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Sample records for 7-36 amide secretion

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide secretion in response to nutrient ingestion in man: acute post-prandial and 24-h secretion patterns.

    PubMed

    Elliott, R M; Morgan, L M; Tredger, J A; Deacon, S; Wright, J; Marks, V

    1993-07-01

    The acute effects of different macronutrients on the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1(7-36)amide) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) were compared in healthy human subjects. Circulating levels of the two hormones were measured over a 24-h period during which subjects consumed a mixed diet. In the first study, eight subjects consumed three equicaloric (375 kcal) test meals of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Small increases in plasma GLP-1(7-36) amide were found after all meals. Levels reached a maximum 30 min after the carbohydrate and 150 min after the fat load. Ingestion of both carbohydrate and fat induced substantial rises in GIP secretion, but the protein meal had no effect. In a second study, eight subjects consumed 75 g glucose or the equivalent portion of complex carbohydrate as boiled brown rice or barley. Plasma GIP, insulin and glucose levels increased after all three meals, the largest increase being observed following glucose and the smallest following the barley meal. Plasma GLP-1(7-36)amide levels rose only following the glucose meal. In the 24-h study, plasma GLP-1(7-36)amide and GIP concentrations were increased following every meal and remained elevated throughout the day, only falling to fasting levels at night. The increases in circulating GLP-1(7-36)amide and GIP levels following carbohydrate or a mixed meal are consistent with their role as incretins. The more sustained rises observed in the daytime during the 24-h study are consistent with an anabolic role in lipid metabolism.

  2. GLP-1(7-36)amide binding in skeletal muscle membranes from streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Delgado, E; Vicent, D; Mérida, E; Alcántara, A I; Valverde, I

    1995-09-01

    A higher specific binding of GLP-1(7-36)amide is found in skeletal muscle plasma membranes from adult streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model) and from neonatal STZ-treated rats (non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model), as compared to that in normal controls; no apparent change in the affinity was observed, that indicating the presence in both diabetic models of an increased number of high affinity binding sites for the peptide. The maximal specific GLP-1(7-16)amide binding in the non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model was found to be significantly higher than that in the insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model. As GLP-1(7-36)amide exerts a glycogenic effect in the rat skeletal muscle, the present data suggest that the action of the peptide in the muscle glucose metabolism may be increased in states of insulin deficiency accompanied or not by insulin resistance.

  3. Inositolphosphoglycans are possible mediators of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (7-36)amide action in the liver.

    PubMed

    Trapote, M A; Clemente, F; Galera, C; Morales, M; Alcántara, A I; López-Delgado, M I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Valverde, I

    1996-02-01

    A potent glycogenic effect for GLP-1(7-36)amide has been found in rat hepatocytes and skeletal muscle, and the specific receptors detected for GLP-1(7-36)amide in these tissue membranes do not seem to be associated to adenylate cyclase. On the other hand, inositolphosphoglycan molecules (IPGs) have been implicated as second messengers in the action of insulin. In a human hepatoma cell line (HEP G-2), we have observed the presence of [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide specific binding, and a stimulatory effect of the peptide upon glycogen synthesis, confirming the findings in isolated rat hepatocytes. Also, GLP-1(7-36)amide modulates the cell content of radiolabelled glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs), in the same manner as insulin, indicating hydrolysis of GPIs and an immediate and short-lived generation of IPGs. Thus, IPGs could be mediators in the GLP-1(7-36)amide glycogenic action in the liver.

  4. Plasma and intestinal concentrations of GIP and GLP-1 (7-36) amide during suckling and after weaning in pigs.

    PubMed

    Knapper, J M; Morgan, L M; Fletcher, J M; Marks, V

    1995-11-01

    Plasma concentrations of glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1[7-36]amide) were measured after milk ingestion in 15-18 day old piglets and after weaning diet ingestion in 33 day old piglets weaned at 21 days. Intestinal concentrations of these two hormones were also measured in unsuckled piglets of less than 24 h of age, and piglets whose ages corresponded with those used for plasma measurements. Suckling piglets showed a moderate glycaemic and insulinaemic response to milk ingestion. Plasma GIP and GLP-1(7-36)amide levels were significantly elevated at 1 and 3-h post-prandially. Weaned piglets showed a much more marked glucose and insulin response to meal ingestion. Plasma GIP and GLP-1(7-36)amide levels were again significantly elevated at 1 and 3 h in these animals. The mean plasma GIP response was greater in the weaned animals compared with the suckling animals at the time points investigated. The plasma GLP-1(7-36)amide response in contrast was significantly greater at 1 h in the suckling animals. In comparison, GIP concentrations in acid ethanol extracts of the small intestine were significantly higher during suckling and GLP-1(7-36)amide concentrations significantly higher after weaning. The circulating levels of both hormones seen during suckling and after weaning were far higher than those previously reported in humans. We conclude that both milk ingestion and the weaning diet are capable of stimulating GIP and GLP-1(7-36)amide in piglets and suggest that the levels of both hormones seen in this study may be important in adipose tissue metabolism at this time.

  5. Exendin-4 agonist and exendin(9-39)amide antagonist of the GLP-1(7-36)amide effects in liver and muscle.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, A I; Morales, M; Delgado, E; López-Delgado, M I; Clemente, F; Luque, M A; Malaisse, W J; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1997-05-01

    The GLP-1 structurally related peptides exendin-4 and exendin(9-39)amide were found to act, in rat liver and skeletal muscle, as agonist and antagonist, respectively, of the GLP-1(7-36)amide effects on glucose metabolism. Thus, like GLP-1(7-36)amide, exendin-4 increased glycogen synthase a activity and glucose incorporation into glycogen in both tissues and also stimulated exogenous D-glucose utilization and oxidation in muscle. These effects of GLP-1(7-36)amide and exendin-4 were inhibited by exendin(9-39)amide. Our findings provide further support to the proposed use of GLP-1, or exendin-4, as a tool in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Thus, in addition to the well-known insulinotropic action of the peptides, they act both in liver and in muscle in a manner most suitable for restoration of glucose homeostasis, with emphasis on their positive effects upon glycogen synthesis in the two tissues and on the stimulation of exogenous glucose catabolism in muscle.

  6. Presence and characterization of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36) amide receptors in solubilized membranes of rat adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Mérida, E; Delgado, E; Trapote, M A; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1993-01-01

    Specific binding of [125I]glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide ([125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide) to solubilized rat adipose tissue membranes was found to be dependent on temperature, time, and membrane protein concentration and readily dissociated. GLP-1(1-36)amide, GLP-2, or glucagon (10(-6) M) did not compete with [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide binding. Half-maximal binding was achieved with 8 x 10(-10) M unlabeled GLP-1(7-36)amide, and the Scatchard plot revealed the presence of high and low affinity binding sites with Kd values of approximately 0.6 and 20 nM, respectively. The binding capacity of [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide was about 3 times higher than that of [125I]glucagon, while the high affinity Kd and the half-maximal binding of the two peptides were similar. The presence and abundance of GLP-1(7-36)amide receptors in fat tissue together with the previous findings that the peptide stimulates glycerol and cAMP production in rat adipocytes and stimulates fatty acid synthesis in explants of rat adipose tissue open the possibility that this insulinotropic intestinal peptide may also be involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism in health and disease.

  7. Ingestion of coffee polyphenols increases postprandial release of the active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1(7-36)) amide in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshie; Osaki, Noriko; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The widespread prevalence of diabetes, caused by impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance, is now a worldwide health problem. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a major intestinal hormone that stimulates glucose-induced insulin secretion from β cells. Prolonged activation of the GLP-1 signal has been shown to attenuate diabetes in animals and human subjects. Therefore, GLP-1 secretagogues are attractive targets for the treatment of diabetes. Recent epidemiological studies have reported that an increase in daily coffee consumption lowers diabetes risk. The present study examined the hypothesis that the reduction in diabetes risk associated with coffee consumption may be mediated by the stimulation of GLP-1 release by coffee polyphenol extract (CPE). GLP-1 secretion by human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells was augmented in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of CPE, and was compatible with the increase in observed active GLP-1(7-36) amide levels in the portal blood after administration with CPE alone in mice. CPE increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner, but this was not mediated by G protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119). The oral administration of CPE increased diet (starch and glyceryl trioleate)-induced active GLP-1 secretion and decreased glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide release. Although CPE administration did not affect diet-induced insulin secretion, it decreased postprandial hyperglycaemia, which indicates that higher GLP-1 levels after the ingestion of CPE may improve insulin sensitivity. We conclude that dietary coffee polyphenols augment gut-derived active GLP-1 secretion via the cAMP-dependent pathway, which may contribute to the reduced risk of type 2 diabetes associated with daily coffee consumption.

  8. Inositolphosphoglycans and diacyglycerol are possible mediators in the glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)amide in BC3H-1 myocytes.

    PubMed

    Galera, C; Clemente, F; Alcantara, A; Trapote, M A; Perea, A; Lopez-Delgado, M I; Villanueva-Penacarrillo, M L; Valverde, I

    1996-03-01

    A potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)amide has been found in rat hepatocytes and skeletal muscle, and specific receptors for this peptide, which do not seem to be associated with the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system, have been detected in these tissue membranes. On the other hand, inositolphosphoglycan molecules (IPGs) have been implicated as second messengers of the action of insulin. In this work, we have found, in differentiated BC3H-1 myocytes, specific binding of [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide, and a stimulatory effect of the peptide on glycogen synthesis, confirming the findings in rat skeletal muscle. Also, GLP-1(7-36)amide modulates the cell content of radiolabelled glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) and increases the production of diacylglycerol (DAG), in the same manner as insulin acts, indicating hydrolysis of GPIs and an immediate and short-lived generation of IPGs. Thus, IPGs and DAG could be mediators in the glycogenic action of GLP-1(7-36)amide in skeletal muscle.

  9. Changes in the concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide and gastric inhibitory polypeptide during the lactation cycle in goats.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, A; Martin, P A

    1998-08-01

    Plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) were determined at fortnightly intervals for over a year throughout the pregnancy-lactation cycle of goats. Both GIP and GLP concentrations were elevated during lactation and fell rapidly when milk secretion was terminated. At the onset of lactation GLP concentrations rose rapidly whereas GIP concentrations showed a delayed response. GLP concentrations remained high throughout lactation but those of GIP declined linearly as milk yields fell. Serum insulin concentrations correlated positively with plasma glucose concentrations but not with either GIP or GLP concentrations. Negative correlations were found between serum insulin concentrations and milk yield and plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations. The results are consistent with plasma GIP and GLP concentrations being determined by other factors in addition to nutrient intake and absorption. Changes in GIP concentrations mirrored reported changes in the hypertrophy and atrophy of the intestine in ruminants while GLP concentrations may be more dependent on the neural and endocrine factors associated with lactation. The elevated concentrations of both peptides indicated a specific role in lactation independent of their normal anabolic and insulinotropic effects.

  10. Inositolphosphoglycans possibly mediate the effects of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide on rat liver and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Márquez, L; Trapote, M A; Luque, M A; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1998-03-01

    Insulin-like effects of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1) in rat liver, skeletal muscle and fat, and also the presence of GLP-1 receptors in these extrapancreatic tissues, have been documented. In skeletal muscle and liver, the action of GLP-1 is not associated with an activation of adenylate cyclase, and in cultured murine myocytes and hepatoma cell lines, it was found that GLP-1 provokes the generation of inositolphosphoglycan molecules (IPGs), which are considered second messengers of insulin action. In the present work, we document in isolated normal rat adipocytes and hepatocytes that GLP-1 exerts a rapid decrease of the radiolabelled glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs)--precursors of IPGs--in the same manner as insulin, indicating their hydrolysis and the immediate short-lived generation of IPGs. Thus, IPGs could be mediators in the GLP-1 actions in adipose tissue and liver, as well as in skeletal muscle, through GLP-1 receptors which are, at least functionally, different from that of the pancreatic B-cell.

  11. Combination of Peptide YY3–36 with GLP-17–36 amide Causes an Increase in First-Phase Insulin Secretion after IV Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tricia M.; Salem, Victoria; Troke, Rachel C.; Alsafi, Ali; Field, Benjamin C. T.; De Silva, Akila; Misra, Shivani; Baynes, Kevin C. R.; Donaldson, Mandy; Minnion, James; Ghatei, Mohammad A.; Godsland, Ian F.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The combination of peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed as a potential treatment for diabetes and obesity. However, the combined effects of these hormones, PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide, on glucose homeostasis are unknown. Objective: This study sought to investigate the acute effects of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide, individually and in combination, on insulin secretion and sensitivity. Setting and Design: Using a frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) and minimal modeling, this study measured the effects of PYY3–36 alone, GLP-17–36 amide alone, and a combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide on acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) and insulin sensitivity index (SI) in 14 overweight human volunteers, studied in a clinical research facility. Results: PYY3–36 alone caused a small but nonsignificant increase in AIRg. GLP-17–36 amide alone and the combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide did increase AIRg significantly. No significant differences in SI were observed with any intervention. Conclusions: PYY3–36 lacks any significant acute effects on first-phase insulin secretion or SI when tested using an FSIVGTT. Both GLP-17–36 amide alone and the combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide increase first-phase insulin secretion. There does not seem to be any additive or synergistic effect between PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide on first-phase insulin secretion. Neither hormone alone nor the combination had any significant effects on SI. PMID:25144632

  12. 7 CFR 7.36 - Implementation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Implementation. 7.36 Section 7.36 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture SELECTION AND FUNCTIONS OF AGRICULTURAL STABILIZATION AND CONSERVATION STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.36 Implementation. Unless specifically provided in...

  13. Study of the effect of 26RF- and 43RF-amides on testosterone and prolactin secretion in the adult male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Wahab, Fazal; Salahuddin, Hina; Anees, Mariam; Leprince, Jerome; Vaudry, Hubert; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Shahab, Muhammad

    2012-07-01

    RF-amides (RFa), a superfamily of evolutionary-conserved neuropeptides, are expressed in both invertebrates and vertebrates. While some endocrine functions have been attributed to these peptides in lower vertebrates and few mammalian models, not much is known about their actions in primates. Therefore, the present study was designed to examine the effects of peripheral administration of two recently cloned human RFa peptides, 26RFa and 43RFa, on testosterone and prolactin secretion in the adult male adult male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). For control purposes, a scrambled sequence of 26RFa (Sc-26RFa) and normal saline (1ml) were injected. Three different doses of 26RFa and 43RFa (19-nmol, 38-nmol and 76-nmol) and a single dose (38-nmol) of Sc-26RFa were tested. A set of four chair-restraint habituated monkeys was used. Comparison of post-treatment T levels with respective pre levels showed that none of the doses of both 26RFa and 43RFa changed T release. Similarly, Sc-26RFa and saline administration also did not affect T levels. In contrast, all doses of 26RFa and 43RFa significantly (P<0.05) stimulated prolactin secretion. 43RFa dose dependently increased prolactin secretion while dose dependency was not observed for 26RFa. Saline and Sc-26RFa injection had no effect on prolactin concentrations. Thus, present study demonstrated that peripheral administration of 26RFa and 43RFa, in the doses tested, have no effect on T secretion, suggesting possible selective lack of their neuroendocrine role in controlling hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the adult male primates. The prominent stimulation of prolactin suggests a neuroendocrine role of RFa peptides in regulation of prolactin release in primates.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism studies on the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-derived metabolite GLP-1(9-36)amide in male Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; McDonald, Thomas S; Landis, Margaret S; Stevens, Benjamin D; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)(7-36)amide is a 30-amino acid peptide hormone that is secreted from intestinal enteroendocrine L-cells in response to nutrients. GLP-1(7-36)amide possesses potent insulinotropic actions in the augmentation of glucose-dependent insulin secretion. GLP-1(7-36)amide is rapidly metabolized by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV to yield GLP-1(9-36)amide as the principal metabolite. Contrary to the earlier notion that peptide cleavage products of native GLP-1(7-36)amide [including GLP-1(9-36)amide] are pharmacologically inactive, recent studies have demonstrated cardioprotective and insulinomimetic effects with GLP-1(9-36)amide in mice, dogs and humans. In the present work, in vitro metabolism and pharmacokinetic properties of GLP-1(9-36)amide have been characterized in dogs, since this preclinical species has been used as an animal model to demonstrate the in vivo vasodilatory and cardioprotective effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry assay was developed for the quantitation of the intact peptide in hepatocyte incubations as opposed to a previously reported enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Although GLP-1(9-36)amide was resistant to proteolytic cleavage in dog plasma and bovine serum albumin (t1/2>240 min), the peptide was rapidly metabolized in dog hepatocytes with a t1/2 of 110 min. Metabolite identification studies in dog hepatocytes revealed a variety of N-terminus cleavage products, most of which, have also been observed in human and mouse hepatocytes. Proteolysis at the C-terminus was not observed in GLP-1(9-36)amide. Following the administration of a single intravenous bolus dose (20 µg/kg) to male Beagle dogs, GLP-1(9-36)amide exhibited a mean plasma clearance of 15 ml/min/kg and a low steady state distribution volume of 0.05 l/kg, which translated into a short elimination half life of 0.05 h. Following subcutaneous administration of GLP-1(9-36)amide at 50 µg/kg, systemic exposure of

  15. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mammoth Cave National Park. 7.36 Section 7.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.36 Mammoth Cave National Park. (a)...

  16. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mammoth Cave National Park. 7.36 Section 7.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.36 Mammoth Cave National Park. (a)...

  17. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mammoth Cave National Park. 7.36 Section 7.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.36 Mammoth Cave National Park. (a)...

  18. cAMP-mediated and metabolic amplification of insulin secretion are distinct pathways sharing independence of β-cell microfilaments.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Nizar I; Nenquin, Myriam; Henquin, Jean-Claude

    2012-10-01

    Insulin secretion is triggered by an increase in the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) in β-cells. Ca(2+)-induced exocytosis of insulin granules can be augmented by metabolic amplification (unknown signals generated through glucose metabolism) or neurohormonal amplification (in particular cAMP mediated). Functional actin microfilaments are not required for metabolic amplification, but their possible role in cAMP-mediated amplification is unknown. It is also uncertain whether cAMP (generated in response to glucose) is implicated in metabolic amplification. These questions were addressed using isolated mouse islets. cAMP levels were increased by phosphodiesterase inhibition (with isobutylmethylxanthine) and adenylate-cyclase stimulation (with forskolin or glucagon-like peptide-1, 7-36 amide). Raising cAMP levels had no steady-state impact on actin polymerization in control islets. Neither disruption (depolymerization by latrunculin) nor stabilization (polymerization by jasplakinolide) of actin microfilaments was counteracted by cAMP. Both changes increased both phases of glucose- or tolbutamide-induced insulin secretion but did not prevent further amplification by cAMP. These large changes in secretion were not caused by changes in [Ca(2+)](c), which was only slightly increased by cAMP. Both phases of insulin secretion were larger in response to glucose than tolbutamide, although [Ca(2+)](c) was lower. This difference in secretion, which reflects metabolic amplification, was independent of microfilaments, was not attributable to differences in cAMP, and persisted in presence of dibutyryl-cAMP or when cAMP levels were variably raised by isobutylmethylxanthine + forskolin or glucagon-like peptide-1, 7-36 amide. We conclude that metabolic and cAMP-mediated amplification of insulin secretion are distinct pathways that accelerate acquisition of release competence by insulin granules that can access exocytotic sites without intervention of microfilaments.

  19. In vitro metabolism of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-derived metabolites GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide in mouse and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raman; McDonald, Thomas S; Eng, Heather; Limberakis, Chris; Stevens, Benjamin D; Patel, Sheena; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have revealed that the glucoincretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)(7-36)amide is metabolized by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) and neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP) to yield GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide, respectively, as the principal metabolites. Contrary to the previous notion that GLP-1(7-36)amide metabolites are pharmacologically inactive, recent studies have demonstrated cardioprotective and insulinomimetic effects with both GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide in animals and humans. In the present work, we examined the metabolic stability of the two GLP-1(7-36)amide metabolites in cryopreserved hepatocytes, which have been used to demonstrate the in vitro insulin-like effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide on gluconeogenesis. To examine the metabolic stability of the GLP-1(7-36)amide metabolites, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay was developed for the quantitation of the intact peptides in hepatocyte incubations. GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide were rapidly metabolized in mouse [GLP-1(9-36)amide: t(1/2) = 52 minutes; GLP-1(28-36)amide: t(1/2) = 13 minutes] and human hepatocytes [GLP-1(9-36)amide: t(1/2) = 180 minutes; GLP-1(28-36)amide: t(1/2) = 24 minutes), yielding a variety of N-terminal cleavage products that were characterized using mass spectrometry. Metabolism at the C terminus was not observed for either peptides. The DPP-IV and NEP inhibitors diprotin A and phosphoramidon, respectively, did not induce resistance in the two peptides toward proteolytic cleavage. Overall, our in vitro findings raise the intriguing possibility that the insulinomimetic effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide on gluconeogenesis and oxidative stress might be due, at least in part, to the actions of additional downstream metabolites, which are obtained from the enzymatic cleavage of the peptide backbone in the parent compounds.

  20. MATE Transporter-Dependent Export of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides.

    PubMed

    Dobritzsch, Melanie; Lübken, Tilo; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Gorzolka, Karin; Blum, Elke; Matern, Andreas; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Böttcher, Christoph; Dräger, Birgit; Rosahl, Sabine

    2016-02-01

    The ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully prevent colonization by Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum), depends on multilayered defense responses. To address the role of surface-localized secondary metabolites for entry control, droplets of a P. infestans zoospore suspension, incubated on Arabidopsis leaves, were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling. The hydroxycinnamic acid amide coumaroylagmatine was among the metabolites secreted into the inoculum. In vitro assays revealed an inhibitory activity of coumaroylagmatine on P. infestans spore germination. Mutant analyses suggested a requirement of the p-coumaroyl-CoA:agmatine N4-p-coumaroyl transferase ACT for the biosynthesis and of the MATE transporter DTX18 for the extracellular accumulation of coumaroylagmatine. The host plant potato is not able to efficiently secrete coumaroylagmatine. This inability is overcome in transgenic potato plants expressing the two Arabidopsis genes ACT and DTX18. These plants secrete agmatine and putrescine conjugates to high levels, indicating that DTX18 is a hydroxycinnamic acid amide transporter with a distinct specificity. The export of hydroxycinnamic acid amides correlates with a decreased ability of P. infestans spores to germinate, suggesting a contribution of secreted antimicrobial compounds to pathogen defense at the leaf surface. PMID:26744218

  1. FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs): A new family of peptides from amphibian defensive skin secretions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Smyth, Anita; Johnsen, Anders H; Zhou, Mei; Chen, Tianbao; Walker, Brian; Shaw, Chris

    2009-06-01

    Amphibian defensive skin secretions are known to contain a plethora of biologically-active peptides that are often structural and functional analogues of vertebrate neuropeptides. Here we report the structures of two invertebrate neuropeptide analogues, IPPQFMRF amide (IF-8 amide) and EGDEDEFLRF amide (EF-10 amide), from the defensive skin secretions of two different species of African hyperoliid frogs, Kassina maculata and Phylictimantis verrucosus, respectively. These represent the first canonical FMRF amide-related peptides (FaRPs) from a vertebrate source. The cDNA encoding IF-8 amide was cloned from a skin secretion library and found to contain a single copy of the peptide located at the C-terminus of a 58 amino acid residue open-reading frame. These data extend the potential targets of the defensive arsenal of amphibian tegumental secretions to parasitic/predatory invertebrates and the novel peptides described may represent the first vertebrate peptidic endectocides. PMID:19358831

  2. CHO cells synthesize amidated neuropeptide Y from a C-peptide deleted form of the precursor.

    PubMed

    Johansen, T E; O'Hare, M M; Wulff, B S; Schwartz, T W

    1991-07-01

    Post-translational processing of peptide precursors producing amidated, biologically active peptides is generally believed to occur only in specially differentiated endocrine or neural cells. Previously it has been shown that endoproteolytic processing of peptide precursors is very inefficient in non-endocrine cells like CHO cells. We have studied the processing of a C-peptide-deleted precursor of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in which the precursor terminates in the sequence Gly-Lys-Arg and does not require any dibasic specific endoproteolytic processing. Following transfection of CHO cells with an expression plasmid encoding this mutated NPY precursor, between 50 and 80 percent of the synthesized NPY was secreted from stable transfectants as authentic amidated NPY as assessed by both a C-terminal amide specific radioimmunoassay and by isoelectric focusing. It is concluded that amidated peptides can be produced in non-endocrine cells provided they are presented with a precursor which does not have to be endoproteolytically processed.

  3. Diaminopimelic Acid Amidation in Corynebacteriales

    PubMed Central

    Levefaudes, Marjorie; Patin, Delphine; de Sousa-d'Auria, Célia; Chami, Mohamed; Blanot, Didier; Hervé, Mireille; Arthur, Michel; Houssin, Christine; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    A gene named ltsA was earlier identified in Rhodococcus and Corynebacterium species while screening for mutations leading to increased cell susceptibility to lysozyme. The encoded protein belonged to a huge family of glutamine amidotransferases whose members catalyze amide nitrogen transfer from glutamine to various specific acceptor substrates. We here describe detailed physiological and biochemical investigations demonstrating the specific role of LtsA protein from Corynebacterium glutamicum (LtsACg) in the modification by amidation of cell wall peptidoglycan diaminopimelic acid (DAP) residues. A morphologically altered but viable ΔltsA mutant was generated, which displays a high susceptibility to lysozyme and β-lactam antibiotics. Analysis of its peptidoglycan structure revealed a total loss of DAP amidation, a modification that was found in 80% of DAP residues in the wild-type polymer. The cell peptidoglycan content and cross-linking were otherwise not modified in the mutant. Heterologous expression of LtsACg in Escherichia coli yielded a massive and toxic incorporation of amidated DAP into the peptidoglycan that ultimately led to cell lysis. In vitro assays confirmed the amidotransferase activity of LtsACg and showed that this enzyme used the peptidoglycan lipid intermediates I and II but not, or only marginally, the UDP-MurNAc pentapeptide nucleotide precursor as acceptor substrates. As is generally the case for glutamine amidotransferases, either glutamine or NH4+ could serve as the donor substrate for LtsACg. The enzyme did not amidate tripeptide- and tetrapeptide-truncated versions of lipid I, indicating a strict specificity for a pentapeptide chain length. PMID:25847251

  4. Effects of RFRP2 and RF9 on secretion of luteinizing hormone in prepubertal gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most mammals, the RF-amide related peptide (RFRP) pre-pro-protein contains cleavage sites for 2 peptides (RFRP1 and RFRP3). Our laboratory did not observe RFRP3-induced suppression of LH secretion in gilts. However, the porcine sequence encodes an additional peptide (RFRP2) with an amidated C-ter...

  5. Protective effect of rhGLP-1 (7-36) on brain ischemia/reperfusion damage in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Libo; Xu, Jia; Wang, Qian; Qian, Zhonglian; Feng, Wanyu; Yin, Xiaoxing; Fang, Yi

    2015-03-30

    In recent years, GLP-1 and its analogs have been developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has been reported that stimulating the GLP-1 receptor can protect neurons against metabolic and oxidative insults, and therefore can be used in the treatment of stroke and Parkinson׳s disease. The present study aimed to examine the neuroprotective effects of rhGLP-1 (7-36) and its possible mechanisms against acute ischemia/reperfusion injuries induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in diabetic rats. The type 2 diabetic rat model was established by a combination of a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin (STZ). RhGLP-1 (7-36) (20, 40, 80μg/kg) was given intraperitoneally before reperfusion. The neuroprotective effects of rhGLP-1 (7-36) were evaluated by changes in neurological deficit scores and 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. Changes in blood glucose were used to assess hypoglycemic effects. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), inducible nitric oxide syntheses (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide syntheses (eNOS) after MCAO/R administration (2h and 46h) were examined to investigate the possible mechanisms of RhGLP-1 (7-36). Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was used for histopathological observation. Compared with the control group, rhGLP-1 (7-36)-treated groups decreased nerve function deficiency scores; significantly reduced infarction volume percentage, MDA, iNOS and blood glucose; and significantly increased SOD, GSH-PX and eNOS. In addition, rhGLP-1 (7-36) groups enhanced the density of surviving neurons and increased vascular proliferation. The current study suggests a neuroprotective effect of rhGLP-1 (7-36) in diabetic MCAO/R rats since anti-oxidative and anti-nitrosative stress effects can contribute to beneficial effects against ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  6. Treatment of Bile Acid Amidation Defects with Glycocholic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Heubi, James E.; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; Jha, Pinky; Buckley, Donna; Zhang, Wujuan; Rosenthal, Philip; Potter, Carol; Horslen, Simon; Suskind, David

    2014-01-01

    Bile acid amidation defects were predicted to present with fat/fat soluble vitamin malabsorption with minimal cholestasis. We identified and treated 5 patients (1 male/4 females) from 4 families with defective bile acid amidation due to a genetically confirmed deficiency in bile acid CoA:amino acid N-acyl transferase (BAAT) with the conjugated bile acid, glycocholic acid (GCA). Fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry analysis of urine and bile at baseline revealed predominantly unconjugated cholic acid and absence of the usual glycine and taurine conjugated primary bile acids. Treatment with 15 mg/kg GCA resulted in total duodenal bile acid concentrations of 23.3 ± 19.1 mmol/L (mean ± SD) and 63.5 ± 4.0% of the bile acids were secreted in bile in the conjugated form of which GCA represented 59.6 ± 9.3% of the total biliary bile acids. Unconjugated cholic acid continued to be present in high concentrations in bile because of partial intestinal deconjugation of orally administered GCA. Serum total bile acid concentrations did not significantly differ between pretreatment and post-treatment samples and serum contained predominantly unconjugated cholic acid. These findings confirmed efficient intestinal absorption, hepatic extraction and biliary secretion of the administered GCA. Oral tolerance tests for vitamin D2 (1000 IU vitamin D2/kg) and tocopherol (100 IU/kg tocopherol acetate) demonstrated improvement in fat-soluble vitamin absorption after GCA treatment. Growth improved in 3/3 growth-delayed prepubertal patients. Conclusions: Oral glycocholic acid therapy is safe and effective in improving growth and fat-soluble vitamin absorption in children and adolescents with inborn errors of bile acid metabolism due to amidation defects. PMID:25163551

  7. The synthesis of sterically hindered amides.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Gabriel; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Amide bond formation is one of the most important reactions due to the ubiquity of the amide functional group in pharmaceuticals and biologically active compounds. However, even the best existing methods reach their limits when it comes to the synthesis of sterically hindered amides. In this article we summarize our research in the formation of sterically hindered amides. We show that the direct coupling of Grignard reagents to isocyanates provides a facile and robust solution to this long-standing challenge and hope that this methodology will find widespread application in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and materials. PMID:24983609

  8. Efficient amidation of C-peptide deleted NPY precursors by non-endocrine cells is affected by the presence of Lys-Arg at the C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Wulff, B S; Catipovic, B; Okamoto, H; Gether, U; Schwartz, T W; Johansen, T E

    1993-02-01

    Post-translational processing of peptide precursors producing amidated, biologically active peptides generally occurs in specially differentiated endocrine or neural cells. However, we have previously shown that a C-peptide-deleted precursor of neuropeptide Y (NPY1-39) in which the precursor terminates in the sequence Gly-Lys-Arg was partially amidated by the non-endocrine cell line, CHO. In the present study we show that two other non-endocrine cell lines, NIH 3T3 and BHK, also possess amidating activities and that the NPY1-39 precursor was completely converted to NPY1-36 amide by the NIH 3T3 cell line. The role of the two basic residues (Lys-Arg) in the C-terminus was studied by transfection of a construct encoding a NPY precursor terminating with glycine alone. Both the CHO and NIH 3T3 cell lines, transfected with this construct, secreted a significantly smaller fraction of NPY reactive material as amidated NPY compared to the fraction of amidated NPY secreted by the cells transfected with the NPY1-39 precursor. It is concluded that the capacity to perform C-terminal amidation appears to be a universal feature of eukaryotic cells and that the carboxypeptidase E-like enzyme influences the amidation process, beyond its known ability to remove the C-terminal basic residues.

  9. MATE Transporter-Dependent Export of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Gorzolka, Karin; Matern, Andreas; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Böttcher, Christoph; Rosahl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully prevent colonization by Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum), depends on multilayered defense responses. To address the role of surface-localized secondary metabolites for entry control, droplets of a P. infestans zoospore suspension, incubated on Arabidopsis leaves, were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling. The hydroxycinnamic acid amide coumaroylagmatine was among the metabolites secreted into the inoculum. In vitro assays revealed an inhibitory activity of coumaroylagmatine on P. infestans spore germination. Mutant analyses suggested a requirement of the p-coumaroyl-CoA:agmatine N4-p-coumaroyl transferase ACT for the biosynthesis and of the MATE transporter DTX18 for the extracellular accumulation of coumaroylagmatine. The host plant potato is not able to efficiently secrete coumaroylagmatine. This inability is overcome in transgenic potato plants expressing the two Arabidopsis genes ACT and DTX18. These plants secrete agmatine and putrescine conjugates to high levels, indicating that DTX18 is a hydroxycinnamic acid amide transporter with a distinct specificity. The export of hydroxycinnamic acid amides correlates with a decreased ability of P. infestans spores to germinate, suggesting a contribution of secreted antimicrobial compounds to pathogen defense at the leaf surface. PMID:26744218

  10. Yttrium (amidate) complexes for catalytic C-N bond formation. Rapid, room temperature amidation of aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Jaclyn A; Schafer, Laurel L

    2012-07-14

    Yttrium (amidate) precatalysts are highly active for the mild amidation of aldehydes with amines. Reactions occur at room temperature within 5 min in up to 98% isolated yield. These rare-earth systems are effective for this transformation in the absence of supplementary heat, light, base, or oxidants. The reaction proceeds with functionalized amines and/or aldehydes. A comparison of various amidate precatalysts in combination with reaction monitoring suggests that the targeted amide products formed during the reaction promote the formation of alternative catalytically active amidate species in situ.

  11. Catalytic synthesis of amides via aldoximes rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Crochet, Pascale; Cadierno, Victorio

    2015-02-14

    Amide bond formation reactions are among the most important transformations in organic chemistry because of the widespread occurrence of amides in pharmaceuticals, natural products and biologically active compounds. The Beckmann rearrangement is a well-known method to generate secondary amides from ketoximes. However, under the acidic conditions commonly employed, aldoximes RHC=NOH rarely rearrange into the corresponding primary amides RC(=O)NH2. In recent years, it was demonstrated that this atom-economical transformation can be carried out efficiently and selectively with the help of metal catalysts. Several homogeneous and heterogenous systems have been described. In addition, protocols offering the option to generate the aldoximes in situ from the corresponding aldehydes and hydroxylamine, or even from alcohols, have also been developed, as well as a series of tandem processes allowing the access to N-substituted amide products. In this Feature article a comprehensive overview of the advances achieved in this particular research area is presented.

  12. Dissecting Hofmeister Effects: Direct Anion-Amide Interactions Are Weaker than Cation-Amide Binding.

    PubMed

    Balos, Vasileios; Kim, Heejae; Bonn, Mischa; Hunger, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Whereas there is increasing evidence for ion-induced protein destabilization through direct ion-protein interactions, the strength of the binding of anions to proteins relative to cation-protein binding has remained elusive. In this work, the rotational mobility of a model amide in aqueous solution was used as a reporter for the interactions of different anions with the amide group. Protein-stabilizing salts such as KCl and KNO3 do not affect the rotational mobility of the amide. Conversely, protein denaturants such as KSCN and KI markedly reduce the orientational freedom of the amide group. Thus these results provide evidence for a direct denaturation mechanism through ion-protein interactions. Comparing the present findings with results for cations shows that in contrast to common belief, anion-amide binding is weaker than cation-amide binding. PMID:27237055

  13. Expression, purification, and C-terminal amidation of recombinant human glucagon-like peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Zhen; Yang, Sheng-Sheng; Dou, Hong; Mao, Ji-Fang; Li, Kang-Sheng

    2004-08-01

    Human glucagon-like peptide-1 (hGLP-1) (7-36) amide, a gastrointestinal hormone with a pharmaceutical potential in treating type 2 diabetes mellitus, is composed of 30 amino acid residues as a mature protein. We report here the development of a method for high-level expression and purification of recombinant hGLP-1 (7-36) amide (rhGLP-1) through glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion expression system. The cDNA of hGLP-1-Leu, the 31st-residue leucine-extended precursor peptide, was prepared by annealing and ligating of artificially synthetic oligonucleotide fragments, inserted into pBluescript SK (+/-) plasmid, and then cloned into pGEX-4T-3 GST fusion vector. The fusion protein GST-hGLP-1-Leu, expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3), was purified by affinity chromatography after high-level culture and sonication of bacteria. Following cleavage of GST-hGLP-1-Leu by cyanogen bromide, the recombinant hGLP-1-Leu was released from fusion protein, and purified using QAE Sepharose ion exchange and RP C(18) chromatography. After purification, the precursor hGLP-1-Leu was transacylated by carboxypeptidase Y, Arg-NH(2) as a nucleophile, to produce rhGLP-1. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed the molecular weight was as expected. The biological activity of rhGLP-1 in a rat model demonstrated that plasma glucose concentrations were significantly lower and insulin concentrations higher after intraperitoneal injection of rhGLP-1 together with glucose compared with glucose alone (P < 0.001). PMID:15249052

  14. Quantum entanglement between amide-I and amide-site in Davydov-Scott model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Fan, Heng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly derive non-Markovian operator Langevin equations of the Davydov monomer in its environment. Next, we replace the equations with the c-number quantum general Langevin equations (QGLEs) by calculating statistical and quantum averages of the operator Langevin equations. Then, by using the c-number QGLEs we investigate the evolutions of the subsystems amide-I and amide-site. The evolution of a parameter θ describing quantum entanglement of the coupling subsystems with continuous variable Hamiltonian has also been investigated. It is shown that there is certain entanglement between the amide-I and amide-site in the Davydov-Scott monomer.

  15. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N–H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N–H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion. PMID:26195754

  16. Structures of Highly Twisted Amides Relevant to Amide N-C Cross-Coupling: Evidence for Ground-State Amide Destabilization.

    PubMed

    Pace, Vittorio; Holzer, Wolfgang; Meng, Guangrong; Shi, Shicheng; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Roman; Szostak, Michal

    2016-10-01

    Herein, we show that acyclic amides that have recently enabled a series of elusive transition-metal-catalyzed N-C activation/cross-coupling reactions are highly twisted around the N-C(O) axis by a new destabilization mechanism of the amide bond. A unique effect of the N-glutarimide substituent, leading to uniformly high twist (ca. 90°) irrespective of the steric effect at the carbon side of the amide bond has been found. This represents the first example of a twisted amide that does not bear significant steric hindrance at the α-carbon atom. The (15) N NMR data show linear correlations between electron density at nitrogen and amide bond twist. This study strongly supports the concept of amide bond ground-state twist as a blueprint for activation of amides toward N-C bond cleavage. The new mechanism offers considerable opportunities for organic synthesis and biological processes involving non-planar amide bonds.

  17. Polyimides Containing Amide And Perfluoroisopropyl Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezem, James F.

    1993-01-01

    New polyimides synthesized from reactions of aromatic hexafluoroisopropyl dianhydrides with asymmetric amide diamines. Soluble to extent of at least 10 percent by weight at temperature of about 25 degrees C in common amide solvents such as N-methylpyrrolidone, N,N-dimethylacetamide, and N,N-dimethylformamide. Polyimides form tough, flexible films, coatings, and moldings. Glass-transition temperatures ranged from 300 to 365 degrees C, and crystalline melting temperatures observed between 543 and 603 degrees C. Display excellent physical, chemical, and electrical properties. Useful as adhesives, laminating resins, fibers, coatings for electrical and decorative purposes, films, wire enamels, and molding compounds.

  18. Enzymes utilizing glutamine as an amide donor.

    PubMed

    Zalkin, H; Smith, J L

    1998-01-01

    Amide nitrogen from glutamine is a major source of nitrogen atoms incorporated biosynthetically into other amino acids, purine and pyrimidine bases, amino-sugars, and coenzymes. A family comprised of at least sixteen amidotransferases are known to catalyze amide nitrogen transfer from glutamine to their acceptor substrates. Recent fine structural advances, largely as a result of X-ray crystallography, now provide structure-based mechanisms that help to explain fundamental aspects of the catalytic and regulatory interactions of several of these aminotransferases. This chapter provides an overview of this recent progress made on the characterization of amidotransferase structure and mechanism. PMID:9559052

  19. Cu(I) complexes of phosphorous amides

    SciTech Connect

    Nifant'ev, E.E.; Antipin, M.Y.; Blokhin, V.I.; Teleshev, A.T.

    1985-11-01

    The authors prepare and investigate copper complexes of phosphorous amides. The IR spectra of the systems investigated contain an absorption band at 920-940 cm/sup -1/ corresponding to P-N vibrations. The coordinates of the nonhydrogen atoms and their isotropic equivalent temperature factors are given with bond lengths and angles. The general form of the molecule of (IId) with the numbering of atoms, which are represented as probability ellipsoids of the thermal vibrations is shown. Copper complexes of phosphorus amides are phosphorylating agents for mono- and di-hydric alcohols.

  20. Poly(ester amide)s from Soybean Oil for Modulated Release and Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Janeni; Dasgupta, Queeny; Shetty, Shreya N; Sarkar, Kishor; Madras, Giridhar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2016-09-28

    Designing biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration that are also capable of eluting drugs is challenging. Poly(ester amide)s are known for their commendable mechanical properties, degradation, and cellular response. In this regard, development of new poly(ester amide)s becomes imperative to improve the quality of lives of people affected by bone disorders. In this framework, a family of novel soybean oil based biodegradable poly(ester amide)s was synthesized based on facile catalyst-free melt-condensation reaction. The structure of the polymers was confirmed by FTIR and (1)H -NMR, which indicated the formation of the ester and amide bonds along the polymer backbone. Thermal analysis revealed the amorphous nature of the polymers. Contact angle and swelling studies proved that the hydrophobic nature increased with increase in chain length of the diacids and decreased with increase in molar ratio of sebacic acid. Mechanical studies proved that Young's modulus decreased with decrease in chain lengths of the diacids and increase in molar ratio of sebacic acid. The in vitro hydrolytic degradation and dye release demonstrated that the degradation and release decreased with increase in chain lengths of the diacids and increased with increase in molar ratio of sebacic acid. The degradation followed first order kinetics and dye release followed Higuchi kinetics. In vitro cell studies showed no toxic effects of the polymers. Osteogenesis studies revealed that the polymers can be remarkably efficient because more than twice the amount of minerals were deposited on the polymer surfaces than on the tissue culture polystyrene surfaces. Thus, a family of novel poly(ester amide)s has been synthesized, characterized for controlled release and tissue engineering applications wherein the physical, degradation, and release kinetics can be tuned by varying the monomers and their molar ratios. PMID:27599306

  1. Enantioselective synthesis of α-oxy amides via Umpolung amide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Leighty, Matthew W; Shen, Bo; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2012-09-19

    α-Oxy amides are prepared through enantioselective synthesis using a sequence beginning with a Henry addition of bromonitromethane to aldehydes and finishing with Umpolung Amide Synthesis (UmAS). Key to high enantioselection is the finding that ortho-iodo benzoic acid salts of the chiral copper(II) bis(oxazoline) catalyst deliver both diastereomers of the Henry adduct with high enantiomeric excess, homochiral at the oxygen-bearing carbon. Overall, this approach to α-oxy amides provides an innovative complement to alternatives that focus almost entirely on the enantioselective synthesis of α-oxy carboxylic acids. PMID:22967461

  2. 40 CFR 721.10680 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10680... Substances § 721.10680 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMNs...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10686 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10686... Substances § 721.10686 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMNs...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10691 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10691... Substances § 721.10691 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-13-267) is...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10320 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10320... Substances § 721.10320 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-03-186) is...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10687 - Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10687 Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (PMNs P-13-201, P-13-203, P-13-204, P-13-205, P-13-206, P-13-207,...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10320 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10320... Substances § 721.10320 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-03-186) is...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10463 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10463... Substances § 721.10463 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10320 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10320... Substances § 721.10320 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-03-186) is...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10463 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10463... Substances § 721.10463 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMN...

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) but not (9-36) augments cardiac output during myocardial ischemia via a Frank-Starling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Tune, Johnathan D; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Sassoon, Daniel; Casalini, Eli D; Mather, Kieren J

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 (7-36) or (9-36) on myocardial oxygen consumption, function and systemic hemodynamics in vivo during normal perfusion and during acute, regional myocardial ischemia. Lean Ossabaw swine received systemic infusions of saline vehicle or GLP-1 (7-36 or 9-36) at 1.5, 3.0, and 10.0 pmol/kg/min in sequence for 30 min at each dose, followed by ligation of the left circumflex artery during continued infusion at 10.0 pmol/kg/min. Systemic GLP-1 (9-36) had no effect on coronary flow, blood pressure, heart rate or indices of cardiac function before or during regional myocardial ischemia. Systemic GLP-1 (7-36) exerted no cardiometabolic or hemodynamic effects prior to ischemia. During ischemia, GLP-1 (7-36) increased cardiac output by approximately 2 L/min relative to vehicle-controls (p = 0.003). This response was not diminished by treatment with the non-depolarizing ganglionic blocker hexamethonium. Left ventricular pressure-volume loops measured during steady-state conditions with graded occlusion of the inferior vena cava to assess load-independent contractility revealed that GLP-1 (7-36) produced marked increases in end-diastolic volume (74 ± 1 to 92 ± 5 ml; p = 0.03) and volume axis intercept (8 ± 2 to 26 ± 8; p = 0.05), without any change in the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship vs. vehicle during regional ischemia. GLP-1 (9-36) produced no changes in any of these parameters compared to vehicle. These findings indicate that short-term systemic treatment with GLP-1 (7-36) but not GLP-1 (9-36) significantly augments cardiac output during regional myocardial ischemia, via increases in ventricular preload without changes in cardiac inotropy.

  12. Vibrational lifetimes of protein amide modes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Rella, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Measurement of the lifetimes of vibrational modes in proteins has been achieved with a single frequency infrared pump-probe technique using the Stanford Picosecond Free-electron Laser, These are the first direct measurements of vibrational dynamics in the polyamide structure of proteins. In this study, modes associated with the protein backbone are investigated. Results for the amide I band, which consists mainly of the stretching motion of the carbonyl unit of the amide linkage, show that relaxation from the first vibrational excited level (v=1) to the vibrational ground state (v=0) occurs within 1.5 picoseconds with apparent first order kinetics. Comparison of lifetimes for myoglobin and azurin, which have differing secondary structures, show a small but significant difference. The lifetime for the amide I band of myoglobin is 300 femtoseconds shorter than for azurin. Further measurements are in progress on other backbone vibrational modes and on the temperature dependence of the lifetimes. Comparison of vibrational dynamics for proteins with differing secondary structure and for different vibrational modes within a protein will lead to a greater understanding of energy transfer and dissipation in biological systems. In addition, these results have relevance to tissue ablation studies which have been conducted with pulsed infrared lasers. Vibrational lifetimes are necessary for calculating the rate at which the energy from absorbed infrared photons is converted to equilibrium thermal energy within the irradiated volume. The very fast vibrational lifetimes measured here indicate that mechanisms which involve direct vibrational up-pumping of the amide modes with consecutive laser pulses, leading to bond breakage or weakening, are not valid.

  13. Polyimides containing amide and perfluoroisopropylidene connecting groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, James F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    New, thermooxidatively stable polyimides were prepared from the reaction of aromatic dianhydrides containing isopropylidene bridging groups with aromatic diamines containing amide connecting groups between the rings. Several of these polyimides were shown to be semi-crystalline as evidenced by wide angle x ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. Most of the polyimides form tough, flexible films with high tensile properties. These polyimide films exhibit enhanced solubility in organic solvents.

  14. Chromatographically separable rotamers of an unhindered amide

    PubMed Central

    Geffe, Mario; Andernach, Lars; Trapp, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Summary Surprisingly stable formamide rotamers were encountered in the tetrahydroisoquinoline and morphinan series of alkaloids. We investigated the hindered rotation around the amide bond by dynamic high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and kinetic measurements of the interconversion of the rotamers which can readily be separated by HPLC as well as TLC. The experimental results of the different methods were compared to each other as well as to results obtained by DFT calculations. PMID:24778722

  15. Infanticide secrets

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jennieffer A.; Beck, Cheryl T.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore thoughts of infanticide that did not lead to the act among mothers with postpartum depression. DESIGN A phenomenologic hermeneutic study in which women were invited to share their experiences of having thoughts of infanticide. SETTING Community setting in a large metropolitan city, Brisbane, Australia. PARTICIPANTS Fifteen women who had been diagnosed as clinically depressed with postpartum onset whose babies were 12 months of age or younger. METHOD Audiotaped, in-depth interviews were transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis commenced immediately after the first interview, and data collection continued until saturation was achieved. A questioning approach that reflected hermeneutics was facilitated by use of journals by the researchers. MAIN FINDINGS Six themes emerged from the data: imagined acts of infanticide, the experience of horror, distorted sense of responsibility, consuming negativity, keeping secrets, and managing the crisis. CONCLUSION Women who experienced nonpsychotic depression preferred not to disclose their thoughts of infanticide to health professionals, including trusted general practitioners or psychiatrists. These women were more likely to mention their suicidal thoughts than their infanticidal thoughts in order to obtain health care. General practitioners and other health professionals should directly ask about whether a woman has been experiencing thoughts of harming herself or her baby, regardless of the reason why she has presented. PMID:19074717

  16. Comparative Effects of the Endogenous Agonist Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1)-(7-36) Amide and the Small-Molecule Ago-Allosteric Agent “Compound 2” at the GLP-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Coopman, Karen; Huang, Yan; Johnston, Neil; Bradley, Sophie J.; Wilkinson, Graeme F.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mediates antidiabetogenic effects through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), which is targeted for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Small-molecule GLP-1R agonists have been sought due to difficulties with peptide therapeutics. Recently, 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert-butylaminoquinoxaline (compound 2) has been described as a GLP-1R allosteric modulator and agonist. Using human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing human GLP-1Rs, we extended this work to consider the impact of compound 2 on G protein activation, Ca2+ signaling and receptor internalization and particularly to compare compound 2 and GLP-1 across a range of functional assays in intact cells. GLP-1 and compound 2 activated Gαs in cell membranes and increased cellular cAMP in intact cells, with compound 2 being a partial and almost full agonist, respectively. GLP-1 increased intracellular [Ca2+] by release from intracellular stores, which was mimicked by compound 2, with slower kinetics. In either intact cells or membranes, the orthosteric antagonist exendin-(9-39), inhibited GLP-1 cAMP generation but increased the efficacy of compound 2. GLP-1 internalized enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged GLP-1Rs, but the speed and magnitude evoked by compound 2 were less. Exendin-(9-39) inhibited internalization by GLP-1 and also surprisingly that by compound 2. Compound 2 displays GLP-1R agonism consistent with action at an allosteric site, although an orthosteric antagonist increased its efficacy on cAMP and blocked compound 2-mediated receptor internalization. Full assessment of the properties of compound 2 was potentially hampered by damaging effects that were particularly manifest in either longer term assays with intact cells or in acute assays with membranes. PMID:20507928

  17. Conversion of amides to esters by the nickel-catalysed activation of amide C-N bonds.

    PubMed

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F; Shah, Tejas K; Baker, Emma L; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K N; Garg, Neil K

    2015-08-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been studied for more than a century. They are the key building blocks of proteins and are present in a broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to the resonance stability of the amide bond. Although amides can readily be cleaved by enzymes such as proteases, it is difficult to selectively break the carbon-nitrogen bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that amide carbon-nitrogen bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We use this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of the amide-to-ester transformation. Our results provide a way to harness amide functional groups as synthetic building blocks and are expected to lead to the further use of amides in the construction of carbon-heteroatom or carbon-carbon bonds using non-precious-metal catalysis. PMID:26200342

  18. Conversion of amides to esters by the nickel-catalysed activation of amide C-N bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F.; Shah, Tejas K.; Baker, Emma L.; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-08-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been studied for more than a century. They are the key building blocks of proteins and are present in a broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to the resonance stability of the amide bond. Although amides can readily be cleaved by enzymes such as proteases, it is difficult to selectively break the carbon-nitrogen bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that amide carbon-nitrogen bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We use this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of the amide-to-ester transformation. Our results provide a way to harness amide functional groups as synthetic building blocks and are expected to lead to the further use of amides in the construction of carbon-heteroatom or carbon-carbon bonds using non-precious-metal catalysis.

  19. New Umami Amides: Structure-Taste Relationship Studies of Cinnamic Acid Derived Amides and the Natural Occurrence of an Intense Umami Amide in Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    PubMed

    Frerot, Eric; Neirynck, Nathalie; Cayeux, Isabelle; Yuan, Yoyo Hui-Juan; Yuan, Yong-Ming

    2015-08-19

    A series of aromatic amides were synthesized from various acids and amines selected from naturally occurring structural frameworks. These synthetic amides were evaluated for umami taste in comparison with monosodium glutamate. The effect of the substitution pattern of both the acid and the amine parts on umami taste was investigated. The only intensely umami-tasting amides were those made from 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid. The amine part was more tolerant to structural changes. Amides bearing an alkyl- or alkoxy-substituted phenylethylamine residue displayed a clean umami taste as 20 ppm solutions in water. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with a high quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (UPLC/MS) was subsequently used to show the natural occurrence of these amides. (E)-3-(3,4-Dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(4-methoxyphenethyl)acrylamide was shown to occur in the roots and stems of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant of the family Rutaceae growing in Korea, Japan, and China.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10682 - Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10682 Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substances... fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (PMNs P-13-63, P-13-64, P-13-65, P-13-69, P-13-70, P-13-71, P-13-72,...

  1. Phenazinium salt-catalyzed aerobic oxidative amidation of aromatic aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Leow, Dasheng

    2014-11-01

    Amides are prevalent in organic synthesis. Developing an efficient synthesis that avoids expensive oxidants and heating is highly desirable. Here the oxidative amidation of aromatic aldehydes is reported using an inexpensive metal-free visible light photocatalyst, phenazine ethosulfate, at low catalytic loading (1-2 mol %). The reaction proceeds at ambient temperature and uses air as the sole oxidant. The operationally easy procedure provides an economical, green, and mild alternative for the formation of amide bonds.

  2. Amide-Substituted Titanocenes in Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Jakoby, Verena; Stainer, Katharina; Schmer, Alexander; Klare, Sven; Bauer, Mirko; Grimme, Stefan; Cuerva, Juan Manuel; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-01-22

    Two new catalytic systems for hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) catalysis involving the N-H bonds of titanocene(III) complexes with pendant amide ligands are reported. In a monometallic system, a bifunctional catalyst for radical generation and reduction through HAT catalysis depending on the coordination of the amide ligand is employed. The pendant amide ligand is used to activate Crabtree's catalyst to yield an efficient bimetallic system for radical generation and HAT catalysis. PMID:26636435

  3. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate in the presence of an amide

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions thereof in the presence of amides to gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) is described. Generally, electrochemical reduction of NO.sub.3 proceeds stepwise, from NO.sub.3 to N.sub.2, and subsequently in several consecutive steps to ammonia (NH.sub.3) as a final product. Addition of at least one amide to the solution being electrolyzed suppresses ammonia generation, since suitable amides react with NO.sub.2 to generate N.sub.2. This permits nitrate reduction to gaseous nitrogen to proceed by electrolysis. Suitable amides include urea, sulfamic acid, formamide, and acetamide.

  4. Enantioselective Synthesis of α-Hydroxy Amides and β-Amino Alcohols from α-Keto Amides.

    PubMed

    Mamillapalli, N Chary; Sekar, Govindasamy

    2015-12-14

    Synthesis of enantiomerically enriched α-hydroxy amides and β-amino alcohols has been accomplished by enantioselective reduction of α-keto amides with hydrosilanes. A series of α-keto amides were reduced in the presence of chiral Cu(II)/(S)-DTBM-SEGPHOS catalyst to give the corresponding optically active α-hydroxy amides with excellent enantioselectivities by using (EtO)3SiH as a reducing agent. Furthermore, a one-pot complete reduction of both ketone and amide groups of α-keto amides has been achieved using the same chiral copper catalyst followed by tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride (TBAF) catalyst in presence of (EtO)3SiH to afford the corresponding chiral β-amino alcohol derivatives. PMID:26503887

  5. Copper-catalyzed oxidative amidation of aldehydes with amine salts: synthesis of primary, secondary, and tertiary amides.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhash Chandra; Ngiam, Joyce S Y; Seayad, Abdul M; Tuan, Dang Thanh; Chai, Christina L L; Chen, Anqi

    2012-09-21

    A practical method for the amidation of aldehydes with economic ammonium chloride or amine hydrochloride salts has been developed for the synthesis of a wide variety of amides by using inexpensive copper sulfate or copper(I) oxide as a catalyst and aqueous tert-butyl hydroperoxide as an oxidant. This amidation reaction is operationally straightforward and provides primary, secondary, and tertiary amides in good to excellent yields for most cases utilizing inexpensive and readily available reagents under mild conditions. In situ formation of amine salts from free amines extends the substrate scope of the reaction. Chiral amides are also synthesized from their corresponding chiral amines without detectable racemization. The practicality of this amide formation reaction has been demonstrated in an efficient synthesis of the antiarrhythmic drug N-acetylprocainamide. PMID:22894712

  6. AMID: autonomous modeler of intragenic duplication.

    PubMed

    Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Weiss, Anthony S; Fekete, Alan; Jermiin, Lars S

    2003-01-01

    Intragenic duplication is an evolutionary process where segments of a gene become duplicated. While there has been much research into whole-gene or domain duplication, there have been very few studies of non-tandem intragenic duplication. The identification of intragenically replicated sequences may provide insight into the evolution of proteins, helping to link sequence data with structure and function. This paper describes a tool for autonomously modelling intragenic duplication. AMID provides: identification of modularly repetitive genes; an algorithm for identifying repeated modules; and a scoring system for evaluating the modules' similarity. An evaluation of the algorithms and use cases are presented.

  7. Conversion of Amides to Esters by the Nickel-Catalyzed Activation of Amide C–N Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F.; Shah, Tejas K.; Baker, Emma L.; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been well studied for more than a century.1 They serve as the key building blocks of proteins and are present in an broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to resonance stability of the amide bond.1,2 Whereas Nature can easily cleave amides through the action of enzymes, such as proteases,3 the ability to selectively break the C–N bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry is quite difficult. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that amide C–N bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We have used this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of this unusual transformation. Our results provide a new strategy to harness amide functional groups as synthons and are expected fuel the further use of amides for the construction of carbon–heteroatom or carbon–carbon bonds using non-precious metal catalysis. PMID:26200342

  8. Polymer Amide as an Early Topology

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, Julie E. M.; McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic polymer amide (HPA) could have been one of the first normal density materials to accrete in space. We present ab initio calculations of the energetics of amino acid polymerization via gas phase collisions. The initial hydrogen-bonded di-peptide is sufficiently stable to proceed in many cases via a transition state into a di-peptide with an associated bound water molecule of condensation. The energetics of polymerization are only favorable when the water remains bound. Further polymerization leads to a hydrophobic surface that is phase-separated from, but hydrogen bonded to, a small bulk water complex. The kinetics of the collision and subsequent polymerization are discussed for the low-density conditions of a molecular cloud. This polymer in the gas phase has the properties to make a topology, viz. hydrophobicity allowing phase separation from bulk water, capability to withstand large temperature ranges, versatility of form and charge separation. Its flexible tetrahedral carbon atoms that alternate with more rigid amide groups allow it to deform and reform in hazardous conditions and its density of hydrogen bonds provides adhesion that would support accretion to it of silicon and metal elements to form a stellar dust material. PMID:25048204

  9. Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Amidation of Unactivated Alkyl Bromides.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Eloisa; Martin, Ruben

    2016-09-01

    A user-friendly, nickel-catalyzed reductive amidation of unactivated primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl bromides with isocyanates is described. This catalytic strategy offers an efficient synthesis of a wide range of aliphatic amides under mild conditions and with an excellent chemoselectivity profile while avoiding the use of stoichiometric and sensitive organometallic reagents. PMID:27357076

  10. Fatty acid amides from freshwater green alga Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, V M; Shkrob, I; Rozentsvet, O A

    2000-08-01

    Freshwater green algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum growing in the Ural Mountains were examined for their fatty acid amides using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Eight fatty acid amides were identified by GC-MS. (Z)-9-octadecenamide was found to be the major component (2.26%).

  11. Fatty acid amides from freshwater green alga Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, V M; Shkrob, I; Rozentsvet, O A

    2000-08-01

    Freshwater green algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum growing in the Ural Mountains were examined for their fatty acid amides using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Eight fatty acid amides were identified by GC-MS. (Z)-9-octadecenamide was found to be the major component (2.26%). PMID:11014298

  12. Retinobenzoic acids. 4. Conformation of aromatic amides with retinoidal activity. Importance of trans-amide structure for the activity.

    PubMed

    Kagechika, H; Himi, T; Kawachi, E; Shudo, K

    1989-10-01

    N-Methylation of two retinoidal amide compounds, 4-[(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)carbamoyl]benz oic acid (3, Am80) and 4-[[(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2- naphthalenyl)carbonyl]amino]benzoic acid (5, Am580), resulted in the disappearance of their potent differentiation-inducing activity on human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60. Studies with 1H NMR and UV spectroscopy indicated that large conformational differences exist between the active secondary amides and the inactive N-methyl amides. From a comparison of the spectroscopic results of these amides with those of stilbene derivatives, the conformations of the active amides are expected to resemble that of (E)-stilbene, whereas the inactive amides resemble the Z isomer: 3 (Am80) and 5 (Am580) have a trans-amide bond and their whole structures are elongated, while the N-methylated compounds [4 (Am90) and 6 (Am590)] have a cis-amide bond, resulting in the folding of the two benzene rings. These structures in the crystals were related to those in solution by 13C NMR spectroscopic comparison between the two phases (solid and solution).

  13. Novel inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Sit, S Y; Conway, Charlie; Bertekap, Robert; Xie, Kai; Bourin, Clotilde; Burris, Kevin; Deng, Hongfeng

    2007-06-15

    A class of bisarylimidazole derivatives are identified as potent inhibitors of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Compound 17 (IC(50)=2 nM) dose-dependently (0.1-10mg/kg, iv) potentiates the effects of exogenous anandamide (1 mg/kg, iv) in a rat thermal escape test (Hargreaves test), and shows robust antinociceptive activity in animal models of persistent (formalin test) and neuropathic (Chung model) pain. Compound 17 (20 mg/kg, iv) demonstrates activity in the formalin test that is comparable to morphine (3mg/kg, iv), and is dose-dependently inhibited by the CB1 antagonist SR141716A. In the Chung model, compound 17 shows antineuropathic effects similar to high-dose (100 mg/kg) gabapentin. FAAH inhibition shows potential utility for the clinical treatment of persistent and neuropathic pain.

  14. Copoly(imide-amides) containing hexafluoroisopropylidene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvin, David J.; Cassidy, Patrick E.; Cameron, Mitch L.

    1990-01-01

    The incorporation of the hexafluoroisopropylidene (HFIP or 6F) group into polymer backbones brings about important and useful changes in properties. These differences include increased thermal and environmental resistance and solubility and decreased dielectric constant and color. Several types of backbones have been substrates for the inclusion of HFIP and all results have reflected impressive property benefits. This project involved the incorporation of 6F groups into a poly(imide-amide) backbone by the condensation of a 6F-containing dianhydride with 4-aminobenzoic acid to yield a diimide terminated with two carboxylic acid groups. This diacid trimer was then polymerized with various diamines. The polymers were obtained in yields of 86-94 percent and with viscosities of 0.90-2.26 dL/g. They were stable to above 500 C and clear, colorless films could be cast from DMAc.

  15. Poly(amide-graft-acrylate) interfacial compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Michael Perez

    Graft copolymers with segments of dissimilar chemistries have been shown to be useful in a variety of applications as surfactants, compatibilizers, impact modifiers, and surface modifiers. The most common route to well defined graft copolymers is through the use of macromonomers, polymers containing a reactive functionality and thus capable of further polymerization. However, the majority of the studies thus far have focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of reacting with vinyl monomers to form graft copolymers. This study focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of participating in condensation polymerizations. A chain transfer functionalization method was utilized. Cysteine was evaluated as a chain transfer agent for the synthesis of amino acid functionalized poly(acrylate) and poly(methacrylate) macromonomers. Low molar mass, functionalized macromonomers were produced. These macromonomers were proven to be capable of reacting with amide precursors to form poly(amide-g-acrylate) graft copolymers. Macromonomers and graft copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis (EA), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The second part of this research involved poly(dimethacrylate) dental restorative materials. Volumetric shrinkage during the cure of these resins results in a poor interface between the resin and the remaining tooth structure, limiting the lifetime of these materials. Cyclic anhydrides were incorporated into common monomer compositions used in dental applications. Volume expansion from the ring opening hydrolysis of these anhydrides was shown to be feasible. The modified dental resins were characterized by swelling, extraction and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), and density measurements. Linear poLymers designed to model the crosslinked dental resins were

  16. Amidation of Bioactive Peptides: The Structure of the Lyase Domain of the Amidating Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Chufan, E.; De, M; Eipper, B; Mains, R; Amzel, L

    2009-01-01

    Many neuropeptides and peptide hormones require amidation of their carboxy terminal for full biological activity. The enzyme peptidyl-{alpha}-hydroxyglycine {alpha}-amidating lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.2.5) catalyzes the second and last step of this reaction, N-dealkylation of the peptidyl-{alpha}-hydroxyglycine to generate the {alpha}-amidated peptide and glyoxylate. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the PAL catalytic core (PALcc) alone and in complex with the nonpeptidic substrate {alpha}-hydroxyhippuric acid. The structures show that PAL folds as a six-bladed {Beta}-propeller. The active site is formed by a Zn(II) ion coordinated by three histidine residues; the substrate binds to this site with its {alpha}-hydroxyl group coordinated to the Zn(II) ion. The structures also reveal a tyrosine residue (Tyr{sup 654}) at the active site as the catalytic base for hydroxyl deprotonation, an unusual role for tyrosine. A reaction mechanism is proposed based on this structural data and validated by biochemical analysis of site-directed PALcc mutants.

  17. GLP-1(32-36)amide, a novel pentapeptide cleavage product of GLP-1, modulates whole body glucose metabolism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Dariush; Angeli, Franca S; Vakilipour, Amin; Carlson, Olga D; Tomas, Eva; Egan, Josephine M; Habener, Joel F; Shannon, Richard P

    2014-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated in human subjects who under euglycemic clamp conditions GLP-1(9-36)amide infusions inhibit endogenous glucose production without substantial insulinotropic effects. An earlier report indicates that GLP-1(9-36)amide is cleaved to a nonapeptide, GLP-1(28-36)amide and a pentapeptide GLP-1(32-36)amide (LVKGR amide). Here we study the effects of the pentapeptide on whole body glucose disposal during hyperglycemic clamp studies. Five dogs underwent indwelling catheterizations. Following recovery, the dogs underwent a 180 min hyperglycemic clamp (basal glucose +98 mg/dl) in a cross-over design. Saline or pentapeptide (30 pmol kg(-1) min(-1)) was infused during the last 120 min after commencement of the hyperglycemic clamp in a primed continuous manner. During the last 30 min of the pentapeptide infusion, glucose utilization (M) significantly increased to 21.4±2.9 mg kg(-1) min(-1)compared to M of 14.3±1.1 mg kg(-1)min(-1) during the saline infusion (P=0.026, paired t-test; P=0.062, Mann-Whitney U test). During this interval, no significant differences in insulin (26.6±3.2 vs. 23.7±2.5 μU/ml, P=NS) or glucagon secretion (34.0±2.1 vs. 31.7±1.8 pg/ml, P=NS) were observed. These findings demonstrate that under hyperglycemic clamp studies the pentapeptide modulates glucose metabolism by a stimulation of whole-body glucose disposal. Further, the findings suggest that the metabolic benefits previously observed during GLP-1(9-36)amide infusions in humans might be due, at least in part, to the metabolic effects of the pentapeptide that is cleaved from the pro-peptide, GLP-1(9-36)amide in the circulation.

  18. Chemical attributes of some clouds amid a forest ecosystem's trees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeFelice, Thomas P.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous physical and chemical characteristics of clouds amid and above the trees of a montane forest, located about 3.3 km southwest of Mt. Mitchell, NC, were collected between 13 and 22 June 1993. This paper summarizes the chemical characteristics of the cloud droplets amid the trees. The ionic composition and pH of the analyzed amid-canopy cloud water samples are generally consistent with those of previous above-canopy cloud water samples obtained at this site. Magnesium, sodium, and calcium are highly correlated to each other amid the canopy as compared to above the canopy. Above-canopy and amid-canopy cloud-only episodes, with concurrent event-averaged cloud water pH values at or below 3.1, generally contain more magnesium, sodium, and calcium in the amid-canopy cloud water samples compared to concurrent above-canopy cloud water samples. The observed chemical differences between the amid-canopy cloud and the above- canopy cloud suggest an unhealthier environment for the tree canopy when the cloud water traversing this site has a pH value at or below 3.1. The predominant ion deposition fluxes were calculated to provide preliminary data for studies designed to explicitly quantify how the chemical composition of cloud water affects tree health. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. New organic semiconductors with imide/amide-containing molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Guanxin; Cai, Zhengxu; Chen, Xin; Luo, Hewei; Li, Yonghai; Wang, Jianguo; Zhang, Deqing

    2014-10-29

    Due to their high electron affinities, chemical and thermal stabilities, π-conjugated molecules with imide/amide frameworks have received considerable attentions as promising candidates for high-performance optoelectronic materials, particularly for organic semiconductors with high carrier mobilities. The purpose of this Research News is to give an overview of recent advances in development of high performance imide/amide based organic semiconductors for field-effect transistors. It covers naphthalene diimide-, perylene diimide- and amide-based conjugated molecules and polymers for organic semiconductors. PMID:24633804

  20. New organic semiconductors with imide/amide-containing molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Guanxin; Cai, Zhengxu; Chen, Xin; Luo, Hewei; Li, Yonghai; Wang, Jianguo; Zhang, Deqing

    2014-10-29

    Due to their high electron affinities, chemical and thermal stabilities, π-conjugated molecules with imide/amide frameworks have received considerable attentions as promising candidates for high-performance optoelectronic materials, particularly for organic semiconductors with high carrier mobilities. The purpose of this Research News is to give an overview of recent advances in development of high performance imide/amide based organic semiconductors for field-effect transistors. It covers naphthalene diimide-, perylene diimide- and amide-based conjugated molecules and polymers for organic semiconductors.

  1. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF SEVEN AMIDES BY SUSPENDED BACTERIAL POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial transformation rate constants were determined for seven amides in natural pond water. A second-order mathematical rate expression served as the model for describing the microbial transformation. Also investigated was the relationship between the infrared spectra and the...

  2. Silver-catalyzed synthesis of amides from amines and aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Madix, Robert J; Zhou, Ling; Xu, Bingjun; Friend, Cynthia M; Freyschlag, Cassandra G

    2014-11-18

    The invention provides a method for producing amides via the reaction of aldehydes and amines with oxygen adsorbed on a metallic silver or silver alloy catalyst. An exemplary reaction is shown in Scheme 1: (I), (II), (III). ##STR00001##

  3. Amide temperature coefficients in the protein G B1 domain.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Jennifer H; Williamson, Mike P

    2012-01-01

    Temperature coefficients have been measured for backbone amide (1)H and (15)N nuclei in the B1 domain of protein G (GB1), using temperatures in the range 283-313 K, and pH values from 2.0 to 9.0. Many nuclei display pH-dependent coefficients, which were fitted to one or two pK(a) values. (1)H coefficients showed the expected behaviour, in that hydrogen-bonded amides have less negative values, but for those amides involved in strong hydrogen bonds in regular secondary structure there is a negative correlation between strength of hydrogen bond and size of temperature coefficient. The best correlation to temperature coefficient is with secondary shift, indicative of a very approximately uniform thermal expansion. The largest pH-dependent changes in coefficient are for amides in loops adjacent to sidechain hydrogen bonds rather than the amides involved directly in hydrogen bonds, indicating that the biggest determinant of the temperature coefficient is temperature-dependent loss of structure, not hydrogen bonding. Amide (15)N coefficients have no clear relationship with structure.

  4. Selective formation of secondary amides via the copper-catalyzed cross-coupling of alkylboronic acids with primary amides.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Steven A; Shimkin, Kirk W; Xu, Qun; Mori-Quiroz, Luis M; Watson, Donald A

    2013-05-01

    For the first time, a general catalytic procedure for the cross-coupling of primary amides and alkylboronic acids is demonstrated. The key to the success of this reaction was the identification of a mild base (NaOSiMe3) and oxidant (di-tert-butyl peroxide) to promote the copper-catalyzed reaction in high yield. This transformation provides a facile, high-yielding method for the monoalkylation of amides. PMID:23611591

  5. Authentication Without Secrets

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, Lyndon G.; Robertson, Perry J.

    2015-11-01

    This work examines a new approach to authentication, which is the most fundamental security primitive that underpins all cyber security protections. Current Internet authentication techniques require the protection of one or more secret keys along with the integrity protection of the algorithms/computations designed to prove possession of the secret without actually revealing it. Protecting a secret requires physical barriers or encryption with yet another secret key. The reason to strive for "Authentication without Secret Keys" is that protecting secrets (even small ones only kept in a small corner of a component or device) is much harder than protecting the integrity of information that is not secret. Promising methods are examined for authentication of components, data, programs, network transactions, and/or individuals. The successful development of authentication without secret keys will enable far more tractable system security engineering for high exposure, high consequence systems by eliminating the need for brittle protection mechanisms to protect secret keys (such as are now protected in smart cards, etc.). This paper is a re-release of SAND2009-7032 with new figures numerous edits.

  6. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B; O'Brien, Thomas J; Stevenson, David M; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using (13)C-labeled sugars and [(15)N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals.

  7. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B.; O'Brien, Thomas J.; Stevenson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using 13C-labeled sugars and [15N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals. PMID:26070680

  8. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B; O'Brien, Thomas J; Stevenson, David M; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using (13)C-labeled sugars and [(15)N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals. PMID:26070680

  9. Cations bind only weakly to amides in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Okur, Halil I; Kherb, Jaibir; Cremer, Paul S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated salt interactions with butyramide as a simple mimic of cation interactions with protein backbones. The experiments were performed in aqueous metal chloride solutions using two spectroscopic techniques. In the first, which provided information about contact pair formation, the response of the amide I band to the nature and concentration of salt was monitored in bulk aqueous solutions via attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was found that molar concentrations of well-hydrated metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Li(+)) led to the rise of a peak assigned to metal cation-bound amides (1645 cm(-1)) and a decrease in the peak associated with purely water-bound amides (1620 cm(-1)). In a complementary set of experiments, the effect of cation identity and concentration was investigated at the air/butyramide/water interface via vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. In these studies, metal ion-amide binding led to the ordering of the adjacent water layer. Such experiments were sensitive to the interfacial partitioning of cations in either a contact pair with the amide or as a solvent separated pair. In both experiments, the ordering of the interactions of the cations was: Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Li(+) > Na(+) ≈ K(+). This is a direct cationic Hofmeister series. Even for Ca(2+), however, the apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of the cation with the amide carbonyl oxygen was no tighter than ∼8.5 M. For Na(+) and K(+), no evidence was found for any binding. As such, the interactions of metal cations with amides are far weaker than the analogous binding of weakly hydrated anions.

  10. Split Ssp DnaB mini-intein-mediated production of recombinant human glucagon-like peptide-1/7-36.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Aiqin; Jin, Wenbo; Zhao, Feng; Tang, Yanchun; Sun, Ziyong; Liu, Jian-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in the regulation of postprandial insulin release. Here, we used the split DnaB mini-intein system to produce recombinant human GLP-1/7-36 (rhGLP-1) in Escherichia coli. The C-terminal domain of DnaB mini-intein (IntC) was genetically fused at the N-terminus of rhGLP-1 to produce IntC-GLP-1. IntC-GLP-1 and N-terminal domain of DnaB mini-intein (IntN) protein were prepared in a denatured buffer of pH 8.0. IntC-GLP-1 was diluted 1:8 into the phosphate buffer of pH 6.6. IntN was added into the diluted solution of IntC-GLP-1 at the molar ratio of 1:2. Then, rhGLP-1 was released from IntC-GLP-1 via inducible C-terminal peptide-bond cleavage by shifting pH from 8.0 to 6.6 at 25 °C for 24-H incubation. Then, the supernatant was applied to a Ni-Sepharose column, and the pass through fraction was collected. About 5.34 mg of rhGLP-1 with the purity of 97% was obtained from 1 L of culture medium. Mass spectrometry showed the molecular weight of 3,300.45 Da, which was equal to the theoretical value of GLP-1/7-36. The glucose-lowering activity of rhGLP-1 was confirmed by the glucose tolerance test in mice. In conclusion, the reported method was an efficient strategy to produce rhGLP-1 without using enzyme or chemical reagents, which could also be used for other similar peptides.

  11. Quantification and enzyme targets of fatty acid amides from duckweed root exudates involved in the stimulation of denitrification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Lu, Yufang; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Shi, Weiming

    2016-07-01

    Fatty acid amides from plant root exudates, such as oleamide and erucamide, have the ability to participate in strong plant-microbe interactions, stimulating nitrogen metabolism in rhizospheric bacteria. However, mechanisms of secretion of such fatty acid amides, and the nature of their stimulatory activities on microbial metabolism, have not been examined. In the present study, collection, pre-treatment, and determination methods of oleamide and erucamide in duckweed root exudates are compared. The detection limits of oleamide and erucamide by gas chromatography (GC) (10.3ngmL(-1) and 16.1ngmL(-1), respectively) are shown to be much lower than those by liquid chromatography (LC) (1.7 and 5.0μgmL(-1), respectively). Quantitative GC analysis yielded five times larger amounts of oleamide and erucamide in root exudates of Spirodela polyrrhiza when using a continuous collection method (50.20±4.32 and 76.79±13.92μgkg(-1) FW day(-1)), compared to static collection (10.88±0.66 and 15.27±0.58μgkg(-1) FW day(-1)). Furthermore, fatty acid amide secretion was significantly enhanced under elevated nitrogen conditions (>300mgL(-1)), and was negatively correlated with the relative growth rate of duckweed. Mechanistic assays were conducted to show that erucamide stimulates nitrogen removal by enhancing denitrification, targeting two key denitrifying enzymes, nitrate and nitrite reductases, in bacteria. Our findings significantly contribute to our understanding of the regulation of nitrogen dynamics by plant root exudates in natural ecosystems. PMID:27152459

  12. Quantification and enzyme targets of fatty acid amides from duckweed root exudates involved in the stimulation of denitrification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Lu, Yufang; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Shi, Weiming

    2016-07-01

    Fatty acid amides from plant root exudates, such as oleamide and erucamide, have the ability to participate in strong plant-microbe interactions, stimulating nitrogen metabolism in rhizospheric bacteria. However, mechanisms of secretion of such fatty acid amides, and the nature of their stimulatory activities on microbial metabolism, have not been examined. In the present study, collection, pre-treatment, and determination methods of oleamide and erucamide in duckweed root exudates are compared. The detection limits of oleamide and erucamide by gas chromatography (GC) (10.3ngmL(-1) and 16.1ngmL(-1), respectively) are shown to be much lower than those by liquid chromatography (LC) (1.7 and 5.0μgmL(-1), respectively). Quantitative GC analysis yielded five times larger amounts of oleamide and erucamide in root exudates of Spirodela polyrrhiza when using a continuous collection method (50.20±4.32 and 76.79±13.92μgkg(-1) FW day(-1)), compared to static collection (10.88±0.66 and 15.27±0.58μgkg(-1) FW day(-1)). Furthermore, fatty acid amide secretion was significantly enhanced under elevated nitrogen conditions (>300mgL(-1)), and was negatively correlated with the relative growth rate of duckweed. Mechanistic assays were conducted to show that erucamide stimulates nitrogen removal by enhancing denitrification, targeting two key denitrifying enzymes, nitrate and nitrite reductases, in bacteria. Our findings significantly contribute to our understanding of the regulation of nitrogen dynamics by plant root exudates in natural ecosystems.

  13. Secrets to success.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2014-02-01

    A new national study reveals what it takes for physician practices to stay financially viable. Several Texas practices, among those rated as "better performers," share their secrets to success. One of those secrets, a physician says, is "hiring good people and getting out of their way." PMID:24500918

  14. Secrets in "The Day of Ahmed's Secret."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckett, Peter; Knox, Marjorie

    2001-01-01

    Examines images and the written text in the picture book, "The Day of Ahmed's Secret," by Florence Parry Heide and Judith Heide Gilliland. Examines the book in greater detail by looking for issues of authenticity as well as social issues within the book's pictures and written texts. (SG)

  15. Mechanism of fluorescence quenching of tyrosine derivatives by amide group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiczk, Wiesław; Rzeska, Alicja; Łukomska, Joanna; Stachowiak, Krystyna; Karolczak, Jerzy; Malicka, Joanna; Łankiewicz, Leszek

    2001-06-01

    The difference between fluorescence lifetimes of the following amino acids: phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), ( O-methyl)tyrosine (Tyr(Me)), (3-hydroxy)tyrosine (Dopa), (3,4-dimethoxy)phenylalanine (Dopa(Me) 2) and their amides was used to testify the mechanism of fluorescence quenching of aromatic amino acids by the amide group. On the basis of the Marcus theory of photoinduced electron transfer parabolic relationships between ln kET and ionization potentials reduced by energy of excitation ( IP-E ∗0,0) for the above-mentioned amino acids were obtained. This finding indicates the occurrence of photoinduced electron transfer from the excited chromophore group to the amide group.

  16. Modulations in restricted amide rotation by steric induced conformational trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, V. V.; Thompson, William B.; Goto, Joy J.; Maitra, Kalyani; Maitra, Santanu

    2012-01-01

    The rotation around the amide bond in N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (m-DEET) has been studied extensively and often used in laboratory instructions to demonstrate the phenomenon of chemical exchange. Herein, we show that a simple modification to N,N-diethyl-o-toluamide (o-DEET) significantly alters the dynamics of the restricted rotation around the amide bond due to steric interactions between the ring methyl group and the two N-ethyl groups. This alters the classic two-site exchange due to restricted rotation around the amide bond, to a three-site exchange, with the third conformation trapped at a higher-energy state compared to the other two. This often overlooked phenomenon is elucidated using variable-temperature NMR, two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy and molecular modeling studies.

  17. Nickel-catalysed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weires, Nicholas A.; Baker, Emma L.; Garg, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    The Suzuki-Miyaura coupling has become one of the most important and prevalent methods for the construction of C-C bonds. Although palladium catalysis has historically dominated the field, the use of nickel catalysis has become increasingly widespread because of its unique ability to cleave carbon-heteroatom bonds that are unreactive towards other transition metals. We report the first nickel-catalysed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides, which proceeds by an uncommon cleavage of the amide C-N bond after N-tert-butoxycarbonyl activation. The methodology is mild, functional-group tolerant and can be strategically employed in sequential transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling sequences to unite heterocyclic fragments. These studies demonstrate that amides, despite classically considered inert substrates, can be harnessed as synthons for use in reactions that form C-C bonds through cleavage of the C-N bond using non-precious metal catalysis.

  18. On the unconventional amide I band in acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Campa, Alessandro; Giansanti, Andrea

    1987-04-01

    We developed a new model to study the molecular dynamics of the acetanilide (ACN) crystal by computer simulation. Low-frequency oscillations of the molecules as a whole were considered with high-frequency vibrations of the amidic degrees of freedom involved in hydrogen bonding. The low-temperature power spectrum has two peaks, shifted by 15 cm -1, in the region of the amide I band: one of them corresponds to the so-called anomalous amide I band in the IR and Raman spectra of ACN. We found that this peak is due to the coupling of the low-frequency motion in the chain of molecules with the motion of the hydrogen-bonded protons, at variance with current suggestions.

  19. Intramolecular amide bonds stabilize pili on the surface of bacilli

    SciTech Connect

    Budzik, Jonathan M.; Poor, Catherine B.; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; He, Chuan; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-01-12

    Gram-positive bacteria elaborate pili and do so without the participation of folding chaperones or disulfide bond catalysts. Sortases, enzymes that cut pilin precursors, form covalent bonds that link pilin subunits and assemble pili on the bacterial surface. We determined the x-ray structure of BcpA, the major pilin subunit of Bacillus cereus. The BcpA precursor encompasses 2 Ig folds (CNA{sub 2} and CNA{sub 3}) and one jelly-roll domain (XNA) each of which synthesizes a single intramolecular amide bond. A fourth amide bond, derived from the Ig fold of CNA{sub 1}, is formed only after pilin subunits have been incorporated into pili. We report that the domains of pilin precursors have evolved to synthesize a discrete sequence of intramolecular amide bonds, thereby conferring structural stability and protease resistance to pili.

  20. Synthesis and antituberculosis activity of new fatty acid amides.

    PubMed

    D'Oca, Caroline Da Ros Montes; Coelho, Tatiane; Marinho, Tamara Germani; Hack, Carolina Rosa Lopes; Duarte, Rodrigo da Costa; da Silva, Pedro Almeida; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes

    2010-09-01

    This work reports the synthesis of new fatty acid amides from C16:0, 18:0, 18:1, 18:1 (OH), and 18:2 fatty acids families with cyclic and acyclic amines and demonstrate for the first time the activity of these compounds as antituberculosis agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv, M. tuberculosis rifampicin resistance (ATCC 35338), and M. tuberculosis isoniazid resistance (ATCC 35822). The fatty acid amides derivate from ricinoleic acid were the most potent one among a series of tested compounds, with a MIC 6.25 microg/mL for resistance strains.

  1. A Direct and Stereoretentive Synthesis of Amides from Cyclic Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Deboprosad; Bellucci, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Chlorosulfites prepared in situ using thionyl chloride react with nitrile complexes of titanium (IV) fluoride to give a one-pot conversion of alcohols into amides. For the first time, amides are obtained from cyclic alcohols with stereoretention. Critical to the design of these new Ti(IV) reactions has been the use of little explored Ti(IV) nitrile complexes which are thought to chelate chlorosulfites in the transition state to create a carbocation that is rapidly captured by the nitrile nucleophile via a front-side attack mechanism. PMID:24273447

  2. Copper-Catalyzed Carbonylative Coupling of Cycloalkanes and Amides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yahui; Dong, Kaiwu; Zhu, Fengxiang; Wang, Zechao; Wu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-06-13

    Carbonylation reactions are a most powerful method for the synthesis of carbonyl-containing compounds. However, most known carbonylation procedures still require noble-metal catalysts and the use of activated compounds and good nucleophiles as substrates. Herein, we developed a copper-catalyzed carbonylative transformation of cycloalkanes and amides. Imides were prepared in good yields by carbonylation of a C(sp(3) )-H bond of the cycloalkane with the amides acting as weak nucleophiles. Notably, this is the first report of copper-catalyzed carbonylative C-H activation. PMID:27167881

  3. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor; Freedman, Holly

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump-probe experiments.

  4. Direct Reaction of Amides with Nitric Oxide To Form Diazeniumdiolates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the apparently unprecedented direct reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with amides to generate ions of structure R(C=O)NH–N(O)=NO–, with examples including R = Me (1a) or 3-pyridyl (1b). The sodium salts of both released NO in pH 7.4 buffer, with 37 °C half-lives of 1–3 min. As NO-releasing drug candidates, diazeniumdiolated amides would have the advantage of generating only 1 equiv of base on hydrolyzing exhaustively to NO, in contrast to their amine counterparts, which generate 2 equiv of base. PMID:25210948

  5. Six secrets of champagne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard

    2015-12-01

    Popping open a bottle of champagne is one of life's great delights, but how much do you really know about the science behind this greatest of wines? Gérard Liger-Belair reveals his six favourite champagne secrets.

  6. Secret quality of love.

    PubMed

    Strachan-Hall, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    Many of us can recite three Donabedian dimensions of the quality of care of structure, process and outcome. Recently, I was introduced to another of Avedis Donabedian's quotes about the 'secret quality of love'. PMID:27581908

  7. Chemoselective esterification and amidation of carboxylic acids with imidazole carbamates and ureas.

    PubMed

    Heller, Stephen T; Sarpong, Richmond

    2010-10-15

    Imidazole carbamates and ureas were found to be chemoselective esterification and amidation reagents. A wide variety of carboxylic acids were converted to their ester or amide analogues by a simple synthetic procedure in high yields.

  8. Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Amidation of Indoles with Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Taejoo; Han, Sangil; Mishra, Neeraj Kumar; Sharma, Satyasheel; Lee, Seok-Yong; Oh, Joa Sub; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, In Su

    2015-07-17

    The rhodium(III)-catalyzed direct amidation of indoles and pyrroles with aryl and alkyl isocyanates is described. These transformations provide a facile and efficient construction of C2-amidated N-heterocyclic scaffolds.

  9. Iodine-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Amidation of β,γ-Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids with Chloramine Salts Leading to Allylic Amides.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Kojima, Takumi; Hishikawa, Yusuke; Minakata, Satoshi

    2015-10-26

    The iodine-catalyzed decarboxylative amidation of β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids with chloramine salts is described. This method enables the regioselective synthesis of allylic amides from various types of β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids containing substituents at the α- and β-positions. In the reaction, N-iodo-N-chloroamides, generated by the reaction of a chloramine salt with I2 , function as a key active species. The reaction provides an attractive alternative to existing methods for the synthesis of useful secondary allylic amine derivatives. PMID:26493878

  10. Efficient quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huawang; Dai, Yuewei

    2016-05-01

    An efficient quantum secret sharing scheme is proposed, in which the dealer generates some single particles and then uses the operations of quantum-controlled-not and Hadamard gate to encode a determinate secret into these particles. The participants get their shadows by performing the single-particle measurements on their particles, and even the dealer cannot know their shadows. Compared to the existing schemes, our scheme is more practical within the present technologies.

  11. Settlement induction of Acropora palmata planulae by a GLW-amide neuropeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, P. M.; Szmant, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Complex environmental cues dictate the settlement of coral planulae in situ; however, simple artificial cues may be all that is required to induce settlement of ex situ larval cultures for reef re-seeding and restoration projects. Neuropeptides that transmit settlement signals and initiate the metamorphic cascade have been isolated from hydrozoan taxa and shown to induce metamorphosis of reef-building Acropora spp. in the Indo-Pacific, providing a reliable and efficient settlement cue. Here, the metamorphic activity of six GLW-amide cnidarian neuropeptides was tested on larvae of the Caribbean corals Acropora palmata, Montastraea faveolata and Favia fragum. A. palmata planulae were induced to settle by the exogenous application of the neuropeptide Hym-248 (concentrations ≥1 × 10-6 M), achieving 40-80% attachment and 100% metamorphosis of competent planulae (≥6 days post-fertilization) during two spawning seasons; the remaining neuropeptides exhibited no activity. Hym-248 exposure rapidly altered larval swimming behavior (<1 h) and resulted in >96% metamorphosis after 6 h. In contrast , M. faveolata and F. fragum planulae did not respond to any GLW-amides tested, suggesting a high specificity of neuropeptide activators on lower taxonomic scales in corals. Subsequent experiments for A. palmata revealed that (1) the presence of a biofilm did not enhance attachment efficiency when coupled with Hym-248 treatment, (2) neuropeptide-induced settlement had no negative effects on early life-history developmental processes: zooxanthellae acquisition and skeletal secretion occurred within 12 days, colonial growth occurred within 36 days, and (3) Hym-248 solutions maintained metamorphic activity following storage at room temperature (10 days), indicating its utility in remote field settings. These results corroborate previous studies on Indo-Pacific Acropora spp. and extend the known metamorphic activity of Hym-248 to Caribbean acroporids. Hym-248 allows for directed and

  12. Ultrasound-assisted direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols catalyzed by graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Mirza-Aghayan, Maryam; Ganjbakhsh, Nahid; Molaee Tavana, Mahdieh; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound irradiation was successfully applied for the direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols with amines into the corresponding amides using graphite oxide (GO) as an oxidative and reusable solid acid catalyst in acetonitrile as solvent at 50°C under air atmosphere. The direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols takes place under mild conditions yielding the corresponding amides in good to high yields (69-95%) and short reaction times under metal-free conditions.

  13. Ultrasound-assisted direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols catalyzed by graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Mirza-Aghayan, Maryam; Ganjbakhsh, Nahid; Molaee Tavana, Mahdieh; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound irradiation was successfully applied for the direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols with amines into the corresponding amides using graphite oxide (GO) as an oxidative and reusable solid acid catalyst in acetonitrile as solvent at 50°C under air atmosphere. The direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols takes place under mild conditions yielding the corresponding amides in good to high yields (69-95%) and short reaction times under metal-free conditions. PMID:27150743

  14. Acidizing using N-vinyl lactum/unsaturated amide copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, L.D.; Stahl, G.A.

    1987-09-01

    A process is described for acidizing a subterranean formation penetrated by at least one well comprising injecting into the formation, without a crosslinking agent, a water soluble thickened acid composition comprising: (1) water; (2) acid; and (3) a linear copolymer prepared from the monomers consisting of a N-vinyl lactam monomer and an alpha, beta-unsaturated amide monomer.

  15. Amidation of esters with amino alcohols using organobase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Nicola; Campbell, Peter S; Jamieson, Craig; Potjewyd, Frances; Simpson, Iain; Watson, Allan J B

    2014-10-01

    A catalytic protocol for the base-mediated amidation of unactivated esters with amino alcohol derivatives is reported. Investigations into mechanistic aspects of the process indicate that the reaction involves an initial transesterification, followed by an intramolecular rearrangement. The reaction is highly general in nature and can be extended to include the synthesis of oxazolidinone systems through use of dimethyl carbonate. PMID:25226088

  16. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, (trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults (trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-...

  17. Universal mechanism for breaking amide bonds by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Phillip S.; Cook, Peter L.; Liu, Xiaosong; Yang, Wanli; Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2011-07-01

    The photodissociation of the amide bond by UV light and soft x-rays is investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the C, N, and O 1s edges. Irradiation leaves a clear and universal signature for a wide variety of amides, ranging from oligopeptides to large proteins and synthetic polyamides, such as nylon. As the π* peak of the amide bond shrinks, two new π* peaks appear at the N 1s edge with a characteristic splitting of 1.1 eV. An additional characteristic is the overall intensity reduction of both the π* and σ* features at the O 1s edge, which indicates loss of oxygen. The spectroscopic results are consistent with the release of the O atom from the amide bond, followed by the migration of the H atom from the N to one of its two C neighbors. Migration to the carbonyl C leads to an imine, and migration to the Cα of the amino acid residue leads to a nitrile. Imine and nitrile produce the two characteristic π* transitions at the N 1s edge. A variety of other models is considered and tested against the N 1s spectra of reference compounds.

  18. Advances in the chemistry of sulphenic acid amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval', I. V.

    1990-04-01

    Results of recent investigations in the area of sulphenic acid amides have been systematised and correlated in the review. Reactions of sulphenamides occurring with the generation of anions, radicals and nitrenes have been considered, as well as reactions accompanied by fussion of the S-N bond and oxidation of the sulphur atom. The bibliography contains 95 references.

  19. Adsorption of sulfur(IV) oxide by amide sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Nikandrov, I.S.; Kogtev, S.E.; Kazimirov, O.E.; Pavlova, I.V.

    1994-04-10

    Adsorption of sulfur(IV) oxide by industrial amide plastics has been studied. Sorption capacity of the sorbents studied has been determined under static and dynamic conditions. Physical and chemical interaction has been demonstrated to take place between sulfur(IV) oxide and the sorbent studied.

  20. Direct effects of exendin-(9,39) and GLP-1-(9,36)amide on insulin action, β-cell function, and glucose metabolism in nondiabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Sathananthan, Matheni; Farrugia, Luca P; Miles, John M; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Cobelli, Claudio; Rizza, Robert A; Vella, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Exendin-(9,39) is a competitive antagonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) at its receptor. However, it is unclear if it has direct and unique effects of its own. We tested the hypothesis that exendin-(9,39) and GLP-1-(9,36)amide have direct effects on hormone secretion and β-cell function as well as glucose metabolism in healthy subjects. Glucose containing [3-(3)H]glucose was infused to mimic the systemic appearance of glucose after a meal. Saline, GLP-1-(9,36)amide, or exendin-(9,39) at 30 pmol/kg/min (Ex 30) or 300 pmol/kg/min (Ex 300) were infused in random order on separate days. Integrated glucose concentrations were slightly but significantly increased by exendin-(9,39) (365 ± 43 vs. 383 ± 35 vs. 492 ± 49 vs. 337 ± 50 mmol per 6 h, saline, Ex 30, Ex 300, and GLP-1-[9,36]amide, respectively; P = 0.05). Insulin secretion did not differ among groups. However, insulin action was lowered by exendin-(9,39) (25 ± 4 vs. 20 ± 4 vs. 18 ± 3 vs. 21 ± 4 10(-4) dL/kg[min per μU/mL]; P = 0.02), resulting in a lower disposition index (DI) during exendin-(9,39) infusion (1,118 ± 118 vs. 816 ± 83 vs. 725 ± 127 vs. 955 ± 166 10(-14) dL/kg/min(2) per pmol/L; P = 0.003). Endogenous glucose production and glucose disappearance did not differ significantly among groups. We conclude that exendin-(9,39), but not GLP-1-(9,36)amide, decreases insulin action and DI in healthy humans.

  1. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides.

    PubMed

    Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R; Coy, Monique R; Chalaire, Katelyn C; Becnel, James J; Agramonte, Natasha M; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Clark, Gary G; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Swale, Daniel R; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2013-09-01

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (1c) was most active (24 h LD50 19.182 nM, 0.5 μL/insect). However, the 24 h LC50 and LD50 values of fipronil against Ae. aegypti larvae and adults were significantly lower: 13.55 nM and 0.787 × 10(-4) nM, respectively. Compound 1c was also active against Drosophila melanogaster adults with 24 h LC50 values of 5.6 and 4.9 μg/cm(2) for the Oregon-R and 1675 strains, respectively. Fipronil had LC50 values of 0.004 and 0.017 μg/cm(2) against the two strains of D. melanogaster, respectively. In repellency bioassays against female Ae. aegypti, 2,2,2-trifluoro-N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (4c) had the highest repellent potency with a minimum effective dosage (MED) of 0.039 μmol/cm(2) compared to DEET (MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2)). Compound N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)hexanamide (4a) had an MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2) which was comparable to DEET. Compound 4c was the most potent fungicide against Phomopsis obscurans. Several trends were discerned between the structural configuration of these molecules and the effect of structural changes on toxicity and repellency. Para- or meta- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with an aromatic ring attached to the carbonyl carbon showed higher toxicity against Ae. aegypti larvae, than ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. Ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with trifluoromethyl or alkyl group attached to the carbonyl carbon produced higher repellent activity against female Ae. aegypti and Anopheles albimanus than meta- or para- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. The presence of 2,6-dichloro- substitution on the phenyl ring of the amide had an influence on larvicidal and repellent

  2. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides.

    PubMed

    Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R; Coy, Monique R; Chalaire, Katelyn C; Becnel, James J; Agramonte, Natasha M; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Clark, Gary G; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Swale, Daniel R; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2013-09-01

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (1c) was most active (24 h LD50 19.182 nM, 0.5 μL/insect). However, the 24 h LC50 and LD50 values of fipronil against Ae. aegypti larvae and adults were significantly lower: 13.55 nM and 0.787 × 10(-4) nM, respectively. Compound 1c was also active against Drosophila melanogaster adults with 24 h LC50 values of 5.6 and 4.9 μg/cm(2) for the Oregon-R and 1675 strains, respectively. Fipronil had LC50 values of 0.004 and 0.017 μg/cm(2) against the two strains of D. melanogaster, respectively. In repellency bioassays against female Ae. aegypti, 2,2,2-trifluoro-N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (4c) had the highest repellent potency with a minimum effective dosage (MED) of 0.039 μmol/cm(2) compared to DEET (MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2)). Compound N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)hexanamide (4a) had an MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2) which was comparable to DEET. Compound 4c was the most potent fungicide against Phomopsis obscurans. Several trends were discerned between the structural configuration of these molecules and the effect of structural changes on toxicity and repellency. Para- or meta- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with an aromatic ring attached to the carbonyl carbon showed higher toxicity against Ae. aegypti larvae, than ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. Ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with trifluoromethyl or alkyl group attached to the carbonyl carbon produced higher repellent activity against female Ae. aegypti and Anopheles albimanus than meta- or para- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. The presence of 2,6-dichloro- substitution on the phenyl ring of the amide had an influence on larvicidal and repellent

  3. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N- . 721.10176... Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, peanut-oil, N- (PMN P-04-144; CAS No....

  4. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N- . 721.10176... Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, peanut-oil, N- (PMN P-04-144; CAS No....

  5. 40 CFR 721.10589 - Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10589 Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine... identified generically as unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine (PMN P-11-106)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10590 - Fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, amides with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10590 Fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (PMN P-11-107) is subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10589 - Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10589 Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine... identified generically as unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine (PMN P-11-106)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10590 - Fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, amides with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10590 Fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (PMN P-11-107) is subject to reporting under...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10512 - Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10512 Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid maleic acid amides (PMNs P-07-563 and P-07-564) are subject to reporting under this...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10512 - Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10512 Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid maleic acid amides (PMNs P-07-563 and P-07-564) are subject to reporting under this...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10191 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- . 721.10191 Section... Substances § 721.10191 Amides, coco, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- (PMN P-06-262; CAS No. 851544-20-2)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10192 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl], acrylates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. 721... Substances § 721.10192 Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- , acrylates (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10192 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl], acrylates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. 721... Substances § 721.10192 Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- , acrylates (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10191 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- . 721.10191 Section... Substances § 721.10191 Amides, coco, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- (PMN P-06-262; CAS No. 851544-20-2)...

  15. Strong Bonds Made Weak: Towards the General Utility of Amides as Synthetic Modules.

    PubMed

    Ruider, Stefan A; Maulide, Nuno

    2015-11-16

    Breaking good: The amide bond is widely recognized as the strongest bond among the carboxylic acid derivatives. Therefore, the potential of amides to serve as synthetic building blocks has remained mostly untapped thus far. This Highlight describes a recent breakthrough that enables the catalytic conversion of amides into esters for the first time. PMID:26460213

  16. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N- . 721.10176... Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, peanut-oil, N- (PMN P-04-144; CAS No....

  17. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N- . 721.10176... Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, peanut-oil, N- (PMN P-04-144; CAS No....

  18. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N- . 721.10176... Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, peanut-oil, N- (PMN P-04-144; CAS No....

  19. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  20. Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of tris(amidate) mono(amido) and tetrakis(amidate) complexes of group 4 transition metals.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philippa R; Thomson, Robert K; Medeiros, Diane M; Wan, Geoff; Schafer, Laurel L

    2013-11-28

    The syntheses of a series of tris(amidate) mono(amido) titanium and zirconium complexes are reported. The binding motif of the amidate ligand has been determined to depend on the size of the metal centre for these sterically demanding N,O-chelating ligands; the larger zirconium metal centre supports three κ(2)-(N,O) bound amidate ligands while the titanium analogue has one ligand bound in a κ(1)-(O) fashion to alleviate steric strain. Reactivity studies indicate that, despite high steric crowding about the tris(amidate) mono(amido) zirconium metal centre, transamination of the reactive dimethylamido ligand can be achieved using aniline. This complex is also an active precatalyst for intramolecular alkene hydroamination, in which protonolysis of one amidate ligand in the presence of excess amine is observed as an initiation step prior to catalytic turnover. Eight-coordinate homoleptic κ(2)-amidate complexes of zirconium and hafnium have also been prepared.

  1. Pathophysiology of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2004-02-01

    Defects in pancreatic islet beta-cell function play a major role in the development of diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a more or less rapid destruction of pancreatic beta cells, and the autoimmune process begins years before the beta-cell destruction becomes complete, thereby providing a window of opportunity for intervention. During the preclinical period and early after diagnosis, much of the insulin deficiency may be the result of functional inhibition of insulin secretion that may be at least partially and transiently reversible. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a progressive loss of beta-cell function throughout the course of the disease. The pattern of loss is an initial (probably of genetic origin) defect in acute or first-phase insulin secretion, followed by a decreasing maximal capacity of insulin secretion. Last, a defective steady-state and basal insulin secretion develops, leading to almost complete beta-cell failure requiring insulin treatment. Because of the reciprocal relation between insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, valid representation of beta-cell function requires interpretation of insulin responses in the context of the prevailing degree of insulin sensitivity. This appropriate approach highlights defects in insulin secretion at the various stages of the natural history of type 2 diabetes and already present in individuals at risk to develop the disease. To date none of the available therapies can stop the progressive beta-cell defect and the progression of the metabolic disorder. The better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease should lead to the development of new strategies to preserve beta-cell function in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  3. Metal amides as the simplest acid/base catalysts for stereoselective carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Shū

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, new possibilities for metal amides are described. Although typical metal amides are recognized as strong stoichiometric bases for deprotonation of inert or less acidic hydrogen atoms, transition-metal amides, namely silver and copper amides, show interesting abilities as one of the simplest acid/base catalysts in stereoselective carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

  4. Simple Amides of Oleanolic Acid as Effective Penetration Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Bednarczyk-Cwynar, Barbara; Partyka, Danuta; Zaprutko, Lucjusz

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal transport is now becoming one of the most convenient and safe pathways for drug delivery. In some cases it is necessary to use skin penetration enhancers in order to allow for the transdermal transport of drugs that are otherwise insufficiently skin-permeable. A series of oleanolic acid amides as potential transdermal penetration enhancers was formed by multistep synthesis and the synthesis of all newly prepared compounds is presented. The synthetized amides of oleanolic acid were tested for their in vitro penetration promoter activity. The above activity was evaluated by means of using the Fürst method. The relationships between the chemical structure of the studied compounds and penetration activity are presented. PMID:26010090

  5. In vivo behavior of hydrogel beads based on amidated pectins.

    PubMed

    Munjeri, O; Collett, J H; Fell, J T; Sharma, H L; Smith, A M

    1998-01-01

    Radio-labeled hydrogel beads, based on amidated pectin, have been produced by adding droplets of an amidated pectin solution to calcium chloride. Incorporation of model drugs into the beads and measurement of the dissolution rate showed that the properties of the beads were unaffected by the incorporation of the radiolabel. The labeled beads were used to carry out an in vivo study of their behavior in the gastrointestinal tract using human volunteers. The volunteers were given the beads after an overnight fast and images were obtained at frequent intervals during transit through the upper gastrointestinal tract and the colon. The beads exhibited rapid gastric emptying and proceeded to pass through the small intestine individually before regrouping at the ileo-caecal junction. Once in the colon, the beads again proceeded as individuals and evidence of the degradation of the beads was observed.

  6. Synthesis of Carfentanil Amide Opioids Using the Ugi Multicomponent Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Váradi, András; Palmer, Travis C.; Haselton, Nathan; Afonin, Daniel; Subrath, Joan J.; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Hunkele, Amanda; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Marrone, Gina F.; Borics, Attila; Majumdar, Susruta

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel approach to synthesize carfentanil amide analogues utilizing the isocyanide-based four-component Ugi multicomponent reaction. A small library of bis-amide analogues of carfentanil was created using N-alkylpiperidones, aniline, propionic acid, and various aliphatic isocyanides. Our lead compound showed high affinity for mu (MOR) and delta opioid receptors (DOR) with no appreciable affinity for kappa (KOR) receptors in radioligand binding assays. The compound was found to be a mixed MOR agonist/partial DOR agonist in [35S]GTPγS functional assays, and it showed moderate analgesic potency in vivo. The compound showed no visible signs of physical dependence or constipation in mice. In addition, it produced less respiratory depression than morphine. Most mixed MOR/DOR opioids reported in the literature are peptides and thereby systemically inactive. Our approach utilizing a multicomponent reaction has the promise to deliver potent and efficacious small-molecule analgesics with potential clinical utility. PMID:26148793

  7. Simulations of the temperature dependence of amide I vibration.

    PubMed

    Kaminský, Jakub; Bouř, Petr; Kubelka, Jan

    2011-01-13

    For spectroscopic studies of peptide and protein thermal denaturation it is important to single out the contribution of the solvent to the spectral changes from those originated in the molecular structure. To obtain insights into the origin and size of the temperature solvent effects on the amide I spectra, combined molecular dynamics and density functional simulations were performed with the model N-methylacetamide molecule (NMA). The computations well reproduced frequency and intensity changes previously observed in aqueous NMA solutions. An empirical correction of vacuum frequencies in single NMA molecule based on the electrostatic potential of the water molecules provided superior results to a direct density functional average obtained for a limited number of solute-solvent clusters. The results thus confirm that the all-atom quantum and molecular mechanics approach captures the overall influence of the temperature dependent solvent properties on the amide I spectra and can improve the accuracy and reliability of molecular structural studies.

  8. Fine structure of the amide i band in acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, G.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.

    1988-05-01

    Their absorption spectrum of both single crystals and powdered samples of acetanilide (a model system for proteins) has been studied in the amide i region, where a narrow band has been identified as a highly trapped soliton state. The powder-sample spectra have been decomposed using four Lorentzian bands. A strong temperature dependence has been found for the intensity of two of the subbands, which also show a complementary behavior. Polarization studies performed on thin crystals have shown that the subbands have the same polarization. Low-temperature spectra of partially deuterated samples show the presence of the subbands at the same absorption frequencies found using the fitting procedure in the spectra of nondeuterated samples. The soliton model currently proposed to explain the origin of the anomalous amide i component at 1650 cm-1 still holds, but some modification of the model is required to account for the new features revealed by this study.

  9. Cleavage of an amide bond by a ribozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, X.; De Mesmaeker, A.; Joyce, G. F.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A variant form of a group I ribozyme, optimized by in vitro evolution for its ability to catalyze magnesium-dependent phosphoester transfer reactions involving DNA substrates, also catalyzes the cleavage of an unactivated alkyl amide when that linkage is presented in the context of an oligodeoxynucleotide analog. Substrates containing an amide bond that joins either two DNA oligos, or a DNA oligo and a short peptide, are cleaved in a magnesium-dependent fashion to generate the expected products. The first-order rate constant, kcat, is 0.1 x 10(-5) min-1 to 1 x 10(-5) min-1 for the DNA-flanked substrates, which corresponds to a rate acceleration of more than 10(3) as compared with the uncatalyzed reaction.

  10. Amino alcohol-based degradable poly(ester amide) elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Bettinger, Christopher J.; Bruggeman, Joost P.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Langer, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Currently available synthetic biodegradable elastomers are primarily composed of crosslinked aliphatic polyesters, which suffer from deficiencies including (1) high crosslink densities, which results in exceedingly high stiffness, (2) rapid degradation upon implantation, or (3) limited chemical moieties for chemical modification. Herein, we have developed poly(1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane-co-polyol sebacate)s, a new class of synthetic, biodegradable elastomeric poly(ester amide)s composed of crosslinked networks based on an amino alcohol. These crosslinked networks feature tensile Young’s modulus on the order of 1 MPa and reversable elongations up to 92%. These polymers exhibit in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. These polymers have projected degradation half-lives up to 20 months in vivo. PMID:18295329

  11. Salivary Gland Secretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, H. L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes materials and procedures for an experiment utilizing a live dog to demonstrate: (1) physiology of the salivary gland; (2) parasympathetic control of the salivary gland; (3) influence of varying salivary flow rates on sodium and potassium ions, osmolarity and pH; and (4) salivary secretion as an active process. (DS)

  12. Biliary lipid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hişmioğullari, Adnan Adil; Bozdayi, A Mithat; Rahman, Khalid

    2007-06-01

    The liver has many biochemical functions, of which one of the most important is bile formation. Bile is both a secretory and an excretory fluid and two of its most important functions are the delivery to the intestinal tract of: (i) bile acids to assist in fat digestion and absorption; and (ii) liver-derived metabolites of potentially toxic materials prior to their elimination from the body in the feces. Bile contains numerous solutes, including bile acids, phospholipids and cholesterol. Biliary lipids mainly consist of cholesterol and phospholipids and their secretion into bile is affected by the secretion of bile acids. Phospholipids and cholesterol are synthesized in the hepatocytes and are thought to be transferred via vesicle- and non-vesicle-mediated mechanisms into the bile canaliculus. Hepatocytes acquire biliary lipid by three pathways, which are biosynthesis, lipoproteins and existing molecules drawn from intracellular membranes, with the newly synthesized biliary lipid accounting for less than 20% of the total lipids. The hepatic determinants of biliary cholesterol elimination are not limited to total cholesterol homeostasis, but also concern biliary disease conditions, since excess biliary cholesterol secretion is involved in cholesterol gallstone formation, as well as being a major risk factor for gallbladder cancer. The purpose of this review was to highlight some of the major mechanisms involved in biliary lipid secretion.

  13. T. thermophila group I introns that cleave amide bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to nucleic acid enzymes or enzymatic RNA molecules that are capable of cleaving a variety of bonds, including phosphodiester bonds and amide bonds, in a variety of substrates. Thus, the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecules are capable of functioning as nucleases and/or peptidases. The present invention also relates to compositions containing the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecule and to methods of making, selecting, and using such enzymes and compositions.

  14. Macrocycle Synthesis by Chloride-Templated Amide Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Martí-Centelles, Vicente; Burguete, M Isabel; Luis, Santiago V

    2016-03-01

    A new family of pseudopeptidic macrocyclic compounds has been prepared involving an anion-templated amide bond formation reaction at the macrocyclization step. Chloride anion was found to be the most efficient template in the macrocyclization process, producing improved macrocyclization yields with regard to the nontemplated reaction. The data suggest a kinetic effect of the chloride template, providing an appropriate folded conformation of the open-chain precursor and reducing the energy barrier for the formation of the macrocyclic product. PMID:26820908

  15. Accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acid amides in winter wheat under snow.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shigeki; Yoshida, Midori; Nakajima, Takashi; Murai, Akio

    2003-06-01

    It was found that the content of antifungal compounds p-coumaroylagmatine [1-(trans-4'-hydroxycinnamoylamino)-4-guanidinobutane] and p-coumaroyl-3-hydroxyagmatine [1-(trans-4'-hydroxycinnamoylamino)-3-hydroxy-4-guanidinobutane] in the crown of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Chihokukomugi) significantly increased under snow cover. This finding suggests that the accumulation of these hydroxycinnamic acid amides was caused by winter stress and related to protecting the plant against snow mold under snow cover.

  16. Toxocara canis: Larvicidal activity of fatty acid amides.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, Taís; D'Oca, Caroline da Ros Montes; Mata-Santos, Hílton Antônio; Fenalti, Juliana; Pinto, Nitza; Coelho, Tatiane; Berne, Maria Elisabeth; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; Scaini, Carlos James

    2016-02-01

    Considering the therapeutic potential of fatty acid amides, the present study aimed to evaluate their in vitro activity against Toxocara canis larvae and their cytotoxicity for the first time. Linoleylpyrrolidilamide was the most potent, with a minimal larvicidal concentration (MLC) of 0.05 mg/mL and 27% cytotoxicity against murine peritoneal macrophages C57BL/6 mice, as assessed by the MTT assay. PMID:26783180

  17. Carbazole and amide alkaloids from the stems of Clausena lansium.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi-Qian; Liu, Hang; Li, Chuang-Jun; Yang, Jing-Zhi; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Dan; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Two new carbazole alkaloids, claulansine S (1) and claulansine T (2), and one new amide alkaloid, clauamide A (3), together with four known analogues (4-7) were isolated from the stems of Clausena lansium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses, including UV, IR, and NMR experiments (HSQC, HMBC, and NOE experiments). Compounds 4 and 6 showed moderate hepatoprotective activities. PMID:26095884

  18. Amide and Peptide Bond Formation in Water at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Christopher M; Keener, Megan; Gallou, Fabrice; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2015-08-21

    A general and environmentally responsible method for the formation of amide/peptide bonds in an aqueous micellar medium is described. Use of uronium salt (1-cyano-2-ethoxy-2-oxoethylidenaminooxy)dimethylaminomorpholinocarbenium hexafluorophosphate (COMU) as a coupling reagent, 2,6-lutidine, and TPGS-750-M represents mild conditions associated with these valuable types of couplings. The aqueous reaction medium is recyclable leading to low E Factors. PMID:26251952

  19. Isotope-enriched protein standards for computational amide I spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reppert, Mike; Roy, Anish R.; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-03-28

    We present a systematic isotope labeling study of the protein G mutant NuG2b as a step toward the production of reliable, structurally stable, experimental standards for amide I infrared spectroscopic simulations. By introducing isotope enriched amino acids into a minimal growth medium during bacterial expression, we induce uniform labeling of the amide bonds following specific amino acids, avoiding the need for chemical peptide synthesis. We use experimental data to test several common amide I frequency maps and explore the influence of various factors on map performance. Comparison of the predicted absorption frequencies for the four maps tested with empirical assignments to our experimental spectra yields a root-mean-square error of 6-12 cm{sup −1}, with outliers of at least 12 cm{sup −1} in all models. This means that the predictions may be useful for predicting general trends such as changes in hydrogen bonding configuration; however, for finer structural constraints or absolute frequency assignments, the models are unreliable. The results indicate the need for careful testing of existing literature maps and shed light on possible next steps for the development of quantitative spectral maps.

  20. Mild Metal-Free Hydrosilylation of Secondary Amides to Amines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Qiang; Lang, Qi-Wei; Wang, Yan-Rong

    2016-05-20

    The combination of amide activation by Tf2O with B(C6F5)3-catalyzed hydrosilylation with TMDS constitutes a method for the one-pot reduction of secondary amides to amines under mild conditions. The method displays a broad applicability for the reduction of many types of substrates, and shows good compatibility and excellent chemoselectivity for many sensitive functional groups. Reductions of a multifunctionalized α,β-unsaturated amide obtained from another synthetic methodology, and a C-H functionalization product produced the corresponding amines in good to excellent yield. Chemoselective reduction of enantiomeric pure (ee >99%) tetrahydro-5-oxo-2-furaneamides yielded 5-(aminomethyl)dihydrofuran-2(3H)-ones in a racemization-free manner. The latter were converted in one pot to N-protected 5-hydroxypiperidin-2-ones, which are building blocks for the synthesis of many natural products. Further elaboration of an intermediate led to a concise four-step synthesis of (-)-epi-pseudoconhydrine. PMID:27100232

  1. The Escherichia coli effector EspJ blocks Src kinase activity via amidation and ADP ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Young, Joanna C.; Clements, Abigail; Lang, Alexander E.; Garnett, James A.; Munera, Diana; Arbeloa, Ana; Pearson, Jaclyn; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Matthews, Stephen J.; Mousnier, Aurelie; Barry, David J.; Way, Michael; Schlosser, Andreas; Aktories, Klaus; Frankel, Gad

    2014-01-01

    The hallmark of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection is the formation of actin-rich pedestal-like structures, which are generated following phosphorylation of the bacterial effector Tir by cellular Src and Abl family tyrosine kinases. This leads to recruitment of the Nck–WIP–N-WASP complex that triggers Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization in the host cell. The same phosphorylation-mediated signalling network is also assembled downstream of the Vaccinia virus protein A36 and the phagocytic Fc-gamma receptor FcγRIIa. Here we report that the EPEC type-III secretion system effector EspJ inhibits autophosphorylation of Src and phosphorylation of the Src substrates Tir and FcγRIIa. Consistent with this, EspJ inhibits actin polymerization downstream of EPEC, Vaccinia virus and opsonized red blood cells. We identify EspJ as a unique adenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribosyltransferase that directly inhibits Src kinase by simultaneous amidation and ADP ribosylation of the conserved kinase-domain residue, Src E310, resulting in glutamine-ADP ribose. PMID:25523213

  2. The Escherichia coli effector EspJ blocks Src kinase activity via amidation and ADP ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Young, Joanna C; Clements, Abigail; Lang, Alexander E; Garnett, James A; Munera, Diana; Arbeloa, Ana; Pearson, Jaclyn; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Matthews, Stephen J; Mousnier, Aurelie; Barry, David J; Way, Michael; Schlosser, Andreas; Aktories, Klaus; Frankel, Gad

    2014-01-01

    The hallmark of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection is the formation of actin-rich pedestal-like structures, which are generated following phosphorylation of the bacterial effector Tir by cellular Src and Abl family tyrosine kinases. This leads to recruitment of the Nck-WIP-N-WASP complex that triggers Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization in the host cell. The same phosphorylation-mediated signalling network is also assembled downstream of the Vaccinia virus protein A36 and the phagocytic Fc-gamma receptor FcγRIIa. Here we report that the EPEC type-III secretion system effector EspJ inhibits autophosphorylation of Src and phosphorylation of the Src substrates Tir and FcγRIIa. Consistent with this, EspJ inhibits actin polymerization downstream of EPEC, Vaccinia virus and opsonized red blood cells. We identify EspJ as a unique adenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribosyltransferase that directly inhibits Src kinase by simultaneous amidation and ADP ribosylation of the conserved kinase-domain residue, Src E310, resulting in glutamine-ADP ribose.

  3. Single-conformation infrared spectra of model peptides in the amide I and amide II regions: Experiment-based determination of local mode frequencies and inter-mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; James, William H.; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guo, Li; Gellman, Samuel H.; Müller, Christian W.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-09-01

    Single-conformation infrared spectra in the amide I and amide II regions have been recorded for a total of 34 conformations of three α-peptides, three β-peptides, four α/β-peptides, and one γ-peptide using resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of the jet-cooled, isolated molecules. Assignments based on the amide NH stretch region were in hand, with the amide I/II data providing additional evidence in favor of the assignments. A set of 21 conformations that represent the full range of H-bonded structures were chosen to characterize the conformational dependence of the vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of the local amide I and amide II modes and their amide I/I and amide II/II coupling constants. Scaled, harmonic calculations at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory accurately reproduce the experimental frequencies and infrared intensities in both the amide I and amide II regions. In the amide I region, Hessian reconstruction was used to extract local mode frequencies and amide I/I coupling constants for each conformation. These local amide I frequencies are in excellent agreement with those predicted by DFT calculations on the corresponding 13C = 18O isotopologues. In the amide II region, potential energy distribution analysis was combined with the Hessian reconstruction scheme to extract local amide II frequencies and amide II/II coupling constants. The agreement between these local amide II frequencies and those obtained from DFT calculations on the N-D isotopologues is slightly worse than for the corresponding comparison in the amide I region. The local mode frequencies in both regions are dictated by a combination of the direct H-bonding environment and indirect, "backside" H-bonds to the same amide group. More importantly, the sign and magnitude of the inter-amide coupling constants in both the amide I and amide II regions is shown to be characteristic of the size of the H-bonded ring linking the two amide groups. These amide I/I and

  4. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  5. Telling stories: keeping secrets.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the reticence of some farm women to share their experiences with historians and how that desire to keep secrets collides with the desire by scholars to tell the stories of these women. It argues that scholars must continue to struggle with the issue of which stories to tell publicly and which to keep private. The author discusses her own experience telling stories about rural women in the 1970s and the need to give voice to the heritage of rural women, especially of groups that have feared revealing their experiences. She offers examples of historians of rural women who have successfully worked with formerly silenced populations and urges historians to continue to tell stories about these lives, to reevaluate what has been already learned, to ask new questions, and to discuss which secrets need to be shared.

  6. Cell secretion: an update.

    PubMed

    Jeremic, A

    2008-08-01

    This past decade has witnessed the publication of a flurry of scientific papers and reports on the subject of cell secretion, following discovery of a permanent plasma membrane structure termed 'porosome' and its determination as the universal secretory machinery in cells. This discovery has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the secretory process, demonstrating that membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the porosome base to release their contents to the cell exterior. The regulated release of intravesicular contents during cell secretion is governed by dilation of the porosome opening to the outside, and the extent of vesicle swelling. In agreement, a great number of articles have been written and studies performed, which are briefly discussed in this article.

  7. Cell secretion: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jeremic, A

    2008-01-01

    This past decade has witnessed the publication of a flurry of scientific papers and reports on the subject of cell secretion, following discovery of a permanent plasma membrane structure termed ‘porosome’ and its determination as the universal secretory machinery in cells. This discovery has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the secretory process, demonstrating that membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the porosome base to release their contents to the cell exterior. The regulated release of intravesicular contents during cell secretion is governed by dilation of the porosome opening to the outside, and the extent of vesicle swelling. In agreement, a great number of articles have been written and studies performed, which are briefly discussed in this article. PMID:18363838

  8. Bile Formation and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Bile is a unique and vital aqueous secretion of the liver that is formed by the hepatocyte and modified down stream by absorptive and secretory properties of the bile duct epithelium. Approximately 5% of bile consists of organic and inorganic solutes of considerable complexity. The bile-secretory unit consists of a canalicular network which is formed by the apical membrane of adjacent hepatocytes and sealed by tight junctions. The bile canaliculi (~1 μm in diameter) conduct the flow of bile countercurrent to the direction of portal blood flow and connect with the canal of Hering and bile ducts which progressively increase in diameter and complexity prior to the entry of bile into the gallbladder, common bile duct, and intestine. Canalicular bile secretion is determined by both bile salt-dependent and independent transport systems which are localized at the apical membrane of the hepatocyte and largely consist of a series of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport proteins that function as export pumps for bile salts and other organic solutes. These transporters create osmotic gradients within the bile canalicular lumen that provide the driving force for movement of fluid into the lumen via aquaporins. Species vary with respect to the relative amounts of bile salt-dependent and independent canalicular flow and cholangiocyte secretion which is highly regulated by hormones, second messengers, and signal transduction pathways. Most determinants of bile secretion are now characterized at the molecular level in animal models and in man. Genetic mutations serve to illuminate many of their functions. PMID:23897680

  9. Catechin secretion and phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Shail

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates that the invasiveness of Centaurea stoebe is attributed to the stronger allelopathic effects on the native North American species than on the related European species, which is one of the unquestionable aspects of the “novel weapons hypothesis (NWH).” Studies originating from controlled to field conditions have shown that C. stoebe utilizes its biochemical potential to exert its invasiveness. The roots of C. stoebe secrete a potent phytotoxin, catechin, which has a detrimental effect on the surrounding plant species. Although, studies on catechin secretion and phytotoxicity represent one of the most well studied systems describing negative plant-plant interactions, it has also sparked controversies lately due to its phytotoxicity dosages and secretion effluxes. Previous reports negate the phytotoxic and pro-oxidant nature of catechin.1–3 In our recent study we have shown that catechin is highly phytotoxic against Arabidopsis thaliana and Festuca idahoensis. We also show that (±) catechin applied to roots of A. thaliana induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) confirming the pro-oxidant nature of catechin. In addition, activation of signature cell death genes such as acd2 and cad1 post catechin treatment in A. thaliana ascertains the phytotoxic nature of catechin. PMID:21057643

  10. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J.

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label ‘amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  11. Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to study long-chain fatty acid amide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Kristen A.; Dempsey, Daniel R.; Behari, Anita L.; Anderson, Ryan L.; Merkler, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acid amides are cell-signaling lipids identified in mammals and, recently, in invertebrates, as well. Many details regarding fatty acid amide metabolism remain unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model system for the study long-chain fatty acid amide metabolism as we have quantified the endogenous levels of N-acylglycines, N-acyldopamines, N-acylethanolamines, and primary fatty acid amides by LC/QTOF-MS. Growth of Drosophila melanogaster on media supplemented with [1-13C]-palmitate lead to a family of 13C-palmitate-labeled fatty acid amides in the fly heads. The [1-13C]-palmitate feeding studies provide insight into the biosynthesis of the fatty acid amides. PMID:24650760

  12. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label 'amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  13. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed C–H bond amidation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Summary Copper catalysis has been known as a powerful tool for its ubiquitous application in organic synthesis. One of the fundamental utilities of copper catalysis is in the C–N bond formation by using carbon sources and nitrogen functional groups such as amides. In this review, the recent progress in the amidation reactions employing copper-catalyzed C–H amidation is summarized. PMID:26664644

  14. Instability of Amide Bond Comprising the 2-Aminotropone Moiety: Cleavable under Mild Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Chenikkayala; Sharma, Nagendra K

    2015-08-21

    An unusual hydrolysis/solvolysis of the classical acyclic amide bond, derived from N-troponylaminoethylglycine (Traeg) and α-amino acids, is described under mild acidic conditions. The reactivity of this amide bond is possibly owed to the protonation of the troponyl carbonyl functional group. The results suggest that the Traeg amino acid is a potential candidate for protecting and caging of the amine functional group of bioactive molecules via a cleavable amide bond.

  15. Copper-catalyzed direct amidation of heterocycles with N-fluorobenzenesulfonimide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sichang; Ni, Zhangqin; Huang, Xin; Wang, Jichao; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2014-11-01

    A highly efficient amidation reaction of heterocycles with N-fluorobenzenesulfonimide (NFSI) has been developed, presumably proceeding via C-H bond activation. Cuprous iodide was employed as the catalyst, and various α-amidated heterocycle derivatives have been generated in good to excellent yields. This chemistry endowed an economic method of synthesis of valuable amidated heterocycles through a direct C-N bond-coupling processes. PMID:25310043

  16. Formation of Amides from Imines via Cyanide-Mediated Metal-Free Aerobic Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hong-Ahn; Cho, Yeon-Ho; Lee, Ye-Sol; Cheon, Cheol-Hong

    2015-12-18

    A new protocol for the direct formation of amides from imines derived from aromatic aldehydes via metal-free aerobic oxidation in the presence of cyanide is described. This protocol was applicable to various aldimines, and the desired amides were obtained in moderate to good yields. Mechanistic studies suggested that this aerobic oxidative amidation might proceed via the addition of cyanide to imines followed by proton transfer from carbon to nitrogen in the original imines, leading to carbanions of α-amino nitriles, which undergo subsequent oxidation with molecular oxygen in air to provide the desired amide compounds.

  17. Copper-Catalyzed Reductive N-Alkylation of Amides with N-Tosylhydrazones Derived from Ketones.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Qi, Fu-Ling; Han, Fu-She; Wang, Yan-Hua

    2016-07-20

    A CuI-catalyzed reductive coupling of ketone-derived N-tosylhydrazones with amides is presented. Under the optimized conditions, an array of N-tosylhydrazones derived from aryl-alkyl and diaryl ketones could couple effectively with a wide variety of (hetero)aryl as well as aliphatic amides to afford the N-alkylated amides in high yields. The method represents the very few examples for reliably accessing secondary and tertiary amides through a reductive N-alkylation protocol. PMID:27346856

  18. Catalyst-free synthesis of sodium amide nanoparticles encapsulated in silica gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Alexander D.; Makepeace, Joshua W.; Hore, Katie; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Apperley, David C.; Mitchels, John M.; Edwards, Peter P.; Sartbaeva, Asel

    2013-12-01

    Crystalline sodium amide nanoparticles encapsulated in an amorphous silica framework were formed by ammoniation of a precursor material, silica gel loaded with metallic sodium, under mild conditions and without catalysis. This ammoniation was performed in situ on TOSCA beamline at ISIS, RAL, using anhydrous gaseous ammonia. The resulting material exhibits no pyrophoricity and much reduced air- and moisture-sensitivity compared to the bulk amide. The nanoparticles formed will offer a greatly increased surface area for chemical reactions where amide is currently used as an important ingredient for industrial applications. We anticipate that this method of sodium amide production will have a diversity of applications.

  19. Amide derivatives of sulfonamides and isoniazid: synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Husain, Asif

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, various amide derivatives of sulfanilamide, sulfamethoxazole, sulfadiazine, dapsone and isoniazid have been synthesized by condensing them with appropriate 4-oxo-4-(4-substituted phenyl)butanoic acid moiety. The compounds have been evaluated for their antiinflammatory, ulcerogenic and antibacterial activities. Their structures were established on the basis of elemental analysis, 1H NMR and mass spectral data. Some of the compounds were found to have significant antiinflammatory and antibacterial activities. Additionally, these derivatives were low in their ulcerogenic action, which is the main side effect of commonly used NSAIDs. PMID:19894647

  20. Amide I band and photoinduced disassembly of a peptide hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measey, Thomas J.; Markiewicz, Beatrice N.; Gai, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Peptide hydrogels are promising candidates for a wide range of medical and biotechnological applications. To further expand the potential utility of peptide hydrogels, herein we demonstrate a simple yet effective strategy to render peptide hydrogels photodegradable, making controlled disassembly of the gel structure of interest feasible. In addition, we find that the high-frequency amide I' component (i.e., the peak at ˜1685 cm-1) of the photodegradable peptide hydrogel studied shows an unusually large enhancement, in comparison to that of other peptide fibrils consisting of antiparallel β-sheets, making it a good model system for further study of the coupling-structure relationship.

  1. Antiproliferative activity of synthetic fatty acid amides from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane S; Piovesan, Luciana A; D'Oca, Caroline R Montes; Hack, Carolina R Lopes; Treptow, Tamara G M; Rodrigues, Marieli O; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T G; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; D'Oca, Marcelo G Montes

    2015-01-15

    In the work, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of a series of synthetic fatty acid amides were investigated in seven cancer cell lines. The study revealed that most of the compounds showed antiproliferative activity against tested tumor cell lines, mainly on human glioma cells (U251) and human ovarian cancer cells with a multiple drug-resistant phenotype (NCI-ADR/RES). In addition, the fatty methyl benzylamide derived from ricinoleic acid (with the fatty acid obtained from castor oil, a renewable resource) showed a high selectivity with potent growth inhibition and cell death for the glioma cell line-the most aggressive CNS cancer.

  2. Physical Limit to Concentration Sensing Amid Spurious Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Thierry

    2015-07-01

    To adapt their behavior in changing environments, cells sense concentrations by binding external ligands to their receptors. However, incorrect ligands may bind nonspecifically to receptors, and when their concentration is large, this binding activity may interfere with the sensing of the ligand of interest. Here, I derive analytically the physical limit to the accuracy of concentration sensing amid a large number of interfering ligands. A scaling transition is found when the mean bound time of correct ligands is twice that of incorrect ligands. I discuss how the physical bound can be approached by a cascade of receptor states generalizing kinetic proofreading schemes.

  3. Amide proton exchange of a dynamic loop in cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Smith, Austin E; Sarkar, Mohona; Young, Gregory B; Pielak, Gary J

    2013-10-01

    Intrinsic rates of exchange are essential parameters for obtaining protein stabilities from amide (1) H exchange data. To understand the influence of the intracellular environment on stability, one must know the effect of the cytoplasm on these rates. We probed exchange rates in buffer and in Escherichia coli lysates for the dynamic loop in the small globular protein chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 using a modified form of the nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, SOLEXSY. No significant changes were observed, even in 100 g dry weight L(-1) lysate. Our results suggest that intrinsic rates from studies conducted in buffers are applicable to studies conducted under cellular conditions.

  4. Construction of Electrochemical Chiral Interfaces with Integrated Polysaccharides via Amidation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Liping; Chen, Xiaohui; Yang, Baozhu; Tao, Yongxin; Kong, Yong

    2016-08-24

    Polysaccharides of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and chitosan (CS) were integrated together via amidation reactions between the carboxyl groups on sodium CMC and the amino groups on CS. Compared with individual sodium CMC and CS, the integrated polysaccharides with a mass ratio of 1:1, CMC-CS (1:1), exhibited a three-dimensional (3D) porous network structure, resulting in a significantly enhanced hydrophility due to the exposed polar functional groups in the CMC-CS (1:1). Chiral interfaces were constructed with the integrated polysaccharides and used for electrochemical enantiorecognition of tryptophan (Trp) isomers. The CMC-CS (1:1) chiral interfaces exhibited excellent selectivity toward the Trp isomers owing to the highly hydrophilic feature of CMC-CS (1:1) and the different steric hindrance during the formation of H bonds between Trp isomers and CMC-CS (1:1). Also, the optimization in the preparation of integrated polysaccharides such as mass ratio and combination mode (amidation or electrostatic interactions) was investigated. The CMC-CS (1:1) presented the ability of determining the percentage of d-Trp in racemic mixtures, and thus, the proposed electrochemical chiral interfaces could be regarded as a potential biosensing platform for enantiorecognition of chiral compounds. PMID:27487166

  5. Interaction of Thioamides, Selenoamides, and Amides With Diiodine

    PubMed Central

    Hadjikakou, Sotiris K.; Hadjiliadis, Nick

    2006-01-01

    We review the results of our work on the iodine interaction with thioamides, selenoamides, and amides. Complexes with (i) “spoke” or “extended spoke” structures, D · I2 and D · I2 · I2, respectively, (D is the ligand donor) (ii) iodonium salts of {[D2 − I]+[In]−} (n = 3, 7) and {[D2 − I]+[FeCl4]−} formulae and (iii) disulfides of the categories (a) [D − D], (b) {[D − DH]+[I3]−} have been isolated and characterized. A compound of formula {[D2 − I]+[I3]−[D · I2]} containing both types of complexes (i) and (ii) was also isolated. The interaction of diiodine with selenium analogs of the antithyroid drug 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU), of formulae RSeU (6-alkyl-2-Selenouracil) results in the formation of complexes with formulae [(RSeU)I2]. All these results are correlated with the mechanism of action of antithyroid drugs. Finally, we review here our work on the diiodine interaction with the amides (LO). PMID:17497011

  6. Complexation of di-amides of dipicolinic acid with neodymium

    SciTech Connect

    Lapka, J.L.; Paulenova, A.

    2013-07-01

    Di-amides have undergone significant studies as possible ligands for use in the partitioning of trivalent minor actinides and lanthanides. The binding affinities of three isomeric ligands with neodymium in acetonitrile solution have been investigated. The stability constants of the metal-ligand complexes formed between different isomers of N,N'-diethyl-N,N'- ditolyl-di-picolinamide (EtTDPA) and trivalent neodymium in acetonitrile have been determined by spectrophotometric and calorimetric methods. Each isomer of EtTDPA has been found to be capable of forming three complexes with trivalent neodymium, Nd(EtTDPA), Nd(EtTDPA){sub 2}, and Nd(EtTDPA){sub 3}. Values from spectrophotometric and calorimetric titrations are within reasonable agreement with each other. The order of stability constants for each metal:ligand complex decreases in the order Et(m)TDPA > Et(p)TDPA > Et(o)TDPA. The obtained values are comparable to other di-amidic ligands obtained under similar system conditions and mirror previously obtained solvent extraction data for EtTDPA at low ionic strengths. (authors.

  7. [Activated Sludge Bacteria Transforming Cyanopyridines and Amides of Pyridinecarboxylic Acids].

    PubMed

    Demakov, V A; Vasil'ev, D M; Maksimova, Yu G; Pavlova, Yu A; Ovechkina, G V; Maksimov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Species diversity of bacteria from the activated sludge of Perm biological waste treatment facilities capable of transformation of cyanopyridines and amides of pyridinecarboxylic acids was investigated. Enrichment cultures in mineral media with 3-cyanopyridine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source were used to obtain 32 clones of gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria exhibiting moderate growth on solid and liquid media with 3- and 4-cyanopyridine. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that the clones with homology of at least 99% belonged to the genera Acinetobacte, Alcaligenes, Delftia, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Xanthobacter. PCR analysis showed that 13 out of 32 isolates contained the sequences (-1070 bp) homologous to the nitrilase genes reported previously in Alcaligenes faecalis JM3 (GenBank, D13419.1). Nine clones were capable of nitrile and amide transformation in minimal salt medium. Acinetobacter sp. 11 h and Alcaligenes sp. osv transformed 3-cyanopyridine to nicotinamide, while most of the clones possessed amidase activity (0.5 to 46.3 mmol/(g h) for acetamide and 0.1 to 5.6 mmol/(g h) for nicotinamide). Nicotinamide utilization by strain A. faecalis 2 was shown to result in excretion of a secondary metabolite, which was identified as dodecyl acrylate at 91% probability. PMID:26263697

  8. Amidated pectin based hydrogels: synthesis, characterization and cytocompatibility study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, R K; Singhal, J P; Datt, M; Banthia, A K

    2007-01-01

    The design and development of pectin-based hydrogels were attempted through the chemical modification of pectin with diethanolamine (DA). Diethanolamine modified pectin (DAMP) was synthesized by the chemical modification of pectin with varying concentrations of DA (1:1,1:2,1:3 and 1:4) at 5 oC in methanol. The modified product was used for the preparation of the hydrogel with glutaraldehyde (GA) reagent. The prepared hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy; organic elemental analysis, and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and swelling, hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility studies of the prepared hydrogels were also done. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of primary and secondary amide absorption bands. The XRD pattern of the DAMP hydrogel clearly indicated that there was a considerable increase in crystallinity as compared to parent pectin. The degree of amidation (DA) and molar and mass reaction yields (Ym and Yn) was calculated based on the results of organic elemental analysis. Drug release studies from the hydrogel membranes were also evaluated in a Franz's diffusion cell. The hydrogels demonstrated good water holding properties and were found to be compatible with B-16 melanoma cells and human blood.

  9. Poly(ester amide)s based on (L)-lactic acid oligomers and α-amino acids: influence of the α-amino acid side chain in the poly(ester amide)s properties.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana C; Coelho, Jorge F J; Valente, Joana F A; Correia, Tiago R; Correia, Ilídio J; Gil, Maria H; Simões, Pedro N

    2013-01-01

    Novel biodegradable and low cytotoxic poly(ester amide)s (PEAs) based on α-amino acids and (L)-lactic acid (L-LA) oligomers were successfully synthesized by interfacial polymerization. The chemical structure of the new polymers was confirmed by spectroscopic analyses. Further characterization suggests that the α-amino acid plays a critical role on the final properties of the PEA. L-phenylalanine provides PEAs with higher glass transition temperature, whereas glycine enhances the crystallinity. The hydrolytic degradation in PBS (pH = 7.4) at 37 °C also depends on the α-amino acid, being faster for glycine-based PEAs. The cytotoxic profiles using fibroblast human cells indicate that the PEAs did not elicit an acute cytotoxic effect. The strategy presented in this work opens the possibility of synthesizing biodegradable PEAs with low citotoxicity by an easy and fast method. It is worth to mention also that the properties of these materials can be fine-tuned only by changing the α-amino acid.

  10. Neuropeptides and nasal secretion.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, J N; Kaliner, M

    1991-10-01

    The nasal mucosa is innervated by the sensory, parasympathetic, and sympathetic nervous systems. Nociceptive sensory nerves are stimulated by mucosal injury, inhalation of irritants, or mast cell degranulation and release of the calcitonin gene-related peptide, the tachykinins substance P and neurokinin A, and other peptides by the axon response mechanism. Sensory nerve stimulation initiates systemic reflexes, such as the sneeze, and central parasympathetic reflexes which release acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and other peptides and lead to glandular secretion. In concert, these proinflammatory neural responses lead to vasodilation, vascular permeability, and glandular secretion. Sympathetic nerves release neuropeptide Y and norepinephrine, potent vasoconstrictors which act to decompress the nasal mucosa and produce nasal patency. The balance between the effects of parasympathetic and sympathetic neurotransmitters may regulate nasal homeostasis, whereas the nociceptive sensory system may be held in reserve as a defense mechanism. Dysfunction of these systems may lead to pathological nasal syndromes. In the future, specific neuropeptide agonists and antagonists may be useful for the treatment of human rhinitic diseases. PMID:1928355

  11. Regulation of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Secretion by Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    GAMMON, C. MICHAEL; FREEMAN, G. MARK; XIE, WEIHUA; PETERSEN, SANDRA L.; WETSEL, WILLIAM C.

    2005-01-01

    Cannabinoids (CBs) exert untoward effects on reproduction by reducing LH secretion and suppressing gonadal function. Recent evidence suggests these effects are due primarily to hypothalamic dysfunction; however, the mechanism is obscure. Using immortalized hypothalamic GnRH neurons, we find these cells produce and secrete at least two different endocannabinoids. Following release, 2-arachidonyl monoacylglycerol and anandamide are rapidly transported into GnRH neurons and are degraded to other lipids by fatty-acid amide hydrolase. The immortalized GnRH neurons also possess CB1 and CB2 receptors that are coupled to Gi/Go proteins whose activation leads to inhibition of GnRH secretion. In perifusion experiments, CBs block pulsatile release of GnRH. When a CB receptor agonist is delivered into the third ventricle of adult female mice, estrous cycles are prolonged by at least 2 days. Although in situ hybridization experiments suggest either that GnRH neurons in vivo do not possess CB1 receptors or that they are very low, transcripts are localized in close proximity to these neurons. Inasmuch as GnRH neurons in vivo possess G protein receptors that are coupled to phospholipase C and increased intracellular Ca2+, these same neurons should also be able to synthesize endocannabinoids. These lipids, in turn, could bind to CB receptors on neighboring cells and perhaps, GnRH neurons, to exert feedback control over GnRH function. This network could serve as a novel mechanism for regulating GnRH secretion where reproductive functions as diverse as the onset of puberty, timing of ovulation, duration of lactational infertility, and initiation/persistence of menopause may be affected. PMID:16020480

  12. Modeling mechanisms of cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Osinga, Hinke M; Tabak, Joël; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2010-12-01

    Secretion is a fundamental cellular process involving the regulated release of intracellular products from cells. Physiological functions such as neurotransmission, or the release of hormones and digestive enzymes, are all governed by cell secretion. Anomalies in the processes involved in secretion contribute to the development and progression of diseases such as diabetes and other hormonal disorders. To unravel the mechanisms that govern such diseases, it is essential to understand how hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters are synthesized and processed, and how their signals are recognized, amplified and transmitted by intracellular signaling pathways in the target cells. Here, we discuss diverse aspects of the detailed mechanisms involved in secretion based on mathematical models. The models range from stochastic ones describing the trafficking of secretory vesicles to deterministic ones investigating the regulation of cellular processes that underlie hormonal secretion. In all cases, the models are closely related to experimental results and suggest theoretical predictions for the secretion mechanisms.

  13. Protecting Trade Secrets in Canada.

    PubMed

    Courage, Noel; Calzavara, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Patents in the life sciences industries are a key form of intellectual property (IP), particularly for products such as brand-name drugs and medical devices. However, trade secrets can also be a useful tool for many types of innovations. In appropriate cases, trade secrets can offer long-term protection of IP for a lower financial cost than patenting. This type of protection must be approached with caution as there is little room for error when protecting a trade secret. Strong agreements and scrupulous security can help to protect the secret. Once a trade secret is disclosed to the public, it cannot be restored as the owner's property; however, if the information is kept from the public domain, the owner can have a property right of unlimited duration in the information. In some situations patents and trade secrets may be used cooperatively to protect innovation, particularly for manufacturing processes. PMID:25986591

  14. Salmonella-secreted Virulence Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Heffron, Fred; Niemann, George; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-05-01

    In this short review we discuss secreted virulence factors of Salmonella, which directly affect Salmonella interaction with its host. Salmonella secretes protein to subvert host defenses but also, as discussed, to reduce virulence thereby permitting the bacteria to persist longer and more successfully disperse. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is the best known and well studied of the mechanisms that enable secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm. Other secretion systems include outer membrane vesicles, which are present in all Gram-negative bacteria examined to date, two-partner secretion, and type VI secretion will also be addressed. Excellent reviews of Salmonella secreted effectors have focused on themes such as actin rearrangements, vesicular trafficking, ubiquitination, and the activities of the virulence factors themselves. This short review is based on S. Typhimurium infection of mice because it is a model of typhoid like disease in humans. We have organized effectors in terms of events that happen during the infection cycle and how secreted effectors may be involved.

  15. Expansible quantum secret sharing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Xu, Sheng-Wei; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Niu, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2013-08-01

    In the practical applications, member expansion is a usual demand during the development of a secret sharing network. However, there are few consideration and discussion on network expansibility in the existing quantum secret sharing schemes. We propose an expansible quantum secret sharing scheme with relatively simple and economical quantum resources and show how to split and reconstruct the quantum secret among an expansible user group in our scheme. Its trait, no requirement of any agent's assistant during the process of member expansion, can help to prevent potential menaces of insider cheating. We also give a discussion on the security of this scheme from three aspects.

  16. Allosteric Indole Amide Inhibitors of p97: Identification of a Novel Probe of the Ubiquitin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Alverez, Celeste; Bulfer, Stacie L; Chakrasali, Ramappa; Chimenti, Michael S; Deshaies, Raymond J; Green, Neal; Kelly, Mark; LaPorte, Matthew G; Lewis, Taber S; Liang, Mary; Moore, William J; Neitz, R Jeffrey; Peshkov, Vsevolod A; Walters, Michael A; Zhang, Feng; Arkin, Michelle R; Wipf, Peter; Huryn, Donna M

    2016-02-11

    A high-throughput screen to discover inhibitors of p97 ATPase activity identified an indole amide that bound to an allosteric site of the protein. Medicinal chemistry optimization led to improvements in potency and solubility. Indole amide 3 represents a novel uncompetitive inhibitor with excellent physical and pharmaceutical properties that can be used as a starting point for drug discovery efforts. PMID:26985295

  17. On the temperature dependence of amide I frequencies of peptides in solution.

    PubMed

    Amunson, Krista E; Kubelka, Jan

    2007-08-23

    The temperature dependence of the amide I vibrational frequencies of peptides in solution was investigated. In D2O, the amide I' bands of both an alpha-helical oligopeptide, the random-coil poly(L-lysine), and the simplest amide, N-methyl acetamide (NMA), exhibit linear frequency shifts of approximately 0.07 cm(-1)/degrees C with increasing temperature. Similar amide I frequency shifts are also observed for NMA in both polar (acetonitrile and DMSO) and nonpolar (1,4-dioxane) organic solvents, thus ruling out hydrogen-bonding strength as the cause of these effects. The experimental NMA amide I frequencies in the organic solvents can be accurately described by a simple theory based on the Onsager reaction field with temperature-dependent solvent dielectric properties and a solute molecular cavity. DFT-level calculations (BPW91/cc-pVDZ) for NMA with an Onsager reaction field confirm the significant contribution of the molecular cavity to the predicted amide I frequencies. Comparison of the computations to experimental data shows that the frequency-dependent response of the reaction field, taken into account by the index of refraction, is crucial for describing the amide I frequencies in polar solvents. The poor predictions of the model for the NMA amide I band in D2O might be due, in part, to the unknown temperature dependence of the refractive index of D2O in the mid-IR range, which was approximated by the available values in the visible region.

  18. One-pot synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acid amides with anti-proliferative properties.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Hugo; St-Georges, Catherine; Legault, Marc-André; Morin, Caroline; Fortin, Samuel; Marsault, Eric

    2014-12-15

    A one-pot environmentally friendly transamidation of ω-3 fatty acid ethyl esters to amides and mono- or diacylglycerols was investigated via the use of a polymer-supported lipase. The method was used to synthesize a library of fatty acid monoglyceryl esters and amides. These new derivatives were found to have potent growth inhibition effects against A549 lung cancer cells.

  19. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  3. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  4. Fast acquisition of high resolution 4-D amide-amide NOESY with diagonal suppression, sparse sampling and FFT-CLEAN.

    PubMed

    Werner-Allen, Jon W; Coggins, Brian E; Zhou, Pei

    2010-05-01

    Amide-amide NOESY provides important distance constraints for calculating global folds of large proteins, especially integral membrane proteins with beta-barrel folds. Here, we describe a diagonal-suppressed 4-D NH-NH TROSY-NOESY-TROSY (ds-TNT) experiment for NMR studies of large proteins. The ds-TNT experiment employs a spin state selective transfer scheme that suppresses diagonal signals while providing TROSY optimization in all four dimensions. Active suppression of the strong diagonal peaks greatly reduces the dynamic range of observable signals, making this experiment particularly suitable for use with sparse sampling techniques. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we collected a high resolution 4-D ds-TNT spectrum of a 23kDa protein using randomized concentric shell sampling (RCSS), and we used FFT-CLEAN processing for further reduction of aliasing artifacts - the first application of these techniques to a NOESY experiment. A comparison of peak parameters in the high resolution 4-D dataset with those from a conventionally-sampled 3-D control spectrum shows an accurate reproduction of NOE crosspeaks in addition to a significant reduction in resonance overlap, which largely eliminates assignment ambiguity. Likewise, a comparison of 4-D peak intensities and volumes before and after application of the CLEAN procedure demonstrates that the reduction of aliasing artifacts by CLEAN does not systematically distort NMR signals.

  5. Solubility and secretability.

    PubMed

    Schein, C H

    1993-08-01

    The solubility and secretability of proteins can often be affected by extremely small changes in their primary structure. Attempts to determine empirical rules for the alteration of protein structure to improve either of these characteristics have met with only partial success. Those (mostly serendipitous) improvements in solubility that have been obtained via mutagenesis cannot be considered to be 'protein engineering'. The most successful examples where directed mutagenesis has been used to alter protein solubility, hemoglobin and insulin, have relied on established crystal structures and a wealth of data about the relationship between sequence and structure of the targeted protein. Currently, optimizing culture growth conditions by trial and error remains the fastest way to improve expression.

  6. Striking Oxygen Sensitivity of the Peptidylglycine α-Amidating Monooxygenase (PAM) in Neuroendocrine Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Peter D.; Eipper, Betty A.; Katz, Maximiliano J.; Gandara, Lautaro; Wappner, Pablo; Fischer, Roman; Hodson, Emma J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Masson, Norma

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between biological pathways and molecular oxygen require robust mechanisms for detecting and responding to changes in cellular oxygen availability, to support oxygen homeostasis. Peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) catalyzes a two-step reaction resulting in the C-terminal amidation of peptides, a process important for their stability and biological activity. Here we show that in human, mouse, and insect cells, peptide amidation is exquisitely sensitive to hypoxia. Different amidation events on chromogranin A, and on peptides processed from proopiomelanocortin, manifest similar striking sensitivity to hypoxia in a range of neuroendocrine cells, being progressively inhibited from mild (7% O2) to severe (1% O2) hypoxia. In developing Drosophila melanogaster larvae, FMRF amidation in thoracic ventral (Tv) neurons is strikingly suppressed by hypoxia. Our findings have thus defined a novel monooxygenase-based oxygen sensing mechanism that has the capacity to signal changes in oxygen availability to peptidergic pathways. PMID:26296884

  7. Synthesis of amide-functionalized cellulose esters by olefin cross-metathesis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangtao; Edgar, Kevin J

    2015-11-01

    Cellulose esters with amide functionalities were synthesized by cross-metathesis (CM) reaction of terminally olefinic esters with different acrylamides, catalyzed by Hoveyda-Grubbs 2nd generation catalyst. Chelation by amides of the catalyst ruthenium center caused low conversions using conventional solvents. The effects of both solvent and structure of acrylamide on reaction conversion were investigated. While the inherent tendency of acrylamides to chelate Ru is governed by the acrylamide N-substituents, employing acetic acid as a solvent significantly improved the conversion of certain acrylamides, from 50% to up to 99%. Homogeneous hydrogenation using p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide successfully eliminated the α,β-unsaturation of the CM products to give stable amide-functionalized cellulose esters. The amide-functionalized product showed higher Tg than its starting terminally olefinic counterpart, which may have resulted from strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the amide functional groups.

  8. Synthesis of amide-functionalized cellulose esters by olefin cross-metathesis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangtao; Edgar, Kevin J

    2015-11-01

    Cellulose esters with amide functionalities were synthesized by cross-metathesis (CM) reaction of terminally olefinic esters with different acrylamides, catalyzed by Hoveyda-Grubbs 2nd generation catalyst. Chelation by amides of the catalyst ruthenium center caused low conversions using conventional solvents. The effects of both solvent and structure of acrylamide on reaction conversion were investigated. While the inherent tendency of acrylamides to chelate Ru is governed by the acrylamide N-substituents, employing acetic acid as a solvent significantly improved the conversion of certain acrylamides, from 50% to up to 99%. Homogeneous hydrogenation using p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide successfully eliminated the α,β-unsaturation of the CM products to give stable amide-functionalized cellulose esters. The amide-functionalized product showed higher Tg than its starting terminally olefinic counterpart, which may have resulted from strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the amide functional groups. PMID:26256383

  9. Collective vibrational effects in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins studied by isotopic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Johansson, C.; Christensen, D. H.; Hvidt, S.; Flink, J.; Høime Hansen, S.; Poulsen, F.

    2000-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the fast dynamics of simple liquid amides and proteins. Raman spectra in the visible region of liquid amides are obtained with a triple additive scanning monochromator, whereas FT-Raman technique is used in the near-IR region in order to avoid fluorescence from impurities in the proteins. Raman spectra are shown in the amide-I region of HCONHCH 3 ( N-methylformamide with all isotopes in their natural abundance), H 13CONHCH 3, HC 18ONHCH 3, human growth hormone, frog tropomyosin and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 including C-13 and N-15 enriched samples of the latter. Resonance energy transfer (RET) between amide molecules gives rise to a non-coincidence effect of the anisotropic and the isotropic components of the amide-I band. This effect influences the band position in mixtures of liquid amide isotopomers. A further spectral feature caused by collective vibrational modes in the hydrogen bonded liquid amides is named coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). The result of this effect is that only one band is found in mixtures of isotopomers where bands at different frequencies are observed for each of the isotopomers. A similar effect may account for the observation of protein amide-I bands with frequencies dependent only on the secondary structure of the protein and not on the amino acid residues. RET and CBMI are due to a collectivity of vibrational modes in different amide molecules. This collectivity may be related to a cooperativity of hydrogen bonds. A low-frequency band around 100 cm -1 is observed in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins. Isotopic substitution shows that the mode corresponding to this band involves displacements of atoms in hydrogen bonds. This mode may drive a breaking of the hydrogen bond.

  10. Catalysis of a Flavoenzyme-Mediated Amide Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2010-09-13

    A new pyrimidine catabolic pathway (the Rut pathway) was recently discovered in Escherichia coli K12. In this pathway, uracil is converted to 3-hydroxypropionate, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. The seven-gene Rut operon is required for this conversion. Here we demonstrate that the flavoenzyme RutA catalyzes the initial uracil ring-opening reaction to give 3-ureidoacrylate. This reaction, while formally a hydrolysis reaction, proceeds by an oxidative mechanism initiated by the addition of a flavin hydroperoxide to the C4 carbonyl. While peroxide-catalyzed amide hydrolysis has chemical precedent, we are not aware of a prior example of analogous chemistry catalyzed by flavin hydroperoxides. This study further illustrates the extraordinary catalytic versatility of the flavin cofactor.

  11. Polymer amide in the Allende and Murchison meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, Julie E. M.; McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2015-11-01

    It has been proposed that exothermic gas phase polymerization of amino acids can occur in the conditions of a warm dense molecular cloud to form hydrophobic polymer amide (HPA) (McGeoch and McGeoch 2014). In a search for evidence of this presolar chemistry Allende and Murchison meteorites and a volcano control were diamond burr-etched and Folch extracted for potential HPA yielding 85 unique peaks in the meteorite samples via matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/MS). The amino acids after acid hydrolysis in Allende were below the level of detection but many of the Allende peaks via the more sensitive MALDI/TOF analysis could be fitted to a polymer combination of glycine, alanine, and alpha-hydroxyglycine with high statistical significance. A similar significant fit using these three amino acids could not be applied to the Murchison data indicating more complex polymer chemistry.

  12. Lead Optimization Studies of Cinnamic Amide EP2 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role. PMID:24773616

  13. Amides and neolignans from the aerial parts of Piper bonii.

    PubMed

    Ding, Duo-Duo; Wang, Yue-Hu; Chen, Ya-Hui; Mei, Ren-Qiang; Yang, Jun; Luo, Ji-Feng; Li, Yan; Long, Chun-Lin; Kong, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Six amides, piperbonamides A-F, three neolignans piperbonins A-C, and 11 known compounds were isolated from the aerial parts of Piper bonii (Piperaceae). The structures of piperbonamides A-F and piperbonins A-C were elucidated based on the analysis of 1D and 2D NMR and MS data. Piperbonin A, (+)-trans-acuminatin, (+)-cis-acuminatin, (+)-kadsurenone, and pipernonaline showed weak activity against platelet aggregation with IC50 values of 118.2, 108.5, 90.02, 107.3, and 116.3 μM, respectively, as compared with the positive control, tirofiban, with an IC50 value of 5.24 μM. Piperbonamides A-F were inactive against five tumor cell lines at concentrations up to 40 μM. PMID:27452451

  14. Small Antimicrobial Agents Based on Acylated Reduced Amide Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Teng, Peng; Huo, Da; Nimmagadda, Alekhya; Wu, Jianfeng; She, Fengyu; Su, Ma; Lin, Xiaoyang; Yan, Jiyu; Cao, Annie; Xi, Chuanwu; Hu, Yong; Cai, Jianfeng

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria has emerged to be one of the greatest threats in the 21st century. Herein, we report the development of a series of small molecular antibacterial agents that are based on the acylated reduced amide scaffold. These molecules display good potency against a panel of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Meanwhile, they also effectively inhibit the biofilm formation. Mechanistic studies suggest that these compounds kill bacteria by compromising bacterial membranes, a mechanism analogous to that of host-defense peptides (HDPs). The mechanism is further supported by the fact that the lead compounds do not induce resistance in MRSA bacteria even after 14 passages. Lastly, we also demonstrate that these molecules have therapeutic potential by preventing inflammation caused by MRSA induced pneumonia in a rat model. This class of compounds could lead to an appealing class of antibiotic agents combating drug-resistant bacterial strains. PMID:27526720

  15. Sulfonyl Fluoride Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Alapafuja, Shakiru O.; Nikas, Spyros P.; Bharatan, Indu; Shukla, Vidyanand G.; Nasr, Mahmoud L.; Bowman, Anna L.; Zvonok, Nikolai; Li, Jing; Shi, Xiaomeng; Engen, John R.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Sulfonyl fluorides are known to inhibit esterases. Early work from our laboratory has identified hexadecyl sulfonylfluoride (AM374) as a potent in vitro and in vivo inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). We now report on later generation sulfonyl fluoride analogs that exhibit potent and selective inhibition of FAAH. Using recombinant rat and human FAAH we show that 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)pentanesulfonyl fluoride (AM3506) has similar inhibitory activity for both the rat and the human enzyme, while rapid dilution assays and mass spectrometry analysis suggest that the compound is a covalent modifier for FAAH and inhibits its action in an irreversible manner. Our SAR results are highlighted by molecular docking of key analogs. PMID:23083016

  16. Infrared amide I' band of the coiled coil.

    PubMed

    Reisdorf, W C; Krimm, S

    1996-02-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of several coiled-coil proteins have been shown to possess unusual features in the amide I' region. Band maxima occur in the vicinity of 1630 cm-1, with component bands at higher frequency. This is well below the observed band at 1650 cm-1 found in standard alpha-helical polypeptides such as poly-L-alanine. Normal mode calculations on models of the coiled-coil structure have been performed to investigate this issue. We find that the observed band profile can be reproduced with very small random variation on the phi, psi of tropomyosin. We believe that the shift to lower frequency is due to additional hydrogen bonding of the solvent accessible backbone CO groups to water.

  17. Study Guide: Seven Simple Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterfield, Nancy; Breaux, Annette; Whitaker, Todd

    2007-01-01

    This study guide has been developed to accompany the "Seven Simple Secrets" book written by Dr. Todd Whitaker and Annette Breaux. "Seven Simple Secrets" focuses on those attributes that have been found to help teachers be their absolute best in their daily challenges of teaching and improving student learning. The study guide is divided into the…

  18. Bacterial Secretion Systems: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Green, Erin R; Mecsas, Joan

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial pathogens utilize a multitude of methods to invade mammalian hosts, damage tissue sites, and thwart the immune system from responding. One essential component of these strategies for many bacterial pathogens is the secretion of proteins across phospholipid membranes. Secreted proteins can play many roles in promoting bacterial virulence, from enhancing attachment to eukaryotic cells, to scavenging resources in an environmental niche, to directly intoxicating target cells and disrupting their functions. Many pathogens use dedicated protein secretion systems to secrete virulence factors from the cytosol of the bacteria into host cells or the host environment. In general, bacterial protein secretion apparatuses can be divided into classes, based on their structures, functions, and specificity. Some systems are conserved in all classes of bacteria and secrete a broad array of substrates, while others are only found in a small number of bacterial species and/or are specific to only one or a few proteins. In this chapter, we review the canonical features of several common bacterial protein secretion systems, as well as their roles in promoting the virulence of bacterial pathogens. Additionally, we address recent findings that indicate that the innate immune system of the host can detect and respond to the presence of protein secretion systems during mammalian infection.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10410 - Polyether ester acid compound with a polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714). 721.10410 Section 721.10410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting... amide (PMN P-05-714) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10410 - Polyether ester acid compound with a polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714). 721.10410 Section 721.10410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting... amide (PMN P-05-714) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  1. Activation of amide N-H bonds by organotransition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schaad, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    This research was aimed at developing new homogeneous transition metal hydroamination catalysts, specifically for hydroamination reactions involving the addition of amides to olefins. New iron-, ruthenium-, palladium- and platinum-amido complexes were formed via amide N-H bond activation reactions to zerovalent and divalent organotransition metal complexes. Complexes of the general formula trans-MW(amido) (diphosphine)[sub 2] were synthesized by reaction of amides with FeH(C[sub 6]H[sub 4]PPhCH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]PPh[sub 2]) (dppe) and cis-RuHNp(dmpe)[sub 2]. Photolysis of cis-FeH[sub 2](dmpe)[sub 2] or Pt(C[sub 2]O[sub 4] (PEt[sub 3])[sub 2] in the presence of amides yielded trans-FeH(amido)(dmple)[sub 2] and trans-PtH (amido) IPEt[sub 3]) products. Reactions of amides with cis-M(PEtt[sub 3])[sub 2]Me[sub 2] yielded compounds with the general formula M(amido)Me(PEt[sub 3])[sub 2] (M = Pd, Pt). The reaction of M(diphosphine)Me[sub 2] complexes with amides produced compounds with the general formula M(amido)Me(diphosphine) (M = Pd, Pt). Reaction of amides with PtMe[sub 2](COD) yielded complexes with the general formula PtMe(amido)(COD). The compounds were characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. The reactions were proposed to occur by two routes: oxidative addition of the amid eN-H bond to the metal complex or direct protonation of the metal complex by the N-H bond of the amide. The rate of formation and the stability of the metal-amido products depended on the nature of the metal complex and the amide employed. Only acidic amides reacted with the iron complexes. For the thermal reactions of amides with the metal complexes, the reactions proceeded to completion faster as the acidity of the amide was increased. The new iron-, ruthenium-, palladium- and platinum-amido complexes were inert to further reaction.

  2. Ground-State Distortion in N-Acyl-tert-butyl-carbamates (Boc) and N-Acyl-tosylamides (Ts): Twisted Amides of Relevance to Amide N-C Cross-Coupling.

    PubMed

    Szostak, Roman; Shi, Shicheng; Meng, Guangrong; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Amide N-C(O) bonds are generally unreactive in cross-coupling reactions employing low-valent transition metals due to nN → π*C═O resonance. Herein we demonstrate that N-acyl-tert-butyl-carbamates (Boc) and N-acyl-tosylamides (Ts), two classes of acyclic amides that have recently enabled the development of elusive amide bond N-C cross-coupling reactions with organometallic reagents, are intrinsically twisted around the N-C(O) axis. The data have important implications for the design of new amide cross-coupling reactions with the N-C(O) amide bond cleavage as a key step. PMID:27480938

  3. New synthesis route for ternary transition metal amides as well as ultrafast amide-hydride hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hujun; Santoru, Antonio; Pistidda, Claudio; Richter, Theresia M M; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-04-14

    K2[Mn(NH2)4] and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were successfully synthesized via a mechanochemical method. The mixture of K2[Mn(NH2)4] and LiH showed excellent rehydrogenation properties. In fact, after dehydrogenation K2[Mn(NH2)4]-8LiH fully rehydrogenates within 60 seconds at ca. 230 °C and 5 MPa of H2. This is one of the fastest rehydrogenation rates in amide-hydride systems known to date. This work also shows a strategy for the synthesis of transition metal nitrides by decomposition of the mixtures of M[M'(NH2)n] (where M is an alkali or alkaline earth metal and M' is a transition metal) and metal hydrides.

  4. Characteristic conformation of Mosher's amide elucidated using the cambridge structural database.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Akio; Ono, Hiroshi; Mikata, Yuji

    2015-07-16

    Conformations of the crystalline 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-methoxy-2-phenylpropanamide derivatives (MTPA amides) deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) were examined statistically as Racid-enantiomers. The majority of dihedral angles (48/58, ca. 83%) of the amide carbonyl groups and the trifluoromethyl groups ranged from -30° to 0° with an average angle θ1 of -13°. The other conformational properties were also clarified: (1) one of the fluorine atoms was antiperiplanar (ap) to the amide carbonyl group, forming a staggered conformation; (2) the MTPA amides prepared from primary amines showed a Z form in amide moieties; (3) in the case of the MTPA amide prepared from a primary amine possessing secondary alkyl groups (i.e., Mosher-type MTPA amide), the dihedral angles between the methine groups and the carbonyl groups were syn and indicative of a moderate conformational flexibility; (4) the phenyl plane was inclined from the O-Cchiral bond of the methoxy moiety with an average dihedral angle θ2 of +21°; (5) the methyl group of the methoxy moiety was ap to the ipso-carbon atom of the phenyl group.

  5. Cleavage kinetics and anchor linked intermediates in solid phase peptide amide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dürr, H; Beck-Sickinger, A G; Schnorrenberg, G; Rapp, W; Jung, G

    1991-08-01

    Kinetics and cleavage conditions of peptide amide synthesis were studied using the anchor molecules 5-(4'-aminomethyl-3',5'-dimethoxyphenoxy)valeric acid (4-ADPV-OH) and 5-(2'-aminomethyl-3'-5'-dimethoxyphenoxy) valeric acid (2-ADPV-OH). Unexpectedly the anchor amide alanyl-4-ADPV-NH2 was isolated and characterized as an intermediate during the cleavage with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) of alanyl-4-ADPV-alanyl-aminomethyl-polystyrene to yield the alanine amide. As a matter of fact the NH--CH alpha bond of the alanyl spacer has to be cleaved to form this intermediate. Using TFA-dichloromethane (1:9) alanyl-4-ADPV-NH2 was obtained as a cleavage product in 50% yield within 60 min, whereas the isomeric alanyl-2-ADPV-NH2 was formed more slowly under these mild conditions. At high TFA concentration no difference between the 2- and 4-ADPV anchor was observed in the rate of formation of the free alanine amide. The presence of tryptophan amide in the cleavage mixture resulted in an anchor alkylated tryptophan amide, which remains stable in acidic solution but disappears rapidly in the presence of the resin. A low TFA/high TFA cleavage procedure is recommended for peptide amid synthesis applying the ADPV anchor.

  6. Characteristic conformation of Mosher's amide elucidated using the cambridge structural database.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Akio; Ono, Hiroshi; Mikata, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Conformations of the crystalline 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-methoxy-2-phenylpropanamide derivatives (MTPA amides) deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) were examined statistically as Racid-enantiomers. The majority of dihedral angles (48/58, ca. 83%) of the amide carbonyl groups and the trifluoromethyl groups ranged from -30° to 0° with an average angle θ1 of -13°. The other conformational properties were also clarified: (1) one of the fluorine atoms was antiperiplanar (ap) to the amide carbonyl group, forming a staggered conformation; (2) the MTPA amides prepared from primary amines showed a Z form in amide moieties; (3) in the case of the MTPA amide prepared from a primary amine possessing secondary alkyl groups (i.e., Mosher-type MTPA amide), the dihedral angles between the methine groups and the carbonyl groups were syn and indicative of a moderate conformational flexibility; (4) the phenyl plane was inclined from the O-Cchiral bond of the methoxy moiety with an average dihedral angle θ2 of +21°; (5) the methyl group of the methoxy moiety was ap to the ipso-carbon atom of the phenyl group. PMID:26193245

  7. Hydrogen bond stabilities in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin from amide-resolved hydrogen-exchange measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, C E; Handcock, L J

    1996-01-01

    Amide-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange-rate constants were measured for backbone amides of alamethicin reconstituted in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles by an exchange-trapping method combined with high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In vesicles containing alamethicin at molar ratios between 1:20 and 1:100 relative to lipid, the exchange-rate constants increased with increasing volume of the D20 buffer in which the vesicles were suspended, indicating that exchange under these conditions is dominated by partitioning of the peptide into the aqueous phase. This was supported by observation of a linear relationship between the exchange-rate constants for amides in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin and those for amides in alamethicin dissolved directly into D2O buffer. Significant protection of amides from exchange with D2O buffer in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin is interpreted in terms of stabilization by helical hydrogen bonding. Under conditions in which amide exchange occurred by partitioning of the peptide into solution, only lower limits for hydrogen-bond stabilities in the membrane were determined; all the potentially hydrogen-bonded amides of alamethicin are at least 1000-fold exchange protected in the membrane-bound state. When partitioning of alamethicin into the aqueous phase was suppressed by hydration of reconstituted vesicles in a limiting volume of water [D2O:dioleoylphosphatidylcholine:alamethicin; 220:1:0.05; (M:M:M)], the exchange-protection factors exhibited helical periodicity with highly exchange-protected, and less well-protected, amides on the nonpolar and polar helix faces, respectively. The exchange data indicate that, under the conditions studied, alamethicin adopts a stable helical structure in DOPC bilayers in which all the potentially hydrogen-bonded amides are stabilized by helical hydrogen bonds. The protection factors define the orientation of the peptide helix with respect to an aqueous phase, which is

  8. Unconventional Protein Secretion in Plants.

    PubMed

    Davis, Destiny J; Kang, Byung-Ho; Heringer, Angelo S; Wilkop, Thomas E; Drakakaki, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Unconventional protein secretion (UPS) describes secretion pathways that bypass one or several of the canonical secretion pit-stops on the way to the plasma membrane, and/or involve the secretion of leaderless proteins. So far, alternatives to conventional secretion were primarily observed and studied in yeast and animal cells. The sessile lifestyle of plants brings with it unique restraints on how they adapt to adverse conditions and environmental challenges. Recently, attention towards unconventional secretion pathways in plant cells has substantially increased, with the large number of leaderless proteins identified through proteomic studies. While UPS pathways in plants are certainly not yet exhaustively researched, an emerging notion is that induction of UPS pathways is correlated with pathogenesis and stress responses. Given the multitude UPS events observed, comprehensively organizing the routes proteins take to the apoplast in defined UPS categories is challenging. With the establishment of a larger collection of studied plant proteins taking these UPS pathways, a clearer picture of endomembrane trafficking as a whole will emerge. There are several novel enabling technologies, such as vesicle proteomics and chemical genomics, with great potential for dissecting secretion pathways, providing information about the cargo that travels along them and the conditions that induce them. PMID:27665550

  9. Acceleration of Amide Bond Rotation by Encapsulation in the Hydrophobic Interior of a Water-Soluble Supramolecular Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-04-08

    The hydrophobic interior cavity of a self-assembled supramolecular assembly exploits the hydrophobic effect for the encapsulation of tertiary amides. Variable temperature 1H NMR experiments reveal that the free energy barrier for rotation around the C-N amide bond is lowered by up to 3.6 kcal/mol upon encapsulation. The hydrophobic cavity of the assembly is able to stabilize the less polar transition state of the amide rotation process. Carbon-13 labeling studies showed that the {sup 13}C NMR carbonyl resonance increases with temperature for the encapsulated amides which suggests that the assembly is able to favor a twisted for of the amide.

  10. Secret key generation via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Evans, P. G.; Lawrie, B.; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, W.; Williams, B. P.; Qi, B.; Grice, W. P.

    2015-05-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over ~6km of telecom. fiber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N - 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and significantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  11. Secret Key Generation via a Modified Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Smith IV, Amos M; Evans, Philip G; Lawrie, Benjamin J; Legre, Matthieu; Lougovski, Pavel; Ray, William R; Williams, Brian P; Qi, Bing; Grice, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over 6km of telecom. ber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N > 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and signicantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  12. Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed Amidation of Unactivated C(sp(3) )-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Tang, Guodong; Li, Xingwei

    2015-10-26

    Nitrogenation by direct functionalization of C-H bonds represents an important strategy for constructing C-N bonds. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed direct amidation of unactivated C(sp(3) )-H bonds is rare, especially under mild reaction conditions. Herein, a broad scope of C(sp(3) )-H bonds are amidated under rhodium catalysis in high efficiency using 3-substituted 1,4,2-dioxazol-5-ones as the amide source. The protocol broadens the scope of rhodium(III)-catalyzed C(sp(3) )-H activation chemistry, and is applicable to the late-stage functionalization of natural products.

  13. Chelate effects in sulfate binding by amide/urea-based ligands.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuandong; Wang, Qi-Qiang; Begum, Rowshan Ara; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2015-07-01

    The influence of chelate and mini-chelate effects on sulfate binding was explored for six amide-, amide/amine-, urea-, and urea/amine-based ligands. Two of the urea-based hosts were selective for SO4(2-) in water-mixed DMSO-d6 systems. Results indicated that the mini-chelate effect provided by a single urea group with two NH binding sites appears to provide enhanced binding over two amide groups. Furthermore, additional urea binding sites incorporated into the host framework appeared to overcome to some extent competing hydration effects with increasing water content.

  14. Bifunctional Brønsted Base Catalyzes Direct Asymmetric Aldol Reaction of α-Keto Amides.

    PubMed

    Echave, Haizea; López, Rosa; Palomo, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    The first enantioselective direct cross-aldol reaction of α-keto amides with aldehydes, mediated by a bifunctional ureidopeptide-based Brønsted base catalyst, is described. The appropriate combination of a tertiary amine base and an aminal, and urea hydrogen-bond donor groups in the catalyst structure promoted the exclusive generation of the α-keto amide enolate which reacted with either non-enolizable or enolizable aldehydes to produce highly enantioenriched polyoxygenated aldol adducts without side-products resulting from dehydration, α-keto amide self-condensation, aldehyde enolization, and isotetronic acid formation.

  15. Chemo- and Stereoselective Transition-Metal-Free Amination of Amides with Azides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of α-amino carbonyl/carboxyl compounds is a contemporary challenge in organic synthesis. Herein, we present a stereoselective α-amination of amides employing simple azides that proceeds under mild conditions with release of nitrogen gas. The amide is used as the limiting reagent, and through simple variation of the azide pattern, various differently substituted aminated products can be obtained. The reaction is fully chemoselective for amides even in the presence of esters or ketones and lends itself to preparation of optically enriched products. PMID:27350334

  16. Chemo- and Stereoselective Transition-Metal-Free Amination of Amides with Azides.

    PubMed

    Tona, Veronica; de la Torre, Aurélien; Padmanaban, Mohan; Ruider, Stefan; González, Leticia; Maulide, Nuno

    2016-07-13

    The synthesis of α-amino carbonyl/carboxyl compounds is a contemporary challenge in organic synthesis. Herein, we present a stereoselective α-amination of amides employing simple azides that proceeds under mild conditions with release of nitrogen gas. The amide is used as the limiting reagent, and through simple variation of the azide pattern, various differently substituted aminated products can be obtained. The reaction is fully chemoselective for amides even in the presence of esters or ketones and lends itself to preparation of optically enriched products. PMID:27350334

  17. Bifunctional Brønsted Base Catalyzes Direct Asymmetric Aldol Reaction of α-Keto Amides.

    PubMed

    Echave, Haizea; López, Rosa; Palomo, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    The first enantioselective direct cross-aldol reaction of α-keto amides with aldehydes, mediated by a bifunctional ureidopeptide-based Brønsted base catalyst, is described. The appropriate combination of a tertiary amine base and an aminal, and urea hydrogen-bond donor groups in the catalyst structure promoted the exclusive generation of the α-keto amide enolate which reacted with either non-enolizable or enolizable aldehydes to produce highly enantioenriched polyoxygenated aldol adducts without side-products resulting from dehydration, α-keto amide self-condensation, aldehyde enolization, and isotetronic acid formation. PMID:26835655

  18. Palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides by carbon-nitrogen cleavage: general strategy for amide N-C bond activation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guangrong; Szostak, Michal

    2016-06-15

    The first palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of amides with boronic acids for the synthesis of ketones by sterically-controlled N-C bond activation is reported. The transformation is characterized by operational simplicity using bench-stable, commercial reagents and catalysts, and a broad substrate scope, including substrates with electron-donating and withdrawing groups on both coupling partners, steric-hindrance, heterocycles, halides, esters and ketones. The scope and limitations are presented in the synthesis of >60 functionalized ketones. Mechanistic studies provide insight into the catalytic cycle of the cross-coupling, including the first experimental evidence for Pd insertion into the amide N-C bond. The synthetic utility is showcased by a gram-scale cross-coupling and cross-coupling at room temperature. Most importantly, this process provides a blueprint for the development of a plethora of metal catalyzed reactions of typically inert amide bonds via acyl-metal intermediates. A unified strategy for amide bond activation to enable metal insertion into N-C amide bond is outlined ().

  19. Palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides by carbon-nitrogen cleavage: general strategy for amide N-C bond activation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guangrong; Szostak, Michal

    2016-06-15

    The first palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of amides with boronic acids for the synthesis of ketones by sterically-controlled N-C bond activation is reported. The transformation is characterized by operational simplicity using bench-stable, commercial reagents and catalysts, and a broad substrate scope, including substrates with electron-donating and withdrawing groups on both coupling partners, steric-hindrance, heterocycles, halides, esters and ketones. The scope and limitations are presented in the synthesis of >60 functionalized ketones. Mechanistic studies provide insight into the catalytic cycle of the cross-coupling, including the first experimental evidence for Pd insertion into the amide N-C bond. The synthetic utility is showcased by a gram-scale cross-coupling and cross-coupling at room temperature. Most importantly, this process provides a blueprint for the development of a plethora of metal catalyzed reactions of typically inert amide bonds via acyl-metal intermediates. A unified strategy for amide bond activation to enable metal insertion into N-C amide bond is outlined (). PMID:26864384

  20. Copper-Catalyzed Intermolecular Amidation and Imidation of Unactivated Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a set of rare copper-catalyzed reactions of alkanes with simple amides, sulfonamides, and imides (i.e., benzamides, tosylamides, carbamates, and phthalimide) to form the corresponding N-alkyl products. The reactions lead to functionalization at secondary C–H bonds over tertiary C–H bonds and even occur at primary C–H bonds. [(phen)Cu(phth)] (1-phth) and [(phen)Cu(phth)2] (1-phth2), which are potential intermediates in the reaction, have been isolated and fully characterized. The stoichiometric reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with alkanes, alkyl radicals, and radical probes were investigated to elucidate the mechanism of the amidation. The catalytic and stoichiometric reactions require both copper and tBuOOtBu for the generation of N-alkyl product. Neither 1-phth nor 1-phth2 reacted with excess cyclohexane at 100 °C without tBuOOtBu. However, the reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with tBuOOtBu afforded N-cyclohexylphthalimide (Cy-phth), N-methylphthalimide, and tert-butoxycyclohexane (Cy-OtBu) in approximate ratios of 70:20:30, respectively. Reactions with radical traps support the intermediacy of a tert-butoxy radical, which forms an alkyl radical intermediate. The intermediacy of an alkyl radical was evidenced by the catalytic reaction of cyclohexane with benzamide in the presence of CBr4, which formed exclusively bromocyclohexane. Furthermore, stoichiometric reactions of [(phen)Cu(phth)2] with tBuOOtBu and (Ph(Me)2CO)2 at 100 °C without cyclohexane afforded N-methylphthalimide (Me-phth) from β-Me scission of the alkoxy radicals to form a methyl radical. Separate reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane with benzamide showed that the turnover-limiting step in the catalytic reaction is the C–H cleavage of cyclohexane by a tert-butoxy radical. These mechanistic data imply that the tert-butoxy radical reacts with the C–H bonds of alkanes, and the subsequent alkyl radical combines with 1-phth2 to form the corresponding N-alkyl imide product

  1. Progesterone inhibits mast cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Vasiadi, M; Kempuraj, D; Boucher, W; Kalogeromitros, D; Theoharides, T C

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, where they secrete numerous vasoactive, inflammatory and nociceptive mediators in response to immunoglobulin E (IgE) and antigen. However, they have also been implicated in inflammatory conditions, such as painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and migraines, all of which occur more often in women and are exacerbated during ovulation, but are suppressed during pregnancy. Mast cells express high affinity estrogen receptors and estradiol augments their secretion, while tamoxifen inhibits it. Here we report that progesterone (100 nM), but not the structurally related cholesterol, inhibits histamine secretion from purified rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated immunologically or by substance P (SP), an effect also documented by electron microscopy. These results suggest that mast cell secretion may be regulated by progesterone and may explain the reduced symptoms of certain inflammatory conditions during pregnancy.

  2. Plant secretome: unlocking secrets of the secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Jwa, Nam-Soo; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Job, Dominique; Rakwal, Randeep

    2010-02-01

    Plant secretomics is a newly emerging area of the plant proteomics field. It basically describes the global study of secreted proteins into the extracellular space of plant cell or tissue at any given time and under certain conditions through various secretory mechanisms. A combination of biochemical, proteomics and bioinformatics approaches has been developed to isolate, identify and profile secreted proteins using complementary in vitro suspension-cultured cells and in planta systems. Developed inventories of secreted proteins under normal, biotic and abiotic conditions revealed several different types of novel secreted proteins, including the leaderless secretory proteins (LSPs). On average, LSPs can account for more than 50% of the total identified secretome, supporting, as in other eukaryotes, the existence of novel secretory mechanisms independent of the classical endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi secretory pathway, and suggesting that this non-classical mechanism of protein expression is, for as yet unknown reasons, more massively used than in other eukaryotic systems. Plants LSPs, which seem to be potentially involved in the defense/stress responses, might have dual (extracellular and/or intracellular) roles as most of them have established intracellular functions, yet presently unknown extracellular functions. Evidence is emerging on the role of glycosylation in the apical sorting and trafficking of secretory proteins. These initial secretome studies in plants have considerably advanced our understanding on secretion of different types of proteins and their underlying mechanisms, and opened a door for comparative analyses of plant secretomes with those of other organisms. In this first review on plant secretomics, we summarize and discuss the secretome definition, the applied approaches for unlocking secrets of the secreted proteins in the extracellular fluid, the possible functional significance and secretory mechanisms of LSPs, as well as glycosylation of

  3. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively.

  4. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  5. Nonlinear Secret Image Sharing Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2⁡m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  6. Synthesis of an Acyltrifluoroborate and its Fusion with Azides to Form Amides

    PubMed Central

    Raushel, Jessica; Ellis, Noel M.

    2010-01-01

    A uniquely stable acyl potassium trifluoroborate, potassium (2-phenylacetyl) trifluoroborate, has been synthesized and isolated. In the presence of an activating Lewis acid, this reagent reacts with azides to form amides in good yields. PMID:20481486

  7. Production of R-(-)-Ketoprofen from an Amide Compound by Comamonas acidovorans KPO-2771-4

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K.; Otsubo, K.; Matsuo, A.; Hayashi, T.; Fujimatsu, I.; Komatsu, K.

    1996-01-01

    R-(-)-2-(3(prm1)-Benzoylphenyl)propionic acid [R-(-)-ketoprofen] was produced from racemic 2-(3(prm1)-benzoylphenyl)propionamide (keto-amide) by the isolated bacterial strain Comamonas acidovorans KPO-2771-4. Sodium fumarate as the carbon source and 2-azacyclononanone or isobutyronitrile as the enhancer in the culture medium were effective for bacterial growth and the enhancement of R-(-)-ketoprofen-producing activity. R-(-)-Ketoprofen produced from the keto-amide by resting cells was present in 99% enantiomeric exess. C. acidovorans KPO-2771-4 has an R-enantioselective amidase for keto-amide because the purified amidase from the bacterium hydrolyzed keto-amide, producing optically pure R-ketoprofen and ammonia. PMID:16535206

  8. Binary and ternary cocrystals of sulfa drug acetazolamide with pyridine carboxamides and cyclic amides

    PubMed Central

    Bolla, Geetha; Nangia, Ashwini

    2016-01-01

    A novel design strategy for cocrystals of a sulfonamide drug with pyridine carboxamides and cyclic amides is developed based on synthon identification as well as size and shape match of coformers. Binary adducts of acetazolamide (ACZ) with lactams (valerolactam and caprolactam, VLM, CPR), cyclic amides (2-pyridone, labeled as 2HP and its derivatives MeHP, OMeHP) and pyridine amides (nicotinamide and picolinamide, NAM, PAM) were obtained by manual grinding, and their single crystals by solution crystallization. The heterosynthons in the binary cocrystals of ACZ with these coformers suggested a ternary combination for ACZ with pyridone and nicotinamide. Novel supramolecular synthons of ACZ with lactams and pyridine carboxamides are reported together with binary and ternary cocrystals for a sulfonamide drug. This crystal engineering study resulted in the first ternary cocrystal of acetazolamide with amide coformers, ACZ–NAM–2HP (1:1:1). PMID:27006778

  9. Crystal structure of the high-energy-density material guanylurea dipicryl­amide

    PubMed Central

    Deblitz, Raik; Hrib, Cristian G.; Hilfert, Liane; Edelmann, Frank T.

    2014-01-01

    The title compound, 1-carbamoylguanidinium bis­(2,4,6-tri­nitro­phen­yl)amide [H2NC(=O)NHC(NH2)2]+[N{C6H2(NO2)3-2,4,6}2]− (= guanylurea dipicryl­amide), was prepared as dark-red block-like crystals in 70% yield by salt-metathesis reaction between guanylurea sulfate and sodium dipicryl­amide. In the solid state, the new compound builds up an array of mutually linked guanylurea cations and dipicryl­amide anions. The crystal packing is dominated by an extensive network of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, resulting in a high density of 1.795 Mg m−3, which makes the title compound a potential secondary explosive. PMID:25249869

  10. A two-step approach to achieve secondary amide transamidation enabled by nickel catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Emma L.; Yamano, Michael M.; Zhou, Yujing; Anthony, Sarah M.; Garg, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing challenge in synthetic chemistry is the development of the transamidation reaction. This process, which involves the conversion of one amide to another, is typically plagued by unfavourable kinetic and thermodynamic factors. Although some advances have been made with regard to the transamidation of primary amide substrates, secondary amide transamidation has remained elusive. Here we present a simple two-step approach that allows for the elusive overall transformation to take place using non-precious metal catalysis. The methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions and is tolerant of amino-acid-derived nucleophiles. In addition to overcoming the classic problem of secondary amide transamidation, our studies expand the growing repertoire of new transformations mediated by base metal catalysis. PMID:27199089

  11. First Novozym 435 lipase-catalyzed Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction in the presence of amides.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xuemei; Zhang, Suoqin; Zheng, Liangyu

    2016-03-01

    The first Novozym 435 lipase-catalyzed Morita-Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reaction with amides as co-catalyst was realized. Results showed that neither Novozym 435 nor amide can independently catalyze the reaction. This co-catalytic system that used a catalytic amount of Novozym 435 with a corresponding amount of amide was established and optimized. The MBH reaction strongly depended on the structure of aldehyde substrate, amide co-catalyst, and reaction additives. The optimized reaction yield (43.4%) was achieved in the Novozym 435-catalyzed MBH reaction of 2, 4-dinitrobenzaldehyde and cyclohexenone with isonicotinamide as co-catalyst and β-cyclodextrin as additive only in 2 days. Although enantioselectivity of Novozym 435 was not found, the results were still significant because an MBH reaction using lipase as biocatalyst was realized for the first time.

  12. Binary and ternary cocrystals of sulfa drug acetazolamide with pyridine carboxamides and cyclic amides.

    PubMed

    Bolla, Geetha; Nangia, Ashwini

    2016-03-01

    A novel design strategy for cocrystals of a sulfonamide drug with pyridine carboxamides and cyclic amides is developed based on synthon identification as well as size and shape match of coformers. Binary adducts of acetazolamide (ACZ) with lactams (valerolactam and caprolactam, VLM, CPR), cyclic amides (2-pyridone, labeled as 2HP and its derivatives MeHP, OMeHP) and pyridine amides (nicotinamide and picolinamide, NAM, PAM) were obtained by manual grinding, and their single crystals by solution crystallization. The heterosynthons in the binary cocrystals of ACZ with these coformers suggested a ternary combination for ACZ with pyridone and nicotinamide. Novel supramolecular synthons of ACZ with lactams and pyridine carboxamides are reported together with binary and ternary cocrystals for a sulfonamide drug. This crystal engineering study resulted in the first ternary cocrystal of acetazolamide with amide coformers, ACZ-NAM-2HP (1:1:1).

  13. Synthesis and structure assignments of amide protected nucleosides and their use as phosphoramidites in deoxyoligonucleotide synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Mag, M; Engels, J W

    1988-01-01

    The syntheses of several amide protected deoxyguanosine- as well as thymidine nucleosides are described. These compounds were synthesized according to the Mitsunobu reaction and Michael addition. In contradiction to previous studies we have discovered that the Michael addition gives only products derived from N-alkylation. The occurrence of N- or O-alkylation was assigned by means of two dimensional 1H, 1 3 C-COLOC-NMR spectroscopy. Further, we have found that the Mitsunobu reaction used for the protection of the amide function of dG is limited to alcohols without acidic hydrogen atoms. Amide protected phosphormidites (15, 16) were used for the preparation of deoxyoligonucleotides with a large number of guanine and thymine bases using two different coupling times. We have shown that there is no experimentally detectable difference in the quality of the products if the starting monomer is amide protected or not. Images PMID:3375062

  14. Synthesis and structure assignments of amide protected nucleosides and their use as phosphoramidites in deoxyoligonucleotide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mag, M; Engels, J W

    1988-04-25

    The syntheses of several amide protected deoxyguanosine- as well as thymidine nucleosides are described. These compounds were synthesized according to the Mitsunobu reaction and Michael addition. In contradiction to previous studies we have discovered that the Michael addition gives only products derived from N-alkylation. The occurrence of N- or O-alkylation was assigned by means of two dimensional 1H, 1 3 C-COLOC-NMR spectroscopy. Further, we have found that the Mitsunobu reaction used for the protection of the amide function of dG is limited to alcohols without acidic hydrogen atoms. Amide protected phosphormidites (15, 16) were used for the preparation of deoxyoligonucleotides with a large number of guanine and thymine bases using two different coupling times. We have shown that there is no experimentally detectable difference in the quality of the products if the starting monomer is amide protected or not. PMID:3375062

  15. H-localized mode in chains of hydrogen-bonded amide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Mariette; Kellouai, Hassan; Page, Gabriel; Moret, Jacques; Johnson, Susanna W.; Eckert, Juergen

    1993-09-01

    New infrared measurements of the anomalous amide modes in acetanilide and its derivatives are presented. Preliminary results of structural data obtained by neutron diffraction at low temperature are also described. Besides the well-known anomalous amide-1 mode (1650 cm -1), it is shown that the NH out-of-plane bend (770 cm -1) and the “H-bond strain” (at about 105 cm -1) exhibit an anomalous increase of intensity proportional to the law exp(- T2/ Θ2), suggesting that the amide proton bears a significant electronic distribution as formerly observed for H - localized modes. Structural data, moreover, show that the thermal ellips of the amide proton has an increasing anisotropy at 15 K. Considering these new results, the theoretical model of a self-trapped “polaronic” state seems to be the most consistent with the whole set of observed anomalies in this family of crystals.

  16. Empirical modeling of the peptide amide I band IR intensity in water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouř, Petr; Keiderling, Timothy A.

    2003-12-01

    An empirical correction to amide group vacuum force fields is proposed in order to account for the influence of the aqueous environment on the C=O stretching vibration (amide I). The dependence of the vibrational absorption spectral intensities on the geometry is studied with density functional theory methods at the BPW91/6-31G** level for N-methyl acetamide interacting with a variety of of water molecule clusters hydrogen bonded to it. These cluster results are then generalized to form an empirical correction for the force field and dipole intensity of the amide I (C=O stretch) mode. As an example of its extension, the method is applied to a larger (β-turn model) peptide molecule and its IR spectrum is simulated. The method provides realistic bandwidths for the amide I bands if the spectra are generated from the ab initio force field corrected by perturbation from an ensemble of solvent geometries obtained using molecular dynamic simulations.

  17. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural perspective of new ferrocenyl amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, Martin; Nigar, Asifa; Ali, Naveed Zafar; Akhter, Zareen; Dinnebier, Robert E.

    2016-05-01

    Two new ferrocene derivatives with amide linkages were synthesized by the condensation of 4-ferrocenylaniline with n-alkyl acid chloride derivatives as pristine orange solids in good yields. FTIR and 1H/13C NMR studies have confirmed the basic structure of the molecules with the involvement of intermolecular H-bonding, which together with the ferrocene-like packing ensures the stability of the crystal structure. Crystal structures for both compounds were solved by Rietveld refinements of high resolution X-ray powder diffraction data. The XRD results show that both compounds crystallize in the monoclinic space group P21/c. The primary feature of the crystal structure is a double layer of ferrocenyl groups stretched out in the b-c -plane perpendicular to the a-axis, with packing of the ferrocenyl groups occurring in a manner similar to that of pure ferrocene. Despite the close structural similarity, both compounds differ in the optimized geometry of respective Ferrocene conformers. The Cp rings are eclipsed for one Ferrocene conformer and close to staggered for the other, owing to the low energy barrier for the rotation of a cyclopentadienyl ring relative to the rest of the molecule.

  18. Effects of three related amides on microecosystem stability

    SciTech Connect

    Flum, T.F.; Shannon, L.J.

    1987-04-01

    Three related amides (diuron, 2-(octyloxy) acetanilide, and salicylanilide) were evaluated for toxicity to aquatic microcosm communities. Effects were measured at the ecosystem level using changes in pH, Eh (redox potential), and dissolved oxygen as indicators of toxicity. These values were used to calculate the resistance, resilience, and relative instability of the microecosystems to each compound at comparable dose levels of approximately 2500 micrograms/liter. Such measures have often been used in a theoretical context, but have not received wide practical application. The systems showed low resistance and no resilience to diuron, high resistance and low resilience to 2-(octyloxy) acetanilide, and no response to salicylanilide. At a higher exposure level (9800 micrograms/liter salicylanilide), the systems showed low resistance and high resilience. Both this approach and more traditional dose-response measures of toxicity indicated that diuron was clearly the most toxic compound, followed by 2-(octyloxy) acetanilide and salicylanilide. While microcosm toxicity tests were slightly less sensitive than some single species tests, they provided important additional information on the extent of perturbations and the rate of ecosystem recovery.

  19. Poly(ester amide) blend microspheres for oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    He, Pan; Liu, Huaiyu; Tang, Zhaohui; Deng, Mingxiao; Yang, Yan; Pang, Xuan; Chen, Xuesi

    2013-10-15

    This study developed a novel oral insulin formulation centered on microspheres consisting of a blend of biodegradable poly(ester amide) (PEA). In the formulation, L-lysine-/L-leucine-based PEA with pendant COOH groups (PEA-COOH) was used as a pH-responsive material for the protection of insulin from the harsh environmental conditions of the stomach. Arginine-based PEA (Arg-PEA) was introduced to improve the intestinal absorption of the drug. The influence of both the hydrophobicity of PEA-COOH and the content of Arg-PEA was investigated in detail on microsphere surface morphology, drug loading, and the in vitro release profile of insulin. The PEA-COOH/Arg-PEA blend microspheres protected the loaded insulin in simulated gastric fluid and released insulin in a fast and sustained manner in simulated intestinal fluid. The in vivo test demonstrated that the oral administration of insulin-loaded PEA blend microspheres could effectively suppress the blood glucose level in diabetic rats for 10h, and the oral bioavailability was improved to 5.89+1.84% in healthy rats. These results indicate that the PEA blend microspheres are promising vehicles for the oral delivery of insulin.

  20. Actinide-lanthanide separation with solvents on the base of amides of heterocyclic diacids

    SciTech Connect

    Babain, V.A.; Alyapyshev, M.Y.; Tkachenko, L.I.

    2013-07-01

    The separation of actinides from lanthanides with a particular emphasis on Am(III) from Eu(III) with amides of heterocyclic dicarboxylic diacids was reviewed. It was shown that the di-amides of the 2,2'-dipyridyl-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid are the most promising ligands for the simultaneous selective recovery of actinides from HLLW (high level radioactive liquid waste) within the GANEX concept. (author)

  1. Cp*Co(III) -Catalyzed C(sp(3) )-H Bond Amidation of 8-Methylquinoline.

    PubMed

    Barsu, Nagaraju; Rahman, Md Atiur; Sen, Malay; Sundararaju, Basker

    2016-06-27

    An efficient and external oxidant-free, Cp*Co(III) -catalyzed C(sp(3) )-H bond amidation of 8-methylquinoline, using oxazolone as an efficient amidating agent, is reported for the first time under mild conditions. The reaction is selective and tolerates a variety of functional groups. Based on previous reports and experimental results, the deprotonation pathway proceeds through an external base-assisted concerted metalation and deprotonation process. PMID:27168249

  2. Practical Synthesis of Amides via Copper/ABNO-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidative Coupling of Alcohols and Amines.

    PubMed

    Zultanski, Susan L; Zhao, Jingyi; Stahl, Shannon S

    2016-05-25

    A modular Cu/ABNO catalyst system has been identified that enables efficient aerobic oxidative coupling of alcohols and amines to amides. All four permutations of benzylic/aliphatic alcohols and primary/secondary amines are viable in this reaction, enabling broad access to secondary and tertiary amides. The reactions exhibit excellent functional group compatibility and are complete within 30 min-3 h at rt. All components of the catalyst system are commercially available. PMID:27171973

  3. Synthesis and characterization of ester and amide derivatives of titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Melánová, Klára; Beneš, Ludvík; Trchová, Miroslava; Svoboda, Jan; Zima, Vítězslav

    2013-06-15

    A set of layered ester and amide derivatives of titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate was prepared by solvothermal treatment of amorphous titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate with corresponding 1-alkanols, 1,ω-alkanediols, 1-aminoalkanes, 1,ω-diaminoalkanes and 1,ω-amino alcohols and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Whereas alkyl chains with one functional group form bilayers tilted to the layers, 1,ω-diaminoalkanes and most of 1,ω-alkanediols form bridges connecting the adjacent layers. In the case of amino alcohols, the alkyl chains form bilayer and either hydroxyl or amino group is used for bonding. This simple method for the synthesis of ester and amide derivatives does not require preparation of acid chloride derivative as a precursor or pre-intercalation with alkylamines and can be used also for the preparation of ester and amide derivatives of titanium carboxyethylphosphonate and zirconium carboxymethylphosphonate. - Graphical abstract: Ester and amide derivatives of layered titanium carboxymethylphosphonate were prepared by solvothermal treatment of amorphous solid with alkanol or alkylamine. - Highlights: • Ester and amide derivatives of titanium carboxymethylphosphonate. • Solvothermal treatment of amorphous solid with alkanol or alkylamine. • Ester and amide formation confirmed by IR spectroscopy.

  4. Hexamethylene dilauroyl, dimyristoyl, and dipalmytoyl amides as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Canik, Guelcin; Alkan, Cemil

    2010-04-15

    Hexamethylene dilauroyl, dimyristoyl, and dipalmytoyl amides have been produced as solid-liquid phase change materials via condensation of hexamethylene diamine with the respective acyl chlorides (lauroyl chloride, myristoyl chloride, and palmytoyl chloride) and were characterized by FT-IR, NMR, DSC, and TG analysis. Hexamethylene dilauroyl, dimyristoyl, and dipalmytoyl amides crystallized due to structural symmetry and flexibility of long alkyl groups. They were characterized by DSC and FT-IR spectroscopy before and after thermal cycling to determine their thermal reliability. Phase change enthalpies were found 110.1 and -103.3 J g{sup -1} for hexamethylene dilauroyl amide (N,N'-hexamethylene didodecanamide), 116.9 and -110.4 J g{sup -1} for hexamethylene dimyristoyl amide (N,N'-hexamethylene ditetradecanamide), and 144.5 and -140.5 J g{sup -1} for hexamethylene dipalmytoyl amides (N,N'-hexamethylene dihexadecanamide) by DSC. The endurance of hexamethylene dilauroyl, dimyristoyl, and dipalmytoyl amides was studied by TG analysis. (author)

  5. Cell secretion and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2005-07-01

    Secretion occurs in all cells of multicellular organisms and involves the delivery of secretory products packaged in membrane-bound vesicles to the cell exterior. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion or hormone release utilize a highly regulated secretory process. Secretory vesicles are transported to specific sites at the plasma membrane, where they dock and fuse to release their contents. Similar to other cellular processes, cell secretion is found to be highly regulated and a precisely orchestrated event. It has been demonstrated that membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and fuse at porosomes, which are specialized supramolecular structures at the cell plasma membrane. Swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of pressure, allowing expulsion of intravesicular contents. The extent of secretory vesicle swelling dictates the amount of intravesicular contents expelled during secretion. The discovery of the porosome, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle fusion at the base of porosomes, and vesicle swelling, has also been resolved. These findings reveal the molecular mechanism of cell secretion.

  6. Second messengers in renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Churchill, P C

    1985-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays a central role in electrolyte homeostasis and in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. The level of activity of this system is determined primarily by the rate at which the kidneys secrete renin into the blood. Although many factors affect renin secretion in vivo, it is certain that all extracellular first messengers affect the activity of the renin-secreting cell by altering its intracellular concentrations of only a few second messengers. The thesis of this review is that free ionic calcium (Ca2+) and cAMP are inhibitory and stimulatory second messengers in renin secretion and that Ca2+ is preeminent. In general, intracellular Ca2+ is controlled by two mechanisms of Ca2+ efflux (Na-Ca exchange; primary active Ca2+ transport) and two mechanisms of Ca2+ influx and/or mobilization (voltage-sensitive Ca channels; receptor-operated channels). There is evidence to suggest that first messengers affect intracellular Ca2+, and therefore renin secretion, by affecting these efflux, influx, and mobilization pathways.

  7. Thyroid hormones and renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    Circulating angiotensin is produced by the action of renin from the kidneys on circulating angiotensinogen. There are other renin-angiotensin systems in various organs in the body, and recent observations raise the intriguing possibility that angiotensin II is produced by a totally intracellular pathway in the juxtaglomerular cells, the gonadotrops of the anterior pituitary, neurons, in the brain, salivary duct cells, and neuroblastoma cells. Circulating angiotensin II levels depend in large part on the plasma concentration of angiotensinogen, which is hormonally regulated, and on the rate of renin secretion. Renin secretion is regulated by an intrarenal baroreceptor mechanism, a macula densa mechanism, angiotensin II, vasopressin, and the sympathetic nervous system. The increase in renin secretion produced by sympathetic discharge is mediated for the most part by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the juxtaglomerular cells. Hyperthyroidism would be expected to be associated with increased renin secretion in view of the increased beta-adrenergic activity in this condition, and hypothyroidism would be associated with decreased plasma renin activity due to decreased beta-adrenergic activity. Our recent research on serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion that depend on the integrity of the dorsal raphe nucleus and the mediobasal hypothalamus has led us to investigate the effect of the pituitary on the renin response to p-chloroamphetamine. The response is potentiated immediately after hypophysectomy, but 22 days after the operation, it is abolished. This slowly developing decrease in responsiveness may be due to decreased thyroid function.

  8. N-acetylcysteine amide, a promising antidote for acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Khayyat, Ahdab; Tobwala, Shakila; Hart, Marcia; Ercal, Nuran

    2016-01-22

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over the counter antipyretic and analgesic medications. It is safe at therapeutic doses, but its overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity, a leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in the USA. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is one of the initiating steps in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity; therefore, one strategy for restricting organ damage is to restore GSH levels by using GSH prodrugs. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an acetaminophen overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and I.V. administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a novel antioxidant with higher bioavailability, and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that NACA is better than NAC at a low dose (106mg/kg) in preventing oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. NACA significantly increased GSH levels and the GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver to 66.5% and 60.5% of the control, respectively; and it reduced the level of ALT by 30%. However, at the dose used, NAC was not effective in combating the oxidative stress induced by APAP. Thus, NACA appears to be better than NAC in reducing the oxidative stress induced by APAP. It would be of great value in the health care field to develop drugs like NACA as more effective and safer options for the prevention and therapeutic intervention in APAP-induced toxicity. PMID:26602168

  9. N-acetylcysteine amide, a promising antidote for acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Khayyat, Ahdab; Tobwala, Shakila; Hart, Marcia; Ercal, Nuran

    2016-01-22

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over the counter antipyretic and analgesic medications. It is safe at therapeutic doses, but its overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity, a leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in the USA. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is one of the initiating steps in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity; therefore, one strategy for restricting organ damage is to restore GSH levels by using GSH prodrugs. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an acetaminophen overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and I.V. administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a novel antioxidant with higher bioavailability, and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that NACA is better than NAC at a low dose (106mg/kg) in preventing oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. NACA significantly increased GSH levels and the GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver to 66.5% and 60.5% of the control, respectively; and it reduced the level of ALT by 30%. However, at the dose used, NAC was not effective in combating the oxidative stress induced by APAP. Thus, NACA appears to be better than NAC in reducing the oxidative stress induced by APAP. It would be of great value in the health care field to develop drugs like NACA as more effective and safer options for the prevention and therapeutic intervention in APAP-induced toxicity.

  10. On family secrets and -K.

    PubMed

    Orgad, Yariv

    2014-08-01

    In this paper I present a novel interpretation of family secrets. Leaning on Bion's concept of -K, the constitution of secrecy is interpreted in terms of family dynamics that actively prevent knowledge formation and mental growth. Family secrets are interpreted as a destructive process that attacks the family's truth-generating-space - the shared semiotic space within which meanings are constituted through family relationships. The paper explores the microstructure interpersonal process of -K through the analysis of Mike Leigh's movie, Secrets and Lies. Two scenes in the movie are used to demonstrate how -K is worked out in the form of a specific intersubjective semiotic endeavor that unconsciously blocks the process of meaning-making. PMID:24902493

  11. On family secrets and -K.

    PubMed

    Orgad, Yariv

    2014-08-01

    In this paper I present a novel interpretation of family secrets. Leaning on Bion's concept of -K, the constitution of secrecy is interpreted in terms of family dynamics that actively prevent knowledge formation and mental growth. Family secrets are interpreted as a destructive process that attacks the family's truth-generating-space - the shared semiotic space within which meanings are constituted through family relationships. The paper explores the microstructure interpersonal process of -K through the analysis of Mike Leigh's movie, Secrets and Lies. Two scenes in the movie are used to demonstrate how -K is worked out in the form of a specific intersubjective semiotic endeavor that unconsciously blocks the process of meaning-making.

  12. Pb(II)-promoted amide cleavage: mechanistic comparison to a Zn(II) analogue.

    PubMed

    Elton, Eric S; Zhang, Tingting; Prabhakar, Rajeev; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2013-10-01

    Two new Pb(II) complexes of the amide-appended nitrogen/sulfur epppa (N-((2-ethylthio)ethyl)-N-((6-pivaloylamido-2-pyridyl)methyl)-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)amine) chelate ligand, [(epppa)Pb(NO3)2] (4-NO3) and [(epppa)Pb(ClO4)2] (4-ClO4), were prepared and characterized. In the solid state, 4-NO3 exhibits κ(5)-epppa chelate ligand coordination as well as the coordination of two bidentate nitrate ions. In acetonitrile, 4-NO3 is a 1:1 electrolyte with a coordinated NO3(-), whereas 4-ClO4 is a 1:2 electrolyte. Treatment of 4-ClO4 with 1 equiv Me4NOH·5H2O in CH3CN:CH3OH (3:5) results in amide methanolysis in a reaction that is akin to that previously reported for the Zn(II) analogue [(epppa)Zn](ClO4)2 (3-ClO4). (1)H NMR kinetic studies of the amide methanolysis reactions of 4-ClO4 and 3-ClO4 as a function of temperature revealed free energies of activation of 21.3 and 24.5 kcal/mol, respectively. The amide methanolysis reactions of 4-ClO4 and 3-ClO4 differ in terms of the effect of the concentration of methanol (saturation kinetics for 4-ClO4; second-order behavior for 3-ClO4), the observation of a small solvent kinetic isotope effect (SKIE) only for the reaction of the Zn(II)-containing 3-ClO4, and the properties of an initial intermediate isolated from each reaction upon treatment with Me4NOH·5H2O. These experimental results, combined with computational studies of the amide methanolysis reaction pathways of 4-ClO4 and 3-ClO4, indicate that the Zn(II)-containing 3-ClO4 initially undergoes amide deprotonation upon treatment with Me4NOH·5H2O. Subsequent amide protonation from coordinated methanol yields a structure containing a coordinated neutral amide and methoxide anion from which amide cleavage can then proceed. The rate-determining step in this pathway is either amide protonation or protonation of the leaving group. The Pb(II)-containing 4-ClO4 instead directly forms a neutral amide-containing, epppa-ligated Pb(II)-OH/Pb(II)-OCH3 equilibrium mixture upon treatment

  13. Cloning of a Novel Arylamidase Gene from Paracoccus sp. Strain FLN-7 That Hydrolyzes Amide Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Yin, Jin-Gang; Hang, Bao-Jian; Cai, Shu; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial isolate Paracoccus sp. strain FLN-7 hydrolyzes amide pesticides such as diflubenzuron, propanil, chlorpropham, and dimethoate through amide bond cleavage. A gene, ampA, encoding a novel arylamidase that catalyzes the amide bond cleavage in the amide pesticides was cloned from the strain. ampA contains a 1,395-bp open reading frame that encodes a 465-amino-acid protein. AmpA was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and homogenously purified using Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. AmpA is a homodimer with an isoelectric point of 5.4. AmpA displays maximum enzymatic activity at 40°C and a pH of between 7.5 and 8.0, and it is very stable at pHs ranging from 5.5 to 10.0 and at temperatures up to 50°C. AmpA efficiently hydrolyzes a variety of secondary amine compounds such as propanil, 4-acetaminophenol, propham, chlorpropham, dimethoate, and omethoate. The most suitable substrate is propanil, with Km and kcat values of 29.5 μM and 49.2 s−1, respectively. The benzoylurea insecticides (diflubenzuron and hexaflumuron) are also hydrolyzed but at low efficiencies. No cofactor is needed for the hydrolysis activity. AmpA shares low identities with reported arylamidases (less than 23%), forms a distinct lineage from closely related arylamidases in the phylogenetic tree, and has different biochemical characteristics and catalytic kinetics with related arylamidases. The results in the present study suggest that AmpA is a good candidate for the study of the mechanism for amide pesticide hydrolysis, genetic engineering of amide herbicide-resistant crops, and bioremediation of amide pesticide-contaminated environments. PMID:22544249

  14. Peptide backbone cleavage by α-amidation is enhanced at methionine residues.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Michael; Löbmann, Katja; Orywol, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Cleavage reactions at backbone loci are one of the consequences of oxidation of proteins and peptides. During α-amidation, the Cα -N bond in the backbone is cleaved under formation of an N-terminal peptide amide and a C-terminal keto acyl peptide. On the basis of earlier works, a facilitation of α-amidation by the thioether group of adjacent methionine side chains was proposed. This reaction was characterized by using benzoyl methionine and benzoyl alanyl methionine as peptide models. The decomposition of benzoylated amino acids (benzoyl-methionine, benzoyl-alanine, and benzoyl-methionine sulfoxide) to benzamide in the presence of different carbohydrate compounds (reducing sugars, Amadori products, and reductones) was studied during incubation for up to 48 h at 80 °C in acetate-buffered solution (pH 6.0). Small amounts of benzamide (0.3-1.5 mol%) were formed in the presence of all sugars and from all benzoylated species. However, benzamide formation was strongly enhanced, when benzoyl methionine was incubated in the presence of reductones and Amadori compounds (3.5-4.2 mol%). The reaction was found to be intramolecular, because α-amidation of a similar 4-methylbenzoylated amino acid was not enhanced in the presence of benzoyl-methionine and carbohydrate compounds. In the peptide benzoyl-alanyl-methionine, α-amidation at the methionine residue is preferred over α-amidation at the benzoyl peptide bond. We propose here a mechanism for the enhancement of α-amidation at methionine residues.

  15. Secrets and Disclosures: How Young Children Handle Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anagnostaki, Lida; Wright, Michael J.; Papathanasiou, Athanasia

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the influence of content and verbal cues on young children's understanding of secret information and of its disclosure. Participants were 209 5- and 6-year-old children in an experiment where a puppet, named Zinc, was the protagonist. Children were asked to whom Zinc would disclose a list of pieces of information, some of…

  16. Determination of Structures and Energetics of Small- and Medium-Sized One-Carbon-Bridged Twisted Amides using ab Initio Molecular Orbital Methods: Implications for Amidic Resonance along the C-N Rotational Pathway.

    PubMed

    Szostak, Roman; Aubé, Jeffrey; Szostak, Michal

    2015-08-21

    Twisted amides containing nitrogen at the bridgehead position are attractive practical prototypes for the investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nonplanar amide linkages. Changes that occur during rotation around the N-C(O) axis in one-carbon-bridged twisted amides have been studied using ab initio molecular orbital methods. Calculations at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level performed on a set of one-carbon-bridged lactams, including 20 distinct scaffolds ranging from [2.2.1] to [6.3.1] ring systems, with the C═O bond on the shortest bridge indicate significant variations in structures, resonance energies, proton affinities, core ionization energies, frontier molecular orbitals, atomic charges, and infrared frequencies that reflect structural changes corresponding to the extent of resonance stabilization during rotation along the N-C(O) axis. The results are discussed in the context of resonance theory and activation of amides toward N-protonation (N-activation) by distortion. This study demonstrates that one-carbon-bridged lactams-a class of readily available, hydrolytically robust twisted amides-are ideally suited to span the whole spectrum of the amide bond distortion energy surface. Notably, this study provides a blueprint for the rational design and application of nonplanar amides in organic synthesis. The presented findings strongly support the classical amide bond resonance model in predicting the properties of nonplanar amides.

  17. Synthesis of Biaryls through Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling of Amides by Carbon-Nitrogen Bond Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shicheng; Meng, Guangrong; Szostak, Michal

    2016-06-01

    The first Ni-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides for the synthesis of widely occurring biaryl compounds through N-C amide bond activation is reported. The reaction tolerates a wide range of electron-withdrawing, electron-neutral, and electron-donating substituents on both coupling partners. The reaction constitutes the first example of the Ni-catalyzed generation of aryl electrophiles from bench-stable amides with potential applications for a broad range of organometallic reactions. PMID:27101428

  18. 24 CFR 7.36 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... unless the MSPB has dismissed the mixed case complaint or appeal for jurisdictional reasons. (See 29 CFR... § 7.35(c) and 29 CFR 1614.108(f) or at any time after 180 days have elapsed from the filing of the... Administrative Judges may dismiss complaints pursuant to 29 CFR 1614.107, on their own initiative, after...

  19. 24 CFR 7.36 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... unless the MSPB has dismissed the mixed case complaint or appeal for jurisdictional reasons. (See 29 CFR... § 7.35(c) and 29 CFR 1614.108(f) or at any time after 180 days have elapsed from the filing of the... Administrative Judges may dismiss complaints pursuant to 29 CFR 1614.107, on their own initiative, after...

  20. 24 CFR 7.36 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... unless the MSPB has dismissed the mixed case complaint or appeal for jurisdictional reasons. (See 29 CFR... § 7.35(c) and 29 CFR 1614.108(f) or at any time after 180 days have elapsed from the filing of the... Administrative Judges may dismiss complaints pursuant to 29 CFR 1614.107, on their own initiative, after...

  1. 24 CFR 7.36 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... unless the MSPB has dismissed the mixed case complaint or appeal for jurisdictional reasons. (See 29 CFR... § 7.35(c) and 29 CFR 1614.108(f) or at any time after 180 days have elapsed from the filing of the... Administrative Judges may dismiss complaints pursuant to 29 CFR 1614.107, on their own initiative, after...

  2. 24 CFR 7.36 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... unless the MSPB has dismissed the mixed case complaint or appeal for jurisdictional reasons. (See 29 CFR... § 7.35(c) and 29 CFR 1614.108(f) or at any time after 180 days have elapsed from the filing of the... Administrative Judges may dismiss complaints pursuant to 29 CFR 1614.107, on their own initiative, after...

  3. Sterically-controlled intermolecular Friedel-Crafts acylation with twisted amides via selective N-C cleavage under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmei; Meng, Guangrong; Liu, Ruzhang; Szostak, Michal

    2016-05-21

    Highly chemoselective Friedel-Crafts acylation with twisted amides under mild conditions is reported for the first time. The reaction shows high functional group tolerance, obviating the need for preformed sensitive organometallic reagents and expensive transition metal catalysts. The high reactivity of amides is switched on by ground-state steric distortion to disrupt the amide bond nN→πCO* resonance as a critical design feature. Conceptually, this new acid-promoted mechanism of twisted amides provides direct access to bench-stable acylating reagents under mild, metal-free conditions. PMID:27139813

  4. The Year of Secret Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Jaclyn

    2004-01-01

    The path to "novelist" was a convoluted one for Moriarty, who began writing fiction as doctoral student at Cambridge University. Her interest in young adults stems from an appreciation for the "troubles, strengths, and surprises of that age group." Now, in a uniquely formatted book titled "The Year of Secret Assignments," we peek inside the mind…

  5. Oligonuclear ferrocene amides: mixed-valent peptides and potential redox-switchable foldamers.

    PubMed

    Siebler, Daniel; Linseis, Michael; Gasi, Teuta; Carrella, Luca M; Winter, Rainer F; Förster, Christoph; Heinze, Katja

    2011-04-11

    Trinuclear ferrocene tris-amides were synthesized from an Fmoc- or Boc-protected ferrocene amino acid, and hydrogen-bonded zigzag conformations were determined by NMR spectroscopy, molecular modelling, and X-ray diffraction. In these ordered secondary structures orientation of the individual amide dipole moments approximately in the same direction results in a macrodipole moment similar to that of α-helices composed of α-amino acids. Unlike ordinary α-amino acids, the building blocks in these ferrocene amides with defined secondary structure can be sequentially oxidized to mono-, di-, and trications. Singly and doubly charged mixed-valent cations were probed experimentally by Vis/NIR, paramagnetic ¹H NMR and Mössbauer spectroscopy and investigated theoretically by DFT calculations. According to the appearance of intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) bands in solution, the ferrocene/ferrocenium amides are described as Robin-Day class II mixed-valent systems. Mössbauer spectroscopy indicates trapped valences in the solid state. The secondary structure of trinuclear ferrocene tris-amides remains intact (coiled form) upon oxidation to mono- and dications according to DFT calculations, while oxidation to the trication should break the intramolecular hydrogen bonding and unfold the ferrocene peptide (uncoiled form).

  6. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L; Luongo, Carl A; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-10-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  7. Condensation Reactions and Formation of Amides, Esters, and Nitriles Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2004-06-01

    Hydrothermal pyrolysis experiments were performed to assess condensation (dehydration) reactions to amide, ester, and nitrile functionalities from lipid precursors. Beside product formation, organic compound alteration and stability were also evaluated. Mixtures of nonadecanoic acid, hexadecanedioic acid, or hexadecanamide with water, ammonium bicarbonate, and oxalic acid were heated at 300°C for 72 h. In addition, mixtures of ammonium bicarbonate and oxalic acid solutions were used to test the abiotic formation of organic nitrogen compounds at the same temperature. The resulting products were condensation compounds such as amides, nitriles, and minor quantities of N-methylalkyl amides, alkanols, and esters. Mixtures of alkyl amide in water or oxalic acid yielded mainly hydrolysis and dehydration products, and with ammonium bicarbonate and oxalic acid the yield of condensation products was enhanced. The synthesis experiments with oxalic acid and ammonium bicarbonate solutions yielded homologous series of alkyl amides, alkyl amines, alkanes, and alkanoic acids, all with no carbon number predominances. These organic nitrogen compounds are stable and survive under the elevated temperatures of hydrothermal fluids.

  8. A comparative study of the complexation of uranium(VI) withoxydiacetic acid and its amide derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin

    2005-05-01

    There has been significant interest in recent years in the studies of alkyl-substituted amides as extractants for actinide separation because the products of radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation of amides are less detrimental to separation processes than those of organophosphorus compounds traditionally used in actinide separations. Stripping of actinides from the amide-containing organic solvents is relatively easy. In addition, the amide ligands are completely incinerable so that the amount of secondary wastes generated in nuclear waste treatment could be significantly reduced. One group of alkyl-substituted oxa-diamides have been shown to be promising in the separation of actinides from nuclear wastes. For example, tetraoctyl-3-oxa-glutaramide and tetraisobutyl-oxa-glutaramide form actinide complexes that can be effectively extracted from nitric acid solutions. To understand the thermodynamic principles governing the complexation of actinides with oxa-diamides, we have studied the complexation of U(VI) with dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid (DMOGA) and tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TMOGA) in aqueous solutions, in comparison with oxydiacetic acid (ODA) (Figure 1). Previous studies have indicated that the complexation of U(VI) with ODA is strong and entropy-driven. Comparing the results for DMOGA and TMOGA with those for ODA could provide insight into the energetics of amide complexation with U(VI) and the relationship between the thermodynamic properties and the ligand structure.

  9. Enhancing ionic conductivity in lithium amide for improved energy storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rosalind A.; Hewett, David R.; Anderson, Paul A.

    2015-03-01

    Non-stoichiometry and bulk cation transport have been identified as key factors in the release and uptake of hydrogen in the Li-N-H system. Amide halide phases have been synthesized that have ionic conductivities several orders of magnitude greater than lithium amide, a faster rate of hydrogen release and elimination of the by-product, ammonia. Here we report the effect of both anion- and cation-doping on the hydrogen desorption properties of lithium amide, focusing in particular on how the presence of chloride anions and magnesium cations affects and controls the structure of the amide and imide compounds at the sub-nanometre level. Reducing the chloride content resulted in new low-chloride rhombohedral phases that contain around half of the chloride present in earlier amide chlorides, but maintained the enhancements seen in hydrogen desorption properties when compared to the halide-free system. These materials may also have potential in a range of other energy applications such as all solid state lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, and CO2 capture and storage membranes. Invited talk at the 7th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2014, 2-6 November 2014, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  10. The amide protonation of (-)-N-benzoylcytisine in its perchlorate salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybył, Anna K.; Kubicki, Maciej; Hoffmann, Marcin

    2014-08-01

    The 13C NMR spectrum of (-)-N-benzoylcytisine perchlorate does not show a double set of signals typical of amide compounds, although this effect has been observed for the other diamine derivatives of cytisine. This observation means that in solution there must be the state of equilibrium between two forms of the cation with the protonated amide groups. DFT calculations have indeed indicated two preferred tautomeric forms with protonated oxygen atoms of amide groups. In the solid state however, according to X-ray analysis of perchlorate and perchlorate hydrate of N-benzoylcytisine the oxygen atom of the amide group in the six-membered ring A is preferred protonation site as compared with the oxygen in benzoic moiety. (-)-N-benzoylcytisine salt is the first compound from among the known derivatives of quinolizidine alkaloids that are not N-oxides, in which in solid state only the oxygen atom at cyclic amide is protonated instead of nitrogen atom or oxygen in benzoic moiety.

  11. Chain-length and mode-delocalization dependent amide-I anharmonicity in peptide oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Wang, Jianping

    2012-06-01

    The diagonal anharmonicities of the amide-I mode in the alanine oligomers are examined in the normal-mode basis by ab initio calculations. The selected oligomers range from dimer to heptamer, in either the α-helical or β-sheet conformations. It is found that the anharmonicity varies from mode to mode within the same oligomer. For a given amide-I mode, the anharmonicity is closely related to the delocalization extent of the mode: the less it delocalizes, the larger the anharmonicity it has. Thus, the single-mode potential energy distribution (PEDmax) can be used as an indicator of the magnitude of the anharmonicity. It is found that as the peptide chain length increases, the averaged diagonal anharmonicity generally decreases; however, the sum of the averaged diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicities within a peptide roughly remains a constant for all the oligomers examined, indicating the excitonic characteristics of the amide-I modes. Excitonic coupling tends to decrease the diagonal anharmonicities in a coupled system with multiple chromophores, which explains the observed behavior of the anharmonicities. The excitonic nature of the amide-I band in peptide oligomers is thus verified by the anharmonic computations. Isotopic substitution effect on the anharmonicities and mode localizations of the amide-I modes in peptides is also discussed.

  12. Optimization of Aryl Amides that Extend Survival in Prion-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Giles, Kurt; Berry, David B; Condello, Carlo; Dugger, Brittany N; Li, Zhe; Oehler, Abby; Bhardwaj, Sumita; Elepano, Manuel; Guan, Shenheng; Silber, B Michael; Olson, Steven H; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2016-09-01

    Developing therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) prevalent in the aging population remains a daunting challenge. With the growing understanding that many NDs progress by conformational self-templating of specific proteins, the prototypical prion diseases offer a platform for ND drug discovery. We evaluated high-throughput screening hits with the aryl amide scaffold and explored the structure-activity relationships around three series differing in their N-aryl core: benzoxazole, benzothiazole, and cyano. Potent anti-prion compounds were advanced to pharmacokinetic studies, and the resulting brain-penetrant leads from each series, together with a related N-aryl piperazine lead, were escalated to long-term dosing and efficacy studies. Compounds from each of the four series doubled the survival of mice infected with a mouse-passaged prion strain. Treatment with aryl amides altered prion strain properties, as evidenced by the distinct patterns of neuropathological deposition of prion protein and associated astrocytic gliosis in the brain; however, none of the aryl amide compounds resulted in drug-resistant prion strains, in contrast to previous studies on compounds with the 2-aminothiazole (2-AMT) scaffold. As seen with 2-AMTs and other effective anti-prion compounds reported to date, the novel aryl amides reported here were ineffective in prolonging the survival of transgenic mice infected with human prions. Most encouraging is our discovery that aryl amides show that the development of drug resistance is not an inevitable consequence of efficacious anti-prion therapeutics. PMID:27317802

  13. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L.; Luongo, Carl A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-06-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  14. Electrostatic frequency shifts in amide I vibrational spectra: Direct parameterization against experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-04-01

    The interpretation of protein amide I infrared spectra has been greatly assisted by the observation that the vibrational frequency of a peptide unit reports on its local electrostatic environment. However, the interpretation of spectra remains largely qualitative due to a lack of direct quantitative connections between computational models and experimental data. Here, we present an empirical parameterization of an electrostatic amide I frequency map derived from the infrared absorption spectra of 28 dipeptides. The observed frequency shifts are analyzed in terms of the local electrostatic potential, field, and field gradient, evaluated at sites near the amide bond in molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the frequency shifts observed in experiment correlate very well with the electric field in the direction of the C=O bond evaluated at the position of the amide oxygen atom. A linear best-fit mapping between observed frequencies and electric field yield sample standard deviations of 2.8 and 3.7 cm-1 for the CHARMM27 and OPLS-AA force fields, respectively, and maximum deviations (within our data set) of 9 cm-1. These results are discussed in the broader context of amide I vibrational models and the effort to produce quantitative agreement between simulated and experimental absorption spectra.

  15. Quinolone Amides as Antitrypanosomal Lead Compounds with In Vivo Activity.

    PubMed

    Hiltensperger, Georg; Hecht, Nina; Kaiser, Marcel; Rybak, Jens-Christoph; Hoerst, Alexander; Dannenbauer, Nicole; Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus; Bruhn, Heike; Esch, Harald; Lehmann, Leane; Meinel, Lorenz; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2016-08-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a major tropical disease for which few drugs for treatment are available, driving the need for novel active compounds. Recently, morpholino-substituted benzyl amides of the fluoroquinolone-type antibiotics were identified to be compounds highly active against Trypanosoma brucei brucei Since the lead compound GHQ168 was challenged by poor water solubility in previous trials, the aim of this study was to introduce structural variations to GHQ168 as well as to formulate GHQ168 with the ultimate goal to increase its aqueous solubility while maintaining its in vitro antitrypanosomal activity. The pharmacokinetic parameters of spray-dried GHQ168 and the newly synthesized compounds GHQ242 and GHQ243 in mice were characterized by elimination half-lives ranging from 1.5 to 3.5 h after intraperitoneal administration (4 mice/compound), moderate to strong human serum albumin binding for GHQ168 (80%) and GHQ243 (45%), and very high human serum albumin binding (>99%) for GHQ242. For the lead compound, GHQ168, the apparent clearance was 112 ml/h and the apparent volume of distribution was 14 liters/kg of body weight (BW). Mice infected with T. b. rhodesiense (STIB900) were treated in a stringent study scheme (2 daily applications between days 3 and 6 postinfection). Exposure to spray-dried GHQ168 in contrast to the control treatment resulted in mean survival durations of 17 versus 9 days, respectively, a difference that was statistically significant. Results that were statistically insignificantly different were obtained between the control and the GHQ242 and GHQ243 treatments. Therefore, GHQ168 was further profiled in an early-treatment scheme (2 daily applications at days 1 to 4 postinfection), and the results were compared with those obtained with a control treatment. The result was statistically significant mean survival times exceeding 32 days (end of the observation period) versus 7 days for the GHQ168 and control treatments

  16. Lanthanide(III) complexation with an amide derived pyridinophane.

    PubMed

    Castro, Goretti; Bastida, Rufina; Macías, Alejandro; Pérez-Lourido, Paulo; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Valencia, Laura

    2015-02-16

    Herein we report a detailed investigation of the solid state and solution structures of lanthanide(III) complexes with the 18-membered pyridinophane ligand containing acetamide pendant arms TPPTAM (TPPTAM = 2,2',2″-(3,7,11-triaza-1,5,9(2,6)-tripyridinacyclododecaphane-3,7,11-triyl)triacetamide). The ligand crystallizes in the form of a clathrated hydrate, where the clathrated water molecule establishes hydrogen-bonding interactions with the amide NH groups and two N atoms of the macrocycle. The X-ray structures of 13 different Ln(3+) complexes obtained as the nitrate salts (Ln(3+) = La(3+)-Yb(3+), except Pm(3+)) have been determined. Additionally, the X-ray structure of the La(3+) complex obtained as the triflate salt was also obtained. In all cases the ligand provides 9-fold coordination to the Ln(3+) ion, ten coordination being completed by an oxygen atom of a coordinated water molecule or a nitrate or triflate anion. The bond distances of the metal coordination environment show a quadratic change along the lanthanide series, as expected for isostructural series of Ln(3+) complexes. Luminescence lifetime measurements obtained from solutions of the Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) complexes in H2O and D2O point to the presence of a water molecule coordinated to the metal ion in aqueous solutions. The analysis of the Ln(3+)-induced paramagnetic shifts indicates that the complexes are ten-coordinated throughout the lanthanide series from Ce(3+) to Yb(3+), and that the solution structure is very similar to the structures observed in the solid state. The complexes of the light Ln(3+) ions are fluxional due to a fast Δ(λλλλλλ) ↔ Λ(δδδδδδ) interconversion that involves the inversion of the macrocyclic ligand and the rotation of the acetamide pendant arms. The complexes of the small Ln(3+) ions are considerably more rigid, the activation free energy determined from VT (1)H NMR for the Lu(3+) complex being ΔG(⧧)298 = 72.4 ± 5.1 kJ mol(-1).

  17. Wnt Secretion and Gradient Formation

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Gonzalo P.; Lüchtenborg, Anne-Marie; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2013-01-01

    Concentration gradients formed by the lipid-modified morphogens of the Wnt family are known for their pivotal roles during embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Wnt morphogens are also implicated in a variety of human diseases, especially cancer. Therefore, the signaling cascades triggered by Wnts have received considerable attention during recent decades. However, how Wnts are secreted and how concentration gradients are formed remains poorly understood. The use of model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster has provided important advances in this area. For instance, we have previously shown that the lipid raft-associated reggie/flotillin proteins influence Wnt secretion and spreading in Drosophila. Our work supports the notion that producing cells secrete Wnt molecules in at least two pools: a poorly diffusible one and a reggie/flotillin-dependent highly diffusible pool which allows morphogen spreading over long distances away from its source of production. Here we revise the current views of Wnt secretion and spreading, and propose two models for the role of the reggie/flotillin proteins in these processes: (i) reggies/flotillins regulate the basolateral endocytosis of the poorly diffusible, membrane-bound Wnt pool, which is then sorted and secreted to apical compartments for long-range diffusion, and (ii) lipid rafts organized by reggies/flotillins serve as “dating points” where extracellular Wnt transiently interacts with lipoprotein receptors to allow its capture and further spreading via lipoprotein particles. We further discuss these processes in the context of human breast cancer. A better understanding of these phenomena may be relevant for identification of novel drug targets and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23455472

  18. Lipolanthionine peptides act as inhibitors of TLR2-mediated IL-8 secretion. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Seyberth, Tobias; Voss, Söhnke; Brock, Roland; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Jung, Günther

    2006-03-01

    Lipoproteins from gram-positive and -negative bacteria, mycoplasma, and shorter synthetic lipopeptide analogues activate cells of the innate immune system via the Toll-like receptor TLR2/TLR1 or TLR2/TLR6 heterodimers. For this reason, these compounds constitute highly active adjuvants for vaccines either admixed or covalently linked. The lanthionine scaffold has structural similarity with the S-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)cysteine core structure of the lipopeptides. Therefore, lanthionine-based lipopeptide amides were synthesized and probed for activity as potential TLR2 agonists or antagonists. A collection of analytically defined lipolanthionine peptide amides exhibited an inhibitory effect of the TLR2-mediated IL-8 secretion when applied in high molar excess to the agonistic synthetic lipopeptide Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4-OH. Structure-activity relationships revealed the influence of the chirality of the two alpha-carbon atoms, the chain lengths of the attached fatty acids and fatty amines, and the oxidation level of the sulfur atom on the inhibitory activity of the lipolanthionine peptide amides. PMID:16509590

  19. Tamper-proof secret image-sharing scheme for identifying cheated secret keys and shared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Liu, Chong-An

    2013-01-01

    A (t,n) secret image-sharing scheme shares a secret image to n participants, and the t users recover the image. During the recovery procedure of a conventional secret image-sharing scheme, cheaters may use counterfeit secret keys or modified shared images to cheat other users' secret keys and shared images. A cheated secret key or shared image leads to an incorrect secret image. Unfortunately, the cheater cannot be identified. We present an exponent and modulus-based scheme to provide a tamper-proof secret image-sharing scheme for identifying cheaters on secret keys or shared images. The proposed scheme allows users to securely select their secret key. This assignment can be performed over networks. Modulus results of each shared image is calculated to recognize cheaters of a shared image. Experimental results indicate that the proposed scheme is excellent at identifying cheated secret keys and shared images.

  20. N-glycosides of amino acid amides from Hemerocallis fulva var. sempervirens.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yuko; Konishi, Tenji

    2009-10-01

    As part of our search for sedative substances from natural sources, we isolated two novel amino acid amides connected with the fructopyranose, kwansonine A (1) and kwansonine B (2), together with three known amino acid amides, longitubanine A (3), longitubanine B (4), and pinnatanine (5), from Hemerocallis fulva L. var. sempervirens (ARAKI) M. HOTTA. The structures of 1 and 2 have been determined on the spectroscopic evidences as N(2)-(1-beta-D-fructopyranosyl)-N(5)-(2',5'-dihydro-2'-furyl-3'-hydroxymethyl)-gamma-hydroxyglutamine and N(2)-(1-beta-D-fructopyranosyl)-N(5)-(2-hydroxymethylbutadienyl)-gamma-hydroxyglutamine. This is the first report on the isolation of amino acid amide N-furctoside from Hemerocallis genus plant. PMID:19801868

  1. One-Pot Amide Bond Formation from Aldehydes and Amines via a Photoorganocatalytic Activation of Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Giorgos N; Kokotos, Christoforos G

    2016-08-19

    A mild, one-pot, and environmentally friendly synthesis of amides from aldehydes and amines is described. Initially, a photoorganocatalytic reaction of aldehydes with di-isopropyl azodicarboxylate leads to an intermediate carbonyl imide, which can react with a variety of amines to afford the desired amides. The initial visible light-mediated activation of a variety of monosubstituted or disubstituted aldehydes is usually fast, occurring in a few hours. Following the photocatalytic reaction, addition of the primary amine at room temperature or the secondary amine at elevated temperatures leads to the corresponding amide from moderate to excellent yields without epimerization. This methodology was applied in the synthesis of Moclobemide, a drug against depression and social anxiety. PMID:27227271

  2. Design, synthesis, and fungicidal activities of imino diacid analogs of valine amide fungicides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Man; Yang, Hui-Hui; Tian, Lei; Li, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Wei-Guang

    2015-12-15

    The novel imino diacid analogs of valine amides were synthesized via several steps, including the protection, amidation, deprotection, and amino alkylation of valine, with the resulting structures confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR and HRMS. Bioassays showed that some of these compounds exhibited good fungicidal activity. Notably, isopropyl 2-((1-((1-(3-fluorophenyl)ethyl)amino)-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)amino)propanoate 5i displayed significant levels of control, at 50%, against Erysiphe graminis at 3.9μM as well as a level of potency very similar to the reference azoxystrobin, which gave 60% activity at this concentration. The present work demonstrates that imino diacid analogs of valine amides could be potentially useful key compounds for the development of novel fungicides against wheat powdery mildew.

  3. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of fatty acid amide (erucamide) using fatty acid and urea.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Neeraj Praphulla; Singh, R P

    2007-01-01

    Ammonolysis of fatty acids to the corresponding fatty acid amides is efficiently catalysed by Candida antartica lipase (Novozym 435). In the present paper lipase-catalysed synthesis of erucamide by ammonolysis of erucic acid and urea in organic solvent medium was studied and optimal conditions for fatty amides synthesis were established. In this process erucic acid gave 88.74 % pure erucamide after 48 hour and 250 rpm at 60 degrees C with 1:4 molar ratio of erucic acid and urea, the organic solvent media is 50 ml tert-butyl alcohol (2-methyl-2-propanol). This process for synthesis is economical as we used urea in place of ammonia or other amidation reactant at atmospheric pressure. The amount of catalyst used is 3 %.

  4. Catalytic asymmetric direct-type 1,4-addition reactions of simple amides.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirotsugu; Sato, Io; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-04-01

    The development of catalytic asymmetric direct-type reactions of less acidic carbonyl compounds such as amides and esters has been a challenging theme in organic chemistry for decades. Here we describe the asymmetric direct 1,4-addition reactions of simple amides with α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds using a catalytic amount of a novel chiral catalyst consisting of a potassium base and a macrocyclic chiral crown ether. The desired 1,5-dicarbonyl compounds were obtained in high yields with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities. This is the first example of a highly enantioselective catalytic direct-type reaction of simple amides. In addition, the structure of the chiral potassium catalyst has been investigated by X-ray crystallographic, dynamic (1)H NMR, and MALDI-TOF MS analyses.

  5. Metal-Free C–H Alkyliminylation and Acylation of Alkenes with Secondary Amides

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pei-Qiang; Huang, Ying-Hong; Geng, Hui; Ye, Jian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Carbon–carbon bond formation by metal-free cross-coupling of two reactants with low reactivity represents a challenge in organic synthesis. Secondary amides and alkenes are two classes of bench-stable compounds. The low electrophilicity of the former and low nucleophilicity of the latter make the direct coupling of these two partners challenging yet highly desirable. We report herein an unprecedented intermolecular reaction of secondary amides with alkenes to afford α,β-unsaturated ketimines or enones, which are versatile intermediates for organic synthesis and are prevalent in bioactive compounds and functional materials. Our strategy relies on the chemoselective activation of the secondary amide with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride (Tf2O)/2-fluoropyridine to generate a highly reactive nitrilium intermediate, which reacts efficiently with alkenes. This metal-free synthesis is characterized by its mild reaction conditions, excellent functional group tolerance and chemoselectivity, allowing the preparation of multi-functionalized compounds without using protecting groups. PMID:27356173

  6. Solvent and conformation dependence of amide I vibrations in peptides and proteins containing proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Santanu; Lessing, Joshua; Meisl, Georg; Ganim, Ziad; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2011-12-01

    We present a mixed quantum-classical model for studying the amide I vibrational dynamics (predominantly CO stretching) in peptides and proteins containing proline. There are existing models developed for determining frequencies of and couplings between the secondary amide units. However, these are not applicable to proline because this amino acid has a tertiary amide unit. Therefore, a new parametrization is required for infrared-spectroscopic studies of proteins that contain proline, such as collagen, the most abundant protein in humans and animals. Here, we construct the electrostatic and dihedral maps accounting for solvent and conformation effects on frequency and coupling for the proline unit. We examine the quality and the applicability of these maps by carrying out spectral simulations of a number of peptides with proline in D2O and compare with experimental observations.

  7. Metal-Free C-H Alkyliminylation and Acylation of Alkenes with Secondary Amides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Qiang; Huang, Ying-Hong; Geng, Hui; Ye, Jian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond formation by metal-free cross-coupling of two reactants with low reactivity represents a challenge in organic synthesis. Secondary amides and alkenes are two classes of bench-stable compounds. The low electrophilicity of the former and low nucleophilicity of the latter make the direct coupling of these two partners challenging yet highly desirable. We report herein an unprecedented intermolecular reaction of secondary amides with alkenes to afford α,β-unsaturated ketimines or enones, which are versatile intermediates for organic synthesis and are prevalent in bioactive compounds and functional materials. Our strategy relies on the chemoselective activation of the secondary amide with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride (Tf2O)/2-fluoropyridine to generate a highly reactive nitrilium intermediate, which reacts efficiently with alkenes. This metal-free synthesis is characterized by its mild reaction conditions, excellent functional group tolerance and chemoselectivity, allowing the preparation of multi-functionalized compounds without using protecting groups. PMID:27356173

  8. Assessing Spectral Simulation Protocols for the Amide I Band of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Ana V; Bondarenko, Anna S; Jansen, Thomas L C

    2016-08-01

    We present a benchmark study of spectral simulation protocols for the amide I band of proteins. The amide I band is widely used in infrared spectroscopy of proteins due to the large signal intensity, high sensitivity to hydrogen bonding, and secondary structural motifs. This band has, thus, proven valuable in many studies of protein structure-function relationships. We benchmark spectral simulation protocols using two common force fields in combination with several electrostatic mappings and coupling models. The results are validated against experimental linear absorption and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy for three well-studied proteins. We find two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to be much more sensitive to the simulation protocol than linear absorption and report on the best simulation protocols. The findings demonstrate that there is still room for ideas to improve the existing models for the amide I band of proteins. PMID:27348022

  9. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of fatty acid amide (erucamide) using fatty acid and urea.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Neeraj Praphulla; Singh, R P

    2007-01-01

    Ammonolysis of fatty acids to the corresponding fatty acid amides is efficiently catalysed by Candida antartica lipase (Novozym 435). In the present paper lipase-catalysed synthesis of erucamide by ammonolysis of erucic acid and urea in organic solvent medium was studied and optimal conditions for fatty amides synthesis were established. In this process erucic acid gave 88.74 % pure erucamide after 48 hour and 250 rpm at 60 degrees C with 1:4 molar ratio of erucic acid and urea, the organic solvent media is 50 ml tert-butyl alcohol (2-methyl-2-propanol). This process for synthesis is economical as we used urea in place of ammonia or other amidation reactant at atmospheric pressure. The amount of catalyst used is 3 %. PMID:17898456

  10. Synthesis and characterization of ester and amide derivatives of titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melánová, Klára; Beneš, Ludvík; Trchová, Miroslava; Svoboda, Jan; Zima, Vítězslav

    2013-06-01

    A set of layered ester and amide derivatives of titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate was prepared by solvothermal treatment of amorphous titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate with corresponding 1-alkanols, 1,ω-alkanediols, 1-aminoalkanes, 1,ω-diaminoalkanes and 1,ω-amino alcohols and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Whereas alkyl chains with one functional group form bilayers tilted to the layers, 1,ω-diaminoalkanes and most of 1,ω-alkanediols form bridges connecting the adjacent layers. In the case of amino alcohols, the alkyl chains form bilayer and either hydroxyl or amino group is used for bonding. This simple method for the synthesis of ester and amide derivatives does not require preparation of acid chloride derivative as a precursor or pre-intercalation with alkylamines and can be used also for the preparation of ester and amide derivatives of titanium carboxyethylphosphonate and zirconium carboxymethylphosphonate.

  11. Choline Chloride Catalyzed Amidation of Fatty Acid Ester to Monoethanolamide: A Green Approach.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pramod; Pratap, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Choline chloride catalyzed efficient method for amidation of fatty acid methyl ester to monoethanolamide respectively. This is a solvent free, ecofriendly, 100% chemo selective and economically viable path for alkanolamide synthesis. The Kinetics of amidation of methyl ester were studied and found to be first order with respect to the concentration of ethanolamine. The activation energy (Ea) for the amidation of lauric acid methyl ester catalyzed by choline chloride was found to be 50.20 KJ mol(-1). The 98% conversion of lauric acid monoethanolamide was obtained at 110°C in 1 h with 6% weight of catalyst and 1:1.5 molar ratio of methyl ester to ethanolamine under nitrogen atmosphere. PMID:26666271

  12. Mucins in cat airway secretions.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J R; Gallagher, J T; Richardson, P S; Sheehan, J K; Carlstedt, I

    1991-01-01

    Mucous secretions were obtained from cat tracheas that had received [3H]glucose and [35S]sulphate to radiolabel mucus glycoproteins biosynthetically. Samples were collected under resting ('basal') conditions as well as after pilocarpine stimulation and were separated into gel and sol phases by centrifugation. Macromolecules were partially purified by using gel chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B, and the species that were eluted with the void volume were then separated into two major populations with isopycnic density-gradient centrifugation in CsCl. The major component from the gel phase of pilocarpine-induced secretions had a buoyant density typical of mucins and was observed as linear and apparently flexible chains by electron microscopy. Reduction of disulphide bonds gave subunits that could be further cleaved by trypsin digestion into components of approximately the same size as the high-Mr glycopeptides obtained from other mucins after this treatment. In contrast, the dominant species in the gel phase of the 'basal' secretion had a significantly higher buoyant density than expected for mucins and was largely unaffected by reduction, as studied by gel chromatography. The macromolecules were fragmented by trypsin, suggesting that they contain a polypeptide backbone. This more dense component also predominated in the sol phase both from the 'basal' secretions and from the pilocarpine-released secretions. Digestion with DNAase, chondroitin ABC lyase or heparan sulphate lyase had no effect, which shows that this component is not DNA, a dermatan sulphate/chondroitin sulphate or a heparan sulphate proteoglycan. In contrast, endo-beta-galactosidase and keratanase caused some fragmentation, suggesting that the molecules contain some linkages of the poly-(N-acetyl-lactosamine) type, although the degradation was not as extensive as expected for keratan sulphate. Treatment with alkaline borohydride resulted in extensive fragmentation of the high-Mr glycopeptides from both

  13. Beta-diketiminato calcium and magnesium amides; model complexes for hydroamination catalysis.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Anthony G M; Casely, Ian J; Crimmin, Mark R; Hill, Michael S; Lachs, Jennifer R; Mahon, Mary F; Procopiou, Panayiotis A

    2009-05-18

    In a study relevant to group 2-mediated hydroamination catalysis, the reaction of the beta-diketiminato magnesium alkyl complex [{ArNC(Me)CHC(Me)NAr}Mg((n/s)Bu)] (Ar = 2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3)) with benzylamine, 2-methoxyethylamine, pyrrolidine, and 2-methyl-4,4-diphenylpyrrolidine has been shown to yield the corresponding magnesium amide complexes [{ArNC(Me)CHC(Me)NAr}Mg(NR(1)R(2))] (R(1) = H, R(2) = CH(2)Ph, CH(2)CH(2)OMe; R(1) = R(2) = -(CH(2))(4)-, -CH(Me)CH(2)CPh(2)CH(2)-) within the first point of analysis (30 min) at room temperature in near quantitative yield as monitored by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Reactions proceeded non-reversibly, and the products have been characterized in both solution and the solid state. While single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that the magnesium amides are dimeric in the solid state, with aggregation occurring via mu(2)-coordinated amide ligands, NMR studies suggest that for more sterically crowded amide ligands discreet monomeric species exist in solution. In contrast, the calcium complex [{ArNC(Me)CHC(Me)NAr}Ca{N(SiMe(3))(2)}(THF)] reacted reversibly with benzylamine at room temperature to form an equilibrium mixture of a calcium benzylamide and bis(trimethylsilyl)amide. A series of Pulsed-Gradient Spin-Echo NMR studies upon beta-diketiminato calcium amides were consistent with the formation of a dimer in solution. A van't Hoff analysis performed on this mixture allowed DeltaH degrees = -51.3 kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS degrees = -134 J mol(-1) of the protonolysis/dimerization reaction to be derived and the Gibbs' free energy to be calculated as DeltaG degrees (298 K) = -11.4 kJ mol(-1). PMID:19326917

  14. Synthesis, Properties and Applications of Biodegradable Polymers Derived from Diols and Dicarboxylic Acids: From Polyesters to Poly(ester amide)s

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Angélica; Katsarava, Ramaz; Puiggalí, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Poly(alkylene dicarboxylate)s constitute a family of biodegradable polymers with increasing interest for both commodity and speciality applications. Most of these polymers can be prepared from biobased diols and dicarboxylic acids such as 1,4-butanediol, succinic acid and carbohydrates. This review provides a current status report concerning synthesis, biodegradation and applications of a series of polymers that cover a wide range of properties, namely, materials from elastomeric to rigid characteristics that are suitable for applications such as hydrogels, soft tissue engineering, drug delivery systems and liquid crystals. Finally, the incorporation of aromatic units and α-amino acids is considered since stiffness of molecular chains and intermolecular interactions can be drastically changed. In fact, poly(ester amide)s derived from naturally occurring amino acids offer great possibilities as biodegradable materials for biomedical applications which are also extensively discussed. PMID:24776758

  15. Evaluation of an amide-based stationary phase for supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Borges-Muñoz, Amaris C; Colón, Luis A

    2016-09-01

    J. Sep. Sci. 2016, 39, 3469-3476 A stationary phase containing an amide group embedded in a hydrophobic backbone (i.e., C18-amide) attached to silica particles was characterized by means of the linear solvation energy relationship model, which relates the chromatographic retention factor to specific solute interactions. The evaluationwas conducted under supercritical fluid chromatographic conditions using a mobile phase composition of carbon dioxide and methanol as co-solvent. The stationary phase showed to provide an alternate separation selectivity that is attractive to separate drug-like polar compounds in a relatively fast analysis time. PMID:27598573

  16. Thermodynamic properties of lithium amide under hydrogen pressure determined by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Satoshi; Ogita, Norio; Udagawa, Masayuki; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2009-01-01

    Partial pressures and equilibrium constants for the reaction from lithium amide and hydrogen to lithium hydride and ammonia at different temperatures were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy to determine standard enthalpy ΔHo and entropy ΔSo of the reaction. Raman intensity measurements were used for estimating ammonia partial pressures in gaseous products after heat treatment of lithium amide under hydrogen atmosphere. The van't Hoff plot of fractions of the partial pressures of ammonia and hydrogen indicated ΔHo=49.9±9.1 kJ mol-1 and ΔSo=59±16 J mol-1 K-1.

  17. Nickel-Catalyzed Decarbonylative Borylation of Amides: Evidence for Acyl C-N Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiefeng; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Yemin; Shi, Zhuangzhi

    2016-07-18

    A nickel/N-heterocyclic carbene catalytic system has been established for decarbonylative borylation of amides with B2 nep2 by C-N bond activation. This transformation shows good functional-group compatibility and can serve as a powerful synthetic tool for late-stage borylation of amide groups in complex compounds. More importantly, as a key intermediate, the structure of an acyl nickel complex was first confirmed by X-ray analysis. Furthermore, the decarbonylative process was also observed. These findings confirm the key mechanistic features of the acyl C-N bond activation process. PMID:27258597

  18. Amide functionalized MWNT/SPEEK composite membrane for better electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlot, Swati; Sharma, Prem P.; Kulshrestha, Vaibhav

    2016-05-01

    Nanocomposite membranes based on multiwalled carbon nanotube /SPEEK (sulfonated poly ether ether ketone) have been synthesized via simple solution casting. Prior to use CNT have been purified and grafted with carboxylic acid groups onto its walls by means of sulfuric and nitric acid. Afterwards, amidation of carboxylated CNTs (c-CNT) has been done. Amidated CNT (a-CNT) is then incorporated in SPEEK polymer matrix to synthesize nanocomposite membranes. Physicochemical, structural, thermal and mechanical characterizations are done through the respective techniques. Electric and ionic conductivities have also been evaluated. Composites membranes show the enhanced electrochemical performance with higher electric conductivity.

  19. Diastereoselective and enantioselective conjugate addition reactions utilizing α,β-unsaturated amides and lactams.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Katherine M

    2015-01-01

    The conjugate addition reaction has been a useful tool in the formation of carbon-carbon bonds. The utility of this reaction has been demonstrated in the synthesis of many natural products, materials, and pharmacological agents. In the last three decades, there has been a significant increase in the development of asymmetric variants of this reaction. Unfortunately, conjugate addition reactions using α,β-unsaturated amides and lactams remain underdeveloped due to their inherently low reactivity. This review highlights the work that has been done on both diastereoselective and enantioselective conjugate addition reactions utilizing α,β-unsaturated amides and lactams.

  20. Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Electrophile Coupling with Organic Reductants in Non-Amide Solvents.

    PubMed

    Anka-Lufford, Lukiana L; Huihui, Kierra M M; Gower, Nicholas J; Ackerman, Laura K G; Weix, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    Cross-electrophile coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides has thus far been primarily conducted with stoichiometric metallic reductants in amide solvents. This report demonstrates that the use of tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene (TDAE) as an organic reductant enables the use of non-amide solvents, such as acetonitrile or propylene oxide, for the coupling of benzyl chlorides and alkyl iodides with aryl halides. Furthermore, these conditions work for several electron-poor heterocycles that are easily reduced by manganese. Finally, we demonstrate that TDAE addition can be used as a control element to 'hold' a reaction without diminishing yield or catalyst activity. PMID:27273457

  1. Catalytic Ester–Amide Exchange Using Group (IV) Metal Alkoxide–Activator Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chong; Lee, Jonathan P.; Lobkovsky, Emil; Porco, John A.

    2005-01-01

    A process for preparation of amides from unactivated esters and amines has been developed using a catalytic system comprised of group (IV) metal alkoxides in conjunction with additives including 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole (HOAt). In general, ester–amide exchange proceeds using a variety of structurally diverse esters and amines without azeotropic reflux to remove the alcohol byproduct. Initial mechanistic studies on the Zr(Ot-Bu)4–HOAt system revealed that the active catalyst is a novel, dimeric zirconium complex as determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:16011366

  2. Diastereoselective and enantioselective conjugate addition reactions utilizing α,β-unsaturated amides and lactams

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary The conjugate addition reaction has been a useful tool in the formation of carbon–carbon bonds. The utility of this reaction has been demonstrated in the synthesis of many natural products, materials, and pharmacological agents. In the last three decades, there has been a significant increase in the development of asymmetric variants of this reaction. Unfortunately, conjugate addition reactions using α,β-unsaturated amides and lactams remain underdeveloped due to their inherently low reactivity. This review highlights the work that has been done on both diastereoselective and enantioselective conjugate addition reactions utilizing α,β-unsaturated amides and lactams. PMID:25977728

  3. Crystal structures of (E)-3-(furan-2-yl)-2-phenyl-N-tosyl-acryl-amide and (E)-3-phenyl-2-(m-tol-yl)-N-tosyl-acryl-amide.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dong; Meng, Xiangzhen; Sheng, Zeyuan; Wang, Shuangming; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Ziqian

    2016-06-01

    In the title N-tosyl-acryl-amide compounds, C20H17NO4S, (I), and C23H21NO3S, (II), the conformation about the C=C bond is E. The acryl-amide groups, [-NH-C(=O)-C=C-], are almost planar, with the N-C-C=C torsion angle being -170.18 (14)° in (I) and -168.01 (17)° in (II). In (I), the furan, phenyl and 4-methyl-benzene rings are inclined to the acryl-amide mean plane by 26.47 (11), 69.01 (8) and 82.49 (9)°, respectively. In (II), the phenyl, 3-methyl-benzene and 4-methyl-benzene rings are inclined to the acryl-amide mean plane by 11.61 (10), 78.44 (10) and 78.24 (10)°, respectively. There is an intra-molecular C-H⋯π inter-action present in compound (II). In the crystals of both compounds, mol-ecules are linked by pairs of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. In (I), the dimers are reinforced by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and linked by C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming chains along [011]. In the crystal of (II), the dimers are linked via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [100]. The chains are further linked by C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming layers parallel to (010).

  4. Crystal structures of (E)-3-(furan-2-yl)-2-phenyl-N-tosyl-acryl-amide and (E)-3-phenyl-2-(m-tol-yl)-N-tosyl-acryl-amide.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dong; Meng, Xiangzhen; Sheng, Zeyuan; Wang, Shuangming; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Ziqian

    2016-06-01

    In the title N-tosyl-acryl-amide compounds, C20H17NO4S, (I), and C23H21NO3S, (II), the conformation about the C=C bond is E. The acryl-amide groups, [-NH-C(=O)-C=C-], are almost planar, with the N-C-C=C torsion angle being -170.18 (14)° in (I) and -168.01 (17)° in (II). In (I), the furan, phenyl and 4-methyl-benzene rings are inclined to the acryl-amide mean plane by 26.47 (11), 69.01 (8) and 82.49 (9)°, respectively. In (II), the phenyl, 3-methyl-benzene and 4-methyl-benzene rings are inclined to the acryl-amide mean plane by 11.61 (10), 78.44 (10) and 78.24 (10)°, respectively. There is an intra-molecular C-H⋯π inter-action present in compound (II). In the crystals of both compounds, mol-ecules are linked by pairs of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. In (I), the dimers are reinforced by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and linked by C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming chains along [011]. In the crystal of (II), the dimers are linked via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [100]. The chains are further linked by C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming layers parallel to (010). PMID:27308045

  5. Sec-mediated secretion by Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterial pathogen that replicates within a phagolysosome-like parasitophorous vacuole (PV) of macrophages. PV formation requires delivery of effector proteins directly into the host cell cytoplasm by a type IVB secretion system. However, additional secretion systems are likely responsible for modification of the PV lumen microenvironment that promote pathogen replication. Results To assess the potential of C. burnetii to secrete proteins into the PV, we analyzed the protein content of modified acidified citrate cysteine medium for the presence of C. burnetii proteins following axenic (host cell-free) growth. Mass spectrometry generated a list of 105 C. burnetii proteins that could be secreted. Based on bioinformatic analysis, 55 proteins were selected for further study by expressing them in C. burnetii with a C-terminal 3xFLAG-tag. Secretion of 27 proteins by C. burnetii transformants was confirmed by immunoblotting culture supernatants. Tagged proteins expressed by C. burnetii transformants were also found in the soluble fraction of infected Vero cells, indicating secretion occurs ex vivo. All secreted proteins contained a signal sequence, and deletion of this sequence from selected proteins abolished secretion. These data indicate protein secretion initially requires translocation across the inner-membrane into the periplasm via the activity of the Sec translocase. Conclusions C. burnetii secretes multiple proteins, in vitro and ex vivo, in a Sec-dependent manner. Possible roles for secreted proteins and secretion mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24093460

  6. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  7. Prolactin-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Mary C.; Schriock, Eldon D.; Jaffe, Robert B.

    1983-01-01

    Prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma is a common cause of gynecologic problems that include oligomenorrhea, infertility, amenorrhea and galactorrhea. Diagnosis requires a combination of endocrine testing and radiologic evaluation. The diagnosis of macroadenomas is usually straightforward and these large tumors may be associated with mass effects such as severe headache, nerve palsies or visual changes. Microadenomas may be more subtle in presentation, and the diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia without radiologic evidence of a tumor frequently is problematic. The management of prolactin-secreting adenoma remains controversial, with no clear consensus or indication for surgical versus medical treatment. Surgical intervention is a realistic option for those patients who have access to an experienced neurosurgeon and who have tumor characteristics that offer a reasonable hope for cure. Many questions remain to be answered, including the cause, natural history of development and the optimum treatment for individual cases. Images PMID:6659490

  8. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  9. Renal tubular secretion of pramipexole.

    PubMed

    Knop, Jana; Hoier, Eva; Ebner, Thomas; Fromm, Martin F; Müller, Fabian

    2015-11-15

    The dopamine agonist pramipexole is cleared predominantly by the kidney with a major contribution of active renal secretion. Previously the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) was shown to be involved in the uptake of pramipexole by renal tubular cells, while the mechanism underlying efflux into tubular lumen remains unclear. Cimetidine, a potent inhibitor of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins 1 (MATE1) and 2-K (MATE2-K), decreases renal pramipexole clearance in humans. We hypothesized that, in addition to OCT2, pramipexole may be a substrate of MATE-mediated transport. Pramipexole uptake was investigated using MDCK or HEK cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K and the respective vector controls (Co). Transcellular pramipexole transport was investigated in MDCK cells single- or double-transfected with OCT2 and/or MATE1 and in Co cells, separating a basal from an apical compartment in a model for renal tubular secretion. Pramipexole uptake was 1.6-, 1.1-, or 1.6-folds in cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K, respectively as compared to Co cells (p<0.05). In transcellular transport experiments, intracellular pramipexole accumulation was 1.7-folds in MDCK-OCT2 (p<0.001), and transcellular pramipexole transport was 2.2- and 4.0-folds in MDCK-MATE1 and MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells as compared to Co cells (p<0.001). Transcellular pramipexole transport was pH dependent and inhibited by cimetidine with IC50 values of 12μM and 5.5μM in MATE1 and OCT2-MATE1 cells, respectively. Taken together, coordinate activity of OCT2-mediated uptake and MATE-mediated efflux determines pramipexole renal secretion. Reduced OCT2 or MATE transport activity due to genetic variation or drug-drug interactions may affect pramipexole renal secretion.

  10. Electronic enhancement of tear secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, Mark; Lim Chung, Jae; Kossler, Andrea; Kook, Koung Hoon; Loudin, Jim; Franke, Manfred; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Objective. To study electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves for enhanced tear secretion, as a potential treatment for dry eye disease. We investigate the response pathways and electrical parameters to safely maximize tear secretion. Approach. We evaluated the tear response to electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves in isofluorane-anesthetized rabbits. In acute studies, electrical stimulation was performed using bipolar platinum foil electrodes, implanted beneath the inferior lacrimal gland, and a monopolar electrode placed near the afferent ethmoid nerve. Wireless microstimulators with bipolar electrodes were implanted beneath the lacrimal gland for chronic studies. To identify the response pathways, we applied various pharmacological inhibitors. To optimize the stimulus, we measured tear secretion rate (Schirmer test) as a function of pulse amplitude (1.5-12 mA), duration (0.1-1 ms) and repetition rate (10-100 Hz). Main results. Stimulation of the lacrimal gland increased tear secretion by engaging efferent parasympathetic nerves. Tearing increased with stimulation amplitude, pulse duration and repetition rate, up to 70 Hz. Stimulation with 3 mA, 500 μs pulses at 70 Hz provided a 4.5 mm (125%) increase in Schirmer score. Modulating duty cycle further increased tearing up to 57%, compared to continuous stimulation in chronically implanted animals (36%). Ethmoid (afferent) nerve stimulation increased tearing similar to gland stimulation (3.6 mm) via a reflex pathway. In animals with chronically implanted stimulators, a nearly 6 mm increase (57%) was achieved with 12-fold less charge density per pulse (0.06-0.3 μC mm-2 with 170-680 μs pulses) than the damage threshold (3.5 μC mm-2 with 1 ms pulses). Significance. Electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland or afferent nerves may be used as a treatment for dry eye disease. Clinical trials should validate this approach in patients with aqueous tear deficiency, and

  11. Pharmaceuticals and Surfactants from Alga-Derived Feedstock: Amidation of Fatty Acids and Their Derivatives with Amino Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Tkacheva, Anastasia; Dosmagambetova, Inkar; Chapellier, Yann; Mäki-Arvela, Päivi; Hachemi, Imane; Savela, Risto; Leino, Reko; Viegas, Carolina; Kumar, Narendra; Eränen, Kari; Hemming, Jarl; Smeds, Annika; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2015-08-24

    Amidation of renewable feedstocks, such as fatty acids, esters, and Chlorella alga based biodiesel, was demonstrated with zeolites and mesoporous materials as catalysts and ethanolamine, alaninol, and leucinol. The last two can be derived from amino acids present in alga. The main products were fatty alkanol amides and the corresponding ester amines, as confirmed by NMR and IR spectroscopy. Thermal amidation of technical-grade oleic acid and stearic acid at 180 °C with ethanolamine were non-negligible; both gave 61% conversion. In the amidation of stearic acid with ethanolamine, the conversion over H-Beta-150 was 80% after 3 h, whereas only 63% conversion was achieved for oleic acid; this shows that a microporous catalyst is not suitable for this acid and exhibits a wrinkled conformation. The highest selectivity to stearoyl ethanolamide of 92% was achieved with mildly acidic H-MCM-41 at 70% conversion in 3 h at 180 °C. Highly acidic catalysts favored the formation of the ester amine, whereas the amide was obtained with a catalyst that exhibited an optimum acidity. The conversion levels achieved with different fatty acids in the range C12-C18 were similar; this shows that the fatty acid length does not affect the amidation rate. The amidation of methyl palmitate and biodiesel gave low conversions over an acidic catalyst, which suggested that the reaction mechanism in the amidation of esters was different.

  12. Pharmaceuticals and Surfactants from Alga-Derived Feedstock: Amidation of Fatty Acids and Their Derivatives with Amino Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Tkacheva, Anastasia; Dosmagambetova, Inkar; Chapellier, Yann; Mäki-Arvela, Päivi; Hachemi, Imane; Savela, Risto; Leino, Reko; Viegas, Carolina; Kumar, Narendra; Eränen, Kari; Hemming, Jarl; Smeds, Annika; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2015-08-24

    Amidation of renewable feedstocks, such as fatty acids, esters, and Chlorella alga based biodiesel, was demonstrated with zeolites and mesoporous materials as catalysts and ethanolamine, alaninol, and leucinol. The last two can be derived from amino acids present in alga. The main products were fatty alkanol amides and the corresponding ester amines, as confirmed by NMR and IR spectroscopy. Thermal amidation of technical-grade oleic acid and stearic acid at 180 °C with ethanolamine were non-negligible; both gave 61% conversion. In the amidation of stearic acid with ethanolamine, the conversion over H-Beta-150 was 80% after 3 h, whereas only 63% conversion was achieved for oleic acid; this shows that a microporous catalyst is not suitable for this acid and exhibits a wrinkled conformation. The highest selectivity to stearoyl ethanolamide of 92% was achieved with mildly acidic H-MCM-41 at 70% conversion in 3 h at 180 °C. Highly acidic catalysts favored the formation of the ester amine, whereas the amide was obtained with a catalyst that exhibited an optimum acidity. The conversion levels achieved with different fatty acids in the range C12-C18 were similar; this shows that the fatty acid length does not affect the amidation rate. The amidation of methyl palmitate and biodiesel gave low conversions over an acidic catalyst, which suggested that the reaction mechanism in the amidation of esters was different. PMID:26197759

  13. 40 CFR 721.6183 - Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine... Substances § 721.6183 Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated...

  14. Infrared spectroscopic study of the amidation reaction of aminophenyl modified Au surfaces and p-nitrobenzoic acid as model system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Sun, Guoguang; Hinrichs, Karsten; Janietz, Silvia; Rappich, Joerg

    2010-10-21

    We have investigated the fundamental amidation reaction by a model system consisting of an electrochemically functionalised Au surface by aminophenyl and 4-nitrobenzoic acid activated by EEDQ. The development of the NO(2) related stretching vibrations with time reveals that the amidation process is very slow at Au surfaces and is completed after about 2 days.

  15. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance.

  16. Multiscale modelling of saliva secretion.

    PubMed

    Sneyd, James; Crampin, Edmund; Yule, David

    2014-11-01

    We review a multiscale model of saliva secretion, describing in brief how the model is constructed and what we have so far learned from it. The model begins at the level of inositol trisphosphate receptors (IPR), and proceeds through the cellular level (with a model of acinar cell calcium dynamics) to the multicellular level (with a model of the acinus), finally to a model of a saliva production unit that includes an acinus and associated duct. The model at the level of the entire salivary gland is not yet completed. Particular results from the model so far include (i) the importance of modal behaviour of IPR, (ii) the relative unimportance of Ca(2+) oscillation frequency as a controller of saliva secretion, (iii) the need for the periodic Ca(2+) waves to be as fast as possible in order to maximise water transport, (iv) the presence of functional K(+) channels in the apical membrane increases saliva secretion, (v) the relative unimportance of acinar spatial structure for isotonic water transport, (vi) the prediction that duct cells are highly depolarised, (vii) the prediction that the secondary saliva takes at least 1mm (from the acinus) to reach ionic equilibrium. We end with a brief discussion of future directions for the model, both in construction and in the study of scientific questions.

  17. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance. PMID:23613592

  18. Comparative analysis of the secretion capability of early and late flagellar type III secretion substrates

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Hanna M.; Erhardt, Marc; Hughes, Kelly T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A remarkable feature of the flagellar-specific type III secretion system (T3SS) is the selective recognition of a few substrate proteins among the many thousand cytoplasmic proteins. Secretion substrates are divided into two specificity classes: early substrates secreted for hook-basal body (HBB) construction and late substrates secreted after HBB completion. Secretion was reported to require a disordered N-terminal secretion signal, mRNA secretion signals within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) and for late substrates, piloting proteins known as the T3S chaperones. Here, we utilized translational β-lactamase fusions to probe the secretion efficacy of the N-terminal secretion signal of fourteen secreted flagellar substrates in Salmonella enterica. We observed a surprising variety in secretion capability between flagellar proteins of the same secretory class. The peptide secretion signals of the early-type substrates FlgD, FlgF, FlgE and the late-type substrate FlgL were analysed in detail. Analysing the role of the 5′-UTR in secretion of flgB and flgE revealed that the native 5′-UTR substantially enhanced protein translation and secretion. Based on our data, we propose a multicomponent signal that drives secretion via the flagellar T3SS. Both mRNA and peptide signals are recognized by the export apparatus and together with substrate-specific chaperones allowing for targeted secretion of flagellar substrates. PMID:24946091

  19. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF PROSTATIC SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Clark, Philip Johnson

    1940-01-01

    Cystic hyperplasia of the prostate occurs spontaneously in senile dogs only when they possess physiologically effective amounts of androgenic hormone. The cysts are closely grouped and radially arranged in a conical manner with the base of the cone at the periphery of the gland. Flattened and columnar epithelium, varying from about 5 to 25µ are seen in each cyst. The cysts communicate with the urethra by way of ducts. Both normal and cystic prostates undergo marked atrophy when the testes are removed, the chief difference 3 months after orchiectomy being the persistence of slightly dilated clefts and spaces at the site of the former cysts in the senile state. In the castrate dog whose prostate gland is being reconstructed as result of the influence of daily injections of androgen, certain doses of estrogen prevent increase of secretion and still larger doses greatly depress the output of the gland. In dogs so treated by daily injections of testosterone propionate, 10 mg., the amount of secretion is maintained from day to day at a level by daily injections of stilbestrol, 0.4 to 0.6 mg. and greatly depressed by doses of 1 to 1.5 mg. When the larger amounts of estrogen are used, together with androgen, squamous metaplasia occurs in the posterior lobe of the prostate while the epithelium of the acini decreases in height to cuboidal or low columnar form; these histological signs of activity of both androgen and estrogen on the prostate show that inhibition of the male hormone by stilbestrol is incomplete at these ratios. In dogs with either normal or cystic prostate glands, the prostate decreases in size when estrogen is injected in amounts to depress prostatic secretion profoundly. The gland is maintained in an atrophic state and overdosage avoided by controlled periodic injections of stilbestrol until secretion is reduced to the minimum, followed by free intervals, the estrogen being again administered when secretion measurably increases. The shrinkage is related to

  20. A universal nanoparticle cell secretion capture assay.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles

    2013-02-01

    Secreted proteins play an important role in intercellular interactions, especially between cells of the immune system. Currently, there is no universal assay that allows a simple noninvasive identification and isolation of cells based on their secretion of various products. We have developed such a method. Our method is based on the targeting, to the cell surface, of heterofunctional nanoparticles coupled to a cell surface-specific antibody and to a secreted protein-specific antibody, which captures the secreted protein on the surface of the producing cell. Importantly, this method does not compromise cellviability and is compatible with further culture and expansion of the secreting cells.

  1. Update on D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA): a viral entry inhibitor that blocks CCR5 chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Michael R; Polianova, Maria; Yang, Quan-en; Leoung, Gifford S; Ruscetti, Francis W; Pert, Candace B

    2003-01-01

    Peptide T, named for its high threonine content (ASTTTNYT), was derived by a database search which assumed that a relevant receptor binding epitope within env (gp120) would have sequence homology to a known signaling peptide. Binding of radiolabeled gp120 to brain membranes was displaced by peptide T and three octapeptide analogs (including "DAPTA", Dala1-peptide T-amide, the protease-resistant analog now in Phase II clinical trials) with the same potency that these four octapeptides blocked infectivity of an early passage patient isolate. This 1986 report was controversial due to a number of laboratories' failure to find peptide T antiviral effects; we now know that peptide T is a potent HIV entry inhibitor selectively targeting CCR5 receptors with minimal effects on the X4 tropic lab adapted virus exclusively in use at that time. Early clinical trials, which demonstrated lack of toxicity and focused on neurological and neurocognitive benefits, are reviewed and data from a small ongoing Phase II trial--the first to assess peptide T's antiviral effects--are presented. Studies using infectivity, receptor binding, chemotaxis, and blockade of gp120-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, discussed and presented here. Peptide T and analogs of its core pentapeptide, present near the V2 stem of numerous gp120 isolates, are potent ligands for CCR5. Clinical data showing peptide T's immunomodulation of plasma cytokine levels and increases in the percentage of IFNgamma secreting CD8+ T cells in patients with HIV disease are presented and suggests additional therapeutic mechanisms via regulation of specific immunity.

  2. Studies into secretions of Tetrahymena: enzymes secreted into inorganic medium.

    PubMed

    Kovács, P; Karsa, J; Csaba, G

    1992-01-01

    The peptides secreted by Tetrahymena cells into inorganic medium were chromatographed. Six fractions showing a marked enzyme-like activity were examined for influence on certain physiological parameters of Tetrahymena. The enzymatically active fractions increased the phagocytic activity of Tetrahymena and decreased its binding capacity for lectins and hormone (insulin), but enhanced insulin imprinting at primary interaction. It remains to be clarified whether these effects were due to the enzymatic or other components of the fractions investigated, or to lack of the compensatory influence of the fractions not studied.

  3. Semiquantum secret sharing using entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qin; Chan, W. H.; Long Dongyang

    2010-08-15

    Secret sharing is a procedure for sharing a secret among a number of participants such that only the qualified subsets of participants have the ability to reconstruct the secret. Even in the presence of eavesdropping, secret sharing can be achieved when all the members are quantum. So what happens if not all the members are quantum? In this paper, we propose two semiquantum secret sharing protocols by using maximally entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type states in which quantum Alice shares a secret with two classical parties, Bob and Charlie, in a way that both parties are sufficient to obtain the secret, but one of them cannot. The presented protocols are also shown to be secure against eavesdropping.

  4. The use of amide local anesthetics in patients susceptible to malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Minasian, A; Yagiela, J A

    1988-10-01

    The use of amide local anesthetics in dental patients presumed to be susceptible to malignant hyperthermia (MH) is controversial. A literature review of 17 recent dental publications and their reference citations revealed that the recommendation to avoid local anesthetics of the amide type in dental treatment of MH-susceptible (MHS) patients is based on in vitro muscle investigations, unpublished communications, and a single case report suggestive of MH. Therefore, a survey of members of the Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States designed to determine what, if any, MH-like reactions have occurred in patients with MHS receiving dental treatment was conducted. Of a total of 307 MHS respondents, 36 (12%) reported adverse reactions to dental care. Only one respondent, however, reported symptoms suspicious of MH (fever, muscle pain) in which the administration of amide local anesthetics appeared to be closely linked. Fifty-six (18%) of the respondents have had difficulty obtaining routine dental care since being identified as MHS; this includes 27 who have been refused dental treatment or have had to undergo operative procedures without the benefit of local anesthesia. These results support the conclusions that amide local anesthetics may be administered to MHS patients without significant risk and that currently the diagnosis of MH susceptibility can adversely affect the quality of dental care. PMID:3054689

  5. N n-disubstituted amide cosurfactants in enhanced oil recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.; Chaney, M. B.

    1984-12-25

    A surfactant system useful for oil recovery consisting essentially of a NaCl brine, a hydrocarbon sulfonate surfactant, such as a petroleum sulfonate, and a cosurfactant such as a N,N-disubstituted amide. In another embodiment, a C/sub 1/ to C/sub 8/ alcohol is additionally present as a cosurfactant.

  6. Characterization and dispersibility of improved thermally stable amide functionalized graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Sumita; Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar, Rajiv; Kumar, Dinesh; Sharma, Sumit; Singh, Gulshan

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Improved thermal stability and surface study of amide functionalized graphene oxide. - Highlights: • Amide functionalized graphene oxides (AGOs) were synthesized from aniline, 2-aminothiazole and 2-aminopyrimidine. • Achieved enhancement in thermal stability of AGOs as compare to GO. • AGOs are found to be highly dispersible in water, DMSO and DMF. • Dispersibility is stable for more than two and half months. - Abstract: Amidation of graphene oxide (GO) with aniline, 2-aminothiazole and 2-aminopyrimidine results in the synthesis of amide functionalized graphene oxides (AGOs). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV–vis and Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the properties of AGOs. It was found that, contrary to GO, AGOs are soluble in water, dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethylformamide and can be stabilized for months. TGA of AGOs shows the major weight loss above 670 °C as compared to GO in which significant weight loss occurs near 200 °C. Thus AGOs show strong improvement in thermal properties.

  7. Copper-catalyzed intermolecular chloroazidation of α,β-unsaturated amides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Xing, Haotian; Zhang, Huaibin; Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-08-21

    A highly practical copper-catalyzed intermolecular chloroazidation of α,β-unsaturated amides has been described, giving a series of azidochlorides in good-to-excellent yields. The stable azidoiodine(iii) reagent and SOCl2 were used as azide and chlorine sources, respectively. The synthetic applications of this protocol were also explored by a variety of synthetically useful transformations. PMID:27462802

  8. Cobalt-catalyzed chelation assisted C-H allylation of aromatic amides with unactivated olefins.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takuma; Kommagalla, Yadagiri; Aihara, Yoshinori; Chatani, Naoto

    2016-08-01

    The cobalt-catalyzed chelation assisted ortho C-H allylation of aromatic amides with unactivated aliphatic alkenes is reported. The reaction proceeds in air under mild reaction conditions, providing allylated products in good to excellent yields with high E-selectivities. This operationally simple method shows a high functional group tolerance.

  9. Investigation of the complex reaction coordinate of acid catalyzed amide hydrolysis from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-05-01

    The rate-determining step of acid catalyzed peptide hydrolysis is the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule to the carbon atom of the amide group. Therein the addition of the hydroxyl group to the amide carbon atom involves the association of a water molecule transferring one of its protons to an adjacent water molecule. The protonation of the amide nitrogen atom follows as a separate reaction step. Since the nucleophilic attack involves the breaking and formation of several bonds, the underlying reaction coordinate is rather complex. We investigate this reaction step from path sampling Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. This approach does not require the predefinition of reaction coordinates and is thus particularly suited for investigating reaction mechanisms. From our simulations the most relevant components of the reaction coordinate are elaborated. Though the C⋯O distance of the oxygen atom of the water molecule performing the nucleophilic attack and the corresponding amide carbon atom is a descriptor of the reaction progress, a complete picture of the reaction coordinate must include all three molecules taking part in the reaction. Moreover, the proton transfer is found to depend on favorable solvent configurations. Thus, also the arrangement of non-reacting, i.e. solvent water molecules needs to be considered in the reaction coordinate.

  10. High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Analysis of Phytoplankton Pigments Using a C16-Amide Column

    EPA Science Inventory

    A reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method was developed to analyze in a single run, most polar and non-polar chlorophylls and carotenoids from marine phytoplankton. The method is based on a RP-C16-Amide column and a ternary gradient system consistin...

  11. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition for the symptomatic relief of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Celorrio, Marta; Fernández-Suárez, Diana; Rojo-Bustamante, Estefanía; Echeverry-Alzate, Víctor; Ramírez, María J; Hillard, Cecilia J; López-Moreno, José A; Maldonado, Rafael; Oyarzábal, Julen; Franco, Rafael; Aymerich, María S

    2016-10-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system are strongly expressed in the basal ganglia where they suffer profound rearrangements after dopamine depletion. Modulation of the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase alters glial phenotypes and provides neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we assessed whether inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase could also provide beneficial effects on the time course of this disease. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, was administered chronically to mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTPp) over 5weeks. URB597 (1mg/kg) prevented MPTPp induced motor impairment but it did not preserve the dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal pathway or regulate glial cell activation. The symptomatic relief of URB597 was confirmed in haloperidol-induced catalepsy assays, where its anti-cataleptic effects were both blocked by antagonists of the two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), and abolished in animals deficient in these receptors. Other fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors, JNJ1661010 and TCF2, also had anti-cataleptic properties. Together, these results demonstrate an effect of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in two distinct experimental models that is mediated by cannabinoid receptors. PMID:27318096

  12. Tri-substituted acylhydrazines as tertiary amide bioisosteres: HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Canales, Eda; Carlson, Joseph S; Appleby, Todd; Fenaux, Martijn; Lee, Johnny; Tian, Yang; Tirunagari, Neeraj; Wong, Melanie; Watkins, William J

    2012-07-01

    The use of a tri-substituted acylhydrazine as an isostere of a tertiary amide was explored in a series of HCV NS5B thumb site II inhibitors. Direct replacement generated an analog with similar conformational and physicochemical properties. The series was extended to produce compounds with potent binding affinities and encouraging levels of cellular potency.

  13. Insights into the mechanism for gold catalysis: behaviour of gold(I) amide complexes in solution.

    PubMed

    Bobin, Mariusz; Day, Iain J; Roe, Stephen M; Viseux, Eddy M E

    2013-05-14

    We report the synthesis and activity of new mononuclear and dinuclear gold amide complexes 1-7. The dinuclear complexes 6b and 7 were characterised by single crystal X-ray analysis. We also report solution NMR and freezing point depression experiments to rationalise their behaviour in solution and question the de-ligation process invoked in gold catalysis. PMID:23478402

  14. New Class of Algicidal Compounds and Fungicidal Activities Derived from a Chromene Amide of Amyris texana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our continuing search for natural algicides with selective toxicity towards the 2-methyl- isoborneol (MIB) -producing blue-green alga Oscillatoria perornata , the ethyl acetate extract from Amyris texana leaves was investigated by bioassay-guided fractionation. A chromene amide was isolated and i...

  15. Nitroxide amide-BODIPY probe behavior in fibroblasts analyzed by advanced fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liras, M; Simoncelli, S; Rivas-Aravena, A; García, O; Scaiano, J C; Alarcon, E I; Aspée, A

    2016-04-26

    A novel synthesized nitroxide amide-BODIPY prefluorescent probe was used to study cellular redox balance that modulates nitroxide/hydroxylamine ratio in cultured human fibroblasts. FLIM quantitatively differentiated between nitroxide states of the cytoplasm-localized probe imaged by TIRF, monitoring nitroxide depletion by hydrogen peroxide; eluding incorrect interpretation if only fluorescence intensity is considered.

  16. Rotaxanes synthesized through sodium-ion-templated clipping of macrocycles around nonconjugated amide and urea functionalities.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tsung-Hsien; Lai, Chien-Chen; Liu, Yi-Hung; Peng, Shie-Ming; Chiu, Sheng-Hsien

    2014-04-14

    A single urea or amide functionality in a dumbbell-shaped guest can be "clipped" by a macrocycle generated from a diamine and a dialdehyde through the templating effect of a Na(+) ion (see scheme). The resulting imine-containing rotaxanes can then be reduced to allow isolation of stable amine-based rotaxanes.

  17. Effects of indole amides on lettuce and onion germination and growth.

    PubMed

    Borgati, Thiago F; Boaventura, Maria Amelia D

    2011-01-01

    Auxins, such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), are important in plant germination and growth, while physiological polyamines, such as putrescine, are involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, and their concentrations increase during germination. In this work, novel indole amides were synthesized in good yields by monoacylation of morpholine and unprotected symmetrical diamines with indole-3-carboxylic acid, a putative metabolite of IAA, possessing no auxin-like activity. These amides were tested for their effects on seed germination and growth of the radicles and shoots of Lactuca sativa (lettuce) and Allium cepa (onion) seedlings, at 100.0, 1.0, and 0.01 microM concentrations. Germination was generally stimulated, with the exception of amide 3, derived from morpholine, at 100 microM. On radicle and shoot growth, the effect of these compounds was predominantly inhibitory. Compound 3 was the best inhibitor of growth of lettuce and onion, at the highest concentration. Amides, such as propanil, among others, are described as having herbicidal activity.

  18. Amide and amine nucleophiles in polar radical crossover cycloadditions: synthesis of γ-lactams and pyrrolidines.

    PubMed

    Gesmundo, Nathan J; Grandjean, Jean-Marc M; Nicewicz, David A

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present a direct catalytic synthesis of γ-lactams and pyrrolidines from alkenes and activated unsaturated amides or protected unsaturated amines, respectively. Using a mesityl acridinium single electron photooxidant and a thiophenol cocatalyst under irradiation, we are able to directly forge these important classes of heterocycles with complete regiocontrol. PMID:25695366

  19. An immunohistochemical localization of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in its amidated form in human frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Blinkenberg, M; Kruse-Larsen, C; Mikkelsen, J D

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive neurons was studied in human frontal cerebral cortex from surgical biopsy specimens by immunohistochemical techniques. NPY-containing neurons were identified in all cortical sublayers except sublayer I. The stained neurons were of the multipolar, bitufted, round or triangular form with dendritic and axonal processes. The immunoreactive neurons were considered to be cortical interneurons, due to their nonpyramidal form, and since their processes could be followed intracortically particularly in direction to superficial cortical layers. The NPY precursor molecule is processed to NPY by a dibasic cleavage, and NPY is further enzymatically amidated before release and receptor activation can be achieved. Antisera raised against Cys-NPY(32-36)amide recognize amidated NPY not cross-reacting with nonamidated NPY. These antisera and immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of a population of NPYamide-immunoreactive cells morphologically indistinguishable from the NPY-immunoreactive cells in the human frontal cortex. By comparing the number of immunoreactive cells in adjacent sections, it appears that the number of NPY-immunoreactive cells was higher than those immunoreactive to NPYamide. Also, the density of NPY fibers was much higher compared with the number stained with NPYamide antiserum. The present immunohistochemical study indicates that NPY in its amidated form is contained in a subpopulation of human cortical NPY-immunoreactive neurons and may participate as an active neurotransmitter/modulator within the human cerebral cortex.

  20. A novel aromatic carbocation-based coupling reagent for esterification and amidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh V; Lyons, Demelza J M

    2015-02-21

    A novel tropylium-based coupling reagent has been developed to facilitate the synthesis of a series of esters, amides, lactones and peptides under mild reaction conditions. Remarkably, this reagent can be used in catalytic amounts in conjunction with a sacrificial reagent, offering a new and efficient method for nucleophilic coupling reactions of carboxylic acids.

  1. Does Kisspeptin Belong to the Proposed RF-Amide Peptide Family?

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seongsik; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Furlong, Michael; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Vaudry, Hubert; Seong, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin (KISS) plays a key role in regulating reproduction by binding to its receptor, GPR54. Because of the Arg-Phe (RF) sequence at its carboxyl terminus, KISS has been proposed to be a member of the RF-amide peptide family consisting of neuropeptide FF (NPFF), neuropeptide VF (NPVF), pyroglutamylated RF-amide peptide (QRFP), and prolactin-releasing hormone (PRLH). Evolutionary relationships of protein families can be determined through phylogenetic analysis. However, phylogenetic analysis among related peptide families often fails to provide sufficient information because only short mature peptide sequences from full preprohormone sequences are conserved. Considering the concept of the coevolution of peptide ligands and their cognate receptors, evolutionary relationships among related receptor families provide clues to explore relationships between their peptides. Although receptors for NPFF, NPVF, and QRFP are phylogenetically clustered together, receptors for PRLH and KISS are on different branches of the phylogenetic tree. In particular, KISS has been proposed to be a member of the KISS/galanin/spexin family based on synteny analysis and the phylogenetic relationship between their receptors. This article discusses the evolutionary history of the receptors for the proposed RF-amide peptide family and proposes that, from an evolutionary aspect, KISS has emerged from an ancestor, which is distinct from those of the other RF-amide peptides, and so should be classed separately. PMID:25165463

  2. Cobalt(III)-Catalyzed C-H Bond Amidation with Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Joshua R; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2015-05-15

    The first examples of cobalt(III)-catalyzed C-H bond addition to isocyanates are described, providing a convergent strategy for arene and heteroarene amidation. Using a robust air- and moisture-stable catalyst, this transformation demonstrates a broad isocyanate scope and good functional-group compatibility and has been performed on gram scale.

  3. Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides yielding selective conversion products

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Jonathan E.

    2006-05-23

    The invention relates to processes for converting amino acids and amides to desirable conversion products including pyrrolidines, pyrrolidinones, and other N-substituted products. L-glutamic acid and L-pyroglutamic acid provide general reaction pathways to numerous and valuable selective conversion products with varied potential industrial uses.

  4. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition for the symptomatic relief of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Celorrio, Marta; Fernández-Suárez, Diana; Rojo-Bustamante, Estefanía; Echeverry-Alzate, Víctor; Ramírez, María J; Hillard, Cecilia J; López-Moreno, José A; Maldonado, Rafael; Oyarzábal, Julen; Franco, Rafael; Aymerich, María S

    2016-10-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system are strongly expressed in the basal ganglia where they suffer profound rearrangements after dopamine depletion. Modulation of the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase alters glial phenotypes and provides neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we assessed whether inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase could also provide beneficial effects on the time course of this disease. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, was administered chronically to mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTPp) over 5weeks. URB597 (1mg/kg) prevented MPTPp induced motor impairment but it did not preserve the dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal pathway or regulate glial cell activation. The symptomatic relief of URB597 was confirmed in haloperidol-induced catalepsy assays, where its anti-cataleptic effects were both blocked by antagonists of the two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), and abolished in animals deficient in these receptors. Other fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors, JNJ1661010 and TCF2, also had anti-cataleptic properties. Together, these results demonstrate an effect of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in two distinct experimental models that is mediated by cannabinoid receptors.

  5. Solvent-Driven Conformational Exchange for Amide-Linked Bichromophoric BODIPY Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Thakare, Shrikant; Stachelek, Patrycja; Mula, Soumyaditya; More, Ankush B; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Ray, Alok K; Sekar, Nagaiyan; Ziessel, Raymond; Harriman, Anthony

    2016-09-26

    The fluorescence lifetime and quantum yield are seen to depend in an unexpected manner on the nature of the solvent for a pair of tripartite molecules composed of two identical boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) residues attached to a 1,10-phenanthroline core. A key feature of these molecular architectures concerns the presence of an amide linkage that connects the BODIPY dye to the heterocyclic platform. The secondary amide derivative is more sensitive to environmental change than is the corresponding tertiary amide. In general, increasing solvent polarity, as measured by the static dielectric constant, above a critical threshold tends to reduce fluorescence but certain hydrogen bond accepting solvents exhibit anomolous behaviour. Fluorescence quenching is believed to arise from light-induced charge transfer between the two BODIPY dyes, but thermodynamic arguments alone do not explain the experimental findings. Molecular modelling is used to argue that the conformation changes in strongly polar media in such a way as to facilitate improved rates of light-induced charge transfer. These solvent-induced changes, however, differ remarkably for the two types of amide. PMID:27529596

  6. Ruthenium on chitosan: A recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium has been immobilized over chitosan by simply stirring an aqueous suspension of chitosan in water with ruthenium chloride and has been utilized for the oxidation of nitriles to amides; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity, which procee...

  7. Solvent extraction of Sr2+ and Cs+ using protic amide-based ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Huang, Jing-Fang; Luo, Huimin

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen protic amide-based ionic liquids (ILs) derived from N,N-dimethylformamide and other protophilic amide derivatives with bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide or bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide as conjugated anions were synthesized in a one-pot reaction with very high yields. All sixteen of these protic ionic liquids (PILs) were characterized by NMR spectra, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry. These protic amide-based ionic liquids were tested as extraction solvents using dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) as an extractant for separation of Sr2+ and Cs+ from aqueous solutions. The extraction efficiencies were studied in comparison with those derived from both imidazolium-based and ammonium-based IL extraction systems. Excellent extraction efficiencies were found for a number of these ILs using DCH18C6 as an extractant. Unlike findings for imidazolium-based and ammonium-based ILs, the observed enhancement trend for the extraction efficiency associated with our amide-based ILs is not directly correlated with the enhanced hydrophilicity of the corresponding cations of the PIL system. The effects on extraction efficiencies of solution acidities, anions, and alkyl chain lengths in the cations of ILs were also investigated and reported.

  8. Mosher Amides: Determining the Absolute Stereochemistry of Optically-Active Amines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Damian A.; Tomaso, Anthony E., Jr.; Priest, Owen P.; Hindson, David F.; Hurlburt, Jamie L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of chiral reagents for the derivatization of optically-active amines and alcohols for the purpose of determining their enantiomeric purity or absolute configuration is a tool used by many chemists. Among the techniques used, Mosher's amide and Mosher's ester analyses are among the most reliable and one of the most often used. Despite this,…

  9. Application of N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides in the separation of some actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, G.M.; Grossi, G.

    1980-05-01

    N,N-dialkyl substituted alkyl amides are known to be good extractants of some actinides such as U, Pu, and Th. Their stability is comparable to that of TBP, and their degradation products do not interfere as do the degradation products of TBP. On the other hand, the principal disadvantage of the amides is their tendency to form poorly soluble U adducts in organic diluents. A systematic investigation has been carried out on the extractive behavior of two typical alkyl amides of different structures with respect to the actinide ions UO/sub 2/ /sup 2+/, Th /sup 4+/, Np /sup +4/, Pu /sup +4/, NpO /sub 2/ /sup 2+/, PuO /sub 2/ / sup 2+/, Pu /sup 3+/, and Am /sup 3+/, as well as with respect to the most significant fission products. The results obtained have been compared with those obtained using TBP in the same experimental conditions, verifying the applicability of amides in the separation of U from Th.

  10. Cobalt(III)-Catalyzed C–H Bond Amidation with Isocyanates

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Joshua R.; Ellman, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    The first examples of cobalt(III)-catalyzed C–H bond addition to isocyanates are described, providing a convergent strategy for arene and heteroarene amidation. Using a robust air- and moisture-stable catalyst, this transformation demonstrates broad isocyanate scope, good functional-group compatibility and has been performed on gram scale. PMID:25945401

  11. Insights into the Mechanism of Peptide Cyclodehydrations Achieved Through the Chemoenzymatic Generation of Amide Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Kyle L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Current strategies for generating peptides and proteins bearing amide carbonyl derivatives rely on solid-phase peptide synthesis for amide functionalization. Although such strategies have been successfully implemented, technical limitations restrict both the length and sequence of the synthetic fragments. Herein we report the repurposing of a thiazole/oxazole-modified microcin (TOMM) cyclodehydratase to site-specifically install amide backbone labels onto diverse peptide substrates, a method we refer to as azoline-mediated peptide backbone labeling (AMPL). This convenient chemoenzymatic strategy can generate both thioamides and amides with isotopically labeled oxygen atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate the first leader peptide-independent activity of a TOMM synthetase, circumventing the requirement that sequences of interest be fused to a leader peptide for modification. Through bioinformatics-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we also convert a strictly dehydrogenase-dependent TOMM azole synthetase into an azoline synthetase. This vastly expands the spectrum of substrates modifiable by AMPL by allowing any in vitro reconstituted TOMM synthetase to be employed. To demonstrate the utility of AMPL for mechanistic enzymology studies, an 18O-labeled substrate was generated to provide direct evidence that cyclodehydrations in TOMMs occur through the phosphorylation of the carbonyl oxygen preceding the cyclized residue. Furthermore, we demonstrate that AMPL is a useful tool for establishing the location of azolines both on in vitro modified peptides and azoline-containing natural products. PMID:23721104

  12. Direct inter- and intramolecular addition of amides to arylalkenes promoted by KOt-Bu/DMF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-juan; Zhao, Xu; Tong, Lang; Chen, Jia-hua; Zhang, Xue-jing; Yan, Ming

    2014-09-19

    Direct addition of tetrahydroisoquinoline derived amides to arylalkenes has been achieved in the presence of KOt-Bu/DMF. Both intermolecular and intramolecular reactions could occur in good yields. α-Amido alkyl radicals are proposed to be generated under the reaction conditions. The reaction is efficient for the synthesis of seven-membered nitrogen heterocycles. A homoprotoberberine was prepared conveniently via this method.

  13. Computational Amide I 2D IR Spectroscopy as a Probe of Protein Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of amide I vibrations is increasingly being used to study the structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides. Amide I, a primarily carbonyl stretching vibration of the protein backbone, provides information on secondary structures as a result of vibrational couplings and on hydrogen-bonding contacts when isotope labeling is used to isolate specific sites. In parallel with experiments, computational models of amide I spectra that use atomistic structures from molecular dynamics simulations have evolved to calculate experimental spectra. Mixed quantum-classical models use spectroscopic maps to translate the structural information into a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian for the spectroscopically observed vibrations. This allows one to model the spectroscopy of large proteins, disordered states, and protein conformational dynamics. With improvements in amide I models, quantitative modeling of time-dependent structural ensembles and of direct feedback between experiments and simulations is possible. We review the advances in developing these models, their theoretical basis, and current and future applications.

  14. Fuel and lubricant additives from acid treated mixtures of vegetable oil derived amides and esters

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazza, B.R.; Devault, A.N.

    1981-05-26

    Vegetable oils such as corn oil, peanut oil, and soy oil are reacted with polyamines to form a mixture containing amides, imides, half esters, and glycerol with subsequent treatment with a strong acid such as sulfonic acid to produce a product mix that has good detergent properties in fuels and lubricants.

  15. Development of chiral metal amides as highly reactive catalysts for asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Yoshimoto, Susumu; Dutton, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Highly efficient catalytic asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions using a chiral copper amide are reported. Compared with the chiral CuOTf/Et3N system, the CuHMDS system showed higher reactivity, and the desired reactions proceeded in high yields and high selectivities with catalyst loadings as low as 0.01 mol %. PMID:27559396

  16. Communication: Quantitative multi-site frequency maps for amide I vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-08-14

    An accurate method for predicting the amide I vibrational spectrum of a given protein structure has been sought for many years. Significant progress has been made recently by sampling structures from molecular dynamics simulations and mapping local electrostatic variables onto the frequencies of individual amide bonds. Agreement with experiment, however, has remained largely qualitative. Previously, we used dipeptide fragments and isotope-labeled constructs of the protein G mimic NuG2b as experimental standards for developing and testing amide I frequency maps. Here, we combine these datasets to test different frequency-map models and develop a novel method to produce an optimized four-site potential (4P) map based on the CHARMM27 force field. Together with a charge correction for glycine residues, the optimized map accurately describes both experimental datasets, with average frequency errors of 2–3 cm{sup −1}. This 4P map is shown to be convertible to a three-site field map which provides equivalent performance, highlighting the viability of both field- and potential-based maps for amide I spectral modeling. The use of multiple sampling points for local electrostatics is found to be essential for accurate map performance.

  17. Development of chiral metal amides as highly reactive catalysts for asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Yoshimoto, Susumu; Dutton, Mark J; Kobayashi, Shū

    2016-01-01

    Highly efficient catalytic asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions using a chiral copper amide are reported. Compared with the chiral CuOTf/Et3N system, the CuHMDS system showed higher reactivity, and the desired reactions proceeded in high yields and high selectivities with catalyst loadings as low as 0.01 mol %. PMID:27559396

  18. New hydrogen-bonding organocatalysts: Chiral cyclophosphazanes and phosphorus amides as catalysts for asymmetric Michael additions

    PubMed Central

    Klare, Helge; Neudörfl, Jörg M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ten novel hydrogen-bonding catalysts based on open-chain PV-amides of BINOL and chinchona alkaloids as well as three catalysts based on rigid cis-PV-cyclodiphosphazane amides of N 1,N 1-dimethylcyclohexane-1,2-diamine have been developed. Employed in the asymmetric Michael addition of 2-hydroxynaphthoquinone to β-nitrostyrene, the open-chain 9-epi-aminochinchona-based phosphorus amides show a high catalytic activity with almost quantitative yields of up to 98% and enantiomeric excesses of up to 51%. The cyclodiphosphazane catalysts show the same high activity and give improved enantiomeric excesses of up to 75%, thus representing the first successful application of a cyclodiphosphazane in enantioselective organocatalysis. DFT computations reveal high hydrogen-bonding strengths of cyclodiphosphazane PV-amides compared to urea-based catalysts. Experimental results and computations on the enantiodetermining step with cis-cyclodiphosphazane 14a suggest a strong bidentate H-bond activation of the nitrostyrene substrate by the catalyst. PMID:24605142

  19. First carbamates conversion to amides by simple alkyl group transfer from trialkylalanes.

    PubMed

    El Kaim, Laurent; Grimaud, Laurence; Lee, Anabelle; Perroux, Yannick; Tirla, Cornelia

    2004-02-01

    [reaction: see text] N-Monosubstituted carbamates are cleanly converted to amides under treatment with trialkylaluminum. This reaction involves an aluminum-assisted internal delivery of alkyl groups. It can be applied to new and mild protecting group strategies for alcohols.

  20. 40 CFR 721.9075 - Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium salt of... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9075 Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl... identified generically as quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide (PMN No. P-92-688)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9075 - Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium salt of... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9075 Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl... identified generically as quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide (PMN No. P-92-688)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9075 - Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium salt of... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9075 Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl... identified generically as quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide (PMN No. P-92-688)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9075 - Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium salt of... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9075 Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl... identified generically as quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide (PMN No. P-92-688)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9075 - Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium salt of... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9075 Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl... identified generically as quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide (PMN No. P-92-688)...

  5. Indoline Amide Glucosides from Portulaca oleracea: Isolation, Structure, and DPPH Radical Scavenging Activity.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ze-Zhao; Yue, Su; Sun, Hong-Xiang; Jin, Tian-Yun; Wang, Hai-Na; Zhu, Rong-Xiu; Xiang, Lan

    2015-11-25

    A polyamide column chromatography method using an aqueous ammonia mobile phase was developed for large-scale accumulation of water-soluble indoline amide glucosides from a medicinal plant, Portulaca oleracea. Ten new [oleraceins H, I, K, L, N, O, P, Q, R, S (1-10)] and four known [oleraceins A-D (11-14)] indoline amide glucosides were further purified and structurally characterized by various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The DPPH radical scavenging activities of oleraceins K (5) and L (6), with EC50 values of 15.30 and 16.13 μM, respectively, were twice that of a natural antioxidant, vitamin C; the EC50 values of the 12 other indoline amides, which ranged from 29.05 to 43.52 μM, were similar to that of vitamin C. Structure-activity relationships indicated that the DPPH radical scavenging activities of these indoline amides correlate with the numbers and positions of the phenolic hydroxy groups. PMID:26562741

  6. Nitroxide amide-BODIPY probe behavior in fibroblasts analyzed by advanced fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liras, M; Simoncelli, S; Rivas-Aravena, A; García, O; Scaiano, J C; Alarcon, E I; Aspée, A

    2016-04-26

    A novel synthesized nitroxide amide-BODIPY prefluorescent probe was used to study cellular redox balance that modulates nitroxide/hydroxylamine ratio in cultured human fibroblasts. FLIM quantitatively differentiated between nitroxide states of the cytoplasm-localized probe imaged by TIRF, monitoring nitroxide depletion by hydrogen peroxide; eluding incorrect interpretation if only fluorescence intensity is considered. PMID:27065020

  7. CoCEST: cobalt(II) amide-appended paraCEST MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Dorazio, Sarina J; Olatunde, Abiola O; Spernyak, Joseph A; Morrow, Janet R

    2013-11-01

    The first examples of air-stable Co(II) paraCEST MRI contrast agents are reported. Amide NH protons on the complexes give rise to CEST peaks that are shifted up to 112 ppm from the bulk water resonance. One complex has multiple CEST peaks that may be useful for ratiometric mapping of pH.

  8. Synthesis and structural characterisation of amides from picolinic acid and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Prarthana; Barry, Sarah M.; Houlihan, Kate M.; Murphy, Michael J.; Turner, Peter; Jensen, Paul; Rutledge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Coupling picolinic acid (pyridine-2-carboxylic acid) and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid with N-alkylanilines affords a range of mono- and bis-amides in good to moderate yields. These amides are of interest for potential applications in catalysis, coordination chemistry and molecular devices. The reaction of picolinic acid with thionyl chloride to generate the acid chloride in situ leads not only to the N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides as expected but also the corresponding 4-chloro-N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides in the one pot. The two products are readily separated by column chromatography. Chlorinated products are not observed from the corresponding reactions of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid. X-Ray crystal structures for six of these compounds are described. These structures reveal a general preference for cis amide geometry in which the aromatic groups (N-phenyl and pyridyl) are cis to each other and the pyridine nitrogen anti to the carbonyl oxygen. Variable temperature 1H NMR experiments provide a window on amide bond isomerisation in solution. PMID:25954918

  9. Uncovering the Sensitivity of Amide-II Vibration to Peptide-Ion Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Wang, Jianping

    2016-09-15

    In this work, linear infrared spectroscopy was used to examine the effect of salt on the amide-II mode in a model β-peptide (N-ethylpropionamide, NEPA) in its deuterated form, to reveal the sensitivity of this mode in reporting peptide-ion interactions. In comparison to the case of NEPA in water, the amide-II spectra mainly showed a red-shifted component in four typical saline solutions (NaCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, and AlCl3) examined in this work. Our results suggest that highly populated hydrated ion complexes under high salt concentration conditions destroy the hydration layer of the model peptide and result in mostly a salting-out state of the peptide. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the hydrated cation mainly interacts with the peptide backbone on the amide C═O side, whereas the hydrated anion interacts on the amide N-H side. As the amide-II mode is mainly a combination of the C-N stretching and N-H in-plane-bending vibrations, this mode is advantageous in being responsive to ionic interaction from both the C═O and N-H sides. Such a dual sensitivity should be very useful in probing the breaking and/or formation of the interamide hydrogen bond between the C═O and N-H groups, which is a very important interaction involved in the solvation and stabilization, as well as folding/unfolding of proteins. PMID:27537202

  10. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  11. A Novel Reaction Mediated by Human Aldehyde Oxidase: Amide Hydrolysis of GDC-0834

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Susan; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Liu, Lichuan; Khojasteh, S. Cyrus; Hop, Cornelis E. C. A.; Barr, John T.; Jones, Jeffrey P.; Halladay, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    GDC-0834, a Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor investigated as a potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, was previously reported to be extensively metabolized by amide hydrolysis such that no measurable levels of this compound were detected in human circulation after oral administration. In vitro studies in human liver cytosol determined that GDC-0834 (R)-N-(3-(6-(4-(1,4-dimethyl-3-oxopiperazin-2-yl)phenylamino)-4-methyl-5-oxo- 4,5-dihydropyrazin-2-yl)-2-methylphenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b] thiophene-2-carboxamide) was rapidly hydrolyzed with a CLint of 0.511 ml/min per milligram of protein. Aldehyde oxidase (AO) and carboxylesterase (CES) were putatively identified as the enzymes responsible after cytosolic fractionation and mass spectrometry-proteomics analysis of the enzymatically active fractions. Results were confirmed by a series of kinetic experiments with inhibitors of AO, CES, and xanthine oxidase (XO), which implicated AO and CES, but not XO, as mediating GDC-0834 amide hydrolysis. Further supporting the interaction between GDC-0834 and AO, GDC-0834 was shown to be a potent reversible inhibitor of six known AO substrates with IC50 values ranging from 0.86 to 1.87 μM. Additionally, in silico modeling studies suggest that GDC-0834 is capable of binding in the active site of AO with the amide bond of GDC-0834 near the molybdenum cofactor (MoCo), orientated in such a way to enable potential nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl of the amide bond by the hydroxyl of MoCo. Together, the in vitro and in silico results suggest the involvement of AO in the amide hydrolysis of GDC-0834. PMID:25845827

  12. Calcium calmodulin and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, B L; Walker, S W; Tomlinson, S

    1985-08-01

    As long ago as 1970, it was proposed that Ca2+ can act as a 'second messenger' like cAMP (Rasmussen & Nagata, 1979). The recognition that calmodulin is a major Ca2+ binding protein in non-muscle cells has prompted the suggestion that calmodulin may serve an analogous role for Ca2+ to that served by protein kinase for cAMP (Wang & Waisman, 1979), or at least to the regulatory subunit of the cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases. It is becoming clear that calmodulin probably does play a role in stimulus secretion coupling in endocrine cells. Nevertheless, some of the experimental approaches which have led to this rather tentative conclusion do induce some doubts, as we have attempted to indicate. Many of the pharmacological agents used in the studies cited in this review are not specific in their interaction with calmodulin. For example, the phenothiazines also inhibit phospholipid-sensitive protein kinase. The introduction of more specific drugs, such as the naphthalene sulphonamides, may lead to a clearer picture of the role of calmodulin in hormone secretion. Relationships probably exist between cyclic nucleotides, calcium, calmodulin, phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover and phospholipids in the overall control of the secretory process (see Fig. 1). There is considerable evidence that calcium is the primary internal signal initiating exocytosis of hormone from many glands. However, it appears that cyclic nucleotides can modulate the calcium signal either positively or negatively and it is possible that cAMP and calcium can separately activate secretion. The presence of both calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in the same tissue would appear to suggest either spatial or temporal control mechanisms or that (diagram; see text) the calcium requirement for calmodulin activation differs between the two enzymes. The true explanation is probably far more complex and involves perhaps as yet unknown factors that can differentially

  13. Controlling secretion to limit chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Georgilis, Athena; Gil, Jesús

    2016-08-15

    The tumor microenvironment influences cancer progression and therapy outcome by mechanisms not yet fully understood. In this issue of Genes & Development, Bent and colleagues (pp. 1811-1821) show how chemotherapy causes endothelial senescence. Interestingly, senescent endothelial cells do not mount a typical senescence-associated secretory phenotype but instead acutely secrete IL-6, promoting chemoresistance. This study unveils a physiological switch involving PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling that restrains the senescence secretory responses to limit the detrimental consequences of persistent inflammation. PMID:27601527

  14. Synchronous connections: nursing's little secret.

    PubMed

    Krejci, J W

    1995-07-01

    As nurses prepare for their place in health care reform, it is becoming more important than ever to be clear about the unique contribution nurses make to health care outcomes. In our technology-driven society, however, some of nursing's most powerful contributions go unacknowledged. An unexpected finding of a study on nurse experts' perceptions of synchrony revealed that nurses themselves frequently do not document or even dialog about important contributions if they cannot be captured within the dominant paradigm of high-technology care. The article describes nurses "little secret" that must be exposed.

  15. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D

    2007-10-01

    Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient includes routine methods for maintaining mucociliary function, as well as techniques for secretion removal. Humidification, mobilization of the patient, and airway suctioning are all routine procedures for managing secretions in the ventilated patient. Early ambulation of the post-surgical patient and routine turning of the ventilated patient are common secretion-management techniques that have little supporting evidence of efficacy. Humidification is a standard of care and a requisite for secretion management. Both active and passive humidification can be used. The humidifier selected and the level of humidification required depend on the patient's condition and the expected duration of intubation. In patients with thick, copious secretions, heated humidification is superior to a heat and moisture exchanger. Airway suctioning is the most important secretion removal technique. Open-circuit and closed-circuit suctioning have similar efficacy. Instilling saline prior to suctioning, to thin the secretions or stimulate a cough, is not supported by the literature. Adequate humidification and as-needed suctioning are the foundation of secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient. Intermittent therapy for secretion removal includes techniques either to simulate a cough, to mechanically loosen secretions, or both. Patient positioning for secretion drainage is also widely used. Percussion and postural drainage have been widely employed for mechanically ventilated patients but have not been shown to reduce ventilator-associated pneumonia or atelectasis. Manual hyperinflation and insufflation-exsufflation, which attempt to improve secretion removal by simulating a cough, have been described in mechanically ventilated patients, but neither has been studied sufficiently to support routine use. Continuous lateral rotation with a specialized bed reduces atelectasis in some patients, but has not been shown

  16. Matroids and quantum-secret-sharing schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep; Raussendorf, Robert

    2010-05-15

    A secret-sharing scheme is a cryptographic protocol to distribute a secret state in an encoded form among a group of players such that only authorized subsets of the players can reconstruct the secret. Classically, efficient secret-sharing schemes have been shown to be induced by matroids. Furthermore, access structures of such schemes can be characterized by an excluded minor relation. No such relations are known for quantum secret-sharing schemes. In this paper we take the first steps toward a matroidal characterization of quantum-secret-sharing schemes. In addition to providing a new perspective on quantum-secret-sharing schemes, this characterization has important benefits. While previous work has shown how to construct quantum-secret-sharing schemes for general access structures, these schemes are not claimed to be efficient. In this context the present results prove to be useful; they enable us to construct efficient quantum-secret-sharing schemes for many general access structures. More precisely, we show that an identically self-dual matroid that is representable over a finite field induces a pure-state quantum-secret-sharing scheme with information rate 1.

  17. Metalloproteinase activity secreted by fibrogenic cells in the processing of prolysyl oxidase. Potential role of procollagen C-proteinase.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, M V; Stetler-Stevenson, W G; Trubetskoy, O V; Gacheru, S N; Kagan, H M

    1996-03-22

    Lysyl oxidase is secreted from fibrogenic cells as a 50-kDa proenzyme that is proteolytically processed to the mature enzyme in the extracellular space. To characterize the secreted proteinase activity, a truncated, recombinant form of lysyl oxidase was prepared as a proteinase substrate containing the sequence of the propeptide cleavage region. The processing proteinase activity secreted by cultured fibrogenic cells resists inhibitors of serine or aspartyl proteinases as well as tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) but is completely inhibited by metal ion chelators. Known metalloproteinases were tested for their activity toward this substrate. Carboxyl-terminal procollagen proteinase (C-proteinase), MMP-2, and conditioned fibrogenic cell culture medium cleave the lysyl oxidase substrate to the size of the mature enzyme. The NH2-terminal sequence generated by arterial smooth muscle conditioned medium and the C-proteinase but not by MMP-2, i.e. Asp-Asp-Pro-Tyr, was identical to that previously identified in mature lysyl oxidase isolated from connective tissue. The C-proteinase activity against the model substrate was inhibited by a synthetic oligopeptide mimic of the cleavage sequence (Ac-Met-Val-Gly-Asp-Asp-Pro-Tyr-Asn-amide), whereas this peptide also inhibited the generation of lysyl oxidase activity in the medium of fetal rat lung fibroblasts in culture. In toto, these results identify a secreted metalloproteinase activity participating in the activation of prolysyl oxidase, identify inhibitors of the processing activity, and implicate procollagen C-proteinase in this role.

  18. Orientation and Order of the Amide Group of Sphingomyelin in Bilayers Determined by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Matsumori, Nobuaki; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Maeta, Yoshiko; Murata, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol) are considered essential for the formation of lipid rafts; however, the types of molecular interactions involved in this process, such as intermolecular hydrogen bonding, are not well understood. Since, unlike other phospholipids, SM is characterized by the presence of an amide group, it is essential to determine the orientation of the amide and its order in the lipid bilayers to understand the nature of the hydrogen bonds in lipid rafts. For this study, 1′-13C-2-15N-labeled and 2′-13C-2-15N-labeled SMs were prepared, and the rotational-axis direction and order parameters of the SM amide in bilayers were determined based on 13C and 15N chemical-shift anisotropies and intramolecular 13C-15N dipole coupling constants. Results revealed that the amide orientation was minimally affected by Chol, whereas the order was enhanced significantly in its presence. Thus, Chol likely promotes the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen-bond network involving the SM amide without significantly changing its orientation, providing a higher order to the SM amide. To our knowledge, this study offers new insight into the significance of the SM amide orientation with regard to molecular recognition in lipid rafts, and therefore provides a deeper understanding of the mechanism of their formation. PMID:26083921

  19. Structure–activity relationship studies of manzamine A: Amidation of positions 6 and 8 of the β-carboline moiety

    PubMed Central

    Wahba, Amir E.; Peng, Jiangnan; Kudrimoti, Sucheta; Tekwani, Babu L.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty manzamine amides were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro antimalarial and antimicrobial activities. The amides of manzamine A (1) showed significantly reduced cytotoxicity against Vero cells, although were less active than 1. The structure–activity analysis showed that linear, short alkyl groups adjacent to the amide carbonyl at position 8 are favored for antimalarial activity, while bulky and cyclic groups at position 6 provided the most active amides. Most of the amides showed potent activity against Mycobacterium intracellulare. The antimicrobial activity profile for position 8 series was similar to that for antimalarial activity profile, in which linear, slightly short alkyl groups adjacent to the amide carbonyl showed improved activity. Two amides 14 and 21, which showed potent antimalarial activity in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum were further evaluated in vivo in Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Oral administration of 14 and 21 at the dose of 30 mg/kg (once daily for three days) caused parasitemia suppression of 24% and 62%, respectively, with no apparent toxicity. PMID:19833520

  20. The formation of lipid hydroperoxide-derived amide-type lysine adducts on proteins: a review of current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation is an important biological reaction. In particular, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) can be oxidized easily. Peroxidized lipids often react with other amines accompanied by the formation of various covalent adducts. Novel amide-type lipid-lysine adducts have been identified from an in vitro reaction mixture of lipid hydroperoxide with a protein, biological tissues exposed to conditions of oxidative stress and human urine from a healthy person. In this chapter, the current knowledge of amide type adducts is reviewed with a focus on the evaluation of functional foods and diseases with a history of discovery of hexanoyl-lysine (HEL). Although there is extensive research on HEL and other amide-type adducts, the mechanism of generation of the amide bond remains unclear. We have found that the decomposed aldehyde plus peroxide combined with a lysine moiety does not fully explain the formation of the amide-type lipid-lysine adduct that is generated by lipid hydroperoxide. Singlet oxygen or an excited state of the ketone generated from the lipid hydroperoxide may also contribute to the formation of the amide linkage. The amide-adducts may prove useful not only for the detection of oxidative stress induced by disease but also for the estimation of damage caused by an excess intake of PUFA. PMID:24374915

  1. Mitochondrial function and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Maechler, Pierre

    2013-10-15

    In the endocrine fraction of the pancreas, the β-cell rapidly reacts to fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations by adjusting the rate of insulin secretion. Glucose-sensing coupled to insulin exocytosis depends on transduction of metabolic signals into intracellular messengers recognized by the secretory machinery. Mitochondria play a central role in this process by connecting glucose metabolism to insulin release. Mitochondrial activity is primarily regulated by metabolic fluxes, but also by dynamic morphology changes and free Ca(2+) concentrations. Recent advances of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis are discussed; in particular the roles of the newly-identified mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter MCU and its regulatory partner MICU1, as well as the mitochondrial Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger. This review describes how mitochondria function both as sensors and generators of metabolic signals; such as NADPH, long chain acyl-CoA, glutamate. The coupling factors are additive to the Ca(2+) signal and participate to the amplifying pathway of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

  2. Bacterial secrets of secretion: EuroConference on the biology of type IV secretion processes.

    PubMed

    Baron, Christian; OCallaghan, David; Lanka, Erich

    2002-03-01

    Type IV secretion systems (TFSS) mediate secretion or direct cell-to-cell transfer of virulence factors (proteins or protein-DNA complexes) from many Gram-negative animal, human and plant pathogens, such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bartonella tribocorum, Bordetella pertussis, Brucella suis, Helicobacter pylori, Legionella pneumophila and Rickettsia prowazekii, into eukaryotic cells. Bacterial conjugation is also classified as a TFSS-like process mediating the spread of broad-host-range plasmids between Gram-negative bacteria such as RP4 and R388, which carry antibiotic resistance genes. Genetic, biochemical, cell biological and structural biology experiments led to significant progress in the understanding of several aspects of TFSS processes. X-ray crystallography revealed that homologues of the A. tumefaciens inner membrane-associated proteins VirB11 and VirD4 from H. pylori and R388, respectively, may form channels for substrate translocation or assembly of the transmembrane TFSS machinery. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed interactions between components of the periplasmic core components VirB8, VirB9 and VirB10, which may form the translocation channel. Analysis of A. tumefaciens virulence proteins VirE2 and VirF suggested that the periplasmic translocation route of the pertussis toxin from B. pertussis may be more generally valid than previously anticipated. Secretion and modification of toxins from H. pylori and L. pneumophila profoundly affect host cell metabolism, thus entering the discipline of cellular microbiology. Finally, results from genome sequencing projects revealed the presence of up to three TFSS in a single organism, and the analysis of their interplay and adaptation to different functions will be a future challenge. TFSS-carrying plasmids were discovered in different ecosystems, suggesting that genetic exchange may speed up their evolution and adaptation to different cell-cell interactions. PMID:11918819

  3. Self-assembly and antimicrobial activity of long-chain amide-functionalized ionic liquids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M Teresa; Ribosa, Isabel; Perez, Lourdes; Manresa, Angeles; Comelles, Francesc

    2014-11-01

    Surface active amide-functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) consisting of a long alkyl chain (C6C14) connected to a polar head group (methylimidazolium or pyridinium cation) via an amide functional group were synthesized and their thermal stability, micellar properties and antimicrobial activity in aqueous solution investigated. The incorporation of an amide group increased the thermal stability of the functionalized ionic liquids compared to simple alkyl chain substituted ionic liquids. The surface activity and aggregation behaviour in aqueous solution of amide-functionalized ionic liquids were examined by tensiometry, conductivity and spectrofluorimetry. Amide-functionalized ILs displayed surface activity and their critical micelle concentration (cmc) in aqueous media decreased with the elongation of the alkyl side chain as occurs for typical surfactants. Compared to non-functionalized ILs bearing the same alkyl chain, ionic liquids with an amide moiety possess higher surface activity (pC20) and lower cmc values. The introduction of an amide group in the hydrophobic chain close to the polar head enhances adsorption at the air/water interface and micellization which could be attributed to the H-bonding in the headgroup region. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against a panel of representative Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. Amide-functionalized ILs with more than eight carbon atoms in the side chain showed broad antimicrobial activity. Antibacterial activities were found to increase with the alkyl chain length being the C12 homologous the most effective antimicrobial agents. The introduction of an amide group enhanced significantly the antifungal activity as compared to non-functionalized ILs.

  4. Application of mid-infrared free-electron laser tuned to amide bands for dissociation of aggregate structure of protein.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Yaji, Toyonari; Ohta, Toshiaki; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a linearly polarized, high-peak powered pulse laser with tunable wavelength within the mid-infrared absorption region. It was recently found that pathogenic amyloid fibrils could be partially dissociated to the monomer form by the irradiation of the FEL targeting the amide I band (C=O stretching vibration), amide II band (N-H bending vibration) and amide III band (C-N stretching vibration). In this study, the irradiation effect of the FEL on keratin aggregate was tested as another model to demonstrate an applicability of the FEL for dissociation of protein aggregates. Synchrotron radiation infrared microscopy analysis showed that the α-helix content in the aggregate structure decreased to almost the same level as that in the monomer state after FEL irradiation tuned to 6.06 µm (amide I band). Both irradiations at 6.51 µm (amide II band) and 8.06 µm (amide III band) also decreased the content of the aggregate but to a lesser extent than for the irradiation at the amide I band. On the contrary, the irradiation tuned to 5.6 µm (non-absorbance region) changed little the secondary structure of the aggregate. Scanning-electron microscopy observation at the submicrometer order showed that the angular solid of the aggregate was converted to non-ordered fragments by the irradiation at each amide band, while the aggregate was hardly deformed by the irradiation at 5.6 µm. These results demonstrate that the amide-specific irradiation by the FEL was effective for dissociation of the protein aggregate to the monomer form. PMID:26698057

  5. Calcium signaling and secretion in cholangiocytes.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Mateus T; Nathanson, Michael H

    2015-07-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis affects up to one-third of individuals who abuse alcohol and can be associated with high mortality. Although this disorder is characterized by hepatocellular damage, steatosis and neutrophil infiltration, recent evidence suggests that cholestasis or impaired bile secretion may be a frequent occurrence as well. Bile secretion results from the concerted activity of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells that line the bile ducts. Hepatocytes secrete bile acids and conjugated products into the bile canaliculi, which then are modified by cholangiocytes through secretion of bicarbonate and water to give rise to the final secreted bile. Here the molecular mechanisms regulating bile secretion in cholangiocytes are reviewed. Moreover, we discuss how the expression of intracellular Ca(2+) channels might be regulated in cholangiocytes, plus evidence that components of the Ca(2+) signaling machinery are altered in a range of cholestatic diseases of the bile ducts. PMID:26100660

  6. Motilin stimulates pepsinogen secretion in Suncus murinus.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Chayon; Tanaka, Toru; Jogahara, Takamichi; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Motilin and ghrelin are gastrointestinal hormones that stimulate the migrating motor complex (MMC) of gastrointestinal motility during the fasting state. In this study, we examined the effect of motilin and ghrelin on pepsinogen secretion in anesthetized suncus (house musk shrew, Suncus murinus), a ghrelin- and motilin-producing mammal. By using a gastric lumen-perfusion system, we found that the intravenous administration of carbachol and motilin stimulated pepsinogen secretion, the latter in a dose-dependent manner, whereas ghrelin had no effect. We then investigated the pathways of motilin-induced pepsinogen secretion using acetylcholine receptor antagonists. Treatment with atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, completely inhibited both carbachol and motilin-induced pepsinogen secretion. Motilin-induced pepsinogen secretion was observed in the vagotomized suncus. This is the first report demonstrating that motilin stimulates pepsinogen secretion, and suggest that this effect occurs through a cholinergic pathway in suncus. PMID:25957475

  7. Quantum secret sharing with minimized quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortescue, Ben; Gour, Gilad

    2013-03-01

    Standard techniques for sharing a quantum secret among multiple players (such that certain subsets of the players can recover the secret while others are denied all knowledge of the secret) require a large amount of quantum communication to distribute the secret, which is likely to be the most costly resource in any practical scheme. Two known methods for reducing this cost are the use of imperfect ``ramp'' secret sharing (in which security is sacrificed for efficiency) and classical encryption (in which certain elements of the players' shares consist of classical information only). We demonstrate how one may combine these methods to reduce the required quantum communication below what has been previously achieved, in some cases to a provable minimum, without any loss of security. The techniques involved are closely-related to the properties of stabilizer codes, and thus have strong potential for being adapted to a wide range of quantum secret sharing schemes.

  8. Type V Secretion Systems in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fan, Enguo; Chauhan, Nandini; Udatha, D B R K Gupta; Leo, Jack C; Linke, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    Type V secretion denotes a variety of secretion systems that cross the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria but that depend on the Sec machinery for transport through the inner membrane. They are possibly the simplest bacterial secretion systems, because they consist only of a single polypeptide chain (or two chains in the case of two-partner secretion). Their seemingly autonomous transport through the outer membrane has led to the term "autotransporters" for various subclasses of type V secretion. In this chapter, we review the structure and function of these transporters and review recent findings on additional factors involved in the secretion process, which have put the term "autotransporter" to debate. PMID:26999388

  9. Enzymatically and reductively degradable α-amino acid-based poly(ester amide)s: synthesis, cell compatibility, and intracellular anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huanli; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Meng, Fenghua; Dias, Aylvin A; Hendriks, Marc; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-02-01

    A novel and versatile family of enzymatically and reductively degradable α-amino acid-based poly(ester amide)s (SS-PEAs) were developed from solution polycondensation of disulfide-containing di-p-toluenesulfonic acid salts of bis-l-phenylalanine diesters (SS-Phe-2TsOH) with di-p-nitrophenyl adipate (NA) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). SS-PEAs with Mn ranging from 16.6 to 23.6 kg/mol were obtained, depending on NA/SS-Phe-2TsOH molar ratios. The chemical structures of SS-PEAs were confirmed by (1)H NMR and FTIR spectra. Thermal analyses showed that the obtained SS-PEAs were amorphous with a glass transition temperature (Tg) in the range of 35.2-39.5 °C. The in vitro degradation studies of SS-PEA films revealed that SS-PEAs underwent surface erosion in the presence of 0.1 mg/mL α-chymotrypsin and bulk degradation under a reductive environment containing 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT). The preliminary cell culture studies displayed that SS-PEA films could well support adhesion and proliferation of L929 fibroblast cells, indicating that SS-PEAs have excellent cell compatibility. The nanoparticles prepared from SS-PEA with PVA as a surfactant had an average size of 167 nm in phosphate buffer (PB, 10 mM, pH 7.4). SS-PEA nanoparticles while stable under physiological environment undergo rapid disintegration under an enzymatic or reductive condition. The in vitro drug release studies showed that DOX release was accelerated in the presence of 0.1 mg/mL α-chymotrypsin or 10 mM DTT. Confocal microscopy observation displayed that SS-PEA nanoparticles effectively transported DOX into both drug-sensitive and -resistant MCF-7 cells. MTT assays revealed that DOX-loaded SS-PEA nanoparticles had a high antitumor activity approaching that of free DOX in drug-sensitive MCF-7 cells, while more than 10 times higher than free DOX in drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells. These enzymatically and reductively degradable α-amino acid-based poly(ester amide)s have provided an appealing platform for

  10. Insight into the SEA amide thioester equilibrium. Application to the synthesis of thioesters at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Pira, S L; El Mahdi, O; Raibaut, L; Drobecq, H; Dheur, J; Boll, E; Melnyk, O

    2016-07-26

    The bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amide (SEA) N,S-acyl shift thioester surrogate has found a variety of useful applications in the field of protein total synthesis. Here we present novel insights into the SEA amide/thioester equilibrium in water which is an essential step in any reaction involving the thioester surrogate properties of the SEA group. We also show that the SEA amide thioester equilibrium can be efficiently displaced at neutral pH for accessing peptide alkylthioesters, i.e. the key components of the native chemical ligation (NCL) reaction.

  11. Physiology of Epithelial Chloride and Fluid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Frizzell, Raymond A.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial salt and water secretion serves a variety of functions in different organ systems, such as the airways, intestines, pancreas, and salivary glands. In cystic fibrosis (CF), the volume and/or composition of secreted luminal fluids are compromised owing to mutations in the gene encoding CFTR, the apical membrane anion channel that is responsible for salt secretion in response to cAMP/PKA stimulation. This article examines CFTR and related cellular transport processes that underlie epithelial anion and fluid secretion, their regulation, and how these processes are altered in CF disease to account for organ-specific secretory phenotypes. PMID:22675668

  12. Stimulation of leptin secretion by insulin

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Minglun; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; Inui, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Leptin has a crucial role in regulating food intake and maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Although little is known about the process of leptin secretion, insulin, which has an important role in the metabolism of glucose and lipids, is believed to regulate leptin secretion through a posttranscriptional mechanism in the short term, and via glucose metabolism in the long term. The gastric mucosa secretes leptin, but this mechanism has not been completely elucidated. Understanding the mechanism of insulin-regulated leptin secretion could lead to the development of new treatment methods for obesity and its comorbidities, which are serious public health concerns. PMID:23565488

  13. Random Secretion of Growth Hormone in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Klaus; Kloppstech, Mirko; Nowlan, Steven J.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Brabant, Georg

    1996-08-01

    In normal humans, growth hormone (GH) is secreted from a gland located adjacent to the brain (pituitary) into the blood in distinct pulses, but in patients bearing a tumor within the pituitary (acromegaly) GH is excessively secreted in an irregular manner. It has been hypothesized that GH secretion in the diseased state becomes random. This hypothesis is supported by demonstrating that GH secretion in patients with acromegaly cannot be distinguished from a variety of linear stochastic processes based on the predictability of the fluctuations of GH concentration in the bloodstream.

  14. Gonadotropin secretion in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, U; Pirke, K M; Laessle, R G; Fichter, M M

    1992-05-01

    Twenty-two normal weight women with bulimia nervosa (BN) were studied (mean age, 25 +/- 5 yr; body mass index, 20.2 +/- 2.6 kg/m2). Sixteen of them reported menstrual cycles in the range of 21-42 days, and 6 had experienced absence of menstruation for at least 3 months. Twenty-one healthy women with regular menstrual cycles (mean age, 23 +/- 2 yr; body mass index, 20.7 +/- 1.4) served as the control subjects. Frequent morning blood samples for estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) determinations were obtained for the duration of 1 menstrual cycle or for 6 weeks in the case of amenorrhea. LH, FSH, cortisol, and insulin secretion were studied on day 3, 4, or 5 after the onset of a menstrual cycle or on a random day in the 6 BN women with amenorrhea. Blood samples were collected at 15-min intervals from 1800-0600 h for LH and FSH and at 30-min intervals from 2400-0600 h for cortisol and insulin. Nineteen of the 21 controls, but only 10 of the 22 BN women, fulfilled the following standard criteria: maximum E2 above 440 pmol/L, maximum P4 above 19 nmol/L, and luteal phase length of 9 days or more. The 10 BN women with normal menstrual cycles had lower mean insulin concentrations than the controls (70 +/- 20 vs. 120 +/- 30 pmol/L; P less than 0.01), but gonadotropin secretion, cortisol, and T3 concentrations were similar. The 8 BN women with amenorrhea or ovulatory dysfunction (maximum E2, less than 440 pmol/L; maximum P4, less than 6 nmol/L) displayed decreased mean LH pulse frequency (2.6 +/- 2.4 vs. 5.7 +/- 2.0 pulses/12 h; P less than 0.01), increased mean cortisol (120 +/- 40 vs. 80 +/- 20 nmol/L; P less than 0.01), decreased mean insulin (90 +/- 40 vs. 120 +/- 30 pmol/L; P less than 0.05), and decreased mean T3 concentrations (1.5 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.2 nmol/L; P less than 0.01). The data suggest that BN in normal weight women is associated with an increased rate of ovarian dysfunction; decreased pulsatile LH secretion seems to be an important mechanism. Increased

  15. [Functional morphology of stomach secretions].

    PubMed

    Liebich, H G

    1985-01-01

    The stimulation of gastric secretion is regulated by neurovagal, endocrine and immunological reactions. During the gastric phase of digestion, especially acetylcholin, gastrin and histamin react as main transmitters, activated by mediators (prostaglandines, leucotrienes, lipoxygenases). The dominant role of nervus vagus has to be seen in the transactions of vago-vagal reflexes, the stimulation of gastrin liberation by an non-cholinergic mechanism and the regulation of the gastric microcirculation. The antrum pylori can be seen as an immunological area of reception, where immunological active cells (macrophages, NK-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes) are recognizing antigens (e.g. food antigens). These immunocytes induce a cascade of endocrine and exocrine mechanisms of digestion. Mastcells, located intra-and extraepithelial, take a regulatory influence in producing histamins, leucotrienes and also prostaglandines.

  16. The type III secretion injectisome.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guy R

    2006-11-01

    The type III secretion injectisome is a complex nanomachine that allows bacteria to deliver protein effectors across eukaryotic cellular membranes. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of its structure, assembly and mode of operation. The principal structural components of the injectisome, from the base located in the bacterial cytosol to the tip of the needle protruding from the cell surface, have been investigated in detail. The structures of several constituent proteins were solved at the atomic level and important insights into the assembly process have been gained. However, despite the ongoing concerted efforts of molecular and structural biologists, the role of many of the constituent components of this nanomachine remain unknown. PMID:17041629

  17. Synthesis and preliminary biological evaluations of (+)-isocampholenic acid-derived amides.

    PubMed

    Grošelj, Uroš; Golobič, Amalija; Knez, Damijan; Hrast, Martina; Gobec, Stanislav; Ričko, Sebastijan; Svete, Jurij

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of two novel (+)-isocampholenic acid-derived amines has been realized starting from commercially available (1S)-(+)-10-camphorsulfonic acid. The novel amines as well as (+)-isocampholenic acid have been used as building blocks in the construction of a library of amides using various aliphatic, aromatic, and amino acid-derived coupling partners using BPC and CDI as activating agents. Amide derivatives have been assayed against several enzymes that hold potential for the development of new drugs to battle bacterial infections and Alzheimer's disease. Compounds 20c and 20e showed promising selective sub-micromolar inhibition of human butyrylcholinesterase [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text] values [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively). PMID:27017352

  18. Novel hydrazone derivatives containing pyridine amide moiety: Design, synthesis, and insecticidal activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zai-Bo; Hu, De-Yu; Zeng, Song; Song, Bao-An

    2016-02-15

    A series of novel hydrazone derivatives containing pyridine amide moiety were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their insecticidal activity. Bioassays indicated that some of the target compounds exhibited good insecticidal activities against Nilaparvata lugens (N. lugens), Plutella xylostella (P. xylostella), Mythimna separata (M. separata), Helicoverpa armigera (H. armigera), Pyrausta nubilalis (P. nubilalis), and Culex pipiens pallens (C. pipiens pallens). In particular, compound 5j revealed excellent insecticidal activity against C. pipiens pallens, with the 50% lethal concentration (LC50) and the 95% lethal concentration (LC95) values of 2.44 and 5.76 mg/L, respectively, which were similar to those of chlorpyrifos (3.26 and 6.98 mg/L, respectively), tebufenozide (1.22 and 2.49 mg/L, respectively), and RH-5849 (2.61 and 6.37 mg/L, respectively). These results indicated that hydrazone derivatives containing pyridine amide moiety could be developed as novel and promising insecticides.

  19. A Simple Primary Amide for the Selective Recovery of Gold from Secondary Resources.

    PubMed

    Doidge, Euan D; Carson, Innis; Tasker, Peter A; Ellis, Ross J; Morrison, Carole A; Love, Jason B

    2016-09-26

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) such as mobile phones contains a plethora of metals of which gold is by far the most valuable. Herein a simple primary amide is described that achieves the selective separation of gold from a mixture of metals typically found in mobile phones by extraction into toluene from an aqueous HCl solution; unlike current processes, reverse phase transfer is achieved simply using water. Phase transfer occurs by dynamic assembly of protonated and neutral amides with [AuCl4 ](-) ions through hydrogen bonding in the organic phase, as shown by EXAFS, mass spectrometry measurements, and computational calculations, and supported by distribution coefficient analysis. The fundamental chemical understanding gained herein should be integral to the development of metal-recovery processes, in particular through the use of dynamic assembly processes to build complexity from simplicity.

  20. Efficient and scalable synthesis of α,α-disubstituted β-amino amides.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Marianne Hagensen; Engqvist, Magnus; Ausbacher, Dominik; Strøm, Morten Bøhmer; Bayer, Annette

    2016-08-21

    A practical and efficient methodology for the preparation of 2-aminoethyl α,α-disubstituted β-amino amides in three steps from methyl cyanoacetate has been developed. The key step in the synthesis was the chemoselective reduction of the nitrile group in presence of an amide and aryl halide functionalities. Reduction with RANEY® Nickel catalyst, either with molecular hydrogen (8-10 bar) or under transfer hydrogenation conditions, necessitated in situ protection of the resulting amines with Boc2O, whereas aryl bromide containing nitriles could be chemoselectively reduced with ZnCl2/NaBH4 without debromination. The developed protocol involved only one chromatographic purification step and can be performed at gram scale. PMID:27439743

  1. A Simple Primary Amide for the Selective Recovery of Gold from Secondary Resources.

    PubMed

    Doidge, Euan D; Carson, Innis; Tasker, Peter A; Ellis, Ross J; Morrison, Carole A; Love, Jason B

    2016-09-26

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) such as mobile phones contains a plethora of metals of which gold is by far the most valuable. Herein a simple primary amide is described that achieves the selective separation of gold from a mixture of metals typically found in mobile phones by extraction into toluene from an aqueous HCl solution; unlike current processes, reverse phase transfer is achieved simply using water. Phase transfer occurs by dynamic assembly of protonated and neutral amides with [AuCl4 ](-) ions through hydrogen bonding in the organic phase, as shown by EXAFS, mass spectrometry measurements, and computational calculations, and supported by distribution coefficient analysis. The fundamental chemical understanding gained herein should be integral to the development of metal-recovery processes, in particular through the use of dynamic assembly processes to build complexity from simplicity. PMID:27554437

  2. Preparation and characterization of amidated pectin based hydrogels for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mishra, R K; Datt, M; Pal, K; Banthia, A K

    2008-06-01

    In the current studies attempts were made to prepare hydrogels by chemical modification of pectin with ethanolamine (EA) in different proportions. Chemically modified pectin products were crosslinked with glutaraldehyde reagent for preparing hydrogels. The hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), organic elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction studies (XRD), swelling studies, biocompatibility and hemocompatibility studies. Mechanical properties of the prepared hydrogels were evaluated by tensile test. The hydrogels were loaded with salicylic acid (used as a model drug) and drug release studies were done in a modified Franz's diffusion cell. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of primary and secondary amide absorption bands. XRD studies indicated increase in crystallinity in the hydrogels as compared to unmodified pectin. The degree of amidation (DA) and molar and mass reaction yields (YM and YN) was calculated based on the results of organic elemental analysis. The hydrogels showed good water holding properties and were found to be compatible with B-16 melanoma cells & human blood.

  3. Aqueous Cation-Amide Binding: Free Energies and IR Spectral Signatures by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pluhařová, Eva; Baer, Marcel D; Mundy, Christopher J; Schmidt, Burkhard; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    Understanding specific ion effects on proteins remains a considerable challenge. N-methylacetamide serves as a useful proxy for the protein backbone that can be well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The spectroscopic signatures in the amide I band reflecting the strength of the interaction of alkali cations and alkaline earth dications with the carbonyl group remain difficult to assign and controversial to interpret. Herein, we directly compute the infrared (IR) shifts corresponding to the binding of either sodium or calcium to aqueous N-methylacetamide using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the two cations interact with aqueous N-methylacetamide with different affinities and in different geometries. Because sodium exhibits a weak interaction with the carbonyl group, the resulting amide I band is similar to an unperturbed carbonyl group undergoing aqueous solvation. In contrast, the stronger calcium binding results in a clear IR shift with respect to N-methylacetamide in pure water.

  4. A simple primary amide for the selective recovery of gold from secondary resources

    DOE PAGES

    Doidge, Euan D.; Carson, Innis; Tasker, Peter A.; Ellis, Ross J.; Morrison, Carole A.; Love, Jason B.

    2016-08-24

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) such as mobile phones contains a plethora of metals of which gold is by far the most valuable. Herein a simple primary amide is described that achieves the selective separation of gold from a mixture of metals typically found in mobile phones by extraction into toluene from an aqueous HCl solution; unlike current processes, reverse phase transfer is achieved simply using water. Phase transfer occurs by dynamic assembly of protonated and neutral amides with [AuCl4]– ions through hydrogen bonding in the organic phase, as shown by EXAFS, mass spectrometry measurements, and computational calculations, andmore » supported by distribution coefficient analysis. In conclusion, the fundamental chemical understanding gained herein should be integral to the development of metal-recovery processes, in particular through the use of dynamic assembly processes to build complexity from simplicity.« less

  5. Chemoselective synthesis of ketones and ketimines by addition of organometallic reagents to secondary amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechara, William S.; Pelletier, Guillaume; Charette, André B.

    2012-03-01

    The development of efficient and selective transformations is crucial in synthetic chemistry as it opens new possibilities in the total synthesis of complex molecules. Applying such reactions to the synthesis of ketones is of great importance, as this motif serves as a synthetic handle for the elaboration of numerous organic functionalities. In this context, we report a general and chemoselective method based on an activation/addition sequence on secondary amides allowing the controlled isolation of structurally diverse ketones and ketimines. The generation of a highly electrophilic imidoyl triflate intermediate was found to be pivotal in the observed exceptional functional group tolerance, allowing the facile addition of readily available Grignard and diorganozinc reagents to amides, and avoiding commonly observed over-addition or reduction side reactions. The methodology has been applied to the formal synthesis of analogues of the antineoplastic agent Bexarotene and to the rapid and efficient synthesis of unsymmetrical diketones in a one-pot procedure.

  6. /sup 17/O NMR spectroscopy: torsion angle relationships in aryl carboxylic esters, acids, and amides

    SciTech Connect

    Baumstark, A.L.; Balakrishnan, P.; Dotrong, M.; McCloskey, C.J.; Oakley, M.G.; Boykin, D.W.

    1987-02-18

    /sup 1/ /sup 7/O NMR spectroscopic data (natural abundance in acetonitrile at 75/sup 0/C) were obtained for the following series of electronically similar, sterically hindered compounds: aromatic methyl esters, aromatic carboxylic acids, and aromatic amides. Torsional angles were calculated by the molecular mechanics (MM2) method. Linear regression analysis of the estimated torsion angles and the /sup 17/O chemical shift data for each series yielded the following results (series, slope delta/degree, correlation coefficient): esters (C=O), 0.70, 0.997; esters (-0-), 0.43, 0.992; acids (-CO/sub 2/H), 0.56, 0.994; amides (C=O), 0.84, 0.942; N,N-dimethylamides (C=O), 0.6, 0.991. The results are discussed in terms of minimization of repulsive van der Waals interactions by rotation of the functional group out of the plane of the aromatic ring.

  7. Selective rhodium-catalyzed reduction of tertiary amides in amino acid esters and peptides.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Li, Yuehui; Bornschein, Christoph; Pisiewicz, Sabine; Kiersch, Konstanze; Michalik, Dirk; Gallou, Fabrice; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-10-12

    Efficient reduction of the tertiary amide bond in amino acid derivatives and peptides is described. Functional group selectivity has been achieved by applying a commercially available rhodium precursor and bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (dppp) ligand together with phenyl silane as a reductant. This methodology allows for specific reductive derivatization of biologically interesting peptides and offers straightforward access to a variety of novel peptide derivatives for chemical biology studies and potential pharmaceutical applications. The catalytic system tolerates a variety of functional groups including secondary amides, ester, nitrile, thiomethyl, and hydroxy groups. This convenient hydrosilylation reaction proceeds at ambient conditions and is operationally safe because no air-sensitive reagents or highly reactive metal hydrides are needed. PMID:26189442

  8. Complexation of amidated pectin with poly(itaconic acid) as a polycarboxylic polymer model compound.

    PubMed

    Nesic, Aleksandra R; Trifunovic, Snezana S; Grujic, Aleksandar S; Velickovic, Sava J; Antonovic, Dusan G

    2011-11-01

    Complexes based on amidated pectin (AP) and poly(itaconic acid) (PIA) were prepared by casting films from solutions of AP and PIA in different ratios with the pectin amount ranging from 10% to 90% by mass. The complexes were investigated by elemental analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermogravimetry (TG). In all investigated ratios of AP/PIA glassy transparent films with a uniform structure were obtained. The results of elemental analysis confirmed the composition of the complexes, and FTIR spectroscopy has shown carboxylic and amide peak shifting, indicating complex formation between AP and PIA. Comparison of thermograms of AP/PIA films with different ratios of AP indicated that the increase of the amount of AP increases the thermal stability of the films by retarding the onset of the main degradation processes. PMID:21943549

  9. Selective rhodium-catalyzed reduction of tertiary amides in amino acid esters and peptides.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Li, Yuehui; Bornschein, Christoph; Pisiewicz, Sabine; Kiersch, Konstanze; Michalik, Dirk; Gallou, Fabrice; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-10-12

    Efficient reduction of the tertiary amide bond in amino acid derivatives and peptides is described. Functional group selectivity has been achieved by applying a commercially available rhodium precursor and bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (dppp) ligand together with phenyl silane as a reductant. This methodology allows for specific reductive derivatization of biologically interesting peptides and offers straightforward access to a variety of novel peptide derivatives for chemical biology studies and potential pharmaceutical applications. The catalytic system tolerates a variety of functional groups including secondary amides, ester, nitrile, thiomethyl, and hydroxy groups. This convenient hydrosilylation reaction proceeds at ambient conditions and is operationally safe because no air-sensitive reagents or highly reactive metal hydrides are needed.

  10. Titanocene(III)-Catalyzed Three-Component Reaction of Secondary Amides, Aldehydes, and Electrophilic Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao; He, Jiang; Li, Heng-Hui; Wang, Ao; Dai, Xi-Jie; Wang, Ai-E; Huang, Pei-Qiang

    2015-11-01

    An umpolung Mannich-type reaction of secondary amides, aliphatic aldehydes, and electrophilic alkenes has been disclosed. This reaction features the one-pot formation of C-N and C-C bonds by a titanocene-catalyzed radical coupling of the condensation products, from secondary amides and aldehydes, with electrophilic alkenes. N-substituted γ-amido-acid derivatives and γ-amido ketones can be efficiently prepared by the current method. Extension to the reaction between ketoamides and electrophilic alkenes allows rapid assembly of piperidine skeletons with α-amino quaternary carbon centers. Its synthetic utility has been demonstrated by a facile construction of the tricyclic core of marine alkaloids such as cylindricine C and polycitorol A.

  11. Benzoxazole and benzothiazole amides as novel pharmacokinetic enhancers of HIV protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jonckers, Tim H M; Rouan, Marie-Claude; Haché, Geerwin; Schepens, Wim; Hallenberger, Sabine; Baumeister, Judith; Sasaki, Jennifer C

    2012-08-01

    A new class of benzoxazole and benzothiazole amide derivatives exhibiting potent CYP3A4 inhibiting properties was identified. Extensive lead optimization was aimed at improving the CYP3A4 inhibitory properties as well as overall ADME profile of these amide derivatives. This led to the identification of thiazol-5-ylmethyl (2S,3R)-4-(2-(ethyl(methyl)amino)-N-isobutylbenzo[d]oxazole-6-carboxamido)-3-hydroxy-1-phenylbutan-2-ylcarbamate (C1) as a lead candidate for this class. This compound together with structurally similar analogues demonstrated excellent 'boosting' properties when tested in dogs. These findings warrant further evaluation of their properties in an effort to identify valuable alternatives to Ritonavir as pharmacokinetic enhancers.

  12. Cationic bismuth-catalyzed hydroamination and direct substitution of the hydroxy group in alcohols with amides.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2012-01-01

    Bismuth-catalyzed hydroamination and direct substitution of the hydroxy group in alcohols are described in this chapter. Intermolecular 1:1 hydroamination of 1,3-dienes with carbamates, sulfonamides, and carboxamides was promoted by a combination of Bi(OTf)(3) and Cu(CH(3)CN)(4)PF(6). The mechanistic studies suggested that a cationic bismuth species would be an active species, which selectively promotes 1:1 hydroamination to give allylic amides in up to 96% yield. The cationic bismuth species was also applicable for hydroamination of vinyl arenes. The combination of Bi(OTf)(3) and KPF(6) was an excellent catalyst for direct substitution of the hydroxy group in allylic, propargylic, and benzylic alcohols with carbamates, sulfonamides, and carboxamides, giving allylic, propargylic, and benzylic amides, respectively, in up to 99% yield in one step. PMID:21647841

  13. Synthesis, biological activity, and bioavailability of moschamine, a safflomide-type phenylpropenoic acid amide found in Centaurea cyanus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moschamine is a safflomide-type phenylpropenoic acid amide originally isolated from Centaurea cyanus. This paper describes the synthesis, detection of serotoninergic and COX inhibitory activities, and bioavailability of moschamine. Moschamine was chemically synthesized and identified using NMR spect...

  14. Sulfonated reduced graphene oxide as a highly efficient catalyst for direct amidation of carboxylic acids with amines using ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mirza-Aghayan, Maryam; Tavana, Mahdieh Molaee; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-03-01

    Sulfonated reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (rGO-SO3H) were prepared by grafting sulfonic acid-containing aryl radicals onto chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) under sonochemical conditions. rGO-SO3H catalyst was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). rGO-SO3H catalyst was successfully applied as a reusable solid acid catalyst for the direct amidation of carboxylic acids with amines into the corresponding amides under ultrasonic irradiation. The direct sonochemical amidation of carboxylic acid takes place under mild conditions affording in good to high yields (56-95%) the corresponding amides in short reaction times.

  15. Is there any difference in Amide and NOE CEST effects between white and gray matter at 7 T?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikov, Vitaliy; Siero, Jeroen C. W.; Wijnen, Jannie; Visser, Fredy; Luijten, Peter R.; Klomp, Dennis W. J.; Hoogduin, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Measurement of Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) is providing tissue physiology dependent contrast, e.g. by looking at Amide and NOE (Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement) effects. CEST is unique in providing quantitative metabolite information at high imaging resolution. However, direct comparison of Amide and NOE effects between different tissues may result in wrong conclusions on the metabolite concentration due to the additional contributors to the observed CEST contrast, such as water content (WC) and water T1 relaxation (T1w). For instance, there are multiple contradictory reports in the literature on Amide and NOE effects in white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) at 7 T. This study shows that at 7 T, tissue water T1 relaxation is a stronger contributor to CEST contrasts than WC. After water T1 correction, there was no difference in Amide effects between WM and GM, whereas WM/GM contrast was enhanced for NOE effects.

  16. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of caffeic acid amides as synergists to sensitize fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li; Zang, Chengxu; Tian, Shujuan; Liu, Wei; Tan, Shanlun; Cai, Zhan; Ni, Tingjunhong; An, Maomao; Li, Ran; Gao, Yue; Zhang, Dazhi; Jiang, Yuanying

    2015-01-01

    A series of caffeic acid amides were designed, synthesized, and their synergistic activity with fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans was evaluated in vitro. The title caffeic acid amides 3-30 except 26 exhibited potent activity, and the subsequent SAR study was conducted. Compound 3, 5, 21, and 34c, at a concentration of 1.0 μg/ml, decreased the MIC₈₀ of fluconazole from 128.0 μg/ml to 1.0-0.5 μg/ml against the fluconazole-resistant C. albicans. This result suggests that the caffeic acid amides, as synergists, can sensitize drug-resistant fungi to fluconazole. The SAR study indicated that the dihydroxyl groups and the amido groups linking to phenyl or heterocyclic rings are the important pharmacophores of the caffeic acid amides.

  17. Metal Ion Binding to Polypeptides Characterized by Irmpd Spectroscopy. Metal-Amide Nitrogen Binding and the Iminol Tautomerization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Polfer, Nicolas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2012-06-01

    We have recently uncovered a new binding mode for the complexation of metal ions with gas-phase peptides. Termed the iminol mode, this binding mode is adopted by strongly binding divalent metal ions including Mg2+ and Ni2+. The metal ion displaces the amide hydrogen, which moves to protonate the amide carbonyl oxygen. A spectroscopic signature of the tautomerization is the disappearance of the characteristic Amide II band normally seen in peptide ion infrared spectra. We find that in peptides up to pentapeptides, multiple iminol binding can take place, such that all amide linkages are tautomerized to the iminol form, and chelate the metal ion. However, the iminol tautomerization depends on the nature of the metal ion, as will be discussed. Spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell of the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with infrared light from the FELIX laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 cm-1.

  18. Nitrotriazole- and Imidazole-Based Amides and Sulfonamides as Antitubercular Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bloomer, William D.; Rosenzweig, Howard S.; Arena, Alexander; Arrieta, Francisco; Rebolledo, Joseph C. J.; Smith, Diane K.

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-three 3-nitrotriazole-based and 2-nitroimidazole-based amides and sulfonamides were screened for antitubercular (anti-TB) activity in aerobic Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv by using the BacTiter-Glo (BTG) microbial cell viability assay. In general, 3-nitrotriazole-based sulfonamides demonstrated anti-TB activity, whereas 3-nitrotriazole-based amides and 2-nitroimidazole-based amides and sulfonamides were inactive. Three 3-nitrotriazole-based sulfonamides (compounds 4, 2, and 7) demonstrated 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50), IC90, and MIC values of 0.38, 0.43, and 1.56 μM (compound 4), 0.57, 0.98, and 3.13 μM (compound 2), and 0.79, 0.87, and 3.13 μM (compound 7), respectively. For 3-nitrotriazole-based sulfonamides, anti-TB activity increased with lipophilicity, whereas the one-electron reduction potential (E1/2) did not play a role. 2-Nitroimidazole-based analogs, which were inactive in the BTG assay, were significantly more active in the low-oxygen assay and more active than the 3-nitrotriazoles. All active nitrotriazoles in the BTG assay were similarly active or more potent (lower MIC values) against resistant strains, with the exception of compounds 2, 3, 4, and 8, which demonstrated greater MIC values against isoniazid-resistant strains. Five 3-nitrotriazole-based sulfonamides demonstrated activity in infected murine J774 macrophages, causing log reductions similar to those seen with rifampin. However, some compounds caused toxicity in uninfected macrophages. In conclusion, the classes of 3-nitrotriazole-based amides and sulfonamides merit further investigation as potential antitubercular agents. PMID:25182645

  19. A new feruloyl amide derivative from the fruits of Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopo; Wei, Na; Huang, Jian; Tan, Yinfeng; Jin, Dejun

    2012-01-01

    A new feruloyl amide derivative, named tribulusamide C, was isolated from the fruits of Tribulus terrestris. Its structure was determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis including IR, 1-D-, 2-D-NMR and HR-ESI-MS. The structure of tribulusamide C was characterised by a unit of pyrrolidine-2,5-dione, which distinguished it from other lignanamides previously isolated from the fruits of T. terrestris.

  20. Ni-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Cross-Coupling: Direct Transformation of Aldehydes to Esters and Amides

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Aaron M.; Dong, Vy M.

    2015-01-01

    By exploring a new mode of Ni-catalyzed cross-coupling, we have developed a protocol to transform both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes into either esters or amides directly. The success of this oxidative coupling depends on the appropriate choice of catalyst and organic oxidant, including the use of either α,α,α-trifluoroacetophenone or excess aldehyde. We present mechanistic data that supports a catalytic cycle involving oxidative addition into the aldehyde C–H bond. PMID:25424967

  1. Nickel-catalyzed dehydrogenative cross-coupling: direct transformation of aldehydes into esters and amides.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Aaron M; Dong, Vy M

    2015-01-19

    By exploring a new mode of nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling, a method to directly transform both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes into either esters or amides has been developed. The success of this oxidative coupling depends on the appropriate choice of catalyst and organic oxidant, including the use of either α,α,α-trifluoroacetophenone or excess aldehyde. Mechanistic data that supports a catalytic cycle involving oxidative addition into the aldehyde C-H bond is also presented. PMID:25424967

  2. Kinetic analyses of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase from pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Noe, B D; Katopodis, A G; May, S W

    1991-08-01

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) plays an important role in the post-translational processing of bioactive neuropeptides by participating in C-terminal amidation. We have examined PAM activity in the pancreatic islets of the anglerfish (AF), Lophius americanus. It was previously demonstrated that the cofactor requirements and pH optimum for the fish PAM are essentially identical to PAM obtained from other tissues and species. The present study was performed to examine the enzymatic characteristics of the fish islet PAM in more detail. One of the questions addressed was the suitability of the AF islet neuropeptide Y-like peptide, aPY-Gly, as a substrate for the islet PAM. Partially purified PAM from AF islet secretory granules was incubated with [125I] aPY-Gly and the resulting products were analyzed by HPLC. The islet PAM readily mediated the formation of aPY-amide from aPY-Gly. PAM purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin granules also catalyzed the amidation of [125I] aPY-Gly. The kinetic parameters of the islet PAM were examined using trinitrophenylated-D-Tyr-Val-Gly (TNP-D-YVG) and 4-nitrohippuric acid (4-NHA). The Km of the islet PAM was 25 +/- 5 microM for TNP-D-YVG and 3.4 +/- 1 mM for 4-NHA. The competitive inhibitor of mammalian PAM activity, 4-methoxybenzoxyacetic acid, proved to be a potent inhibitor of the islet PAM as well, with an apparent KI of 0.06 mM. These results demonstrate that the AF islet PAM exhibits substrate compatibility, kinetic parameters, and inhibitor susceptibility quite similar to the characteristics of PAM from other tissues and species. PMID:1916206

  3. Antimycobacterial activity generated by the amide coupling of (-)-fenchone derived aminoalcohol with cinnamic acids and analogues.

    PubMed

    Slavchev, Ivaylo; Dobrikov, Georgi M; Valcheva, Violeta; Ugrinova, Iva; Pasheva, Evdokia; Dimitrov, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    Aminoethyl substituted 2-endo-fenchol prepared from (-)-fenchone was used as scaffold for the synthesis of series of 31 amide structures by N-acylation applying cinnamic acids and analogues. The evaluation of their in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv showed for some of them promising activity-up to 0.2 μg/ml, combined with relatively low cytotoxicity of the selected active compounds.

  4. Anti-proliferative activity of Monensin and its tertiary amide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Huczyński, Adam; Klejborowska, Greta; Antoszczak, Michał; Maj, Ewa; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2015-10-15

    New tertiary amide derivatives of polyether ionophore Monensin A (MON) were synthesised and their anti-proliferative activity against cancer cell lines was studied. Very high activity (IC50=0.09 μM) and selectivity (SI=232) of MON against human biphenotypic myelomonocytic leukemia cell line (MV4-11) was demonstrated. The MON derivatives obtained exhibit interesting anti-proliferative activity, high selectivity index and also are able to break the drug-resistance of cancer cell line.

  5. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange of aromatic amines and amides using deuterated trifluoroacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Richard; Lee, Amy; Jung, Erica; Kang, Aaron; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    The H-D exchange of aromatic amines and amides, including pharmaceutically relevant compounds such as acetaminophen and diclofenac, was investigated using CF3COOD as both the sole reaction solvent and source of deuterium label. The described method is amenable to efficient deuterium incorporation for a wide variety of substrates possessing both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents. Best results were seen with less basic anilines and highly activated acetanilides, reflecting the likelihood of different mechanistic pathways. PMID:25641994

  6. The effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the planarity of amides.

    PubMed

    Platts, James A; Maarof, Hasmerya; Harris, Kenneth D M; Lim, Gin Keat; Willock, David J

    2012-09-14

    Ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations on some model systems are presented to assess the extent to which intermolecular hydrogen bonding can affect the planarity of amide groups. Formamide and urea are examined as archetypes of planar and non-planar amides, respectively. DFT optimisations suggest that appropriately disposed hydrogen-bond donor or acceptor molecules can induce non-planarity in formamide, with OCNH dihedral angles deviating by up to ca. 20° from planarity. Ab initio energy calculations demonstrate that the energy required to deform an amide molecule from the preferred geometry of the isolated molecule is more than compensated by the stabilisation due to hydrogen bonding. Similarly, the NH(2) group in urea can be made effectively planar by the presence of appropriately positioned hydrogen-bond acceptors, whereas hydrogen-bond donors increase the non-planarity of the NH(2) group. Small clusters (a dimer, two trimers and a pentamer) extracted from the crystal structure of urea indicate that the crystal field acts to force planarity of the urea molecule; however, the interaction with nearest neighbours alone is insufficient to induce the molecule to become completely planar, and longer-range effects are required. Finally, the potential for intermolecular hydrogen bonding to induce non-planarity in a model of a peptide is explored. Inter alia, the insights obtained in the present work on the extent to which the geometry of amide groups may be deformed under the influence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding provide structural guidelines that can assist the interpretation of the geometries of such groups in structure determination from powder X-ray diffraction data. PMID:22847473

  7. Characterization of FdmV as an Amide Synthetase for Fredericamycin A Biosynthesis in Streptomyces griseus ATCC 43944*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yihua; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Ju, Jianhua; Lin, Shuangjun; Rajski, Scott R.; Shen, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Fredericamycin (FDM) A is a pentadecaketide natural product that features an amide linkage. Analysis of the fdm cluster from Streptomyces griseus ATCC 43944, however, failed to reveal genes encoding the types of amide synthetases commonly seen in natural product biosynthesis. Here, we report in vivo and in vitro characterizations of FdmV, an asparagine synthetase (AS) B-like protein, as an amide synthetase that catalyzes the amide bond formation in FDM A biosynthesis. This is supported by the findings that (i) inactivation of fdmV in vivo afforded the ΔfdmV mutant strain SB4027 that abolished FDM A and FDM E production but accumulated FDM C, a biosynthetic intermediate devoid of the characteristic amide linkage; (ii) FdmV in vitro catalyzes conversion of FDM C to FDM B, a known intermediate for FDM A biosynthesis (apparent Km = 162 ± 67 μm and kcat = 0.11 ± 0.02 min−1); and (iii) FdmV also catalyzes the amidation of FDM M-3, a structural analog of FDM C, to afford amide FDM M-6 in vitro, albeit at significantly reduced efficiency. Preliminary enzymatic studies revealed that, in addition to the common nitrogen sources (l-Gln and free amine) of class II glutamine amidotransferases (to which AS B belongs), FdmV can also utilize l-Asn as a nitrogen donor. The amide bond formation in FDM A biosynthesis is proposed to occur after C-8 hydroxylation but before the carbaspirocycle formation. PMID:20926388

  8. Host-Defense Peptides with Therapeutic Potential from Skin Secretions of Frogs from the Family Pipidae

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, J. Michael; Mechkarska, Milena

    2014-01-01

    Skin secretions from frogs belonging to the genera Xenopus, Silurana, Hymenochirus, and Pseudhymenochirus in the family Pipidae are a rich source of host-defense peptides with varying degrees of antimicrobial activities and cytotoxicities to mammalian cells. Magainin, peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa), caerulein-precursor fragment (CPF), and xenopsin-precursor fragment (XPF) peptides have been isolated from norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from several species of Xenopus and Silurana. Hymenochirins and pseudhymenochirins have been isolated from Hymenochirus boettgeri and Pseudhymenochirus merlini. A major obstacle to the development of these peptides as anti-infective agents is their hemolytic activities against human erythrocytes. Analogs of the magainins, CPF peptides and hymenochirin-1B with increased antimicrobial potencies and low cytotoxicities have been developed that are active (MIC < 5 μM) against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Despite this, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents has not been realized so that alternative clinical applications as anti-cancer, anti-viral, anti-diabetic, or immunomodulatory drugs are being explored. PMID:24434793

  9. "The Secret Garden": A Literary Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the life of Frances Hodgson Burnett, author of "The Secret Garden." Argues that it not only tells an enthralling tale, but takes readers on a journey through the history of English literature. Discusses the gothic tradition and romanticism of "The Secret Garden." Lists classic elements in the book and offers five ideas for stimulating…

  10. Family Secrets: The Bioethics of Genetic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Dina G.; DuPre, Michael J.; Holt, Susan; Chen, Shaw-Ree; Wischnowski, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses "Family Secrets," a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum module that focuses on the bioethical implications of genetic testing. In high school biology classrooms throughout New York State, students are using "Family Secrets" to learn about DNA testing; Huntington's disease (HD); and the ethical, legal, and social…

  11. [Characterization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe secreted proteins].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ling; Liu, Yun-Fan; Xie, Jian-Ping

    2007-02-01

    Secreted proteins play a vital physiological role. Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important model organism for cell cycle study and a potential useful drug screen model. Secreted proteins also initiate the mating. However, few global studies concerning the secreted proteins of S. pombe was reported. To address this issue, bioinformatics were used to reveal the global secreted proteins of S. pombe. The 4997 proteins deduced from the S. pombe genome were analyzed by combined several programs. One hundred and sixty proteins were identified carrying an NH2-terminal secretory signal peptide by signalP3.0. Among them, 117 proteins are integral membrane proteins (TMpred), 13 proteins are lipoproteins (PrositeS-can), and 66 proteins are secreted proteins. The location of the secreted proteins was also predicted by Target P. Some of the secreted proteins are involved in the nutrition, reproduction, as well as the communication between cells and environment. The global information of the secreted proteins of S. pombe will benefit further studies in drug screening model and host searching for heterologous gene expression.

  12. Bacterial Secretion Systems – An overview

    PubMed Central

    Green, Erin R.; Mecsas, Joan

    2015-01-01

    CHAPTER SUMMARY Bacterial pathogens utilize a multitude of methods to invade mammalian hosts, damage tissue sites, and thwart the immune system from responding. One essential component of these strategies for many bacterial pathogens is the secretion of proteins across phospholipid membranes. Secreted proteins can play many roles in promoting bacterial virulence, from enhancing attachment to eukaryotic cells, to scavenging resources in an environmental niche, to directly intoxicating target cells and disrupting their functions. Many pathogens use dedicated protein secretion systems to secrete virulence factors from the cytosol of the bacteria into host cells or the host environment. In general, bacterial protein secretion apparatuses can be divided into different classes, based on their structures, functions, and specificity. Some systems are conserved in all classes of bacteria and secrete a broad array of substrates, while others are only found in a small number of bacterial species and/or are specific to only one or a few proteins. In this chapter, we review the canonical features of several common bacterial protein secretion systems, as well as their roles in promoting the virulence of bacterial pathogens. Additionally, we address recent findings that indicate that the innate immune system of the host can detect and respond to the presence of protein secretion systems during mammalian infection. PMID:26999395

  13. Role of an amide bond for self-assembly of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Romain; Tropsch, Juergen; Holmberg, Krister

    2010-03-01

    Self-assembly in solution and adsorption at the air-water interface and at solid surfaces were investigated for two amino-acid-based surfactants with conductimetry, NMR, tensiometry, quartz crystal microbalance with monitoring of the dissipation (QCM-D), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The surfactants studied were sodium N-lauroylglycinate and sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate, differing only in a methyl group on the amide nitrogen for the sarcosinate. Thus, the glycinate but not the sarcosinate surfactant is capable of forming intermolecular hydrogen bonds via the amide group. It was found that the amide bond, N-methylated or not, gave a substantial contribution to the hydrophilicity of the amphiphile. The ability to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds led to tighter packing at the air-water interface and at a hydrophobic surface. It also increased the tendency for precipitation as an acid-soap pair on addition of acid. Adsorption of the surfactants at a gold surface was also investigated and gave unexpected results. The sarcosine-based surfactant seemed to give bilayer adsorption, while the glycine derivative adsorbed as a monolayer.

  14. On the relationship between NMR-derived amide order parameters and protein backbone entropy changes.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Kim A; O'Brien, Evan; Kasinath, Vignesh; Wand, A Joshua

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to analyze the relationship between NMR-derived squared generalized order parameters of amide NH groups and backbone entropy. Amide order parameters (O(2) NH ) are largely determined by the secondary structure and average values appear unrelated to the overall flexibility of the protein. However, analysis of the more flexible subset (O(2) NH  < 0.8) shows that these report both on the local flexibility of the protein and on a different component of the conformational entropy than that reported by the side chain methyl axis order parameters, O(2) axis . A calibration curve for backbone entropy vs. O(2) NH is developed, which accounts for both correlations between amide group motions of different residues, and correlations between backbone and side chain motions. This calibration curve can be used with experimental values of O(2) NH changes obtained by NMR relaxation measurements to extract backbone entropy changes, for example, upon ligand binding. In conjunction with our previous calibration for side chain entropy derived from measured O(2) axis values this provides a prescription for determination of the total protein conformational entropy changes from NMR relaxation measurements.

  15. vir-Gene-inducing activities of hydroxycinnamic acid amides in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, K; Buret, D; Guerin, B; Delay, D; Negrel, J; Delmotte, F M

    1998-11-20

    Expression of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes and transformation of dicots by this organism are dependent upon host plant phenolic compounds. Several alkylsyringamides have recently been shown to be powerful inducers of these vir-genes. These synthetic amides, and especially ethylsyringamide, are much stronger inducers than syringic acid. In this work, four alkylamides derived from ferulic or sinapic acids were synthesized by a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide method and tested for their potential to induce vir-gene expression on A. tumefaciens strains harbouring virB::lacZ or virE::lacZ fusion plasmids. Their effectiveness was compared to that of ethylsyringamide and tyraminylferulamide, a naturally occurring amide in plants. Whatever the amine moiety of the amide (ethylamine, propylamine, tyramine or beta-alanine ethyl ester) conjugation of the acid functional group clearly diminished the toxicity to the bacteria of the respective acid at high concentration and thereby increased the vir-inducing potential. However, none of the inducers tested exhibited higher activity than acetosyringone, the reference compound for vir-gene induction, with the exception of ethylsyringamide at concentrations above 1mM. When tested on Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A348(pSM243cd), ethylferulamide and ethylsinapamide were more efficient than the corresponding phenolic acids but only above 100 microM. PMID:11711062

  16. Amides from Piper nigrum L. with dissimilar effects on melanocyte proliferation in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiu; Liao, Yonghong; Venkatasamy, Radhakrishnan; Hider, Robert C; Soumyanath, Amala

    2007-04-01

    Melanocyte proliferation stimulants are of interest as potential treatments for the depigmentary skin disorder, vitiligo. Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae) fruit (black pepper) water extract and its main alkaloid, piperine (1), promote melanocyte proliferation in-vitro. A crude chloroform extract of P. nigrum containing piperine was more stimulatory than an equivalent concentration of the pure compound, suggesting the presence of other active components. Piperine (1), guineensine (2), pipericide (3), N-feruloyltyramine (4) and N-isobutyl-2E, 4E-dodecadienamide (5) were isolated from the chloroform extract. Their activity was compared with piperine and with commercial piperlongumine (6) and safrole (7), and synthetically prepared piperettine (8), piperlonguminine (9) and 1-(3, 4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-decane (10). Compounds 6-10 either occur in P. nigrum or are structurally related. Compounds 1, 2, 3, 8 and 9 stimulated melanocyte proliferation, whereas 4, 5, 6, 7 and 10 did not. Comparison of structures suggests that the methylenedioxyphenyl function is essential for melanocyte stimulatory activity. Only those compounds also possessing an amide group were active, although the amino component of the amide group and chain linking it to the methylenedioxyphenyl group can vary. P. nigrum, therefore, contains several amides with the ability to stimulate melanocyte proliferation. This finding supports the traditional use of P. nigrum extracts in vitiligo and provides new lead compounds for drug development for this disease.

  17. Temperature dependence of amino acid side chain IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Amide I' IR spectra are widely used for studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins as a function of temperature. Temperature dependent absorptions of amino acid side-chains that overlap the amide I' may significantly complicate the structural analyses. While the side-chain IR spectra have been investigated previously, thus far their dependence on temperature has not been reported. Here we present the study of the changes in the IR spectra with temperature for side-chain groups of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, and tyrosine in the amide I' region (in D2O). Band fitting analysis was employed to extract the temperature dependence of the individual spectral parameters, such as peak frequency, integrated intensity, band width, and shape. As expected, the side-chain IR bands exhibit significant changes with temperature. The majority of the spectral parameters, particularly the frequency and intensity, show linear dependence on temperature, but the direction and magnitude vary depending on the particular side-chain group. The exception is arginine, which exhibits a distinctly nonlinear frequency shift with temperature for its asymmetric CN3H5(+) bending signal, although a linear fit can account for this change to within ~1/3 cm(-1). The applicability of the determined spectral parameters for estimations of temperature-dependent side-chain absorptions in peptides and proteins are discussed.

  18. Rational design and synthesis of an orally bioavailable peptide guided by NMR amide temperature coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Conan K.; Northfield, Susan E.; Colless, Barbara; Chaousis, Stephanie; Hamernig, Ingrid; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Nielsen, Daniel S.; Schroeder, Christina I.; Liras, Spiros; Price, David A.; Fairlie, David P.; Craik, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing the oral bioavailability of peptide drug leads is a major challenge in drug design. As such, methods to address this challenge are highly sought after by the pharmaceutical industry. Here, we propose a strategy to identify appropriate amides for N-methylation using temperature coefficients measured by NMR to identify exposed amides in cyclic peptides. N-methylation effectively caps these amides, modifying the overall solvation properties of the peptides and making them more membrane permeable. The approach for identifying sites for N-methylation is a rapid alternative to the elucidation of 3D structures of peptide drug leads, which has been a commonly used structure-guided approach in the past. Five leucine-rich peptide scaffolds are reported with selectively designed N-methylated derivatives. In vitro membrane permeability was assessed by parallel artificial membrane permeability assay and Caco-2 assay. The most promising N-methylated peptide was then tested in vivo. Here we report a novel peptide (15), which displayed an oral bioavailability of 33% in a rat model, thus validating the design approach. We show that this approach can also be used to explain the notable increase in oral bioavailability of a somatostatin analog. PMID:25416591

  19. Theoretical study on the properties of linear and cyclic amides in gas phase and water solution.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Martínez, S; Hall, K R; Balbuena, P B

    2006-07-27

    The structural and energetic properties of a group of selected amides, of well-known importance for the design of efficient clathrate inhibitors, are calculated with Hartree-Fock and density functional theory, B3LYP, theoretical levels, and a 6-311++g** basis set in the gas phase and a water solution. The conformational behavior of the molecules is studied through the scanning of the torsional potential energy surfaces and by the analysis of the differences in the energetic and structural properties between the isomers. The properties of the amides in water solution are determined within a self-consistent reaction field approach with a polarizable continuum model that allows the calculation of the different contributions to the free energy of solvation. The calculated barriers to rotation are in good agreement with the available experimental data and the comparison of the gas and water results shows the strong effect of the solute polarization. The properties of different amide-water complexes are calculated and compared with available experimental information.

  20. On the relationship between NMR-derived amide order parameters and protein backbone entropy changes

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Kim A.; O’Brien, Evan; Kasinath, Vignesh; Wand, A. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to analyze the relationship between NMR-derived squared generalized order parameters of amide NH groups and backbone entropy. Amide order parameters (O2NH) are largely determined by the secondary structure and average values appear unrelated to the overall flexibility of the protein. However, analysis of the more flexible subset (O2NH < 0.8) shows that these report both on the local flexibility of the protein and on a different component of the conformational entropy than that reported by the side chain methyl axis order parameters, O2axis. A calibration curve for backbone entropy vs. O2NH is developed which accounts for both correlations between amide group motions of different residues, and correlations between backbone and side chain motions. This calibration curve can be used with experimental values of O2NH changes obtained by NMR relaxation measurements to extract backbone entropy changes, e.g. upon ligand binding. In conjunction with our previous calibration for side chain entropy derived from measured O2axis values this provides a prescription for determination of the total protein conformational entropy changes from NMR relaxation measurements. PMID:25739366

  1. General and Mild Cobalt-Catalyzed C-Alkylation of Unactivated Amides and Esters with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Deibl, Nicklas; Kempe, Rhett

    2016-08-31

    The borrowing hydrogen or hydrogen autotransfer methodology is an elegant and sustainable or green concept to construct carbon-carbon bonds. In this concept, alcohols, which can be obtained from barely used and indigestible biomass, such as lignocellulose, are employed as alkylating reagents. An especially challenging alkylation is that of unactivated esters and amides. Only noble metal catalysts based on iridium and ruthenium have been used to accomplish these reactions. Herein, we report on the first base metal-catalyzed α-alkylation of unactivated amides and esters by alcohols. Cobalt complexes stabilized with pincer ligands, recently developed in our laboratory, catalyze these reactions very efficiently. The precatalysts can be synthesized easily from commercially available starting materials on a multigram scale and are self-activating under the basic reaction conditions. This Co catalyst class is also able to mediate alkylation reactions of both esters and amides. In addition, we apply the methodology to synthesize ketones and to convert alcohols into aldehydes elongated by two carbon atoms. PMID:27490682

  2. Crystal structures and spectroscopic properties of ester amide and diamide of squaric acid with prolinamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Tsonko; Seidel, Rüdiger W.; Mayer-Figge, Heike; Spiteller, Michael; Sheldrick, William S.; Koleva, Bojidarka B.

    2009-04-01

    We report the synthesis, spectroscopic and structural elucidation of two prolinamide derivatives of squaric acid, i.e. prolinamide ester amide of squaric acid ethyl ester ( 1) and prolinamide diamide of squaric acid dihydrate ( 2). Both compounds crystallize in non-centrosymmetric space groups, monoclinic P2 1 ( 1) and orthorhombic P2 12 12 1 ( 2), respectively. For first time in the literature the crystal structure of homodiamide of amino acid amide of squaric acid is reported. The data for heterodiamides is also absent. Supramolecular zig-zag chains by hydrogen bonds of H 2N-C dbnd O⋯HNH (3.020 Å) and HNH⋯O dbnd C (Sq) (2.972 Å) types with the participation of amide and squaric acid (Sq) fragments, -C dbnd O-NH 2 and O dbnd C (Sq) are refined in ( 1). A helix supramolecular structure is formed in ( 2) by moderate intermolecular HNH⋯O dbnd C(NH 2) hydrogen bond with length of 2.947 Å. The two crystallographical non-equivalent water molecules stabilized the helix by interactions of types HOH⋯O dbnd C (Sq) (2.917 Å), HOH⋯O dbnd C(NH 2) (2.899 Å), H 2O⋯NH 2(C dbnd O) (2.972 Å), respectively. Optical and magnetic properties are investigated with a view to explain the correlation structure-properties of the newly synthesized molecules.

  3. Type VI secretion system: secretion by a contractile nanomachine

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The type VI secretion systems (T6SS) are present in about a quarter of all Gram-negative bacteria. Several key components of T6SS are evolutionarily related to components of contractile nanomachines such as phages and R-type pyocins. The T6SS assembly is initiated by formation of a membrane complex that binds a phage-like baseplate with a sharp spike, and this is followed by polymerization of a long rigid inner tube and an outer contractile sheath. Effectors are preloaded onto the spike or into the tube during the assembly by various mechanisms. Contraction of the sheath releases an unprecedented amount of energy, which is used to thrust the spike and tube with the associated effectors out of the effector cell and across membranes of both bacterial and eukaryotic target cells. Subunits of the contracted sheath are recycled by T6SS-specific unfoldase to allow for a new round of assembly. Live-cell imaging has shown that the assembly is highly dynamic and its subcellular localization is in certain bacteria regulated with a remarkable precision. Through the action of effectors, T6SS has mainly been shown to contribute to pathogenicity and competition between bacteria. This review summarizes the knowledge that has contributed to our current understanding of T6SS mode of action. PMID:26370934

  4. Synthesis and biological evaluation of piperic acid amides as free radical scavengers and α-glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takao, Koichi; Miyashiro, Takaki; Sugita, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A series of piperic acid amides (4-24, 29, 30) were synthesized and their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were evaluated. Among the synthesized compounds, the amides 11, 13 and 15, which contain o-methoxyphenol, catechol or 5-hydroxyindole moieties, showed potent DPPH free radical scavenging activity (11: EC50 140 µM; 13: EC50 28 µM; 15: EC50 20 µM). The amides 10, 18 and 23 showed higher inhibitory activity of α-glucosidase (10: IC50 21 µM; 18: IC50 21 µM; 23: IC50 12 µM). These data suggest that the hydrophobicity of the conjugated amines is an important determinant of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. In addition, the amides 13 and 15 showed both potent DPPH free radical scavenging activity and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (13: IC50 46 µM; 15: IC50 46 µM). This is the first report identifying the DPPH free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of piperic acid amides and suggests that these amides may serve as lead compounds for the development of novel α-glucosidase inhibitors with antioxidant activity.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of piperic acid amides as free radical scavengers and α-glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takao, Koichi; Miyashiro, Takaki; Sugita, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A series of piperic acid amides (4-24, 29, 30) were synthesized and their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were evaluated. Among the synthesized compounds, the amides 11, 13 and 15, which contain o-methoxyphenol, catechol or 5-hydroxyindole moieties, showed potent DPPH free radical scavenging activity (11: EC50 140 µM; 13: EC50 28 µM; 15: EC50 20 µM). The amides 10, 18 and 23 showed higher inhibitory activity of α-glucosidase (10: IC50 21 µM; 18: IC50 21 µM; 23: IC50 12 µM). These data suggest that the hydrophobicity of the conjugated amines is an important determinant of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. In addition, the amides 13 and 15 showed both potent DPPH free radical scavenging activity and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (13: IC50 46 µM; 15: IC50 46 µM). This is the first report identifying the DPPH free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of piperic acid amides and suggests that these amides may serve as lead compounds for the development of novel α-glucosidase inhibitors with antioxidant activity. PMID:25948326

  6. Chlorination of N-methylacetamide and amide-containing pharmaceuticals. Quantum-chemical study of the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Šakić, Davor; Šonjić, Pavica; Tandarić, Tana; Vrček, Valerije

    2014-03-27

    Chlorination of amides is of utmost importance in biochemistry and environmental chemistry. Despite the huge body of data, the mechanism of reaction between amides and hypochlorous acid in aqueous environment remains unclear. In this work, the three different reaction pathways for chlorination of N-methylacetamide by HOCl have been considered: the one-step N-chlorination of the amide, the chlorination via O-chlorinated intermediate, and the N-chlorination of the iminol intermediate. The high-level quantum chemical G3B3 composite procedure, double-hybrid B2-PLYPD, B2K-PLYP methods, and global hybrid M06-2X and BMK methods have been employed. The calculated energy barriers have been compared to the experimental value of ΔG(#)298 ≈ 87 kJ/mol, which corresponds to reaction rate constant k(r) ≈ 0.0036 M(-1) s(-1). Only the mechanism in which the iminol form of N-methylacetamide reacts with HOCl is consistent (ΔG(#)298 = 87.3 kJ/mol at G3B3 level) with experimental results. The analogous reaction mechanism has been calculated as the most favorable pathway in the chlorination of small-sized amides and amide-containing pharmaceuticals: carbamazepine, acetaminophen, and phenytoin. We conclude that the formation of the iminol intermediate followed by its reaction with HOCl is the general mechanism of N-chlorination for a vast array of amides.

  7. Hylaranins: prototypes of a new class of amphibian antimicrobial peptide from the skin secretion of the oriental broad-folded frog, Hylarana latouchii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Hu, Nan; Lyu, Peng; Ma, Jie; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Mei; Guo, Suhua; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Amphibian skin secretions contain a broad spectrum of biologically active compounds, particularly antimicrobial peptides, which are considered to constitute a first line of defence against bacterial infection. Here we describe the identification of two prototype peptides representing a novel structural class of antimicrobial peptide from the skin secretion of the oriental broad-folded frog, Hylarana latouchii. Named hylaranin-L1 (GVLSAFKNALPGIMKIIVamide) and hylaranin-L2 (GVLSVIKNALPGIMRFIAamide), both peptides consist of 18 amino acid residues, are C-terminally amidated and are of unique primary structures. Their primary structures were initially deduced by MS/MS fragmentation sequencing from reverse-phase HPLC fractions of skin secretion that demonstrated antimicrobial activity. Subsequently, their precursor-encoding cDNAs were cloned from a skin secretion-derived cDNA library and their primary structures were confirmed unequivocally. Synthetic replicates of both peptides exhibited broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity with mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 34 μM against Gram-negative Escherichia coli, 4.3 μM against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and 4-9 μM against the yeast, Candida albicans. Both peptides exhibited little haemolytic activity (<6%) at the MICs for S. aureus and C. albicans. Amphibian skin secretions thus continue to provide novel antimicrobial peptide structures that may prove to be lead compounds in the design of new classes of anti-infection therapeutics. PMID:24378871

  8. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred; McDermott, Jason E.

    2009-04-24

    The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates, effector proteins, are not. We have used a machine learning approach to identify new secreted effectors. The method integrates evolutionary measures, such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, and sequence-based features, such as G+C content, amino acid composition and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from Salmonella typhimurium and validated on a corresponding set of effectors from Pseudomonas syringae, after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. The method was able to identify all of the known effectors in P. syringae with a specificity of 84% and sensitivity of 82%. The reciprocal validation, training on P. syringae and validating on S. typhimurium, gave similar results with a specificity of 86% when the sensitivity level was 87%. These results show that type III effectors in disparate organisms share common features. We found that maximal performance is attained by including an N-terminal sequence of only 30 residues, which agrees with previous studies indicating that this region contains the secretion signal. We then used the method to define the most important residues in this putative secretion signal. Finally, we present novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated, and apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. This approach is a novel and effective way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  9. Identification of protein secretion systems and novel secreted proteins in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    PubMed Central

    Krehenbrink, Martin; Downie, J Allan

    2008-01-01

    Background Proteins secreted by bacteria play an important role in infection of eukaryotic hosts. Rhizobia infect the roots of leguminous plants and establish a mutually beneficial symbiosis. Proteins secreted during the infection process by some rhizobial strains can influence infection and modify the plant defence signalling pathways. The aim of this study was to systematically analyse protein secretion in the recently sequenced strain Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Results Similarity searches using defined protein secretion systems from other Gram-negative bacteria as query sequences revealed that R. l. bv. viciae 3841 has ten putative protein secretion systems. These are the general export pathway (GEP), a twin-arginine translocase (TAT) secretion system, four separate Type I systems, one putative Type IV system and three Type V autotransporters. Mutations in genes encoding each of these (except the GEP) were generated, but only mutations affecting the PrsDE (Type I) and TAT systems were observed to affect the growth phenotype and the profile of proteins in the culture supernatant. Bioinformatic analysis and mass fingerprinting of tryptic fragments of culture supernatant proteins identified 14 putative Type I substrates, 12 of which are secreted via the PrsDE, secretion system. The TAT mutant was defective for the symbiosis, forming nodules incapable of nitrogen fixation. Conclusion None of the R. l. bv. viciae 3841 protein secretion systems putatively involved in the secretion of proteins to the extracellular space (Type I, Type IV, Type V) is required for establishing the symbiosis with legumes. The PrsDE (Type I) system was shown to be the major route of protein secretion in non-symbiotic cells and to secrete proteins of widely varied size and predicted function. This is in contrast to many Type I systems from other bacteria, which typically secrete specific substrates encoded by genes often localised in close proximity to the genes encoding the

  10. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO−3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO−3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO−3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions. PMID:24917822

  11. Extracellular Enzyme Secretion by Pseudomonas lemoignei

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M. W.; Merrick, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    The ability of succinate to repress the secretion of Pseudomonas lemoignei poly-β-hydroxybutyrate depolymerase was a function of pH. Repression only occurred when the pH of the medium was 7.0 or less. At a higher pH, lack of sensitivity to succinate concentration may have been due to a limited ability to transport succinate. Actively secreting cultures (at pH 7.4) continued to secrete enzyme for approximately 30 min after the pH was rapidly decreased to pH 6.8, even though sufficient succinate was present to repress enzyme synthesis. Similarly, after the addition of rifampin to secreting cultures, there was a 30-min delay before secretion was inhibited. Evidence is presented which suggests that continued secretion may be the result of depolymerase messenger ribonucleic acid accumulation within the cells. Studies with chloramphenicol indicated that de novo protein synthesis is necessary for the secretion of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate depolymerase and that exoenzyme is not released from a preformed pool. Studies with various inhibitors of protein synthesis indicated that synthesis of exoenzyme is 5 to 10 times more susceptible to inhibition than is the synthesis of cell-associated proteins. PMID:4152045

  12. Glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Linford; Salehi, Albert; Vergari, Elisa; Zhang, Quan; Rorsman, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes involves a ménage à trois of impaired glucose regulation of pancreatic hormone release: in addition to impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, the release of the hyperglycaemic hormone glucagon becomes dysregulated; these last-mentioned defects exacerbate the metabolic consequences of hypoinsulinaemia and are compounded further by hypersecretion of somatostatin (which inhibits both insulin and glucagon secretion). Glucagon secretion has been proposed to be regulated by either intrinsic or paracrine mechanisms, but their relative significance and the conditions under which they operate are debated. Importantly, the paracrine and intrinsic modes of regulation are not mutually exclusive; they could operate in parallel to control glucagon secretion. Here we have applied mathematical modelling of α-cell electrical activity as a novel means of dissecting the processes that underlie metabolic regulation of glucagon secretion. Our analyses indicate that basal hypersecretion of somatostatin and/or increased activity of somatostatin receptors may explain the loss of adequate counter-regulation under hypoglycaemic conditions, as well as the physiologically inappropriate stimulation of glucagon secretion during hyperglycaemia seen in diabetic patients. We therefore advocate studying the interaction of the paracrine and intrinsic mechanisms; unifying these processes may give a more complete picture of the regulation of glucagon secretion from α-cells than studying the individual parts. PMID:27044683

  13. Insulin signaling pathways in lepidopteran ecdysone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Wendy A.; Lamattina, Anthony; Collins, McKensie

    2014-01-01

    Molting and metamorphosis are stimulated by the secretion of ecdysteroid hormones from the prothoracic glands. Insulin-like hormones have been found to enhance prothoracic gland activity, providing a mechanism to link molting to nutritional state. In silk moths (Bombyx mori), the prothoracic glands are directly stimulated by insulin and the insulin-like hormone bombyxin. Further, in Bombyx, the neuropeptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) appears to act at least in part through the insulin-signaling pathway. In the prothoracic glands of Manduca sexta, while insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and Akt, neither insulin nor bombyxin II stimulate ecdysone secretion. Involvement of the insulin-signaling pathway in Manduca prothoracic glands was explored using two inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002 and wortmannin. PI3K inhibitors block the phosphorylation of Akt and 4EBP but have no effect on ecdysone secretion, or on the phosphorylation of the MAPkinase, ERK. Inhibitors that block phosphorylation of ERK, including the MEK inhibitor U0126, and high doses of the RSK inhibitor SL0101, effectively inhibit ecdysone secretion. The results highlight differences between the two lepidopteran insects most commonly used to directly study ecdysteroid secretion. In Bombyx, the PTTH and insulin-signaling pathways intersect; both insulin and PTTH enhance the phosphorylation of Akt and stimulate ecdysteroid secretion, and inhibition of PI3K reduces ecdysteroid secretion. By contrast, in Manduca, the action of PTTH is distinct from insulin. The results highlight species differences in the roles of translational regulators such as 4EBP, and members of the MAPkinase pathway such as ERK and RSK, in the regulation of insect ecdysone secretion, and in the impact of nutritionally-sensitive hormones such as insulin in the control of ecdysone secretion and molting. PMID:24550835

  14. Kassorins: novel innate immune system peptides from skin secretions of the African hyperoliid frogs, Kassina maculata and Kassina senegalensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hang; Wang, Lei; Zeller, Martin; Hornshaw, Martin; Wu, Youjia; Zhou, Mei; Li, Jia; Hang, Xinxing; Cai, Jiqun; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2011-01-01

    From defensive skin secretions acquired from two species of African hyperoliid frogs, Kassina maculata and Kassina senegalensis, we have isolated two structurally related, C-terminally amidated tridecapeptides of novel primary structure that exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activity. In reflection of their structural novelty and species of origin, we named the peptides kassorin M (FLEGLLNTVTGLLamide; 1387.8 Da) and kassorin S (FLGGILNTITGLLamide; 1329.8 Da), respectively. The primary structure and organisation of the biosynthetic precursors of kassorins M and S were deduced from cloned skin secretion-derived cDNA. Both open-reading frames encoded a single copy of kassorin M and S, respectively, located at the C-terminus. Kassorins display limited structural similarities to vespid chemotactic peptides (7/13 residues), temporin A (5/13 residues), the N-terminus of Lv-ranaspumin, a foam nest surfactant protein of the frog, Leptodactylus vastus, and an N-terminal domain of the equine sweat surfactant protein, latherin. Both peptides elicit histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. However, while kassorin S was found to possess antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, kassorin M was devoid of such activity. In contrast, kassorin M was found to contract the smooth muscle of guinea pig urinary bladder (EC(50) = 4.66 nM) and kassorin S was devoid of this activity. Kassorins thus represent the prototypes of a novel family of peptides from the amphibian innate immune system as occurring in defensive skin secretions.

  15. Peptidomic analysis of skin secretions demonstrates that the allopatric populations of Xenopus muelleri (Pipidae) are not conspecific.

    PubMed

    Mechkarska, Milena; Ahmed, Eman; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; King, Jay D; Conlon, J Michael

    2011-07-01

    Mueller's clawed frog Xenopus muelleri (Peters 1844) occupies two non-contiguous ranges in east and west Africa. The phylogenetic relationship between the two populations is unclear and it has been proposed that the western population represents a separate species. Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from X. muelleri from the eastern range resulted in the identification of five antimicrobial peptides structurally related to the magainins (magainin-M1 and -M2), xenopsin-precursor fragments (XPF-M1) and caerulein-precursor fragments (CPF-M1 and -M2) previously found in skin secretions of other Xenopus species. A cyclic peptide (WCPPMIPLCSRF.NH₂) containing the RFamide motif was also isolated that shows limited structural similarity to the tigerinins, previously identified only in frogs of the Dicroglossidae family. The components identified in skin secretions from X. muelleri from the western range comprised one magainin (magainin-MW1), one XPF peptide (XPF-MW1), two peptides glycine-leucine amide (PGLa-MW1 and -MW2), and three CPF peptides (CPF-MW1, -MW2 and -MW3). Comparison of the primary structures of these peptides suggest that western population of X. muelleri is more closely related to X. borealis than to X. muelleri consistent with its proposed designation as a separate species. The CPF peptides showed potent, broad-spectrum activity against reference strains of bacteria (MIC 3-25 μM), but were hemolytic against human erythrocytes. PMID:21664395

  16. Digestive Secretion of Dionaea muscipula (Venus's Flytrap).

    PubMed

    Scala, J; Iott, K; Schwab, D W; Semersky, F E

    1969-03-01

    The digestive fluid of Dionaea muscipula has been studied with respect to its protein content as a function of time after entrapment of protein material and some enzymes of the secretion. Maximum secretion of enzyme occurs within the first 3 days of the digestive cycle and protein reaches its maximum at 4 days. Phosphatase, proteinase, nuclease and amylase have been observed in the secretion. The enzymes have acid pH optima and the proteinase has a molecular weight of about 40,000.

  17. Islet Insulin Secretion Measurements in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hugill, Alison; Shimomura, Kenju; Cox, Roger D

    2016-01-01

    This article describes detailed protocols for in vitro measurements of insulin function and secretion in isolated mouse islets for the analysis of glucose homeostasis. We specify a method of enzyme digestion and hand picking to isolate and release the greatest number of high quality islets from the pancreas of the mouse. We describe an effective method for generating dynamic measurements of insulin secretion using a perifusion assay including a detailed protocol for constructing a peristaltic pump and tubing assembly. In addition we describe an alternative and simple technique for measuring insulin secretion using static incubation of isolated islets. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584553

  18. Parathyroid hormone - Secretion and metabolism in vivo.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habener, J. F.; Powell, D.; Murray, T. M.; Mayer, G. P.; Potts, J. T., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Gel filtration and radioimmunoassay were used to determine the molecular size and immunochemical reactivity of parathyroid hormone present in gland extracts, in the general peripheral circulation, and in parathyroid effluent blood from patients with hyperparathyroidism, as well as from calves and from cattle. It was found that parathyroid hormone secreted from the parathyroids in man and cattle is at least as large as the molecule extracted from normal bovine glands. However, once secreted into the circulation the hormone is cleaved, and one or more fragments, immunologically, dissimilar to the originally secreted hormone, constitute the dominant form of circulating immunoreactive hormone.

  19. Graph states for quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, Damian; Sanders, Barry C.

    2008-10-01

    We consider three broad classes of quantum secret sharing with and without eavesdropping and show how a graph state formalism unifies otherwise disparate quantum secret sharing models. In addition to the elegant unification provided by graph states, our approach provides a generalization of threshold classical secret sharing via insecure quantum channels beyond the current requirement of 100% collaboration by players to just a simple majority in the case of five players. Another innovation here is the introduction of embedded protocols within a larger graph state that serves as a one-way quantum-information processing system.

  20. Using Transcriptional Control To Increase Titers of Secreted Heterologous Proteins by the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Kevin J.; Finnerty, Casey; Azam, Anum; Valdivia, Elias

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded at the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) locus secretes protein directly from the cytosol to the culture media in a concerted, one-step process, bypassing the periplasm. While this approach is attractive for heterologous protein production, product titers are too low for many applications. In addition, the expression of the SPI-1 gene cluster is subject to native regulation, which requires culturing conditions that are not ideal for high-density growth. We used transcriptional control to increase the amount of protein that is secreted into the extracellular space by the T3SS of Salmonella enterica. The controlled expression of the gene encoding SPI-1 transcription factor HilA circumvents the requirement of endogenous induction conditions and allows for synthetic induction of the secretion system. This strategy increases the number of cells that express SPI-1 genes, as measured by promoter activity. In addition, protein secretion titer is sensitive to the time of addition and the concentration of inducer for the protein to be secreted and SPI-1 gene cluster. Overexpression of hilA increases secreted protein titer by >10-fold and enables recovery of up to 28 ± 9 mg/liter of secreted protein from an 8-h culture. We also demonstrate that the protein beta-lactamase is able to adopt an active conformation after secretion, and the increase in secreted titer from hilA overexpression also correlates to increased enzyme activity in the culture supernatant. PMID:25038096

  1. Structure elucidation and in vitro cytotoxicity of ochratoxin α amide, a new degradation product of ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Andrea; Cramer, Benedikt; Harrer, Henning; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    The mycotoxin ochratoxin A is a secondary metabolite occurring in a wide range of commodities. During the exposure of ochratoxin A to white and blue light, a cleavage between the carbon atom C-14 and the nitrogen atom was described. As a reaction product, the new compound ochratoxin α amide has been proposed based on mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. In the following study, we observed that this compound is also formed at high temperatures such as used for example during coffee roasting and therefore represents a further thermal ochratoxin A degradation product. To confirm the structure of ochratoxin α amide, the compound was prepared in large scale and complete structure elucidation via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MS was performed. Additionally, first studies on the toxicity of ochratoxin α amide were performed using immortalized human kidney epithelial (IHKE) cells, a cell line known to be sensitive against ochratoxin A with an IC50 value of 0.5 μM. Using this system, ochratoxin α amide revealed no cytotoxicity up to concentrations of 50 μM. Thus, these results propose that the thermal degradation of ochratoxin A to ochratoxin α amide might be a detoxification process. Finally, we present a sample preparation and a HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for the analysis of ochratoxin α amide in extrudates and checked its formation during the extrusion of artificially contaminated wheat grits at 150 and 180 °C, whereas no ochratoxin α amide was detectable under these conditions. PMID:25566949

  2. Host-defense peptides from skin secretions of Fraser's clawed frog Xenopus fraseri (Pipidae): Further insight into the evolutionary history of the Xenopodinae.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Nowotny, Norbert; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert

    2014-12-01

    Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of the tetraploid frog Xenopus fraseri Boulenger, 1905 (Pipidae) led to identification of 13 host-defense peptides. The primary structures of the peptides demonstrate that they belong to the magainin (3 peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide, PGLa (4 peptides), and xenopsin-precursor fragment, XPF (2 peptides) families, first identified in Xenopus laevis, together with caerulein precursor fragment-related peptides, CPF-RP (4 peptides), first identified in Silurana tropicalis. In addition, the secretions contain a molecular variant of xenopsin displaying the substitution Arg(4)→Lys compared with X. laevis xenopsin and peptide glycine-tyrosine-amide (PGYa) (GRIIPIYPEFERVFA KKVYPLY.NH2) whose function is unknown. The most potent antimicrobial peptide identified is CPF-RP-F1 (GFGSVLGKALKFGANLL.NH2) with MIC=12.5μM against Staphylococcus aureus and 50μM against Escherichia coli. On the basis of similarities in morphology and advertisement calls, X. fraseri has been placed in a species group that includes the octoploids Xenopus amieti and Xenopus andrei, and the tetraploid Xenopus pygmaeus. Cladistic analyses based upon the primary structures of magainin, PGLa, and CPF-RP peptides support a close evolutionary relationship between X. fraseri, X. amieti and X. andrei but suggest a more distant relationship with X. pygmaeus. PMID:25463057

  3. Cell secretion: current structural and biochemical insights.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Saurabh; Lee, Elizabeth C; Jeremic, Aleksandar M

    2010-10-12

    Essential physiological functions in eukaryotic cells, such as release of hormones and digestive enzymes, neurotransmission, and intercellular signaling, are all achieved by cell secretion. In regulated (calcium-dependent) secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and transiently fuse with specialized, permanent, plasma membrane structures, called porosomes or fusion pores. Porosomes are supramolecular, cup-shaped lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane that mediate and control the release of vesicle cargo to the outside of the cell. The sizes of porosomes range from 150 nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas to 12 nm in neurons. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the porosome and the cellular activities required for cell secretion, such as membrane fusion and swelling of secretory vesicles. The discovery of the porosome complex and the molecular mechanism of cell secretion are summarized in this article.

  4. Applying secret sharing for HIS backup exchange.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kimura, Eizen; Matsumura, Yasushi; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Hiramatsu, Haruhiko; Kume, Naoto; Sato, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    To secure business continuity is indispensable for hospitals to fulfill its social responsibility under disasters. Although to back up the data of the hospital information system (HIS) at multiple remote sites is a key strategy of business continuity plan (BCP), the requirements to treat privacy sensitive data jack up the cost for the backup. The secret sharing is a method to split an original secret message up so that each individual piece is meaningless, but putting sufficient number of pieces together to reveal the original message. The secret sharing method eases us to exchange HIS backups between multiple hospitals. This paper evaluated the feasibility of the commercial secret sharing solution for HIS backup through several simulations. The result shows that the commercial solution is feasible to realize reasonable HIS backup exchange platform when template of contract between participating hospitals is ready. PMID:24110653

  5. Applying secret sharing for HIS backup exchange.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kimura, Eizen; Matsumura, Yasushi; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Hiramatsu, Haruhiko; Kume, Naoto; Sato, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    To secure business continuity is indispensable for hospitals to fulfill its social responsibility under disasters. Although to back up the data of the hospital information system (HIS) at multiple remote sites is a key strategy of business continuity plan (BCP), the requirements to treat privacy sensitive data jack up the cost for the backup. The secret sharing is a method to split an original secret message up so that each individual piece is meaningless, but putting sufficient number of pieces together to reveal the original message. The secret sharing method eases us to exchange HIS backups between multiple hospitals. This paper evaluated the feasibility of the commercial secret sharing solution for HIS backup through several simulations. The result shows that the commercial solution is feasible to realize reasonable HIS backup exchange platform when template of contract between participating hospitals is ready.

  6. Insulin and Glucagon Secretion In Vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, Arun S.

    1998-01-01

    Long-duration space flight is associated with many physiological abnormalities in astronauts. In particular, altered regulation of the hormones insulin and glucagon may contribute to metabolic disturbances such as increased blood sugar levels, which if persistently elevated result in toxic effects. These changes are also observed in the highly prevalent disease diabetes, which affects 16 million Americans and consumes over $100 billion in annual healthcare costs. By mimicking the microgravity environment of space in the research laboratory using a NASA-developed bioreactor, one can study the physiology of insulin and glucagon secretion and determine if there are alterations in these cellular processes. The original specific objectives of the project included: (1) growing ('cell culture') of pancreatic islet beta and alpha cells that secrete insulin and glucagon respectively, in the NASA bioreactor; (2) examination of the effects of microgravity on insulin and glucagon secretion; and (3) study of molecular mechanisms of insulin and glucagon secretion if altered by microgravity.

  7. How to Share a Quantum Secret

    SciTech Connect

    Cleve, R.; Gottesman, D.; Lo, H.

    1999-07-01

    We investigate the concept of quantum secret sharing. In a (k,thinspn) threshold scheme, a secret quantum state is divided into n shares such that any k of those shares can be used to reconstruct the secret, but any set of k{minus}1 or fewer shares contains absolutely no information about the secret. We show that the only constraint on the existence of threshold schemes comes from the quantum {open_quotes}no-cloning theorem,{close_quotes} which requires that n{lt}2k , and we give efficient constructions of all threshold schemes. We also show that, for k{le}n{lt}2k{minus}1 , then any (k,thinspn) threshold scheme {ital must} distribute information that is globally in a mixed state. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  8. Secreting Glandular Trichomes: More than Just Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, George J.

    1991-01-01

    Secreting glandular plant trichome types which accumulate large quantities of metabolic products in the space between their gland cell walls and cuticle permit the plant to amass secretions in a compartment that is virtually outside the plant body. These structures not only accumulate and store what are often phytotoxic oils but they position these compounds as an apparent first line of defense at the surface of the plant. Recent advances in methods for isolation and study of trichome glands have allowed more precise analysis of gland cell metabolism and enzymology. Isolation of mutants with altered trichome phenotypes provides new systems for probing the genetic basis of trichome development. These advances and their continuation can pave the way for future attempts at modification of trichome secretion. The biochemical capability of glandular secreting trichomes and the potential for its future manipulation to exploit this external storage compartment is the focus of this review. PMID:16668241

  9. Progress in Studying Salt Secretion from the Salt Glands in Recretohalophytes: How Do Plants Secrete Salt?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Leng, Bingying; Wang, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    To survive in a saline environment, halophytes have evolved many strategies to resist salt stress. The salt glands of recretohalophytes are exceptional features for directly secreting salt out of a plant. Knowledge of the pathway(s) of salt secretion in relation to the function of salt glands may help us to change the salt-tolerance of crops and to cultivate the extensive saline lands that are available. Recently, ultrastructural studies of salt glands and the mechanism of salt secretion, particularly the candidate genes involved in salt secretion, have been illustrated in detail. In this review, we summarize current researches on salt gland structure, salt secretion mechanism and candidate genes involved, and provide an overview of the salt secretion pathway and the asymmetric ion transport of the salt gland. A new model recretohalophyte is also proposed. PMID:27446195

  10. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  11. Percolation of secret correlations in a network

    SciTech Connect

    Leverrier, Anthony; Garcia-Patron, Raul

    2011-09-15

    In this work, we explore the analogy between entanglement and secret classical correlations in the context of large networks--more precisely, the question of percolation of secret correlations in a network. It is known that entanglement percolation in quantum networks can display a highly nontrivial behavior depending on the topology of the network and on the presence of entanglement between the nodes. Here we show that this behavior, thought to be of a genuine quantum nature, also occurs in a classical context.

  12. A polarizable QM/MM approach to the molecular dynamics of amide groups solvated in water.

    PubMed

    Schwörer, Magnus; Wichmann, Christoph; Tavan, Paul

    2016-03-21

    The infrared (IR) spectra of polypeptides are dominated by the so-called amide bands. Because they originate from the strongly polar and polarizable amide groups (AGs) making up the backbone, their spectral positions sensitively depend on the local electric fields. Aiming at accurate computations of these IR spectra by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which derive atomic forces from a hybrid quantum and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Hamiltonian, here we consider the effects of solvation in bulk liquid water on the amide bands of the AG model compound N-methyl-acetamide (NMA). As QM approach to NMA we choose grid-based density functional theory (DFT). For the surrounding MM water, we develop, largely based on computations, a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) model potential called GP6P, which features six Gaussian electrostatic sources (one induced dipole, five static partial charge distributions) and, therefore, avoids spurious distortions of the DFT electron density in hybrid DFT/PMM simulations. Bulk liquid GP6P is shown to have favorable properties at the thermodynamic conditions of the parameterization and beyond. Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters of the DFT fragment NMA are optimized by comparing radial distribution functions in the surrounding GP6P liquid with reference data obtained from a "first-principles" DFT-MD simulation. Finally, IR spectra of NMA in GP6P water are calculated from extended DFT/PMM-MD trajectories, in which the NMA is treated by three different DFT functionals (BP, BLYP, B3LYP). Method-specific frequency scaling factors are derived from DFT-MD simulations of isolated NMA. The DFT/PMM-MD simulations with GP6P and with the optimized LJ parameters then excellently predict the effects of aqueous solvation and deuteration observed in the IR spectra of NMA. As a result, the methods required to accurately compute such spectra by DFT/PMM-MD also for larger peptides in aqueous solution are now at hand.

  13. Amide Proton Solvent Protection in Amylin Fibrils Probed by Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T.

    2013-01-01

    Amylin is an endocrine hormone that accumulates in amyloid plaques in patients with advanced type 2 diabetes. The amyloid plaques have been implicated in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, which synthesize amylin and insulin. To better characterize the secondary structure of amylin in amyloid fibrils we assigned the NMR spectrum of the unfolded state in 95% DMSO and used a quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange technique to look at amide proton solvent protection in the fibrils. In this technique, partially exchanged fibrils are dissolved in 95% DMSO and information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils is determined from DMSO-denatured monomers. Hydrogen exchange lifetimes at pH 7.6 and 37°C vary between ∼5 h for the unstructured N-terminus to 600 h for amide protons in the two β-strands that form inter-molecular hydrogen bonds between amylin monomers along the length of the fibril. Based on the protection data we conclude that residues A8-H18 and I26-Y37 comprise the two β-strands in amylin fibrils. There is variation in protection within the β-strands, particularly for strand β1 where only residues F15-H18 are strongly protected. Differences in protection appear to be due to restrictions on backbone dynamics imposed by the packing of two-layers of C2-symmetry-related β-hairpins in the protofilament structure, with strand β1 positioned on the surface and β2 in the interior. PMID:23457571

  14. Conformational properties of amphotericin B amide derivatives--impact on selective toxicity.

    PubMed

    Resat, H; Sungur, F A; Baginski, M; Borowski, E; Aviyente, V

    2000-10-01

    Even though it is highly toxic, Amphotericin B (AmB), an amphipathic polyene macrolide antibiotic, is used in the treatment of severe systemic fungal infections as a life-saving drug. To examine the influence of conformational factors on selective toxicity of these compounds, we have investigated the conformational properties of five AmB amide derivatives. It was found that the extended conformation with torsional angles (phi,psi)=(290 degrees,180 degrees) is a common minimum of the potential energy surfaces (PES) of unsubstituted AmB and its amide derivatives. The extended conformation of the studied compounds allows for the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen bond network between adjacent antibiotic molecules in the open channel configuration. Therefore, the extended conformation is expected to be the dominant conformer in an open AmB (or its amide derivatives) membrane channel. The derivative compounds for calculations were chosen according to their selective toxicity compared to AmB and they had a wide range of selective toxicity. Except for two AmB derivatives, the PES maps of the derivatives reveal that the molecules can coexist in more than one conformer. Taking into account the cumulative conclusions drawn from the earlier MD simulation studies of AmB membrane channel, the results of the potential energy surface maps, and the physical considerations of the molecular structures, we hypothesize a new model of structure-selective toxicity of AmB derivatives. In this proposed model the presence of the extended conformation as the only well defined global conformer for AmB derivatives is taken as the indicator of their higher selective toxicity. This model successfully explains our results. To further test our model, we also investigated an AmB derivative whose selective toxicity has not been experimentally measured before. Our prediction for the selective toxicity of this compound can be tested in experiments to validate or invalidate the proposed model

  15. Far-infrared amide IV-VI spectroscopy of isolated 2- and 4-Methylacetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J.; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M.; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-01

    Delocalized molecular vibrations in the far-infrared and THz ranges are highly sensitive to the molecular structure, as well as to intra- and inter-molecular interactions. Thus, spectroscopic studies of biomolecular structures can greatly benefit from an extension of the conventional mid-infrared to the far-infrared wavelength range. In this work, the conformer-specific gas-phase far-infrared spectra of two aromatic molecules containing the peptide -CO-NH- link, namely, 2- and 4-Methylacetanilide, are investigated. The planar conformations with trans configuration of the peptide link have only been observed in the supersonic-jet expansion. The corresponding far-infrared signatures associated with the vibrations of the peptide -CO-NH- moiety, the so-called amide IV-VI bands, have been assigned and compared with the results of density functional theory frequency calculations based on the anharmonic vibrational second-order perturbation theory approach. The analysis of the experimental and theoretical data shows that the amide IV-VI bands are highly diagnostic for the geometry of the peptide moiety and the molecular backbone. They are also strongly blue-shifted upon formation of the NH⋯O-C hydrogen bonding, which is, for example, responsible for the formation of secondary protein structures. Furthermore, the amide IV-VI bands are also diagnostic for the cis configuration of the peptide link, which can be present in cyclic peptides. The experimental gas-phase data presented in this work can assist the vibrational assignment of similar biologically important systems, either isolated or in natural environments.

  16. 1H NMR spectra part 31: 1H chemical shifts of amides in DMSO solvent.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The (1)H chemical shifts of 48 amides in DMSO solvent are assigned and presented. The solvent shifts Δδ (DMSO-CDCl3 ) are large (1-2 ppm) for the NH protons but smaller and negative (-0.1 to -0.2 ppm) for close range protons. A selection of the observed solvent shifts is compared with calculated shifts from the present model and from GIAO calculations. Those for the NH protons agree with both calculations, but other solvent shifts such as Δδ(CHO) are not well reproduced by the GIAO calculations. The (1)H chemical shifts of the amides in DMSO were analysed using a functional approach for near ( ≤ 3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy and steric effect of the amide group for more distant protons. The chemical shifts of the NH protons of acetanilide and benzamide vary linearly with the π density on the αN and βC atoms, respectively. The C=O anisotropy and steric effect are in general little changed from the values in CDCl3. The effects of substituents F, Cl, Me on the NH proton shifts are reproduced. The electric field coefficient for the protons in DMSO is 90% of that in CDCl3. There is no steric effect of the C=O oxygen on the NH proton in an NH…O=C hydrogen bond. The observed deshielding is due to the electric field effect. The calculated chemical shifts agree well with the observed shifts (RMS error of 0.106 ppm for the data set of 257 entries). PMID:24824670

  17. Kinetic Isotope Effects Support the Twisted Amide Mechanism of Pin1 Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Mercedes-Camacho, Ana Y.; Mullins, Ashley B.; Mason, Matthew D.; Xu, Guoyan G.; Mahoney, Brendan J.; Wang, Xingsheng; Peng, Jeffrey W.; Etzkorn, Felicia A.

    2013-01-01

    The Pin1 peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) catalyzes isomerization of pSer/pThr-Pro motifs in regulating the cell cycle. Peptide substrates, Ac–Phe–Phe–phosphoSer–Pro–Arg–p-nitroaniline, were synthesized in unlabeled form, and with deuterium labeled Ser-d3 and Pro-d7 amino acids. Kinetic data was collected as a function of Pin1 concentration to measure kinetic isotope effects (KIE) on catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km). The normal secondary (2°) KIE value measured for the Ser-d3 substrate (kH/kD = 1.6 ± 0.2) indicates that the serine carbonyl does not rehybridize from sp2 to sp3 in the rate-determining step, ruling out a nucleophilic addition mechanism. The normal 2° KIE can be explained by hyperconjugation between Ser α-C–H/D and C=O, and release of steric strain upon rotation of the amide bond from cis to syn-exo. The inverse 2° KIE value (kH/kD = 0.86 ± 0.08) measured for the Pro-d7 substrate indicates rehybridization of the prolyl nitrogen from sp2 to sp3 during the rate-limiting step of isomerization. No solvent kinetic isotope was measured by NMR exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) (kH2O/kD2O = 0.92 ± 0.12), indicating little or no involvement of exchangeable protons in the mechanism. These results support the formation of a simple twisted-amide transition state as the mechanism for peptidyl prolyl isomerization catalyzed by Pin1. A model of the reaction mechanism is presented using crystal structures of Pin1 with ground state analogues and an inhibitor that resembles a twisted amide transition state. PMID:24116866

  18. Far-infrared amide IV-VI spectroscopy of isolated 2- and 4-Methylacetanilide.

    PubMed

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-14

    Delocalized molecular vibrations in the far-infrared and THz ranges are highly sensitive to the molecular structure, as well as to intra- and inter-molecular interactions. Thus, spectroscopic studies of biomolecular structures can greatly benefit from an extension of the conventional mid-infrared to the far-infrared wavelength range. In this work, the conformer-specific gas-phase far-infrared spectra of two aromatic molecules containing the peptide -CO-NH- link, namely, 2- and 4-Methylacetanilide, are investigated. The planar conformations with trans configuration of the peptide link have only been observed in the supersonic-jet expansion. The corresponding far-infrared signatures associated with the vibrations of the peptide -CO-NH- moiety, the so-called amide IV-VI bands, have been assigned and compared with the results of density functional theory frequency calculations based on the anharmonic vibrational second-order perturbation theory approach. The analysis of the experimental and theoretical data shows that the amide IV-VI bands are highly diagnostic for the geometry of the peptide moiety and the molecular backbone. They are also strongly blue-shifted upon formation of the NH⋯O-C hydrogen bonding, which is, for example, responsible for the formation of secondary protein structures. Furthermore, the amide IV-VI bands are also diagnostic for the cis configuration of the peptide link, which can be present in cyclic peptides. The experimental gas-phase data presented in this work can assist the vibrational assignment of similar biologically important systems, either isolated or in natural environments.

  19. Far-infrared amide IV-VI spectroscopy of isolated 2- and 4-Methylacetanilide.

    PubMed

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-14

    Delocalized molecular vibrations in the far-infrared and THz ranges are highly sensitive to the molecular structure, as well as to intra- and inter-molecular interactions. Thus, spectroscopic studies of biomolecular structures can greatly benefit from an extension of the conventional mid-infrared to the far-infrared wavelength range. In this work, the conformer-specific gas-phase far-infrared spectra of two aromatic molecules containing the peptide -CO-NH- link, namely, 2- and 4-Methylacetanilide, are investigated. The planar conformations with trans configuration of the peptide link have only been observed in the supersonic-jet expansion. The corresponding far-infrared signatures associated with the vibrations of the peptide -CO-NH- moiety, the so-called amide IV-VI bands, have been assigned and compared with the results of density functional theory frequency calculations based on the anharmonic vibrational second-order perturbation theory approach. The analysis of the experimental and theoretical data shows that the amide IV-VI bands are highly diagnostic for the geometry of the peptide moiety and the molecular backbone. They are also strongly blue-shifted upon formation of the NH⋯O-C hydrogen bonding, which is, for example, responsible for the formation of secondary protein structures. Furthermore, the amide IV-VI bands are also diagnostic for the cis configuration of the peptide link, which can be present in cyclic peptides. The experimental gas-phase data presented in this work can assist the vibrational assignment of similar biologically important systems, either isolated or in natural environments. PMID:27634262

  20. Spinal astrocytes produce and secrete dynorphin neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Wahlert, Andrew; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Yaksh, Tony; Hook, Vivian

    2013-04-01

    Dynorphin peptide neurotransmitters (neuropeptides) have been implicated in spinal pain processing based on the observations that intrathecal delivery of dynorphin results in proalgesic effects and disruption of extracellular dynorphin activity (by antisera) prevents injury evoked hyperalgesia. However, the cellular source of secreted spinal dynorphin has been unknown. For this reason, this study investigated the expression and secretion of dynorphin-related neuropeptides from spinal astrocytes (rat) in primary culture. Dynorphin A (1-17), dynorphin B, and α-neoendorphin were found to be present in the astrocytes, illustrated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, in a discrete punctate pattern of cellular localization. Measurement of astrocyte cellular levels of these dynorphins by radioimmunoassays confirmed the expression of these three dynorphin-related neuropeptides. Notably, BzATP (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate) and KLA (di[3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonyl]-lipid A) activation of purinergic and toll-like receptors, respectively, resulted in stimulated secretion of dynorphins A and B. However, α-neoendorphin secretion was not affected by BzATP or KLA. These findings suggest that dynorphins A and B undergo regulated secretion from spinal astrocytes. These findings also suggest that spinal astrocytes may provide secreted dynorphins that participate in spinal pain processing.