmented by medial surgeries (blepharo, rhino) whose trauma obstruct their natural drainage, increasing the congestion and edema. To study the lymphatic drainage, the day before an extended face lift (FL) a woman was infiltrated in the cheek skin with lynfofast (solution of tecmesio) and the absorption was observed by gamma camera. Seven days after the FL she underwent the same study; we observed no absorption by the lymphatic, concluding that a week after surgery, the lymphatic network was still damaged. To study the venous return during surgery, a fine catheter was introduced into the external jugular vein up to the mandibular border to measure the peripheral pressure. Following platysma plication the pressure rose, and again after a simple bandage, but with an elastic bandage it increased even further, diminishing considerably when it was released. Hence, platysma plication and the elastic bandage on the neck augment the venous congestion of the face. There are diseases that produce and can prolong the surgical edema: cardiac, hepatic, and renal insufficiencies, hypothyroidism, malnutrition, etc. According to these factors, the post-op edema can be predicted, the surgeon can choose between a wide dissection or a medial surgery, depending on the social or employment compromises the patient has, or the patient must accept a prolonged recovery if a complex surgery is necessary. Operative

  1. Clinical experimental studies of postoperative infusion analgesia.

    PubMed

    Knoche, E; Dick, W; Bowdler, I; Gundlach, G

    1983-01-01

    Thirty postoperative patients, after undergoing abdominal hysterectomy and standard general anesthesia, were randomly allocated to three groups and received, in the recovery ward, a continuous infusion of either pentazocine, piritramide, or ketamine. The patients rated their pain on a 15-cm visual analog scale. Patients in group 1 received pentazocine. Mean dosage was 0.12 mg/kg/hr on the day of operation, 0.1 mg/kg/hr on the first postoperative day, and only 0.07 mg/kg/hr on the second postoperative day. Pentazocine blood levels averaged 50 micrograms/L. Patients in group 2 received piritramide. Mean dosage was 0.038 mg/kg/hr on the day of operation, 0.024 mg/kg/hr on the first postoperative day, and 0.019 mg/kg/hr on the second postoperative day. Blood levels of piritramide were not determined because no satisfactory assay is available. Patients in group 3 received ketamine. Mean dosage was 0.32 mg/kg/hr on the day of operation, 0.28 mg/kg/hr on the first postoperative day, and 0.29 mg/kg/hr on the second postoperative day. Ketamine blood levels ranged between 120 and 180 micrograms/L. None of the three analgesics caused any important hemodynamic or respiratory side effects. Pentazocine and piritramide were more effective analgesics than ketamine was. Ketamine also had a higher incidence of side effects. PMID:6627285

  2. Postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Joshi, G P

    1994-01-01

    Inadequately treated pain is a major cause of unanticipated hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. The ability to provide adequate pain relief by simple methods that are readily available to the day-care patient in his or her home environment is one of the major challenges for providers of ambulatory surgery and anesthesia. The increasing number of extensive and painful surgical procedures (e.g., laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laminectomy, knee construction, hysterectomies) being undertaken on an ambulatory basis presents new challenges with respect to acute postoperative pain. Hence the availability of more sophisticated and effective treatment modalities, such as ambulatory PCA and continuous local and regional anesthetic blocks, with minimal side effects, are necessary to optimize the benefits of ambulatory surgery for both patient and health care provider. However, outcome studies are needed to evaluate the effect of these newer therapeutic approaches with respect to postoperative side effects and other important recovery parameters. Recent studies suggest that factors other than pain per se must be controlled to reduce postoperative morbidity and facilitate the recovery process. Not surprisingly, the anesthetic technique can influence analgesic requirement in the early postoperative period. Although oral analgesic agents will continue to play an important role, the adjunctive use of local anesthetic agents is likely to assume an even greater role in the future. Use of drug combinations (e.g., opiates and local anesthetics, opiates and NSAIDs) may provide improved analgesia with fewer side effects. Finally, safer and simpler analgesic delivery systems are needed to improve our ability to provide cost-effective pain relief after ambulatory surgery. In conclusion, as a result of our enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of acute pain and the physiological basis of nociception, the provision of "stress-free" anesthesia with minimal postoperative

  3. Story Telling: Research and Action to Improve 6th Grade Students' Views about Certain Aspects of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahraman, Feray; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    This study is a four-week section of ongoing attempts that aim to improve 6th grade students' understandings of the nature of science. The study was carried out in a sixth grade science and technology class at a rural middle school with 15 students on the basis of action research methodology. During the study, four different stories based on the…

  4. Assessment of 6th Grade Elementary School Students, Their Parents' and Branch Teachers' Perspective on Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyraz, Sirin; Ozbar, Nurper; Yetgin, Meral Kucuk; Koksalan, Burke

    2015-01-01

    A total of 437 volunteers including 54 teachers, 218 6th grade students and 102 parents from Beykoz Elementary Schools participated in this study to understand the perspectives of students, families and teachers on Physical Education classes. The perspectives of students, families and teachers of other branches are identified by survey method.…

  5. Primary School English Teachers' Perceptions of the English Language Curriculum of 6th, 7th and 8th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersen Yanik, Asli

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to investigate how the teachers who have different background characteristics perceive the goals and content of the English language curriculum implemented at the 6th, 7th and 8th grades of public primary schools. The study was conducted during the 2004-2005 school year with 368 English teachers selected from the seven regions of…

  6. Comparing Science Learning among 4th-, 5th-, and 6th-Grade Students: STS versus Textbook-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Robert E.; Choi, AeRan; Yager, Stuart O.; Akcay, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen 4th-, 5th-, and 6th-grade teachers from five school districts each taught two sections of science--one with a Science-Technology-Society (STS) approach and the other with a more traditional textbook approach in which basic science concepts were the major organizers. Local, current, and personally relevant issues provided the context and…

  7. Process Evaluation of "Learn Young, Learn Fair": A Stress Management Programme for 5th and 6th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraag, Gerda; Van Breukelen, Gerard; Lamberts, Petra; Vugts, Odette; Kok, Gerjo; Fekkes, Minne; Abu-Saad, Huda Huijer

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the process evaluation of a stress management program called "Learn Young, Learn Fair" for 5th and 6th graders. Studies, reviews and meta-analyses of prevention programs report that a common limitation in studies is the restricted documentation of process factors that contribute to the success of interventions. Program…

  8. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations.

  9. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations. PMID:27041258

  10. Proceedings from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jodie I; Beatty, Jennifer K; Peplowski, Michael A; Keough, Michael B; Yipp, Bryan G; Hollenberg, Morley D; Beck, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    On November 14, 2014, the Leaders in Medicine (LIM) program at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary hosted its 6th Annual Research Symposium. Dr. Danuta Skowronski, Epidemiology Lead for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), was the keynote speaker and presented a lecture entitled "Rapid response research during emerging public health crises: influenza and reflections from the five year anniversary of the 2009 pandemic". The LIM symposium provides a forum for both LIM and non-LIM medical students to present their research work, either as an oral or poster presentation. There were a total of six oral presentations and 77 posters presented. 
The oral presentations included: Swathi Damaraju, "The role of cell communication and 3D Cell-Matrix environment in a stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for bone repair"; Menglin Yang, "The proteolytic activity of Nepenthes pitcher fluid as a therapeutic for the treatment of celiac disease"; Amelia Kellar, "Monitoring pediatric inflammatory bowel disease - a retrospective analysis of transabdominal ultrasound"; Monica M. Faria-Crowder, "The design and application of a molecular profiling strategy to identify polymicrobial acute sepsis infections"; Waleed Rahmani, "Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla and modulate hair type"; and, Laura Palmer, "A novel role for amyloid beta protein during hypoxia/ischemia". 
The article on the University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Program, "A Prescription that Addresses the Decline of Basic Science Education in Medical School," in a previous issue of CIM (2014 37(5):E292) provides more details on the program. Briefly, the LIM Research Symposium has the following objectives: (1) to showcase the impressive variety of projects undertaken by students in the LIM Program as well as University of Calgary medical students; (2) to encourage medical

  11. Proceedings from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jodie I; Beatty, Jennifer K; Peplowski, Michael A; Keough, Michael B; Yipp, Bryan G; Hollenberg, Morley D; Beck, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    On November 14, 2014, the Leaders in Medicine (LIM) program at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary hosted its 6th Annual Research Symposium. Dr. Danuta Skowronski, Epidemiology Lead for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), was the keynote speaker and presented a lecture entitled "Rapid response research during emerging public health crises: influenza and reflections from the five year anniversary of the 2009 pandemic". The LIM symposium provides a forum for both LIM and non-LIM medical students to present their research work, either as an oral or poster presentation. There were a total of six oral presentations and 77 posters presented. 
The oral presentations included: Swathi Damaraju, "The role of cell communication and 3D Cell-Matrix environment in a stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for bone repair"; Menglin Yang, "The proteolytic activity of Nepenthes pitcher fluid as a therapeutic for the treatment of celiac disease"; Amelia Kellar, "Monitoring pediatric inflammatory bowel disease - a retrospective analysis of transabdominal ultrasound"; Monica M. Faria-Crowder, "The design and application of a molecular profiling strategy to identify polymicrobial acute sepsis infections"; Waleed Rahmani, "Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla and modulate hair type"; and, Laura Palmer, "A novel role for amyloid beta protein during hypoxia/ischemia". 
The article on the University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Program, "A Prescription that Addresses the Decline of Basic Science Education in Medical School," in a previous issue of CIM (2014 37(5):E292) provides more details on the program. Briefly, the LIM Research Symposium has the following objectives: (1) to showcase the impressive variety of projects undertaken by students in the LIM Program as well as University of Calgary medical students; (2) to encourage medical

  12. PREFACE: 6th Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA-6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan Bhatti, Javaid; Hussain, Talib; Khan, Wakil

    2013-06-01

    The Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA) conference series has been organized to create a new forum in Asia and Australia to discuss vacuum, surface and related sciences, techniques and applications. The conference series is officially endorsed by the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technique and Application (IUVSTA). The International Steering Committee of VASSCAA is comprised of Vacuum Societies in seven countries: Australia, China, India, Iran, Japan, South Korea and Pakistan. VASSCAA-1 was organized by the Vacuum Society of Japan in 1999 in Tokyo, Japan. VASSCAA-2 was held in 2002 in Hong Kong, VASSCAA-3 in Singapore in 2005. VASSCAA-4 was held in Matsue, Japan in 2008 and VASSCAA-5 in 2010 in Beijing, China. The 6th Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA-6) was held from 9-13 October 2012 in the beautiful city of Islamabad, Pakistan. The venue of the conference was the Pak-China Friendship Centre, Islamabad. More than six hundred local delgates and around seventy delegates from different countries participated in this mega event. These delegates included scientists, researchers, engineers, professors, plant operators, designers, vendors, industrialists, businessmen and students from various research organizations, technical institutions, universities, industries and companies from Pakistan and abroad. The focal point of the event was to enhance cooperation between Pakistan and the international community in the fields of vacuum, surface science and other applied technologies. At VASSCAA-6 85 oral presentations were delivered by local and foreign speakers. These were divided into different sessions according to their fields. A poster session was organized at which over 70 researchers and students displayed their posters. The best three posters won prizes. In parallel to the main conference sessions four technical short courses were held. The participants showed keen interest in all these

  13. Effect of preoperative statin therapy on early postoperative memory impairment after off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sambhunath; Nanda, Sunil K.; Bisoi, Akshya K.; Wadhawan, Ashima N.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Frequent incidence of early postoperative memory impairment (POMI) after cardiac surgery remains a concern because of associated morbidity, impaired quality of life, and increased health care cost. Aim: To assess the effect of preoperative statin therapy on POMI in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery. Setting and Design: Prospective observational study in a tertiary level hospital. Methods: Sixty patients aged 45–65 years undergoing OPCAB surgery were allocated into two groups of 30 each. Group A patients were receiving statin and Group B patients were not receiving statins. All patients underwent memory function assessment preoperatively after admission to hospital and on the 6th postoperative day using postgraduate institute memory scale. Statistical Analysis: Appropriate tests were applied with SPSS 20 to compare both groups. The value P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Multiple regression analysis was performed with confounding factors to determine the effect on memory impairment. Results: Patients in Group A showed significant postoperative deterioration in 6 of the 10 functions and in Group B showed deterioration in 9 of 10 functions tested compared to preoperative scores. Intergroup comparison detected less POMI in Group A compared to Group B and was statistically significant in 8 memory functions. Multiple regression analysis detected statin as an independent factor in preventing memory impairment. Conclusions: Preoperative statin therapy attenuates the early POMI in patients undergoing OPCAB. Future long-term studies will define the efficacy of statin on POMI. PMID:26750672

  14. The Efficiency of Cluster Method in Improving the Creative Writing Skill of 6th Grade Students of Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahbaz, Namik Kemal; Duran, Gozde

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to search the effect of the cluster method on the creative writing skill of 6th grade students. In this paper, the students of 6-A, studying at Ulas Primary School in 2010-2011 academic year, were divided into two groups as experiment and control. Taking into consideration the various variants, pre-test and last-test…

  15. PREFACE: 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Marc

    2008-07-01

    The 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice (ICIPE 2008) belongs to a successful series of conferences held up to now following a three-year cycle. Previous conferences took place in Palm Coast, Florida, USA (1993), Le Croisic, France (1996), Port Ludlow, Washington, USA (1999), Angra dos Reis, Brazil (2002), and Cambridge, UK (2005). The conference has its roots on the informal seminars organized by Professor J V Beck at Michigan State University, which were initiated in 1987. The organization of this Conference, which took place in Dourdan (Paris) France, 15-19 June 2008, was made possible through a joint effort by four research departments from four different universities: LEMTA (Laboratoire de Mécanique Théorique et Appliquée, Nancy-Université) LMS (Laboratoire de Mécanique des Solides, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris) LMAC (Laboratoire de Mathématiques Appliquées, UTC Compiègne) LTN (Laboratoire de Thermocinétique, Université de Nantes) It received support from three organizations: SFT (Société Française de Thermique: French Heat Transfer Association) ACSM (Association Calcul de Structures et Simulation : Computational Structural Mechanics Association) GdR Ondes - CNRS (`Waves' Network, French National Center for Scientific Research) The objective of the conference was to provide the opportunity for interaction and cross-fertilization between designers of inverse methods and practitioners. The delegates came from very different fields, such as applied mathematics, heat transfer, solid mechanics, tomography.... Consequently the sessions were organised along mostly methodological topics in order to facilitate interaction among participants who might not meet otherwise. The present proceedings, published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series, gathers the four plenary invited lectures and the full-length versions of 103 presentations. The latter have been reviewed by the scientific committee (see

  16. PREFACE: 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Marc

    2008-07-01

    The 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice (ICIPE 2008) belongs to a successful series of conferences held up to now following a three-year cycle. Previous conferences took place in Palm Coast, Florida, USA (1993), Le Croisic, France (1996), Port Ludlow, Washington, USA (1999), Angra dos Reis, Brazil (2002), and Cambridge, UK (2005). The conference has its roots on the informal seminars organized by Professor J V Beck at Michigan State University, which were initiated in 1987. The organization of this Conference, which took place in Dourdan (Paris) France, 15-19 June 2008, was made possible through a joint effort by four research departments from four different universities: LEMTA (Laboratoire de Mécanique Théorique et Appliquée, Nancy-Université) LMS (Laboratoire de Mécanique des Solides, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris) LMAC (Laboratoire de Mathématiques Appliquées, UTC Compiègne) LTN (Laboratoire de Thermocinétique, Université de Nantes) It received support from three organizations: SFT (Société Française de Thermique: French Heat Transfer Association) ACSM (Association Calcul de Structures et Simulation : Computational Structural Mechanics Association) GdR Ondes - CNRS (`Waves' Network, French National Center for Scientific Research) The objective of the conference was to provide the opportunity for interaction and cross-fertilization between designers of inverse methods and practitioners. The delegates came from very different fields, such as applied mathematics, heat transfer, solid mechanics, tomography.... Consequently the sessions were organised along mostly methodological topics in order to facilitate interaction among participants who might not meet otherwise. The present proceedings, published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series, gathers the four plenary invited lectures and the full-length versions of 103 presentations. The latter have been reviewed by the scientific committee (see

  17. The Hetu'u Global Network: Using the rare June 5th/6th Transit of Venus to Bring Astronomy to the Remote Easter Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jacqueline; Rodriguez, D.

    2013-01-01

    There are rare times in astronomy when a celestial event, visible in broad daylight, can be used to measure a fundamental parameter and inspire a globe full of school age students. The June 5th/6th transit of Venus was one such event. In celebration, nine astronomy postdocs from the Chilean mainland traveled to Easter Island to lead a series of astronomy outreach activities over three days, culminating in a transit-viewing event. Our team dubbed "Equipo Hetu'u" or "Team Star" in the Rapa Nui (Easter Island native) language spent two days giving astronomy talks and doing hands-on demonstrations at the Museo Antropologico P. Sebastian Englert. In the final day-and-a-half leading up to the transit, we visited the science classes in the majority of the schools on the island, in order to spread the message about the once-in-a-lifetime transit event, highlighting how we planned on using it to measure the distance to the Sun. We estimate over 25% 1500 people) of this remote island participated in one or more of our organized activities. Our experience with this project is an excellent lesson on how to organize, lead, and fully execute a major outreach endeavor that inspires hundreds with minimal resources (save the spectacular event provided by the cosmos).

  18. SB6.0: The 6th International meeting on Synthetic Biology, July 9-11, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, Linda J.

    2015-04-23

    The Synthetic Biology conference series (SBx.0) is the preeminent academic meeting in synthetic biology. Organized by the BioBricks Foundation, the SBx.0 conference series brings together leading researchers, students, industry executives, and policy makers from around the world to share, consider, debate, and plan efforts to make biology easier to engineer. Historically held every two years, the SBx.0 conferences are held in alternating locations in the United States, Europe, and Asia to encourage global participation and collaboration so that the ramifications of synthetic biology research and development are most likely to be safe ethical, and beneficial. On 9-11 July 2013, the 6th installment of the synthetic biology conference series (SB6.0) was held on the campus of Imperial College London (http://sb6.biobricks.org). The SB6.0 conference was attended by over 700 people, and many more were able to participate via video digital conference (http://sb6.biobricks.org/digital-conference/). Over the course of three days, the SB6.0 conference agenda included plenary sessions, workshops, and poster presentations covering topics ranging from the infrastructure needs arising when “Systematic Engineering Meets Biological Complexity” and design-led considerations for “Connecting People and Technologies” to discussions on “Engineering Biology for New Materials,” “Assessing Risk and Managing Biocontainment,” and “New Directions for Energy and Sustainability.” The $10,150 grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-SC0010233) to the BioBricks Foundation was used to provide partial reimbursement for the travel expenses of leading researchers from the United States to speak at the SB6.0 conference. A total of $9,450 was used to reimburse U.S. speakers for actual expenses related to the SB6.0 conference, including airfare (economy or coach only), ground transportation, hotel, and registration fees. In addition, $700 of the grant was used to offset

  19. Partnering to change the world for people with haemophilia: 6(th) Haemophilia Global Summit, Prague, Czech Republic, 24-26(th) September 2015.

    PubMed

    Astermark, Jan; Hart, Dan; Lobet, Sébastien; Blatný, Jan; d'Oiron, Roseline; Kenet, Gili; Dolan, Gerry; Libotte, Valérie; Hermans, Cedric

    2016-07-01

    The 6(th) Haemophilia Global Summit was held in Prague, Czech Republic, in September 2015. The programme was designed by an independent Scientific Steering Committee of haemophilia experts and aimed to share optimal management strategies for haemophilia at all life stages, explore recent potential advances in the management of haemophilia A and B and discuss challenges in haemophilia care. In this supplement from the meeting, Dan Hart reviews the lessons that can be learnt from cost-constrained environments with regard to improving care for people with haemophilia globally. Sébastien Lobet discusses the importance of physical activity for optimising care and Roseline d'Oiron and Jan Blatný consider the role of real-world data in understanding the effect of treatment in a clinical setting over the long term and the true impact of treatment on the day-to-day life of the patient. Gili Kenet addresses the current challenges relating to the optimal management of prophylaxis, and Gerry Dolan and Cedric Hermans discuss the value of pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters in informing treatment decisions. Cedric Hermans and Valérie Libotte explore the importance of considering social and occupational development factors as an integral part of haemophilia care, and Jan Astermark reviews key strategies to predict and prevent inhibitor development.

  20. Is the onset of the 6th century 'dark age' in Maya history related to explosive volcanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooren, Kees; Hoek, Wim Z.; Van der Plicht, Hans; Sigl, Michael; Galop, Didier; Torrescano-Valle, Nuria; Islebe, Gerald; Huizinga, Annika; Winkels, Tim; Middelkoop, Hans; Van Bergen, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Maya societies in Southern Mexico, Guatemala and Belize experienced a 'dark age' during the second half of the 6th century. This period, also known as the 'Maya Hiatus', is characterized by cultural downturn, political instability and abandonment of many sites in the Central Maya Lowlands. Many theories have been postulated to explain the occurrence of this 'dark age' in Maya history. A possible key role of a large volcanic eruption in the onset of this 'dark age' will be discussed. Volcanic deposits recovered from the sedimentary archive of lake Tuspán and the Usumacinta-Grijalva delta were studied in detail and the combination of multiple dating techniques allowed the reconstruction of the timing of a large 6th century eruption. Volcanic glass shards were fingerprinted to indicate the source volcano and high resolution pollen records were constructed to indicate the environmental impact of the eruption. Results are compared with available archaeological data and causality with the disruption of Maya civilization will be evaluated.

  1. [Prevention of thromboembolic complications during total hip arthroplasty by pre- and postoperative heparinotherapy with adapted doses. Apropos of 356 cases].

    PubMed

    Pidhorz, L; Munafo-Dauccia, R; Badatcheff, F; Galland, F

    1988-01-01

    From January 1980 to July 1987, a continuous series of 356 total hip replacement underwent preventive treatment of subcutaneous Heparin, prescribed in adapted doses, both before and after surgery, and relayed at the 7th postoperative day by Ethyl Biscoumacetate. This medication was continued for 45 days. Modern methods of detection were used to detect thromboembolic complications: up to the 7th day radioactive labeled Fibrinogen and, at the slightest hint of problem, phlebocavography of the lower limbs. The established procedure made it possible to lower significantly the rate of phlebothromboses to 14 cases (3.9%) of which 3 (0.8%) developed non lethal pulmonary embolisms. The surgical site revealed an hematoma in 5% of the case, of which 1.4% had to be subjected to a surgical relief. Of the 4 deaths observed in this series, two resulted from the anticoagulant preventive method. The biological monitoring disclosed a lasting fall in the Antithrombin III in the three days following the operation and significant drop in the coagulation tests between the 4th and 6th day in the case of the patients who were to develop a thromboembolism.

  2. 6th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Galitski, Timothy, P.

    2007-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology is an annual two-day event gathering the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investigating complex systems. In recognition of the fundamental similarity between the scientific problems addressed in environmental science and systems biology studies at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels, the 2007 Symposium featured global leaders in “Systems Biology and the Environment.” The objective of the 2007 “Systems Biology and the Environment” International Symposium was to stimulate interdisciplinary thinking and research that spans systems biology and environmental science. This Symposium was well aligned with the DOE’s Genomics:GTL program efforts to achieve scientific objectives for each of the three DOE missions: • Develop biofuels as a major secure energy source for this century, • Develop biological solutions for intractable environmental problems, and • Understand biosystems’ climate impacts and assess sequestration strategies Our scientific program highlighted world-class research exemplifying these priorities. The Symposium featured 45 minute lectures from 12 researchers including: Penny/Sallie Chisholm of MIT gave the keynote address “Tiny Cells, Global Impact: What Prochlorococcus Can Teach Us About Systems Biology”, plus Jim Fredrickson of PNNL, Nitin Baliga of ISB, Steve Briggs of UCSD, David Cox of Perlegen Sciences, Antoine Danchin of Institut Pasteur, John Delaney of the U of Washington, John Groopman of Johns Hopkins, Ben Kerr of the U of Washington, Steve Koonin of BP, Elliott Meyerowitz of Caltech, and Ed Rubin of LBNL. The 2007 Symposium promoted DOE’s three mission areas among scientists from multiple disciplines representing academia, non-profit research institutions, and the private sector. As in all previous

  3. 5/6th nephrectomy in combination with high salt diet and nitric oxide synthase inhibition to induce chronic kidney disease in the Lewis rat.

    PubMed

    van Koppen, Arianne; Verhaar, Marianne C; Bongartz, Lennart G; Joles, Jaap A

    2013-07-03

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global problem. Slowing CKD progression is a major health priority. Since CKD is characterized by complex derangements of homeostasis, integrative animal models are necessary to study development and progression of CKD. To study development of CKD and novel therapeutic interventions in CKD, we use the 5/6th nephrectomy ablation model, a well known experimental model of progressive renal disease, resembling several aspects of human CKD. The gross reduction in renal mass causes progressive glomerular and tubulo-interstitial injury, loss of remnant nephrons and development of systemic and glomerular hypertension. It is also associated with progressive intrarenal capillary loss, inflammation and glomerulosclerosis. Risk factors for CKD invariably impact on endothelial function. To mimic this, we combine removal of 5/6th of renal mass with nitric oxide (NO) depletion and a high salt diet. After arrival and acclimatization, animals receive a NO synthase inhibitor (NG-nitro-L-Arginine) (L-NNA) supplemented to drinking water (20 mg/L) for a period of 4 weeks, followed by right sided uninephrectomy. One week later, a subtotal nephrectomy (SNX) is performed on the left side. After SNX, animals are allowed to recover for two days followed by LNNA in drinking water (20 mg/L) for a further period of 4 weeks. A high salt diet (6%), supplemented in ground chow (see time line Figure 1), is continued throughout the experiment. Progression of renal failure is followed over time by measuring plasma urea, systolic blood pressure and proteinuria. By six weeks after SNX, renal failure has developed. Renal function is measured using 'gold standard' inulin and para-amino hippuric acid (PAH) clearance technology. This model of CKD is characterized by a reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), hypertension (systolic blood pressure>150 mmHg), proteinuria (> 50 mg/24 hr) and mild uremia (>10 mM). Histological

  4. Postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Lovich-Sapola, Jessica; Smith, Charles E; Brandt, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Prevention and control of postoperative pain are essential. Inadequate treatment of postoperative pain continues to be a major problem after many surgeries and leads to worse outcomes, including chronic postsurgical pain. Optimal management of postoperative pain requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of pain, methods available to reduce pain, invasiveness of the procedure, and patient factors associated with increased pain, such as anxiety, depression, catastrophizing, and neuroticism. Use of a procedure-specific, multimodal perioperative pain management provides a rational basis for enhanced postoperative pain control, optimization of analgesia, decrease in adverse effects, and improved patient satisfaction.

  5. IR and py/GC/MS examination of amber relics excavated from 6th century royal tomb in Korean Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongseo; Yun, Eunyoung; Kang, Hyungtae; Ahn, Jooyoung; Kim, Gyuho

    2016-08-01

    Relics of amber were excavated from King Muryeong's tomb constructed in the 6th century on the Korean peninsula. To estimate the provenance, FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and py/GC/MS (pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) analysis were utilized. The reference Baltic amber sample was also analyzed with the same method for comparison. The relics were confirmed to be amber from the FTIR analysis where an absorption band near 1150cm(-1), characteristic one in Baltic amber, was also observed. In py/GC/MS analysis, pyrolyzed products like butanedioic acid and dehydroabietic acid, known constituents of amber, were observed. In addition, d-fenchyl alcohol, camphor, borneol and butanedioic acid, typical constituents of Baltic amber, were observed in some samples. From this, it appears that some of relics were made from Baltic amber and that Baltic amber was transported to the Korean peninsula in the time of tomb construction. PMID:27116473

  6. IR and py/GC/MS examination of amber relics excavated from 6th century royal tomb in Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongseo; Yun, Eunyoung; Kang, Hyungtae; Ahn, Jooyoung; Kim, Gyuho

    2016-08-01

    Relics of amber were excavated from King Muryeong's tomb constructed in the 6th century on the Korean peninsula. To estimate the provenance, FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and py/GC/MS (pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) analysis were utilized. The reference Baltic amber sample was also analyzed with the same method for comparison. The relics were confirmed to be amber from the FTIR analysis where an absorption band near 1150 cm- 1, characteristic one in Baltic amber, was also observed. In py/GC/MS analysis, pyrolyzed products like butanedioic acid and dehydroabietic acid, known constituents of amber, were observed. In addition, D-fenchyl alcohol, camphor, borneol and butanedioic acid, typical constituents of Baltic amber, were observed in some samples. From this, it appears that some of relics were made from Baltic amber and that Baltic amber was transported to the Korean peninsula in the time of tomb construction.

  7. Robust Satellite Techniques (RST) for monitoring Earthquake active regions: the case of Abruzzo April 6th 2009 event. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergola, N.; Aliano, C.; Corrado, R.; Genzano, N.; Lisi, M.; Mazzeo, G.; Tramutoli, V.; Coviello, I.; Filizzola, C.; Lacava, T.; Paciello, R.

    2009-12-01

    Space-time fluctuations of Earth’s emitted Thermal Infrared (TIR) radiation have been observed from satellite months to weeks before earthquakes occurrence. The general RST approach has been proposed in order to discriminate normal (i.e. related to the change of natural factor and/or observation conditions) TIR signal fluctuations from anomalous signal transients possibly associated to earthquake occurrence. In this work, the same approach is applied to the case of Abruzzo April 6th 2009 event (M=6.3) by using, for the first time: - the geostationary satellite MSG having improved spatial and temporal resolution - contemporary observations recorded by 3 independent satellite systems (NOAA-AVHRR, EOS-MODIS, MSG-SEVIRI) - a very long historical data set made of 30 years of satellite records. Preliminary results will be discussed also considering physical models that could explain the apparent correlation between anomalous space-time TIR transients and earthquake occurrence.

  8. Postoperative Spine Infections.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit Yuvaraj; Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  9. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  10. Social and moral norm differences among Portuguese 1st and 6th year medical students towards their intention to comply with hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Magda S; Mearns, Kathryn; Silva, Silvia A

    2012-01-01

    This study examines social and moral norms towards the intention to comply with hand hygiene among Portuguese medical students from 1st and 6th years (N = 175; 121 from the 1st year, 54 from the 6th year). The study extended the theory of planned behaviour theoretical principles and hypothesised that both subjective and moral norms will be the best predictors of 1st and 6th year medical students' intention to comply with hand hygiene; however, these predictors ability to explain intention variance will change according to medical students' school year. Results indicated that the subjective norm, whose referent focuses on professors, is a relevant predictor of 1st year medical students' intention, while the subjective norm that emphasises the relevance of colleagues predicts the intentions of medical students from the 6th year. In terms of the moral norm, 6th year students' intention is better predicted by a norm that interferes with compliance; whereas intentions from 1st year students are better predicted by a norm that favours compliance. Implications of the findings highlight the importance of role models and mentors as key factors in teaching hand hygiene in medical undergraduate curricula. PMID:22111788

  11. [Clinical experimental studies of postoperative infusion analgesia].

    PubMed

    Dick, W; Knoche, E; Grundlach, G; Klein, I

    1983-06-01

    30 postoperative patients, who had undergone abdominal gynaecological surgery with standard general anaesthesia were randomly divided into three groups and received, in the recovery ward, a continuous infusion of either pentazocine, piritramid, or ketamine. The patients rated their pain on a 15 cm pain analogue score. Group I pentazocine: Mean dosage on the day of operation 0.12 mg/kg/h, 0.1 mg/kg/h on the first and only 0.07 mg/kg/h on the second postoperative day. Pentazocine blood levels were on average 50 micrograms/l. Group II piritramid: Mean dosage on the day of operation 0.038 mg/kg/h, 0.024 mg/kg/h on the first and 0.019 mg/kg/h on the second postoperative day. Blood levels of piritramid were not determined because there is no satisfactory assay available. Group III ketamine: mean dosage on the day of operation 0.32 mg/kg/h, 0.28 mg/kg/h on the first and 0.29 mg/kg/h on the second postoperative day. Ketamine blood levels lay between 120 and 180 micrograms/l. The three analgesics did not cause any important haemodynamic or respiratory side effects. Pentazocine and piritramid were the most effective analgesics, ketamine was the least effective with a high incidence of side effects. PMID:6412586

  12. Risk factors for postoperative ileus

    PubMed Central

    Kutun, Suat; Ulucanlar, Haluk; Tarcan, Oguz; Demir, Abdullah; Cetin, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to examine extended postoperative ileus and its risk factors in patients who have undergone abdominal surgery, and discuss the techniques of prevention and management thereof the light of related risk factors connected with our study. Methods This prospective study involved 103 patients who had undergone abdominal surgery. The effects of age, gender, diagnosis, surgical operation conducted, excessive small intestine manipulation, opioid analgesic usage time, and systemic inflammation on the time required for the restoration of intestinal motility were investigated. The parameters were investigated prospectively. Results Regarding the factors that affected the restoration of gastrointestinal motility, resection operation type, longer operation period, longer opioid analgesics use period, longer nasogastric catheter use period, and the presence of systemic inflammation were shown to retard bowel motility for 3 days or more. Conclusion Our study confirmed that unnecessary analgesics use in patients with pain tolerance with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, excessive small bowel manipulation, prolonged nasogastric catheter use have a direct negative effect on gastrointestinal motility. Considering that an exact treatment for postoperative ileus has not yet been established, and in light of the risk factors mentioned above, we regard that prevention of postoperative ileus is the most effective way of coping with intestinal dysmotility. PMID:22111079

  13. Ethical, legal, and social aspects of farm animal cloning in the 6th Framework Programme for Research.

    PubMed

    Claxton, John; Sachez, Elena; Matthiessen-Guyader, Line

    2004-01-01

    Cloned livestock have potential importance in the provision of improved medicine as well as in the development of livestock production. The public is, however, increasingly concerned about the social and ethical consequences of these advances in knowledge and techniques. There is unevenness throughout Europe in different Member States' attitudes to research into livestock cloning. Although there is EU legislation controlling the use of animals for research purposes, there is no legislation specifically governing cloning in livestock production. The main EU reference is the 9th Opinion of the European Group on Ethics, which states "Cloning of farm animals may prove to be of medical and agricultural as well as economic benefit. It is acceptable only when the aims and methods are ethically justified and when carried out under ethical conditions." The ethical justification includes the avoidance of suffering, the use of the 3Rs principle and a lack of better alternatives. The Commission addresses these issues in the 6th Framework Programme by promoting the integration of ethical, legal and social aspects in all proposals where they are relevant, by fostering ethical awareness and foresight in the proposals, by encouraging public dialogue, and by supporting specific actions to promote the debate. Research must respect fundamental ethical principles, including animal welfare requirements.

  14. Associations Between Home Environment and After-School Physical Activity and Sedentary Time Among 6th Grade Children.

    PubMed

    Lau, Erica Y; Barr-Anderson, Daheia J; Dowda, Marsha; Forthofer, Melinda; Saunders, Ruth P; Pate, Russell R

    2015-05-01

    This study examined associations of various elements of the home environment with after-school physical activity and sedentary time in 671 6th-grade children (Mage = 11.49 ± 0.5 years). Children's after-school total physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and sedentary time were measured by accelerometry. Parents completed surveys assessing elements of the home social and physical environment. Mixed-model regression analyses were used to examine the associations between each element of the home environment and children's after-school physical activity and sedentary time. Availability of home physical activity resources was associated positively with after-school total physical activity and negatively with after-school sedentary time in boys. Parental support was associated positively with after-school total physical activity and MVPA and negatively with after-school sedentary time in girls. The home physical environment was associated with boys' after-school physical activity and sedentary time, whereas the home social environment was associated with girls' after-school physical activity and sedentary time.

  15. Photometric and Spectroscopic Footprint Corrections in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s 6th Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specian, Mike A.; Szalay, Alex S.

    2016-04-01

    We identify and correct numerous errors within the photometric and spectroscopic footprints (SFs) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s (SDSS) 6th data release (DR6). Within the SDSS’s boundaries hundreds of millions of objects have been detected. Yet we present evidence that the boundaries themselves contain a significant number of mistakes that are being revealed for the first time within this paper. Left unaddressed, these can introduce systematic biases into galaxy clustering statistics. Using the DR6 Main Galaxy Sample (MGS) targets as tracers, we reveal inconsistencies between the photometric and SF definitions provided in the Catalog Archive Server (CAS), and the measurements of targets therein. First, we find that 19.7 deg2 of the DR6 photometric footprint are devoid of MGS targets. In volumes of radii 7 {h}-1 {Mpc}, this can cause errors in the expected number of galaxies to exceed 60%. Second, we identify seven areas that were erroneously included or excluded from the SF. Moreover, the tiling algorithm that positioned spectroscopic fibers during and between DRs caused many areas along the edge of the SF to be significantly undersampled relative to the footprint’s interior. Through our corrections, we increase the completeness 2.2% by trimming 3.6% of the area from the existing SF. The sum total of these efforts has generated the most accurate description of the SDSS DR6 footprints ever created.

  16. Yersinia pestis DNA from skeletal remains from the 6(th) century AD reveals insights into Justinianic Plague.

    PubMed

    Harbeck, Michaela; Seifert, Lisa; Hänsch, Stephanie; Wagner, David M; Birdsell, Dawn; Parise, Katy L; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Grupe, Gisela; Thomas, Astrid; Keim, Paul; Zöller, Lothar; Bramanti, Barbara; Riehm, Julia M; Scholz, Holger C

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of the disease plague, has been implicated in three historical pandemics. These include the third pandemic of the 19(th) and 20(th) centuries, during which plague was spread around the world, and the second pandemic of the 14(th)-17(th) centuries, which included the infamous epidemic known as the Black Death. Previous studies have confirmed that Y. pestis caused these two more recent pandemics. However, a highly spirited debate still continues as to whether Y. pestis caused the so-called Justinianic Plague of the 6(th)-8(th) centuries AD. By analyzing ancient DNA in two independent ancient DNA laboratories, we confirmed unambiguously the presence of Y. pestis DNA in human skeletal remains from an Early Medieval cemetery. In addition, we narrowed the phylogenetic position of the responsible strain down to major branch 0 on the Y. pestis phylogeny, specifically between nodes N03 and N05. Our findings confirm that Y. pestis was responsible for the Justinianic Plague, which should end the controversy regarding the etiology of this pandemic. The first genotype of a Y. pestis strain that caused the Late Antique plague provides important information about the history of the plague bacillus and suggests that the first pandemic also originated in Asia, similar to the other two plague pandemics.

  17. New safe medicines faster: A proposal for a key action within the European union's 6th framework programme.

    PubMed

    Bjerrum, O J

    2000-01-01

    The global competitiveness of the European pharmaceutical industry is under threat. Technology currently available for the development of new medicines is unable to match the pace of drug discovery and design; and the ever-growing demand for safety, efficacy and quality documentation has increased the cost and time involved in getting new medicines on the market. Although the pharmaceutical industry is one of the strongest in Europe in terms of research, innovation, exports and employment, there are severe restrictions on its ability to create wealth and launch safe drugs for the treatment of common and rare afflictions. The present situation should not be allowed to continue. For this reason, the European Federation for Pharmaceutical Sciences (EUFEPS) has proposed a key action under the title "New safe medicines faster" for the forthcoming EU 6th RTD framework programme. The key action has three main objectives: to seek new technologies capable of more effective selection of potential drug candidates for innovative medicines while accommodating safety demands; to use such technologies to speed up the pharmaceutical development process and eliminate bottlenecks created by initial exploratory drug research; and to cultivate a pan-European interdisciplinary network that bridges the gap between industry, academia and regulatory authorities. By involving regulatory authorities early on and fuelling research and innovation with EU money it should be possible to create a new set of recognised European standards whereby new safe medicines can be brought onto the market faster and cheaper. PMID:10905750

  18. Effects of using relaxation breathing training to reduce music performance anxiety in 3rd to 6th graders.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Huei; Luh, Jer-Junn; Chen, Hsin-I; Lin, Chao-Chen; Liao, Miin-Jiun; Chen, Heng-Shuen

    2010-06-01

    The current study examined the effects of applying relaxation breathing training (RBT) as a means to reduce music performance anxiety (MPA) in young, talented musicians. A group of 59 young musicians from 3rd to 6th grade participated in this study, and all of them started RBT twice a week for 2 months prior to the examination. Four tests--2 mos, 1 mos, half an hour and 5 min before the examination--were conducted to examine the level of MPA after the application of RBT. Results show that the degree of MPA 5 min before the trial was lower than the degree of performance anxiety half an hour before the jury (t = -3.683, p < 0.01), which indicated that the RBT was associated with a decrease in MPA. Although a series of RBT exercises was applied, results indicated that when approaching the date of examination, the degree of performance anxiety still increased and reached its maximum half an hour before the jury. The recommendation for future studies is to combine the application of RBT with other methods to expand its effect in reducing MPA.

  19. Negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry of main group elements Part 2. 6th group: sulfur, selenium and tellurium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachsmann, M.; Heumann, K. G.

    1992-05-01

    A systematic investigation of the formation of negative ions for the 6th main group elements using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (NTI-MS) is presented. A double-filament ion source with BaO on the ionization filament has been applied to reduce the work function of the rhenium filament material. S[radical sign]-, Se[radical sign]- and Te[radical sign]- were produced as most abundant ions. Low intensities of SeO[radical sign]-, SeO[radical sign]-2, TeO[radical sign]- and TeO[radical sign]-2 have also been detected. Although the electron affinity of SO2 is low, high ion currents of SO[radical sign]-2 have been observed from BaSo4 samples. This may be due to an electron capture process of this molecule rather than to a thermal ionization process. A silica gel suspension mixed with the sample enhanced the Se[radical sign]- ion current by a factor of about 40 and the Te[radical sign]- intensity by a factor of about 10. However, the silica gel showed no enhancing effect on the S[radical sign]- ion current. An improvement in the precision of the selenium and tellurium isotope ratio measurements by a factor of up to 10 was obtained when using the silica gel technique as compared with previous NTI investigations. The data of the selenium isotope abundance measurements were accepted as "best measurements" by the IUPAC.

  20. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and…

  1. Day to day with COPD

    MedlinePlus

    ... day; Chronic obstructive airways disease - day to day; Chronic obstructive lung disease - day to day; Chronic bronchitis - day to day; ... strategy for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of chronic ... disease. Updated 2015. www.goldcopd.it/materiale/2015/GOLD_ ...

  2. Comparing independent observations at the time of Abruzzo April 6th 2009 earthquake: new vs false ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzano, N.; Aliano, C.; Corrado, R.; Coviello, I.; Filizzola, C.; Lisi, M.; Lacava, T.; Martinelli, G.; Mazzeo, G.; Paciello, R.; Pergola, N.; Tramutoli, V.

    2009-12-01

    The discussion about earthquake precursors has been, since long time, biased by a number of assumptions not always scientifically funded and often not demonstrated at all. For instance an argument often used against the (claimed) existence of a precursor has been the lack of correlation between the relative intensity of the precursor signal and the magnitude of corresponding earthquake. The reason why such correlation “has to” exist in whatever condition, time and place, is still waiting for a scientific demonstration. But such assumptions are not without consequences. The idea that EQs have no precursors at all (that seems to justify approaches purely statistical based only on the analysis of seismic data) has discouraged for long time the European investments on multi-parametric observation networks and related research activities: so that even in presence of several months long seismic crisis (like the one culminated with the Abruzzo April 6th 2009 earthquake) most of the observational efforts remain concentrated in co-post seismic phases and relatively poor (mainly due to occasional/individual researchers initiatives) are the observational data-set available for the pre-event phase. In this context satellite sensors offering continuity of the Earth Observation at the global scale can play a particularly important role. In this work results achieved by applying the general RST approach to different satellite data (NOAA-AVHRR, EOS-MODIS, MSG-SEVIRI) during the Abruzzo March-April 2009 seismic sequence will be discussed also for comparison with other ground based observations performed before and after the main shock in order to understand if some new idea can substitute false assumptions helping to improve our knowledge on EQ preparatory phases.

  3. Postoperative Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Veerabhadram; Cellini, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The effective relief of pain is of the utmost importance to anyone treating patients undergoing surgery. Pain relief has significant physiological benefits; hence, monitoring of pain relief is increasingly becoming an important postoperative quality measure. The goal for postoperative pain management is to reduce or eliminate pain and discomfort with a minimum of side effects. Various agents (opioid vs. nonopioid), routes (oral, intravenous, neuraxial, regional) and modes (patient controlled vs. “as needed”) for the treatment of postoperative pain exist. Although traditionally the mainstay of postoperative analgesia is opioid based, increasingly more evidence exists to support a multimodal approach with the intent to reduce opioid side effects (such as nausea and ileus) and improve pain scores. Enhanced recovery protocols to reduce length of stay in colorectal surgery are becoming more prevalent and include multimodal opioid sparing regimens as a critical component. Familiarity with the efficacy of available agents and routes of administration is important to tailor the postoperative regimen to the needs of the individual patient. PMID:24436674

  4. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  5. Postoperative inflammation after cataract surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pahor, D; Pahor, A; Gracner, B

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the influence of preoperative activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on early postoperative anterior chamber inflammation after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation. Twenty-three eyes in 18 patients were included in our study. On the first postoperative day, anterior chamber inflammation was observed in 11 eyes (47.8%). Five days after surgery, we found postoperative inflammation only in 1 eye (4.3%). Keratic precipitates were observed in 1 eye (4.3%) on the second postoperative day. We found no correlation between the extent of anterior chamber inflammation and the preoperative activity of RA. Postoperative anterior chamber inflammation was also not associated with the medical management of RA.

  6. Comparing Traditional and Computer Assisted Education in the Teaching of Colour to 6th Grade Students and Determination of Its Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akengin, Gultekin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, informing 6th grade students on the subject of colour was taught using traditional and computer assisted education methods. Colour information was taught by the researcher for 5 weeks in order to specify the influence of both methods on students. The test, which was prepared at the beginning of the study and at the end of five-week…

  7. Trends in Substance Use among 6th-to 10th-Grade Students from 1998 to 2010: Findings from a National Probability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Russell, Ashley; Farhat, Tilda; Haynie, Denise; Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Of the handful of national studies tracking trends in adolescent substance use in the United States, only the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study collects data from 6th through 10th graders. The purpose of this study was to examine trends from 1998 to 2010 (four time points) in the prevalence of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use…

  8. The Hetu'u Global Network: Measuring the Distance to the Sun Using the June 5th/6th Transit of Venus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Rodriguez, David R.; Miller, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    In the spirit of historic astronomical endeavors, we invited school groups across the globe to collaborate in a solar distance measurement using the rare June 5/6th transit of Venus. In total, we recruited 19 school groups spread over 6 continents and 10 countries to participate in our Hetu'u Global Network. Applying the methods of French…

  9. Proceedings of the Office of Special Education Programs' Annual Technical Assistance and Dissemination Meeting (6th, Washington, DC, January 16-18, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Education Programs (ED/OSERS), Washington, DC.

    This document presents the proceedings for the Office of Special Education Programs' 6th Annual Technical Assistance and Dissemination Meeting held on January 16-18, 1996, in Washington, DC. Conference discussions centered around changing expectations for local and state education agencies and technical assistance and dissemination (TA&D)…

  10. Research into Higher Education 1970; Papers Presented at the Annual Conference of the Society for Research into Higher Education (6th).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Research into Higher Education, Ltd., London (England).

    This report presents three papers that were prepared for the 6th annual conference of the Society for Research into Higher Education, a London based organization. The 1st paper is "Factors Influencing Choice of Higher Education," by Margaret D. McCreath. She discusses part of an intensive study of the transition between school and higher education…

  11. Integration of physical activity and technology motion devices within a combined 5th and 6th grade science curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Kevin Eugene

    Background: National recommendations to increase school-based physical activity and promote academic success advise incorporating movement into traditional classroom lessons. Classroom-based physical activities have favorable associations with indicators of cognitive functioning, academic behaviors, and academic achievement. Purpose: This study analyzed the Active Science framework, which incorporated school-based physical activity within interactive science classroom lessons. Specifically, the study measured the effects of the Active Science framework on student physical activity levels in the classroom, student learning of science inquiry skills and content knowledge, and student perceptions of physical activity and science. A secondary purpose was to evaluate the teachers' perceptions on the implementation of the framework. Subjects: Participants were 37 Hispanic girls (age=11.1 +/-0.8 yr) in mixed 5th/6th grade science classes in a private, urban middle school. Methods: Physical activity levels of the students during the Active Science framework were measured using pedometers and heart rate monitors. Pre- and post-tests were used to assess the levels of learning achieved by the students in science inquiry skills and content during the Active Science framework. Student perceptions and attitudes toward science and physical activity were measured during student focus groups and pre-post perception surveys. Lesson plan evaluations completed by the teachers and structured interviews provided data on implementation of the framework. Results: Physical activity results showed heart rate (146 +/-9 bpm); maximal heart rate (196 +/-10.6 bpm); time (35 +/-2.5 mins); steps (3050 +/-402.7); calories (99 +/-8.4 kcal); and distance (1.1 +/-0.2 miles) while performing the activity portion of the science lessons were consistent with national recommendations for accumulating school-based physical activity. Significant increases in science content and skills test scores with a 22

  12. Conference scene: Summary of the 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories with international participation.

    PubMed

    Carasevici, Eugen

    2011-10-01

    The Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories (RAML) conferences have acquired a reputation for standing out as the most prominent and efficient meetings in the national community of laboratory medicine, being a landmark of the development in this field in Romania and an active affiliation to international forums. This year, the conference setting was Piatra Neamt, in the northeast part of Romania, which produced a friendly and stimulating professional environment. As in previous years, leading experts in the fields of laboratory medicine attended the event. This year, we enjoyed the opportunity to have such distinguished guests as the members of the executive board of International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC); Graham Beastall, IFCC President; Päivi Hannele Laitinen, IFCC secretary; and Grazyna Sypniewska, IFCC Communication and Publication Division, and editor of the electronic journal of the IFCC. As usual, the conference program included all aspects of clinical laboratory activity, with a special focus on technology development, instrumentation and laboratory management. Fully aware of the fact that the complexity and depth of laboratory practice have undergone an impressive and rapid evolution, the specific goals of the event were to increase knowledge in the fundamentals of new molecular investigation, areas which show the tendency to become routine in our daily activity. In addition, laboratory management and the place of medical laboratories in the process of translational medicine were subjects of focus. The 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories was held from Wednesday 1st to Saturday 4th of June 2011. A total of 273 participants from all local branches of the Association attended. The scientific program included seven plenary sessions where 22 lectures and 18 short communications were delivered, and three poster sessions with 44 poster presentations. Session topics covered issues of

  13. Conference scene: Summary of the 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories with international participation.

    PubMed

    Carasevici, Eugen

    2011-10-01

    The Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories (RAML) conferences have acquired a reputation for standing out as the most prominent and efficient meetings in the national community of laboratory medicine, being a landmark of the development in this field in Romania and an active affiliation to international forums. This year, the conference setting was Piatra Neamt, in the northeast part of Romania, which produced a friendly and stimulating professional environment. As in previous years, leading experts in the fields of laboratory medicine attended the event. This year, we enjoyed the opportunity to have such distinguished guests as the members of the executive board of International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC); Graham Beastall, IFCC President; Päivi Hannele Laitinen, IFCC secretary; and Grazyna Sypniewska, IFCC Communication and Publication Division, and editor of the electronic journal of the IFCC. As usual, the conference program included all aspects of clinical laboratory activity, with a special focus on technology development, instrumentation and laboratory management. Fully aware of the fact that the complexity and depth of laboratory practice have undergone an impressive and rapid evolution, the specific goals of the event were to increase knowledge in the fundamentals of new molecular investigation, areas which show the tendency to become routine in our daily activity. In addition, laboratory management and the place of medical laboratories in the process of translational medicine were subjects of focus. The 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories was held from Wednesday 1st to Saturday 4th of June 2011. A total of 273 participants from all local branches of the Association attended. The scientific program included seven plenary sessions where 22 lectures and 18 short communications were delivered, and three poster sessions with 44 poster presentations. Session topics covered issues of

  14. Postoperative endophthalmitis by Flavimonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chien-Kuang; Liu, Chi-Chang; Kuo, Hsi-Kung

    2004-11-01

    A 55-year-old man suffered from blurred vision of the left eye (visual acuity was counting fingers/5-10 cm) 8 days after undergoing cataract surgery. After thorough ophthalmologic examinations with gram-negative bacillus justified on smear of vitreous specimen, postoperative endophthalmitis (os) was impressed. Intravitreous injection of 1.0 mg of vancomycin, 0.4 mg of amikacin, and 0.4 mg of dexamethasone was given twice and vitreous fluid culture was also performed. However, the inflammatory condition was not well controlled. Because the results of vitreous fluid culture revealed Flavimonas oryzihabitans infection which is sensitive to piperacillin, we performed the 3rd intravitreous injection of 1.0 mg of piperacillin and 0.4 mg of dexamethasone. The inflammatory condition was under control and the visual acuity of left eye improved. For patients with ocular diseases, postoperative endophthalmitis by Flavimonas oryzihabitans is a rare condition. According to the results of this case, intravitreous injection of piperacillin was effective against the pathogen.

  15. Postoperative endophthalmitis by Flavimonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chien-Kuang; Liu, Chi-Chang; Kuo, Hsi-Kung

    2004-11-01

    A 55-year-old man suffered from blurred vision of the left eye (visual acuity was counting fingers/5-10 cm) 8 days after undergoing cataract surgery. After thorough ophthalmologic examinations with gram-negative bacillus justified on smear of vitreous specimen, postoperative endophthalmitis (os) was impressed. Intravitreous injection of 1.0 mg of vancomycin, 0.4 mg of amikacin, and 0.4 mg of dexamethasone was given twice and vitreous fluid culture was also performed. However, the inflammatory condition was not well controlled. Because the results of vitreous fluid culture revealed Flavimonas oryzihabitans infection which is sensitive to piperacillin, we performed the 3rd intravitreous injection of 1.0 mg of piperacillin and 0.4 mg of dexamethasone. The inflammatory condition was under control and the visual acuity of left eye improved. For patients with ocular diseases, postoperative endophthalmitis by Flavimonas oryzihabitans is a rare condition. According to the results of this case, intravitreous injection of piperacillin was effective against the pathogen. PMID:15796259

  16. Peppermint oil: a treatment for postoperative nausea.

    PubMed

    Tate, S

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes a research study to investigate the efficacy of peppermint oil as a treatment for postoperative nausea. It uses a three-condition experimental design using statistical analysis to compare groups. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to establish significance and the Mann-Whitney test to differentiate significance between the groups. The control, placebo and experimental groups of gynaecological patients were compared, using variables known to affect postoperative nausea. They were found to be homogeneous for the purposes of the study. A statistically significant differences was demonstrated on the day of operation, using the Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.0487. Using the Mann-Whitney test the difference was shown to be between the placebo and experimental group (U = 3; P = 0.02). The experimental group also required less traditional antiemetics and received more opioid analgesia postoperatively. The total cost of the treatment was 48 pence per person.

  17. VLAP: results immediately post-op

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Robert S.

    1996-05-01

    Visual laser ablation of the prostate (VLAP) has been shown to be as effective with fewer complications than TURP in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Questions have been raised about VLAP regarding prolonged irritative and obstructive voiding symptoms postoperatively. It is postulated that these symptoms are due to the slow slough of necrotic debris following VLAP. In an effort to improve upon the technique of VLAP, patients underwent lasing of the prostate in the routine manner (2, 4, 8, and 10 o'clock positions with sixty watts for sixty seconds) using Nd:YAG free beam energy. A bladder neck incision was then performed using a contact laser fiber. International prostate symptom score assessments were done preoperatively; one week and six weeks postoperatively. Post void residual urine volumes and prostate size were also evaluated. The findings indicate that symptom scores and post void residual urine volumes have significantly improved within ten days postoperatively using this technique.

  18. Tryptophan Supplementation and Postoperative Delirium – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Thomas N.; Dunn, Christina L.; Adams, Jill C.; Hawkins, Carrie L.; Tran, Zung V.; Raeburn, Christopher D.; Moss, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Tryptophan deficiency has been associated with increased incidence of postoperative delirium. Therefore, we hypothesized that the post-operative administration of tryptophan would be beneficial for elderly surgical patients who are at higher risk of developing post-operative delirium. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. Setting: Participants A total of 325 individuals aged 60 years and older undergoing major elective operations requiring a postoperative intensive care unit admission. Intervention L-tryptophan, 1 gram orally, three times daily or placebo was started following the operation and continued for up to three days postoperatively. Measurements Delirium and its motor subtypes were measured using the Confusion Assessment Method-ICU and the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale. The primary outcome for between groups comparison was the incidence of excitatory (mixed and hyperactive) postoperative delirium. The secondary outcomes for comparison were the incidence and duration of overall postoperative delirium. Results The overall incidence of postoperative delirium was 39% (116) (95% confidence interval 34% to 44%). The percentages of patients with excitatory delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups were 17% and 9% (p=0.176), and the duration of excitatory delirium was 3.3±1.7 and 3.1±1.9 days (p=0.741). The percentage of patients with overall delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups was 40% and 37% (p=0.597), and the duration of overall delirium was 2.9±1.8 and 2.4±1.6 days (p=0.167). Conclusion Postoperative tryptophan supplementation in older adults undergoing major elective operations requiring postoperative intensive care unit admission demonstrated no efficacy in reducing the incidence of postoperative excitatory delirium or overall delirium, and the duration of excitatory or overall delirium. PMID:25112175

  19. Future perspectives in melanoma research: meeting report from the "Melanoma Bridge": Napoli, December 3rd-6th 2014.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Atkins, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo; Botti, Gerardo; Cochran, Alistair; Davies, Michael; Demaria, Sandra; Dummer, Reinhard; Ferrone, Soldano; Formenti, Silvia; Gajewski, Thomas F; Garbe, Claus; Khleif, Samir; Kiessling, Rolf; Lo, Roger; Lorigan, Paul; Arthur, Grant Mc; Masucci, Giuseppe; Melero, Ignacio; Mihm, Martin; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Parmiani, Giorgio; Puzanov, Igor; Romero, Pedro; Schilling, Bastian; Seliger, Barbara; Stroncek, David; Taube, Janis; Tomei, Sara; Zarour, Hassane M; Testori, Alessandro; Wang, Ena; Galon, Jérôme; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Mozzillo, Nicola; Marincola, Francesco M; Thurin, Magdalena

    2015-11-30

    The fourth "Melanoma Bridge Meeting" took place in Naples, December 3-6th, 2014. The four topics discussed at this meeting were: Molecular and Immunological Advances, Combination Therapies, News in Immunotherapy, and Tumor Microenvironment and Biomarkers. Until recently systemic therapy for metastatic melanoma patients was ineffective, but recent advances in tumor biology and immunology have led to the development of new targeted and immunotherapeutic agents that prolong progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). New therapies, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway inhibitors as well as other signaling pathway inhibitors, are being tested in patients with metastatic melanoma either as monotherapy or in combination, and all have yielded promising results. These include inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases (BRAF, MEK, and VEGFR), the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathway [PI3K, AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)], activators of apoptotic pathway, and the cell cycle inhibitors (CDK4/6). Various locoregional interventions including radiotherapy and surgery are still valid approaches in treatment of advanced melanoma that can be integrated with novel therapies. Intrinsic, adaptive and acquired resistance occur with targeted therapy such as BRAF inhibitors, where most responses are short-lived. Given that the reactivation of the MAPK pathway through several distinct mechanisms is responsible for the majority of acquired resistance, it is logical to combine BRAF inhibitors with inhibitors of targets downstream in the MAPK pathway. For example, combination of BRAF/MEK inhibitors (e.g., dabrafenib/trametinib) have been demonstrated to improve survival compared to monotherapy. Application of novel technologies such sequencing have proven useful as a tool for identification of MAPK pathway-alternative resistance mechanism and designing other combinatorial therapies such as those between BRAF and AKT inhibitors. Improved

  20. Future perspectives in melanoma research: meeting report from the "Melanoma Bridge": Napoli, December 3rd-6th 2014.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Atkins, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo; Botti, Gerardo; Cochran, Alistair; Davies, Michael; Demaria, Sandra; Dummer, Reinhard; Ferrone, Soldano; Formenti, Silvia; Gajewski, Thomas F; Garbe, Claus; Khleif, Samir; Kiessling, Rolf; Lo, Roger; Lorigan, Paul; Arthur, Grant Mc; Masucci, Giuseppe; Melero, Ignacio; Mihm, Martin; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Parmiani, Giorgio; Puzanov, Igor; Romero, Pedro; Schilling, Bastian; Seliger, Barbara; Stroncek, David; Taube, Janis; Tomei, Sara; Zarour, Hassane M; Testori, Alessandro; Wang, Ena; Galon, Jérôme; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Mozzillo, Nicola; Marincola, Francesco M; Thurin, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The fourth "Melanoma Bridge Meeting" took place in Naples, December 3-6th, 2014. The four topics discussed at this meeting were: Molecular and Immunological Advances, Combination Therapies, News in Immunotherapy, and Tumor Microenvironment and Biomarkers. Until recently systemic therapy for metastatic melanoma patients was ineffective, but recent advances in tumor biology and immunology have led to the development of new targeted and immunotherapeutic agents that prolong progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). New therapies, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway inhibitors as well as other signaling pathway inhibitors, are being tested in patients with metastatic melanoma either as monotherapy or in combination, and all have yielded promising results. These include inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases (BRAF, MEK, and VEGFR), the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathway [PI3K, AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)], activators of apoptotic pathway, and the cell cycle inhibitors (CDK4/6). Various locoregional interventions including radiotherapy and surgery are still valid approaches in treatment of advanced melanoma that can be integrated with novel therapies. Intrinsic, adaptive and acquired resistance occur with targeted therapy such as BRAF inhibitors, where most responses are short-lived. Given that the reactivation of the MAPK pathway through several distinct mechanisms is responsible for the majority of acquired resistance, it is logical to combine BRAF inhibitors with inhibitors of targets downstream in the MAPK pathway. For example, combination of BRAF/MEK inhibitors (e.g., dabrafenib/trametinib) have been demonstrated to improve survival compared to monotherapy. Application of novel technologies such sequencing have proven useful as a tool for identification of MAPK pathway-alternative resistance mechanism and designing other combinatorial therapies such as those between BRAF and AKT inhibitors. Improved

  1. Comparison of methods to facilitate postoperative bowel function.

    PubMed

    Crainic, Christina; Erickson, Kathie; Gardner, Janet; Haberman, Sheri; Patten, Pam; Thomas, Pat; Hays, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Improving postoperative return of bowel function after abdominal surgery is an important nursing and medical goal. One promising intervention to achieve this goal is to have patients chew gum several times per day in the early postoperative period to stimulate the cephalic-vagal reflex and bowel peristalsis. A study to determine if return of gastrointestinal function after abdominal surgery could be hastened by the simple intervention of chewing gum or sucking on hard candy three times per day is described.

  2. Postoperative pain management

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexandros; Lazaridis, George; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Karavergou, Anastasia; Pataka, Athanasia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a very important issue for several patients. Indifferent of the surgery type or method, pain management is very necessary. The relief from suffering leads to early mobilization, less hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An individual approach should be applied for pain control, rather than a fix dose or drugs. Additionally, medical, psychological, and physical condition, age, level of fear or anxiety, surgical procedure, personal preference, and response to agents given should be taken into account. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is minimizing the dose of medications to lessen side effects while still providing adequate analgesia. Again a multidisciplinary team approach should be pursued planning and formulating a plan for pain relief, particularly in complicated patients, such as those who have medical comorbidities. These patients might appear increase for analgesia-related complications or side effects. PMID:25774311

  3. [Postoperative medical icterus].

    PubMed

    Cerf, M

    1978-06-01

    The onset of jaundice following a surgical operation sometimes raises difficult problems. It is rarely due to hemolysis, infective hepatitis or decomposated cirrhosis of the liver. One should seek as a routine hepatitis due to halotane. However the most frequent cause is "benign postoperative cholestasis". This variety of jaundice presents in the form of an icterus due to conjugated bilirubine with often a large increase in alkaline phosphatase levels. The ocurse is variable. Almost always due to severe surgical or septic trauma, accompanied by shock and/or anoxia, it raises difficult diagnostic problems. The clinical and physiopathological aspects of benign postoperative cholestasis are recalled. One should remember, above all, that this is not an autonomous clinical entity but the sign of local or general complications which should be sought carefully.

  4. [Sclerotherapy of postoperative lymphocele].

    PubMed

    Ravid, A; Papo, J; Kaplan, O; Klausner, J

    1994-12-15

    Postoperative lymphocele is a well-documented complication of gynecological operations involving pelvic and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. It is not uncommon following renal transplantation. We report a 77-year-old woman with a lymphocele which developed 4 months after panhysterectomy. Diagnosis was by CT scan, confirmed by aspiration and cytology. Percutaneous drainage and sclerotherapy with tetracycline was curative. This appears to be the treatment of choice for lymphocele and is superior to repeated aspirations and surgical intervention, the current usual treatment.

  5. Archeomagnetic Intensity Variations During the 6th Millennium BC in the Middle East: New Data from Yarim Tepe II (Northern Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimova, S.; Gallet, Y.; Amirov, S.

    2015-12-01

    During the seventies, Soviet archeologists conducted in Northern Iraq excavations of several ancient settlements dated from the Pottery Late Neolithic period (7th and 6th millennia BC). A very large collection of artifacts unearthed from these sites, in particular several thousands of well-documented pottery fragments, is now stored at the Archeological Institute in Moscow. We collected a time-sequential series of groups of potsherds from the multilayered settlement called Yarim Tepe II dated to the Halaf period (6th millennium BC). Each group comprises a minimum of 3 potsherds (up to 10) found within a same archeological layer, typically a thickness of about 20 cm. Altogether, the fragment groups encompass the entire 7-m thick stratigraphic sequence of Yarim Tepe II. We will present our first archeointensity results obtained using the experimental protocol developed for the Triaxe magnetometer, taking into account the effects of both the thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) anisotropy and the cooling rate dependence on TRM acquisition. The new data help to better constrain the geomagnetic field intensity variations in the Middle East during the 6th millennium BC. Thanks to the comparison with other datasets from Bulgaria and Syria, the new archeointensity results provide evidence for the occurrence of very rapid geomagnetic field intensity variations around 5500 BC.

  6. Celebrating Partnerships. Highlights of the Annual Community Education Conference (6th, River Grove, IL, November 14, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solorzano, Sylvia M., Ed.

    This paper is published annually by the Celebrating Partnerships Conference Planning Committee to share information on successful partnership programs that address community issues and concerns. The papers were presented at a conference in honor of National Community Education Day. This collection illustrates the efforts of diverse community…

  7. Comparison of the effect of naproxen, etodolac and diclofenac on postoperative sequels following third molar surgery: A randomised, double-blind, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Nihat; Atakan, Cemal; Çölok, Gülümser

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) diclofenac potassium, etodolac and naproxen sodium in relation to pain, swelling and trismus following impacted third molar surgery. Study Design: The study was a randomized and a double-blinded study which included 42 healthy young individuals with impacted third molars and bone retention. Patients were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n: 14) to which diclofenac potassium, naproxen sodium and etodolac were administered orally an hour before the operation. Impacted third molars were surgically extracted with local anaesthesia. Visual analog scales (VAS) were used to assess the pain in the 6th, 12th hours and on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th, and 7th days postoperatively. Swelling was evaluated using ultrasound (US) and mouth opening (trismus) was measured with a composing stick pre and post operatively on the 2nd and 7th days respectively. Results: Regarding pain alleviation, diclofenac potassium was better than naproxen sodium and naproxen sodium was better than etodolac but these differences were not statistically significant. US measurements showed that the swelling on postoperative 2nd day was significantly lowest with diclofenac potassium as compared to others (p= 0.027) while naproxen sodium and etodolac acted similarly (p=0.747). No difference was noted regarding trismus in any of the groups. Conclusions: NSAIDs (diclofenac, naproxen and etodolac) are somehow similarly effective for controlling pain and trismus following extraction of mandibular third molars but diclofenac potassium surpasses others in reduction of swelling. Key words:Diclofenac potassium, naproxen sodium, etodolac, impacted third molar surgery, pain, swelling, trismus. PMID:24316711

  8. Postoperative extradural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Pichierri, Angelo; Ruggeri, Andrea; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Delfini, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative extradural hematoma (POEH) is a possible complication after head surgery, often neglected in the literature. In a single surgeon experience we found 13 cases of POEH (0.8%). We distinguished two subtypes: (1) larger hematomas (>40 cc) with typical features and overt clinical picture that always needed evacuation, and (2) smaller hematomas (<40 cc) with insidious clinical onset and different radiological features compared with traumatic and spontaneous extradural hematomas. On the basis of our experience, we propose that clinical picture and radiologic appearance lead the decision between conservative or interventional treatment of type II hematomas.

  9. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  10. 6th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Applications and Beyond, April 25–27, 2013, Riga, Latvia

    PubMed Central

    Schlaeger, Christof; Hinzmann, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Abstract International experts in the fields of diabetes, diabetes technology, endocrinology, and pediatrics gathered for the 6th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Applications and beyond. The aim of this meeting was to continue setting up a global network of experts in this field and provide an international platform for exchange of ideas to improve life for people with diabetes. The 2013 meeting comprised a comprehensive scientific program, parallel interactive workshops, and two keynote lectures. All these discussions were intended to help identify gaps and areas where further scientific work and clinical studies are warranted. PMID:24074038

  11. Postoperative fiberoptic choledochoscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Birkett, D H; Williams, L F

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients underwent fiberoptic T-tube tract choledochoscopy for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of filling defects seen on postoperative T-tube cholangiograms. In 22 patients, 59 retained stones were treated by extraction. In six other patients with diagnostic problems arising from cholangiogram defects, the diagnosis was made by direct vision and biopsy specimen examination. There were multiple papillary adenocarcinomas in one patient, and normal mucosal folds in two patients. The procedure was accompanied by a low complication rate, with two patients developing pancreatitis and five patients developing transient fever. The advantages of the procedure are a direct examination of the biliary tree with the facility to remove stones and biopsy lesions under direct vision. PMID:7294933

  12. [Postoperative epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Donato, S; Malisano, A M; Dogareschi, T; Chiarandini, P; Spasiano, A; Pasetto, A

    1995-01-01

    Epidural analgesia with local anesthetics and opioids is one of the most effective methods for postoperative pain control. In critical patients it seems to improve outcome as well as pain control. This technique works better when started in the intraoperative time. Epidural analgesia is safe on surgical wards if nursing staff is trained in managing epidural catheters and in early detection and treatment of major and minor side effects. Nursing staff cooperates with the Acute Pain Service doctors and nurses who are on call on a 24 hour basis. Many perspective and retrospective studies showed a very low incidence of major side effects with epidurals. So we can consider it safe and effective even if we consider its invasiveness.

  13. Postoperative nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a long-standing issue, not a new concept in anesthesiology. Despite many studies over the last several decades, PONV remains a significant problem due to its complex mechanism. This review presents a summary of the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of PONV, focusing on preventive treatment, particularly the use of new drugs. In addition, we discuss the latest meta-analysis results regarding correct clinical use of classic drugs. I also summarize the latest trends of postdischarge nausea and vomiting and the pharmacogenetics, which is attracting a great deal of attention from other medical fields in PONV-related studies. Finally, we discuss the drawbacks of existing studies on PONV and suggest a focus for future investigations. PMID:25302092

  14. Keratoplasty postoperative treatment update.

    PubMed

    Shimmura-Tomita, Machiko; Shimmura, Shigeto; Satake, Yoshiyuki; Shimazaki-Den, Seika; Omoto, Masahiro; Tsubota, Kazuo; Shimazaki, Jun

    2013-11-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy is the main postoperative treatment for keratoplasty, but there are considerable differences in protocols for the use of steroids and other immunosuppressants. Therefore, we conducted 2 prospective randomized clinical trials and 1 prospective nonrandomized clinical trial on keratoplasty postoperative treatment. One study evaluated the efficacy and safety of long-term topical corticosteroids after a penetrating keratoplasty was performed. Patients who underwent keratoplasty and maintained graft clarity for >1 year were randomly assigned to either a steroid or a no-steroid group. At the 12-month follow-up, the no-steroid group developed significantly more endothelial rejection than did the steroid group. A second study elucidated the effectiveness and safety of systemic cyclosporine in high-risk corneal transplantation. The patients were assigned to a systemic cyclosporine or control group. At a mean follow-up of 42.7 months, no difference was observed in the endothelial rejection rates and graft clarity loss between the 2 groups. A third study elucidated the effectiveness and the safety of systemic tacrolimus in high-risk corneal transplantation. Of 11 consecutive eyes decompensated despite systemic cyclosporine treatment, there was no irreversible rejection in eyes treated with tacrolimus, which was significantly better than in previous penetrating keratoplasty with systemic cyclosporine treatment. Prognosis after keratoplasty in patients with keratoconus is relatively good, but special attention is required for patients with atopic dermatitis. Postkeratoplasty atopic sclerokeratitis (PKAS) is a severe form of sclerokeratitis after keratoplasty in atopic patients. Our retrospective study showed that 35 eyes of 29 patients from a total of 247 keratoconus eyes undergoing keratoplasty were associated with atopic dermatitis, of which 6 eyes of 5 patients developed PKAS. Eyes with PKAS had a significantly higher incidence of atopic blepharitis

  15. Smoking practices, risk perception of smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure among 6th-grade students in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bird, Yelena; Moraros, John; Olsen, Larry K; Forster-Cox, Sue; Staines-Orozco, Hugo; Buckingham, Robert W

    2007-02-01

    This study assessed the smoking practices, risk perception of smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure among adolescents in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. We used a cross-sectional method to examine the smoking practices, risk perception of smoking, and ETS exposure of 6th-grade students (N=506), aged 11-13 years, attending six randomly selected middle schools. Schools were classified by school setting (i.e., public vs. private) and socioeconomic status (SES; i.e., low, middle, or high). The results indicated that 6th-grade students attending a public, low-SES school setting in Ciudad Juárez not only exhibited significantly higher rates of ETS exposure at home and in public places (p<.01) but also were more likely to have tried smoking (p<.01) and to be current smokers (p<.01), and were less likely to support a ban on smoking in public places (p<.01), compared with students who attended a private school or a public, middle- or high-SES school setting. These results provide further evidence that public health interventions to prevent initiation of smoking and to assist in smoking cessation among adolescents and to reduce their ETS exposure at home and in public need to target all school-aged students, especially those attending school in a low-SES settings.

  16. Metastatic lymph node ratio, 6th or 7th AJCC edition: witch is the best lymph node classification for esophageal cancer? Prognosis factor analysis in 487 patients

    PubMed Central

    CORAL, Roberto V.; BIGOLIN, André V.; CORAL, Roberto P.; HARTMANN, Antonio; DRANKA, Carolina; ROEHE, Adriana V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The esophageal cancer is one of the most common and aggressive worldwide. Recently, the AJCC changed the staging system, considering, among others, the important role of the lymph node metastasis on the prognosis. Aim To discuss the applicability of different forms of lymph node staging in a western surgical center. Methods Four hundred eighty seven patients with esophageal cancer were enrolled. Three staging systems were evaluated, the 6th and the 7th AJCC editions and the Lymph Node Metastatic Ratio. Results The majority of the cases were squamous cell carcinoma. The mean lymph node sample was eight. Considering the survival, there was no significant difference between the patients when they were classified by the 7th AJCC edition. Analysis of the Lymph Node Metastatic Ratio, just on the group of patients with 0 to 25%, has shown significant difference (p=0,01). The 6th AJCC edition shows the major significant difference between among the classifications evaluated. Conclusion In this specific population, the 7th AJCC edition for esophageal cancer was not able to find differences in survival when just the lymph node analysis was considered. PMID:26176242

  17. Downregulated Expression of Ly-6-ThB on Developing T Cells Marks CD4+CD8+ Subset Undergoing Selection in the Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Justin T.; Mehta, Hitesh; Chappell, Clay H.

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of TCRs on CD4+CD8+ immature T cell with MHC-peptide complexes on stromal cells is required for positive and negative selection in the thymus. Identification and characterization of a subpopulation of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes undergoing selection in the thymus will aid in understanding the mechanisms underlying lineage commitment and thymic selection. Herein, we describe the expression of Ly-6 ThB on developing thymocytes. The majority of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes express Ly-6 ThB at high levels. Its expression is downregulated in a subset of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes as well as in mature CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ T cells. More importantly, interaction of TCR/coreceptor with the self-MHC-peptide contributes to the downregulation of ThB expression on developing thymocytes. These findings indicate that downregulation of ThB on CD4+CD8+ thymocytes identifies a unique subset (CD4+CD8+ThBneg–low) of thymocytes that has received the initial signals for thymic selection but have not yet downregulated the CD4 and CD8 cell surface expression. In addition, these results also indicate that a high frequency (Ÿ20–40%) of CD4+CD8+ immature thymocytes receive these initial signals during thymic selection. PMID:11589307

  18. Rabies vaccine standards: comparison of the 5th and 6th WHO international reference standards to the USDA veterinary reference standard.

    PubMed

    Hermann, J; Fry, A; Reising, M; Patterson, P; Siev, D; Gatewood, D

    2012-11-01

    Ensuring rabies vaccines are potent and effective is paramount in preventing transmission of this deadly disease and safeguarding public health. Efficacy of human and veterinary vaccines is ensured by evaluating relative potency estimates of the vaccine compared to a rabies reference standard using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) test. Reference vaccines are based on the International Standard for Rabies Vaccine provided by the World Health Organization (WHO). A comparison study was conducted to determine the relative potency of the 5th WHO, 6th WHO, and United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) 08-14 reference standards using the NIH test. Results from the study demonstrate that the 6th WHO reference standard is approximately twice as potent as the 5th WHO reference when reconstituted to contain 1 IU per ml. Based on these results, the Center for Veterinary Biologics (CVB) doubled the reconstitution volume of USDA veterinary reference 08-14 from 13 ml to 26 ml, for an initial use dilution of 0.7 IU per ml for use by veterinary biologics manufacturers in the NIH test. This study emphasizes the importance of reference standard calibration for use in the National Institutes of Health test.

  19. Postoperative hypercoagulability and deep-vein thrombosis after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Caprini, J A; Arcelus, J I; Laubach, M; Size, G; Hoffman, K N; Coats, R W; Blattner, S

    1995-03-01

    Patients who undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) are operated on under general anesthesia, in a reverse Trendelenburg position, with 12-15-mmHg pneumoperitoneum. All of these factors can induce venous stasis of the legs, which may lead to postoperative deep-vein thrombosis (DVT). The objectives of this study were to assess the degree of hypercoagulability and to determine the rate of postoperative DVT in a group of 100 patients in whom LC was completed. Whole-blood thrombelastography (TEG) and plasma-activated partial thromboplastin time (PTT) determination were carried out preoperatively and on the 1st postoperative day. All patients received pre-, intra-, and postoperative graduated compression stockings and sequential pneumatic compression devices until fully ambulatory. Twenty-six percent of the patients with a risk score > 4, or a post-operative TEG index > +5.0, received subcutaneous heparin (5,000 units b.i.d.), beginning in the postoperative period and continuing for 4 weeks as an outpatient. A complete venous duplex scan of both legs was performed on the 7th postoperative day, at the time of their office visit. Our results revealed significant postoperative hypercoagulability for the TEG index (P < 0.005) and for PTT (P < 0.05). One patient had an asymptomatic DVT (1%), and no side effects from the mechanical or pharmacological prophylaxis occurred in this series. These data suggest that the low incidence of thrombosis in the face of theoretical and laboratory evidence of postoperative hypercoagulability may reflect an effective prophylactic regime.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Postoperative infections: prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Gaston, R Glenn; Kuremsky, Marshall A

    2010-05-01

    Postoperative infections continue to be a challenging problem. The incidence of bacterial antibiotic resistance such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is rising. There are numerous intrinsic patient factors that should be optimized before surgery to minimize the risk of surgical site infections. When postoperative infections develop, treatment must be individualized. This article outlines the principles that can help guide treatment.

  1. [Therapeutic approach to postoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Moltó, L

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative anemia is a common finding in patients who undergo major surgery, and it can affect early rehabilitation and the return to daily activities. Allogeneic blood transfusion is still the most widely used method for restoring hemoglobin levels rapidly and effectively. However, the potential risks of transfusions have led to the review of this practice and to a search for alternative measures for treating postoperative anemia. The early administration of intravenous iron appears to improve the evolution of postoperative hemoglobin levels and reduce allogeneic transfusions, especially in patients with significant iron deficiency or anemia. What is not clear is whether this treatment heavily influences rehabilitation and quality of life. There is a lack of well-designed, sufficiently large, randomized prospective studies to determine whether postoperative or perioperative intravenous iron treatment, with or without recombinant erythropoietin, has a role in the recovery from postoperative anemia, in reducing transfusions and morbidity rates and in improving exercise capacity and quality of life.

  2. [Day surgery for anal disease].

    PubMed

    Takano, M

    2000-10-01

    Historically, patients with anal diseases treated on a day surgery basis had inadequate cure rates and a high complication rate. After World War II, modern treatment methods were learned from the UK and USA and improved in Japan. However, the improved radical methods were so complex that approximately 2 weeks' hospitalization was needed. Recently, day surgery for various diseases including hemorrhoids has been recommended by the Japanese ministry of Health and Welfare. However, the characteristics of anal anatomy and physiology make the smooth healing of wounds difficult and tend to cause postoperative pain, bleeding, infection, prolonged healing time, etc. To prevent such difficulties, care must be well planned following the critical path of informed consent, careful surgery, postoperative observation, and management at home. However, hospital staff in charge of such surgery are under so much stress that only patients with less severe anal disease without local or systemic complications should be selected for day surgery.

  3. [ANESTHESIA DURING THE SEPARATION OF THE FETUS IN FETU IN A 2 DAYS-LIFE CHILD WITH ACCOMPANYING NON-CORRECTED CRITICAL CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE (CHD)].

    PubMed

    Agavelyan, E G; Svarinskaya, E M; Ovchinnikov, S V

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a clinical case of treating a few- hours-life child with birth body weight--2900 g, length--50 cm, who had been extremely rare complex congenital malformations: fetus in fetu in the epigastrium with satisfactorily formed the lower half of the body of the failed twin, omphalocele and severe CHD. The surgical treatment was in terms of multicomponent endotracheal anesthesia. At the end of surgery puncture and catheterization of the epidural space at the level of L1/L2 holding the catheter up to Th9/Th10 for postoperative analgesia was made. Cardiotonic therapy and mechanical ventilation was performed after the operation. There have been signs of high pulmonary hypertension. On the 6th day of life the child was transferred to the Department of cardiac surgery and intensive care for the correction of complex combined CHD. At the age of 8 days of life performed the operation. Clamping of the aorta lasted for 21 minutes. On the 24th day of life has been deteriorating due to increasing renal failure and development of multiorgan failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome. After repeated resuscitations the child died at the age of 25 days of life. PMID:27192856

  4. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  5. CEMI Days

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    CEMI Days are an important channel of engagement between DOE and the manufacturing industry to identify challenges and opportunities for increasing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness. CEMI Days that are held at manufacturing companies’ facilities can include tours of R&D operations or other points of interest determined by the host company.

  6. Dinosaur Day!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  7. New archeointensity data from French Early Medieval pottery production (6th-10th century AD). Tracing 1500 years of geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevey, Agnès; Gallet, Yves; Jesset, Sébastien; Thébault, Erwan; Bouillon, Jérôme; Lefèvre, Annie; Le Goff, Maxime

    2016-08-01

    Nineteen new archeointensity results were obtained from the analysis of groups of French pottery fragments dated to the Early Middle Ages (6th to 10th centuries AD). They are from several medieval ceramic production sites, excavated mainly in Saran (Central France), and their precise dating was established based on typo-chronological characteristics. Intensity measurements were performed using the Triaxe protocol, which takes into account the effects on the intensity determinations of both thermoremanent magnetization anisotropy and cooling rate. Intensity analyses were also carried out on modern pottery produced at Saran during an experimental firing. The results show very good agreement with the geomagnetic field intensity directly measured inside and around the kiln, thus reasserting the reliability of the Triaxe protocol and the relevance of the quality criteria used. They further demonstrate the potential of the Saran pottery production for archeomagnetism. The new archeointensity results allow a precise and coherent description of the geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe during the Early Medieval period, which was until now poorly documented. They show a significant increase in intensity during the 6th century AD, high intensity values from the 7th to the 9th century, with a minimum of small amplitude at the transition between the 7th and the 8th centuries and finally an important decrease until the beginning of the 11th century. Together with published intensity results available within a radius of 700 km around Paris, the new data were used to compute a master curve of the Western European geomagnetic intensity variations over the past 1500 years. This curve clearly exhibits five intensity maxima: at the transition between the 6th and 7th century AD, at the middle of the 9th century, during the 12th century, in the second part of the 14th century and at the very beginning of the 17th century AD. Some of these peaks are smoothed, or

  8. Local anesthetic infusion pumps improve postoperative pain after inguinal hernia repair: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Barry; Waxman, Kenneth; Tatevossian, Raymond; Gamberdella, Marla; Read, Bruce

    2004-11-01

    Pain after an open inguinal hernia repair may be significant. In fact, some surgeons feel that the pain after open repair justifies a laparoscopic approach. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of local anesthetic infusion pumps would reduce postoperative pain after open inguinal hernia repair. We performed a prospective, double-blind randomized study of 45 open plug and patch inguinal hernia repairs. Patients were randomized to receive either 0.25 per cent bupivicaine or saline solution via an elastomeric infusion pump (ON-Q) for 48 hours, at 2 cc/h. The catheters were placed in the subcutaneous tissue and removed on postoperative day 3. Both groups were prescribed hydrocodone to use in the postoperative period at the prescribed dosage as needed for pain. Interviews were conducted on postoperative days 3 and 7, and patient's questionnaires, including pain scores, amount of pain medicine used, and any complications, were collected accordingly. During the first 5 postoperative days, postoperative pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Twenty-three repairs were randomized to the bupivicaine group and 22 repairs randomized to the placebo group. In the bupivicaine group, there was a significant decrease in postoperative pain on postoperative days 2 through 5 with P values <0.05. This significant difference continued through postoperative day 5, 2 days after the infusion pumps were removed. Patients who had bupivicaine instilled in their infusion pump had statistically significant lower subjective pain scores on postoperative days 2 through 5. This significant difference continued even after the infusion pumps were removed. Local anesthetic infusion pumps significantly decreased the amount of early postoperative pain. Pain relief persisted for 2 days after catheter and pump removal. PMID:15586515

  9. [Preemptive analgesia for postoperative pain after frontotemporal craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Honnma, Toshimi; Imaizumi, Toshio; Chiba, Masahiko; Niwa, Jun

    2002-02-01

    Two thirds of patients suffer from moderate to severe pain after frontotemporal craniotomy. We think neurosurgeons must try to reduce the postoperative pain, which may induce postoperative hypertension, restlessness, and pathological pains. To investigate how preemptive analgesia effects postoperative pain, we assessed the pain in 20 consecutive patients who underwent neck clipping for non-ruptured cerebral aneurysms of anterior circulation systems by frontotemporal craniotomies. Ten patients underwent preemptive analgesia with four procedures (preemptive group) as follows, 1) oral administration of long-acting non-steroid anti inflammatory drug (NSAID, ampiroxicam) two hours before the surgical operation, 2) nerve blockades of the supra-orbital nerve and the infra-orbital nerve by bupivacaine, 3) local anesthesia of the scalp along the marker of a skin incision by xylocaine, 4) local anesthesia by bupivacaine along a skin incision after the skin closure. Ten patients of the control group underwent only procedure No. 3. Visual analog pain score (VAS) for postoperative pain 6, 12, and 24 hours, and 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after operation and NSAID administration for the pain were evaluated. Patients of the preemptive group had significantly less postoperative pain during the whole post-surgery period and required less administration of NSAID than the control group. Preemptive analgesia procedures No. 1, 2 and 4 reduced the postoperative pain and the total administration of NSAID. Postoperative pain may be reduced after other types of brain surgery, with proper nerve blocks like procedure No. 2, procedures No. 1, 3 and 4. PMID:11857941

  10. Comparison of Values in 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Grade Primary Education Music Class Students'? Workbooks According to Rokeach?s and Akbas's Value Classifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çakirer, H. Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the values in the songs of 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education music classes students? workbooks according to the value categorizations proposed by Rockeach and Akbas and which values among the categories mentioned are taught to the students in the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education…

  11. Report on the 3'rd scientific meeting of the "Verein zur Förderung des Wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchses in der Neurologie" (NEUROWIND e.V.) held in Motzen, Germany, Nov. 4'th - Nov. 6'th, 2011

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    From November 4th- 6th 2011, the 3rd NEUROWIND e.V. meeting was held in Motzen, Brandenburg, Germany. Like in the previous years, the meeting provided an excellent platform for scientific exchange and the presentation of innovative projects for young colleagues in the fields of neurovascular research, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. As kick-off to the scientific sessions, Reinhard Hohlfeld, Head of the Institute for Clinical Neuroimmunology in Munich, gave an illustrious overview on the many fascinations of neuroimmunologic research. A particular highlight on the second day of the meeting was the award of the 1'st NEUROWIND e.V. prize for young academics in the field of experimental neurology. This award is posted for young colleagues under the age of 35 with a significant achievement in the field of neurovascular research, neuroinflammation or neurodegeneration and comprises an amount of 20.000 Euro, founded by Merck Serono GmbH, Darmstadt. Germany. The first prize was awarded to Ivana Nikic from Martin Kerschensteiner's group in Munich for her brilliant work on a reversible form of axon damage in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis, published in Nature Medicine in 2011. This first prize award ceremony was a great incentive for the next call for proposals now upcoming in 2012. PMID:22360825

  12. Combined preoperative and postoperative immunotherapy for murine C1300 neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fowler, C L; Brooks, S P; Rossman, J E; Cooney, D R

    1993-03-01

    Preoperative treatment of murine C1300-neuroblastoma (C1300) with triple immunotherapy using low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY), retinyl palmitate (RP), and interleukin-2 (IL2), followed by tumor resection leads to significant initial tumor control and prolonged survival. However, because long-term tumor recurrence is 67%, the efficacy of continued postoperative immunotherapy is now evaluated. Thirty-two A/J mice with 1 cm subcutaneous C1300 tumors were treated for 13 days with CY-100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (IP), on day 2 of treatment then 25 mg/kg on day 9, RP-2500 IU IP 2 x/week, and IL2 1.6 x 10(5) U IP BID on days 4 to 9 and 11 to 13. On day 14, mice were divided into five treatment groups: (1) OP (operated-tumor resection, n = 6); (2) OP+CY (resection and postoperative CY, n = 7); (3) OP+CY+RP (resection and postoperative CY+RP, n = 7); (4) OP+CY+RP+IL2 (resection and postoperative CY+RP+IL2, n = 7); and (5) CY+RP+IL2 (continued CY+RP+IL2 with no resection, n = 5). Survival and postoperative tumor recurrence were followed for 60 days. The cure rates were group 1 33% (2/6), group 2 43% (3/7), group 3 29% (2/7), group 4 71% (5/7), and group 5 20% (1/5). After surgery, tumors that recurred did so in 8 to 22 days, with no statistical difference noted between groups. MHC class I antigenic expression of tumors resected on day 14 and recurrent tumors was determined with monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. In tumors resected on day 14, class I expression measured by mean fluorescence, was 374.8 +/- 27.40.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Laparoscopic Surgery Can Reduce Postoperative Edema Compared with Open Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Gong, Jianfeng; Cao, Lei; Wei, Yao; Guo, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The study aimed to investigate the impact of laparoscopic surgery and open surgery on postoperative edema in Crohn's disease. Methods. Patients who required enterectomy were divided into open group (Group O) and laparoscopic group (Group L). Edema was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis preoperatively (PRE) and on postoperative day 3 (POD3) and postoperative day 5 (POD5). The postoperative edema was divided into slight edema and edema by an edema index, defined as the ratio of total extracellular water to total body water. Results. Patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery had better clinical outcomes and lower levels of inflammatory and stress markers. A total of 31 patients (26.05%) developed slight edema and 53 patients (44.54%) developed edema on POD3. More patients developed postoperative edema in Group O than in Group L on POD3 (p = 0.006). The value of the edema index of Group O was higher than that of Group L on POD3 and POD5 (0.402 ± 0.010 versus 0.397 ± 0.008, p = 0.001; 0.401 ± 0.009 versus 0.395 ± 0.007, p = 0.039, resp.). Conclusions. Compared with open surgery, laparoscopic surgery can reduce postoperative edema, which may contribute to the better outcomes of laparoscopic surgery over open surgery. PMID:27777583

  14. Islet cell research brings hope for a diabetes cure: meeting report from the 6(th) annual islet society meeting in Stellenbosch, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Tchokonte-Nana, V; Cockburn, I L; Manda, J K; Kotze, P C; Johnson, J D

    2014-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation predicts that, over the next twenty years, the largest increase in the prevalence of diabetes will be in the Africa region. Recognizing an unmet need for more focus on Africa and engagement with African scholars, the Islet Society held its 6th annual meeting July 20-21, 2014 in Stellenbosch, South Africa. Here, we present a report that covers the presentations and discussion points from that meeting. Work was presented on a variety of topics and included presentations by a significant proportion of Africa diabetes researchers. Overall, it was an excellent conference, with many new international collaborations initiated. We hope that other groups will also respond to the need for more conferences in Africa and focused on Africa.

  15. Imaging of the Postoperative Orbit.

    PubMed

    Learned, Kim O; Nasseri, Farbod; Mohan, Suyash

    2015-08-01

    Imaging evaluation of the postoperative orbit remains challenging even for the expert neuroradiologist. This article provides a simplified framework for understanding the complex postoperative appearances of the orbit, in an attempt to enhance the diagnostic accuracy of postoperative computed tomography and MR imaging of the orbit. Readers are familiarized with the normal appearances of common eye procedures and orbit reconstructions to help avoid interpretative pitfalls. Also reviewed are imaging features of common surgical complications, and evaluation of residual/recurrent neoplasm in the setting of oncologic imaging surveillance.

  16. Postoperative patient falls on an orthopedic inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Duncan B; Trousdale, Robert T; Bieber, Patti; Henely, Joan; Pagnano, Mark W; Berry, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    We are not aware of any data looking specifically at inpatient falls in an orthopedic ward. We reviewed all postoperative orthopedic patients who fell during 2003 and 2005 on a single postoperative orthopedic unit. Seventy patients (1%) fell, resulting in 2.5 falls per 1000 musculoskeletal inpatient days. Most (n = 45, 64%) were bathroom related, were unassisted (n = 54, 77%), and occurred during the evening or night shift (n = 46, 66%). Thirteen (19%) patients acquired an injury as a consequence. Female sex (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9), patient age greater than 65 years (OR = 1.7), prolonged admission (OR = 1.7), and admission for primary or revision knee arthroplasty (OR = 5.0) were all significant risk factors for a postoperative inpatient fall. This information has provided us with some insight to direct the development of a fall prevention program specific to postoperative orthopedic patients.

  17. Climate Change and the Water Cycle: A New Southwest Regional Climate Hub Curriculum Unit for 6th-12th Grade Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, E.; Steele, C. M.; Bestelmeyer, S.; Haan-Amato, S.; Deswood, H.; Rango, A.; Havstad, K.

    2015-12-01

    As climate change intensifies, increased temperatures and altered precipitation will make water, a limited resource in the arid southwestern United States, even scarcer in many locations. The USDA Southwest Regional Climate Hub (SWRCH) developed Climate Change and the Water Cycle, an engaging and scientifically rigorous education unit for 6th -12th grade students. The unit is aligned with Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards. Nine activities can be conducted over 10 instruction hours. Each activity can also stand alone. In partnership with SWRCH, the Asombro Institute for Science Education developed the unit. Each activity was reviewed by an educator for educational practices and by a scientist for scientific accuracy. The unit was pilot tested with 524 students in 2014, and pre- and post-tests were administered. Ninety-one percent of students were able to name a greenhouse gas on the post-test, compared to only 48% on the pre-test. On the post-test, 86% of students identified the relationship between average global temperature and carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, compared to only 52% on the pre-test. A student commented: "I loved all of the activities! They are fun and help us understand about what goes on in the world." Educators who participated in pilot testing said: "the entire curriculum is great, but I was particularly impressed with the progression of ideas and the variety of lessons," and "students could see the relevance and importance of these real life issues." Anyone interested in using the unit to host workshops for teachers in southwestern states should contact Asombro for more information (information@asombro.org). The Climate Change and the Water Cycle 6th-12th grade curriculum unit is available online: www.swclimatehub.info/education/climate-change-and-water-cycle

  18. Prognostic Impact of the 6th and 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Staging Systems on Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Motoo; Shitara, Kohei; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hatooka, Shunzo; Mizota, Ayako; Kondoh, Chihiro; Yokota, Tomoya; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Muro, Kei

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The new 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system is based on pathologic data from esophageal cancers treated by surgery alone. There is no information available on evaluation of the new staging system with regard to prognosis of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of the new staging system on esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 301 consecutive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with CRT. Comparisons were made of the prognostic impacts of the 6th and 7th staging systems and the prognostic impacts of stage and prognostic groups, which were newly defined in the 7th edition. Results: There were significant differences between Stages I and III (p < 0.01) according to both editions. However, the 7th edition poorly distinguishes the prognoses of Stages III and IV (p = 0.36 by multivariate analysis) in comparison to the 6th edition (p = 0.08 by multivariate analysis), although these differences were not significant. For all patients, T, M, and gender were independent prognostic factors by multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). For the Stage I and II prognostic groups, survival curves showed a stepwise decrease with increase in stage, except for Stage IIA. However, there were no significant differences seen between each prognostic stage. Conclusions: Our study indicates there are several problems with the 7th TNM staging system regarding prognostic factors in patients undergoing CRT.

  19. Career Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's 2013 Career Days was a joint collaboration between NASA Langley and the Newport News Shipbuilding where 600 high school students from Virginia took on two design challenges -- designing a ca...

  20. Zoo Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warden, Marian

    1978-01-01

    Zoo Day was one of the culminating activities of Art Extravaganza, a pilot summer art program for high ability first-and second-graders. Field trips, art history lessons, box sculpture, and a study of cavemen were included. (SJL)

  1. Postoperative respiratory morbidity: identification and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, C; Garrahy, P; Peake, P

    1982-04-01

    Two hundred consecutive patients admitted for general surgery were studied prospectively to evaluate the contribution of risk factors to postoperative respiratory morbidity (PORM). PORM was expressed both in terms of individual clinical features present on the second postoperative day (when the incidence was greatest), and as an aggregate score incorporating many clinical features. The importance of recognised risk factors, such as previous respiratory disease, cigarette smoking, upper abdominal procedures and the duration of surgery was confirmed, in that these factors were associated with some of the individual clinical features of PORM. The relative importance and independent contribution of these risk factors were assessed by their association with the aggregate score. A naso-gastric tube (NGT) present for 24 hours postoperatively was the factor more associated with PORM. The NGT identified patients at risk more clearly than, and independently of, the next most important factor, upper abdominal surgery. The duration of surgery did not contribute to PORM after the influence of NGT and site of surgery had been considered. Previous respiratory disease predisposed to PORM, and was best identified by, in order of importance, an observed productive cough, a reduced one second forced expiratory volume, and purulent sputum. After the incidence of these factors had been considered, cigarette smoking and a history of a chronic productive cough did not contribute further to PORM. PMID:6952867

  2. The 6th FDR prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakoshi, Mitsuaki

    2013-06-01

    From the 58 papers published in 2012 in Fluid Dynamics Research, the following paper has been selected for the sixth FDR prize: The finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method and its application in computational aero-acoustics by Michihisa Tsutahara (Professor Emeritus, Kobe University, Japan), published in volume 44 (August 2012) 045507. This is a review paper of the author's recent work on the finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM). In this paper, the author introduces a modified FDLBM and its application to aero-acoustics. To solve the discrete Bhatnager, Gross and Krook equation for simulating fluid flow, the FDLBM applies a stable finite-difference scheme on a curvilinear coordinate system, whereas the ordinary lattice Boltzmann method uses regular lattices. It is known that for the lattice Boltzmann methods, there is difficulty in simulating high Mach number compressible flows in principle. To alleviate this, the author proposed the modified FDLBM, expanding the flexibility of setting time increments. With this FDLBM, the author has shown that it is possible to simulate compressible flows efficiently around complex bluff bodies and with complex aero-acoustic behaviour. The author summarizes all those works, including studies only available in Japanese up to now, in this review paper. After discussing the details of the FDLBM proposed by the author, example results of simulating the Aeolian tone generated from a circular cylinder at the Mach number M = 0.7 are shown. Then, the scheme is expanded for moving bodies by combining with the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation. Using this moving mesh scheme, the author shows the simulation results of the very strong sound pressure generated by a high-speed train in a tunnel. For issues of sound propagation in compressible two-phase flows whose density ratio is high, the two-particle model is introduced. Also, techniques to reduce noise generation from the flow velocity and pressure at gas-liquid interfaces are shown. Finally, the scattering of sound waves by water droplets is discussed. In thick fog, the sound coming from a distance becomes faint due to the sound-scattering effects of micro water droplets. The author gives an example of successfully solving such an issue by the FDLBM. It is highly admirable that the author developed the new FDLBM for aero-acoustic issues and has summarized it with sub-schemes to overcome several difficulties of engineering aeroacoustics in this review. It will certainly contribute to further development of fluid dynamics through computational aero-acoustics. Consequently, this paper was selected as the winner of the sixth FDR prize.

  3. [Serum estradiol levels in early postoperative period after surgical castration--the influence of estrogen replacement therapy].

    PubMed

    Janeczek, L; Paszkowski, T; Sikorski, R; Baszak, E; Milart, P

    2001-12-01

    In 40 premenopausal women who underwent TAH&BSO serum E2 levels were measured by means of RIA in 3 time points: before the operation, in the postoperative day 2 and in the postoperative day 3. In 20 of the subjects the ERT (transdermal estradiol 0.1 g/24 h) was introduced in the 2 postoperative day. In the postoperative day 2 the average serum E2 decreased by nearly 90% as compared to the preoperative values. Twenty four hours after the application of the transdermal E2 patch, the estradiol level returned to the values insignificantly different from the preoperative ones. PMID:11883283

  4. Inspire Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated…

  5. Energy Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program in which students present their displays in the normal science-fair style but without the competitive element and more as a "science-share". Describes an "energy day" celebration which included an energy exhibition and engaged students in an "energy decathlon" that challenged them with tasks encompassing many aspects of energy.…

  6. Radiotherapy in the treatment of postoperative chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chylothorax is characterized by the presence of chyle in the pleural cavity. The healing rate of non-operative treatment varies enormously; the maximum success rate in series is 70%. We investigate the efficacy and outcomes of radiotherapy for postoperative chylothorax. Methods Chylothorax was identified based on the quantity and quality of the drainage fluid. Radiation was indicated if the daily chyle flow exceeded 450 ml after complete cessation of oral intake. Radiotherapy consisted of opposed isocentric portals to the mediastinum using 15 MV photon beams from a linear accelerator, a single dose of 1–1.5 Gy, and a maximum of five fractions per week. The radiation target area was the anatomical region between TH3 and TH10 depending on the localization of the resected lobe. The mean doses of the ionizing energy was 8.5 Gy ± 3.5 Gy. Results The median start date of the radiation was the fourth day after chylothorax diagnosis. The patients’ mediastinum was radiated an average of six times. Radiotherapy, in combination with dietary restrictions, was successful in all patients. The median time between the end of the radiation and the removal of the chest tube was one day. One patient underwent wound healing by secondary intention. The median time between the end of radiation and discharge was three days, and the overall hospital stay between the chylothorax diagnosis and discharge was 18 days (range: 11–30 days). After a follow-up of six months, no patient experienced chylothorax recurrence. Conclusions Our results suggest that radiotherapy in combination with dietary restriction in the treatment of postoperative chylothorax is very safe, rapid and successful. This novel interventional procedure can obviate repeat major thoracic surgery and shorten hospital stays and could be the first choice in the treatment of postthoracotomy chylothorax. PMID:23566741

  7. Postoperative programmed muscle tension augmented osteotendinous junction repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Chen, H H; Yang, X H; Xu, G; Chan, K M; Qin, L

    2007-08-01

    The postoperative programmed muscle tension induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES) was evaluated for its potential efficacy on acceleration of osteotendinous junction healing using an established partial patellectomy model in rabbits. After immobilization of the operated knee for 6 weeks, daily FES was applied to quadriceps muscles for 30 minutes per day and 5 days per week for 6 weeks in the treatment group and compared with the non-treatment control group at postoperative week 12 and 18, radiologically, histologically and biomechanically. Results showed that FES-induced muscle tension significantly increased new bone formation, bone mineral density, and fibrocartilage zone restoration in the osteotendinous healing interface. The failure load and ultimate strength of the repairing osteotendinous complex were also improved significantly with healing over time. In conclusion, the postoperative programmed FES-induced muscle tension was favorable for acceleration of osteotendinous junction repair and therefore recommended for clinical trails in orthopedic sports medicine and rehabilitation.

  8. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day. (a) Day means calendar day unless otherwise indicated as business day or school day. (b) Business...

  9. Evidence of strong Quaternary earthquakes in the epicentral areaof the April 6th 2009 L'Aquila seismic event from sediment paleofluidization and overconsolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storti, F.; Balsamo, F.; Aldega, L.; Corrado, S.; Di Paolo, L.; Mastalertz, M.; Tallini, M.

    2012-04-01

    The strong seismological potential of the Central Apennines, including the L'Aquila basin, is documented in the historical heritage of the past two millenia and by paleoseismological data. Despite the main active fault system network of Central Italy is well described and mapped, the April 6th 2009 L'Aquila event showed that Mw> 6.0 earthquakes can occur on fault zones characterized by subtlemorphotectonic evidence, like the Paganica Fault, whose seismic hazard potential may thus be overlooked. An additional source of uncertainty is provided by the evidence that in the L'Aquila region many active extensional fault systems developed by negative inversion of pre-existing contractional deformation structures. The resulting complex along-strike segmentation and overlap patterns are thus governed by the interplay between the modern extensional stress field and the structural inheritance and reduce the effectiveness of predictive scaling laws, which do not typically account for fault attributes produced by polyphased tectonics. This is particularly true in the L'Aquila region, where seismic activation of the northwestern half of the basin-boundary fault system has been proposed for the 1703 Mw ~ 7.0 earthquake, whereas only the central segment was activated in 1461 and 2009, producing earthquakes with Mw ~ 6.0 - 6.3. The reasons for this dual behaviour are still unclear despite many structural and paleoseismological studies. Indirect evidence for paleoearthquake magnitude from ground shaking effects, like paleo-fluidization structures, can provide very useful complementary information on maximum expected earthquake intensities along active fault systems.In this work wedescribe in detail large paleo-fluidization-induced features associated with a previously unmapped extensional fault zone cutting through Quaternary strata. These sediments, including lacustrine lignites and mudstones, show a somehow enigmatic overconsolidation that we quantitatively describe, as well as

  10. Transesophageal echocardiography in the postoperative child with an open sternum.

    PubMed

    Marcus, B; Wong, P C; Wells, W J; Lindesmith, G G; Starnes, V A

    1994-07-01

    We report the use of transesophageal echocardiography in 3 children whose sternums remained open for several days postoperatively. In these patients transesophageal echocardiography provided critical information when transthoracic echocardiography was ineffective due to limited acoustic windows. This report points out the application of transesophageal echocardiography in children with chest wall distortion. PMID:8037535

  11. One-Year Postoperative Resource Utilization in Sarcopenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Peter S.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Cron, David C.; Terjimanian, Michael N.; Wang, Stewart C.; Campbell, Darrell A.; Englesbe, Michael J.; Werner, Nicole L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is well established that sarcopenic patients are at higher risk of postoperative complications and short-term healthcare utilization. Less well understood is how these patients fare over the long-term after surviving the immediate postoperative period. We explored costs over the first postoperative year among sarcopenic patients. Methods We identified 1,279 patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative database who underwent inpatient elective surgery at a single institution from 2006 to 2011. Sarcopenia, defined by gender-stratified tertiles of lean psoas area, was determined from preoperative CT scans using validated analytic morphomics. Data were analyzed to assess sarcopenia’s relationship to costs, readmissions, discharge location, intensive care unit admissions, hospital length of stay, and mortality. Multivariate models adjusted for patient demographics and surgical risk factors. Results Sarcopenia was independently associated with increased adjusted costs at 30, 90, and 180 but not 365 days. The difference in adjusted postsurgical costs between sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic patients was $16,455 at 30 days and $14,093 at one year. Sarcopenic patients were more likely to be discharged somewhere other than home (p <0.001). Sarcopenia was not an independent predictor of increased readmission rates in the postsurgical year. Conclusion The effects of sarcopenia on healthcare costs are concentrated in the immediate postoperative period. It may be appropriate to allocate additional resources to sarcopenic patients in the perioperative setting to reduce the incidence of negative postoperative outcomes. PMID:25990695

  12. Postoperative infections: general principles and considerations.

    PubMed

    Downey, M S; Lamy, C J

    1990-07-01

    Every surgeon should have a thorough knowledge and awareness of the general principles of postoperative infections. The key to postoperative infections is in their prevention. Even with the most prudent and ardent regimens, however, postoperative wound infections will occasionally occur. Thus, the aforementioned knowledge will allow an improved clinical acumen and permit the early diagnosis of postoperative infection. Early and vigorous local wound care combined with systemic antibiotics are necessary to minimize the potentially debilitating sequelae of the postoperative wound infection.

  13. The Beginning of Metallurgy in the Southern Levant: A Late 6th Millennium CalBC Copper Awl from Tel Tsaf, Israel

    PubMed Central

    Garfinkel, Yosef; Klimscha, Florian; Shalev, Sariel; Rosenberg, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of metallurgy in the ancient Near East attracts much attention. The southern Levant, with the rich assemblage of copper artifacts from the Nahal Mishmar cave and the unique gold rings of the Nahal Qanah cave, is regarded as a main center of early metallurgy during the second half of the 5th millennium CalBC. However, a recently discovered copper awl from a Middle Chalcolithic burial at Tel Tsaf, Jordan Valley, Israel, suggests that cast metal technology was introduced to the region as early as the late 6th millennium CalBC. This paper examines the chemical composition of this item and reviews its context. The results indicate that it was exported from a distant source, probably in the Caucasus, and that the location where it was found is indicative of the social status of the buried individual. This rare finding indicates that metallurgy was first defused to the southern Levant through exchange networks and only centuries later involved local production. This copper awl, the earliest metal artifact found in the southern Levant, indicates that the elaborate Late Chalcolithic metallurgy developed from a more ancient tradition. PMID:24671185

  14. The beginning of metallurgy in the southern Levant: a late 6th millennium CalBC copper awl from Tel Tsaf, Israel.

    PubMed

    Garfinkel, Yosef; Klimscha, Florian; Shalev, Sariel; Rosenberg, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of metallurgy in the ancient Near East attracts much attention. The southern Levant, with the rich assemblage of copper artifacts from the Nahal Mishmar cave and the unique gold rings of the Nahal Qanah cave, is regarded as a main center of early metallurgy during the second half of the 5th millennium CalBC. However, a recently discovered copper awl from a Middle Chalcolithic burial at Tel Tsaf, Jordan Valley, Israel, suggests that cast metal technology was introduced to the region as early as the late 6th millennium CalBC. This paper examines the chemical composition of this item and reviews its context. The results indicate that it was exported from a distant source, probably in the Caucasus, and that the location where it was found is indicative of the social status of the buried individual. This rare finding indicates that metallurgy was first diffused [corrected] to the southern Levant through exchange networks and only centuries later involved local productionThis copper awl, the earliest metal artifact found in the southern Levant, indicates that the elaborate Late Chalcolithic metallurgy developed from a more ancient tradition.

  15. Meeting Report: "Proteomics from Discovery to Function:" 6th Annual Meeting of Proteomics Society, India and International Conference-A Milestone for the Indian Proteomics Community.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shabarni; Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Ray, Sandipan; Atak, Apurva; Gollapalli, Kishore; Jain, Rekha; Shah, Veenita Grover; Ghantasala, Saicharan; Kumar, Saurabh; Pandala, Narendra Goud; Phapale, Prasad; Pandey, Vishnu Kumar; Zingde, Surekha; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-06-01

    Proteomics is at the epicenter of post-genomics biotechnologies that are currently driving the next generation system science. Moreover, proteomics is a truly global science. The 6(th) Annual Meeting of Proteomics Society, India (PSI) and International Conference on "Proteomics from Discovery to Function" held from December 7-9, 2014, was a transformative endeavor for global proteomics, bringing together the luminaries in the field of proteomics for the very first time in India. This meeting report presents the lessons learned and the highlights of this international scientific conference that was comprised of nine thematic sessions, pre- and post-conference workshops, and an opportunity to cultivate enduring collaborations for proteomics science to benefit both India and global society. The conference had an unforgettable impression on the participants: for the first time, India hosted past and present President and Council members from the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO), along with eminent scientists and young scholars from India and abroad in the field of proteomics at such a large scale, a major highlight of this international event. In all, the PSI 2014 was a milestone conference that has firmly poised the Indian life sciences community as a leading contributor to post-genomics life sciences, thus cultivating crucial trans-generational capacity and inspiration by recognizing the emerging scholars and omics systems scientists who can think and conduct science from cell to society.

  16. Vegetation dieback as a proxy for temperature within a wet pyroclastic density current: A novel experiment and observations from the 6th of August 2012 Tongariro eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efford, Jackson T.; Bylsma, Rebecca J.; Clarkson, Bruce D.; Pittari, Adrian; Mauriohooho, Kate; Moon, Vicki G.

    2014-10-01

    The 6th of August 2012 eruption of Te Maari (Mt Tongariro, New Zealand) generated wet pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) which caused widespread dieback of vegetation (singed, brown foliage) in their path. An absence of significant charcoal formation suggests that PDC temperatures were mostly below 250 °C. Textural evidence for liquid water being present in the matrices during emplacement (vesicles) suggests that temperatures were < 100 °C. We determined a probable minimum PDC temperature using an experiment replicating the critical temperatures required to induce foliar browning in seven species affected by the eruption. In locations where all species exhibited browned foliage (or were defoliated), temperatures were probably ≥ 64 °C assuming a PDC duration of 60 s. In the more distal areas, where only the most susceptible species were browned while others remained healthy and unaffected, temperatures were probably around 51-58 °C. These results have relevance to volcanic hazard mitigation and risk assessment, especially on the popular Tongariro Alpine Crossing.

  17. Immediate postoperative enteral feeding results in impaired respiratory mechanics and decreased mobility.

    PubMed Central

    Watters, J M; Kirkpatrick, S M; Norris, S B; Shamji, F M; Wells, G A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors set out to determine whether immediate enteral feeding minimizes early postoperative decreases in handgrip and respiratory muscle strength. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Muscle strength decreases considerably after major surgical procedures. Enteral feeding has been shown to restore strength rapidly in other clinical settings. METHODS: A randomized, controlled, nonblinded clinical trial was conducted in patients undergoing esophagectomy or pancreatoduodenectomy who received immediate postoperative enteral feeding via jejunostomy (fed, n = 13), or no enteral feeding during the first 6 postoperative days (unfed, n = 15). Handgrip strength, vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) were measured before surgery and on postoperative days 2, 4, and 6. Fatigue and vigor were evaluated before surgery and on postoperative day 6. Mobility was assessed daily after surgery using a standardized descriptive scale. Postoperative urine biochemistry was evaluated in daily 24-hour collections. RESULTS: Postoperative vital capacity (p < 0.05) and FEV1 (p = 0.07) were consistently lower (18%-29%) in the fed group than in the unfed group, whereas grip strength and maximal inspiratory pressure were not significantly different. Postoperative mobility also was lower in the fed patients (p < 0.05) and tended to recover less rapidly (p = 0.07). Fatigue increased and vigor decreased after surgery (both p < or = 0.001), but changes were similar in the fed and unfed groups. Intensive care unit and postoperative hospital stay did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Immediate postoperative jejunal feeding was associated with impaired respiratory mechanics and postoperative mobility and did not influence the loss of muscle strength or the increase in fatigue, which occurred after major surgery. Immediate postoperative enteral feeding should not be routine in well-nourished patients at low risk of nutrition

  18. Valentine's Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02174 Valentine's Day

    This isolated mesa [lower left center of the image] has an almost heart-shaped margin. Happy Valentine's Day from Mars.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 29.4N, Longitude 79.1E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. [Surgical controversy. Limiting postoperative scarring].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2005-06-01

    Postoperative follow-up of glaucoma surgery must be rigorous and carried out over the long term. Data acquired on the make-up of the filtering bleb justifies using postoperative anti-inflammatory drugs, even if the eye is clinically quiet. When using antimetabolites, the risk factors for failure must be well known and either 5-fluorouracile or mitomycin should be chosen depending on the level of risk of scarring. Their use in needle revision must be adapted case by case. anti-TGF-beta-2 antibody, currently being investigated, may prove advantageous in the very near future. PMID:16208245

  20. Alvimopan, for Postoperative Ileus Following Bowel Resection

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Conor P.; Wolff, Bruce G.; Viscusi, Eugene R.; Senagore, Anthony J.; Fort, John G.; Du, Wei; Techner, Lee; Wallin, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To obtain further analysis regarding specific outcomes and alvimopan doses in bowel resection (BR) patients. Summary Background Data: Although postoperative ileus (POI) is common after BR, there is currently no recognized treatment or prevention available. Alvimopan, a novel, peripherally active mu-opioid receptor antagonist, accelerated GI recovery after BR or hysterectomy in 3 phase III trials. Methods: A pooled retrospective subset analysis of BR patients in alvimopan phase III trials was performed. Randomized BR patients received alvimopan 6 mg (n = 397), 12 mg (n = 413), or placebo (n = 402) ≥2 hours before surgery and twice daily until hospital discharge for ≤7 days. The primary endpoint of each trial was time to recovery of GI function. Hospital discharge order (DCO) written, readmission, and morbidities were also assessed. Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyze treatment effects on time-to-event endpoints. Results: Alvimopan (6 or 12 mg) significantly accelerated GI recovery (GI-3; hazard ratio = 1.28 and 1.38, respectively; P ≤ 0.001 for both). Alvimopan significantly accelerated time to DCO written by 16 hours for 6 mg and 18 hours for 12 mg (P < 0.001 for both) from a mean of 147 hours for placebo. Alvimopan-treated patients had reduced postoperative morbidity compared with placebo, and incidence of prolonged hospital stay or readmission was significantly reduced (P < 0.001). Tolerability profiles were similar among groups. Conclusions: Alvimopan significantly accelerated GI recovery in BR patients. A 12-mg dose provided more consistent benefits across both sexes and all ages. Postoperative morbidity rates, prolonged hospital stay, and rates of hospital readmission were significantly reduced. Alvimopan reduces the consequences of POI after BR. PMID:17435541

  1. Impact of surgical approach on postoperative delirium in elderly patients undergoing gastrectomy: laparoscopic versus open approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young-Hee; Jeong, Hee-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative delirium is a frequent complication in elderly patients undergoing major abdominal surgery and is associated with a poor outcome. We compared postoperative delirium in elderly patients following laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG) versus open gastrectomy (OG). Methods In total, 130 patients aged ≥ 65 years with gastric cancer undergoing LG and OG were enrolled prospectively. Postoperative delirium and cognitive status were assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), respectively, for 3 days postoperatively. For CAM-positive patients, delirium severity was then assessed using the Delirium Index (DI). Results In total, 123 subjects (LG, n = 60; OG, n = 63) were included in the analysis. In both groups, the overall incidences of postoperative delirium were similar: 31.6% (19/60) in the LG group and 41.2% (26/63) in the OG group. When considering only those with delirium, the severity, expressed as the highest DI score, was similar between the groups. A decline in cognitive function (reduction in MMSE ≥ 2 points from baseline) during 3 days postoperatively was observed in 23 patients in the LG group (38.3%) and 27 patients in the OG group (42.9%) (P = 0.744). In both groups, postoperative cognitive decline was significantly associated with postoperative delirium (P < 0.001). Conclusions We found that, compared with traditional open gastrectomy, laparoscopic gastrectomy did not reduce either postoperative delirium or cognitive decline in elderly patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26257851

  2. Postoperative posterior spinal wound infections.

    PubMed

    Massie, J B; Heller, J G; Abitbol, J J; McPherson, D; Garfin, S R

    1992-11-01

    The incidence of postoperative spinal infections increases with the complexity of the procedure. Diskectomy is associated with less than a 1% risk of infection; spinal fusion without instrumentation is associated with a 1%-5% risk; and fusion with instrumentation may be associated with a risk of 6% or more. Twenty-two postoperative posterior spinal infections that occurred during a three-year period were reviewed for this report. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism cultured (more than 50% of the cases). Other recurring organisms were Staphylococcus epidermis, Peptococcus, Enterobacter cloacae, and Bacteroides. Many patients had multiple organisms. Risk factors appeared to include advanced age, prolonged hospital bed rest, obesity, diabetes, immunosuppression, and infection at remote sites. Operative factors included prolonged surgery (greater than five hours), high volume of personnel moving through the operating room, and instrumentation. Postoperative contamination may occur and may be related to prolonged postoperative bed rest, skin maceration (thoracolumbosacral orthoses), and drainage tubes exiting distally from lumbar wounds (toward the rectum). Effective treatment includes early diagnosis, surgical debridement and irrigation, and parenteral antibiotics. Superficial infections were treated successfully with wound closure over outflow tubes, and deep infections with inflow-outflow systems. Maintaining the instrumentation in place was possible in most cases. Parenteral antibiotics were maintained for six weeks in every case. PMID:1395319

  3. Postoperative make-up techniques.

    PubMed

    Marvaldi, D A

    1978-01-01

    Guiding the postoperative patient to a happy self-acceptance is the common endeavor of the make-up artist and the cosmetic surgeon. It is my hope that this article will somehow help the patient bridge the gap which so many are unable to cross unassisted.

  4. Proficiency of eye drop instillation in postoperative cataract patients in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Murdoch, Amanda; Bassett, Ken; Dharamsi, Shafik

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative instruction on proficiency of eye drop instillation following cataract surgery, and to determine whether such proficiency correlates with the prevalence and/or duration of irritation and pain experienced in operated eyes. Design This was a prospective, nonrandomized control trial with an educational intervention conducted via a single eye clinic in Accra, Ghana. Participants The 218 subjects who completed the study were postoperative cataract surgery patients whose surgery had been funded by the nongovernmental organization Unite for Sight. Methods Patients were evaluated on their ability to administer eye drops correctly on their first attempt on postoperative day one. If unsuccessful, patients were given an educational session that consisted of verbal instructions and an educational video. Both groups (successful and unsuccessful) on the first postoperative day were tested again for proficiency on postoperative day 30. The baseline group was evaluated only on postoperative day 30 and consisted of 36 patients. Results Of the 133 patients who received the educational session on eye drop instillation, 112 (84%) exhibited proficiency on postoperative day 30 as compared with 29 of 49 patients (59%) who did not receive the intervention. Additionally, there were fewer reports of pain and irritation following cataract extraction in the patients who received the educational session. Conclusion This study supports the efficacy of patient education in improving proficiency in eye drop instillation and in reducing pain and irritation following cataract extraction surgeries. PMID:24194638

  5. Critical issues with the in vivo comet assay: A report of the comet assay working group in the 6th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT).

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Kojima, Hajime; Burlinson, Brian; Collins, Andrew R; Kasper, Peter; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Uno, Yoshifumi; Vasquez, Marie; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Escobar, Patricia A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Pant, Kamala; Pfuhler, Stefan; Tanaka, Jin; Levy, Dan D

    2015-05-01

    As a part of the 6th IWGT, an expert working group on the comet assay evaluated critical topics related to the use of the in vivo comet assay in regulatory genotoxicity testing. The areas covered were: identification of the domain of applicability and regulatory acceptance, identification of critical parameters of the protocol and attempts to standardize the assay, experience with combination and integration with other in vivo studies, demonstration of laboratory proficiency, sensitivity and power of the protocol used, use of different tissues, freezing of samples, and choice of appropriate measures of cytotoxicity. The standard protocol detects various types of DNA lesions but it does not detect all types of DNA damage. Modifications of the standard protocol may be used to detect additional types of specific DNA damage (e.g., cross-links, bulky adducts, oxidized bases). In addition, the working group identified critical parameters that should be carefully controlled and described in detail in every published study protocol. In vivo comet assay results are more reliable if they were obtained in laboratories that have demonstrated proficiency. This includes demonstration of adequate response to vehicle controls and an adequate response to a positive control for each tissue being examined. There was a general agreement that freezing of samples is an option but more data are needed in order to establish generally accepted protocols. With regard to tissue toxicity, the working group concluded that cytotoxicity could be a confounder of comet results. It is recommended to look at multiple parameters such as histopathological observations, organ-specific clinical chemistry as well as indicators of tissue inflammation to decide whether compound-specific toxicity might influence the result. The expert working group concluded that the alkaline in vivo comet assay is a mature test for the evaluation of genotoxicity and can be recommended to regulatory agencies for use. PMID

  6. Fetal Sex Determination using Non-Invasive Method of Cell-free Fetal DNA in Maternal Plasma of Pregnant Women During 6(th)- 10(th) Weeks of Gestation.

    PubMed

    Zargari, Maryam; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Shahhosseiny, Mohammad Hassan; Kamali, Koroush; Saliminejad, Kyomars; Esmaeilzadeh, Ali; Khorshid, Hamid Reza Khorram

    2011-10-01

    In previous years, identification of fetal cells in maternal blood circulation has caused a new revolution in non-invasive method of prenatal diagnosis. Low number of fetal cells in maternal blood and long-term survival after pregnancy limited the use of fetal cells in diagnostic and clinical applications. With the discovery of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in plasma of pregnant women, access to genetic material of the fetus had become possible to determine early gender of a fetus in pregnancies at the risk of X-linked genetic conditions instead of applying invasive methods. Therefore in this study, the probability of detecting sequences on the Y chromosome in pregnant women has been evaluated to identify the gender of fetuses. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 80 pregnant women at 6(th) to 10(th) weeks of gestation and then the fetal DNA was extracted from the plasma. Nested PCR was applied to detect the sequences of single copy SRY gene and multi copy DYS14 & DAZ genes on the Y chromosome of the male fetuses. At the end, all the obtained results were compared with the actual gender of the newborns. In 40 out of 42 born baby boys, the relevant gene sequences were identified and 95.2% sensitivity was obtained. Non-invasive early determination of fetal gender using cffDNA could be employed as a pre-test in the shortest possible time and with a high reliability to avoid applying invasive methods in cases where a fetus is at the risk of genetic diseases.

  7. Critical issues with the in vivo comet assay: A report of the comet assay working group in the 6th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT).

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Kojima, Hajime; Burlinson, Brian; Collins, Andrew R; Kasper, Peter; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Uno, Yoshifumi; Vasquez, Marie; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Escobar, Patricia A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Pant, Kamala; Pfuhler, Stefan; Tanaka, Jin; Levy, Dan D

    2015-05-01

    As a part of the 6th IWGT, an expert working group on the comet assay evaluated critical topics related to the use of the in vivo comet assay in regulatory genotoxicity testing. The areas covered were: identification of the domain of applicability and regulatory acceptance, identification of critical parameters of the protocol and attempts to standardize the assay, experience with combination and integration with other in vivo studies, demonstration of laboratory proficiency, sensitivity and power of the protocol used, use of different tissues, freezing of samples, and choice of appropriate measures of cytotoxicity. The standard protocol detects various types of DNA lesions but it does not detect all types of DNA damage. Modifications of the standard protocol may be used to detect additional types of specific DNA damage (e.g., cross-links, bulky adducts, oxidized bases). In addition, the working group identified critical parameters that should be carefully controlled and described in detail in every published study protocol. In vivo comet assay results are more reliable if they were obtained in laboratories that have demonstrated proficiency. This includes demonstration of adequate response to vehicle controls and an adequate response to a positive control for each tissue being examined. There was a general agreement that freezing of samples is an option but more data are needed in order to establish generally accepted protocols. With regard to tissue toxicity, the working group concluded that cytotoxicity could be a confounder of comet results. It is recommended to look at multiple parameters such as histopathological observations, organ-specific clinical chemistry as well as indicators of tissue inflammation to decide whether compound-specific toxicity might influence the result. The expert working group concluded that the alkaline in vivo comet assay is a mature test for the evaluation of genotoxicity and can be recommended to regulatory agencies for use.

  8. A new postoperative otoplasty dressing technique using cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Miriam; Foehn, Matthias; Wedler, Volker

    2010-04-01

    There are many techniques for cosmetic surgery of the ears and also many different procedures for postoperative treatment. The postoperative dressing is described as important for a successful outcome. We present our method of postoperative dressing in the form of liquid bonding. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives as liquid bonding agents are used for fixation of the pinna at the mastoid area. After 10-14 days the bonding can be easily removed. No huge dressings, tapes, or plasters are necessary. The patients are satisfied with the light dressing; they do not feel ashamed to appear in public. We have found this dressing technique to be simple and economical, especially because of the use of the bonding for skin closure before. It can be used after otoplasty with an anterior or a posterior approach.

  9. [Postoperative refractory chylothorax which was improved by octreotide acetate].

    PubMed

    Gabe, Atsushi; Seki, Masahiro; Taira, Naohiro; Katsura, Morihiro; Ishida, Tomoki; Kang, Yukijya; Kubota, Tadao; Yamashiro, Toshimitsu; Uehara, Tetsuo; Sunagawa, Tohru; Ohkubo, Kazuaki

    2012-03-01

    A 77-year-old male with chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis underwent a right middle-lower lobectomy and lymph node dissection because of non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. On the 1st post-operative day (POD1), a large quantity of chylous pleural effusion was recognized after he initiated oral intake. The diagnosis was postoperative chylothorax. Conservative therapy including a medium chain tryglyceride diet and total parental nutrition were not effective. Considering of the patient's past history, we decided to continue conservative therapy using octreotide acetate on POD7. After administration of the octreotide acetate, the volume of chylous pleural effusion gradually decreased. The chest tube was removed on POD19. Octeotide acetate should be a choice for the conservative treatment of postoperative refractory chylothorax.

  10. Postoperative Pain in Children After Dentistry Under General Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michelle; Copp, Peter E; Haas, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, severity, and duration of postoperative pain in children undergoing general anesthesia for dentistry. This prospective cross-sectional study included 33 American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I and II children 4-6 years old requiring multiple dental procedures, including at least 1 extraction, and/or pulpectomy, and/or pulpotomy of the primary dentition. Exclusion criteria were children who were developmentally delayed, cognitively impaired, born prematurely, taking psychotropic medications, or recorded baseline pain or analgesic use. The primary outcome of pain was measured by parents using the validated Faces Pain Scale-Revised (FPS-R) and Parents' Postoperative Pain Measure (PPPM) during the first 72 hours at home. The results showed that moderate-to-severe postoperative pain, defined as FPS-R ≥ 6, was reported in 48.5% of children. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe pain was 29.0% by FPS-R and 40.0% by PPPM at 2 hours after discharge. Pain subsided over 3 days. Postoperative pain scores increased significantly from baseline (P < .001, Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test). Moderately good correlation between the 2 pain measures existed 2 and 12 hours from discharge (Spearman rhos correlation coefficients of 0.604 and 0.603, P < .005). In conclusion, children do experience moderate-to-severe pain postoperatively. Although parents successfully used pain scales, they infrequently administered analgesics.

  11. How Do 4th, 5th, and 6th Grade Students' Categories of Cognitive Reflections in Interviews on Derivational Morphology Compare to Their Upper Level Spelling Inventory Orthographic Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Darcie D.

    2012-01-01

    Eighty-seven 4th, 5th and 6th grade students were administered the "Derivational Relatedness Interview" (DRI) (Templeton, Smith, Moloney, Van Pelt, & Ives, 2009). The purpose of this instrument is to explore students' understanding of derivational morphology. During the same week, the subjects were also administered an Upper…

  12. Study of the Effects on Student Knowledge and Perceptions of Activities Related to Submetering the 6th Grade Wing of a Middle School, to Displaying the Carbon Footprint, and to Efforts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Rick

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects upon student knowledge and perceptions regarding greenhouse gas emissions as a result of an intervention relying upon the submetering the 6th grade wing of a Middle School, displaying the information regarding electrical consumption and carbon footprint, and reducing the electrical consumption…

  13. Postoperative pain relief with epidural buprenorphine versus epidural butorphanol in laparoscopic hysterectomies: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Dona Elsa; Ganapathi, P.; Anish Sharma, N. G.; Shankaranarayana, P.; Aiyappa, D. S.; Nazim, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of postoperative analgesia with epidural buprenorphine and butorphanol tartrate. Methods: Sixty patients who were scheduled for elective laparoscopic hysterectomies were randomly enrolled in the study. At the end of the surgery, in study Group A 1 ml (0.3 mg) of buprenorphine and in Group B 1 ml (1 mg) of butorphanol tartrate both diluted to 10 ml with normal saline was injected through the epidural catheter. Visual analog pain scales (VAPSs) were assessed every hour till the 6th h, then 2nd hourly till the 12th h. To assess sedation, Ramsay sedation score was used. The total duration of postoperative analgesia was taken as the period from the time of giving epidural drug until the patients first complain of pain and the VAPS is more than 6. Patients were observed for any side effects such as respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting, hypotension, bradycardia, pruritus, and headache. Results: Buprenorphine had a longer duration of analgesia when compared to butorphanol tartrate (586.17 ± 73.64 vs. 342.53 ± 47.42 [P < 0.001]). Nausea, vomiting (13% vs. 10%), and headache (20% vs. 13%) were more in buprenorphine group; however, sedation score and pruritus (3% vs. 6%) were found to be more with butorphanol. Conclusion: Epidural buprenorphine significantly reduced pain and increased the quality of analgesia with a longer duration of action and was a better alternative to butorphanol for postoperative pain relief. PMID:26957696

  14. The effect of postoperative positive end-expiratory pressure on postoperative bleeding after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Salihoglu, Ece; Celik, Sezai; Ugurlucan, Murat; Caglar, Ilker Murat; Turhan-Caglar, Fatma Nihan; Isik, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To compare postoperative prophylactic use of two positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels in order to prevent postoperative bleeding in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Material and methods Sixty patients undergoing an elective off-pump CABG operation were included in this prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial. Patients were divided into two groups as receiving either 5 cm H2O (group 1) or 8 cm H2O PEEP (group 2) after the operation until being extubated. Chest tube outputs, use of blood products and other fluids, postoperative hemoglobin levels, accumulation of pleural and pericardial fluid after the removal of chest tubes, and duration of hospital stay were recorded and compared. Results Low- and high-pressure PEEP groups did not differ with regard to postoperative chest tube outputs, amounts of transfusions and crystalloid/colloid infusion requirements, or postoperative hemoglobin levels. However, low-pressure PEEP application was associated with significantly higher pleural (92 ±37 ml vs. 69 ±29 ml, p = 0.03) and pericardial fluid (17 ±5 ml vs. 14 ±6 ml, p = 0.04) accumulation. On the other hand, high-pressure PEEP application was associated with significantly longer duration of hospitalization (6.25 ±1.21 days vs. 5.25 ±0.91 days, p = 0.03). Conclusions Prophylactic administration of postoperative PEEP levels of 8 cm H2O, although safe, does not seem to reduce chest-tube output or transfusion requirements in off-pump CABG when compared to the lower level of PEEP. Further studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to confirm the benefits and identify ideal levels of PEEP administration in this group of patients. PMID:25395944

  15. Comparison of intramuscular and epidural morphine for postoperative analgesia in the grossly obese: influence on postoperative ambulation and pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Rawal, N; Sjöstrand, U; Christoffersson, E; Dahlström, B; Arvill, A; Rydman, H

    1984-06-01

    In a randomized double-blind study of thirty grossly obese patients undergoing gastroplasty for weight reduction, the effects of intramuscular and epidural morphine were compared as regards analgesia, ambulation, gastrointestinal motility, early and late pulmonary function, duration of hospitalization, and occurrence of deep vein thrombosis in the postoperative period. The patients were operated on under thoracic epidural block combined with light endotracheal anesthesia. A six-grade scale was devised to quantify postoperative mobilization. A radioactive isotope method using 99mTc -plasmin was employed to detect postoperative deep vein thrombosis. For 14 hr after the first analgesic injection, respiratory frequency was noted every 15 min and arterial blood gases were measured hourly. Peak expiratory flow was recorded daily until the patient was discharged from hospital. Spirometry was performed the day before and the day after surgery. Plasma concentrations of morphine were measured after both intramuscular and epidural administration. Both intramuscular and epidural morphine gave effective analgesia, but the average dose of intramuscular morphine was up to seven times greater than that required by the epidural route. A larger number of patients receiving epidural morphine postoperatively were able to sit, stand, or walk unassisted within 6, 12, and 24 hr, respectively. Being alert and more mobile as a result of superior postoperative analgesia from epidural morphine, patients in this group benefited more from vigorous physiotherapy routine, which resulted in fewer pulmonary complications. Furthermore, earlier postoperative recovery of peak expiratory flow and bowel function presumably contributed to a significantly shorter hospitalization in patients receiving epidural morphine. There was no evidence of prolonged respiratory depression in this high-risk category of patients. The 99mTc -plasmin tests revealed no significant difference between the two groups.

  16. Computed tomography of the postoperative abdominal aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, S.; Megibow, A.J.; Naidich, D.P.; Bosniak, M.A.

    1982-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen was performed on 46 patients who had undergone graft replacement of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Twelve post-operative complications were found in nine patients. They included hemorrhage, infection, anastomotic pseudoaneurysms, major vessel occlusion, postoperative pancreatitis, and others. The varied apperance of the normal postoperative graft is also presented. It is concluded that CT is a rapid, sensitive, and noninvasive method for detecting or excluding postoperative complications of abdominal aortic surgery.

  17. Postoperative radiosurgery of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Valentino, V

    1991-01-01

    From 1984-1990, 52 patients with pituitary adenomas had postoperative radiosurgery for incomplete surgical removal or regrowth of the tumor. The atraumatic Greitz-Bergström fixation head device was adopted for the stereotactic procedure and irradiation was performed with a linear accelerator. Because of the variability of the tumor response, a 10-20 Gy single dose was directed at 1-2 targets and radiosurgery repeated if the result was unsatisfactory. The median radiation dose was 30 Gy. No adverse effects occurred. Regression of pretreatment symptoms caused by tumor mass was observed in 67% of patients. GH and PRL activity decreased in 20 patients, was stable in 11 and increased in 2 prolactinomas. CT studies showed disappearance of the tumor in 4 patients and shrinkage in 36. Postoperative radiosurgery is a valuable method of treatment whenever pituitary surgery has been incomplete.

  18. Postoperative Care of the Facial Laceration

    PubMed Central

    Medel, Nicholas; Panchal, Neeraj; Ellis, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to examine factors involved in the postoperative care of traumatic lacerations. An evidence-based comprehensive literature review was conducted. There are a limited number of scientifically proven studies that guide surgeons and emergency room physicians on postoperative care. Randomized controlled trials must be conducted to further standardize the postoperative protocol for simple facial lacerations. PMID:22132257

  19. EDITORIAL: The 6th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnologies for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fréchette, Luc G.

    2007-09-01

    Energy is a sector of paramount importance over the coming decades if we are to ensure sustainable development that respects our environment. The research and development of novel approaches to convert available energy into usable forms using micro and nanotechnologies can contribute towards this goal and meet the growing need for power in small scale portable applications. The dominant power sources for handheld and other portable electronics are currently primary and rechargeable batteries. Their limited energy density and adverse effects on the environment upon disposal suggest that alternative approaches need to be explored. This special issue will showcase some of the leading work in this area, initially presented at PowerMEMS 2006, the 6th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnologies for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications. Power MEMS are defined as microsystems for electrical power generation and other energy conversion applications, including propulsion and cooling. The range of power MEMS technologies includes micro thermodynamic machines, such as microturbines, miniature internal combustion engines and micro-coolers; solid-state direct energy conversion, such as thermoelectric and photovoltaic microstructures; micro electrochemical devices, such as micro fuel cells and nanostructure batteries; vibration energy harvesting devices, such as piezoelectric, magnetic or electrostatic micro generators, as well as micro thrusters and rocket engines for propulsion. These can either be driven by scavenging thermal, mechanical or solar energy from the environment, or from a stored energy source, such as chemical fuel or radioactive material. The unique scope leads to unique challenges in the development of power MEMS, ranging from the integration of novel materials to the efficient small scale implementation of energy conversion principles. In this special issue, Mitcheson et al provide a comparative assessment of three inertial vibration

  20. Transdermal Buprenorphine Patches for Postoperative Pain Control in Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prithvi Kumar; Verma, Reetu; Chandra, Girish; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Bogra, Jaishri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic derivative of thebaine; its low concentration is sufficient to provide effective pain relief. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch in postoperative pain management. Materials and Methods After ethical approval and taking informed consent from the patients, they were randomized into three groups (n=30 in each group) using a computer generated random number table. Group A: placebo patch; Group B: buprenorphine (10mg) patch and Group C: buprenorphine (20mg) patch. Haemodynamic and analgesic effects were compared by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey’s post hoc test. The proportion of side effects was compared using the Chi-square test. Results Haemodynamic changes were not statistically different in all the three groups A, B and C, whereas at the end of surgery VAS score of Group A subjects was significantly higher (4.93±0.98) as compared to Group B (1.73±0.64) and Group C (1.40±0.50). On 2nd postoperative day, no pain was reported by the Group C patients and on 4th day after surgery, no pain was reported by Group B patients. Conclusion The transdermal buprenorphine patch (20mg) was effective in attenuating postoperative pain, maintaining haemodynamic stability requiring no rescue analgesia, with fewer postoperative rescue analgesic requirements in low dose of buprenorphine patch (10mg) group. PMID:27504383

  1. Effect of suture material on postoperative astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Gimbel, H V; Raanan, M G; DeLuca, M

    1992-01-01

    Two hundred patients were enrolled in a randomized, prospective clinical trial comparing the use of 10-0 nylon, 10-0 polypropylene (Prolene), 11-0 polyester (Mersilene), and 10-0 polyethylene (Novafil) suture materials on the amount and decay curves of surgically induced astigmatism following intraocular lens (IOL) surgery. Patients with Mersilene and nylon sutures had the highest amounts of induced with-the-rule (WTR) cylinder (significantly more than Prolene) at one day after surgery. However, the WTR cylinder decayed rapidly for nylon during the first three months but more slowly for Mersilene because of its lack of stretchability. The Prolene group had the lowest level of induced WTR cylinder at one day, but against-the-rule (ATR) drift occurred, leaving cases with ATR astigmatism by a year. The nylon group had the second highest amount of induced WTR cylinder at one day, which had decayed to ATR cylinder by five months. Between one and two years postoperatively, the nylon group experienced a significant ATR shift. The amount of early induced WTR cylinder seemed to be related to the knot-tying technique and tissue gripping characteristics, whereas the shape of the decay curve was related to the material characteristics of the suture. PMID:1531234

  2. Is Early Enteral Nutrition Better for Postoperative Course in Esophageal Cancer Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuaki; Koyama, Yu; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Ishikawa, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kaoru; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively examined esophageal cancer patients who received enteral nutrition (EN) to clarify the validity of early EN compared with delayed EN. A total of 103 patients who underwent transthoracic esophagectomy with three-field lymphadenectomy for esophageal cancer were entered. Patients were divided into two groups; Group E received EN within postoperative day 3, and Group L received EN after postoperative day 3. The clinical factors such as days for first fecal passage, the dose of postoperative albumin infusion, differences of serum albumin value between pre- and postoperation, duration of systematic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), incidence of postoperative infectious complication, and use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) were compared between the groups. The statistical analyses were performed using Mann-Whitney U test and Chi square test. The statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. Group E showed fewer days for the first fecal passage (p < 0.01), lesser dose of postoperative albumin infusion (p < 0.01), less use of TPN (p < 0.01), and shorter duration of SIRS (p < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Early EN started within 3 days after esophagectomy. It is safe and valid for reduction of albumin infusion and TPN, for promoting early recovery of intestinal movement, and for early recovery from systemic inflammation. PMID:24067386

  3. [Systemic analgesia for postoperative pain management in the adult].

    PubMed

    Binhas, M; Marty, J

    2009-02-01

    Severe postsurgical pain contributes to prolonged hospital stay and is also believed to be a risk factor for the development of chronic pain. Locoregional anesthesia, which results in faster patient recovery with fewer side effects, is favored wherever feasible, but is not applicable to every patient. Systemic analgesics are the most widely used method for providing pain relief in the postoperative period. Improvements in postoperative systemic analgesia for pain management should be applied and predictive factors for severe postoperative pain should be anticipated in order to control pain while minimizing opioid side effects. Predictive factors for severe postoperative pain include severity of preoperative pain, prior use of opiates, female gender, non-laparoscopic surgery, and surgeries involving the knee and shoulder. Pre- and intraoperative use of small doses of ketamine has a preventive effect on postoperative pain. Multimodal or balanced analgesia (the combined use of various analgesic agents) such as NSAID/morphine, NSAID/nefopam, morphine/ketamine improves analgesia with morphine-sparing effects. Nausea and vomiting, the principle side effects of morphine, can be predicted using Apfel's simplified score; patients with a high Apfel score risk should receive preemptive antiemetic agents aimed at different receptor sites, such as preoperative dexamethasone and intraoperative droperidol. Droperidol can be combined with morphine for postoperative patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA). When PCA is used, dosage parameters should be adjusted every day based on pain evaluation. Patients with presurgical opioid requirements will require preoperative administration of their daily opioid maintenance dose before induction of anesthesia: PCA offers useful options for effective postsurgical analgesia using a basal rate equivalent to the patient's hourly oral usage plus bolus doses as required.

  4. Risk Factors for Postoperative Hemorrhage After Partial Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Saebin; Min, Gyeong Eun; Chung, Benjamin I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the frequency and clinical characteristics of postoperative hemorrhage as a complication of partial nephrectomy. Materials and Methods The demographics, physical statistics, tumor size, R.E.N.A.L. nephrometry score, operative method, warm ischemic time, and presence of postoperative hemorrhage and its severity and method of intervention were examined in 300 partial nephrectomy patients in two medical centers (Stanford Medical Center and Kyung Hee University Medical Center) between March 2000 and March 2012. Results Of the 300 subjects, 13 (4.3%) experienced postoperative hemorrhage severe enough to require intervention more invasive than transfusion (Clavien grade III or higher). Univariate analysis of the bleeding and nonbleeding groups showed that whereas age, ischemic time, tumor size and stage, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists class, and operative method did not differ significantly, the exophyticity (E) score was significantly higher for severe postoperative hemorrhage (p=0.04). However, multivariate analysis showed none of the factors to differ significantly. In most of the cases requiring intervention, selective embolization was sufficient, but in one case explorative laparotomy and nephrectomy were required. Clinical characteristics varied significantly among severe hemorrhage cases, with time of onset ranging from the first to the 30th postoperative day and symptoms presenting in a diverse manner, such as gross hematuria and pleuritic chest pain. Computed tomography and angiographic findings were consistent with either arteriovenous fistula or pseudoaneurysms. Conclusions Severe hemorrhage after partial nephrectomy is rare. Nonetheless, with the great variability in presenting symptoms and time of onset after surgery, surgeons should exercise great vigilance during the postoperative care of partial nephrectomy patients. PMID:24466392

  5. Effectiveness of preoperative analgesics on postoperative dental pain: a study.

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, M.; Hunter, K. M.; Baker, A. B.

    1996-01-01

    Patients undergoing extractions of third molar teeth under general anesthesia were given a placebo, diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) 100 mg, or methadone (an opiate) 10 mg 60 to 90 min prior to surgery, and their pain scores and postoperative medication requirements were measured for 3 days. All patients received local anesthetic blocks and analgesic drugs during the perioperative period. There were no significant differences between the three groups in the pain scores and medication requirements during the period of study. It was concluded that preoperative use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates may not offer a preemptive analgesic effect in patients who have had adequate analgesia during the surgery. Continued use of analgesic drugs during the postoperative period is perhaps more useful for this purpose. There appears to be a higher incidence of vomiting following opiates (methadone), precluding its clinical use in day-care patients. PMID:10323113

  6. Postoperative hyperthermia of unknown origin treated with dantrolene sodium.

    PubMed

    Inada, Hirohito; Jinno, Shigeharu; Kohase, Hikaru; Fukayama, Haruhisa; Umino, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    An 11-year-old girl was scheduled for alveolar cleft bone grafting with an iliac bone under general anesthesia. Anesthesia was performed with 70% nitrous oxide, 30% oxygen, and propofol. On the first and second postoperative day, persistent hyperthermia was observed. Because the administration of diclofenac sodium had not been effective for the hyperthermia, dantrolene sodium was given. Her body temperature gradually dropped and returned to normal level on the fifth postoperative day. The hyperthermia in the present case might have been caused by a rapidly elevated muscle metabolism in response to pain and stress after the propofol anesthesia. The oral administration of dantrolene sodium successfully lowered the patient's high body temperature. PMID:15859445

  7. Postoperative infection of laparoscopic surgery wound due to Mycobacterium chelonae.

    PubMed

    Rajini, M; Prasad, S R; Reddy, R R; Bhat, R V; Vimala, K R

    2007-04-01

    We report a case of postoperative wound infection due to Mycobacterium chelonae. A 35-year-old woman presented with multiple erythematous nodules, plaques and discharging sinuses over the abdomen, 45 days after she had undergone laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy. The seropurulent discharge from the wound showed acid-fast bacilli on Ziehl- Neelsen stain and culture yielded Mycobacterium chelonae. The patient responded to clarithromycin and doxycycline. The source of infection was probably contaminated water or disinfectant solution used for sterilization of laparoscopic instruments.

  8. Pulmonary artery stump thrombosis developed during the late postoperative period

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Seyda Ors; Samancilar, Ozgur; Ceylan, Kenan Can

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man underwent left pneumonectomy for squamous cell lung carcinoma 3 years ago. The postoperative and follow-up periods were uneventful. A thrombus was detected in the left pulmonary artery stump during the last chest computed tomography (CT) scan. Anticoagulant treatment was applied: intravenous heparin for 3 days followed by oral warfarin. The follow-up chest CT examination revealed regression in the size of the thrombus.

  9. Laparoscopic surgery complications: Postoperative peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Drăghici, L; Drăghici, I; Ungureanu, A; Copăescu, C; Popescu, M; Dragomirescu, C

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Complications within laparoscopic surgery, similar to classic surgery are inevitable and require immediate actions both to diminish intraoperative risks and to choose the appropriate therapeutic attitude. Peritonitis and hemorrhagic incidents are both part of the complications aspect of laparoscopic surgery. Fortunately, the incidence is limited, thus excluding the rejection of celioscopic methods. Patient’s risks and benefits are to be analyzed carefully prior recommending laparoscopic surgery. Materials and methods: This study presents a statistical analysis of peritonitis consecutive to laparoscopic surgery, experience of „Sf. Ioan” Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, and Department of Surgery (2000-2010). Results:There were 180 (0,96%) complicated situations requiring reinterventions, from a total of 18676 laparoscopic procedures. 106 cases (0,56%) represented different grades of postoperative peritonitis. Most frequently, there were consecutive laparoscopic appendicectomia and colecistectomia. During the last decade, few severe cases of peritonitis followed laparoscopic bariatric surgical procedures. Conclusions: This study reflects the possibility of unfavorable evolution of postoperative peritonitis comparing with hemorrhagic incidents within laparoscopic surgery. PMID:23049630

  10. Determinants of adverse reaction following postoperative T-tube cholangiogram.

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, E P; Kirshenbaum, G; Weinstein, M; Steer, M

    1980-01-01

    The incidence, nature, and mechanisms of adverse reaction following postoperative T-tube cholangiogram have received little attention in the medical literature. This paper presents the experience at one hospital over a 30-month period (1975--1977) covering 139 patients who had 170 cholangiograms. Factors examined included intraoperative and postoperative cultures of bile, the use of antibiotics prior to the performance of the cholangiogram, the technique of cholangiography, the interval between operation and cholangiogram. Eleven (6.5%) cholangiograms were followed by an adverse reaction. Two of these reactions were severe, manifested by signs of septic shock. The administration of antibiotics was not associated with a reduction in adverse reactions. The cholangiographic technique of gravity infusion of dye, which effectively limits the amount of pressure generated during the study, was associated with a significant reduction in adverse reactions. No severe reactions occurred following any study performed by the gravity technique. There was no significant correlation between the age of the patient or the number of days postoperative with adverse reaction. A review of the literature suggests that the mechanism for these severe reactions is cholangiovenous reflux. The avoidance of high intraductal pressures (above 25 cm of water) during the performance of postoperative T-tube cholangiogram should significantly reduce the incidence of adverse reactions. PMID:7369805

  11. Interrelationship of Postoperative Delirium and Cognitive Impairment and Their Impact on the Functional Status in Older Patients Undergoing Orthopaedic Surgery: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chih-Kuang; Chu, Chin-Liang; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Lin, Yu-Te; Lu, Ti; Hsu, Chien-Jen; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of postoperative delirium on post-discharge functional status of older patients remains unclear, and little is known regarding the interrelationship between cognitive impairment and post-operative delirium. Therefore, the main purpose was to evaluate the post-discharge functional status of patients who experience delirium after undergoing orthopaedic surgery and the interrelationship of postoperative delirium with underlying cognitive impairment. Method This prospective cohort study, conducted at a tertiary care medical center from April 2011 to March 2012, enrolled all subjects aged over 60 years who were admitted for orthopaedic surgery. The baseline characteristics (age, gender, BMI, and living arrangement), surgery-related factors (ASA class, admission type, type of surgery, and length of hospital stay), results of geriatric assessment (postoperative delirium, cognition, depressive mood, comorbidity, pain, malnutrition, polypharmacy, ADL, and instrumental [I]ADL) and 1–12-month postoperative ADL and IADL functional status were collected for analysis. Results Overall, 9.1% of 232 patients (mean age: 74.7±7.8 years) experienced postoperative delirium, which was significantly associated with IADL decline at only 6 and 12 months postoperatively (RR: 6.22, 95% CI: 1.08–35.70 and RR: 12.54, 95% CI: 1.88–83.71, respectively). Delirium superimposed on cognitive impairment was a significant predictor for poor functional status at 6 and 12 months postoperatively (RR: 12.80, 95% CI: 1.65–99.40 for ADL at the 6th month, and RR: 7.96, 95% CI: 1.35–46.99 at the 12th month; RR: 13.68, 95% CI: 1.94–96.55 for IADL at the 6th month, and RR: 30.61, 95% CI: 2.94–318.54 at the 12th month, respectively). Conclusion Postoperative delirium is predictive of IADL decline in older patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery, and delirium superimposed on cognitive impairment is an independent risk factor for deterioration of ADL and IADL functional status

  12. Effects of ketoprofen for prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takashi; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Iwata, Hideki; Morikawa, Akihiro; Imori, Satoko; Waki, Sayaka; Tamura, Takahiko; Yamazaki, Fumimoto; Eguchi, Satoru; Kumagai, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a common geriatric complication that may be associated with increased mortality. Here, we investigated the effects of postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen on cognitive functions in aged animals and compared its effectiveness to morphine. Rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups: isoflurane anesthesia without surgery (group C), isoflurane anesthesia with laparotomy (group IL), and isoflurane anesthesia with laparotomy plus postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen or morphine. There was no difference in postoperative locomotor activity among groups. In group IL, postoperative pain levels assessed by the Rat Grimace Scale significantly increased until 8 h after surgery, which was similarly inhibited by both ketoprofen and morphine. Cognitive function was assessed using radial arm maze testing for 12 consecutive days from postoperative day 3. Results showed that the number of memory errors in group IL were significantly higher than those in goup C. However, both ketoprofen and morphine could attenuate the increase in memory errors following surgery to a similar degree. Conversely, ketoprofen showed no effect on cognitive function in the nonsurgical rats that did not experience pain. Our findings suggest that postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen can prevent the development of surgery-associated memory deficits via its pain-relieving effects.

  13. The method of early postoperative alimentation by needle-catheter jejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Bodoky, G; Harsányi, L

    1989-01-01

    It is well established that the nutritional state greatly influences tolerance during the operation. Authors present a new procedure for the early postoperative enteral alimentation having not been used in Hungary so far. Twelve hours after operation, a pump-operated, gradually increasing amount of oligopeptide food-preparation and concentrate is introduced continuously into the second jejunal loop intraoperatively. Using this method, a caloric intake of 9572 kJ can be achieved already from the fourth postoperative day onwards. Based on our experience gained from 32 patients, the method can be recommended for an up-to-date postoperative enteral alimentation.

  14. Adaptive and regulatory mechanisms in aged rats with postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yanlin; Liu, Shuyun; Yu, Xinjuan; Wang, Mingshan; Wang, Yuelan

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation may play a role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction. 5′ Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-kappa B, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α are involved in inflammation. Therefore, these inflammatory mediators may be involved in postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Western immunoblot analysis revealed 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappa B in the hippocampus of aged rats were increased 1–7 days after splenectomy. Moreover, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α were upregulated and gradually decreased. Therefore, these inflammatory mediators may participate in the splenectomy model of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aged rats. PMID:25206851

  15. [MORPHOMETRIC AND HISTOLOGICAL CHANGES OF TISSUES IN PATIENTS, WHO UNDERWENT OPERATIONS FOR POSTOPERATIVE ABDOMINAL HERNIAS].

    PubMed

    Brek, O O

    2015-05-01

    The impact of hernioplasty on postoperative morphometric and histological changes in tissues of patients, suffering postoperative abdominal hernias (POAH), was studied. For POAH 135 patients were operated, in 85 of them (the main group)--combined methods of hernial gate plasty in accordance to procedures proposed, and in 50 (control group)--classical methods of hernial gate were applied. The most favorable course of the wound process of the inflammatory, changes reduction and stabilization of the tissues reaction on implant already on the 7th postoperative day was noted after application of a sub lay method in original modification.

  16. Postoperative imaging in femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Tobias J; Dora, Claudio; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2013-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been recognized as a common cause of pain, limited range of motion, and development of early osteoarthritis of the hip in adolescents and adults. Current surgical approaches include femoral osteochondroplasty, acetabular rim resection, and reattachment of torn labrum as either open surgical or arthroscopic techniques as well as periacetabular osteotomy. Conventional radiographs are routinely obtained in the postoperative setting. In addition, MRI serves for work-up in patients with persistent or recurrent groin pain after surgery. Inappropriate correction of the underlying femoral or acetabular osseous abnormality, insufficiency fractures of the femoral neck due to bone resection, intra-articular adhesions, ongoing joint degeneration including advanced cartilage damage, iatrogenic cartilage injury, retear of the labrum, rarely avascular necrosis of the femoral head, defects of the hip joint capsule, or heterotopic ossification might be observed after surgery for FAI. PMID:23787981

  17. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ2 or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104–3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03–2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365–7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78–3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. PMID:23845841

  18. Gender Affects Early Postoperative Outcomes of Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hee-Uk; Jung, Jae-Won; Lee, Young-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Background The literature does not provide consistent information on the impact of patients' gender on recovery after rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to determine whether gender affects pain and functional recovery in the early postoperative period after rotator cuff repair. Methods Eighty patients (40 men and 40 women) were prospectively enrolled. Pain intensity and functional recovery were evaluated, using visual analog scale (VAS) pain score and range of motion on each of the first 5 postoperative days, at 2 and 6 weeks and at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Perioperative medication-related adverse effects and postoperative complications were also assessed. Results The mean VAS pain score was significantly higher for women than men at 2 weeks after surgery (p = 0.035). For all other periods, there was no significant difference between men and women in VAS pain scores, although women had higher scores than men. Mean forward flexion in women was significantly lower than men at 6 weeks after surgery (p = 0.033) and the mean degree of external rotation in women was significantly lower than men at 6 weeks (p = 0.007) and at 3 months (p = 0.017) after surgery. There was no significant difference in medication-related adverse effects or postoperative complications. Conclusions Women had more pain and slower recovery of shoulder motion than men during the first 3 months after rotator cuff repair. These findings can serve as guidelines for pain management and rehabilitation after surgery and can help explain postoperative recovery patterns to patients with scheduled rotator cuff repair. PMID:26217471

  19. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  20. Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Staphylococcus haemolyticus following Femtosecond Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Margaret; Baumrind, Benjamin R; Frank, James H; Halpern, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old Caucasian man underwent femtosecond cataract surgery and then presented with pain and hand motions vision 1 day following surgery. Anterior segment examination showed a 2-mm-layered hypopyon, a well-centered intraocular lens in the sulcus, and an obscured view to the fundus. B-scan ultrasonography showed significant vitritis and that the retina was attached. A tap and an injection of vancomycin 1 mg per 0.1 ml and of ceftazidime 2.25 mg per 0.1 ml were performed. The tap eventually yielded culture results positive for Staphylococcus haemolyticus, which was sensitive to vancomycin. We report a case of endophthalmitis that occurred on postoperative day 1 following complicated cataract surgery. This is an uncommon bacterium that is not widely reported in the literature as a cause of endophthalmitis in the postoperative period. We urge clinicians to consider S. haemolyticus as an offending agent, especially when the infection presents very early and aggressively in the postoperative period.

  1. Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Staphylococcus haemolyticus following Femtosecond Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Margaret; Baumrind, Benjamin R.; Frank, James H.; Halpern, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old Caucasian man underwent femtosecond cataract surgery and then presented with pain and hand motions vision 1 day following surgery. Anterior segment examination showed a 2-mm-layered hypopyon, a well-centered intraocular lens in the sulcus, and an obscured view to the fundus. B-scan ultrasonography showed significant vitritis and that the retina was attached. A tap and an injection of vancomycin 1 mg per 0.1 ml and of ceftazidime 2.25 mg per 0.1 ml were performed. The tap eventually yielded culture results positive for Staphylococcus haemolyticus, which was sensitive to vancomycin. We report a case of endophthalmitis that occurred on postoperative day 1 following complicated cataract surgery. This is an uncommon bacterium that is not widely reported in the literature as a cause of endophthalmitis in the postoperative period. We urge clinicians to consider S. haemolyticus as an offending agent, especially when the infection presents very early and aggressively in the postoperative period. PMID:26951642

  2. Percutaneous drainage of postoperative abdominal and pelvic lymphoceles.

    PubMed

    White, M; Mueller, P R; Ferrucci, J T; Butch, R J; Simeone, J F; Neff, C C; Yoder, I; Papanicolaou, N; Pfister, R C

    1985-11-01

    Eleven patients with postoperative abdominal and pelvic lymphoceles underwent percutaneous diagnostic and therapeutic intervention with either needle aspiration or catheter drainage. Although initial sonographic or CT examinations accurately identified these collections, definitive diagnosis required fluid sampling and laboratory analysis for confirmation. Seven pelvic and two retroperitoneal lymphoceles demonstrated a gross appearance and composition different from two lymphatic collections in the upper peritoneum. Nine patients underwent catheter drainage; two were managed by needle aspiration alone. Duration of catheter drainage was 4-120 days, substantially longer than is customary for standard fluid collections. Nine of 11 patients were cured by percutaneous aspiration or drainage alone. Bacterial colonization developed in three persistently draining lymphoceles. However, no clinical sepsis or bacteremia occurred. In another patient with persistent high-volume lymphatic output, sclerotherapy with tetracycline instillation was successful in rapidly closing the lymphatic fistula. Percutaneous drainage is a safe, effective procedure for drainage of postoperative lymphoceles.

  3. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-09-18

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, "ossified" knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as "is postoperative brace use really necessary?", "what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?", "to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?", "how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?", "should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?" be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper.

  4. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-09-18

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, "ossified" knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as "is postoperative brace use really necessary?", "what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?", "to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?", "how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?", "should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?" be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  5. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, “ossified” knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as “is postoperative brace use really necessary?”, “what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?”, “to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?”, “how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?”, “should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?” be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  6. [The value of music in postoperative care].

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, M

    1999-05-20

    During the immediate postoperative period good monitoring, adequate analgesia and competent, comprehensive care are of paramount importance. The effect of music in the recovery room raised my interest as an additional "instrumentarium". It is my intent to motivate to take advantage of the many-fold uses of music in the postoperative phase.

  7. Excessive Postoperative Fluid Administration in Infants with Gastroschisis.

    PubMed

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Hobbs, Gerald R; Vaughan, Richard A; Shorter, Nicholas A; Nakayama, Don K

    2016-08-01

    Careful fluid management is a cornerstone of neonatology because the cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems in the newborn are sensitive to overhydration. Fluid management in gastroschisis is complicated by insensible fluid loss and postoperative third-space fluid shifts. Study of perioperative fluid management in gastroschisis is limited and has not undergone careful scrutiny. We reviewed perioperative fluid administration and urine output in all infants with gastroschisis over a 5-year period. Data included whether the patient underwent primary closure or staged repair, weight, and events during hospitalization (length of hospitalization and duration of gastric decompression, parenteral nutrition, and ventilator support). Paired t test gave statistical comparisons with significance at P < 0.05. From 2010 to 2014, 24 patients underwent abdominal closure, 17 had primary and 7 had staged closures. Fluid administration exceeded 100 mL/kg/d after primary closure, and was significantly higher (>150 mL/kg/d; P < 0.05) after staged closure on postoperative days 0 to 5. Postoperative urinary output exceeded 75 mL/kg/d for all patients, with higher volumes reaching 100 mL/kg/d after staged closure on postoperative days 4 to 6 (P < 0.05). Two patients died of sepsis. All survivors were discharged with intestinal continuity and gaining weight on oral feeding. Patients with gastroschisis received large volumes of fluid after operation despite similarly high urine output and positive daily fluid balances. The amounts of fluid administered after both primary and staged closure may be excessive and potentially deleterious. PMID:27657585

  8. A Practical Guide to Postoperative Delirium.

    PubMed

    Beck, Justin L; Tucker, Phebe

    2015-01-01

    In conclusion, delirium is a common postoperative complication that especially impacts the elderly population. It contributes to a significant increase in morbidity, mortality, length of inpatient stay, and medical costs. Even with preventive efforts, many patients will develop postoperative delirium. While the gold standard treatment is to correct the underlying disorder, many therapies ranging from the use of antipsychotics to patient comfort measures are used to decrease the severity and duration of postoperative delirium. The most practical approach for physicians is continuous vigilance for the emergence of postoperative delirium. Movement toward increased use of multidisciplinary inpatient ward teams, early psychiatric consultation during postoperative delirium, larger clinical trials of prophylactic medications, and future research on delirium's pathogenesis will decrease complications of this common clinical problem. PMID:26638418

  9. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Pleşca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlănescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolăescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer

  10. [Effect of capnoperitoneum on postoperative carbon dioxide homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Blobner, M; Felber, A R; Hösl, P; Gögler, S; Schneck, H J; Jelen-Esselborn, S

    1994-11-01

    After laparoscopic cholecystectomy, carbon dioxide (CO2) must be exhaled after resorption from the abdominal cavity. There is controversy about the amount and relevance of postoperative CO2 resorption. Without continuous postoperative monitoring, after laparoscopic cholecystectomy a certain risk may consist in unnoticed hypercapnia due to CO2 resorption. Studies exist on the course of end-expiratory CO2 (Pe-CO2) alone over a longer postoperative period of time in extubated patients during spontaneous breathing. The goal of this prospective study was to investigate the amount of CO2 resorbed from the abdominal cavity in the postoperative period by means of CO2 metabolism. METHODS. After giving informed consent to the study, which was approved by the local ethics committee, 20 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. All patients received general endotracheal anaesthesia. After induction, total IV anaesthesia was maintained using fentanyl, propofol, and atracurium. Patients were ventilated with oxygen in air (FiO2 0.4). The intra-abdominal pressure during the surgical procedure ranged from 12 to 14 mm Hg. Thirty minutes after releasing the capnoperitoneum (KP), CO2 elimination (VCO2), oxygen uptake (VO2), and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured every minute for 1 h by indirect calorimetry using the metabolic monitor Deltatrac according to the principle of Canopy. Assuming an unchanged metabolism, the CO2 resorption (delta VCO2) at any given time (t) can be calculated from delta VCO2 (t) = VCO2 (t)-RQ(preop) VO2 (t). It was thus necessary to define the patient's metabolism on the day of operation. The first data were collected before surgery and after introduction of the arterial and venous cannulae for a 15-min period. Measuring point 0 was determined after exsufflation of the KP and emptying of the remaining CO2 via manual compression by the surgeon at the end of surgery. Patient's tracheas were extubated and metabolic monitoring started 30 min after

  11. PREFACE: MEM11: The 6th International Workshop on Mechanical-Electromagnetic Properties of Composite Superconductors (Okinawa, Japan, 5-7 December 2011) MEM11: The 6th International Workshop on Mechanical-Electromagnetic Properties of Composite Superconductors (Okinawa, Japan, 5-7 December 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaji, Satoshi; Osamura, Kozo; Hampshire, Damian

    2012-05-01

    The effect of stress and strain on the electromagnetic properties of superconducting composite conductors is one of the key issues for the practical application of superconductivity. To discuss these subjects thoroughly, the International Workshop on Mechanical-Electromagnetic Properties of Composite Superconductors (MEM) has been held regularly since 2001. The 6th workshop (MEM11) was held in Okinawa, Japan in 2011, which was the centennial of the discovery of superconductivity by Professor Kamerlingh Onnes, as well as the 25th anniversary of the discovery of high temperature superconductors (HTS). Although it was originally planned that MEM11 be held in Mito, the workshop venue was changed because of the serious disaster in the north of Japan on 11 March 2011. Sixty five scientists participated in this specialized workshop. Fifty six papers were presented in the following six sessions: (1) Intrinsic strain effects on low temperature superconductors (LTS) and HTS, (2) The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), (3) Strain evaluation by quantum beams, (4) Flux pinning properties of HTS, (5) Standardization and the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) and (6) High field magnets. Several large topics were presented and discussed at the workshop: the important progress in methods for non-invasive measurements of the local strain exerted on the superconducting components in superconducting wires and cables using quantum beam techniques. This approach provides powerful tools for investigating the effect of strain in composite superconductors; the intrinsic strain effects in LTS and HTS in the reversible strain region. Recently, it has become easier to determine quantitatively the strain dependence of critical current when the local strain is measured directly, and the mechanical and electromagnetic properties of the superconductors used in the ITER tokamak. This was a major topic at the workshop since the superconducting

  12. [Postoperative digestive fistulas. Etiopathogenic considerations].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Iulia; Stefan, S; Sirbu-Boeti, Mirela; Popescu, R; Burcoveanu, Ioana; Topală, Roxana; Burcoveanu, C

    2009-01-01

    The digestive fistula is one of the most serious complications that might appear following different types of resectional digestive surgery. This condition still carries a considerable morbidity and mortality rate and therefore all surgical and ICU staff pay a great deal of attention and intensify their care to avoid the fatalities. The postoperative digestive fistulas, through their physiopathological and clinical complexity induce the disturbance of the biological equilibrium with vital consequences. The trend of the last decades is the increasing of digestive fistulas incidence with a variable mortality rate after different authors. A therapeutic algorithm is needed. The mortality rate due to digestive fistulas, two decades ago was, around 60%; at the present there is a decrease of the mortality rate, which is around 10%. The explanation is the introduction of the new methods of treatment such as lactic acid lavage aspiration for alkaline fistulas or total parenteral nutrition, continuous enteral nutrition and antiexocrine chemotherapy. A fistula is a communication between two epithelial or endothelial surfaces, lined by granulation tissue. It can be a life-threatening condition. PMID:21495307

  13. Tramadol versus ketorolac in the treatment of postoperative pain following maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Shankariah, Manjunath; Mishra, Madan; Kamath, Rajay A D

    2012-09-01

    Pain plagues daily activity and hence its management would require alleviation at both the mental and physical planes, thus, bringing about comfort. It includes delivering analgesics in parenteral or oral form, or patches depending on the intensity and availability. Best analgesic regimens are ones that offer broad coverage, easy to administer, safe and economical. A drug seemingly appropriate to treat moderate to severe pain would be Tramadol hydrochloride, a centrally acting synthetic opioid analgesic with lower opiate-like dependence than Morphine. Ketorolac, a pyrrolo-pyrrole derivative, possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activity would also appear equally suitable. Fifty adult ASA grade I and II patients undergoing surgery under GA in the Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, were included. Ketorolac (30 mg IM) for 25 patients and Tramadol (100 mg IM) for 25 patients were administered at the time of skin closure and repeated after 8 and 16 h from the conclusion of surgery. Pain, using the VAS at the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th and 24th post-operative hour, was assessed and compared using χ(2)-test. Vitals were monitored and adverse events were looked for. Though both the drugs resulted in significant decrease in pain intensity from the 2nd to 24th post-operative hour, Tramadol always resulted in better pain control than Ketorolac at every post-operative hour (P < 0.050). To conclude, intramuscular Tramadol seemed useful in controlling pain following surgery, with better levels of tolerance than intramuscular Ketorolac. However, both the drugs produced mild side effects but did not appear to influence the outcome. PMID:23997475

  14. Postoperative Adverse Outcomes in Patients With Asthma: A Nationwide Population-based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Shun; Chang, Chuen-Chau; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chung, Chi-Li; Chen, Ta-Liang; Liao, Chien-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Outcome after surgery in patients with asthma remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate postoperative major complications and mortality in surgical patients with asthma.Using reimbursement claims from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, the authors identified 24,109 surgical patients with preoperative asthma and 24,109 nonasthma patients undergoing major surgeries using matching procedure with propensity score by sociodemographics, coexisting medical conditions, and surgical characteristics. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 30-day postoperative complications and mortality associated with asthma were analyzed in the multivariate logistic regressions.Asthma increased postoperative pneumonia (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.34-1.64), septicemia (OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.02-1.21), and urinary tract infection (OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.09-1.26). Preoperative emergency care for asthma was significantly associated with postoperative 30-day in-hospital mortality, with an OR of 1.84 (95% CI 1.11-3.04). Preoperative emergency service, hospitalizations, admission to intensive care unit, and systemic use of corticosteroids for asthma were also associated with higher postoperative complication rates for asthmatic patients.Postoperative complications and mortality were significantly increased in asthmatic patients. We suggest urgent efforts to revise protocols for asthma patients' perioperative care.

  15. Xylitol Gum Chewing to Achieve Early Postoperative Restoration of Bowel Motility After Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yunhui; Zhang, Qianwen; Qiao, Lin; Lv, Donghao; Ruan, Jiaying; Chen, Hongqin; Gong, Junming; Shi, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effects of postoperative xylitol gum chewing on gastrointestinal functional recovery after laparoscopy. Altogether, 120 patients undergoing elective gynecologic laparoscopy were randomly divided into 2 groups of 60 each (final numbers: 53 controls, 56 patients). Controls underwent a routine postoperative regimen. Starting 6 hour after surgery, study patients chewed mint-flavored, sugarless xylitol gum until flatus occurred thrice a day. Other postoperative management was routine. First bowel sounds, first flatus, first bowel movement, and discharge times were recorded. Symptoms included abdominal distension, nausea, and vomiting. First flatus and first bowel sounds occurred significantly (P<0.001) earlier in the study patients. No significant differences were found for first defecation time, hospitalization duration, or mild/severe intestinal obstruction (all P>0.05). Thus, xylitol gum chewing after laparoscopy can effectively shorten the time to first flatus and helps with postoperative gastrointestinal functional recovery. It is simple, convenient, and well tolerated. PMID:26121546

  16. Postoperative elevation of amylase/creatinine clearance ratio in patients without pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gross, J B; Levitt, M D

    1979-09-01

    An elevated CAm/CCr ratio has been used as evidence for the frequent occurrence of acute pancreatitis in the postoperative period. We measured CAm/CCr pre and postoperatively in 28 patients undergoing extraperitoneal surgical procedures. None of the patients had clinical evidence of pancreatitis, although 2 of the 28 patients had elevated CAm/CCr ratios preoperatively. Mean CAm/CCr rose from a preoperative level of 2.3 +/- 0.3% (1 SE) to 3.2 +/- 0.3% on the first postoperative day (P less than 0.001). Of the 26 patients with normal preoperative CAm/CCr, 12% (3 of 26) developed a clearly abnormal ratio and 12% (3 of 26) developed borderline elevated values. An elevated CAm/CCr appears to be a nonspecific postoperative finding and cannot be used as evidence of acute pancreatitis during this period.

  17. Xylitol Gum Chewing to Achieve Early Postoperative Restoration of Bowel Motility After Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yunhui; Zhang, Qianwen; Qiao, Lin; Lv, Donghao; Ruan, Jiaying; Chen, Hongqin; Gong, Junming; Shi, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effects of postoperative xylitol gum chewing on gastrointestinal functional recovery after laparoscopy. Altogether, 120 patients undergoing elective gynecologic laparoscopy were randomly divided into 2 groups of 60 each (final numbers: 53 controls, 56 patients). Controls underwent a routine postoperative regimen. Starting 6 hour after surgery, study patients chewed mint-flavored, sugarless xylitol gum until flatus occurred thrice a day. Other postoperative management was routine. First bowel sounds, first flatus, first bowel movement, and discharge times were recorded. Symptoms included abdominal distension, nausea, and vomiting. First flatus and first bowel sounds occurred significantly (P<0.001) earlier in the study patients. No significant differences were found for first defecation time, hospitalization duration, or mild/severe intestinal obstruction (all P>0.05). Thus, xylitol gum chewing after laparoscopy can effectively shorten the time to first flatus and helps with postoperative gastrointestinal functional recovery. It is simple, convenient, and well tolerated.

  18. Experimental Model of Intervertebral Disk Mediated Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Larionov, Sergey N.; Sorokovikov, V.A.; Erdyneyev, K.C.; Lepekhova, S.A.; Goldberg, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis (EF) after lumbar discectomy is the most common and at the same time controversial issue. Purpose The etiology and pathogenesis creates a lot of discussion and selection of methods of treatment and prevention continues. Methods LIV laminectomy with dura mater (DM) exposition was done in 24 rats, and then, 0.3 ml of elements of suspension of autologous intervertebral disk was implicated on DM. As autologous intervertebral disk, we used the intervertebral disk from amputated tail. In all the animals, incisions were closed with 3/0 Vicryl. EF was examined. Fibroblast cell density was calculated in each field at ×40 magnification: Grade 1 - fewer than 100 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 2 - 100-150 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 3 - more than 150 fibroblasts in each field. Results Based on histological results, we confirmed our model of experiment. On the 30th day of evaluation, there were significant histological evidences of postoperative epidural adhesions in experimental animals, which included the obliteration of epidural space, the presence of adhesions in the dura and nerve roots, the restructuring of the yellow ligament, bone sclerosis, excessive appearance of fibrous tissue around the autologous intervertebral disk tissue that applied on the DM. Conclusion In our work, we describe a new experimental model, where the elements of autologous intervertebral disk play the role of inflammation trigger, which cause postoperative scar and EF. PMID:27647957

  19. Nurses' strategies for managing pain in the postoperative setting.

    PubMed

    Manias, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Botti, Mari

    2005-03-01

    Acute pain is a significant problem in the postoperative setting. Patients report a lack of information about pain-control measures and ineffective pain control. Nurses continue to rely on pharmacologic measures and tend to under-administer analgesics. The purpose of this study was to determine the strategies nurses used to manage patients' pain in the postoperative setting. It also sought to examine the effect of context, including organization of care, nurses' prioritization of work activities, and pressures during a working shift, on their pain-management strategies. An observational design was used in two surgical units of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Six fixed observation times were identified as key periods for pain activities, each comprising a 2-hour duration. An observation period was examined at least 12 times, resulting in the completion of 74 observations and the identification of 316 pain cases. Fifty-two nurses were observed during their normal day's work with postoperative patients. Six themes were identified: managing pain effectively; prioritizing pain experiences for pain management; missing pain cues for pain management; regulators and enforcers of pain management; preventing pain; and reactive management of pain. The findings highlighted the critical nature of communication between clinicians and patients and among clinicians. It also demonstrated the influence of time on management strategies and the relative importance that nurses place on nonpharmacologic measures in actual practice. This research, which portrays what happens in actual clinical practice, has facilitated the identification of new data that were not evident from other research studies.

  20. Experimental Model of Intervertebral Disk Mediated Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Larionov, Sergey N.; Sorokovikov, V.A.; Erdyneyev, K.C.; Lepekhova, S.A.; Goldberg, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis (EF) after lumbar discectomy is the most common and at the same time controversial issue. Purpose The etiology and pathogenesis creates a lot of discussion and selection of methods of treatment and prevention continues. Methods LIV laminectomy with dura mater (DM) exposition was done in 24 rats, and then, 0.3 ml of elements of suspension of autologous intervertebral disk was implicated on DM. As autologous intervertebral disk, we used the intervertebral disk from amputated tail. In all the animals, incisions were closed with 3/0 Vicryl. EF was examined. Fibroblast cell density was calculated in each field at ×40 magnification: Grade 1 - fewer than 100 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 2 - 100-150 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 3 - more than 150 fibroblasts in each field. Results Based on histological results, we confirmed our model of experiment. On the 30th day of evaluation, there were significant histological evidences of postoperative epidural adhesions in experimental animals, which included the obliteration of epidural space, the presence of adhesions in the dura and nerve roots, the restructuring of the yellow ligament, bone sclerosis, excessive appearance of fibrous tissue around the autologous intervertebral disk tissue that applied on the DM. Conclusion In our work, we describe a new experimental model, where the elements of autologous intervertebral disk play the role of inflammation trigger, which cause postoperative scar and EF.

  1. Efficacy of Postoperative Prophylactic Antibiotic Therapy in Third Molar Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Reddy B, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical extraction of mandibular third molar is the most frequently performed procedure in oral surgery. This procedure is associated with significant postoperative sequelae such as trismus, swelling, pain and infection. The need of antibiotic therapy during the removal of mandibular third molar has been a contentious issue. Method: This study investigated a regimen by using amoxycillin and metronidazole in one group and without using antibiotics in the other. Both the groups were assessed postoperatively on the 1st, 2nd, 5th, 7th and 10th days by the same observer for post operative mouth opening (interincisal distance), presence of a purulent discharge at the site of surgery, pain and swelling. Result: Overall, no statistically significant difference was seen between both the treatment groups when interincisal distance, pain, swelling and purulent discharge were considered. Conclusion: The results of this study failed to show any advantage which was associated with the routine postoperative use of antibiotics in asymptomatic third molar surgeries. PMID:24995236

  2. Postoperative nausea and vomiting: A simple yet complex problem

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Safiya Imtiaz; Nagarekha, D.; Hegade, Ganapati; Marutheesh, M.

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is one of the complex and significant problems in anesthesia practice, with growing trend toward ambulatory and day care surgeries. This review focuses on pathophysiology, pharmacological prophylaxis, and rescue therapy for PONV. We searched the Medline and PubMed database for articles published in English from 1991 to 2014 while writing this review using “postoperative nausea and vomiting, PONV, nausea-vomiting, PONV prophylaxis, and rescue” as keywords. PONV is influenced by multiple factors which are related to the patient, surgery, and pre-, intra-, and post-operative anesthesia factors. The risk of PONV can be assessed using a scoring system such as Apfel simplified scoring system which is based on four independent risk predictors. PONV prophylaxis is administered to patients with medium and high risks based on this scoring system. Newer drugs such as neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (aprepitant) are used along with serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 3) receptor antagonist, corticosteroids, anticholinergics, antihistaminics, and butyrophenones for PONV prophylaxis. Combination of drugs from different classes with different mechanism of action are administered for optimized efficacy in adults with moderate risk for PONV. Multimodal approach with combination of pharmacological and nonpharmacological prophylaxis along with interventions that reduce baseline risk is employed in patients with high PONV risk. PMID:27746521

  3. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in postoperative patients. A clinical review].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a method of ventilatory support that is increasing in importance day by day in the management of postoperative respiratory failure. Its role in the prevention and treatment of atelectasis is particularly important in the in the period after thoracic and abdominal surgeries. Similarly, in the transplanted patient, NIV can shorten the time of invasive mechanical ventilation, reducing the risk of infectious complications in these high-risk patients. It has been performed A systematic review of the literature has been performed, including examining the technical, clinical experiences and recommendations concerning the application of NIV in the postoperative period.

  4. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in postoperative patients. A clinical review].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a method of ventilatory support that is increasing in importance day by day in the management of postoperative respiratory failure. Its role in the prevention and treatment of atelectasis is particularly important in the in the period after thoracic and abdominal surgeries. Similarly, in the transplanted patient, NIV can shorten the time of invasive mechanical ventilation, reducing the risk of infectious complications in these high-risk patients. It has been performed A systematic review of the literature has been performed, including examining the technical, clinical experiences and recommendations concerning the application of NIV in the postoperative period. PMID:25892605

  5. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 6th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves, Bankoku Shinryoukan, Okinawa, Japan, 20-24 June 2005 Proceedings of the 6th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves, Bankoku Shinryoukan, Okinawa, Japan, 20-24 June 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mio, N.

    2006-04-01

    This issue is published as the Proceedings of the 6th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves, held on 20-24 June 2005 at Bankoku Shinryoukan in Okinawa, Japan. Since the first Amaldi conference was held in Frascati in 1994, eleven years have passed and the scale of the conference has grown with the increasing activity in the field of gravitational waves. As the centenary celebration of Einstein's 'miracle year', 2005 was called 'World Year of Physics'. Among his breakthroughs published in 1905, the special theory of relativity is recognized as the most significant revolution in physics, completely changing our views concerning time and space. Ten years later, Einstein proposed the general theory of relativity, by which he predicted the existence of gravitational waves (GWs). At that time, it was only a dream to observe a GW because its effect was so small. Efforts to detect GWs, pioneered by Weber, have continued for almost 40 years, yet their detection remained a dream. However, the presentations at this conference have convinced us that it is no longer a dream. The GW detector projects have made extraordinary advances; in particular, the significant sensitivity improvement of LIGO and the completion of the VIRGO detector mark the beginning of the new era of GW physics. Firm developments in theories and source estimations were also reported. In particular, the data analysis session was very active and various discussions were held. Elaborate experimental techniques were presented, some of them already achieving the requirements for the next generation of detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and LCGT. In addition to the earth-based detectors, many presentations concerning space detectors were contributed; they indicated that space would become the new stage for GW physics and astronomy. This issue brings together the papers which were presented at this exciting conference. The proceedings comprise two volumes; the largest part is published as a volume of

  6. Acute post-operative rhinosinusitis following endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Shams, P N; Selva, D

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the incidence and risk factors for acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) following endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EnDCR). Methods Retrospective single-surgeon interventional case series, including 196 consecutive patients undergoing 203 endonasal DCR, with clinical and radiological evidence of nasolacrimal duct or common canalicular obstruction. Pre-operative lacrimal and sinonasal clinical assessment and imaging, intraoperative endoscopic video recording, and post-operative clinical and endoscopic findings were analysed for cases of ARS occurring within the first 4 weeks following DCR among patients with and without a past history of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Surgical complications and outcomes at 12 months and management of ARS are reported. Results Three patients (1.5%) developed ARS within the first 5 post-operative days, none of which had experienced peri-operative complications and all had a past history of CRS. The rate of CRS in this cohort of 196 patients was 10.2% (n=20), of which 15% (n=3) developed ARS, although none had symptoms of CRS at the time of surgery; one had undergone previous sinus surgery. Presenting symptoms of ARS included facial pain, tenderness over the affected sinus, and nasal discharge; all patients responded to oral antibiotic therapy. Discussion The rate of ARS following EnDCR was 1.5%. In those with a prior history of CRS, it was 15% (P=0.009). ARS developed within the first post-operative week among patients with a past history of CRS, who were asymptomatic at the time of surgery, and responded to oral antibiotics. CRS may be a risk factor for the development of post-operative ARS. PMID:23846379

  7. Postoperative ultrasonography of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Cho, Kil-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography of the postoperative musculoskeletal system plays an important role in the Epub ahead of print accurate diagnosis of abnormal lesions in the bone and soft tissues. Ultrasonography is a fast and reliable method with no harmful irradiation for the evaluation of postoperative musculoskeletal complications. In particular, it is not affected by the excessive metal artifacts that appear on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Another benefit of ultrasonography is its capability to dynamically assess the pathologic movement in joints, muscles, or tendons. This article discusses the frequent applications of musculoskeletal ultrasonography in various postoperative situations including those involving the soft tissues around the metal hardware, arthroplasty, postoperative tendons, recurrent soft tissue tumors, bone unions, and amputation surgery. PMID:25971901

  8. Early postoperative complications following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Andrea R; Platz, Klaus-Peter; Kremer, Bernd

    2004-10-01

    Liver transplantation is a highly successful treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. However, serious postoperative complications can significantly compromise patient survival. Complications can be technical, medical, or immunological in nature. The risk of developing early postoperative complications is associated with the patient's preoperative condition, the quality of the donor liver, the quality of the donor and recipient procedure, initial graft function, and perioperative anaesthesiological and intensive care management. The patient's preoperative condition can include gastrointestinal bleeding, acute renal failure, a requirement for cathecholamines or mechanical ventilation, and prolonged encephalopathy for the most detrimental risk factors for developing early postoperative complications. The necessity for prolonged mechanical ventilation or the requirement for reintubation after transplantation can significantly increase the risk of developing pneumonia, sepsis, and multiple organ dysfunction. A decrease in infectious and other complications can be achieved by early postoperative enteral nutition, including the application of probiotics. PMID:15494284

  9. [New approach to postoperative delirium treatment].

    PubMed

    Pasechnik, I N; Makhlaĭ, A V; Tepliakova, A N; Gubaĭdullin, R R; Sal'nikov, P S; Borisov, A Iu; Berezenko, M N

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of different drugs for sedation was studied in 51 patients after large abdominal operations complicated by postoperative delirium. Diagnosis of postoperative delirium was established according to CAM-ICU criteria. Dexmedetomidine has demonstrated significantly decreased duration of delirium and hospital stay in intensive care unit in comparison with haloperidol. Besides, patients which received dexmedetomidine preserved opportunity for verbal contact. Also these patients interacted better with department's stuff. PMID:26031955

  10. Foreign material in postoperative adhesions.

    PubMed Central

    Luijendijk, R W; de Lange, D C; Wauters, C C; Hop, W C; Duron, J J; Pailler, J L; Camprodon, B R; Holmdahl, L; van Geldorp, H J; Jeekel, J

    1996-01-01

    larger in patients with a history of multiple laparotomies, unoperated intra-abdominal inflammatory disease, and previous postoperative intra-abdominal complications, and when adhesions were already present at previous laparotomy. In recent adhesions, suture granulomas occurred in a large percentage. This suggests that the intra-abdominal presence of foreign material is an important cause of adhesion formation. Therefore intra-abdominal contamination with foreign material should be minimized. Images Figure 1. PMID:8604903

  11. Percutaneous Management of Postoperative Duodenal Stump Leakage with Foley Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung Suk Lee, Hae Giu Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Byung Gil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai; Ohm, Joon Young

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6-20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6-38) after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5-14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10-58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites.

  12. Schoolwide Literacy Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polder, Darlene D.

    2000-01-01

    Describes 10 "literacy day" activities that one California elementary school has used successfully schoolwide, typically one such day per month, to make reading fun and purposeful, while developing a sense of community. Includes: spread-a-quilt day; teacher exchange day; turn off the TV; Dr. Seuss day; community readers; schoolwide poets; original…

  13. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-08-20

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery.

  14. [Experimental analysis of postoperative early recurrence of liver cancer].

    PubMed

    Namieno, T

    1989-09-01

    The author suspected that the high incidence of early recurrence after macroscopically curative operation in human liver cancers correlated with the production of liver regeneration factor which was induced following partial hepatectomy (PH). The author therefore analyzed whether PH enhanced the growth of liver cancers or not, and the relevant mechanism involved, using rats subcutaneously injected with hepatocellular carcinoma (KDH-8, AH-66) cells. Primarily, it proved that PH significantly enhanced the growth of liver cancers injected in rats. The effect of this enhancement of liver cancer growth appeared as an abrupt increase in tumor volume within 24 hours following PH, which fact was supported by the mitotic indices of the hepatocellular carcinoma (KDH-8) cells. However PH did not affect rats injected with mammary carcinoma (SST-2) cells without estrogen receptor (E2R) or fibrosarcoma (KMT-75) cells. Secondly, based on this result, the author tried to analyze the mechanism of enhanced growth of liver cancers following PH, from the standpoints of; changes in postoperative immunity, expression of cytosol E2R in liver cancer cells or liver regeneration factor, using KDH-8 cells. The changes in postoperative immunity (NK-activity and Blastogenesis) did not correlate with the changes in liver cancer growth. Although serum estradiol (E2) increased significantly after PH, E2R was not detected in the KDH-8 cells used in this experiment. Serum was obtained from healthy rats 24 hours after PH, and 20 mg of serum, as calculated from total protein, was eluted into 50 fractions by high liquid chromatography (column; TSK G3000 SW). When the author examined which fractions stimulated both the growth of primarily cultivated hepatocytes and KDH-8 cells, only the fraction Fr. 30, the molecular weight of which was about 100 Kd, enhanced both. Furthermore, the author performed an in vivo assay to determine the number of days needed for tumor appearance: PHs were carried out 2

  15. Quality of postoperative pain management in American versus European institutions.

    PubMed

    Chapman, C Richard; Stevens, Duncan A; Lipman, Arthur G

    2013-12-01

    Management of postoperative pain remains an important clinical problem throughout the world. Using the PAIN-OUT acute pain registry database to examine perioperative pain management in orthopedic surgery patients, we compared patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in a pooled sample obtained from four American hospitals (N = 473) with PROs in a pooled sample of 20 European institutions (N = 8799). Most American hospitals consistently assess acute pain in surgical patients due to Joint Commission accreditation guidelines. Therefore, we hypothesized that this practice would create a climate of clinical staff sensitivity to patients' pain and a greater readiness to intervene when pain is higher than one would find in Europe as a whole. American institutions might then provide better control of postoperative pain after orthopedic surgery than European institutions. Because of the large sample sizes, our analyses focused on effect size rather than statistical significance. Evaluation of the pain PROs revealed that European patients reported much lower Worst Pain on the first day after orthopedic surgery than American patients. The mean Worst Pain (± SD) for Europeans was 5.4 (2.5) but for Americans the mean was 7.4 (2.7), p < .0001, a large effect size. Europeans also reported significantly less emotional discomfort, less interference of pain with activity and lower Least Pain. Nonetheless, 98.3% of American patients received opioids on the ward on the first postoperative day compared to 70.2% of European patients, and 41.1% received regional analgesia on the ward while 15.9% of European patients received regional analgesia (both small effect sizes). Overall, the results are clear in demonstrating much better pain control in the ensemble of European countries as compared to the United States. PMID:24143928

  16. First Day of Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy The First Day of Life KidsHealth > For Parents > The First Day ... continue What Your Baby Does on the First Day Many parents are surprised to see how alert ...

  17. Effect of different adhesive strategies on the post-operative sensitivity of class I composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Yildiz, Esra; Bayrak, Isil; Ozel, Sevda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the post-operative sensitivity of occlusal restorations using different dentin adhesives performed by an undergraduate and a post-doctorate dentist. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-eight molar occlusal restorations were placed in 39 patients (ages between 18 and 30) using 3 different kind of adhesive systems; Optibond FL (OBF), Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB), and iBond (IB) by a post-doctorate dentist or a fifth-year dental student according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Post-operative sensitivity to cold and air was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) after 24 hours, 30, 90, and 180 days. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U and Friedman tests (P < 0.05). Results: Post-operative sensitivity scores for OBF and CPB were higher for the dental student (P < 0.05), while IB scores did not differ statistical significantly according to the operator (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Operator skill and experience appears to play a role in determining the outcome of post-operative sensitivity of multi-step adhesive systems although the post-operative sensitivity was low. It is suggested that the less experienced clinicians (rather than experienced clinicians) should better use the self-etching dentin bonding systems with reduced application steps to minimize the potential risk of post-operative sensitivity of dental adhesives. PMID:24966741

  18. The Effect of Steroid Therapy on Postoperative Inflammatory Response after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Atsushi; Omoto, Tadashi; Iizuka, Hirofumi; Kawaura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Unexpected systemic inflammatory response with high fever and increase in C-reactive protein (CRP) occurred frequently after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). This excessive inflammatory response affects the postoperative course. We evaluated the effects of steroid on the postoperative inflammatory response after EVAR. Methods: Steroid therapy, intravenous infusion of methylprednisolone 1000 mg just after the anesthesia induction, was started since December 2012. After induction of the steroid therapy, 25 patients underwent EVAR with steroid therapy (Group S). These patients were compared with the 65 patients who underwent EVAR without steroid therapy (Group C) in white blood cell count (WBC), CRP and maximum body temperature (BT) on postoperative day 1–5. Results: There was no significant difference in age, female gender, operation time, maximum aneurysm diameter between the two groups. There was no postoperative infective complication in the both groups. WBC did not differ between the two groups; however, CRP was significantly suppressed in Group S than in Group C on POD 1, 3 and 5. Also BT was significantly lower in Group S than Group C on POD 1, 2 and 3. Conclusions: Steroid pretreatment before implantation of the stent graft reduces the early postoperative inflammatory response after EVAR, without increasing postoperative infection. (This is a translation of Jpn J Vasc Surg 2015; 24: 861–865.)

  19. Lower-extremity amputation with immediate postoperative prosthetic placement.

    PubMed

    Folsom, D; King, T; Rubin, J R

    1992-10-01

    To study the efficacy of an immediate postoperative prosthesis (IPOP) program, a retrospective review of 167 major lower-extremity amputations was performed. Patient enrollment in the IPOP program was based on the individual's potential for rehabilitation and participation in an aggressive postoperative physical therapy regimen, as determined by the surgeon, prosthetist, physical therapist, and social worker. Indications for amputation were intractable infection and/or severe unreconstructable arterial insufficiency. Sixty-five patients underwent 69 amputations with IPOP (59 below knee; 10 above knee). Successful program completion was defined as independent ambulation and occurred in 86% of those patients enrolled. The average interval from amputation to ambulation was 15.2 days for the below-knee amputees and 9.3 days for the above-knee amputees. Failure to complete the program occurred in 14% of patients and was due to noncompliance, stump infection, stump trauma, and death. The results of this review support the use of IPOP after major lower-extremity amputation. PMID:1415937

  20. Different MMSE Score Is Associated with Postoperative Delirium in Young-Old and Old-Old Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meijuan; Zhu, Yingbo; Li, Cheng; Li, Guodong; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Xie, Zhongcong; Shen, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative delirium is one of the most common postoperative complications in geriatric patients. Mini-mental state examination (MMSE) assesses cognitive function in patients and is associated with postoperative delirium. However, whether there is an age-dependent relationship between preoperative MMSE score and postoperative delirium remains unknown. Methods We therefore set out to investigate the association between preoperative MMSE score and postoperative delirium in young-old (≤80 year-old, 75.46±4.69 years, 27.0% male, n = 63) and old-old (>80 year-old, 84.51±3.46 years, 20.9% male, n = 67) participants, who had repairs of hip fractures under general anesthesia. The Confusion Assessment Method and Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale were administrated before surgery, and on the first, second and fourth days after surgery, to assess the incidence and severity of the delirium, respectively. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to calculate the optimal cutoff score of MMSE in predicting postoperative delirium. Results Thirty-four (26.2%) of 130 patients (80.12±6.12 years, 23.8% male) developed postoperative delirium. Preoperative MMSE scores were negatively associated with higher incidences and greater severity of postoperative delirium. The optimal cutoff scores of MMSE associated with postoperative delirium for young-old and old-old participants were 18.4 and 21.4, with a sensitivity of 60% and 83.8%, and a specificity of 92.5% and 62.8%, respectively. Conclusion The data demonstrated the optimal cutoff score of MMSE associated with postoperative delirium in young-old adults might be lower than that in old-old adults. Pending further investigation, these findings suggest that the association between preoperative MMSE score and postoperative delirium is age-dependent. PMID:26460750

  1. [A severe late tonsillar hemorrhage 2 months postoperatively].

    PubMed

    Swoboda, H; Welleschik, B

    1988-08-01

    Tonsilloadenoidectomy performed on an 8-year old girl, in the course of which heavy bleeding from the left niche was staunched by suture ligation, was complicated from the 7th day onwards by severe haemorrhages at intervals from 5 to 25 days, causing life-threatening hypovolaemia. Haemorrhages started mostly in the early morning hours and ceased spontaneously. Revision of the left niche was undertaken shortly after the 5th bleeding two months postoperatively. After removal of the almost completely restituted mucosal covering, spreading of a haemosiderinstained canal released a massive pulsating haemorrhage which was controlled by ligation of the external carotid artery and suturing of the tonsillar bed. As the origin of the haemorrhage, an arterial lesion either by tonsil enucleation or by suture ligation is discussed. Attention is drawn to the possibility that certain branches of the external carotid artery may be positioned very close to the inferior half of the tonsil. PMID:3210878

  2. Premedication with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor meloxicam reduced postoperative pain in patients after oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Yamaguchi, H; Naito, H; Shiiki, K; Izawa, K; Ota, Y; Sakamoto, H; Kaneko, A

    2006-07-01

    The efficacy of the selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor meloxicam for treatment of postoperative oral surgical pain was assessed in a randomized controlled trial. Patients undergoing unilateral mandibular 3rd molar extraction surgery were allocated to 3 groups, A, B and C. After oral premedication of meloxicam 10 mg in group A, ampiroxicam 27 mg in group B and placebo in group C, surgery was completed within 30 min under local anaesthesia using 2% lidocaine. For postoperative pain relief the patients were allowed to take oral loxoprofen (60 mg per tablet). Postoperative pain was evaluated at the clinic on the 1st, 7th and 14th postoperative day (POD) using a visual analogue scale (VAS), as was the number of loxoprofen tablets consumed, and the results were compared among the 3 groups with statistical significance of P<0.05. VAS scores on 1 POD were significantly lower in group A than in group C. Loxoprofen consumption on the day of surgery and 1 POD was significantly lower in group A than in group C (P<0.01). Total analgesic consumption was significantly lower in groups A and B than in group C (P<0.02). The COX-2 inhibitor, meloxicam 10 mg used for premedication reduced postoperative pain compared with control in oral surgery. PMID:16540287

  3. Antinociceptive effects of vitexin in a mouse model of postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Mao, Li-Na; Liu, Cheng-Peng; Sun, Yue-Hua; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jun-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Vitexin, a C-glycosylated flavone present in several medicinal herbs, has showed various pharmacological activities including antinociception. The present study investigated the antinociceptive effects of vitexin in a mouse model of postoperative pain. This model was prepared by making a surgical incision on the right hindpaw and von Frey filament test was used to assess mechanical hyperalgesia. Isobolographical analysis method was used to examine the interaction between vitexin and acetaminophen. A reliable mechanical hyperalgesia was observed at 2 h post-surgery and lasted for 4 days. Acute vitexin administration (3–10 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently relieved this hyperalgesia, which was also observed from 1 to 3 days post-surgery during repeated daily treatment. However, repeated vitexin administration prior to surgery had no preventive value. The 10 mg/kg vitexin-induced antinociception was blocked by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone or the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. The doses of vitexin used did not significantly suppress the locomotor activity. In addition, the combination of vitexin and acetaminophen produced an infra-additive effect in postoperative pain. Together, though vitexin-acetaminophen combination may not be useful for treating postoperative pain, vitexin exerts behaviorally-specific antinociception against postoperative pain mediated through opioid receptors and GABAA receptors, suggesting that vitexin may be useful for the control of postoperative pain. PMID:26763934

  4. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  5. [Pain and postoperative analgesia after craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Verchère, E; Grenier, B

    2004-04-01

    Neurosurgery has for a long time been considered as a minimal painful surgery. This explains why there are few references in the literature concerning postoperative neurosurgical pain. Recent papers have demonstrated that even if postoperative pain is less important than in other specialities, such pain exists and should be taken care of. Rapid neurological recovery is now possible because of the progress in the surgical techniques and the introduction of new anaesthetic drugs. This implies a strict postoperative analgesic strategy in order to avoid both direct and indirect complications associated with pain. In this respect, the use of remifentanil or other techniques like target-controlled injection of opioids should absolutely be considered. In most cases, class I and II analgesics seem to provide optimal pain relief. However, for some patients, the use of an opioid may be required. PMID:15120790

  6. Recent Advances in Postoperative Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Mitra, Sukanya; Narayan, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Good pain control after surgery is important to prevent negative outcomes such as tachycardia, hypertension, myocardial ischemia, decrease in alveolar ventilation, and poor wound healing. Exacerbations of acute pain can lead to neural sensitization and release of mediators both peripherally and centrally. Clinical wind up occurs from the processes of N-Methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) activation, wind up central sensitization, long-term potentiation of pain (LTP), and transcription-dependent sensitization. Advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms have led to the development of multimodal analgesia and new pharmaceutical products to treat postoperative pain. The new pharmacological products to treat postoperative pain include extended-release epidural morphine and analgesic adjuvants such as capsaicin, ketamine, gabapentin, pregabalin dexmetomidine, and tapentadol. Newer postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in modes such as intranasal, regional, transdermal, and pulmonary presents another interesting avenue of development. PMID:20351978

  7. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within 'post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy' on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  8. Biomarkers of postoperative delirium and cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Androsova, Ganna; Krause, Roland; Winterer, Georg; Schneider, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Elderly surgical patients frequently experience postoperative delirium (POD) and the subsequent development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Clinical features include deterioration in cognition, disturbance in attention and reduced awareness of the environment and result in higher morbidity, mortality and greater utilization of social financial assistance. The aging Western societies can expect an increase in the incidence of POD and POCD. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been studied on the molecular level albeit with unsatisfying small research efforts given their societal burden. Here, we review the known physiological and immunological changes and genetic risk factors, identify candidates for further studies and integrate the information into a draft network for exploration on a systems level. The pathogenesis of these postoperative cognitive impairments is multifactorial; application of integrated systems biology has the potential to reconstruct the underlying network of molecular mechanisms and help in the identification of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:26106326

  9. Technology for Teachers. 6th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volker, Roger; Simonson, Michael

    This book helps teachers learn how to use and make educational media, covering traditional and new media such as computer laboratories, authentic assessment, theory bases, and hypermedia. Chapter topics progress from simple to complex. Each chapter includes clearly stated behavioral objectives that provide a study guide for students and can serve…

  10. Elementary Science Guide -- 6th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieland, Anne; And Others

    Presented is a resource book to be used with instructional kits for elementary school science students, grade 6. The individual units at this grade level are based on curriculum which has been developed by the National Science Foundation in the 1960s and revised to meet student and teacher identified needs in Anchorage, Alaska. Six units are…

  11. Fish Oil and Post-Operative Atrial Fibrillation – Results of the Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Prevention of Post-Operative Atrial Fibrillation (OPERA) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Marchioli, Roberto; Macchia, Alejandro; Silletta, Maria G.; Ferrazzi, Paolo; Gardner, Timothy J.; Latini, Roberto; Libby, Peter; Lombardi, Federico; O’Gara, Patrick T.; Page, Richard L.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Tognoni, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Context Post-operative atrial fibrillation/flutter (AF) is one of the most common complications of cardiac surgery and significantly increases morbidity and healthcare utilization. A few small trials have evaluated whether long-chain n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) reduce post-op AF, with mixed results. Objective To determine whether peri-operative n-3-PUFA supplementation reduces post-op AF. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational, clinical trial. Patients A total of 1,516 patients scheduled for cardiac surgery across 28 centers in the US, Italy, and Argentina, enrolled between Aug 2010 and Jun 2012. Inclusion criteria were broad; the main exclusions were regular use of fish oil or absence of sinus rhythm at enrollment. Forty-eight percent of screened patients and 94% of eligible patients were enrolled. Intervention Patients were randomized to receive fish oil (1 g capsules containing ≥840 mg n-3-PUFA as ethyl esters) or placebo, with pre-operative loading of 10g over 3-5 days (or 8g over 2 days) followed post-operatively by 2g/d until hospital discharge or post-op day10, whichever first. Main Outcome Measures The primary endpoint was occurrence of post-op AF >30 sec. We also evaluated post-op AF lasting >1hr, resulting in symptoms, or treated with cardioversion; other secondary post-op AF endpoints; other tachyarrhythmias; hospital utilization; and major adverse cardiovascular events, 30-day mortality, bleeding, and other adverse events. All endpoints and analyses plans were prespecified. Results At enrollment, mean±SD age was 64±13 years, 72.2% were male, and 51.8% had planned valvular surgery. The primary endpoint occurred in 233 (30.7%) and 227 (30.0%) patients assigned to placebo and n-3-PUFA, respectively (OR=0.96, 95%CI=0.77-1.20; P=0.74). None of the secondary endpoints were significantly different, including post-op AF that was sustained, symptomatic, or treated (n=231 [30.5%] vs. n=224 [29.6%], P=0.70) or number of

  12. Pathogenesis of postoperative oral surgical pain.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cliff K. S.; Seymour, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pain is a major postoperative symptom in many oral surgical procedures. It is a complex and variable phenomenon that can be influenced by many factors. Good management of oral surgical pain requires a detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of surgical pain. This article aims at reviewing postoperative pain from a broad perspective by looking into the nociception, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropharmacology of pain. Therapeutic recommendations are made after reviewing the evidence from the literature for maximizing the efficacy of pain management techniques for oral surgical pain. PMID:12722900

  13. Postoperative global amnesia reversed with flumazenil.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Joseph B; Baker, Brandee; Raphael, Darren

    2012-07-01

    Global postoperative amnesia (profound anterograde and retrograde amnesia) is rare and usually attributed to transient global amnesia-a poorly understood condition with no broadly accepted mechanism. We report an incident of probable transient global amnesia in a patient after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram under general anesthesia, which was successfully treated with flumazenil. On the basis of the results of flumazenil administration in this and a previous case report, we would recommend a trial dose of 0.2 mg for cases of global postoperative amnesia, repeated if the first dose seems effective.

  14. Pre- to Post-operative Changes in Physical Activity: Report from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy C; Hsu, Jesse Y; Belle, Steven H; Courcoulas, Anita P; Eid, George M; Flum, David R; Mitchell, James E; Pender, John R; Smith, Mark D; Steffen, Kristine J; Wolfe, Bruce M

    2011-01-01

    Background Numerous studies report that bariatric surgery patients report more physical activity (PA) after surgery than before, but the quality of PA assessment has been questionable. Methods The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 is a 10-center longitudinal study of adults undergoing bariatric surgery. Of 2458 participants, 455 were given an activity monitor, which records steps/minute, and an exercise diary before and 1 year after surgery. Mean step/day, active minutes/day, and high-cadence minutes/week were calculated for 310 participants who wore the monitor at least 10 hours/day for at least 3 days at both time points. Pre- and post-surgery PA were compared for differences using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Generalized Estimating Equations identified independent pre-operative predictors of post-operative PA. Results PA increased significantly (p<.0001) pre- to post-operative for all PA measures. Median values pre- and post-operative were: 7563 and 8788 steps/day; 309 and 340 active minutes/day; and 72 and 112 high-cadence minutes/week, respectively. However, depending on the PA measure, 24–29% of participants were at least 5% less active post-operative than pre-operative. Controlling for surgical procedure, sex, age and BMI, higher PA preoperative independently predicted higher PA post-operative (p<.0001, all PA measures). Less pain, not having asthma and self-report of increasing PA as a weight loss strategy pre-operative also independently predicted more high-cadence minutes/week post-operative (p<.05). Conclusion The majority of adults increase their PA level following bariatric surgery. However, most remain insufficiently active and some become less active. Increasing PA, addressing pain and treating asthma prior to surgery may have a positive impact on post-operative PA. PMID:21944951

  15. Differential Postoperative Effects of Volatile Anesthesia and Intraoperative Remifentanil Infusion in 7511 Thyroidectomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Jun-Young; Choi, Seong-Soo; Yi, Jung Min; Joo, Eun Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Se Ung; Sim, Ji-Hoon; Karm, Myong-Hwan; Ku, Seungwoo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although remifentanil is used widely by many clinicians during general anesthesia, there are recent evidences of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as an adverse effect. This study aimed to determine if intraoperative remifentanil infusion caused increased pain during the postoperative period in patients who underwent a thyroidectomy. A total of 7511 patients aged ≥ 20 years, who underwent thyroidectomy between January 2009 and December 2013 at the Asan Medical Center were retrospectively analyzed. Enrolled patients were divided into 2 groups: group N (no intraoperative remifentanil and only volatile maintenance anesthesia) and group R (intraoperative remifentanil infusion including total intravenous anesthesia and balanced anesthesia). Following propensity score matching analysis, 2582 patients were included in each group. Pain scores based on numeric rating scales (NRS) were compared between the 2 groups at the postoperative anesthetic care unit and at the ward until 3 days postoperation. Incidences of postoperative complications, such as nausea, itching, and shivering were also compared. The estimated NRS pain score on the day of surgery was 5.08 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.97–5.19) in group N patients and 6.73 (95% CI 6.65–6.80) in group R patients (P < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in NRS scores on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3 between the 2 groups. Postoperative nausea was less frequent in group R (31.4%) than in group N (53.5%) (P < 0.001). However, the incidence of itching was higher in group R (4.3%) than in group N (0.7%) (P < 0.001). Continuous infusion of remifentanil during general anesthesia can cause higher intensity of postoperative pain and more frequent itching than general anesthesia without remifentanil infusion immediately after thyroidectomy. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of continuous remifentanil infusion, volatile anesthesia without opioid may be a good choice for minor

  16. Comparison between IV Paracetamol and Tramadol for Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Efforts to use safer drug with minimal side effects for postoperative analgesia are growing day by day for surgeries of shorter duration or which may require day care only, search for ideal agent has been a never ending process. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and Tramadol for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods This study was done at Department of Anaesthesiology, Era’s Medical College, Lucknow, India. Sixty ASA-I or II patients between 18-55 years of age, scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups of 30 each. Group A received IV infusion of paracetamol 1g in 100 ml solution, while Group B received IV infusion of Tramadol 100 mg in 100 ml NS at 0 (first complain of pain postoperatively), 6, 12 and 18 hours respectively. Pain intensity was measured by a 10 point Visual Analogue Scale (0→no pain and 10→worst imaginable pain) VAS at T(0)→just before analgesic administration, at 0.5, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours thereafter, in addition to HR, SBP, DBP. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test, Student t-test and p-values <0.05 was considered significant. Results During postoperative follow-up intervals, paracetamol showed significantly lower VAS scores as compared to tramadol at 1.5 hour, 3 hour, 6 hour, 12 hour and 24 hour follow up intervals. One patient in tramadol group had nausea postoperatively (p>0.05). No adverse effect attributable to paracetamol was noticed. Conclusion Intravenous Paracetamol can be advocated as an effective and safe analgesic agent for postoperative pain relief. PMID:27656532

  17. CGRP 4218T/C polymorphism correlated with postoperative analgesic effect of fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yusheng; Zhao, Mingqiang; Xu, Fenghe; Liu, Chuansheng; Yin, Yanwei; Yu, Junmin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Our study aimed at evaluating the association between α-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) 4218T/C polymorphism and the patient-controlled analgesic (PCA) effect of fentanyl on Chinese Han population. Methods: 98 patients were involved in the experiment, but only 92 patients completed the experiment. 0.1 mg/kg fentanyl was given to the patients through intravenous injection ten minutes before the ending of surgery. The patients achieved PCA by controlling the fentanyl infusion pump and a single dose was 1 mg. The CGRP 4218T/C polymorphism was genotyped with polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. The fentanyl consumption within the 72 hours after the surgery was recorded and the pain was assessed with numeric rating scale (NRS) method. Results: The patients were divided into three groups of wild homozygote (T/T), heterozygote (T/C), and mutant homozygote (C/C). At the 6th hour and the 12th hour after the surgery, the fentanyl consumption for PCA of the T/C group was significantly higher than the T/T group (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the fentanyl consumption of the C/C group was much higher than the T/T group (P<0.05) at the 12th hour and the 24th hour. Besides, the fentanyl consumption of the C/C group was more than the T/C group (P<0.05) at the 24th hour. The differences in NRS scores, Ramsey scores, and postoperative adverse reactions between each group at all time points were not statistically significant. Conclusions: CGRP 4218T/C polymorphism may be associated with the postoperative fentanyl consumption for analgesia. PMID:26191294

  18. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000) compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day). The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse's response, doctor's response to pain and the overall pain management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management. PMID:27761037

  19. [Videothoracoscopic treatment of postoperative bleedings and its' complications by thoracic traumas].

    PubMed

    Voskresenskiĭ, O V; Abakumov, M M; Daneilian, Sh N

    2012-01-01

    35 patients, operated on the thoracic trauma (ISS - 9±3), had videothoracoscopy on the reason of the continued bleeding (n=6), clotted hemothorax (n=27) or pleura empyem (n=2). The best results were obtained in case of the clotted hemothorax thoracoscopic evacuation within 3 days after bleeding. Even the late use of videothoracoscopic procedures for the treatment of postoperative complications shortens the hospital stay in comparison with the traditional methods. The video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is an accurate and safe method for the postoperative bleeding complications in hemodynamically stable patients.

  20. Every Day Is National Lab Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama recently issued a call for increased hands-on learning in U.S. schools in an address at the National Academy of Sciences. Obama concluded that the future of the United States depends on one's ability to encourage young people to "create, and build, and invent." In this article, the author discusses National Lab Day (NLD)…

  1. Postoperative sore throat: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    El-Boghdadly, K; Bailey, C R; Wiles, M D

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative sore throat has a reported incidence of up to 62% following general anaesthesia. In adults undergoing tracheal intubation, female sex, younger age, pre-existing lung disease, prolonged duration of anaesthesia and the presence of a blood-stained tracheal tube on extubation are associated with the greatest risk. Tracheal intubation without neuromuscular blockade, use of double-lumen tubes, as well as high tracheal tube cuff pressures may also increase the risk of postoperative sore throat. The expertise of the anaesthetist performing tracheal intubation appears to have no influence on the incidence in adults, although it may in children. In adults, the i-gel(™) supraglottic airway device results in a lower incidence of postoperative sore throat. Cuffed supraglottic airway devices should be inflated sufficiently to obtain an adequate seal and intracuff pressure should be monitored. Children with respiratory tract disease are at increased risk. The use of supraglottic airway devices, oral, rather than nasal, tracheal intubation and cuffed, rather than uncuffed, tracheal tubes have benefit in reducing the incidence of postoperative sore throat in children. Limiting both tracheal tube and supraglottic airway device cuff pressure may also reduce the incidence.

  2. Postoperative sore throat: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    El-Boghdadly, K; Bailey, C R; Wiles, M D

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative sore throat has a reported incidence of up to 62% following general anaesthesia. In adults undergoing tracheal intubation, female sex, younger age, pre-existing lung disease, prolonged duration of anaesthesia and the presence of a blood-stained tracheal tube on extubation are associated with the greatest risk. Tracheal intubation without neuromuscular blockade, use of double-lumen tubes, as well as high tracheal tube cuff pressures may also increase the risk of postoperative sore throat. The expertise of the anaesthetist performing tracheal intubation appears to have no influence on the incidence in adults, although it may in children. In adults, the i-gel(™) supraglottic airway device results in a lower incidence of postoperative sore throat. Cuffed supraglottic airway devices should be inflated sufficiently to obtain an adequate seal and intracuff pressure should be monitored. Children with respiratory tract disease are at increased risk. The use of supraglottic airway devices, oral, rather than nasal, tracheal intubation and cuffed, rather than uncuffed, tracheal tubes have benefit in reducing the incidence of postoperative sore throat in children. Limiting both tracheal tube and supraglottic airway device cuff pressure may also reduce the incidence. PMID:27158989

  3. Management of pain in the postoperative neonate.

    PubMed

    Truog, R; Anand, K J

    1989-03-01

    Only recently has the use of anesthesia and analgesia become widely accepted in the newborn infant. This is largely a result of the overwhelming evidence that neonates have the neurologic substrate for the perception of pain and display characteristic behavioral, physiologic, metabolic, and hormonal responses to noxious stimuli. The management of postoperative pain in the surgical neonate begins in the operating room, where techniques can be chosen that will ease the transition into the postoperative period. For postoperative analgesia, the most widely used and effective agents are the narcotics morphine and fentanyl. They may be administered either intermittently or continuously, and with proper precautions may be given to both intubated and nonintubated newborns. Other medications for analgesia and sedation are not as well studied in the newborn, but chloral hydrate and the benzodiazepines are useful for sedation, and acetaminophen may be used for analgesia alone or for potentiating the effect of narcotics. In addition, a number of creative nonpharmacologic techniques are being developed and promise to further decrease the discomfort experienced by postoperative neonates.

  4. Postoperative nausea and vomiting following orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, C.; Brookes, C. D.; Rich, J.; Arbon, J.; Turvey, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with postoperative nausea (PON) and vomiting (POV) after orthognathic surgery. A review of the clinical records of consecutively enrolled subjects (2008–2012) at a single academic institution was conducted between 9/2013 and 3/2014. Data on the occurrence of PON and POV and potential patient-related, intraoperative, and postoperative explanatory factors were extracted from the medical records. Logistic models were used for the presence/absence of postoperative nausea and vomiting separately. Data from 204 subjects were analyzed: 63% were female, 72% Caucasian, and the median age was 19 years. Thirty-three percent had a mandibular osteotomy alone, 27% a maxillary osteotomy alone, and 40% had bimaxillary osteotomies. Sixty-seven percent experienced PON and 27% experienced POV. The most important risk factors for PON in this series were female gender, increased intravenous fluids, and the use of nitrous oxide, and for POV were race, additional procedures, and morphine administration. The incidence of PON and POV following orthognathic surgery in the current cohort of patients, after the introduction of the updated 2007 consensus guidelines for the management of postoperative nausea and vomiting, has not decreased substantially from that reported in 2003–2004. PMID:25655765

  5. Influence of state anxiety and trate anxiety in postoperative in oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    Recio-Lora, Concha; Castillo-Dalí, Gabriel; Ruiz-de-León-Hernández, Gonzalo; Hita-Iglesias, Pilar; Serrera-Figallo, Maria A.; Segura-Egea, Juan J.; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José L

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this article was to study the influence of anxiety (both state and trait) in postoperative recovery after extraction of third molar together, to establish the role of each of the aspects of anxiety in the results you obtained in an independent and complementary way. Material and Methods: We performed a prospective study of a consecutive series of 88 patients who underwent lower third molar extractions. Before being provided with any information about the operation, patients were asked to complete the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait and State. We have evaluated postoperative swelling and pain, patients completed a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) at home each day (at approximately the same time of day as the operation) until day 8 after surgery, when the sutures were removed. Results: Regarding postoperative variables between positive and negative trait anxiety groups, consumption of analgesic drugs was higher in positive trait anxiety group in a statistically significant way, while these differences were detected only on specific occasions regarding pain and swelling. Discussion: In the present study, anxiety was taken into account and showed a significant effect in explaining postoperative pain and taking analgesics. Key words:Anxiety, satisfaction, third molar surgery, Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory. PMID:24608206

  6. Every Day Is Mathematical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October…

  7. Growing degree day calculator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Degree-day benchmarks indicate discrete biological events in the development of insect pests. For the Sparganothis fruitworm, we have isolated all key development events and linked them to degree-day accumulations. These degree-day accumulations can greatly improve treatment timings for cranberry IP...

  8. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Postoperative chemotherapy; Postoperative radiotherapy; Postoperative hormone therapy; Postoperative immunotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy; Postoperative multimodal therapy; Prognostic factors in postoperative adjuvant therapy.

  9. A comparative study of postoperative pain for open thyroidectomy versus bilateral axillo-breast approach robotic thyroidectomy using a self-reporting application for iPad

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Young Jun; Song, Junho; Kang, Jiyoung; Woo, Jung-Woo; Song, Ra-Yeong; Kwon, Hyungju; Kim, Su-Jin; Choi, June Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Postoperative pain for robotic thyroid surgeries including bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) has not been well studied. In this study, we have developed a self-reporting application (SRA) for iPad and prospectively collected pain scores from open thyroidectomy (OT) and BABA robotic thyroidectomy (RT) patients. Methods Female patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma were included. Patients recorded pain scores for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, chest, and back on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3. Once discharged, on postoperative day 14, a survey was also conducted on satisfaction of SRA and cosmesis. Results A total of 54 patients were enrolled (27 BABA RT and 27 OT). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative complication rates. Postoperative pain scores at days 1, 2, 3, and 14 were not significantly different between the groups for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, or back. Postoperative analgesic requirements were similar between the 2 groups. Wound satisfaction scores were significantly higher in the BABA RT group (BABA RT 7.4 vs. OT 5.7; P = 0.016). Satisfaction scores for the usefulness of SRA were above 7.2 for all four questionnaire items on the 10-point scale. Conclusion Postoperative pain for BABA RT is equivalent to OT but offers greater cosmetic satisfaction for patients. A mobile device application such as SRA may facilitate proper assessment and management of pain in postoperative patients. PMID:27186567

  10. Convergent Validity of Three Methods for Measuring Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley A.; Escallier, Krisztina E.; Abdallah, Arbi Ben; Oberhaus, Jordan; Becker, Jennifer; Geczi, Kristin; McKinnon, Sherry; Helsten, Dan L.; Sharma, Anshuman; Wildes, Troy S.; Avidan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anesthesiologists need tools to accurately track postoperative outcomes. The accuracy of patient report in identifying a wide variety of postoperative complications after diverse surgical procedures has not previously been investigated. Methods In this cohort study, 1,578 adult surgical patients completed a survey at least 30 days after their procedure asking if they had experienced any of 18 complications while in the hospital after surgery. Patient responses were compared to the results of an automated electronic chart review and (for a random subset of 750 patients) to a manual chart review. Results from automated chart review were also compared to those from manual chart review. Forty-two randomly selected patients were contacted by telephone to explore reasons for discrepancies between patient report and manual chart review. Results Comparisons between patient report, automated chart review, and manual chart review demonstrated poor-to-moderate positive agreement (range, 0 to 58%) and excellent negative agreement (range, 82 to 100%). Discordance between patient report and manual chart review was frequently explicable by patients reporting events that happened outside the time period of interest. Conclusions Patient report can provide information about subjective experiences or events that happen after hospital discharge, but often yields different results from chart review for specific in-hospital complications. Effective in-hospital communication with patients and thoughtful survey design may increase the quality of patient-reported complication data. PMID:27028469

  11. [A colostomy plug (the Conseal system). Assessment of early postoperative use].

    PubMed

    Waever, E; Bülow, S; Moesgaard, F A

    1993-03-15

    The Conseal plug was evaluated in a four week period among 30 consecutive colostomy patients. The clinical trial, a multicenter study covering 11 Danish Hospitals, was started five to 12 days postoperatively among motivated patients in good physical condition. Twenty patients (67%) completed the trial. Ten patients (33%) gave up because of wound infection, leakage, extrusion of the foam part or fault in the test procedure. At the end of the trial all 20 patients wanted to continue using the plug and 84% were still using the Conseal system six months later. We conclude that the plug is well tolerated among motivated patients less than a week postoperatively and that the Conseal plug is a good alternative to the colostomy bag early in the postoperative course.

  12. Prognostic factors associated with pressure sore development in the immediate post-operative period.

    PubMed

    Nixon, J; Brown, J; McElvenny, D; Mason, S; Bond, S

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify variables associated with post-operative pressure sore incidence. The data were derived from a sequential, double triangular, randomised, blinded, controlled trial of the intra-operative use of a visco-elastic polymer pad conducted at two centres. Of 446 surgical patients recruited the main endpoint was assessed for 416 patients of whom 65 (15.6%) had a post-operative pressure sore. Analysis determined that the probability of a patient developing a pressure sore was associated with increased number of hypotensive episodes and mean core temperature during surgery, and reduced mobility Day 1 post-operatively. The development of a probability equation illustrates the future potential of prognostic factor research in the development of risk assessment tools and their application within clinical settings.

  13. A study of patient experience and perception regarding postoperative pain management in Chinese hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Weiran, Liu; Lei, Zhang; Woo, Stephanie Mu-Lian; Anliu, Tang; Shumin, Xie; Jing, Zhang; Kai, Zhang; Zhen, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aims to analyze the current status of postoperative pain management in the People’s Republic of China’s provincial-level hospitals, and the existing knowledge and opinions held by patients regarding these methods. Methods The 128 participants in this study were urology and hepatobiliary patients from three provincial-level hospitals in Hunan. The questionnaire assessing postoperative pain was designed using the typical pain assessment scales and pain management guidelines as references. Results 82.8% of study participants claimed that their postoperative pain was relieved within 3 days of their operations. However, while 91.4% of surveyed patients experienced moderate to severe pain, 51.6% received no treatment for their postoperative pain, and 14.9% complained that medical personnel failed to manage their pain. 20.2% were unsatisfied with their pain management, indicating that treatment did not meet their expectations. Furthermore, participants demonstrated a great misunderstanding of pain and analgesics, as 72.6% of patients were unfamiliar with morphine, 51.6% of patients believed only certain types of pain required management, and 18.5% refused to use morphine. Conclusion In most Chinese provincial-level hospitals, current postoperative pain management methods are able to alleviate the pain experienced by the majority of patients, though pain assessment and therapy procedures are still not standardized. Furthermore, most patients lack a proper understanding of postoperative pain and analgesics. Therefore, pain management education for doctors and patients and their relatives should be implemented in order to improve the quality of postoperative pain management. PMID:24235819

  14. Pre- and postoperative changes in serum myelin basic protein immunoreactivity in neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, N R; Seeldrayers, P A; Moussa, A H; Paul, E A; Thomas, D G

    1984-07-01

    In 44 patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures for intracranial tumors, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or spinal and peripheral nerve lesions, serum myelin basic protein (MBP) immunoreactivity was measured preoperatively and serially in the first 10 postoperative days. The double-antibody radioimmunoassay method was used, with a detection limit of 2.5 ng/ml in serum. Clinical evaluation was carried out at admission and on successive days during the period of neurosurgical management; outcome was assessed later. In the early postoperative phase, there was a fall in MBP immunoreactivity in all groups of patients. In the groups with intracranial tumor and subarachnoid hemorrhage, there was a subsequent rise in MBP immunoreactivity before the end of the 10-day period, which was not found in the group with spinal and peripheral nerve lesions.

  15. Postoperative irradiation impairs or enhances wound strength depending on time of administration

    SciTech Connect

    Vegesna, V.; McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R.

    1995-08-01

    Irradiation can complicate surgical wound healing, yet little is known of the importance of the time between surgery and irradiation on this process. This study investigated the impact of post-operative irradiation on gain in wound tensile strength in a murine skin model. Irradiation on the same day as wounding or to 2-day-old wounds reduced wound tensile strength. In contrast, postoperative irradiation delivered at 7, 9 and 14 days transiently enhanced wound tensile strength, as measure d 3 but not 4 or 5 weeks later. This effect was independent of the inclusion (hemi-body) or exclusion (skin alone) of the hematopoietic system in the field of irradiation. Radiation-enhanced wound tensile strength was greater and occurred earlier after higher radiation doses. Even though the effect of irradiation in enhancing wound tensile strength is transitory, it could be important in assisting early wound healing. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Use of postoperative irradiation for the prevention of heterotopic bone formation after total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, J.E.; Greenberg, P.; Selch, M.T.; Thomas, B.J.; Amstutz, H.

    1988-03-01

    Formation of heterotopic bone (HTB) following total hip replacement may partially or completely ankylose the joint space, causing pain and/or limiting the range of motion. Patients at high risk for formation of HTB postoperatively include those with previous HTB formation, heterotopic osteoarthritis, and active rheumatoid spondylitis. Patients in these high risk groups have a 63-69% incidence of post-operative HTB formation, usually seen radiographically by 2 months post-operation. From 1980-1986 twenty-nine hips in 28 consecutively treated patients were irradiated post-operatively at the UCLA Center for the Health Sciences. The indication for irradiation was documented HTB formation previously in 26 of the 27 hips presented below. From 1980-1982 patients received 20 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions; from 1982-1986 the dose was reduced to 10 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Twenty-seven hips in 26 patients completed therapy and were available for evaluation, with a minimum of 2 month follow-up, and a median follow-up of 12 months. Three of 27 hips developed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV) post-operatively, whereas 5 of 27 hips developed minor, nonsymptomatic HTB (Brooker grade I). When irradiation was begun by postoperative day 4, 0 of 17 hips formed significant HTB. If irradiation began after post-operative day 4, 3 of 10 hips formed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV). These 3 hips received doses of 10 Gy in one hip and 20 Gy in the other 2 hips. There were no differences in the incidence or severity of side effects in the 10 Gy vs. the 20 Gy treatment groups. Eighteen hips received 10 Gy, 8 hips 20 Gy and, 1 hip 12 Gy. In conclusion, 10 Gy in 5 fractions appears as effective as 20 Gy in 10 fractions at preventing post-operative formation of HTB. For optimal results, treatment should begin as early as possible prior to post-operative day 4.

  17. Levetiracetam seizure prophylaxis in craniotomy patients at high risk for postoperative seizures

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Sankalp; Khan, Shariq Ali; Agrawal, Abhishek; Friedman, Allan H.; McDonagh, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The risk of developing immediate postoperative seizures in patients undergoing supratentorial brain tumor surgery without anti-epileptic drug (AED) prophylaxis is 15-20%. Patients who present with pre-operative seizures and patients with supratentorial meningioma or supratentorial low grade gliomas are at significantly higher risk. There is little data on the efficacy of levetiracetam as a prophylactic AED in the immediate postoperative period (within 7 days of surgery) in these patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 165 adult patients classified as higher risk for postoperative seizures who underwent brain tumor resection at Duke University Hospital between time May 2010 and December 2011. All patients had received levetiracetam monotherapy in doses of 1000-3000 mg/day in the immediate postoperative period. Results: We identified 165 patients with following tumor locations: Frontal 83 (50.3%), Temporal 37 (22.4%), Parietal 30 (18.2%), Occipital 2 (1.2%) and 13 (7.8%) with single lesions involving more than one lobe. Histology revealed: Glioma 98 (59.4%), Meningioma 57 (34.5%) and Brain Metastases 6 (3.6%). Preoperatively, 88/165 (53.3%) patients had presented with seizures. 12/165 patients (7.3%) developed clinical seizures (generalized 10, partial 2) in the immediate post-operative period. Other than somnolence in 7 patients (4.2%), no major side-effects were noted. Conclusions: The incidence of seizures was significantly lower in patients treated with levetiracetam (7.3%) when compared with the expected (15-20%) rate without AED prophylaxis based on the previous literature. Levetiracetam appears effective and safe for seizure prevention in patients undergoing brain tumor resection and who are at significantly higher risk of developing post-operative seizures. These findings warrant confirmation in a prospective randomized trial. PMID:24550999

  18. Effects of remifentanil versus nitrous oxide on postoperative nausea, vomiting, and pain in patients receiving thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Yi, Myung Sub; Kang, Hyun; Choi, Geun-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Remifentanil and nitrous oxide (N2O) are 2 commonly used anesthetic agents. Both these agents are known risk factors for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). However, remifentanil and N2O have not been directly compared in a published study. Remifentanil can induce acute tolerance or hyperalgesia, thus affecting postoperative pain. The objective of this retrospective study is to compare the effects of remifentanil and N2O on PONV and pain in patients receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after thyroidectomy. We analyzed the electronic medical records of 992 patients receiving fentanyl-based IV-PCA after thyroidectomy at Chung-Ang University Hospital from January 1, 2010 to April 30, 2016. We categorized the patients according to anesthetic agents used: group N2O (n = 745) and group remifentanil (n = 247). The propensity score matching method was used to match patients in the 2 groups based on their covariates. Finally, 128 matched subjects were selected from each group. There were no differences between groups for all covariates after propensity score matching. The numeric rating scale for nausea (0.55 ± 0.88 vs 0.27 ± 0.76, P = 0.01) was higher and complete response (88 [68.8%] vs 106 [82.8%], P = 0.001) was lower in group N2O compared with group remifentanil on postoperative day 0. However, the visual analog scale score for pain (3.47 ± 2.02 vs 3.97 ± 1.48, P = 0.025) was higher in group remifentanil than group N2O on postoperative day 0. In patients receiving IV-PCA after thyroidectomy, postoperative nausea was lower but postoperative pain was higher in group remifentanil. PMID:27741140

  19. Effectiveness of Submucosal Dexamethasone to Control Postoperative Pain & Swelling in Apicectomy of Maxillary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shahzad Ali; Khan, Irfanullah; Shah, Humera Shahzad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal dexamethasone injection to control postoperative pain and swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth. Methods A randomized, controlled trial comprising 60 adult patients (68.3% male, 31.7% female) with no local or systemic problems was conducted. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was given 4mg dexamethasone injection perioperatively. Group B (control group) was treated conventionally without any steroid injection. Postoperative pain and swelling was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). Objective measurements of facial pain and swelling were performed daily up to six days postoperatively. Results Dexamethasone group showed significant reduction in pain and swelling postoperatively compared with the control. Conclusion Submucosal dexamethasone 4mg injection is an effective therapeutic strategy for swift and comfortable improvement after surgical procedure and has a significant effect on reducing postoperative pain and swelling. The treatment offers a simple, safe, painless, noninvasive and cost effective therapeutic option for moderate and severe cases. PMID:23267293

  20. Postoperative pain management at Tirana university hospital center -Mother Teresa-, Tirana, Albania.

    PubMed

    Dibra, A; Kellici, S; Akshija, I

    2012-01-01

    There is no or little evidence on postoperative pain assessment and treatment in Albanian hospitals. This study is based on our every day work and aims to highlight our experience. We conducted a descriptive drug utilization study which implied data collection over 6 months. Evidence of the enrolled patients was kept by maintaining records and the completed structured questionnaires. Postoperative pain was assessed through a five-category verbal rating scale (VRS). Metamizole was the most prescribed and administered analgesic drug as single therapy and in combination therapy, and acetaminophen was the least prescribed drug. The compliance between the prescribed dosages and those administered was higher in patients treated with a single analgesic compared to multiple therapies. A few patients reported adverse events (4.2 percent). There is much variability in postoperative pain management methods used by medical staff within the Tirana University Hospital. In Albania to date there is no standard protocol for postoperative pain treatment. This study shows that there are no essential differences in patient outcomes in terms of efficacy of analgesic treatment. This leads to the conclusion that a postoperative protocol/guideline for pain management should be prepared, based on our local study findings and also on international experience. Moreover, the guidelines should consider use of balanced analgesia.

  1. Inflammation Induced by Perfluorocarbon Liquid: Intra- and Postoperative Use

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Marta S.; Casas, Diego Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon liquids (PFCLs) are useful and safe surgical tools in vitreoretinal surgery. The use of PFCL as a tamponade has been controversial due to the corneal toxicity, retinal infiltration, and inflammatory reaction in experimental studies. Several authors have studied in humans the anatomical and functional outcome and adverse effects of perfluorocarbon liquids used as short-, medium-, and long-term tamponade. PFCLs develop dispersion a few days after injection and droplets may move into the anterior chamber and cause corneal endothelial damage. When PFCLs are used as postoperative tamponades for more than one week, a foreign-body inflammatory reaction is observed in up to 30% of cases but such a reaction does not induce PVR, and it resolves after removal of PFCLs. Although most clinical studies have found no signs of retinal toxicity such as progressive visual acuity deterioration or macular anatomical changes, few performed ERG or retinal histological analysis. PMID:24783224

  2. Quality of sleep in postoperative surgical oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Elizabeth; Sawada, Namie Okino; Sonobe, Helena Megumi; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate surgical-oncologic patients' quality of sleep through the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire. It is an exploratory study with transversal-observational design, in 46 postoperative head & neck and urology cancer patients. The PSQI questionnaire was used to evaluate the subjective quality of sleep and the occurrence of sleep disorders. Six PSQI components were statistically significant and 78.3% of the interviewees had impaired subjective quality of sleep. Among factors leading to sleep disorders we point out: taking too long to fall asleep; waking up in the middle of the night; getting up to go to the bathroom and napping during the day. This study is expected to sensitize the nursing team regarding the need to investigate quality of sleep and causes of its disorders in cancer survivors for an effective course of action. PMID:19820854

  3. [Therapeutic use of amiodarone against postoperative fibrillation after cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Osawa, Hisayoshi; Muraki, Satoshi; Sakurada, Taku; Kawaharada, Nobuyoshi; Sasaki, Jun; Araki, Eiji; Nakashima, Shinji

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the effect of amiodarone (AMD) administered intravenously for the treatment of post-operative atrial fibrillation( POAF) after cardiac surgery. After rapid administration of 150 mg for 10 minutes, AMD was administered in 1.0 mg per minute for 6 hours followed by 0.5 mg per minute for 18 hours. AMD was then administered orally 200 mg per day for 1 or 2 weeks. Twenty-five cases were enrolled from January 2010 to June 2013. In 18 cases(72%), the patients were successfully defibrillated by this protocol. In the other 7 cases, the patients required electrical defibrillation, but in 1 patient developed chronic atrial fibrillation. It was thought that AMD could be a choice for POAF.

  4. Open Day at SHMI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosova, M.

    2010-09-01

    During the World Meteorological Day there has been preparing "Open Day" at Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute. This event has more than 10 years traditions. "Open Day" is one of a lot of possibilities to give more information about meteorology, climatology, hydrology too to public. This "Day" is executed in whole Slovakia. People can visit the laboratories, the forecasting room....and meteo and clima measuring points. The most popular is visiting forecasting room. Visitors are interested in e.g. climatologic change in Slovakia territory, preparing weather forecasting, dangerous phenomena.... Every year we have more than 500 visitors.

  5. The Efficacy of Acupuncture in Post-Operative Pain Management: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Shun; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Chen, I-Fan; Huang, Shihping Kevin; Tzeng, Pei-Chuan; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative pain resulting from surgical trauma is a significant challenge for healthcare providers. Opioid analgesics are commonly used to treat postoperative pain; however, these drugs are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupuncture-related techniques in treating postoperative pain. Data Source MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases were searched until Sep 30, 2014. Study Eligibility Criteria Randomized controlled trials of adult subjects (≥ 18 years) who had undergone surgery and who had received acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or acupoint electrical stimulation for managing acute post-operative pain were included. Results We found that patients treated with acupuncture or related techniques had less pain and used less opioid analgesics on Day 1 after surgery compared with those treated with control (P < 0.001). Sensitivity analysis using the leave-one-out approach indicated the findings are reliable and are not dependent on any one study. In addition, no publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that conventional acupuncture and transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) were associated with less postoperative pain one day following surgery than control treatment, while electroacupuncture was similar to control (P = 0.116). TEAS was associated with significantly greater reduction in opioid analgesic use on Day 1 post surgery than control (P < 0.001); however conventional acupuncture and electroacupuncture showed no benefit in reducing opioid analgesic use compared with control (P ≥ 0.142). Conclusion Our findings indicate that certain modes of acupuncture improved postoperative pain on the first day after surgery and reduced opioid use. Our findings support the use of acupuncture as adjuvant therapy in treating postoperative pain. PMID:26959661

  6. [Pneumothorax revealed by postoperative computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shizuka; Katori, Kiyoshi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Nitahara, Keiichi; Higa, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    We report a case of pneumothorax revealed by postoperative computed tomography. A 39-year-old obese woman (height 153 cm, weight 70 kg) with fractures of the radius, ulna, clavicle, and femur in a traffic accident, was scheduled for osteosynthesis. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental and maintained with 50% nitrous oxide in oxygen and sevoflurane. The Spo2 decreased from 99% to 94% during the surgery. Bilateral chest sounds were symmetrical. The Spo2 increased to 100% after discontinuation of nitrous oxide. Pneumothorax was not evident on a postoperative chest X-ray, but computed tomography of the chest demonstrated right-sided pneumothorax. An ECG electrode had overlapped the fractured rib on the preoperative chest X-ray.

  7. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  8. Postoperative epilepsy in patients undergoing craniotomy for glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Telfeian, A E; Philips, M F; Crino, P B; Judy, K D

    2001-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has associated with it one of the poorest prognoses among brain tumors. Postoperative seizures and the side effects of anticonvulsants, routinely given for prophylactic purposes, add to patient morbidity. The primary goal of this study was to determine who, of those undergoing craniotomy for GBM resection, is at risk for epilepsy. We studied 72 consecutive patients who underwent craniotomy and palliative resection for GBM. Twenty-nine presented with seizures and 17 had postoperative seizures. All patients were treated with a postoperative anticonvulsant for at least six months; anticonvulsants were continued longer if there was a postoperative seizure. Patient factors examined for an association with risk for postoperative seizure included age, sex, tumor size, tumor location, adjuvant therapy, postoperative complications and history of preoperative seizures. The majority of patients with no prior seizure history and who seized postoperatively had their first seizure after withdrawal from their anticonvulsant medication. All, but one, of the patients with both pre- and postoperative seizures had their first postoperative seizure while still on anticonvulsants. Smaller tumor size and frontal resection were associated with an increased risk of postoperative seizures. Our data suggests that those who do not present with seizures and undergo GBM resection may still be prone to seize but more easily protected from postoperative seizures with anticonvulsant therapy than patients who present with seizures; resection of frontal tumors and smaller tumors seemed to indicate an increased risk for postoperative seizures. PMID:11370829

  9. Intravitreal Daptomycin for Recalcitrant Postoperative Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jennifer M.; Kapoor, Kapil G.; Wagner, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the first case to our knowledge of intravitreal daptomycin used to successfully treat culture-negative vancomycin resistant to exogenous endophthalmitis. Methods Case report with preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative findings. Results A 63-year-old Caucasian male underwent routine pars plana vitrectomy with epiretinal membrane peeling. He developed acute postoperative endophthalmitis, and underwent vitreous tap and injection of intravitreal vancomycin/ceftazidime/dexamethasone. Gram stain showed Gram-positive cocci, but cultures were negative. His infection subsequently proved very recalcitrant and his treatment course involved pars plana vitrectomy with anterior chamber washout and repeat injection of antibiotics, followed by repeat intravitreal vancomycin and ceftazidime. Ultimately, a second vitrectomy with intravitreal daptomycin controlled his intraocular infection. On each occasion, cultures were negative. Conclusion This case suggests that vancomycin resistance should be considered in culture-negative postoperative endophthalmitis, and intravitreal daptomycin should be considered as an important treatment alternative. Although vancomycin resistance is fairly rare in endophthalmitis, acknowledgment of its increasing occurrence rate is critical for optimal management. PMID:27293409

  10. Zygomatic salivary mucocoele as a postoperative complication following caudal hemimaxillectomy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Ben S; L'Eplattenier, Henry F

    2010-09-01

    Zygomatic mucocoele is reported as a postoperative complication occurring secondary to a caudal hemimaxillectomy in a two-year-old Labrador retriever. The dog was presented with a history of a rapidly growing oral mass, identified as a soft tissue sarcoma. A caudal hemimaxillectomy via an intraoral approach was performed as treatment for local control of the oral mass. Fifteen days postoperatively, periorbital swelling and exophthalmos developed on the ipsilateral side. The degree of swelling progressed and was identified by computed tomography, ultrasound and cytology as a salivary mucocoele. Zygomatic sialoadenectomy was performed via a modified lateral approach with zygomatic osteotomy. A small amount of discharge persisted from the surgical site but gradually resolved. Recurrence of the periorbital swelling and exophthalmos was noted 25 days later and further surgery was performed to excise residual salivary tissue. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed, however local recurrence of the oral mass was identified 5 months postoperatively and the patient subsequently euthanased. Salivary mucocoele has been cited as a possible postoperative complication following maxillectomy and mandibulectomy procedures; however to the authors' knowledge, only one previous case report exists in the literature. The current case documents a zygomatic salivary mucocoele occurring subsequent to caudal hemimaxillectomy.

  11. The effect of various kinematics on postoperative pain after instrumentation: a prospective, randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Hakan; Khalilov, Ruslan; Doğanay, Ezgi; Karatas, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate various kinematic movements on postoperative pain using a Reciproc system. Material and Methods: Fifty-six molar teeth were divided into four groups according to kinematics as follows: continuous rotation, 360° CCW – 30° CW, 270° CCW – 30° CW, and 150° CCW – 30° CW. Preoperative and postoperative pain levels using visual analogue scale (VAS), percussion pain, and analgesic intake were recorded for each subject. Postoperative pain levels at 1, 3, 5, and 7 d were evaluated. Data were analyzed statistically using the Kruskal-Walis, Mann-Whitney-U, one-way analysis of variance, and chi-square tests (p=0.05). Results: Continuous rotation resulted in more pain at Day 1 when compared with the reciprocating groups (360° CCW – 30° CW and 270° CCW – 30° C) (p<0.05). Conclusions: Continuous rotation resulted in more postoperative pain at Day 1 than in reciprocating groups, and thereafter no significant pain was found among the groups. PMID:27812621

  12. The impact of postoperative pain on early ambulation after hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Dubljanin-Raspopović, E; Marković-Denić, L; Ivković, K; Nedeljković, U; Tomanović, S; Kadija, M; Tulić, G; Bumbasirević, M

    2013-01-01

    Hip fractures are the most serious consequence of falling in older people with osteoporosis. Early ambulation is one of the main goals of inpatient rehabilitation aimed at reducing negative effects of immobilization, and promoting functional recovery. Recognizing the role of different factors that are associated with time to ambulation time after hip fracture surgery may help decrease morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of postoperative pain time to ambulation following hip fracture surgery. A total of 96 patients who consecutively presented at the Clinic for Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Clinical Center Serbia during a 6 month period were included in the study. Subjects were assessed regarding socioedemographic characteristics, prefracture functional status, cognitive status, general health status, fracture type, type of anaesthesia, and waiting time for surgery. The VAS scale (0-100) was used to measure pain intensity on the first postoperative day. Our results revealed that patients, whose time to ambulation was = 48 h postoperatively were of worse physical health, and had significantly higher VAS score on the first postoperative day. Unrelieved pain in geriatric hip fracture patients is associated with delayed ambulation. Future research should confirm the posi-tive effects of aggressive pain management programs on early functional outcome in elderly patients who sustain hip fractures.

  13. State anxiety and depression as factors modulating and influencing postoperative pain in dental implant surgery. A prospective clinical survey

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; Montero-Martín, Javier; Prados-Frutos, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objetives: To determine whether preoperative state anxiety and depression modulate or influence objective and subjective postoperative pain following dental implant insertion. Study Design: Prospective, clinical study with 7-day follow-up of a sample of 105 subjects who preoperatively completed the state anxiety questionnaire (STAI-E) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and postoperatively, at 2 and 7 days, recorded objective pain with the Semmes-Weinstein mechanical esthesiometer (SW test) and subjective pain with the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results: 85.6% and 81.5% of patients, respectively, recorded no signs of state anxiety or depression. The correlation between anxiety and depression for both maxillary bones was the lower (P=0.02). The correlation between subjective and objective pain at 2 and 7 days, and the anatomic regions intervened, was statistically significant in the mandible at day 7 (P<0.01), and highly significant (P<0.001) for the other variables. The correlation between state anxiety and objective pain at day 7 was nearly statistically significant (P=0.07). Conclusions: The correlation between state anxiety and depression, and objective and subjective pain at day 7 was not statistically significant. A strong correlation was found between objective and subjective pain in the immediate postoperative period. Key words:Anxiety, depression, postoperative pain, dental implants. PMID:24880447

  14. Protective Effect of RNase on Unilateral Nephrectomy-Induced Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhu, Tao; Ma, Gang; Li, Tao; Zhang, Xiyang; Li, Qian; Cheng, Xu; Wu, Chaomeng; Yang, Jing; Zuo, Yunxia; Liu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a common complication after surgery, especially for elderly patients. Administration of RNase has been reported to exhibit neuroprotective effects in acute stroke. However, the potential role of RNase on POCD is unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether RNase treatment could mitigate unilateral nephrectomy induced-cognitive deficit in aged mice. In the present study, twelve-month-old mice were administered RNase or an equal amount of normal saline perioperatively. All mice underwent Morris Water Maze (MWM) training 3 times per day for 7 days to acclimatize them to the water maze before surgical operation, and testing on days 1, 3 and 7 after surgery. We found that perioperative administration of RNase: 1) attenuated unilateral nephrectomy-induced cognitive impairment at day 3 after surgery; 2) reduced the hippocampal cytokines mRNA production and serum cytokines protein production at day 1 and day 7 (for MCP-1) after surgery, and; 3) inhibited hippocampal apoptosis as indicated by cleaved caspase-3 western blot and TUNEL staining at day 1 after surgery. In addition, a trend decrease of total serum RNA levels was detected in the RNase treated group after surgery compared with the untreated group. Further, our protocol of RNase administration had no impact on the arterial blood gas analysis right after surgery, kidney function and mortality rate at the observed days postoperatively. In conclusion, perioperative RNase treatment attenuated unilateral nephrectomy-induced cognitive impairment in aged mice. PMID:26225860

  15. Rainy Day Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Experienced caregivers plan ahead for rainy days. This article describes specific rainy day activities for young children, such as books and crafts to learn about rain (rain in a jar, making a rainbow), simple cooking activities (taffy pull, cinnamon candy tea), and games (mummy wrap, hunt the thimble, rain lotto). (EV)

  16. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  17. The Presidents' Day Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2008-01-01

    The history behind the holiday commonly called "Presidents' Day" is a bit confusing. It started as a federal holiday called Washington's Birthday. It was a day set aside to honor George Washington for his accomplishments as a founding father of the country. Later, many northern states began to recognize Abraham Lincoln's Birthday as well for his…

  18. Science Challenge Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The…

  19. School Building Day, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Educational Facility Planners, International, Scottsdale, AZ.

    This document presents information and development materials about "School Building Day" (an event spotlighting the school facility and developing support and pride in the community's schools) to help local school districts conduct their own "School Building Day" to be held on April 20th of 2001. Included are lists of suggested activities and…

  20. My Lucky Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olvey, Maura

    2010-01-01

    Teaching based on problem solving brings challenges for the teacher, primarily that of finding problems with multiple access points that accommodate all students. This article narrates the author's lucky day as she discovers the Four fours problem which impacted her passion for teaching math. The day she presented the Four fours problem to her…

  1. Day of the Dead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dann, Tammy; Murphy, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language in Elementary School (FLES) teachers in the West Des Moines schools incorporate the Day of the Dead into the fourth grade curriculum each year. The teachers discuss the Day of the Dead celebration at the Art Center, and many ask for volunteers from fourth grade to participate in the event. Student presentations include a wide…

  2. Family Science Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbins, Sara; Thomas, Bethany; Vetere, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a family-friendly science day event that encourages scientific discovery through hands-on activities, while also providing an opportunity to learn about scientific careers from actual research scientists and science educators, thereby raising awareness of the importance of STEM in our society. The one-day event bought…

  3. Day Care Personnel Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi Strauss Foundation, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    The information presented in this guide focuses on the knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes needed for effective personnel management in day care settings. Information included in this publication came from the suggestions of day care directors who participated in Training for Child Care Project workshops on administration, as well as from…

  4. Popular Chat Day Q & A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Day / Popular Chat Day Q & A Popular Chat Day Q & A Print Read students’ most popular questions ... Cool Order Free Materials National Drugs & Alcohol Chat Day Chat Day Participant FAQs Popular Chat Day Q & ...

  5. Risk Factors for 30-Day Hospital Readmission among General Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kassin, Michael T; Owen, Rachel M; Perez, Sebastian; Leeds, Ira; Cox, James C; Schnier, Kurt; Sadiraj, Vjollca; Sweeney, John F

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission within 30-days of an index hospitalization is receiving increased scrutiny as a marker of poor quality patient care. This study identifies factors associated with 30-day readmission following General Surgery procedures. Study Design Using standard National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) protocol, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected on patients undergoing inpatient General Surgery procedures at a single academic center between 2009 and 2011. Data were merged with our institutional clinical data warehouse to identify unplanned 30-day readmissions. Demographics, comorbidities, type of procedure, postoperative complications, and ICD-9 coding data were reviewed for patients who were readmitted. Univariate and multivariate analysis was utilized to identify risk factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results 1442 General Surgery patients were reviewed. 163 (11.3%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. The most common reasons for readmission were gastrointestinal complaint/complication (27.6%), surgical infection (22.1%), and failure to thrive/malnutrition (10.4%). Comorbidities associated with risk of readmission included disseminated cancer, dyspnea, and preoperative open wound (p<0.05 for all variables). Surgical procedures associated with higher rates of readmission included pancreatectomy, colectomy, and liver resection. Postoperative occurrences leading to increased risk of readmission were blood transfusion, postoperative pulmonary complication, wound complication, sepsis/shock, urinary tract infection, and vascular complications. Multivariable analysis demonstrates that the most significant independent risk factor for readmission is the occurrence of any postoperative complication (OR 4.20, 95% CI 2.89–6.13). Conclusions Risk factors for readmission after General Surgery procedures are multi-factorial; however, postoperative complications appear to drive readmissions in

  6. Increased Risk of Postthoracotomy Pain Syndrome in Patients with Prolonged Hospitalization and Increased Postoperative Opioid Use

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Adam K.; Passe, Melissa A.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postthoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) is unfortunately very common following thoracotomy and results in decreased quality of life. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine perioperative patient, surgical, and analgesic characteristics associated with the development of PTPS. Methods. Sixty-six patients who presented to the Mayo Clinic Rochester Pain Clinic were diagnosed with PTPS 2 months or more after thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia. These patients were matched with sixty-six control patients who underwent thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia and were never diagnosed with PTPS. Results. Median (IQR) hospital stay was significantly different between control patients (5 days (4, 6)) compared with PTPS patients (6 days (5, 8)), P < 0.02. The total opioid equivalent utilized in oral morphine equivalents in milligrams for the first three days postoperatively was significantly different between control patients and PTPS patients. The median (IQR) total opioid equivalent utilized was 237 (73, 508) for controls and 366 (116, 874) for PTPS patients (P < 0.005). Conclusion. Patients with a prolonged hospital stay after thoracotomy were at an increased risk of developing PTPS, and this is a novel finding. Patients who utilize higher oral morphine equivalents for the first 3 days were also at increased risk for PTPS. PMID:27340565

  7. The effect of early warm plastic bag application on postoperative pain after hemorrhoidectomy: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Balta, Ahmet Ziya; Ozdemir, Yavuz; Sucullu, Ilker; Filiz, Ali Ilker; Yucel, Ergun; Akin, Mehmet Levhi

    2015-02-01

    Hemorrhoidectomy is used for the surgical treatment of high-grade hemorrhoids. The most prominent complaint after hemorrhoidectomy is pain. Postoperative pain management is still a big problem after surgery in patients with hemorrhoidectomy. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of early application of warm bag on postoperative pain after hemorrhoidectomy. All patients were randomly divided into warm plastic bag and control groups by using sealed envelopes, which were prepared preoperatively. After standard spinal anesthesia, all patients underwent standard Milligan-Morgan hemorrhoidectomy using Ligasure™. Although the study group received the warm bag application, the control group did not receive such a treatment. Two separate visual analog scale (VAS) measurements were performed for postoperative pain assessments on postoperative days, one during the resting state and the other one during the straining phase after the onset of peristaltic bowel movement. Postoperative VAS scores were significantly lower among the warm plastic bag group as compared with the control group on Days 1 and 3 for the resting state and on Day 3 for defecation. Additionally, a significant difference existed between the two groups in terms of the need for additional anesthesia. Local thermal application appears to be a safe and effective method for pain relief after hemorrhoidectomy.

  8. Impact of intraoperative hypotension and blood pressure fluctuations on early postoperative delirium after non-cardiac surgery†‡

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, J.; DePalma, G.; Tsai, T. T.; Sands, L. P.; Leung, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative delirium is common in older patients. Despite its prognostic significance, the pathophysiology is incompletely understood. Although many risk factors have been identified, no reversible factors, particularly ones potentially modifiable by anaesthetic management, have been identified. The goal of this prospective cohort study was to investigate whether intraoperative hypotension was associated with postoperative delirium in older patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. Methods Study subjects were patients >65 years of age, undergoing major non-cardiac surgery, who were enrolled in an ongoing prospective observational study of the pathophysiology of postoperative delirium. Intraoperative blood pressure was measured and predefined criteria were used to define hypotension. Delirium was measured by the Confusion Assessment Method on the first two postoperative days. Data were analysed using t-tests, two-sample proportion tests and ordered logistic regression multivariable models, including correction for multiple comparisons. Results Data from 594 patients with a mean age of 73.6 years (sd 6.2) were studied. Of these 178 (30%) developed delirium on day 1 and 176 (30%) on day 2. Patients developing delirium were older, more often female, had lower preoperative cognitive scores, and underwent longer operations. Relative hypotension (decreases by 20, 30, or 40%) or absolute hypotension [mean arterial pressure (MAP)<50 mm Hg] were not significantly associated with postoperative delirium, nor was the duration of hypotension (MAP<50 mm Hg). Conversely, intraoperative blood pressure variance was significantly associated with postoperative delirium. Discussion These results showed that increased blood pressure fluctuation, not absolute or relative hypotension, was predictive of postoperative delirium. PMID:25616677

  9. Pregnancy - identifying fertile days

    MedlinePlus

    ... between days 7 and 20 of a woman's menstrual cycle. In order to become pregnant, having sex every ... hours of ovulation. If you have an irregular menstrual cycle, an ovulation predictor kit can help you know ...

  10. Career Day 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    More than 200 high school juniors and seniors with interests in science, technology, engineering and math met one-on-one with professionals at NASA's Langley Research Center during Career Day 2012,...

  11. Day care health risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... after going to the bathroom or changing a diaper, and then preparing food. In addition to good ... washing, important policies include: Preparing food and changing diapers in different areas Making sure day care staff ...

  12. Incidence, Predictors, and Impact of Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Military Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Lorraine D.; Bakshi, Ankur; Rachlin, Eric; Preventza, Ourania; Rosengart, Todd K.; Coselli, Joseph S.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Petersen, Nancy J.; Pattakos, Greg; Bakaeen, Faisal G.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the frequency and clinical implications of postoperative atrial fibrillation in military veterans who undergo coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We examined long-term survival data, clinical outcomes, and associated risk factors in this population. We retrospectively reviewed baseline, intraoperative, and postoperative data from 1,248 consecutive patients with similar baseline risk profiles who underwent primary isolated CABG at a Veterans Affairs hospital from October 2006 through March 2013. Multivariable logistic regression identified predictors of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate long-term survival (the primary outcome measure), morbidity, and length of hospital stay. Postoperative atrial fibrillation occurred in 215 patients (17.2%). Independent predictors of this sequela were age ≥65 years (odds ratios [95% confidence intervals], 1.7 [1.3–2.4] for patients of age 65–75 yr and 2.6 [1.4–4.8] for patients >75 yr) and body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 (2.0 [1.2–3.2]). Length of stay was longer for patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation than for those without (12.7 ± 6.6 vs 10.3 ± 8.9 d; P ≤0.0001), and the respective 30-day mortality rate was higher (1.9% vs 0.4%; P=0.014). Seven-year survival rates did not differ significantly. Older and obese patients are particularly at risk of postoperative atrial fibrillation after CABG. Patients who develop the sequela have longer hospital stays than, but similar long-term survival rates to, patients who do not. PMID:27777519

  13. Revised cardiac risk index and postoperative morbidity after elective orthopaedic surgery: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ackland, G. L.; Harris, S.; Ziabari, Y.; Grocott, M.; Mythen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) is associated strongly with increased cardiac ischaemic risk and perioperative death. Associations with non-cardiac morbidity in non-cardiac surgery have not been explored. In the elective orthopaedic surgical population, morbidity is common but preoperative predictors are unclear. We hypothesized that RCRI would identify individuals at increased risk of non-cardiac morbidity in this surgically homogenous population. Methods Five hundred and sixty patients undergoing elective primary (>90%) and revision hip and knee procedures were studied. A modified RCRI (mRCRI) score was calculated, weighting intermediate and low risk factors. The primary endpoint was the development of morbidity, collected prospectively using the Postoperative Morbidity Survey, on postoperative day (POD) 5. Results Morbidity on POD 5 was more frequent in patients with mRCRI ≥3 {relative risk 1.7, [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4–2.1]; P<0.001}. Time to hospital discharge was delayed in patients with mRCRI score ≥3 (log-rank test, P=0.0002). Pulmonary (P<0.001), infectious (P=0.001), cardiovascular (P=0.0003), renal (P<0.0001), wound (P=0.02), and neurological (P=0.002) morbidities were more common in patients with mRCRI score ≥3. Pre/postoperative haematocrit, anaesthetic/analgesic technique, and postoperative temperature were similar across mRCRI groups. There were significant associations with hospital stay, as measured by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves for mRCRI 0.64 (95% CI: 0.58–0.70) and POSSUM 0.70 (95% CI: 0.63–0.75). Conclusions mRCRI score ≥3 is associated with increased postoperative non-cardiac morbidity and prolonged hospital stay after elective orthopaedic procedures. mRCRI can contribute to objective risk stratification of postoperative morbidity. PMID:20876700

  14. Postoperative Adverse Outcomes in Intellectually Disabled Surgical Patients: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jui-An; Liao, Chien-Chang; Chang, Chuen-Chau; Chang, Hang; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Background Intellectually disabled patients have various comorbidities, but their risks of adverse surgical outcomes have not been examined. This study assesses pre-existing comorbidities, adjusted risks of postoperative major morbidities and mortality in intellectually disabled surgical patients. Methods A nationwide population-based study was conducted in patients who underwent inpatient major surgery in Taiwan between 2004 and 2007. Four controls for each patient were randomly selected from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Preoperative major comorbidities, postoperative major complications and 30-day in-hospital mortality were compared between patients with and without intellectual disability. Use of medical services also was analyzed. Adjusted odds ratios using multivariate logistic regression analyses with 95% confidence intervals were applied to verify intellectual disability's impact. Results Controls were compared with 3983 surgical patients with intellectual disability. Risks for postoperative major complications were increased in patients with intellectual disability, including acute renal failure (odds ratio 3.81, 95% confidence interval 2.28 to 6.37), pneumonia (odds ratio 2.01, 1.61 to 2.49), postoperative bleeding (odds ratio 1.35, 1.09 to 1.68) and septicemia (odds ratio 2.43, 1.85 to 3.21) without significant differences in overall mortality. Disability severity was positively correlated with postoperative septicemia risk. Medical service use was also significantly higher in surgical patients with intellectual disability. Conclusion Intellectual disability significantly increases the risk of overall major complications after major surgery. Our findings show a need for integrated and revised protocols for postoperative management to improve care for intellectually disabled surgical patients. PMID:22046425

  15. Postoperative differences between colonization and infection after pediatric cardiac surgery-a propensity matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to identify the postoperative risk factors associated with the conversion of colonization to postoperative infection in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods Following approval from the Institutional Review Board, patient demographics, co-morbidities, surgery details, transfusion requirements, inotropic infusions, laboratory parameters and positive microbial results were recorded during the hospital stay, and the patients were divided into two groups: patients with clinical signs of infection and patients with only positive cultures but without infection during the postoperative period. Using propensity scores, 141 patients with infection were matched to 141 patients with positive microbial cultures but without signs of infection. Our database consisted of 1665 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent cardiac surgery between January 2004 and December 2008 at a single center. The association between the patient group with infection and the group with colonization was analyzed after propensity score matching of the perioperative variables. Results 179 patients (9.3%) had infection, and 253 patients (15.2%) had colonization. The occurrence of Gram-positive species was significantly greater in the colonization group (p = 0.004). The C-reactive protein levels on the first and second postoperative days were significantly greater in the infection group (p = 0.02 and p = 0.05, respectively). The sum of all the positive cultures obtained during the postoperative period was greater in the infection group compared to the colonization group (p = 0.02). The length of the intensive care unit stay (p < 0.001) was significantly longer in the infection group compared to the control group. Conclusions Based on our results, we uncovered independent relationships between the conversion of colonization to infection regarding positive S. aureus and bloodstream results, as well as significant differences

  16. The role of age and comorbidities in postoperative outcome of mitral valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Vincent; Boisselier, Clément; Saplacan, Vladimir; Belin, Annette; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Fischer, Marc-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The average age of patients undergoing mitral valve repair is increasing each year. This retrospective study aimed to compare postoperative complications of mitral valve repair (known to be especially high-risk) between 2 age groups: under and over the age of 80. Patients who underwent mitral valve repair were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (<80 years old) and group 2 (≥80 years old). Baseline characteristics, pre- and postoperative hemodynamic data, surgical characteristics, and postoperative follow-up data until hospital discharge were collected. A total of 308 patients were included: 264 in group 1 (age 63 ± 13 years) and 44 in group 2 (age 83 ± 2 years). Older patients had more comorbidities (atrial fibrillation, history of cardiac decompensation, systemic hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, and chronic kidney disease) and they presented more postoperative complications (50.0% vs 33.7%; P = 0.043), with a longer hospital stay (8.9 ± 6.9 vs 6.6 ± 4.6 days; P = 0.005). To assess the burden of age, a propensity score was awarded to postoperative complications. Active smoking, chronic pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, associated ischemic heart disease, obesity, and cardio pulmonary by-pass duration were described as independent risk factors. When matched on this propensity score, there was no difference in morbidity or mortality between group 1 and group 2. Older patients suffered more postoperative complications, which were related to their comorbidities and not only to their age. PMID:27336886

  17. Stennis Day Camper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Sara Beth Casey, 5, proudly displays her artwork, 'Planets.' Sara Beth created the art as a student of Stennis Day Camp, a free camp for Stennis Space Center employees' children whose schools have not resumed since Hurricane Katrina hit the region on Aug. 29. The camp has registered nearly 200 children and averages 100 children each day. The camp will continue until all schools are back in session.

  18. Postoperative immunotherapy of murine C1300-neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fowler, C L; Brooks, S P; Rossman, J E; Cooney, D R

    1990-02-01

    Low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY) is an immunomodulating agent that down-regulates T suppressor cell function. This study investigates postoperative immunotherapy with CY as an alternate treatment for advanced immunogenic tumors such as neuroblastoma that typically respond poorly to traditional high-dose chemotherapy. A/J mice with 1.5-cm subcutaneous C1300-neuroblastoma (C1300-NB) tumors were divided into the following treatment groups: I, untreated (n = 14); II, 85% tumor resection (n = 18); III, sham-operated (n = 18); IV, multiple-dose CY (n = 6); V, 85% resection and single-dose CY (n = 14); VI, 85% resection and multiple-dose CY (n = 14). CY (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was given initially 24 hours post-operatively to groups IV, V, and VI. Groups IV and VI also received weekly maintenance doses of 25 mg/kg CY. Results showed significantly increased survival (log-rank test) in CY-treated groups (IV, V, VI) compared with control groups (I,II,III). Cures were observed only in groups receiving partial resection plus CY (V, 7%; VI, 29%). Although surgical debulking of tumor alone (II) did not enhance survival, the procedure normalized depressed total lymphocyte counts and the subpopulation of Lyt 2,3+ (T suppressor/cytolytic cells) in the immediate postoperative period during which immunotherapy with CY was instigated. This may have contributed to the success of CY immunotherapy. To characterize the tumor-host immune interaction, additional studies were performed. Results showed the following. (1) Mice cured by debulking plus CY (from groups V and VI) could not be successfully reimplanted with C1300-NB, demonstrating immunologic mediation by CY.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. [Postoperative pain therapy in Germany. Status quo].

    PubMed

    Pogatzki-Zahn, E M; Meissner, W

    2015-10-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the field of postoperative pain therapy in the last 20 years. Beginning from clinical trials on the effectiveness of individual procedures, such as epidural anesthesia and patient-controlled analgesia, a wide range of healthcare services research as well as basic research with human and animal experiments has been established. Whereas health services research in the 1980s and 1990s focused more on the implementation of acute pain services, outcome-oriented research approaches are nowadays the center of attention. Acute pain registries and pain certification projects initiated in Germany have to be mentioned particularly in this respect. Basic research papers from recent years increasingly address specific aspects of acute postoperative pain and have provided translational approaches that are applied around the world for studying neurobiological mechanisms of postoperative pain. At the same time, interdisciplinary cooperation in research projects has led to a better understanding of complex correlations regarding predictors and mechanisms (including psychosocial aspects) of acute and in recent times also chronic pain after surgery. In parallel, evidence-based medicine has found its way into acute pain medicine in Germany. In 2007, clinical acute pain therapy in Germany was enhanced by S3 level guidelines for the first time; however, the implementation is still incomplete. In future, questions concerning mechanism-based therapy of acute pain need to be equally in the center of attention of research, such as prevention of persisting pain after surgery and acute pain of different origins. PMID:26289394

  20. Postoperative Intussusception in a Neonate with Congenital Cutis Laxa and Huge Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Sadeghian; Aliraza, Mirshemirani; Ahmad, Khaleghnejad Tabari; Mohsen, Rouzrokh; Nahid, Jafari

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cutis laxa is a genetically heterogeneous condition presenting in the newborn with loose, redundant skin folds, decreased elasticity of the skin, and general connective tissue involvement. A 2-day-old full term neonate with congenital cutis laxa presented with respiratory distress. Investigations revealed huge hiatal hernia. Patient underwent loose Nissen’s fundoplication. In postoperative period patient developed intussusception which was manually reduced at re-surgery. PMID:24834384

  1. Postoperative pain management after supratentorial craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Verchère, Eric; Grenier, Bruno; Mesli, Abdelghani; Siao, Daniel; Sesay, Mussa; Maurette, Pierre

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of three different postoperative treatments after supratentorial craniotomy. Sixty-four patients were allocated prospectively and randomly into three groups: paracetamol (the P group, n = 8), paracetamol and tramadol (the PT group, n = 29), and paracetamol and nalbuphine (the PN group, n = 27). General anesthesia was standardized with propofol and remifentanil using atracurium as the muscle relaxant. One hour before the end of surgery, all patients received 30 mg/kg propacetamol intravenously then 30 mg/kg every 6 hours. Patients in the PT group received 1.5 mg/kg tramadol 1 hour before the end of surgery. For patients in the PN group, 0.15 mg/kg nalbuphine was injected after discontinuation of remifentanil, because of its mu-antagonist effect. Postoperative pain was assessed in the fully awake patient after extubation (hour 0) and at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours using a visual analog scale (VAS). Additional tramadol (1.5 mg/kg) or 0.15 mg/kg nalbuphine was administered when the VAS score was > or = 30 mm. Analgesia was compared using the Mantha and Kaplan-Meier methods. Adverse effects of the drugs were also measured. The three groups were similar with respect to the total dose of remifentanil received (0.27 +/- 0.1 mircog/kg/min). In all patients, extubation was obtained within 6 +/- 3 minutes after remifentanil administration. Postoperative analgesia was ineffective in the P group; therefore, inclusions in this group were stopped after the eighth patient. Postoperative analgesia was effective in the two remaining groups because VAS scores were similar, except at hour 1, when nalbuphine was more effective (P = .001). Nevertheless, acquiring such a result demanded significantly more tramadol than nalbuphine (P < .05). More cases of nausea and vomiting were observed in the PT group but the difference was not significant (P < .06). In conclusion, pain after supratentorial neurosurgery must be taken into account

  2. Reduction in postoperative endophthalmitis with intracameral cefuroxime.

    PubMed

    Myneni, J; Desai, S P; Jayamanne, D G R

    2013-08-01

    Postoperative endophthalmitis is an uncommon complication of cataract surgery with grave consequences. This report describes the trend of endophthalmitis in a district general hospital in England over eight years, and attempts made to modify this trend. An outbreak of endophthalmitis in 2007 led to a detailed investigation and subsequent changes in practice. Intracameral cefuroxime (ICC) was introduced in place of subconjunctival cefuroxime. Use of ICC in patients with 'penicillin allergy' was explored, found to be safe and resulted in a change of policy. This led to a four-fold reduction in the rate of endophthalmitis.

  3. Bladder exstrophy: current management and postoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Ketsia; Borer, Joseph; Phelps, Andrew; Chow, Jeanne S

    2014-07-01

    Bladder exstrophy is a rare malformation characterized by an infra-umbilical abdominal wall defect, incomplete closure of the bladder with mucosa continuous with the abdominal wall, epispadias, and alterations in the pelvic bones and muscles. It is part of the exstrophy-epispadias complex, with cloacal exstrophy on the severe and epispadias on the mild ends of the spectrum. Bladder exstrophy is the most common of these entities and is more common in boys. The goal of this paper is to describe common methods of repair and to provide an imaging review of the postoperative appearances. PMID:24939762

  4. [An autopsy case of postoperative erythroderma after nephroureterectomy possibly induced by graft-versus-host reaction following blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, E; Tado, O; Sasaki, H; Hayashi, Y

    1992-03-01

    The case is a 45-year-old female who underwent right total nephroureterectomy and partial cystectomy for renal pelvic cancer. During the operation, she received blood transfusion. On the 10th postoperative day, she developed high fever and skin rush on the face, which were followed by liver dysfunction and pancytopenia. On the 18th post-operative day, she died of sepsis. Autopsy revealed hypoplasia and aplasia of the bone marrow and severe atrophy of the systemic lymph nodes and spleen. The characteristic clinical course and autopsy findings of this case closely resembled graft-versus-host disease which is observed after bone marrow transplantation or blood transfusion given to patients with severe immunodeficiency. It is therefore strongly suggested that postoperative erythroderma of this case was induced by graft-versus-host reaction due to blood transfusion given during the operation. PMID:1532997

  5. PEarly Postoperative Emergency Department Care of Abdominal Transplant Recipients1

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Lisa M.; Schmidt, Kathryn A.; Richards, Christopher T.; Lapin, Brittany; Abecassis, Michael M.; Holl, Jane L.; Adams, James; Ladner, Daniela P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Research on post-transplant care has predominantly focused on predictors of readmission with little attention to emergency department (ED) visits. The goal of this study was to describe early postoperative ED care of transplant recipients. Methods A secondary database analysis of adult patients who underwent abdominal organ transplantation between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2013 and sought ED care within one year post-transplantation was conducted. Survival was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to adjust for pertinent covariates. Results A total of 1,900 abdominal organ transplants were performed during the study period. Of these, 37% (N=711) transplant recipients sought care in the ED (1,343 total visits) with 1.89 mean ED visits per recipient. Of recipients seen in the ED, 58% received a kidney transplant and 28% received a liver transplant, with 45% of recipients presenting within the first 60 postoperative days. The most common chief complaints were gastroenterological (17%) and abnormal laboratory values or vital signs (17%). In total, 74% of recipients were readmitted and 50% of admitted patients were discharged in less than 24 hours. Transplant recipients with ED visits had lower 3-year graft (81% vs. 87%; p<0.001) and patient (89% vs. 93%; p=0.002) survival. Conclusion Transplant recipients have a high frequency of ED visits in the first post-transplantation year and high rates of subsequent hospital admission. Further investigation is needed to understand what drives recipient presentation to the ED and create care models that achieve the best outcomes. PMID:26050012

  6. Hypothermia Increases Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression and Decreases Post-Operative Intra-Abdominal Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Wang, Hsuan-Mao; Chou, Tzung-Hsin; Wu, Meng-Che; Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia during operation decreases postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. We sought to determine the most appropriate duration of hypothermia, and whether hypothermia affects the expression of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Methods 80 male BALB/c mice weighing 25–30 g are randomized into one of five groups: adhesion model with infusion of 15°C saline for 15 minutes (A); 30 minutes (B); 45 minute (C); adhesion model without infusion of cold saline (D); and sham operation without infusion of cold saline (E). Adhesion scores and tPA levels in the peritoneum fluid levels were analyzed on postoperative days 1, 7, and 14. Results On day 14, the cold saline infusion groups (A, B, and C) had lower adhesion scores than the without infusion of cold saline group (D). However, only group B (cold saline infusion for 30 minutes) had a significantly lower adhesion scores than group D. Also, group B was found to have 3.4 fold, 2.3 fold, and 2.2 fold higher levels of tPA than group D on days 1, 7, and 14 respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that cold saline infusion for 30 minutes was the optimum duration to decrease postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. The decrease in the adhesion formations could be partly due to an increase in the level of tPA. PMID:27583464

  7. Abdominal computed tomography for postoperative abscess: is it useful during the first week?

    PubMed

    Antevil, Jared L; Egan, John C; Woodbury, Robert O; Rivera, Louis; Oreilly, Eamon B; Brown, Carlos V R

    2006-06-01

    While classic teaching dictates computed tomography (CT) for postoperative abdominal or pelvic abscess in the first week is of low yield, little evidence supports intentional delays in imaging for suspected abscess. This retrospective review examined all CT scans obtained for clinical suspicion of abscess between 3 and 30 days after abdominal or pelvic operation over a 3-year period. Scans were grouped into those obtained between 3 and 7 days after surgery (EARLY) and those obtained after day 7 (LATE). Diagnostic yield was compared between EARLY and LATE groups. Of 262 CT examinations (EARLY, n = 106; LATE, n = 156), 71 studies (27%) demonstrated abscess. There was no significant difference in the diagnostic yield of CT for abscess between EARLY and LATE groups (23% [24 of 106] versus 30% [47 of 156], P = 0.18). Of patients with an abscess, 63% (45 of 71) underwent percutaneous or operative drainage (EARLY 75% [18 of 24], LATE 57% [27 of 47], P = 0.15). Abdominal CT for postoperative abscess can be expected to be diagnostic in a substantial proportion of cases in the first week, the majority of which lead to percutaneous or operative drainage. Postoperative CT for intra-abdominal abscess should be obtained as clinically indicated, regardless of interval from surgery.

  8. Ketorolac: a new parenteral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Lassen, K; Epstein-Stiles, M; Olsson, G L

    1992-08-01

    Providing adequate pain control with minimal side effects in inpatient and ambulatory settings is a continuous challenge to the PACU nurse. Ketorolac tromethamine (Toradol, Syntex, Palo Alto, CA) is a new parenteral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) approved for use in the United States. Ketorolac is useful in the management of short term, moderate to severe postoperative pain. It is used by itself or as an adjunct to traditional opioid analgesics. Ketorolac, like other NSAIDs, has analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties. Unlike morphine or meperidine, ketorolac does not bind to opioid receptors and is not a centrally acting agent. Administered intramuscularly, peak plasma levels are reached in 45 to 50 minutes. It is administered as a 30- or 60-mg intramuscular (IM) loading dose followed by 15- or 30-mg doses IM every 6 hours, with a maximum first-day dose of 150 mg and 120 mg on subsequent days up to a recommended maximum of 5 days. The lower dose range is recommended for elderly patients, patients weighing less than 50 kg, and patients with impaired kidney function. Initial studies show that use of ketorolac decreases the overall amount of opioid analgesia needed for postoperative pain control. To date, reported occurrence of side effects is low. A case study presents a healthy ambulatory surgical patient admitted for inguinal hernia repair using epidural anesthesia. Use of ketorolac has shown initial favorable results. More research is needed to further define its role and side effects in postoperative pain management.

  9. Tonsillectomy and Adenoids PostOp

    MedlinePlus

    ... patient comes home Most children take seven to ten days to recover from the surgery. Some may ... scabs fall off in small pieces five to ten days after surgery. Bleeding : With the exception of ...

  10. EARLY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN ROUX-EN-Y GASTRIC BYPASS

    PubMed Central

    STOLL, Aluisio; ROSIN, Leandro; DIAS, Mariana Fernandes; MARQUIOTTI, Bruna; GUGELMIN, Giovana; STOLL, Gabriela Fanezzi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is one of the most common bariatric surgery and leads to considerable weight loss in the first months. Aim: To quantify the main early postoperative complications in patients submitted to the gastric bypass. Method: Observational retrospective cohort. Data of 1051 patients with class II obesity associated with comorbidities or class III obesity submitted to the gastric bypass with 30 days of follow-up starting from the date of the surgery. Results: The age average was 36 years with a predominance of females (81.1%). The mean preoperative body mass index was 43 kg/m². The major complication was fistula (2.3%), followed by intestinal obstruction (0.5%) and pulmonary embolism (0.5%). Death occurred in 0.6% of the cases. Conclusion: In the period of 30 days after surgery the overall complication rate was 3.8%; reoperation was necessary in 2.6% and death occurred in 0.6%. Fistula was the main complication and the leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit, reoperation and death. PMID:27683781

  11. Effect of preoperative suggestion on postoperative gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed Central

    Disbrow, E A; Bennett, H L; Owings, J T

    1993-01-01

    Autonomic behavior is subject to direct suggestion. We found that patients undergoing major operations benefit more from instruction than from information and reassurance. We compared the return of intestinal function after intra-abdominal operations in 2 groups of patients: the suggestion group received specific instructions for the early return of gastrointestinal motility, and the control group received an equal-length interview offering reassurance and nonspecific instructions. The suggestion group had a significantly shorter average time to the return of intestinal motility, 2.6 versus 4.1 days. Time to discharge was 6.5 versus 8.1 days. Covariates including duration of operation, amount of intraoperative bowel manipulation, and amount of postoperative narcotics were also examined using the statistical model analysis of covariance. An average savings of $1,200 per patient resulted from this simple 5-minute intervention. In summary, the use of specific physiologically active suggestions given preoperatively in a beleivable manner can reduce the morbidity associated with an intra-abdominal operation by reducing the duration of ileus. PMID:8342264

  12. Jupiter Night and Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Day and night side narrow angle images taken on January 1, 2001 illustrating storms visible on the day side which are the sources of visible lightning when viewed on the night side. The images have been enhanced in contrast. Note the two day-side occurrences of high clouds, in the upper and lower parts of the image, are coincident with lightning storms seen on the darkside. The storms occur at 34.5 degrees and 23.5 degrees North latitude, within one degree of the latitudes at which similar lightning features were detected by the Galileo spacecraft. The images were taken at different times. The storms' longitudinal separation changes from one image to the next because the winds carrying them blow at different speeds at the two latitudes.

  13. Surgical outcomes associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation after robotic-assisted pulmonary lobectomy: retrospective review of 208 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Emily P.; Velez-Cubian, Frank O.; Rodriguez, Kathryn L.; Thau, Matthew R.; Moodie, Carla C.; Garrett, Joseph R.; Fontaine, Jacques P.

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of post-operative atrial fibrillation (POAF) after robotic-assisted video-thoracoscopic pulmonary lobectomy on comorbid postoperative complications, chest tube duration, and hospital length of stay (LOS). Methods We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data from 208 consecutive patients who underwent robotic-assisted pulmonary lobectomy by one surgeon for known or suspected lung cancer. Postoperatively, 39 (18.8%) of these patients experienced POAF during their hospital stay. The occurrence of postoperative complications other than POAF, chest tube duration, and hospital LOS were analyzed in patients with POAF and without POAF. Statistical significance (P≤0.05) was determined by unpaired Student’s t-test or by Chi-square test. Results Of patients with POAF, 46% also had other concurrent postoperative complications, while only 31% of patients without POAF experienced complications. The average number of postoperative complications experienced by patients with POAF was significantly higher than that experienced by those without POAF (0.9 vs. 0.4, P<0.05). Median chest tube duration in POAF patients (6 days) was significantly higher than in patients without POAF (4 days). A similar result was also seen with hospital LOS, with the median hospital LOS of 8 days in POAF patients being significantly longer than in those without POAF, whose median hospital LOS was 4 days. No other significant difference was detected between the two groups of patients. Conclusions This study demonstrated the association between the incidence of POAF and a more complicated hospital course. Further studies are needed to determine whether confounders were involved in this association. PMID:27621862

  14. Can bedside patient-reported numbness predict postoperative ambulation ability for total knee arthroplasty patients with nerve block catheters?

    PubMed Central

    Mudumbai, Seshadri C.; Ganaway, Toni; Kim, T. Edward; Howard, Steven K.; Giori, Nicholas J.; Shum, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Background Adductor canal catheters offer advantages over femoral nerve catheters for knee replacement patients because they produce less quadriceps muscle weakness; however, applying adductor canal catheters in bedside clinical practice remains challenging. There is currently no patient-reported outcome that accurately predicts patients' physical function after knee replacement. The present study evaluates the validity of a relatively new patient-reported outcome, i.e., a numbness score obtained using a numeric rating scale, and assesses its predictive value on postoperative ambulation. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study pooling data from two previously-published clinical trials using identical research methodologies. Both studies recruited patients undergoing knee replacement; one studied adductor canal catheters while the other studied femoral nerve catheters. Our primary outcome was patient-reported numbness scores on postoperative day 1. We also examined postoperative day 1 ambulation distance and its association with postoperative numbness using linear regression, adjusting for age, body mass index, and physical status. Results Data from 94 subjects were included (femoral subjects, n = 46; adductor canal subjects, n = 48). Adductor canal patients reported decreased numbness (median [10th–90th percentiles]) compared to femoral patients (0 [0–5] vs. 4 [0–10], P = 0.001). Adductor canal patients also ambulated seven times further on postoperative day 1 relative to femoral patients. There was a significant association between postoperative day 1 total ambulation distance and numbness (Beta = –2.6; 95% CI: –4.5, –0.8, P = 0.01) with R2 = 0.1. Conclusions Adductor canal catheters facilitate improved early ambulation and produce less patient-reported numbness after knee replacement, but the correlation between these two variables is weak. PMID:26885299

  15. Surgical outcomes associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation after robotic-assisted pulmonary lobectomy: retrospective review of 208 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Emily P.; Velez-Cubian, Frank O.; Rodriguez, Kathryn L.; Thau, Matthew R.; Moodie, Carla C.; Garrett, Joseph R.; Fontaine, Jacques P.

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of post-operative atrial fibrillation (POAF) after robotic-assisted video-thoracoscopic pulmonary lobectomy on comorbid postoperative complications, chest tube duration, and hospital length of stay (LOS). Methods We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data from 208 consecutive patients who underwent robotic-assisted pulmonary lobectomy by one surgeon for known or suspected lung cancer. Postoperatively, 39 (18.8%) of these patients experienced POAF during their hospital stay. The occurrence of postoperative complications other than POAF, chest tube duration, and hospital LOS were analyzed in patients with POAF and without POAF. Statistical significance (P≤0.05) was determined by unpaired Student’s t-test or by Chi-square test. Results Of patients with POAF, 46% also had other concurrent postoperative complications, while only 31% of patients without POAF experienced complications. The average number of postoperative complications experienced by patients with POAF was significantly higher than that experienced by those without POAF (0.9 vs. 0.4, P<0.05). Median chest tube duration in POAF patients (6 days) was significantly higher than in patients without POAF (4 days). A similar result was also seen with hospital LOS, with the median hospital LOS of 8 days in POAF patients being significantly longer than in those without POAF, whose median hospital LOS was 4 days. No other significant difference was detected between the two groups of patients. Conclusions This study demonstrated the association between the incidence of POAF and a more complicated hospital course. Further studies are needed to determine whether confounders were involved in this association.

  16. Postoperative morbidity and histopathologic characteristics of tonsillar tissue following coblation tonsillectomy in children: a prospective randomized single-blind study.

    PubMed

    Roje, Zeljka; Racić, Goran; Dogas, Zoran; Pisac, Valdi Pesutić; Timms, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized single blind study was to determine the depth of thermal damage to tonsillar tissue due to coblation, and to compare it with thermal damage to tonsillar tissue following conventional tonsillectomy; to correlate the depth of thermal damage to tonsillar tissue with the parameters of postoperative morbidity, to compare intraoperative blood loss, postoperative pain severity, time to resuming normal physical activity, and incidence of postoperative bleeding between two groups of tonsillectomized children aged up to 16 years. 72 children aged 3-16 years scheduled for tonsillectomy randomly assigned into two groups submitted either to conventional tonsillectomy with bipolar diathermy coagulation or to coblation tonsillectomy, with a 14-day follow up. Statistically significant differences were observed in the depth of thermal damage to tonsillar tissue (p < 0.001), intraoperative blood loss (p < 0.004), in postoperative pain severity (p < 0.05) and in time to resuming normal physical activity between the two groups (p < 0.001). There was no case of reactionary or secondary bleeding in either group. In this paper for the first time we have correlated postoperative morbidity and thermal tissue damage: less thermal damage is associated with less postoperative morbidity.

  17. Transcutaneous Electrical Acupoint Stimulation Improves the Postoperative Quality of Recovery and Analgesia after Gynecological Laparoscopic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yusheng; Zhao, Qiuyan; Gong, Cansheng; Wu, Yihuan; Chen, Ying; Qiu, Liangcheng; Wu, Xiaodan; Chen, Yanqing

    2015-01-01

    Background. We conducted this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the effects of transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) on the quality of recovery (QoR) and postoperative analgesia after gynecological laparoscopic surgery. Methods. 74 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA) I or II patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopic surgery were randomly allocated to TEAS or control groups. The primary outcome was the quality of recovery, which was assessed on the day before surgery and 24 h after surgery using a 40-item questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included postoperative pain scores, the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), duration of postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay, and patient's satisfaction. Results. The TEAS group had higher QoR scores than control group upon 24 h after surgery (177 versus 165; P < 0.001). Compared with the control group, postoperative pain scores and the cumulative number of opioids administered were lower in the TEAS group patients (P = 0.04). TEAS reduced the incidence of PONV and dizziness, as well as duration of PACU stay. Simultaneously, the patient's satisfaction scores were higher in the TEAS group (P = 0.002). Conclusion. Preoperative TEAS enhances QoR, improves postoperative analgesia and patient's satisfaction, alleviates postoperative side effects, and accelerates discharge after general anesthesia for gynecological laparoscopic surgery. PMID:26170873

  18. Early enteral nutrition therapy in congenital cardiac repair postoperatively: A randomized, controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Singal, Anuradha; Menon, Ramesh; Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Mohan, Alka; Manral, Mala; Singh, Divya; Devagouru, V.; Talwar, Sachin; Choudhary, Shiv Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Adequate nutritional supplementation in infants with cardiac malformations after surgical repair is a challenge. Critically ill infants in the early postoperative period are in a catabolic stress. The mismatch between estimated energy requirement (EER) and the intake in the postoperative period is multifactorial, predisposing them to complications such as immune deficiency, more infection, and growth failure. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and efficacy of enriched breast milk feed on postoperative recovery and growth of infants after open heart surgery. Methodology: Fifty infants <6 months of age were prospectively randomized in the trial for enteral nutrition (EN) postoperatively from day 1 to 10, after obtaining the Institute Ethics Committee's approval. They were equally divided into two groups on the basis of the feed they received: Control group was fed with expressed breast milk (EBM; 0.65 kcal/ml) and intervention group was fed with EBM + energy supplementation/fortification with human milk fortifier (7.5 kcal/2 g)/Simyl medium-chain triglyceride oil (7.8 kcal/ml). Energy need for each infant was calculated as per EER at 90 kcal/kg/day, as the target requirement. The intra- and post-operative variables such as cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times, ventilation duration, Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and hospital length of stay and mortality were recorded. Anthropometric and hematological parameters and infection control data were recorded in a predesigned pro forma. Data were analyzed using Stata 14.1 software. Results: The duration of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay (LOIS), length of hospital stay (LOHS), infection rate, and mortality rate were lower in the intervention group compared to the control group although none of the differences were statistically significant. Infants in control group needed mechanical ventilation for about a day more (i.e., 153.6 ± 149.0 h vs. 123.2 ± 107.0 h; P = 0

  19. Postoperative pain relief by demand analgesia.

    PubMed

    Peeters, M; Brugmans, J

    1980-01-01

    Postoperative pain relief is only apparently an easy task. A brief survey of literature investigating the discomfort experienced in the postoperative phase is all but encouraging. One can identify four basic problems in obtaining adequate results by delivery of analgesic drugs: a) the biological variability among individual patients, b) the unpredictable uptake of the drug administered intramuscularly, c) the time lag involved between request by the patient and the subsequent administration of a single dose and d) the lack of knowledge about the nature of the discomfort and its remedies. An alternative strategy introducing "On-Demand" analgesia administering prescribed doses at the right moment is presented and analysed a) as an operant conditioning process implementing a particular reinforcement schedule (behavioural sciences), as well as b) a negative feedback control loop that entrust the central judgement to the patient (system theory). Both approaches give insight into the results: the technique copes with biological variability; anticipating pain induced by fear disappears; the feedback strategy works well and patients adapt to a wide range in prescriptions; intermittent administration makes more efficient use of the analgesic; an optimal result is demonstrated in studies comparing on-demand analgesia with the normal IM-regime and epidural analgesia; continuity in pain relief can be obtained in routine clinical practice.

  20. [Postoperative management of hip and knee endoprostheses].

    PubMed

    Seitz, S; Rüther, W

    2012-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is often accompanied by massive destruction of the smaller and larger joints even with early therapy using antirheumatic drugs. In these cases total joint arthroplasty is the only surgical option, especially for the knee and hip joint. Knowledge of the specific disease-related postoperative characteristics is a prerequisite for the successful treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. As dislocation of the arthroplastic joint does not occur more often in rheumatoid arthritis, the risk of periprosthetic infection is increased due to the use of biologicals. Therefore, a perioperative optimization is obligatory. In order to facilitate independence in daily living physiotherapy in combination with aids such as arthritis crutches, gripping pliers or raised toilet seat need to be started as soon as possible after surgical treatment. To achieve this goal it is recommended to refer patients with inflammatory arthritis to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. With respect to the specific postoperative treatment after joint replacement the long-term results are comparable with those from patients with primary osteoarthritis.

  1. [Suspected case of postoperative malignant hyperthermia treated with dantrolene one week after neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazushi; Nishibe, Shinichi; Usuda, Yutaka; Kitamura, Akira

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old man who presented with hyperthermia (>40°C), an elevated creatine kinase level (>64,000 IU · l-1), and myoglobinuria one week after undergoing two successive neurosurgeries for a brain hemorrhage under sevoflurane anesthesia. After having been diagnosed with suspicious atypical postoperative malignant hyperthermia, he was treated with dantrolene and his symptoms disappeared on the day of dantrolene administration. Central hyperthermia is defined as hyperthermia associated with thermoregulatory dysfunction after brainstem injury. Postoperative malignant hyperthermia can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from central hyperthermia, especially after neurosurgery. We could not eliminate the possibility of central hyperthermia as a cause of hyperthermia in the present patient If marked postoperative hyperthermia must be addressed immediately and managed appropriately in neurosurgical patients and dantrolene having few serious side effects, we were able to control his symptoms immediately after the infusion of dantrolene. Therefore, the administration of dantrolene should be considered when treating unidentified postoperative hyperthermia after a neurosurgical procedure. PMID:25693350

  2. High incidence and spontaneous resolution of mastoid effusion after craniotomy on early postoperative magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Saito, N; Sato, N; Takahashi, A; Fujimaki, H; Tosaka, M; Sasaki, T

    2003-07-01

    Mastoid effusion is a poorly understood complication after craniotomy. The incidence and severity of postoperative mastoid effusion were retrospectively examined on postoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to assess any association with craniotomy procedures, time course, and neuro-otological complications. We evaluated the early postoperative MR images (within 4 days of craniotomy) and medical records of 74 patients who underwent 77 operations for the treatment of various intracranial diseases from January 2000 to December 2001. Mastoid effusion was classified into four grades: none, partial, moderate, and severe diffuse effusion in the mastoid air cells. Thirty-three follow-up MR images from 26 patients were also reviewed. Postoperative mastoid effusion occurred ipsilateral to the craniotomy site in 62 cases and contralateral in 56 cases. Mastoid effusion was significantly more severe ipsilateral than contralateral to craniotomy with exposure of the mastoid air cells ( P<0.0001). There was no significant difference in severity between the contralateral and ipsilateral sides after craniotomy without mastoid air cell opening ( P=0.437). Mastoid effusion following craniotomy without exposure of mastoid air cells resolved within 3 months. However, otitis media with effusion developed in six patients with severe mastoid effusion ipsilateral to craniotomy with exposure of the mastoid air cells. Mastoid effusion frequently developed on both sides. Any grade of mastoid effusion on the ipsilateral side to craniotomy without exposure of mastoid air cells, or on the contralateral side, was asymptomatic or had a benign course, and disappeared within 3 months. PMID:12811440

  3. Nerve Blockage Attenuates Postoperative Inflammation in Hippocampus of Young Rat Model with Surgical Trauma.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Li, Zhi; Zuo, Yun-Xia

    2015-01-01

    It is hypothesized that central nervous system inflammation induced by systematic inflammation due to surgical trauma plays a critical role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction. The potential inhibitory effect of nerve blockage with local anesthetics on peripheral inflammatory response has been reported. We hypothesize that nerve blockage may be effective in reducing postoperative inflammation and cognitive decline. The rats at the age of 4 weeks were subjected to general anesthesia and humeral fracture fixation, in combination with brachial plexus block, saline versus ropivacaine, respectively. The rats from control group underwent general anesthesia only. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines in plasma and in hippocampus was measured. Open field test and new object recognition task were performed before surgery and on postoperative days (POD) 1, 3, and 7. Compared with control group, the level of cytokines in plasma and hippocampus revealed an obvious increase in surgery groups. The effect of brachial plexus block on decreasing cytokines was observed. The rats exposed to surgery without brachial plexus block showed behavior impairment. Our results indicated that nerve blockage could downregulate proinflammatory cytokines in hippocampus after humeral fixation surgery, which may ameliorate the postoperative cognitive dysfunction in young rats. PMID:26664150

  4. Comparison between two thoracotomy closure techniques: postoperative pain and pulmonary function*

    PubMed Central

    Leandro, Juliana Duarte; Rodrigues, Olavo Ribeiro; Slaets, Annie France Frere; Schmidt, Aurelino F.; Yaekashi, Milton L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two thoracotomy closure techniques (pericostal and transcostal suture) in terms of postoperative pain and pulmonary function. METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study carried out in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of the Luzia de Pinho Melo Hospital das Clínicas and at the University of Mogi das Cruzes, both located in the city of Mogi das Cruzes, Brazil. We included 30 patients (18-75 years of age) undergoing posterolateral or anterolateral thoracotomy. The patients were randomized into two groups by the type of thoracotomy closure: pericostal suture (PS; n = 16) and transcostal suture (TS; n = 14). Pain intensity during the immediate and late postoperative periods was assessed by a visual analogic scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Spirometry variables (FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, and PEF) were determined in the preoperative period and on postoperative days 21 and 60. RESULTS: Pain intensity was significantly greater in the PS group than in the TS group. Between the preoperative and postoperative periods, there were decreases in the spirometry variables studied. Those decreases were significant in the PS group but not in the TS group. CONCLUSIONS: The patients in the TS group experienced less immediate and late post-thoracotomy pain than did those in the PS group, as well as showing smaller reductions in the spirometry parameters. Therefore, transcostal suture is recommended over pericostal suture as the thoracotomy closure technique of choice. PMID:25210961

  5. Somatostatin prevents the postoperative increases in plasma amino acid clearance and urea synthesis after elective cholecystectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Heindorff, H; Billesbølle, P; Pedersen, S L; Hansen, R; Vilstrup, H

    1995-01-01

    The importance of glucagon on postoperative changes in hepatic amino-nitrogen conversion were investigated in six patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy for uncomplicated gall stones. Patients were given infusions of somatostatin (bolus of 6 micrograms/kg followed by continuous infusion of 6 micrograms/kg/h) from induction of anaesthesia to the end of investigation, the first postoperative day (30 hours). Controls were 16 patients undergoing the same procedures omitting the somatostatin infusion. In all patients blood concentration and plasma clearance of total alpha-amino-nitrogen, and amino acid stimulated rate of urea synthesis were measured. Elective cholecystectomy decreased blood alpha-amino-nitrogen concentration from mean (SEM) 2.9 (0.2) to 2.4 (0.1) mmol/l (p < 0.05), increased the clearance of total alpha-amino-nitrogen from 5.2 (0.3) to 6.6 (0.3) ml/s (p < 0.05), and increased the rate of amino acid stimulated urea synthesis from 27 (1) to 37 (2) mumol/s (p < 0.05) pointing to increased hepatic removal of amino-nitrogen at expense of plasma amino-nitrogen. Infusion of somatostatin prevented increase of glucagon for 24 hours after surgery, and prevented the negative changes in postoperative nitrogen homeostasis resulting from the postoperative changes in hepatic nitrogen conversion, suggesting glucagon as mediator. The exact mechanism remains in doubt, however, because of the multiple effects of somatostatin. PMID:7797129

  6. Preoperative oral health care reduces postoperative inflammation and complications in oral cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Ohta, Kouji; Fujimoto, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Mizuta, Kuniko; Ono, Shigehiro; Shimasue, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Yoshiaki; Higashikawa, Koichiro; Tada, Misato; Ishida, Fumi; Okui, Gaku; Okumura, Toshiya; Fukui, Akiko; Kubozono, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Yoko; Seino, Sayaka; Hashikata, Miho; Sasaki, Kazuki; Naruse, Takako; Rahman, Mohammad Zeshaan; Uetsuki, Ryo; Nimiya, Akiko; Takamoto, Megumi; Dainobu, Kana; Tokikazu, Tomoko; Nishi, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Takechi, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The records of 70 patients with oral cancer who were treated at a single institution between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. The body temperature, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared between those who had received preoperative oral care (oral care group) and those who had not received any (non-oral care group). When the patients were divided into those who underwent minimally invasive surgery and those who underwent severely invasive surgery, the mean CRP level in the early postoperative period was lower in the oral care group as compared with the non-oral care group in those who underwent minimally invasive surgery as well as those who underwent severely invasive surgery. However, the mean CRP level was most evidently reduced in the severely invasive group on days 1 and 3–5. However, no significant differences were observed with regard to the percentage of postoperative infectious complications (for example, surgical site infection, anastomotic leak and pneumonia) between the oral care (13.6%) and non-oral care (20.8%) groups, though a reduced prevalence of postoperative complications following preoperative oral care was noted. The results of the present study suggest that preoperative oral care can decrease inflammation during the early postoperative stage in patients with oral cancer who undergo severely invasive surgery. PMID:27588111

  7. Systemic Trans- and Postoperative Evaluations of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Junior, Joel Ferreira Santiago; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Moreno, Amália; Villa, Luiz Marcelo Ribeiro; de Carvalho Dekon, Stefan Fiuza; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to examine the trans- and postoperative systemic characteristics of patients undergoing dental implant surgery and to investigate the relationship between pre- and post- surgery anxiety levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-nine patients were analyzed in 3 call centers to determine anxiety levels, pain levels, and preoperative and postoperative histories using the State–Trait (STAI) questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 93 dental implants were installed, with a success rate of 100%. The most frequently reported systemic disease was hypertension. There was a significantly higher rate of effective clamping (torque) to the mandibular bone than to the maxillary bone. The association between postoperative surgical complications and longer operative time was not significant, but there was a significant correlation between the alteration of mouth opening and daily routine activities and a significant decrease in anxiety levels between the day of surgery and the postoperative time point (p=0.006). CONCLUSION: A longer surgical time was associated with surgery-related complications and with a higher anxiety index on the preoperative evaluation. PMID:27074177

  8. The 6th Meeting of the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis: A half-time review of lymphatic filariasis elimination and its integration with the control of other neglected tropical diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The 6th Meeting of the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GAELF6) was held 1-3 June, 2010 in Seoul, Korea, with 150 participants from 38 countries. The year 2010 marks the midpoint between the first GAELF meeting, in 2000, and the World Health Organization (WHO) 2020 goal of global elimination of lymphatic filariasis (LF) as a public health problem. The theme of the meeting, "Half-time in LF Elimination: Teaming Up with Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs)," reflected significant integration of LF elimination programmes into a comprehensive initiative to control NTDs. Presentations on LF epidemiology, treatment, research, and programmes highlighted both accomplishments and remaining challenges. The WHO strategy to interrupt LF transmission is based on annual mass drug administration (MDA) using two-drug combinations. After mapping the geographic distribution of LF, MDA is implemented for ≥ 5 years, followed by a period of post-MDA surveillance, and, ultimately, verification of LF elimination. Morbidity management further reduces disease burden. Of 81 countries considered LF-endemic in 2000, 52 (64.2%) have begun MDA; 10 (12.3%) others with low-level transmission are unlikely to require MDA. In 2008, ~695 million people were offered treatment (51.7% of the at-risk population); ~496 million participated. Approximately 22 million people have been protected from LF infection and disease, with savings of ~US $24.2 billion. Morbidity management programmes have been implemented in 27 (33.3%) countries. Significant challenges to LF elimination remain. These include: initiating MDA in the remaining 19 countries that require it; achieving full geographic coverage in countries where MDA has started; finding alternative strategies to address the problem of Loa loa co-endemicity in Central Africa; developing strategies to treat urban populations; initiating and sustaining MDA in settings of armed conflict; developing refined guidelines and procedures for

  9. Patenting biotechnologies: the European Union Directive 98/44/EC of the European parliament and of the council of 6th July 1998 on the legal protection of biotechnological inventions.

    PubMed

    Morelli Gradi, G

    1999-01-01

    Before the Directive 98/44/EC of the European Parliament and the Council of 6th July 1998, notwithstanding some decisions of the European Patent Office (still presently under opposition) and some patents already granted by the Italian Patent Office, the existing legal framework did not allow the patentability of living organisms in the European Community countries. The Directive has dramatically changed the perspectives. It ensures free circulation of patented biotechnological products harmonising the national legal system of each Member State, guaranteeing compliance with the European Patent Convention signed in Munich on 5th October 1973, the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights agreement of 15th April 1994 and the Rio de Janeiro Convention on Biological Diversity of 5th June 1992. The legal basis of the Directive and the fundamental principles of protection are that discoveries as such are not considered patentable. Plant and animal varieties as such, as well as essentially biological procedures for the production of plants and animals are excluded from protection by patent. On the contrary, the new field of patentability covers plants and parts of animals with new introduced genetic characters. Methods of surgical and therapeutic treatment and diagnostic methods applied to animal bodies are not considered inventions suitable for industrial applications and excluded from protection by patents. Biological materials and material isolated from its natural environment and isolated elements of the human body with technical processes may be patented. Excluded from patentability are inventions that are contrary to law and order or public morality as well as processes for human cloning for reproductive purposes and for modifying the germ-line genetic identity of human beings, as well as the use of human embryos. The processes for modifying the genetic identity of animals without any substantial medical benefit for man (with the exception of studying new

  10. First Day of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bort, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In this brief article, the author, a science teacher at F. C. Hammond Middle School in Alexandria, Virginia, describes how the setting up of a simple science experiment on the first day of school can get students excited about learning science. The experiment involves heating a small amount of water in a flask, then covering the opening of the…

  11. Scheduling: Seven Period Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Driven by stable or declining financial resources many school districts are considering the costs and benefits of a seven-period day. While there is limited evidence that any particular scheduling model has a greater impact on student learning than any other, it is clear that the school schedule is a tool that can significantly impact teacher…

  12. Fabulous Weather Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in…

  13. 90-Day Cycle Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sandra; Takahashi, Sola

    2013-01-01

    90-Day Cycles are a disciplined and structured form of inquiry designed to produce and test knowledge syntheses, prototyped processes, or products in support of improvement work. With any type of activity, organizations inevitably encounter roadblocks to improving performance and outcomes. These barriers might include intractable problems at…

  14. Day Care: Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Florence P.; And Others

    This collection of 12 short, bilingual papers on nutrition and preschool children is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Topics dealt with include an overview of children's nutritional needs; development of…

  15. An Earth Day Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Don, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presents what the author believes to be some of the most important environmental books published since Earth Day 1970. Discusses each selection and how it provides the historical background, basic information, and appreciation necessary to understand the character of our environmental dilemma and our need to address it. (MCO)

  16. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  17. Make a Splash Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coverdale, Greg; Rust, April; Jensen, Belinda

    2004-01-01

    At the annual, all-day events-sponsored by Project WET (Water Education for Teachers) and held in nearly every state across the country each September--students participate in interactive activities and exhibits to learn about water resources and explore how human behaviors, such as development and recreation, can affect the quality of the…

  18. One Play a Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate theater students rarely get the chance to work on a major world premiere, but this year hundreds of them will. Currently, more than 70 colleges and universities are participating in "365 Days/365 Plays," an ambitious project from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks. Every week, as they mount their portion of this epic…

  19. Seize the Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkey, Tim

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve what happens in classrooms, a considerable amount of work needs to take place between teachers and principals. This can only happen if campus leaders make dramatic shifts in how and where they spend their daily time. Principals can have a greater impact on teaching and learning by transforming their work one day at a time. The…

  20. Predictive Factors of Postoperative Pain and Postoperative Anxiety in Children Undergoing Elective Circumcision: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsamoudaki, Stella; Ntomi, Vasileia; Yiannopoulos, Ioannis; Christianakis, Efstratios; Pikoulis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Although circumcision for phimosis in children is a minor surgical procedure, it is followed by pain and carries the risk of increased postoperative anxiety. This study examined predictive factors of postoperative pain and anxiety in children undergoing circumcision. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children scheduled for elective circumcision. Circumcision was performed applying one of the following surgical techniques: sutureless prepuceplasty (SP), preputial plasty technique (PP), and conventional circumcision (CC). Demographics and base-line clinical characteristics were collected, and assessment of the level of preoperative anxiety was performed. Subsequently, a statistical model was designed in order to examine predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Assessment of postoperative pain was performed using the Faces Pain Scale (FPS). The Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire study was used to assess negative behavioral manifestations. Results A total of 301 children with a mean age of 7.56 ± 2.61 years were included in the study. Predictive factors of postoperative pain measured with the FPS included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the absence of siblings, and c) the presence of postoperative complications. Predictive factors of postoperative anxiety included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the level of education of mothers, c) the presence of preoperative anxiety, and d) a history of previous surgery. Conclusions Although our study was not without its limitations, it expands current knowledge by adding new predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Clearly, further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm its results. PMID:26495079

  1. Use of Kaolin-impregnated Gauze for Improvement of Intraoperative Hemostasis and Postoperative Wound Healing in Blepharoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Czyz, Craig N.; Stacey, Andrew W.; Cahill, Kenneth V.; Foster, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Kaolin is a mineral shown to be effective in controlling hemorrhage when combined with standard gauze and applied to wounds. This study investigates the application of kaolin to control intraoperative bleeding and promote wound healing in eyelid surgery. Methods: This prospective, randomized, double-blind study recruited patients who underwent eyelid surgery. Following skin incision, kaolin-impregnated gauzewas placed in one eyelid wound bed and cotton gauze in the other, then removed. Distinct, individual areas of bleeding were recorded. Standardized photographs were obtained postoperatively on Day 1, 4, and 7. Photographs were graded for edema and ecchymosis by four blinded observers. Patients also completed a survey inquiring which side had more bruising, swelling, and pain at each return visit. Results: A total of 46 patients completed the study. The number of intraoperative bleeding sites for kaolin versus plain gauze was not significantly different (p=0.96). Photographic grading by blinded observers did not identify any statistically significant differences in postoperative edema at any time point between lids. There was a statistically significant difference for ecchymosis at postoperative Day 4 (p=0.009) and Day 7 (p=0.016). Patient surveys did not show any difference in perceived edema, ecchymosis, or pain between lids. Conclusion: Intraoperative hemostasis was not affected by the use of kaolin-impregnated gauze. The effectiveness of kaolin in wound healing showed improved ecchymosis at Days 4 and 7 when assessed by blinded observers. Patients did not notice any improvement in postoperative edema, ecchymosis, or pain. PMID:27386052

  2. Immediate postoperative complications in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Bithal, Parmod K.; Schaller, Bernhard; Dash, Hari Hara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the important role of pituitary gland in regulating various endocrine axes and its unique anatomical location, various postoperative complications can be anticipated resulting from surgery on pituitary tumors. We examined and categorized the immediate postoperative complications according to various tumor pathologies. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective study in 152 consecutive patients and noted various postoperative complications during neurosurgical intensive care unit stay (within 48 hrs of hospital stay) in patients undergoing transsphenoidal removal of pituitary tumors. Results: In our series, various groups showed different postoperative complications out of which, cerebrospinal fluid leak was the commonest followed by diabetes insipidus, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and hematoma at operation site. Conclusion: Various immediate postoperative complications can be anticipated in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery even though, it is considered to be relatively safe. PMID:25191182

  3. External Nursing Applications in the Supportive Management of Prolonged Postoperative Ileus: Description of Interventions and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Deckers, Bernhard; von Schoen-Angerer, Tido; Voggenreiter, Bernd; Vagedes, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged postoperative ileus is a common but clinically challenging problem that leads to patient discomfort and prolonged hospitalization; the condition is managed through a multimodular program of supportive measures. In anthroposophic nursing, the management of prolonged postoperative ileus involves additional tools, including external abdominal compresses and massages with plant or silver-containing oils and ointments. We describe 3 typical techniques: Oxalis tincture compresses, Thuja/Argentum ointment compresses, and massage with "Wala Melissenöl" (containing Melissa officinalis, Carvum cari, Foeniculum amari, and Origanum majorana). A 61-year-old man with chronic pain from adhesions after multiple abdominal surgical procedures developed a prolonged postoperative ileus after an elective ileostomy reversal. Following slow recovery during the first postoperative days, he began vomiting. A nasogastric tube was inserted, and daily Oxalis tincture compresses and massage with "Wala Melissenöl" and Thuja/Argentum ointment compresses were applied on the abdomen. The patient's symptoms gradually improved over the next 10 days. No prokinetic medications were needed to manage this episode. External abdominal nursing applications with plant substances and silver can be an additional tool in the management of prolonged postoperative ileus. PMID:27309410

  4. Postoperative Nutritional Effects of Early Enteral Feeding Compared with Total Parental Nutrition in Pancreaticoduodectomy Patients: A Prosepective, Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon Seong; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Kim, Jae Keun

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of early enteral feeding (EEN) have been demonstrated in gastrointestinal surgery. But, the impact of EEN has not been elucidated yet. We assessed the postoperative nutritional status of patients who had undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) according to the postoperative nutritional method and compared the clinical outcomes of two methods. A prospective randomized trial was undertaken following PD. Patients were randomly divided into two groups; the EEN group received the postoperative enteral feed and the control group received the postoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN) management. Thirty-eight patients were included in our analyses. The first day of bowel movement and time to take a normal soft diet was significantly shorter in EEN group than in TPN group. Prealbumin and transferrin were significantly reduced on post-operative day (POD) 7 and were slowly recovered until POD 90 in the TPN group than in the EEN group. EEN group rapidly recovered weight after POD 21 whereas it was gradually decreased in TPN group until POD 90. EEN after PD is associated with preservation of weight compared with TPN and impact on recovery of digestive function after PD. PMID:22379336

  5. Postoperative nutritional effects of early enteral feeding compared with total parental nutrition in pancreaticoduodectomy patients: a prosepective, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon Seong; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Kim, Jae Keun; Yoon, Dong Sup

    2012-03-01

    The benefits of early enteral feeding (EEN) have been demonstrated in gastrointestinal surgery. But, the impact of EEN has not been elucidated yet. We assessed the postoperative nutritional status of patients who had undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) according to the postoperative nutritional method and compared the clinical outcomes of two methods. A prospective randomized trial was undertaken following PD. Patients were randomly divided into two groups; the EEN group received the postoperative enteral feed and the control group received the postoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN) management. Thirty-eight patients were included in our analyses. The first day of bowel movement and time to take a normal soft diet was significantly shorter in EEN group than in TPN group. Prealbumin and transferrin were significantly reduced on post-operative day (POD) 7 and were slowly recovered until POD 90 in the TPN group than in the EEN group. EEN group rapidly recovered weight after POD 21 whereas it was gradually decreased in TPN group until POD 90. EEN after PD is associated with preservation of weight compared with TPN and impact on recovery of digestive function after PD.

  6. [Clinical and functional considerations in some cases of postoperative endophthalmitis].

    PubMed

    Muşat, O; Toma, Oana; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R; Burcea, M

    2013-01-01

    We present 3 cases of postsurgery endophthalmitis, with good initial operatory technique, which were admitted in our hospital within variable time, to which a second surgery was performed, with good postoperative evolution, without any inflammatory signs and preserving the eye. We analyse the pre and post-operative treatment of endophthalmitis, but also the ways to prevent the appearance of this post-operative complication.

  7. [Clinical and functional considerations in some cases of postoperative endophthalmitis].

    PubMed

    Muşat, O; Marinescu, Oana; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R

    2012-01-01

    We present 3 cases of postsurgery endophthalmitis, with good initial operatory technique, which were admitted in our hospital within variable time, to which a second surgery was performed, with good postoperative evolution, without any inflamatory signs and preserving the eye. We analyse the pre and post-operative treatment of endophthalmitis, but also the ways to prevent the appearance of this post-operative complication.

  8. Tubeless video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) under non-intubated, intravenous anesthesia with spontaneous ventilation and no placement of chest tube postoperatively

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fei; Liu, Jun; Li, Shuben; Yin, Weiqiang; Xin, Xu; Shao, Wenlong

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the feasibility and safety of tubeless video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) under non-intubated, intravenous anesthesia with spontaneous ventilation and no placement of a chest tube postoperatively compared with VATS under intubated anesthesia with single-lung mechanical ventilation. Methods A total of 91 patients undergoing tubeless VATS (60 sympathectomies, 22 bullae resections, and 9 mediastinal tumor resections) between December 2012 and December 2015 were included. Additionally, 82 patients were treated by VATS by the same team while under intubated general anesthesia (52 sympathectomies, 19 bullae resections, and 11 mediastinal tumor resections). Comprehensive early outcome data, including intraoperative and postoperative variables, were compared between the subgroups. Results In total, 89 patients in the tubeless group underwent an effective operation and exhibited good postoperative recovery, while 2 (one sympathectomy and one bullae resection) had their operation aborted for some reason. The tubeless group showed advantages in the postoperative fasting time, the mean duration of the postoperative hospital stay, and postoperative pain scores, while no significant difference was found in intraoperative blood loss, the operation time or postoperative complications between the tubeless group and the intubated group. Furthermore, 83% (49/59) of sympathectomies, 81% (17/21) of bullae resections, and 56% (5/9) of mediastinal tumor resections were achieved via day surgery. Conclusions In this study, our experience has shown that tubeless VATS is a safe and feasible surgery with certain advantages in selected patients with thoracic disease and that we can achieve day surgery in these cases. PMID:27621880

  9. Single dose dipyrone for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Faura, Clara; Edwards, Jayne; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Dipyrone (metamizole) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used in some countries to treat pain (postoperative, colic, cancer, and migraine); it is banned in others because of an association with life-threatening blood agranulocytosis. This review updates a 2001 Cochrane review, and no relevant new studies were identified, but additional outcomes were sought. Objectives To assess the efficacy and adverse events of single dose dipyrone in acute postoperative pain. Search methods The earlier review searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and the Oxford Pain Relief Database to December 1999. For the update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE,EMBASE and LILACS to February 2010. Selection criteria Single dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo or active controlled trials of dipyrone for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. We included oral, rectal, intramuscular or intravenous administration of study drugs. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief over six hours (TOTPAR) was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. Derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over six hours. Use and time to use of rescue medication were additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Fifteen studies tested mainly 500 mg oral dipyrone (173 participants), 2.5 g intravenous dipyrone (101), 2.5 g intramuscular dipyrone (99); fewer than 60 participants received any other dose. All studies used active controls (ibuprofen, paracetamol, aspirin, flurbiprofen, ketoprofen, dexketoprofen, ketorolac, pethidine, tramadol, suprofen); eight used placebo controls. Over 70% of participants

  10. Novel pharmaceuticals in the management of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Novel pharmaceutical advances in postoperative pain management include both non-opioid adjuvants as well as opioid analgesics. Optimizing postoperative analgesics includes improving onset of action, matching duration of analgesia to the setting of use, and minimizing adverse events. To improve on the current standard of care, the physicochemical properties of new analgesics and route of administration must be taken into consideration in order to achieve these three goals. Appropriately, patient satisfaction with postoperative pain is a key emphasis in hospital-focused patient satisfaction surveys, thereby focusing much-needed attention on improvement of care in the postoperative setting from both an analgesic efficacy and safety standpoint.

  11. Multiple postoperative intracerebral haematomas remote from the site of craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Rapanà, A; Lamaida, E; Pizza, V

    1998-08-01

    A postoperative haemorrhage is a common and serious complication of a neurosurgical procedure. It usually occurs at the site of the surgery, but on occasion a postoperative haematoma is found at a distance from the previous craniotomy. Multiple postoperative haemorrhages are extremely rare. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, operated on for the removal of a supratentorial astrocytoma, who developed in the early post-operative period multiple bilateral intracerebral haematomas without involvement of the surgical bed. PMID:10070433

  12. Early postoperative complications following ostomy surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Butler, Doris L

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews early postoperative complications in adults undergoing ostomy surgery. Whether the ostomy is the result of an emergent or elective procedure, the WOC nurse and staff nurses are responsible for monitoring and ensuring quality healthcare for the patient. Nevertheless, many patients undergoing ostomy surgery experience a complication during the early postoperative period. Early postoperative complications not only influence immediate postoperative care but may also impact quality of life for the person living with an ostomy. Keen assessment skills, early recognition of signs and symptoms of a complication, and prompt interventions are crucial to maintaining a viable stoma and a successful surgical outcome.

  13. Comprehensive Postoperative Management After Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tien, Duc A; Stokken, Janalee K; Recinos, Pablo F; Woodard, Troy D; Sindwani, Raj

    2016-02-01

    To maximize outcomes from endoscopic skull base surgery, careful early postoperative management is critically important. Standardized postoperative regimens are lacking. The type of reconstruction and presence and type of cerebrospinal fluid leak dictate management. If a leak is encountered intraoperatively, patients should avoid maneuvers that increase intracranial pressures for at least 1 month. Early postoperative care focuses on minimizing and managing nasal crusting. This article reviews the evidence in the literature on postoperative management, complications, and quality of life after surgery, and outlines our experience in the management of patients after endoscopic skull base surgery.

  14. Market day midwives.

    PubMed

    1994-06-01

    In August 1994 in Uganda, the Social Marketing for Change (SOMARC) project invited midwives to counsel clients and sell low-dose oral contraceptives (OCs), condoms, and the progestin-only OCs in local markets. They now sell these contraceptives from vendor stalls in busy markets, which allows clients to speak privately with the midwives. The midwives refer clients to their maternity clinics or to hospitals for other contraceptive methods and reproductive/maternal and child health (MCH) services. All Market Day Midwives have taken a 1-month family planning course and a course in quality of customer service. By the end of March 1994, 17 midwives served 22 marketplaces ranging from rural village markets operating once every 2 weeks to very busy, daily city markets. Some markets have 15 permanent stalls, while other midwives move within markets. Market Day Midwives have been able to add more than 1900 women to the list of women using the OC Pilplan. 65% of the new acceptors had not used any OC before Pilplan. 46% of them would be women considered to be high risk if they were to become pregnant (teenagers, women over 35, and women with many children). These midwives have been successful because they operate where the people are and they provide anonymity. Market Day Midwives have also brought in men who seek them out for family planning/sexually transmitted disease prevention services. They have sold more than 1000 Protector condoms. Another benefit of the market day approach is professional growth of the midwives. They often invest their earnings into new equipment and their private maternity clinics. They have learned the significance of advertising and the value of high-quality customer service. They look to expand into other markets and to integrate MCH products (e.g., oral rehydration) into their contraceptive business.

  15. Flight Day 2 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The STS-107 second flight day begins with a shot of the Spacehab Research Double Module. Live presentations of experiments underway inside of the Spacehab Module are presented. Six experiments are shown. As part of the Space Technology and Research Student Payload, students from Australia, China, Israel, Japan, New York, and Liechtenstein are studying the effect that microgravity has on ants, spiders, silkworms, fish, bees, granular materials, and crystals. Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla is seen working with the zeolite crystal growth experiment.

  16. The Dying Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiles, Carl

    1993-05-01

    The 85-foot telescope's dying day was part of a week of memorably unusual weather---which, in turn, was part of a memorable winter in California (and elsewhere!). On this day, it spent several hours finishing a months-long, apparently successful observation of Zeeman splitting of the 18-cm OH lines in absorption against the Galactic center continuum source Sgr A. Later, it continued a survey of weak diffuse radio recombination lines near the Galactic plane---observations that were interrupted by strong winds, which made the telescope move to the stow position. We know the rest. Had the telescope not been destroyed, it would have been reconfigured the following day to observe the 21-cm line. It would have continued an ongoing survey of interstellar magnetic fields using Zeeman splitting of the 21-cm line. It would have begun a search for broad, weak line wings, which had been previously discovered in association with supernova remnants. It would have been involved in a number of H I mapping projects. And it would have continued its measurements of diffuse radio recombination lines. Had it not been for the inclement weather, the weekend would have seen it being used in laboratory exercises for undergraduates at UC Berkeley.

  17. Hair Transplantation: Preventing Post-operative Oedema.

    PubMed

    Gholamali, Abbasi; Sepideh, Pojhan; Susan, Emami

    2010-05-01

    Swelling or oedema of forehead or eyelids is a common consequence of hair transplantation surgery. However, this results in increased morbidity and absence from work due to unaesthetic appearance. To study various physical and therapeutic modalities to reduce or completely prevent the occurrence of such oedema. Three hundred forty hair transplant patients were recruited in the study and were categorized into 8 groups depending upon the intervention employed. There were 32 dropouts in the study due to various reasons. Patients who were administered steroid with tumescent solution had the highest number of patients without oedema, with only 3 out of 117 patients developing oedema. Physical measures like position of head during sleeping, application of occlusion bands or ice packs did not show satisfactory results. Addition of triamcinolone to tumescent anaesthetic solution is a very effective technique of preventing post-operative swelling. PMID:21031066

  18. Postoperative pain relief and regional techniques.

    PubMed

    Reiz, S

    1984-01-01

    The methods of providing postoperative analgesia by regional anaesthetic techniques with local anaesthetics are outlined. For the use of epidural analgesia, the techniques of inserting an epidural catheter at any level of the spine must be familiar. The block should be regional, restricted to the area of pain and effective at all times after its institution with a minimum of side effects. Bupivacaine is at present the best local anaesthetic and can be administered either as intermittent injections with an interval of 1-2 hours or as a continuous infusion. A dose regimen for thoracic, abdominal, perineal and lower extremity pain is presented. Side effects of the epidural technique and ways to treat and avoid them are discussed. The intercostal nerve block for post-thoracotomy and upper abdominal pain is described with special reference to the recent development of the continuous technique with bupivacaine and the cryoanalgesia technique. PMID:6497310

  19. [ULTRASOUND MONITORING FEATURES OF POSTOPERATIVE HEPATIC ECHINOCOCCOSIS].

    PubMed

    Melia, Kh; Kokaia, N; Manjgaladze, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate ultrasound features (US) of liver after post operative anti-parasite recurrence treatment of patients with echinococcosis. The clinical analyses of 50 patients were carried out. It was concluded that the use of ultrasound can provide valuable data to the clinician to assess and monitor anti parasitic therapy echinococcosis of liver in post operative period. During the monitoring the positive dynamics of disease was observed in 94,5% of cases, in 5% оf cases toxic hepatites with septic complication was diagnosed, and in 0,5% of cases the disease recurrence was revealed. Ultrasound semiotics of liver after post operative anti-parasite recurrence treatment of patients with echinococcosis was presented. Control and monitoring of patients in the postoperative period echinococcosis with appropriate antirelapse antiparasitic therapy should be held not less than 1-5 years. PMID:26870968

  20. [How to control postoperative pain: intravenous route].

    PubMed

    Occella, P; Vivaldi, F

    2003-12-01

    Intravenous administration of analgesic drugs is one of the most common ways to control post-operative pain. It can be used in almost all kinds of surgical interventions and particularly those of medium and high complexity. Besides, when other techniques are contraindicated because of clinical and/or managing problems, intravenous way finds its best application. Among analgesic drugs NSAID (ketorolac) and opioids (tramadol, morphine, buprenorphine) are most frequently used. As to administration techniques, elastomeric pump is, according to personal experience, a simple-to-manage, practical and precise device with lower cost respect to other administration set. Elastomeric pump is a single use reservoir that allows continuous administration of drugs with a uniform pre-set infusion speed. Finally, guide-lines, showing pre-load and infusion doses of analgesic drugs, based on pain intensity, are presented. PMID:14663417

  1. Nonoperative and postoperative rehabilitation for glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Kevin E; Macrina, Leonard C

    2013-10-01

    The glenohumeral joint is an inherently unstable joint that relies on the interaction of the dynamic and static stabilizers to maintain stability. Disruption of this interplay or poor development of any of these factors may result in instability, pain, and a loss of function. Rehabilitation will vary based on the type of instability present and the key principles described. Whether a course of nonoperative rehabilitation is followed or the patient presents postoperatively, a comprehensive program designed to establish full ROM and balance capsular mobility, in addition to maximizing muscular strength, endurance, proprioception, dynamic stability, and neuromuscular control is essential. A functional approach to rehabilitation using movement patterns and sport-specific positions along with an interval sport program will allow a gradual return to athletics. The focus of the program should minimize the risk of recurrence and ensure that the patient can safely return to functional activities.

  2. Postoperative conversion disorder in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Judge, Amy; Spielman, Fred

    2010-11-01

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM IV), conversion disorder is classified as a somatoform illness and defined as an alteration or loss of physical function because of the expression of an underlying psychological ailment. This condition, previously known as hysteria, hysterical neurosis, or conversion hysteria occurs rarely, with an incidence of 11-300 cases per 100,000 people (American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 4th edn. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Presentation after an anesthetic is exceptional. After thorough review of the literature, fewer than 20 cases have been documented, with only two instances in patients younger than 18 years of age after general anesthesia; both were mild in nature. We present a severe case of postoperative conversion disorder that developed upon emergence from anesthesia in a previously healthy 16-year-old girl following direct laryngoscopy with vocal fold injection.

  3. [ULTRASOUND MONITORING FEATURES OF POSTOPERATIVE HEPATIC ECHINOCOCCOSIS].

    PubMed

    Melia, Kh; Kokaia, N; Manjgaladze, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate ultrasound features (US) of liver after post operative anti-parasite recurrence treatment of patients with echinococcosis. The clinical analyses of 50 patients were carried out. It was concluded that the use of ultrasound can provide valuable data to the clinician to assess and monitor anti parasitic therapy echinococcosis of liver in post operative period. During the monitoring the positive dynamics of disease was observed in 94,5% of cases, in 5% оf cases toxic hepatites with septic complication was diagnosed, and in 0,5% of cases the disease recurrence was revealed. Ultrasound semiotics of liver after post operative anti-parasite recurrence treatment of patients with echinococcosis was presented. Control and monitoring of patients in the postoperative period echinococcosis with appropriate antirelapse antiparasitic therapy should be held not less than 1-5 years.

  4. Use of continuous local anesthetic infusion in the management of postoperative split-thickness skin graft donor site pain.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Jorge L Reguero; Savetamal, Alisa; Crombie, Roselle E; Cholewczynski, Walter; Atweh, Nabil; Possenti, Paul; Schulz, John T

    2013-01-01

    Donor sites from split-thickness skin grafts (STSG) impose significant pain on patients in the early postoperative period. We report the use of continuous local anesthetic infusion as a method for the management of postoperative STSG donor site pain. Patients undergoing single or dual, adjacent STSG harvest from the thigh (eight patients) or back (one patient) were included in this study. Immediately after STSG harvest, subcutaneous catheters were placed for continuous infusion of local anesthetic. Daily donor site-specific pain severity scores were prospectively recorded in nine patients receiving local anesthetic infusion. Patient characteristics, technical aspects, and postoperative complications were identified in the study. The thigh was the anatomic location chosen for most donor sites. A single catheter was placed for donor sites limited to 4 inches in width or less. A dual catheter system was used for those wider than 4 inches. An elastomeric pump delivered continuously a total of 4 ml/hr of a solution of 0.5% bupivacaine. The average anesthetic infusion duration was 3.1 days. A substantial decrease in worst, least, and average donor site pain scores was found from the first 24 hours to the second postoperative day in our patients, a treatment trend that continued through postoperative day 3. One patient developed minor anesthetic leakage from the catheter insertion site; and in three cases, accidental dislodgement of the catheters occurred. There were no cases of donor site secondary infection. All donor sites were completely epithelialized at 1-month follow-up. Continuous local anesthetic infusion is technically feasible and may represent an option for postoperative donor site pain control after STSG harvesting. Relative cost-benefit of the technique remains to be determined. PMID:23271060

  5. Differential Postoperative Effects of Volatile Anesthesia and Intraoperative Remifentanil Infusion in 7511 Thyroidectomy Patients: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jun-Young; Choi, Seong-Soo; Yi, Jung Min; Joo, Eun Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Se Ung; Sim, Ji-Hoon; Karm, Myong-Hwan; Ku, Seungwoo

    2016-02-01

    Although remifentanil is used widely by many clinicians during general anesthesia, there are recent evidences of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as an adverse effect. This study aimed to determine if intraoperative remifentanil infusion caused increased pain during the postoperative period in patients who underwent a thyroidectomy. A total of 7511 patients aged ≥ 20 years, who underwent thyroidectomy between January 2009 and December 2013 at the Asan Medical Center were retrospectively analyzed. Enrolled patients were divided into 2 groups: group N (no intraoperative remifentanil and only volatile maintenance anesthesia) and group R (intraoperative remifentanil infusion including total intravenous anesthesia and balanced anesthesia). Following propensity score matching analysis, 2582 patients were included in each group. Pain scores based on numeric rating scales (NRS) were compared between the 2 groups at the postoperative anesthetic care unit and at the ward until 3 days postoperation. Incidences of postoperative complications, such as nausea, itching, and shivering were also compared. The estimated NRS pain score on the day of surgery was 5.08 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.97-5.19) in group N patients and 6.73 (95% CI 6.65-6.80) in group R patients (P < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in NRS scores on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3 between the 2 groups. Postoperative nausea was less frequent in group R (31.4%) than in group N (53.5%) (P < 0.001). However, the incidence of itching was higher in group R (4.3%) than in group N (0.7%) (P < 0.001). Continuous infusion of remifentanil during general anesthesia can cause higher intensity of postoperative pain and more frequent itching than general anesthesia without remifentanil infusion immediately after thyroidectomy. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of continuous remifentanil infusion, volatile anesthesia without opioid may be a good choice for minor surgeries

  6. Nefopam and Ketamine Comparably Enhance Postoperative Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kapfer, Barbara; Alfonsi, Pascal; Guignard, Bruno; Sessler, Daniel I.; Chauvin, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Summary Opioids alone sometimes provide insufficient postoperative analgesia. Co-administration of drugs may reduce opioid use and to improve opioid efficacy. We therefore tested the hypothesis that administration of ketamine or nefopam, to postoperative patients with pain only partly alleviated by morphine, limits the amount of subsequent opioid necessary to produce adequate analgesia. Patients (n=77) recovering from major surgery were given up to 9 mg intravenous morphine. Those still suffering from pain were randomly assigned to blinded administration of: 1) isotonic saline (Control, n=21); 2) ketamine 10 mg (Ketamine, n=22); or, 3) nefopam 20 mg (Nefopam, n=22). Three-mg morphine boluses were subsequently given at 5-minute intervals until adequate analgesia was obtained, or 60 minutes elapsed after the beginning of the study drug administration, or ventilation became insufficient (respiratory rate < 10 breath/minute or saturation by pulse oxymetery < 95%). Supplemental morphine (i.e., after test drug administration) requirements were significantly greater in the Control group [17 ± 10 (SD) mg] than in the Nefopam (10 ± 5 mg, P < 0.005) or Ketamine (9 ± 5 mg, P < 0.001) groups. Morphine titration was successful in all Ketamine and Nefopam patients, but failed in four Control patients (two from respiratory toxicity and two from persistent pain). Tachycardia and profuse sweating were more frequent in patients given nefopam and sedation was greater with ketamine; however, the incidence of other potential complications did not differ between groups. Implications We conclude that ketamine 10 mg and nefopam 20 mg comparably potentiate opioid analgesia, each reducing opioid need by approximately 40%. Ketamine administration was associated with sedation whereas nefopam produced tachycardia and sweating. However, none of the side effects was serious. Either drug can thus be used to potentiate opioid analgesia. PMID:15616073

  7. Electro-acupuncture to prevent prolonged postoperative ileus: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhi-Qiang; Garcia, M Kay; Chiang, Joseph S; Peng, Hui-Ting; Shi, Ying-Qiang; Fu, Jie; Liu, Lu-Ming; Liao, Zhong-Xing; Zhang, Ying; Bei, Wen-Ying; Thornton, Bob; Palmer, J Lynn; McQuade, Jennifer; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether acupuncture can prevent prolonged postoperative ileus (PPOI) after intraperitoneal surgery for colon cancer. METHODS: Ninety patients were recruited from the Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai, China. After surgery, patients were randomized to receive acupuncture (once daily, starting on postoperative day 1, for up to six consecutive days) or usual care. PPOI was defined as an inability to pass flatus or have a bowel movement by 96 h after surgery. The main outcomes were time to first flatus, time to first bowel movement, and electrogastroenterography. Secondary outcomes were quality of life (QOL) measures, including pain, nausea, insomnia, abdominal distension/fullness, and sense of well-being. RESULTS: No significant differences in PPOI on day 4 (P = 0.71) or QOL measures were found between the groups. There were also no group differences when the data were analyzed by examining those whose PPOI had resolved by day 5 (P = 0.69) or day 6 (P = 0.88). No adverse events related to acupuncture were reported. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture did not prevent PPOI and was not useful for treating PPOI once it had developed in this population. PMID:20039456

  8. Can we improve parents’ management of their children’s postoperative pain at home?

    PubMed Central

    Chorney, Jill MacLaren; Twycross, Alison; Mifflin, Katherine; Archibald, Karen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thousands of children undergo surgery each year, and a shift toward same-day surgeries and decreased lengths of hospital stay results in parents being increasingly responsible for their child’s postoperative care. Recent studies have tested interventions designed to improve parent management of their children’s postoperative pain at home, but progress in this area has been limited by a lack of synthesis of these findings. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of interventions aimed at improving parent management of children’s postoperative pain at home. METHODS: Articles evaluating interventions to improve management of their children’s postoperative pain were identified using a library scientist-designed search strategy applied in EMBASE, PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO. Two independent raters assessed each study for eligibility and extracted data. RESULTS: Of the 147 articles identified for the review, eight met the inclusion criteria. Interventions included pain education, training in pain assessment, education on distraction, instruction in around-the-clock dosing and nurse coaching. Overall, results of comparisons of pain intensity and analgesic administration were modest. The intervention with the largest effect size was instruction in around-the-clock dosing, either alone or in combination with nurse coaching. Results of studies investigating pain assessment, pain education and distraction trials revealed small to medium effect sizes. CONCLUSIONS: Results of trials investigating interventions to improve parent management of their children’s postoperative pain at home were modest. Future studies should further examine barriers and facilitators to pain management to design more effective interventions. PMID:25106030

  9. Post-operative strabismus control and motor alignment for basic intermittent exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Fiona Lee Min; Gesite-de Leon, Bhambi Uellyn; Quah, Boon Long

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess strabismus control and motor ocular alignment for basic exotropia surgery at 5y follow-up. METHODS The medical records of 80 consecutive patients aged less than 17 years of age, who underwent surgery for basic exotropia by a single surgeon between years 2000 to 2009 and completed a minimum of 5y follow-up post-operatively were reviewed. Pre- and post-operative characteristics were documented at 1wk, 6mo, 1, 3 and 5y follow-up. Subjects at 5-year follow-up were assigned to the success group if they had a post-operative angle of deviation within 10 prism diopters of exotropia or within 5 prism diopters of esotropia for distance on prism cover test, and had moderate to good strabismus control. The remaining subjects were assigned to the failure group. RESULTS Post-operative surgical success at one week was 75%, which decreased to 41% at 5y follow-up. The success group was noted to have more patching pre-operatively (P=0.003). The duration of patching a day (P=0.020) and total duration of patching pre-operatively (P=0.030) was higher in the success group. Surgical success at 1y (P=0.004) and 3y (P=0.002) were associated with higher surgical success at 5y follow-up. CONCLUSION Post-operative motor alignment and strabismus control for basic exotropia surgery at 1y and beyond is associated with higher exotropia surgery success at 5-year follow-up. There is an association between pre-operative patching and 5-year surgical success of basic intermittent exotropia surgery. PMID:27500110

  10. Pre- and post-operative management of dental implant placement. Part 1: management of post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Bryce, G; Bomfim, D I; Bassi, G S

    2014-08-01

    Although dental implant placements have high success rates and a low incidence of morbidity, post-operative pain and complications with the healing process have been reported. There is little guidance available regarding optimal pre- and post-operative management of dental implant placement. This first paper discusses the mechanisms of pain associated with dental implant placement and offers guidance to clinicians on optimal pre- and post-operative pain management regimes. The second paper aims to discuss pre- and post-operative means of reducing the risk of early healing complications. PMID:25104691

  11. Reducing Postoperative Pain from Tonsillectomy Using Monopolar Electrocautery by Cooling the Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Lucas; Nissen, Leonardo; Sela, Gustavo; Amara, Yara; Fonseca, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evaluate intraoperative cooling of the oropharynx to reduce postoperative pain in tonsillectomy using monopolar electrocautery. Methods Sixty-six patients, age 1 to 12 years, were selected for the study, 33 in the control group and 33 in the experimental group. After randomization, patients underwent subcapsular dissection and hemostasis with monopolar electrocautery. Patients in the experimental group had the oropharynx cooled after tonsil dissection and hemostasis for 10 minutes. The procedure was done through the oral cavity by irrigation with 500 mL of 0.9% saline, in temperatures between 5°C and 10°C, for 5 minutes. The evaluation of postoperative pain was made with the pain visual analog scale (VAS) for 10 days. As complementary data on the evaluation of pain, we recorded daily use of ketoprofen for pain relief. Results Pain after tonsillectomy assessed by VAS was significantly lower in the experimental group at days 0, 5, and 6 (p < 0.05). There were no differences in the use of ketoprofen between the groups. Conclusion Cooling of the oropharynx after tonsillectomy promotes clinically significant reduction in postoperative pain, without additional complications. PMID:25992083

  12. Does the nicotine patch help in the postoperative period for arterial vessel repair?

    PubMed

    Battista, Vince; Fanua, Sione P; Shaw Wilgis, E F

    2008-01-01

    This study attempts to determine whether a nicotine patch will affect the patency rate of the femoral artery anastomosis in a smoking rat model. Twenty-four rats underwent a smoking protocol of 4 weeks of exposure to cigarette smoke in a smoking chamber at 1 hour per day, using a 1:10 dilution of unfiltered cigarette smoke. Each rat then underwent a femoral artery transaction and anastomosis. Postoperatively, the rats were divided into two groups of 12. Group I had no postoperative smoking or nicotine therapy. Group II had nicotine patch treatment only. The femoral artery was evaluated for flow 7-days postoperatively. At the time of anastomosis, the femoral arteries were smaller in diameter, averaging 0.5 mm (0.4-0.7 mm) as opposed to the normal 0.75-1 mm. All anastomoses were patent at 5 min when the wound was closed. No difference in patency rate occurred with the use of the nicotine patch. PMID:18286657

  13. Postoperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in the Prevention of Keloids

    SciTech Connect

    Veen, Ronald E. Kal, Henk B.

    2007-11-15

    Background: The aim of this study is to show the efficiency of keloidectomy and postoperative interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 35 patients with 54 keloids were treated postoperatively with HDR brachytherapy. The first HDR dose was applied within 6 hours after surgery, and two additional HDR doses were administered on the next day with a six-hour interval. The majority of patients received 6 Gy as the first dose postsurgery and two fractions of 4 Gy (38 keloids) on the next day. Seven keloids were treated postoperatively with three fractions of 6 Gy. The biologically effective dose (BED), derived from the linear quadratic concept, was applied to calculate the BED for the various radiation regimens. The keloid recurrence rates at specific BED values were compared with those derived for other fractionation schemes in the literature. Results: Four recurrences/nonsatisfactory results out of nine treated keloids were observed after treatments with 1 x 4 Gy + 2 x 3 Gy. Only one recurrence out of 38 was found after 1 x 6 Gy + 2 x 4 Gy and none after 3 x 6 Gy. Better cosmetic results were found at the higher-dose schemes. Conclusion: The results of this study prove the effectiveness of HDR brachytherapy after keloidectomy provided that the total HDR dose is sufficient. Currently our scheme is 3 x 6 Gy.

  14. Early postoperative bone scintigraphy in the evaluation of microvascular bone grafts in head and neck reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Schuepbach, Jonas; Dassonville, Olivier; Poissonnet, Gilles; Demard, Francois

    2007-01-01

    Background Bone scintigraphy was performed to monitor anastomotic patency and bone viability. Methods In this retrospective study, bone scans were carried out during the first three postoperative days in a series of 60 patients who underwent microvascular bone grafting for reconstruction of the mandible or maxilla. Results In our series, early bone scans detected a compromised vascular supply to the bone with high accuracy (p < 10-6) and a sensitivity that was superior to the sensitivity of clinical monitoring (92% and 75% respectively). Conclusion When performing bone scintigraphy during the first three postoperative days, it not only helps to detect complications with high accuracy, as described in earlier studies, but it is also an additional reliable monitoring tool to decide whether or not microvascular revision surgery should be performed. Bone scans were especially useful in buried free flaps where early postoperative monitoring depended exclusively on scans. According to our experience, we recommend bone scans as soon as possible after surgery and immediately in cases suspicious of vascularized bone graft failure. PMID:17448223

  15. One Cold Autumn Day

    PubMed Central

    de Schweinitz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral change is at the heart of effective primary care, but when patients don’t change, how do we account for our days? In this personal essay, I relate an encounter with a patient who wants to quit smoking, lose weight, and control her diabetes. I am discouraged when she deflects my recommendations, but a colleague’s comment encourages a deeper inquiry. Knowing the patient’s story and deepening the conversation, however, do not guarantee change. The experience reminds me why patience, humility, and faith are core values of the primary care physician. PMID:25964410

  16. Preventing 30-day readmissions.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Sherri

    2015-03-01

    Preventing 30-day readmissions to hospitals is a top priority in the era of health care reform. New regulations will be costly to health care facilities because of payment guidelines. The most frequently readmitted medical conditions are acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The transition from the hospital and into the home has been classified as a vulnerable time for many patients. During this time of transition patients may fail to fully understand their discharge instructions. Ineffective communication, low health literacy, and compliance issues contribute to readmissions. Telehealth and the use of technology may be used to prevent some readmissions.

  17. Postoperative Change in Ocular Torsion in Intermittent Exotropia: Relationship with Postoperative Surgical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Yeun; Hwang, Sungsoon; Oh, Shin Yeop; Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether objective ocular torsion in intermittent exotropia (IXT) changes after recession surgery, and to evaluate the relationship between change in ocular torsion and clinical parameters in IXT. Sixty patients between 3 and 14 years of age underwent lateral rectus (LR) recession for IXT. Digital fundus photographs were obtained from both eyes of each subject and the disc-foveal angle (ocular torsion) was calculated using image software. We compared the preoperative and postoperative amount of ocular torsion, and analyzed the correlation between the difference in ocular torsion (DOC) and clinical parameters including age, duration of strabismus, stereoacuity, amount of preoperative exodeviation, and mean dose response. We categorized the patients according to DOC value: positive DOC value as group 1, and negative DOC value as group 2. A correlation between ocular torsion dominance and fixation preference was also investigated using the Kappa test. The mean ocular torsion was 15.8 ± 4.6 degrees preoperatively and 13.7 ± 5.1 degrees postoperatively. Compared with preoperative values, the mean ocular torsion showed a significant decrease after LR recession (p<0.001), and a greater preoperative ocular torsion was significantly associated with the amount of DOC (r = 0.37, p<0.001). Degree of stereopsis, mean dose-response, and postoperative exodeviation were significantly different between group 1 (positive DOC) and group 2 (negative DOC) (p<0.001, 0.030, and 0.001 respectively). The Kappa test showed that there was a significant correlation between the dominance of ocular torsion and fixation preference (p = 0.020). Therefore, change in ocular torsion after LR recession can be a useful supplementary indicator for evaluating the degree of fusional control and for predicting postoperative surgical response in IXT. PMID:27622574

  18. Postoperative Change in Ocular Torsion in Intermittent Exotropia: Relationship with Postoperative Surgical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Yeun; Hwang, Sungsoon; Oh, Shin Yeop; Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether objective ocular torsion in intermittent exotropia (IXT) changes after recession surgery, and to evaluate the relationship between change in ocular torsion and clinical parameters in IXT. Sixty patients between 3 and 14 years of age underwent lateral rectus (LR) recession for IXT. Digital fundus photographs were obtained from both eyes of each subject and the disc-foveal angle (ocular torsion) was calculated using image software. We compared the preoperative and postoperative amount of ocular torsion, and analyzed the correlation between the difference in ocular torsion (DOC) and clinical parameters including age, duration of strabismus, stereoacuity, amount of preoperative exodeviation, and mean dose response. We categorized the patients according to DOC value: positive DOC value as group 1, and negative DOC value as group 2. A correlation between ocular torsion dominance and fixation preference was also investigated using the Kappa test. The mean ocular torsion was 15.8 ± 4.6 degrees preoperatively and 13.7 ± 5.1 degrees postoperatively. Compared with preoperative values, the mean ocular torsion showed a significant decrease after LR recession (p<0.001), and a greater preoperative ocular torsion was significantly associated with the amount of DOC (r = 0.37, p<0.001). Degree of stereopsis, mean dose-response, and postoperative exodeviation were significantly different between group 1 (positive DOC) and group 2 (negative DOC) (p<0.001, 0.030, and 0.001 respectively). The Kappa test showed that there was a significant correlation between the dominance of ocular torsion and fixation preference (p = 0.020). Therefore, change in ocular torsion after LR recession can be a useful supplementary indicator for evaluating the degree of fusional control and for predicting postoperative surgical response in IXT. PMID:27622574

  19. Postoperative Change in Ocular Torsion in Intermittent Exotropia: Relationship with Postoperative Surgical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Yeun; Hwang, Sungsoon; Oh, Shin Yeop; Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether objective ocular torsion in intermittent exotropia (IXT) changes after recession surgery, and to evaluate the relationship between change in ocular torsion and clinical parameters in IXT. Sixty patients between 3 and 14 years of age underwent lateral rectus (LR) recession for IXT. Digital fundus photographs were obtained from both eyes of each subject and the disc-foveal angle (ocular torsion) was calculated using image software. We compared the preoperative and postoperative amount of ocular torsion, and analyzed the correlation between the difference in ocular torsion (DOC) and clinical parameters including age, duration of strabismus, stereoacuity, amount of preoperative exodeviation, and mean dose response. We categorized the patients according to DOC value: positive DOC value as group 1, and negative DOC value as group 2. A correlation between ocular torsion dominance and fixation preference was also investigated using the Kappa test. The mean ocular torsion was 15.8 ± 4.6 degrees preoperatively and 13.7 ± 5.1 degrees postoperatively. Compared with preoperative values, the mean ocular torsion showed a significant decrease after LR recession (p<0.001), and a greater preoperative ocular torsion was significantly associated with the amount of DOC (r = 0.37, p<0.001). Degree of stereopsis, mean dose-response, and postoperative exodeviation were significantly different between group 1 (positive DOC) and group 2 (negative DOC) (p<0.001, 0.030, and 0.001 respectively). The Kappa test showed that there was a significant correlation between the dominance of ocular torsion and fixation preference (p = 0.020). Therefore, change in ocular torsion after LR recession can be a useful supplementary indicator for evaluating the degree of fusional control and for predicting postoperative surgical response in IXT.

  20. Postoperative infection in hand surgery. Cause, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, D B

    1994-02-01

    The consequences of postoperative infection in hand surgery are fortunately uncommon but can lead to severe disability. This article reviews the pathogenesis of infections and the role of antibiotics, skin preparation, and surgical technique in the development and prevention of infection. The final sections discuss the role that different disease states and different types of surgery have on the risk of postoperative infection.

  1. Management of Postoperative Spondylodiscitis with and without Internal Fixation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Tao, Hairong; Zhu, Yanhui; Lu, Xiongwei; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spondylodiscitis is relatively uncommon. This complication is associated with increased cost, and long-term of inability to work, and even morbidity. Although the majority of postoperative spondylodiscitis cases can be well managed by conservative treatment, postoperative spondylodiscitis after internal fixation and those cases that are unresponsive to the conservative treatment present challenges to the surgeon. Here, a review was done to analyze the treatment of postoperative spondylodiscitis with/without internal fixation. This review article suggested that majority of postoperative spondylodiscitis without internal fixation could be cured by conservative treatment. Either posterior or anterior debridement can be used to treat postoperative spondylodiscitis without internal fixation when conservative treatment fails. In addition, minimally invasive debridement and drainage may also be an alternative treatment. In case of postoperative spondylodiscitis after internal fixation, surgical treatment was required. In the cervical spine, it can be well managed by anterior debridement, removal of internal fixation, and reconstruction of the spinal stability by using bone grafting/cage/anterior plate. Postoperative spondylodiscitis after internal fixation is successfully managed by combined anterior debridement, fusion with posterior approach and removal of pedicle screw or extension of pedicle screw beyond the lesion site, in the thoracic and lumbar spine. PMID:26242325

  2. Postoperative Imaging of the Knee: Meniscus, Cartilage, and Ligaments.

    PubMed

    Walz, Daniel M

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging appearance of frequently performed surgical procedures of the meniscus, articular cartilage, and ligaments. Imaging algorithms and protocols are discussed with particular attention to MR imaging techniques. Attention is paid to surgical procedures and the expected postoperative appearance as well to commonly identified recurrent and residual disorders and surgical complications. PMID:27545429

  3. Postoperative Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage Associated With Total En Bloc Spondylectomy.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Noriaki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Takayoshi; Igarashi, Takashi; Fang, Xiang; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a serious postoperative complication associated with total en bloc spondylectomy. The authors examined the risk factors for CSF leakage after this procedure. A total of 72 patients underwent total en bloc spondylectomy at the authors' institution between May 2010 and April 2013. Postoperative CSF leakage was observed in 17 of the 72 patients (23.6%). The results of univariate analysis suggested that age 54 years or older, preoperative surgical site irradiation, resection of 3 or more vertebral bodies, and dural injury were significant risk factors for postoperative CSF leakage after total en bloc spondylectomy. Multivariate analysis showed that preoperative surgical site irradiation was the only significant risk factor for postoperative CSF leakage (adjusted odds ratio, 5.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-26.45, P=.046). The authors also assessed the course of treatment for postoperative CSF leakage in each patient. Of 17 patients with postoperative CSF leakage, 13 recovered without further complications, but 4 required reoperation (2 for wound dehiscence, 1 for surgical site infection, and 1 for severe intracranial hypotension). All 4 patients who required reoperation had a history of surgical site irradiation. Thus, this study suggests that careful consideration should be given to postoperative CSF leakage in patients with a history of surgical site irradiation. These findings may contribute to the management of postoperative CSF leakage associated with total en bloc spondylectomy and supplement the information given to the patient in the process of obtaining informed consent.

  4. [One case of postoperative facial paralysis after first branchial fistula].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Xu, Yaosheng

    2015-12-01

    Pus overflow from patent's fistula belew the left face near mandibular angle 2 years agowith a little pain. Symptoms relieved after oral antibiotics. This symptom frequently occurred in the past six months. Postoperative facial paralysis occurred after surgery, and recovered after treatment. It was diagnosed as the postoperative facial paralysis after first branchial fistula surgery.

  5. The impact of opioid-induced hyperalgesia for postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Koppert, Wolfgang; Schmelz, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that--besides their well known analgesic activity - opioids can increase rather than decrease sensitivity to noxious stimuli. Based on the observation that opioids can activate pain inhibitory and pain facilitatory systems, this pain hypersensitivity has been attributed to a relative predominance of pronociceptive mechanisms. Acute receptor desensitization via uncoupling of the receptor from G-proteins, upregulation of the cAMP pathway, activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor system, as well as descending facilitation, have been proposed as potential mechanisms underlying opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Numerous reports exist demonstrating that opioid-induced hyperalgesia is observed both in animal and human experimental models. Brief exposures to micro-receptor agonists induce long-lasting hyperalgesic effects for days in rodents, and also in humans large-doses of intraoperative micro-receptor agonists were found to increase postoperative pain and morphine consumption. Furthermore, the prolonged use of opioids in patients is often associated with a requirement for increasing doses and the development of abnormal pain. Successful strategies that may decrease or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia include the concomitant administration of drugs like NMDA-antagonists, alpha2-agonists, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioid rotation or combinations of opioids with different receptor/selectivity.

  6. Risk Factors for Postoperative Retention After Hemorrhoidectomy: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Qi-Ming, Xue; Jue-Ying, Xiang; Ben-Hui, Chen; Jing, Wu; Ning, Li

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors for urinary retention after hemorrhoidectomy. With the approval of West China Hospital of Sichuan University Ethics Board, data were abstracted from 961 charts of patients who underwent hemorrhoidectomy from January 1, 2009, to June 30, 2011. The outcome was urinary retention in the first 24 hours after surgery. Risk factors were identified using multivariable logistic regression, and they were expressed as odds ratios or 95% confidence intervals. The overall urinary retention rate was 14.8% (n = 142). Significant risk factors associated with postoperative urinary retention included female gender, anesthesia methods, severity of hemorrhoid, a large amount of intravenous fluid administered perioperatively, and length of hospital stay. Logistic regression analysis revealed that female gender (odds ratio, 2.607; p < .01), sacral anesthesia (odds ratio, 2.481; p = .02), more than 3 hemorrhoids resected (odds ratio, 2.658; p < .01), hemorrhoids having 4 degrees of severity (odds ratio, 3.101; p < .01), intravenous fluids > 700 ml (odds ratio, 1.597; p = .02), and length of stay more than 7 days (odds ratio, 1.852; p < .01) were significant predictors of urinary retention post-hemorrhoidectomy.

  7. Acupuncture for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We report on the design and implementation of a study protocol entitled Acupuncture randomised trial for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain - a pilot study (ACUARP) designed to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy performed in the perioperative period on post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomised controlled pilot trial with three arms and partial double blinding. We will compare (a) press needle acupuncture, (b) no treatment and (c) press plaster acupressure in a standardised anaesthetic setting. Seventy-five patients scheduled for laparoscopic surgery to the uterus or ovaries will be allocated randomly to one of the three trial arms. The total observation period will begin one day before surgery and end on the second postoperative day. Twelve press needles and press plasters are to be administered preoperatively at seven acupuncture points. The primary outcome measure will be time from extubation to ‘ready for discharge’ from the post anaesthesia care unit (in minutes). The ‘ready for discharge’ end point will be assessed using three different scores: the Aldrete score, the Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System and an In-House score. Secondary outcome measures will comprise pre-, intra- and postoperative variables (which are anxiety, pain, nausea and vomiting, concomitant medication). Discussion The results of this study will provide information on whether acupuncture may improve patient post anaesthetic recovery. Comparing acupuncture with acupressure will provide insight into potential therapeutic differences between invasive and non-invasive acupuncture techniques. Trial registration NCT01816386 (First received: 28 October 2012) PMID:25047046

  8. Postoperative adverse outcomes among physicians receiving major surgeries: A nationwide retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Liao, Chien-Chang; Shih, Chun-Chuan; Jeng, Long-Bin; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2016-09-01

    Outcomes after surgeries involving physicians as patients have not been researched. This study compares postoperative adverse events between physicians as surgical patients and nonhealth professional controls.Using reimbursement claims data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Program, we conducted a matched retrospective cohort study of 7973 physicians as surgical patients and 7973 propensity score-matched nonphysician controls receiving in-hospital major surgeries between 2004 and 2010. We compared postoperative major complications, length of hospital stay, intensive care unit (ICU), medical expenditure, and 30-day mortality.Compared with nonphysician controls, physicians as surgical patients had lower adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of postoperative deep wound infection (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.40-0.99; P < 0.05), prolonged length of stay (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.62-0.75; P < 0.0001), ICU admission (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.66-0.83; P < 0.0001), and increased medical expenditure (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.73-0.88; P < 0.0001). Physicians as surgical patients were not associated with 30-day in-hospital mortality after surgery. Physicians working at medical centers (P < 0.05 for all), dentists (P < 0.05 for all), and those with fewer coexisting medical conditions (P < 0.05 for all) had lower risks for postoperative prolonged length of stay, ICU admission, and increased medical expenditure.Although our study's findings suggest that physicians as surgical patients have better outcomes after surgery, future clinical prospective studies are needed for validation. PMID:27684836

  9. Clinical results of renal artery embolization to control postoperative hemorrhage after partial nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Chang Ho; Yoon, Chang Jin; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Sang Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background With the wider application of nephron-sparing surgery, there has been an increase in the occurrence of postoperative hemorrhage. However, despite such an increase, there are only a limited number of reports regarding renal artery embolization (RAE) for the management of postoperative bleeding after nephron-sparing surgery, especially after robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (RALPN). Purpose To evaluate the safety and clinical efficacy of transcatheter RAE for postoperative hemorrhage after open partial nephrectomy (OPN) and RALPN. Material and Methods A total of 29 patients (17 men, 12 women; age range, 31–70 years) who were referred to our hospital for postoperative hemorrhage after partial nephrectomy, between December 2003 and December 2014, were selected. We retrospectively reviewed patients’ clinical data, angiographic findings, embolization details, and clinical outcomes. Results Embolization was performed in patients who underwent OPN (25/29) and RALPN (4/29). The angiographic findings were as follows: renal artery pseudoaneurysm (n = 18), contrast extravasation (n = 8), and arteriovenous fistula (n = 3). Fiber-coated microcoil and n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) was administered to the targeted bleeding renal arteries in 12 and 11 patients, respectively. In six patients, fiber-coated microcoil and NBCA were used concurrently. Technical and clinical successes were achieved in all patients (100%). Bleeding cessation was achieved in all patients, and no further relevant surgeries or interventions were required for hemorrhage control. There were no episodes of hemorrhagic recurrence during the follow-up period (median, 20 days; range, 7–108 days). Conclusion Angiography and RAE identified the origin of bleeding and could successfully preserve the residual renal function. PMID:27570638

  10. [Management of postoperative analgesia in patients after craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Imaev, A A; Dolmatova, E V; Lubnin, A Iu

    2013-01-01

    In a review paper, an analysis of publications in the world literature on the problem of acute postoperative pain in neurosurgical patients who underwent craniotomy is performed. Is shown that problem of acute postoperative pain in patients after craniotomy was underestimated for a long time. Mistakenly was thought that these patients do not experience any pain in the early postoperative period. Results of recent studies have shown that up to 80% of these patients may experience acute pain in the range from mild to severe. Unarrested postoperative pain could cause a number of serious secondary complications. This article demonstrates basic approaches to the prevention and treatment of acute postoperative pain in neurosurgical patients after craniotomy--first of all, the use of narcotic analgesics, NSAIDs, and other approaches. PMID:23866579

  11. Proximal row carpectomy with or without postoperative immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R; Degreef, I; De Smet, L

    2008-12-01

    Previously published reports have shown good results after proximal row carpectomy in all cases that had a postoperative immobilisation period from 1 to 4 weeks. Immobilisation is thought to be necessary because of the risk of postoperative subluxation of the carpus and for pain relief. There is, however, no evidence of its value. The results in 13 patients who underwent proximal row carpectomy without postoperative immobilisation were compared with those in 25 patients who underwent proximal row carpectomy with postoperative immobilisation for 4 weeks. After a mean follow-up period of 27 months, no significant differences were found for pain, range of motion or return to work between the two groups. We conclude that postoperative immobilisation is not necessary after proximal row carpectomy.

  12. Impact of enteral nutrition on postoperative immune function and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Hou, M X; Wu, X L; Bao, L D; Dong, P D

    2015-06-10

    We studied the effects of enteral nutrition (EN) support initiated 1 week before surgery on postoperative nutritional status, immune function, and inflammatory response in gastric cancer patients. A total of 200 gastric cancer patients were randomly divided into two groups: EN starting 1 week before surgery (study group) and EN starting early after surgery (control group). The two groups received EN support, following different therapeutic schedules, until the 9th day after operation. In the patients, body weight, skinfold thickness, upper-arm circumference, white blood cell count, albumin, prealbumin, C-reactive protein, peripheral immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, and IgM), T lymphocyte subsets, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were measured 10 days before and after surgery and on the first day after surgery. There was no statistically significant difference in the results of recovery time of passage of gas by anus, abdominal distension, stomachache, blood glucose, hepatic and renal functions, and electrolytes between the two groups of patients (P > 0. 05). Adverse reactions occurred to both groups at 1 and 2 days after operation. Such conditions was improved after the intravenous drip rate was adjusted. The albumin and prealbumin levels of the patients in both groups decreased at 1 day after operation (P < 0. 05). The levels rose when the research was finished (P < 0. 05). The prealbumin level of the study group was higher than that of the control group at 10 days after operation (P < 0. 05). The IgG level of the study group was higher than that of the control group at 10 days after operation (P < 0. 05). The two groups of inflammatory reaction indicators of the study group were lower than those of the control group at 10 days after operation (P < 0. 05). This study indicates that appropriate preoperative EN support for gastric cancer patients can improve their postoperative nutritional status and immune function, can reduce inflammatory response, and is

  13. Proceedings, Dean's Day 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, M.A.

    1999-03-01

    On January 14--15, 1999, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored Deans Day, a conference for the Deans of Engineering and other executive-level representatives from 29 invited universities. Through breakout sessions and a wrap-up discussion, university and Sandia participants identified activities to further develop their strategic relationships. The four primary activities are: (A) concentrate joint efforts on current and future research strengths and needs; (B) attract the best students (at all grade levels) to science and engineering; (C) promote awareness of the need for and work together to influence a national science and technology R and D policy; and (D) enable the universities and Sandia to be true allies, jointly pursuing research opportunities and funding from government agencies and industry.

  14. Equine surgical colic: risk factors for postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    French, N P; Smith, J; Edwards, G B; Proudman, C J

    2002-07-01

    The reason for undertaking this study was that postoperative complications of colic surgery lead to patient discomfort, prolonged hospitalisation and increased cost. Potential risk factors for the 6 most common postoperative complications (jugular thrombosis, ileus, re-laparotomy, wound suppuration, incisional herniation and colic) were evaluated using multivariable models. Jugular thrombosis was associated significantly with heart rate greater than 60 beats/min and with increased packed cell volume (PCV) at admission. The risk of postoperative ileus also increased with increasing PCV at admission and was higher in horses recovering from pedunculated lipoma obstruction. Incisional herniation was strongly associated with wound suppuration and with increasing heart rate at admission. The emergence of cardiovascular parameters as risk factors for several postoperative complications is consistent with the hypothesis that endotoxaemia is important in the development of these complications. Early referral of colic cases, prior to the development of severe endotoxaemic shock, may minimise the risk of some postoperative complications. Horses that have suffered epiploic foramen entrapment, are more than 4 times as likely to undergo re-laparotomy than other horses. Horses that have suffered postoperative ileus have a similarly increased risk of undergoing re-laparotomy. The risk of postoperative colic is significantly associated with horses recovering from large colon torsion (>360 degrees) and with having undergone re-laparotomy. Hazard ratios (with 95% confidence intervals) for these last two effects are 3.1 (1.7, 5.7) and 3.4 (1.9, 6.2), respectively. Knowledge of the risk factors for postoperative complications allows more accurate prognostication postoperatively and suggests ways in which the risk of postoperative complications can be minimised.

  15. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy does not prevent the postoperative protein catabolic response in muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Essén, P; Thorell, A; McNurlan, M A; Anderson, S; Ljungqvist, O; Wernerman, J; Garlick, P J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors determined the effect of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. In addition to a decrease in muscle protein synthesis, after open cholecystectomy, the authors previously demonstrated a decrease in insulin sensitivity. This study on patients undergoing laparoscopic and open surgery, therefore, included simultaneous measurements of protein synthesis and insulin sensitivity. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Laparoscopy has become a routine technique for several operations because of postoperative benefits that allow rapid recovery. However, its effect on postoperative protein catabolism has not been characterized. Conventional laparotomy induces a drop in muscle protein synthesis, whereas degradation is unaffected. METHODS: Patients were randomized to laparoscopic or open cholecystectomy, and the rate of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle was determined 24 hours postoperatively by the flooding technique using L-(2H5)phenylalanine, during a hyperinsulinemic normoglycemic clamp to assess insulin sensitivity. RESULTS: The protein synthesis rate decreased by 28% (1.77 +/- 0.11%/day vs. 1.26 +/- 0.08%/day, p < 0.01) in the laparoscopic group and by 20% (1.97 +/- 0.15%/day vs. 1.57 +/- 0.15%/day, p < 0.01) in the open cholecystectomy group. In contrast, the fall in insulin sensitivity after surgery was lower with laparoscopic (22 +/- 2%) compared with open surgery (49 +/- 5%). CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy did not avoid a substantial decline in muscle protein synthesis, despite improved insulin sensitivity. The change in the two parameters occurred independently, indicating different mechanisms controlling insulin sensitivity and muscle protein synthesis. PMID:7618966

  16. Postoperative Outcome Comparison Between Pudendal Nerve Block and Caudal Block After Lateral Open Internal Sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhaldi, Hazem Mohammad; Salaita, Wasfi Mohammad; Shabaneh, Mohammad Ahmad; Al-Horut, Mohammad Ibrahim; Aldabbas, Raed Mohameh Abu Azzam; Uraiqat, Ahmad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the postoperative outcome between pudendal nerve block and caudal block after open lateral internal sphincterotomy for chronic anal fissure. Methods: Our prospective, randomized and double blind investigation included 123 patients, of both sexes, aged 25-56 years, classed I-II by the American society of anesthesiologists and scheduled for elective open internal lateral sphincterotomy for anal fissure at King Hussein hospital, KHMC, Amman, Jordan, during the period from Jan. 2013 to Feb. 2015. Patients were divided into two groups. Group I included 62 patients (GI, n=62) operated under pudendal nerve block with local infiltration anesthesia and group II included 61 patients (GII, n=61) operated under caudal block. Postoperative pain, surgical duration, period of hospital admission, back to regular working activity and 4 weeks evaluation were compared between the two groups. Results: Postoperative outcome was more enhanced in group II but not significant than in group I. Patients in G-I experienced moderate pain for a mean of 5. 3 days in comparison with 4. 3 days in G-II. P>0. 05. Three patients (4. 9%) in G-II in comparison with 5 patients (8. 1%) in G-I had more hospital stay than 24 hours. Patients in G-II went back to normal activity after a mean of 7. 5 days in comparison with 8. 0 days in G-I. Conclusion: Undergoing open lateral internal sphincterotomy with the aid of Pudendal nerve block is an excellent, easy and safe alternative anesthesia to caudal anesthesia. PMID:26261389

  17. [Trans and postoperative myocardial infarct in heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Rotberg, T; Macías, R; Correa-Suárez, R; Luna, P; Malo, R

    1976-01-01

    1. A study was made of 34 cases (33%) of myocardial infarction trans and immediately postoperative which occurred in 11,210 surgical interventions with and without extracorporeal circulation. 2. This presents a statistical relation of the frequency of myocardial infarction in realtion to the heart disease acquired with or without extracorporeal circulation with the mitral, aortic, and double prosthesis of the mitral and aortic valves. A correlation was also made with the ischemic heart disease subjected to revascularization. The same analysis was carried out in the congenital heart disease with or without extracorporeal circulation. 3. In all cases the antecedents, precipitating factors, and the clinical picture were studied and in 12 cases the necropsy was analized. The principal finding was transmural myocardial infarction with electrocardiographic proof and serial enzymes. 4. The group was divided into two sub-groups; Group "A" with acute myocardial infarction transoperative, and Group "B" with acute myocardial infarction in the first eight postoperative days. The electrical and mechanical complications were analized. 5. A correlation was made of the causes of mortality related to the type of congenital or acquired heart disease with or without extracorporeal circulation. 6. The frequency of this entity was studied with the total time of aortic clamping, and the complications such as the low cardiac output syndrome, rupture of the wall, aneurysms, acute pulmonary edema, and with the disturbances of rhythm and conduction. 7. The presence of 33.3% of normal coronaries in these of necropsy was emphasized. 8. The importance of the coronary profile of this group in relation to the consequences of a stress from anesthesia, surgery, extracorporeal circulation, and aortic clamping is mentioned. 9. The diagnostic parameters such as arterial hypotension with or without the low cardiac output syndrome, enzyme levels, and the action of the potassium ion are mentioned. 10

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a postoperative clinical care pathway in head and neck surgery with microvascular reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a postoperative clinical care pathway for patients undergoing major head and neck oncologic surgery with microvascular reconstruction. Methods This is a comparative trial of a prospective treatment group managed on a postoperative clinical care pathway and a historical group managed prior to pathway implementation. Effectiveness outcomes evaluated were total hospital days, return to OR, readmission to ICU and rate of pulmonary complications. Costing perspective was from the government payer. Results 118 patients were included in the study. All outcomes demonstrated that the postoperative pathway group was both more effective and less costly, and is therefore a dominant clinical intervention. The overall mean pre- and post-pathway costs are $22,733 and $16,564 per patient, respectively. The incremental cost reduction associated with the postoperative pathway was $6,169 per patient. Conclusion Implementing the postoperative clinical care pathway in patients undergoing head and neck oncologic surgery with reconstruction resulted in improved clinical outcomes and reduced costs. PMID:24351020

  19. Prediction of Postoperative Mortality in Liver Transplantation in the Era of MELD-Based Liver Allocation: A Multivariate Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schultze, Daniel; Hillebrand, Norbert; Hinz, Ulf; Büchler, Markus W.; Schemmer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Liver transplantation is the only curative treatment for end-stage liver disease. While waiting list mortality can be predicted by the MELD-score, reliable scoring systems for the postoperative period do not exist. This study's objective was to identify risk factors that contribute to postoperative mortality. Methods Between December 2006 and March 2011, 429 patients underwent liver transplantation in our department. Risk factors for postoperative mortality in 266 consecutive liver transplantations were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. Patients who were <18 years, HU-listings, and split-, living related, combined or re-transplantations were excluded from the analysis. The correlation between number of risk factors and mortality was analyzed. Results A labMELD ≥20, female sex, coronary heart disease, donor risk index >1.5 and donor Na+>145 mmol/L were identified to be independent predictive factors for postoperative mortality. With increasing number of these risk-factors, postoperative 90-day and 1-year mortality increased (0–1: 0 and 0%; 2: 2.9 and 17.4%; 3: 5.6 and 16.8%; 4: 22.2 and 33.3%; 5–6: 60.9 and 66.2%). Conclusions In this analysis, a simple score was derived that adequately identified patients at risk after liver transplantation. Opening a discussion on the inclusion of these parameters in the process of organ allocation may be a worthwhile venture. PMID:24905210

  20. Self-care and postoperative dressing management.

    PubMed

    Dawn Hunt, Sharon

    2016-08-11

    As the increasing burden on healthcare costs continues to rise, posing clinical and financial challenges for all healthcare providers attempting to provide optimal, evidence-based wound care, the situation appears to be reaching the tipping point with regard to reduced resources, increasing patient groups with complex wounds and financial restraints. It is clearly time for action and new ways of working that include empowering patients and carers to take appropriate ownership within their personal wound-care journey. This observational evaluation explores 10 community-based patients presenting with postoperative acute surgical wounds; it examines and evaluates the patients' experience with regard to self-care satisfaction, Leukomed Control product satisfaction and actual traditional/personal costs incurred up to a 4-week period. The evaluation highlights not only an overall positive improvement within patient satisfaction and experience, alongside optimised wound progression and related cost savings, but also offers a valuable insight into the promotion and success of patients taking ownership of their wound-care journey. PMID:27523771

  1. Pterygia: Single-fraction postoperative beta irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, D.C. )

    1991-02-01

    A retrospective evaluation was performed with records of 128 patients with 146 eyes that underwent applications of strontium-90 after pterygium excisions performed between 1982 and 1988. With a median follow-up of 13 months, 135 eyes were evaluable. Most pterygia (127 of 135) were treated with a single postoperative application of Sr-90 that delivered 3,000 cGy of beta radiation in one fraction. The actuarial freedom from relapse was 87%; all recurrences occurred within the first 18 months, and 46% of these within the first 3 months. Of the 13 recurrences, 10 have been re-treated with surgery and a second course of beta irradiation with excellent results. All eight eyes for which follow-up was available had no evidence of disease. The ultimate control rate was 96.3% for the series. Correlation of various treatment parameters, including age, bilaterality, prior recurrence, and interval from surgery to irradiation, was performed, and no statistically significant difference was seen. No serious complications have developed. Transient conjunctivitis and photophobia were almost universally seen, with five cases lasting beyond 5 months. The authors conclude that a single application of Sr-90 after surgery is effective and safe in managing pterygia.

  2. Postoperative Acute Pulmonary Embolism Following Pulmonary Resections

    PubMed Central

    Shonyela, Felix Samuel; Liu, Bo; Jiao, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections is highly fatal complication. Many literatures have documented cancer to be the highest risk factor for acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections. Early diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism is highly recommended and computed tomographic pulmonary angiography is the gold standard in diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic therapy have shown a great success in treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. Surgical therapies (embolectomy and inferior vena cava filter replacement) proved to be lifesaving but many literatures favored medical therapy as the first choice. Prophylaxis pre and post operation is highly recommended, because there were statistical significant results in different studies which supported the use of prophylaxis in prevention of acute pulmonary embolism. Having reviewed satisfactory number of literatures, it is suggested that thoroughly preoperative assessment of patient conditions, determining their risk factors complicating to pulmonary embolism and the use of appropriate prophylaxis measures are the key options to the successful minimization or eradication of acute pulmonary embolism after lung resections. PMID:26354232

  3. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  4. The triple day.

    PubMed

    Smith, V

    1980-08-01

    The risks are high and the returns low when Peruvian women work outside the home, but they have few other options. Most have large families, and their husbands scramble to earn a few dollars. For some women the day begins at 3:30 a.m. when they go to Lima to peddle fish, combs, or whatever commodity is available. The poor women who live in the pueblos jovenes of Lima, the newly formed outskirts, have banded together in a Christian group called Luz y Esperanza, or Light and Hope. The group has a 10-year history of coping with unsanitary water and resultant health problems, child care, and lack of electricity. The women began with neighborhood issues but have also developed an interest in trade unions and other less local concerns. Members have also started to attend union meetings in Lima and involved themselves in recent trade union struggles. The development of the women's political consciousness is closely intertwined with their Christian faith. They believe Christ is the source of the energy they need to persevere. PMID:12262074

  5. Day-1 chick development.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Guojun

    2014-03-01

    The first day of chick development takes place inside the mother hen (in utero), during which the embryo progresses from fertilization to late blastula/early gastrula formation. The salient features of developmental anatomy in this period are conserved among the sauropsids (birds and reptiles). Many of these features are also shared in prototherian (monotreme) embryos, whereas metatherian (marsupial) and eutherian (placental) embryos display significant variations. Important for understanding the evolution of early development in amniotes, the knowledge of cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating in utero chick development may also offer valuable insight into early lineage specification in prototherians and conserved features in mammalian early development. This commentary provides a snapshot of what is currently known about intrauterine chick development and identifies key issues that await further clarification, including the process of cellularization, allocation of maternal determinants, zygotic gene activation, mid-blastula transition, cell layer increase and reduction, radial symmetry breaking, early lineage segregation, and role of yolk syncytium in early patterning. PMID:24550174

  6. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  7. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  8. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  9. [Postoperative pain management. Aims and organization of a strategy for postoperative acute pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Nolli, M; Nicosia, F

    2000-09-01

    The Health Services, not only the Italian one, is under pressure because of request for improving treatment quality and the financial need for reorganization and cost-saving. It's required a rationalization of intervention, together with a careful choice of the best and cheapest techniques and the demonstration of their efficacy. The anaesthesia service activity, in a period of cost rationalization and funds restriction should be aimed to appropriate outcome measures corrected by both patient's risk factors and surgical-anaesthesiological case-mix. The development of a complete strategy for surgical pain management might run into two phases. The first phase, internal and mono-specialistic, should develop like the creation of an Acute Pain Team. The main processes are: focusing the problem (charge of the care), training, information, teaching methodology (timing, methods, drugs, techniques, etc.) and the audit (before and after changes). The main aims are the evaluation of the level of analgesia and pain relief or patient's satisfaction which are partial endpoints useful to demonstrate the improvement and the efficacy of the new pain management strategies. The second phase, multidisciplinary, is directed toward the creation of a Postoperative Evaluation Team. The main objective is to set up a collaborative clinical group able to identify the criteria for quality, efficacy and safety. The major purpose is the evaluation of major outcome measures: surgical outcome, morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. The improvement in the quality of postoperative pain treatment goes through a better organization and a progressive increase of the already available therapy. The achievement of the result and the quality projects depend on the interaction among staff members with different behaviours and settings. Internal teaching and training, continuous education for doctors and nurses, and external information, marketing and improvement of attractive capability of

  10. International Women's Day speech.

    PubMed

    Kazibwe, S W

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the International Women's Day are: 1) to celebrate the struggle for women's rights in the economic, social, political, and cultural domain; 2) to reaffirm women's solidarity in the struggle for peace; 3) and to show what women have achieved. In 1988, Uganda's government of the National Resistance Movement created the Ministry of Women in Development. The period 1988-1990 was one of consultations, needs assessment, planning, and recruiting staff for the Ministry. From 1990 to 1993, measurable results have been achieved. The Ministry's gender concerns pertained to the sector policies of the Ministries of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, Education, Health, Water, Energy, Minerals, and Environment Protection. Under the Umbrella Project for Women in Development, gender sensitization has been achieved with policy makers in ministries, at district level, and in the media. Gender issues have also been incorporated in the National Political School Curriculum. The Ministry has also trained a corps of 73 women trainers from 38 districts. The Ministry, with funding from DANIDA, collected women's views on the constitution through meetings and seminars in all the districts in the country. Recommendations were submitted in a consolidated report to the Constitution Commission. A pilot para-legal scheme is successfully being implemented in Kamuli district. A community-based pool of legal advisors has been developed. Legal matters that affect both women and men are undertaken at the community level. The economic emancipation of women is a crucial part of the Ministry's mandate. In conjunction with NGOs, pilot credit programs are being run in Mukono, Jinja, Mbale, and Kapchorwa districts. Cross-sectoral programs are in close collaboration with the rural water and sanitation program, the Northern Uganda rehabilitation program, and the integrated Basic Education Pilot Project to be implemented in 8 districts. PMID:12345405

  11. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  12. Franco, the Early Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemssen, R. H.

    2004-04-01

    As this meeting is to honour Franco on the occasion of his 60 birthday I thought that it might be fitting to report on some early reminiscences of Franco of the pre-IBA days. Franco first came to Groningen in 1972 for a seminar on the invitation of Alex Lande. Alex and Franco had known each other from the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, where they had collaborated. In 1972 both Alex and I had been freshly appointed at Groningen, Alex on the Faculty of the Theory Department, and I myself as the new director of the KVI. A position for a Senior Scientist in theory had been newly created at the KVI with the aim to establish a strong in-house theory group. Needless to say that everyone who met Franco was deeply impressed by him. We thus were extremely happy to be able to entice Franco to join the KVI as a Senior Scientist in 1974, after he had spent a few weeks in Groningen in 1973 as a visitor. So characteristic of Franco he immediately took a strong interest in the experimental program as evidenced by the following publications on the weak-coupling description of three-nucleon pickup in the (p, α) reaction [1] and the spreading width of deep-hole states [2]. Both topics appear to have maintained their actuality, looking at the many papers that have been published since on these and related topics. But this brief citation of the "other Franco" would not do justice to him without mentioning the diverse palette of Franco's work also listed in the KVI 1974 Annual Report, reflecting Franco's extremely broad and diversified scientific interests. [3-10]...

  13. International Women's Day speech.

    PubMed

    Kazibwe, S W

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the International Women's Day are: 1) to celebrate the struggle for women's rights in the economic, social, political, and cultural domain; 2) to reaffirm women's solidarity in the struggle for peace; 3) and to show what women have achieved. In 1988, Uganda's government of the National Resistance Movement created the Ministry of Women in Development. The period 1988-1990 was one of consultations, needs assessment, planning, and recruiting staff for the Ministry. From 1990 to 1993, measurable results have been achieved. The Ministry's gender concerns pertained to the sector policies of the Ministries of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, Education, Health, Water, Energy, Minerals, and Environment Protection. Under the Umbrella Project for Women in Development, gender sensitization has been achieved with policy makers in ministries, at district level, and in the media. Gender issues have also been incorporated in the National Political School Curriculum. The Ministry has also trained a corps of 73 women trainers from 38 districts. The Ministry, with funding from DANIDA, collected women's views on the constitution through meetings and seminars in all the districts in the country. Recommendations were submitted in a consolidated report to the Constitution Commission. A pilot para-legal scheme is successfully being implemented in Kamuli district. A community-based pool of legal advisors has been developed. Legal matters that affect both women and men are undertaken at the community level. The economic emancipation of women is a crucial part of the Ministry's mandate. In conjunction with NGOs, pilot credit programs are being run in Mukono, Jinja, Mbale, and Kapchorwa districts. Cross-sectoral programs are in close collaboration with the rural water and sanitation program, the Northern Uganda rehabilitation program, and the integrated Basic Education Pilot Project to be implemented in 8 districts.

  14. Federal Policy & American Indian Health Needs: The Role of the Consumers in a National Health Program. Report of the National Conference on Indian Health (6th, New York, New York, October 29-30, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association on American Indian Affairs, Inc., New York, NY.

    American Indian professionals and community representatives, Indian Health Service (IHS) officials, professors of medicine and public health, and other advocates of improved Indian health services attended a 2-day roundtable conference to: explore the relationship of Federal Policy and Indian health needs, and relate these to issues affecting the…

  15. Promoting safety of postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veney, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk for postoperative complications related to administration of pain medications, anxiolytics, and antiemetics. They are more likely to experience respiratory and cardiac complications, be transferred to an intensive care unit, or have an increased length of stay in the hospital. This informational article is for nurses who care for postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The focus is on promoting patient safety through communication, vigilant postoperative sedation assessment, and nursing interventions that include appropriate patient positioning, patient education, and involving patients and their families in care. PMID:24247310

  16. Endocapsular cellulomonas as a cause of persistent postoperative endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shobha; Saffra, Norman A; Chinyadza, Tanyanyiwa; Ghitan, Monica; Chapnick, Edward K

    2008-01-01

    Sequestration of bacteria within the capsular fornices after cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation can cause both acute and chronic inflammation. A case of persistent postoperative endophthalmitis caused by capsular sequestration of Cellulomonas is described. The patient underwent uncomplicated cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation and subsequently developed acute postoperative endophthalmitis. Inflammation persisted despite several vitreous taps and the injection of intravitreal antibiotics. Definitive treatment required pars plana vitrectomy, intraocular lens explantation, capsular bag removal, and intravitreal and parenteral antibiotics. In patients with postoperative endophthalmitis, one must consider atypical organisms as the source and should consider explantation of the intraocular lens with capsular bag removal.

  17. Postoperative prevention of falls in older adults with fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Demontiero, Oddom; Gunawardene, Piumali; Duque, Gustavo

    2014-05-01

    The postoperative period after correction of a fragility fracture is usually associated with functional deconditioning. This deconditioning is caused by multiple factors associated with a higher risk of falls during the immediate postoperative period and after discharge. Identification of risk and appropriate fall prevention interventions in these patients are pivotal. In this article, an overview is presented of the strategies to identify falls risk in postoperative patients after suffering a fragility fracture. Evidence is presented favoring targeted multicomponent intervention for falls prevention rather than a single intervention in fractured older patients at high risk of new falls and fractures.

  18. Incidence of postoperative deep vein thrombosis in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Orr, K B

    1973-06-01

    The author's experience in Vietnam in 1968 indicates a low incidence of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and coronary thrombosis as postoperative complications. Australian surgeons in Vietnam confirm these findings. The role of diet and/or nutrition is discounted since both of these in Vietnam are similar to Queensland, Australia, where postoperative deep vein complications have occurred at a rate similar to those in Britain and the U.S. It is hypothesized that climate in tropical areas may retard these types of postoperative complications. Further investigations will be necessary.

  19. Postoperative Morganella morganii endophthalmitis associated with subclinical urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Tsanaktsidis, Gina; Agarwal, Smita A; Maloof, Anthony J; Chandra, Jay; Mitchell, Paul

    2003-05-01

    We report a case of Morganella morganii acute endophthalmitis following clear corneal phacoemulsification cataract surgery in which a coincident asymptomatic chronic urinary tract infection was detected postoperatively. Morganella morganii is a gram-negative bacillus that inhabits the gastrointestinal tract and is part of the normal fecal flora. It is an opportunistic pathogen usually encountered in postoperative and nosocomial settings, causing urinary tract and wound infections. Chronic urinary tract infection may be a risk factor for postoperative endophthalmitis. A dipstick urinalysis before elective cataract surgery in elderly patients with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections may be considered.

  20. Factors affecting postoperative blood loss in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Faraoni, David; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the influence of cyanotic disease on postoperative blood loss is closely related to age in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of a cyanotic disease is associated with increased postoperative blood loss in children aged 1 to 6 months. Children with cyanotic disease and aged<1 month who received fresh frozen plasma during cardiopulmonary bypass had less postoperative blood loss and higher maximal clot firmness on FIBTEM than cyanotic children from all other groups. Additional studies are needed to define optimal pathophysiology-based management in children undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:24512988

  1. Postoperative Radiation Therapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Node-Positive Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Junqiang; Pan, Jianji; Liu, Jian; Li, Jiancheng; Zhu, Kunshou; Zheng, Xiongwei; Chen, Mingqiang; Chen, Ming; Liao, Zhongxing

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy plus RT (CRT) for the postoperative treatment of node-positive thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TESCC) and to determine the incidence and severity of toxic reactions. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed data from 304 patients who had undergone esophagectomy with 3-field lymph node dissection for TESCC and were determined by postoperative pathology to have lymph node metastasis without distant hematogenous metastasis. Of these patients, 164 underwent postoperative chemotherapy (cisplatin 80 mg/m{sup 2}, average days 1-3, plus paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1; 21-day cycle) plus RT (50 Gy), and 140 underwent postoperative RT alone. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for the CRT and RT groups were 47.4% and 38.6%, respectively (P=.030). The distant metastasis rate, the mixed (regional lymph node and distant) metastasis rate, and the overall recurrence rate were significantly lower in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). However, mild and severe early toxic reactions, including neutropenia, radiation esophagitis, and gastrointestinal reaction, were significantly more common in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). No significant differences in incidence of late toxic reactions were found between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our results show that in node-positive TESCC patients, postoperative CRT is significantly more effective than RT alone at increasing the overall survival and decreasing the rates of distant metastasis, mixed metastasis, and overall recurrence. Severe early toxic reactions were more common with CRT than with RT alone, but patients could tolerate CRT.

  2. Minor Postoperative Increases of Creatinine Are Associated with Higher Mortality and Longer Hospital Length of Stay in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kork, Felix; Balzer, Felix; Spies, Claudia D.; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Ginde, Adit A.; Jankowski, Joachim; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical patients frequently experience postoperative increases in creatinine levels. The authors hypothesized that even small increases in postoperative creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Methods The authors examined the association of postoperative changes from preoperative baseline creatinine with all-cause in-hospital mortality and hospital length of stay (HLOS) in a retrospective analysis of surgical patients at a single tertiary care center between January 2006 and June 2012. Results The data of 39,369 surgical patients (noncardiac surgery n = 37,345; cardiac surgery n = 2,024) were analyzed. Acute kidney injury (AKI)—by definition of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome group—was associated with a five-fold higher mortality (odds ratio [OR], 4.8; 95% CI, 4.1 to 5.7; P < 0.001) and a longer HLOS of 5 days (P < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, congestive heart failure, preoperative hemoglobin, preoperative creatinine, exposure to radiocontrast agent, type of surgery, and surgical AKI risk factors. Importantly, even minor creatinine increases (Δcreatinine 25 to 49% above baseline but < 0.3 mg/dl) not meeting AKI criteria were associated with a two-fold increased risk of death (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.4; P < 0.001) and 2 days longer HLOS (P < 0.001). This was more pronounced in noncardiac surgery patients. Patients with minor creatinine increases had a five-fold risk of death (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 1.5 to 20.3; P < 0.05) and a 3-day longer HLOS (P < 0.01) when undergoing noncardiac surgery. Conclusions Even minor postoperative increases in creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. These results emphasize the importance to find effective therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat even mild forms of postoperative kidney dysfunction to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26492475

  3. Post-operative pain management in head and neck cancer patients: predictive factors and efficacy of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, C; Malagò, M; Crema, L; Aimoni, C; Matarazzo, T; Bortolazzi, S; Ciorba, A; Pelucchi, S; Pastore, A

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest about all aspects of pain sensation for patients undergoing head and neck surgery, and efforts have been made to better assess, monitor and reduce the occurrence of pain. The aetiology of pain is considered to be "multifactorial", as it is defined by several features such as personal experience, quality perception, location, intensity and emotional impact. The aim of this paper is: (i) to evaluate the efficacy of analgesic treatment in patients with head and neck cancer treated by surgery, and (ii) to study the variables and predictive factors that can influence the occurrence of pain. A total of 164 patients, affected by head and neck cancer and surgically treated, between December 2009 and December 2013, were included in this study. Data collected include age, gender, assessment of anaesthetic risk, tumour localisation, pathological cancer stage, TNM stage, type of surgery performed, complexity and duration of surgery, post-operative complications, postoperative days of hospital stay and pain evaluation on days 0, 1, 3 and 5 post-surgery. We studied the appropriateness of analgesic therapy in terms of incidence and prevalence of post-operative pain; we also related pain to patient characteristics, disease and surgical treatment to determine possible predictive factors. The population studied received adequate pain control through analgesic therapy immediately post-surgery and in the following days. No associations between gender, age and post-operative pain were found, whereas pathological cancer stage, complexity of surgery and tumour site were significantly associated with the risk of post-operative pain. Adequate pain control is essential in oncological patients, and particularly in head and neck cancer patients as the prevalence of pain in this localisation is reported to be higher than in other anatomical sites. Improved comprehension of the biological and psychological factors that characterise pain perception will help to

  4. Post-operative pain management in head and neck cancer patients: predictive factors and efficacy of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, C; Malagò, M; Crema, L; Aimoni, C; Matarazzo, T; Bortolazzi, S; Ciorba, A; Pelucchi, S; Pastore, A

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest about all aspects of pain sensation for patients undergoing head and neck surgery, and efforts have been made to better assess, monitor and reduce the occurrence of pain. The aetiology of pain is considered to be "multifactorial", as it is defined by several features such as personal experience, quality perception, location, intensity and emotional impact. The aim of this paper is: (i) to evaluate the efficacy of analgesic treatment in patients with head and neck cancer treated by surgery, and (ii) to study the variables and predictive factors that can influence the occurrence of pain. A total of 164 patients, affected by head and neck cancer and surgically treated, between December 2009 and December 2013, were included in this study. Data collected include age, gender, assessment of anaesthetic risk, tumour localisation, pathological cancer stage, TNM stage, type of surgery performed, complexity and duration of surgery, post-operative complications, postoperative days of hospital stay and pain evaluation on days 0, 1, 3 and 5 post-surgery. We studied the appropriateness of analgesic therapy in terms of incidence and prevalence of post-operative pain; we also related pain to patient characteristics, disease and surgical treatment to determine possible predictive factors. The population studied received adequate pain control through analgesic therapy immediately post-surgery and in the following days. No associations between gender, age and post-operative pain were found, whereas pathological cancer stage, complexity of surgery and tumour site were significantly associated with the risk of post-operative pain. Adequate pain control is essential in oncological patients, and particularly in head and neck cancer patients as the prevalence of pain in this localisation is reported to be higher than in other anatomical sites. Improved comprehension of the biological and psychological factors that characterise pain perception will help to

  5. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  6. 2016 SPD: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors note: This week were in Boulder, Colorado at the 47th meeting of the AAS Solar Physics Division (SPD). Follow along to catch some of the latest news from the field of solar physics!The 2016 SPD meeting was launched this morning from the University of Colorado Boulder campus. Two of the hot topics at this years meeting include celebration of the recent move of the National Solar Observatorys headquarters to Boulder, and discussion of the future Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST). DKIST, planned for a 2019 completion in Hawaii, is the next big telescope on the horizon for solar physics.Todays press conference had an interesting focus: instruments providing new high-energy observations of the Sun. Representatives from four different instruments were here to talk about some of the latest X-ray solar observations.GRIPSThe GRIPS payload flew at 130,000 ft over Antarctica on a giant balloon in January 2016. [NASA/Albert Shih]First up, Albert Shih (NASA Goddard) described the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares, or GRIPS. GRIPS is a balloon-borne instrument designed to detect X-rays and gamma rays emitted during solar flares. Up to tens of a percent of the energy in solar flares is emitted in the form of accelerated particles, but the physics behind this process is not well understood. GRIPS observes where the highest-energy particles are accelerated, in an effort to learn more about the process.GRIPS was launched on 19 January, 2016 and flew for roughly 12 days gathering ~1 million seconds of data! The logistics of this instruments flight are especially interesting, since it was launched from Antarctica and carried by a balloon at a whopping elevation of 130,000 ft (to get high enough that the atmosphere doesnt absorb all the photons GRIPS is trying to observe). Though the data from the mission has been retrieved, the bulk of the hardware remains where it landed at the end of January. It must

  7. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  8. Association of Coronary Stent Indication With Postoperative Outcomes Following Noncardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Carla N.; Hollis, Robert H.; Graham, Laura A.; Richman, Joshua S.; Valle, Javier A.; Itani, Kamal M.; Maddox, Thomas M.; Hawn, Mary T.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current guidelines for delaying surgery after coronary stent placement are based on stent type. However, the indication for the stent may be an important risk factor for postoperative major adverse cardiac events (MACE). OBJECTIVE To determine whether the clinical indication for a coronary stent is associated with postoperative MACE. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study in patients at US Veterans Affairs hospitals who had a coronary stent placed between January 1,2000, and December 31, 2010, and underwent noncardiac surgery within the following 24 months. The association between the indication for stent and postoperative MACE rates was examined using logistic regression to control for patient and procedure factors. EXPOSURES Three subgroups of stent indication were examined: (1) myocardial infarction (MI); (2) unstable angina; and (3) revascularization not associated with acute coronary syndrome (non-ACS). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Composite 30-day postoperative MACE rates including all-cause mortality, MI, or revascularization. RESULTS Among 26 661 patients (median [IQR] age, 68 [61.0–76.0] years; 98.4% male; 88.1% white) who underwent 41 815 surgical procedures within 24 months following coronary stent placement, the stent indication was MI in 32.8% of the procedures, unstable angina in 33.8%, and non-ACS in 33.4%. Postoperative MACE rates were significantly higher in the MI group (7.5%) compared with the unstable angina (2.7%) and non-ACS (2.6%) groups (P < .001). When surgery was performed within 3 months of percutaneous coronary intervention, adjusted odds of MACE were significantly higher in the MI group compared with the non-ACS group (odds ratio [OR] = 5.25; 95% CI, 4.08–6.75). This risk decreased over time, although it remained significantly higher at 12 to 24 months from percutaneous coronary intervention (OR = 1.95; 95% CI, 1.58–2.40). The adjusted odds of MACE for the unstable angina group were similar to those

  9. The occurrence of postoperative atrial fibrillation according to different surgical settings in cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Jakubová, Marta; Mitro, Peter; Stančák, Branislav; Sabol, František; Kolesár, Adrián; Cisarik, Paul; Nagy, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia after cardiac surgery. The pathogenesis of postoperative atrial fibrillation is multifactorial. The aim of the study was to analyse preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative factors and their relationships with the occurrence and duration of atrial fibrillation. METHODS One hundred and ninety-six patients with coronary heart disease (152 men, age 62.7 ± 10.1 years) underwent surgical revascularization. Extracorporeal circulation was used in 64 patients and minimal extracorporeal circulation was used in 75 patients. Fifty-seven patients underwent surgery without extracorporeal circulation. During the first three postoperative days, subjects were monitored for the duration and incidence of atrial fibrillation, laboratory markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, leucocytes) and serum potassium. RESULTS Demographic data and associated cardiovascular diseases in the groups were not statistically different. The overall incidence of atrial fibrillation was 56% (110 patients). The highest incidence of atrial fibrillation was found in the extracorporeal circulation subgroup, with a significantly lower incidence using minimal extracorporeal circulation, and in patients operated on without extracorporeal circulation (75 vs 47 vs 46%, P <0.001). The longest duration of atrial fibrillation was found in patients operated on with extracorporeal circulation compared with minimal extracorporeal circulation, and without extracorporeal circulation (9.7 ± 11.6 vs 4.9 ± 8.3 vs 3.1 ± 5.2, P ≤0.001). The incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation significantly correlated with elevation of inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, leucocytes) compared with patients who were free of atrial fibrillation (P ≤0.001, P ≤0.05). The values of serum potassium were not significantly different. The relationship between postoperative atrial fibrillation and echocardiographic parameters was not confirmed

  10. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  11. Pain point system scale (PPSS): a method for postoperative pain estimation in retrospective studies

    PubMed Central

    Gkotsi, Anastasia; Petsas, Dimosthenis; Sakalis, Vasilios; Fotas, Asterios; Triantafyllidis, Argyrios; Vouros, Ioannis; Saridakis, Evangelos; Salpiggidis, Georgios; Papathanasiou, Athanasios

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Pain rating scales are widely used for pain assessment. Nevertheless, a new tool is required for pain assessment needs in retrospective studies. Methods The postoperative pain episodes, during the first postoperative day, of three patient groups were analyzed. Each pain episode was assessed by a visual analog scale, numerical rating scale, verbal rating scale, and a new tool – pain point system scale (PPSS) – based on the analgesics administered. The type of analgesic was defined based on the authors’ clinic protocol, patient comorbidities, pain assessment tool scores, and preadministered medications by an artificial neural network system. At each pain episode, each patient was asked to fill the three pain scales. Bartlett’s test and Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin criterion were used to evaluate sample sufficiency. The proper scoring system was defined by varimax rotation. Spearman’s and Pearson’s coefficients assessed PPSS correlation to the known pain scales. Results A total of 262 pain episodes were evaluated in 124 patients. The PPSS scored one point for each dose of paracetamol, three points for each nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug or codeine, and seven points for each dose of opioids. The correlation between the visual analog scale and PPSS was found to be strong and linear (rho: 0.715; P < 0.001 and Pearson: 0.631; P < 0.001). Conclusion PPSS correlated well with the known pain scale and could be used safely in the evaluation of postoperative pain in retrospective studies. PMID:23152699

  12. Prophylactic postoperative ketorolac improves outcomes in diabetic patients assigned for cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Elsawy, Moataz F; Badawi, Nermine; Khairy, Hany A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prophylactic role of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in reducing the incidence of central macular edema (CME) in diabetic eyes post-cataract surgery. Patients and methods This study included 86 eyes (70 patients) with high risk characteristics for the development of CME after cataract surgery. All patients underwent phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation. Patients were divided into two equal groups (n = 43 [eyes]): a control group given topical dexamethasone 0.1%, four times/day for 12 weeks postoperatively and a study group given topical ketorolac tromethamine 0.4% twice daily in addition to topical dexamethasone 0.1% four times daily for 12 weeks. Patients were examined at 3, 6, and 12 weeks postoperatively for evaluation of CME development. The main study outcome was the change in the retinal fovea thickness measured with ocular coherence topography. Results Ten eyes developed CME (11.6%); eight eyes in the control group and only two eyes in the study group. Mean retinal fovea thickness was significantly higher in the control group compared to the study group. Moreover, eyes of the control group developed CME significantly earlier than those of the study group. Conclusion Prophylactic postoperative ketorolac 0.4% may have a role in reducing the frequency and severity of CME in diabetic eyes post-cataract surgery. PMID:23836953

  13. Randomized study comparing postoperative pain between coblation and bipolar scissor tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Hanna; Raitiola, Hannu; Chrapek, Wojciech; Pukander, Juhani

    2008-07-01

    Coblation tonsillectomy has shown promising results with respect to postoperative pain when compared with other techniques. Our study was designed to compare this technique with bipolar scissor tonsillectomy. Forty adult patients with a history of chronic or recurrent tonsillitis referred for standard tonsillectomy were recruited and randomized into two groups. Twenty were operated with Coblator and 20 with bipolar scissors. Exclusion criteria were a history of quinsy, bleeding disorder, or any major health problems. All participants completed the study. Postoperative pain, return to normal diet, and estimated need for sick leave were utilized as parameters. Data on operative time, difficulty of tissue removal, and hemostasis were also analyzed. Operative time was longer (P < 0.001) and tissue removal as well as hemostasis control were more difficult (P = 0.005, P = 0.013) with Coblator than with bipolar scissors. Participants in Coblator group assessed higher pain scores 1 and 3 h postoperatively (P = 0.044, P = 0.036). From the time of extubation, patients had access to an opioid (fentanyl) via a self-controlled analgesia device. The number of doses of analgesics needed during the hospital stay was significantly higher in the Coblator group (P = 0.020). During the 14-day follow-up, no significant differences were found in pain scores, return to solid food or subjective working ability between the groups. Considering the overall outcome of the patients the results did not favor coblation technique over bipolar scissors.

  14. Comparison of Postoperative Pain in Children with Two Intracapsular Tonsillotomy Techniques and a Standard Tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Deak, Levente; Saxton, David; Johnston, Keith; Benedek, Palma; Katona, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the duration and severity of postoperative pain for two different tonsillotomy techniques (radiofrequency [RF] and microdebrider [MD]) with the standard tonsillectomy. Methods: This non-randomised retrospective study, carried out from February 2011 to September 2012, investigated 128 children in two independent centres: Heim Pál Children’s Hospital in Budapest, Hungary, and Muscat Private Hospital in Muscat, Oman. Those undergoing conventional tonsillectomies acted as the control group. One centre tested the MD technique (n = 28) while the other centre tested the RF technique (n = 31). Results: The pain-free period after the tonsillotomies was similar between the two techniques and ranged up to three days. Other indicators of pain resolution, like the use of a single analgesic, reduced night-time waking and the time taken to resume a normal diet, were also similar for the two groups. However, patients benefited significantly from having a tonsillotomy rather than a tonsillectomy. Conclusion: The partial resectioning of tonsillar tissue using the MD and RF techniques showed promising outcomes for a better postoperative quality of life when compared to a traditional tonsillectomy. In this study, the results of both the MD and RF tonsillotomy methods were almost identical in terms of the duration of postoperative pain and recovery time. PMID:25364553

  15. Prediction of postoperative facial swelling, pain and trismus following third molar surgery based on preoperative variables

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Santos, Jadson A.; Martins-Filho, Paulo R.; da Silva, Luiz C.; de Oliveira e Silva, Emanuel D.; Gomes, Ana C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This paper investigates the relationship between preoperative findings and short-term outcome in third molar surgery. Study design: A prospective study was carried out involving 80 patients who required 160 surgical extractions of impacted mandibular third molars between January 2009 and December 2010. All extractions were performed under local anesthesia by the same dental surgeon. Swelling and maximal inter-incisor distance were measured at 48 h and on the 7th day postoperatively. Mean visual analogue pain scores were determined at four different time periods. Results: One-hundred eight (67.5%) of the 160 extractions were performed on male subjects and 52 (32.5%) were performed on female subjects. Median age was 22.46 years. The amount of facial swelling varied depending on gender and operating time. Trismus varied depending on gender, operating time and tooth sectioning. The influence of age, gender and operating time varied depending on the pain evaluation period (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Short-term outcomes of third molar operations (swelling, trismus and pain) differ depending on the patients’ characteristics (age, gender and body mass index). Moreover, surgery characteristics such as operating time and tooth sectioning were also associated with postoperative variables. Key words:Third molar extraction, pain, swelling, trismus, postoperative findings, prediction. PMID:23229245

  16. Preoperative and late postoperative psychosocial state following coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Strauss, B; Paulsen, G; Strenge, H; Graetz, S; Regensburger, D; Speidel, H

    1992-04-01

    In a prospective study of psychological and neurological reactions to coronary artery bypass surgery, 45 patients were examined preoperatively, postoperatively, and 21 to 27 months after, using a variety of neurological, psychiatric, and psychological investigations. Within the follow-up sample, three subgroups of patients could be identified by cluster analysis who differed with respect to their emotional status and life satisfaction. One group (24% of the total sample) was characterized by high levels of anxiety, depression and life dissatisfaction and appears as a risk population. The other groups could be described as either average (42%) or stable (33%). At the follow up, the risk group further indicated a preference for depressive coping styles, a slightly higher degree of cognitive impairment, more neurological and psychopathological symptoms (specifically giving-up and hostility), a considerably lower return-to-work rate, more subjective physical complaints and a poorer attitude toward the outcome. While postoperative measurements (obtained 2-3 and 6-8 days after surgery) as well as intraoperative parameters did not reveal significant group differences, the analysis yielded an increased impairment within the risk group already prior to surgery, especially emotional problems, specific health-related cognitions and a more fatalistic attitude. The results are in line with those of other studies investigating the late postoperative psychological status with regard to the proportion of patients showing psychological impairments as well as to their specific psychological characteristics.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1631873

  17. Electroacupuncture Reduces Postoperative Pain and Analgesic Consumption in Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tongyu; Xu, Jianjun; Ma, Wen; Zhou, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on postoperative pain management in patients undergoing thoracic surgery. A randomized study was conducted. Ninety-two thoracic surgical patients were randomly divided into an EA group and a sham group. Postoperative intravenous analgesia was applied with a half dose of the conventional drug concentration in both groups. In the EA group, EA treatment was administered for three consecutive days after the surgery with 6 sessions of 30 min each. Compared with the sham group, patients in the EA group had a lower visual analogue scale (VAS) score at 2, 24, 48, and 72 hours and consumed less analgesic after surgery. The incidence of opioid-related adverse effects of nausea was lower in the EA group. The time to first flatus and defecation was also shorter in the EA group. Furthermore, the plasma β-endorphin (β-EP) level was higher by radioimmunoassay and the plasma 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) level was lower in the EA group by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay during the first 72 hr after thoracic surgery. Therefore, EA is suitable as an adjunct treatment for postoperative pain management after thoracic surgery. PMID:27073400

  18. Antinociceptive effects of curcumin in a rat model of postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Sun, Yuehua; Yun, Xiaodi; Ou, Yuntao; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin is a principal ingredient of traditional Chinese medicine, Curcuma Longa, which possesses a variety of pharmacological activities including pain relief. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that curcumin has antinociceptive effects for inflammatory and neuropathic pain. This study examined the effects of curcumin in a rat model of postoperative pain. A surgical incision on the right hind paw induced a sustained mechanical hyperalgesia that lasted for 5 days. Acute curcumin treatment (10–40 mg/kg, p.o) significantly and dose dependently reversed mechanical hyperalgesia. In addition, repeated curcumin treatment significantly facilitated the recovery from surgery. In contrast, repeated treatment with curcumin before surgery did not impact the postoperative pain threshold and recovery rate. All the doses of curcumin did not significantly alter the spontaneous locomotor activity. Combined, these results suggested that curcumin could alleviate postoperative pain and promote recovery from the surgery, although there was no significant preventive value. This study extends previous findings and supports the application of curcumin alone or as an adjunct therapy for the management of peri-operative pain. PMID:24816565

  19. Pre- and post-operative cardiac evaluation of dogs undergoing lobectomy and pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kocatürk, Meriç; Salci, Hakan; Bayram, A. Sami; Koch, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of lobectomy and pneumonectomy on cardiac rhythm and on the dimensions and function of the right-side of the heart. Twelve dogs undergoing lobectomy and eight dogs undergoing pneumonectomy were evaluated preoperatively and one month postoperatively with electrocardiography and Doppler echocardiography at rest. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was estimated by the tricuspid regurgitation jet (TRJ) via the pulse wave Doppler velocity method. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria (SIRS) were also evaluated based on the clinical and hematological findings in response to lobectomy and pneumonectomy. Following lobectomy and pneumonectomy, we predominantly detected atrial fibrillation and varying degrees of atrioventricular block (AVB). Dogs that died within seven days of the lobectomy (n = 2) or pneumonectomy (n = 1) had complete AVB. Preoperative right atrial, right ventricular, and pulmonary artery dimensions increased gradually during the 30 days (p<0.05) following pneumonectomy, but did not undergo significant changes during that same period after lobectomy. Mean PASP was 56.0 ± 4.5 mmHg in dogs having significant TRJ after pneumonectomy. Pneumonectomy, but not lobectomy, could lead to increases (p<0.01) in the SIRS score within the first day post-surgery. In brief, it is important to conduct pre- and postoperative cardiac evaluation of dogs undergoing lung resections because cardiac problems are a common postoperative complication after such surgeries. In particular, complete AVB should be considered a life-threatening complication after pneumonectomy and lobectomy. In addition, pneumonectomy appears to increase the likelihood of pulmonary hypertension development in dogs. PMID:20706034

  20. 2016 SPD: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    advances in simulating sunspot formation. He and his collaborators have used high-performance computing to build a model that successfully reproduces many of the key properties of sunspots that are observed.In particular, these simulations track the motions of the magnetic field starting within the interior of the Sun (8000 km below the surface!). The magnetic field is generated and intensified by convection deep within the solar interior. Bundles of magnetic field then rise through the convection zone, eventually breaking through the solar surface and giving rise to sunspots.This process of tracking the flow as it travels from the convective layer all the way through the solar surface has resulted in what may be some of the highest fidelity simulations of sunspots thus far. The structures produced in these simulations compares very favorably with actual observations of sunspots including the asymmetry seen in most sunspots.Counting Spots on the SunContinuing the discussion of sunspots, Leif Svalgaard (Stanford University) next took us on a historical journey from the 1600s through the present. For the last 400 years starting with Galileo people have kept records of the number of sunspots visible on the Suns disk.One of Galileos drawings of his sunspot observations from 1612. [The Galileo Project]This turns out to be a very useful practice! Total solar irradiance, a measure used as input into climate models, is reconstructed from sunspot numbers. Therefore, the historical record of sunspots over the last 400 years impacts our estimates of the long-term trends in solar activity.Based on raw sunspot counts, studies have argued that solar activity has been steadily increasing over time. But could this be a misinterpretation resulting from the fact that our technology and therefore our ability to detect sunspots has improved over time? Svalgaard believes so.By studying and reconstructing 18th century telescopes, he demonstrates that modern-day sunspot counts are able to detect