Science.gov

Sample records for 7-cell hollow-core photonic

  1. Hollow-core photonic-crystal fibres for laser dentistry.

    PubMed

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Mitrokhin, Vladimir P; Fedotov, Andrei B; Sidorov-Biryukov, Dmitrii A; Beloglazov, Valentin I; Skibina, Nina B; Wintner, Ernst; Scalora, Michael; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2004-04-07

    Hollow-core photonic-crystal fibres (PCFs) for the delivery of high-fluence laser radiation capable of ablating tooth enamel are developed. Sequences of picosecond pulses of 1.06 microm Nd:YAG-laser radiation with a total energy of about 2 mJ are transmitted through a hollow-core photonic-crystal fibre with a core diameter of approximately 14 microm and are focused on a tooth surface in vitro to ablate dental tissue. The hollow-core PCF is shown to support the single-fundamental-mode regime for 1.06 microm laser radiation, serving as a spatial filter and allowing the laser beam quality to be substantially improved. The same fibre is used to transmit emission from plasmas produced by laser pulses on the tooth surface in the backward direction for detection and optical diagnostics.

  2. Flying particle sensors in hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, D. S.; Schmidt, O. A.; Euser, T. G.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-07-01

    Optical fibre sensors make use of diverse physical effects to measure parameters such as strain, temperature and electric field. Here we introduce a new class of reconfigurable fibre sensor, based on a ‘flying-particle’ optically trapped inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre and illustrate its use in electric field and temperature sensing with high spatial resolution. The electric field distribution near the surface of a multi-element electrode is measured with a resolution of ∼100 μm by monitoring changes in the transmitted light signal due to the transverse displacement of a charged silica microparticle trapped within the hollow core. Doppler-based velocity measurements are used to map the gas viscosity, and thus the temperature, along a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. The flying-particle approach represents a new paradigm in fibre sensors, potentially allowing multiple physical quantities to be mapped with high positional accuracy over kilometre-scale distances.

  3. Hollow-Core Photonic Band Gap Fibers for Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J.; Spencer, James E.; Kuhlmey, Boris T.; /Sydney U.

    2011-08-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) dielectric fibers with hollow cores are being studied both theoretically and experimentally for use as laser driven accelerator structures. The hollow core functions as both a longitudinal waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM) accelerating fields and a channel for the charged particles. The dielectric surrounding the core is permeated by a periodic array of smaller holes to confine the mode, forming a photonic crystal fiber in which modes exist in frequency pass-bands, separated by band gaps. The hollow core acts as a defect which breaks the crystal symmetry, and so-called defect, or trapped modes having frequencies in the band gap will only propagate near the defect. We describe the design of 2-D hollow-core PBG fibers to support TM defect modes with high longitudinal fields and high characteristic impedance. Using as-built dimensions of industrially-made fibers, we perform a simulation analysis of the first prototype PBG fibers specifically designed to support speed-of-light TM modes.

  4. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette M.; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kinds of hollow core band gap fibers. The light source for this experiment consists of ytterbium-doped double clad fiber aeroGAIN-ROD-PM85 in a high power amplifier setup. It provided 22ps pulses with a maximum average power of 95W, 40MHz repetition rate at 1032nm (~2.4μJ pulse energy), with M2 <1.3. We determined the facet damage threshold for a 7-cells hollow core photonic bandgap fiber and showed up to 59W average power output for a 5 meters fiber. The damage threshold for a 19-cell hollow core photonic bandgap fiber exceeded the maximum power provided by the light source and up to 76W average output power was demonstrated for a 1m fiber. In both cases, no special attention was needed to mitigate bend sensitivity. The fibers were coiled on 8 centimeters radius spools and even lower bending radii were present. In addition, stimulated rotational Raman scattering arising from nitrogen molecules was measured through a 42m long 19 cell hollow core fiber.

  5. Liquid-filled simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengnan; Gao, Wei; Li, Hongwei; Dong, Yongkang; Zhang, Hongying

    2014-12-01

    We report on a novel type of liquid-filled simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs), and investigate their transmission properties with various filling liquids, including water, ethanol and FC-40. The loss and dispersion characterizations are calculated for different fiber parameters including strut thickness and core diameter. The results show that there are still low-loss windows existing for liquid-filled simplified HC-PCFs, and the low-loss windows and dispersions can be easily tailored by filling different liquids. Such liquid-filled simplified HC-PCFs open up many possibilities for nonlinear fiber optics, optical, biochemical and medical sensing.

  6. Photonic bandgap narrowing in conical hollow core Bragg fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ozturk, Fahri Emre; Yildirim, Adem; Kanik, Mehmet; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-08-18

    We report the photonic bandgap engineering of Bragg fibers by controlling the thickness profile of the fiber during the thermal drawing. Conical hollow core Bragg fibers were produced by thermal drawing under a rapidly alternating load, which was applied by introducing steep changes to the fiber drawing speed. In conventional cylindrical Bragg fibers, light is guided by omnidirectional reflections from interior dielectric mirrors with a single quarter wave stack period. In conical fibers, the diameter reduction introduced a gradient of the quarter wave stack period along the length of the fiber. Therefore, the light guided within the fiber encountered slightly smaller dielectric layer thicknesses at each reflection, resulting in a progressive blueshift of the reflectance spectrum. As the reflectance spectrum shifts, longer wavelengths of the initial bandgap cease to be omnidirectionally reflected and exit through the cladding, which narrows the photonic bandgap. A narrow transmission bandwidth is particularly desirable in hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensing schemes, where broadband light is coupled to the fiber and the analyte vapor is introduced into the hollow core to measure infrared absorption. We carried out sensing simulations using the absorption spectrum of isopropyl alcohol vapor to demonstrate the importance of narrow bandgap fibers in chemical sensing applications.

  7. Compact and Robust Refilling and Connectorization of Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fiber Gas Reference Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for refilling and connectorization of hollow core photonic crystal fiber gas reference cells. Thees hollow-core photonic crystal fiber allow optical propagation in air or vacuum and are for use as gas reference cell is proposed and demonstrated. It relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to a mechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers.

  8. A test resonator for Kagome Hollow-core Photonic Crystal Fibers for resonant rotation sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fsaifes, Ihsan; Feugnet, Gilles; Ravaille, Alexia; Debord, Benoït; Gérôme, Frédéric; Baz, Assaad; Humbert, Georges; Benabid, Fetah; Schwartz, Sylvain; Bretenaker, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    We build ring resonators to assess the potentialities of Kagome Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers for future applications to resonant rotation sensing. The large mode diameter of Kagome fibers permits to reduce the free space fiber-to-fiber coupling losses, leading to cavities with finesses of about 30 for a diameter equal to 15 cm. Resonance linewidths of 3.2 MHz with contrasts as large as 89% are obtained. Comparison with 7-cell photonic band gap (PBG) fiber leads to better finesse and contrast with Kagome fiber. Resonators based on such fibers are compatible with the angular random walk required for medium to high performance rotation sensing. The small amount of light propagating in silica should also permit to further reduce the Kerr-induced non-reciprocity by at least three orders of magnitudes in 7-cell Kagome fiber compared with 7-cell PBG fiber.

  9. Large-pitch kagome-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Couny, F; Benabid, F; Light, P S

    2006-12-15

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a new type of hollow-core photonic crystal fiber based on large-pitch (approximately 12 microm) kagome lattice cladding. The optical characteristics of the 19-cell, 7-cell, and single-cell core defect fibers include broad optical transmission bands covering the visible and near-IR parts of the spectrum with relatively low loss and low chromatic dispersion, no detectable surface modes and high confinement of light in the core. Various applications of such a novel fiber are also discussed, including gas sensing, quantum optics, and high harmonic generation.

  10. Highly efficient fluorescence sensing with hollow core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Smolka, Stephan; Barth, Michael; Benson, Oliver

    2007-10-01

    We investigate the potential of microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) for highly sensitive absorption and fluorescence measurements by infiltrating a dye solution in the holey structure. Generally in a MOF only the evanescent part of the electromagnetic field penetrates into the sample material, providing a weak light-matter interaction. We compare such a MOF with a selectively filled hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF), in which most of the field energy propagates in the sample material. We show that dye concentrations down to 1x10(-10) M can be detected in a HCPCF using only nanoliter sample volumes. Our experiments proof that HCPCFs are well suited for demanding sensing applications, outperforming existing fiber tools that rely on evanescent sensing.

  11. Compact and Robust Refilling and Connectorization of Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fiber Gas Reference Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for evacuating, refilling and connectorizing hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for use asgas reference cell is proposed and demonstrated. It relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to amechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers.

  12. Rydberg atoms in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres

    PubMed Central

    Epple, G.; Kleinbach, K. S.; Euser, T. G.; Joly, N. Y.; Pfau, T.; Russell, P. St. J.; Löw, R.

    2014-01-01

    The exceptionally large polarizability of highly excited Rydberg atoms—six orders of magnitude higher than ground-state atoms—makes them of great interest in fields such as quantum optics, quantum computing, quantum simulation and metrology. However, if they are to be used routinely in applications, a major requirement is their integration into technically feasible, miniaturized devices. Here we show that a Rydberg medium based on room temperature caesium vapour can be confined in broadband-guiding kagome-style hollow-core photonic crystal fibres. Three-photon spectroscopy performed on a caesium-filled fibre detects Rydberg states up to a principal quantum number of n=40. Besides small energy-level shifts we observe narrow lines confirming the coherence of the Rydberg excitation. Using different Rydberg states and core diameters we study the influence of confinement within the fibre core after different exposure times. Understanding these effects is essential for the successful future development of novel applications based on integrated room temperature Rydberg systems. PMID:24942281

  13. Micro-displacement sensor based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Pinto, Ana Margarida; Baptista, José Manuel; Santos, José Luís; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Frazão, Orlando

    2012-12-17

    A sensing head based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for in-reflection measurement of micro-displacements is presented. The sensing structure takes advantage of the multimodal behavior of a short segment of hollow-core photonic crystal fiber in-reflection, being spliced to a single mode fiber at its other end. A modal interferometer is obtained when the sensing head is close to a mirror, through which displacement is measured.

  14. Micro-Displacement Sensor Based on a Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ana Margarida Rodrigues; Baptista, José Manuel; Santos, José Luís; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Frazão, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    A sensing head based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for in-reflection measurement of micro-displacements is presented. The sensing structure takes advantage of the multimodal behavior of a short segment of hollow-core photonic crystal fiber in-reflection, being spliced to a single mode fiber at its other end. A modal interferometer is obtained when the sensing head is close to a mirror, through which displacement is measured. PMID:23247414

  15. Depolarized guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wenjia Elser née; Stiller, Birgit; Elser, Dominique; Heim, Bettina; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-10-19

    By performing quantum-noise-limited optical heterodyne detection, we observe polarization noise in light after propagation through a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We compare the noise spectrum to the one of a standard fiber and find an increase of noise even though the light is mainly transmitted in air in a hollow-core PCF. Combined with our simulation of the acoustic vibrational modes in the hollow-core PCF, we are offering an explanation for the polarization noise with a variation of guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering (GAWBS). Here, instead of modulating the strain in the fiber core as in a solid core fiber, the acoustic vibrations in hollow-core PCF influence the effective refractive index by modulating the geometry of the photonic crystal structure. This induces polarization noise in the light guided by the photonic crystal structure.

  16. Modal interferometer based on hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for strain and temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Aref, S H; Amezcua-Correa, R; Carvalho, J P; Frazão, O; Caldas, P; Santos, J L; Araújo, F M; Latifi, H; Farahi, F; Ferreira, L A; Knight, J C

    2009-10-12

    In this work, sensitivity to strain and temperature of a sensor relying on modal interferometry in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers is studied. The sensing structure is simply a piece of hollow-core fiber connected in both ends to standard single mode fiber. An interference pattern that is associated to the interference of light that propagates in the hollow core fundamental mode with light that propagates in other modes is observed. The phase of this interference pattern changes with the measurand interaction, which is the basis for considering this structure for sensing. The phase recovery is performed using a white light interferometric technique. Resolutions of +/- 1.4 microepsilon and +/- 0.2 degrees C were achieved for strain and temperature, respectively. It was also found that the fiber structure is not sensitive to curvature.

  17. Modal dynamics in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers with elliptical veins.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Amit; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2005-08-08

    Modal characteristics of hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers with elliptical veins are studied by use of a recently proposed numerical method. The dynamic behavior of bandgap guided modes, as the wavelength and aspect ratio are varied, is shown to include zero-crossings of the birefringence, polarization dependent radiation losses, and deformation of the fundamental mode.

  18. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre.

    PubMed

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-17

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the (1)S0-(3)P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  19. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    PubMed Central

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom–atom and atom–wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom–atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0−3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  20. Photonic nanojet focusing for hollow-core photonic crystal fiber probes.

    PubMed

    Ghenuche, Petru; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2012-12-20

    Large-pitch kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) offer appealing optical properties for beam delivery and remote sensing. However, focusing their optical mode on a submicrometer spot can be challenging due to the large mode diameter and low numerical aperture of these fibers. Here, we demonstrate that a 30 μm latex microsphere directly set at the HC-PCF end-face provides an efficient means to focus the fiber mode down to a spot of 540 nm full width at half-maximum thanks to a photonic nanojet effect. The system is used for fluorescence imaging and direct laser writing on a thin absorbing layer. Potential applications include inspection of semiconductor wafers, photolithography, laser surgery, fluorescence sensing, or optical transfection.

  1. Bio-functionalized hollow core photonic crystal fibers for label-free DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candiani, A.; Salloom, Hussein T.; Coscelli, E.; Sozzi, M.; Manicardi, A.; Ahmad, Ahmad K.; Al-Janabi, A. Hadi; Corradini, R.; Picchi, G.; Cucinotta, A.; Selleri, S.

    2014-02-01

    Bio-functionalization of inner surfaces of all silica Hollow Core-Photonic Crystal Fibers (HC-PCF) has been investigated. The approach is based on layer-by-layer self-assembly Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes, which is an oligonucleotide mimic that is well suited for specific DNA target recognition. Two kinds of HC-PCFs have been considered: a photonic Bragg fiber and a hollow core (HC-1060) fiber. After spectral characterization and internal surface functionalization by using PNA probes, genomic DNA solutions from soy flour were infiltrated into the fibers. The experimental results indicate that hybridization of the complementary strand of target DNA increases the thickness of the silica layer and leads up to the generation of surface modes, resulting in a significant modulation of the transmission spectra. Numerical analysis confirms such behavior, suggesting the possibility to realize biological sensing.

  2. Enhanced four-wave mixing in a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Konorov, S O; Fedotov, A B; Zheltikov, A M

    2003-08-15

    Hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers are shown to substantially enhance four-wave mixing (FWM) of laser pulses in a gas filling the fiber core. Picosecond pulses of Nd:YAG fundamental radiation and its second harmonic are used to generate a signal at the frequency of the third harmonic by the FWM process 3omega = 2omega + 2omega - omega. The efficiency achieved for this process in a 9-cm-long, 13-microm-hollow-core-diameter photonic-crystal fiber, designed to simultaneously transmit a two-color pump and the FWM signal, is shown to be approximately 800 times higher than the maximum FWM efficiency attainable with the same laser pulses in the tight-focusing regime.

  3. Quasi-phase-matched high harmonic generation in hollow core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Ren, H; Nazarkin, A; Nold, J; Russell, P St J

    2008-10-13

    The potential of hollow core photonic crystal fiber as a nonlinear gas cell for efficient high harmonic generation is discussed. The feasibility of phase-matching this process by modulating the phase of ionization electrons using a counter-propagating laser field is shown. In this way, harmonics with energies of several hundreds of eV can be produced using fs-laser pump pulses of microJ energy.

  4. Parametrically polarization-shaped pulses via a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Weise, Fabian; Achazi, Georg; Lindinger, Albrecht

    2010-11-15

    We present a procedure to generate parametrically shaped pulses after propagation through a microstructured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The properties of the fiber are characterized and employed to analytically design sequences of subpulses which are available after the fiber. In these sequences, each subpulse can be individually controlled in its physically intuitive parameters: position in time, energy, phase, and chirp as well as the polarization state with orientation, ellipticity, and helicity. Various endoscopic applications may arise from this approach.

  5. Realizing A Mid-Infrared Optically Pumped Molecular Gas Laser Inside Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    REALIZING A MID-INFRARED OPTICALLY PUMPED MOLECULAR GAS LASER INSIDE HOLLOW-CORE PHOTONIC CRYSTAL FIBER by ANDREW MICHAEL JONES... Laser Inside Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...optical fibers . These novel lasers are appealing for a variety of applications including frequency metrology in the midinfrared,free-space

  6. Optical frequency standard using acetylene-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Triches, Marco; Michieletto, Mattia; Hald, Jan; Lyngsø, Jens K; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole

    2015-05-04

    Gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers are used to stabilize a fiber laser to the 13C2H2 P(16) (ν1+ν3) transition at 1542 nm using saturated absorption. Four hollow-core fibers with different crystal structure are compared in terms of long term lock-point repeatability and fractional frequency instability. The locked fiber laser shows a fractional frequency instability below 4 × 10(-12) for averaging time up to 10(4) s. The lock-point repeatability over more than 1 year is 1.3 × 10(-11), corresponding to a standard deviation of 2.5 kHz. A complete experimental investigation of the light-matter interaction between the spatial modes excited in the fibers and the frequency of the locked laser is presented. A simple theoretical model that explains the interaction is also developed.

  7. In-line fiber-optic etalon formed by hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Rao, Y J; Zhu, T; Yang, X C; Duan, D W

    2007-09-15

    A novel fiber-optic in-line etalon formed by splicing a section of hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) in between two single-mode fibers is proposed and demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge. Such a HCPCF-based etalon acts as an excellent optical waveguide to form a Fabry-Perot interferometer and hence allows the cavity length to be as long as several centimeters with good visibility as the transmission loss of the HCPCF is much smaller than that of a hollow core fiber; this offers great potential to generate a practical dense fiber-optic sensor network with spatial frequency division-multiplexing. This novel etalon is demonstrated for strain measurement, and the experimental results show that a good visibility of 0.3 and a strain accuracy of better than +/- 5 microepsilon are achieved.

  8. Resonant optical propulsion of a particle inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Maslov, A V

    2016-07-01

    Resonant propulsion of small nonresonant particles inside metal waveguides due to the formation of resonant states by the guided modes below their cutoffs has been predicted in the past. Here it is shown that stable resonant propulsion exists in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers, which are all-dielectric structures and are a major platform for various photonic applications. Specific features of the resonant propulsion are discussed together with the fiber design issues. The results may enable power-efficient transport of particles over long distances, particle sorting, and sensitive detection.

  9. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  10. Accelerating solitons in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facão, M.; Carvalho, M. I.; Almeida, P.

    2013-06-01

    We found the self-similar solitary solutions of a recently proposed model for the propagation of pulses in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers that includes a plasma induced nonlinearity. As anticipated for a simpler model and using a perturbation analysis, there are indeed stationary solitary waves that accelerate and self-shift to higher frequencies. However, if the plasma nonlinearity strength is large or the pulse amplitudes are small, the solutions have distinguished long tails and decay as they propagate.

  11. Hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber gas sensor with high sensitivity and fast response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Jin, Wei; Cao, Yingchun; Ho, Hoi Lut

    2014-05-01

    The effects of modal interference (MI) on the performance of hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBF) gas sensors are investigated. By optimizing mode launch, applying wavelength modulation with proper modulation parameters as well as appropriate digital signal processing, an estimated lower detection limit of <1 ppmv acetylene is achieved with 13-m long HC-PBF. The impacts of drilling side-hole on the MI and response time are also studied. With a 62-cm long sensing HC-PBF drilled with multiple side-holes, an acetylene sensor with a lower detection limit of 11 ppmv and a recovery time of 2 minute is demonstrated.

  12. Laser-cooled atoms inside a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Bajcsy, M.; Hofferberth, S.; Balic, V.; Zibrov, A. S.; Lukin, M. D.; Peyronel, T.; Liang, Q.; Vuletic, V.

    2011-06-15

    We describe the loading of laser-cooled rubidium atoms into a single-mode hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber. Inside the fiber, the atoms are confined by a far-detuned optical trap and probed by a weak resonant beam. We describe different loading methods and compare their trade-offs in terms of implementation complexity and atom-loading efficiency. The most efficient procedure results in loading of {approx}30,000 rubidium atoms, which creates a medium with an optical depth of {approx}180 inside the fiber. Compared to our earlier study this represents a sixfold increase in the maximum achieved optical depth in this system.

  13. Detailed study of macrobending effects in a wide transmission bandwidth hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Sandoghchi, S. R.; Numkam, E.; Bradley, T. D.; Hayes, J. R.; Wheeler, N. V.; Jasion, G.; Gray, D. R.; Poletti, F.; Petrovich, M. N.; Richardson, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    We study in detail the macrobending effects in a wide transmission bandwidth (~200nm) 19 cell hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber operating at 1550nm. Our results indicate low bend sensitivity over a ~130nm wide interval within the transmission window, with negligible loss (<0.1dB) for bending radii down to 5mm. The "red shift" and "blue shift" of the bandgap edge have been observed at the short and long wavelength edges, respectively. The cutoff wavelengths where air-guiding modes stop guiding can be extracted from the bending loss spectra, which matches well with the simulated effective refractive index map of such fiber.

  14. Similariton fiber laser with a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, A.; Prochnow, O.; Engelbrecht, M.; Wandt, D.; Kracht, D.

    2007-05-01

    We report on an ytterbium-doped similariton fiber ring laser with a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber for intracavity dispersion control. The oscillator is hybrid mode locked with a saturable Bragg reflector and by nonlinear polarization evolution. This scheme allows for an exact adjustment of the transmission characteristic to avoid the formation of bunched noiselike pulses while the self-starting characteristic is preserved. The oscillator generates highly stretched similaritons at 1025 nm with a pulse energy above 1n J at a repetition rate of 21.9 MHz.

  15. Hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers for orbital angular momentum applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Ren, G.; Gao, Y.; Zhu, B.; Wang, J.; Yin, B.; Jian, S.

    2017-04-01

    We present a study on the potential and challenges of guiding orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBGFs). Two 19-cell HC-PBGFs with different structural parameters are comparably investigated. The OAM mode properties in a 37-cell HC-PBGF are also discussed to explore the scalability of OAM states. Characteristics of vector modes and OAM modes are comprehensively analyzed with numerical simulations. The results show HC-PBGF with a larger core could effectively support more OAM modes with lower confinement loss and a larger effective area. In addition, HC-PBGF with a deeper and wider photonic bandgap is advantageous for achieving low crosstalk OAM transmission over a broader band-width. 19-cell HC-PBGFs could support OAM modes with purity beyond 0.9, and the value can be further improved by exploiting the 37-cell HC-PBGF.

  16. Hollow-core photonic-crystal-fiber-based optical frequency references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holá, Miroslava; Hrabina, Jan; Mikel, Břetislav; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    This research deals with preparation of an optical frequency references based on hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCF). This fiber-based type of absorption cells represents a effiecient way how to replace classic bulky and fragile glass made tubes references with low-weight and low-volume optical fibers. This approach allows not only to increase possible interaction length between incident light and absorption media but it also carries a possibility of manufacturing of easy-operable reference which is set up just by plugging-in of optical connectors into the optical setup. We present the results of preparation, manufacturing and filling of a set of fiber-based cells intended for lasers frequency stabilization. The work deals with setting and optimalization of HC-PCF splicing processes, minimalization of optical losses between HC-PCF and SMF fiber transitions and finishing of HC-PCF spliced ends with special care for optimal closing of hollow-core structure needed for avoiding of absorption media leakage.

  17. High-resolution optical spectroscopy in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrella, C.; Light, P. S.; Stace, T. M.; Benabid, F.; Luiten, A. N.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present detailed high-resolution spectroscopy of rubidium (Rb) vapor confined within a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). We find a very low level of additional frequency broadening associated with this confinement, with spectral features being only 1 MHz broader than the natural linewidth of the excited state. We show that this additional broadening is consistent solely with the atoms' transit across the fiber's optical mode. This low level of decoherence opens the door to a wide variety of applications including compact frequency standards and new types of quantum optical devices based on alkali-metal-loaded HC-PCFs. We highlight the low level of decoherence through observation of electromagnetically induced transparency in the confined vapor.

  18. Hollow core photonic crystal fiber for monitoring leukemia cells using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    PubMed Central

    Khetani, Altaf; Momenpour, Ali; Alarcon, Emilio I.; Anis, Hanan

    2015-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates an antibody-free, robust, fast, and portable platform for detection of leukemia cells using Raman spectroscopy with a 785-nm laser diode coupled to a hollow core photonic crystal (HC-PCF) containing silver nanoparticles. Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most common bone marrow cancers in children and youths. Clinical studies suggest that early diagnosis and remission evaluation of myoblasts in the bone marrow are pivotal for improving patient survival. However, the current protocols for leukemic cells detection involve the use of expensive antibodies and flow cytometers. Thus, we have developed a new technology for detection of leukemia cells up to 300 cells/ml using a compact fiber HC-PCF, which offers a novel alternative to existing clinical standards. Furthermore, we were also able to accurately distinguish live, apoptotic and necrotic leukemic cells. PMID:26601021

  19. Fluorescence-based remote irradiation sensor in liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltner, R.; Bykov, D. S.; Xie, S.; Euser, T. G.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report an irradiation sensor based on a fluorescent "flying particle" that is optically trapped and propelled inside the core of a water-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. When the moving particle passes through an irradiated region, its emitted fluorescence is captured by guided modes of the fiber core and so can be monitored using a filtered photodiode placed at the fiber end. The particle speed and position can be precisely monitored using in-fiber Doppler velocimetry, allowing the irradiation profile to be measured to a spatial resolution of ˜10 μm. The spectral response can be readily adjusted by appropriate choice of particle material. Using dye-doped polystyrene particles, we demonstrate detection of green (532 nm) and ultraviolet (340 nm) light.

  20. Generation of megawatt optical solitons in hollow-core photonic band-gap fibers.

    PubMed

    Ouzounov, Dimitre G; Ahmad, Faisal R; Müller, Dirk; Venkataraman, Natesan; Gallagher, Michael T; Thomas, Malcolm G; Silcox, John; Koch, Karl W; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2003-09-19

    The measured dispersion of a low-loss, hollow-core photonic band-gap fiber is anomalous throughout most of the transmission band, and its variation with wavelength is large compared with that of a conventional step-index fiber. For an air-filled fiber, femtosecond self-frequency--shifted fundamental solitons with peak powers greater than 2megawatts can be supported. For Xe-filled fibers, nonfrequency-shifted temporal solitons with peak powers greater than 5.5 megawatts can be generated, representing an increase in the power that can be propagated in an optical fiber of two orders of magnitude. The results demonstrate a unique capability to deliver high-power pulses in a single spatial mode over distances exceeding 200 meters.

  1. Direct fiber comb stabilization to a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shun; Wang, Chenchen; Fourcade-Dutin, Coralie; Washburn, Brian R; Benabid, Fetah; Corwin, Kristan L

    2014-09-22

    We have isolated a single tooth from a fiber laser-based optical frequency comb for nonlinear spectroscopy and thereby directly referenced the comb. An 89 MHz erbium fiber laser frequency comb is directly stabilized to the P(23) (1539.43 nm) overtone transition of (12)C(2)H(2) inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. To do this, a single comb tooth is isolated and amplified from 20 nW to 40 mW with sufficient fidelity to perform saturated absorption spectroscopy. The fractional stability of the comb, ~7 nm away from the stabilized tooth, is shown to be 6 × 10(-12) at 100 ms gate time, which is over an order of magnitude better than that of a comb referenced to a GPS-disciplined Rb oscillator.

  2. Direction-independent fiber inclinometer based on simplified hollow core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuhui; Liu, Ningliang; Hou, Maoxiang; Guo, Jiangtao; Li, Zhihua; Lu, Peixiang

    2013-02-15

    A fiber optical inclinometer based on modal interferometer is demonstrated for bend angle sensing. The device consists of a piece of simplified hollow core photonic crystal fiber sandwiched between single mode fibers with lateral offset. The measurement of bend angles up to 45° is demonstrated, and the spectrum exhibits a blueshift of over 50 nm. The sensitivity is found to increase with the applied bend angles and reaches 2.4 nm/deg at 45°, and the response is independent of the direction of bending. A low temperature sensitivity of 0.5 pm/°C is observed between room temperature and 1000°C. Due to its capacity for withstanding high temperature, the device can work as a direction-independent inclinometer in high-temperature environments.

  3. Hollow core photonic crystal fiber for monitoring leukemia cells using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    PubMed

    Khetani, Altaf; Momenpour, Ali; Alarcon, Emilio I; Anis, Hanan

    2015-11-01

    The present paper demonstrates an antibody-free, robust, fast, and portable platform for detection of leukemia cells using Raman spectroscopy with a 785-nm laser diode coupled to a hollow core photonic crystal (HC-PCF) containing silver nanoparticles. Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most common bone marrow cancers in children and youths. Clinical studies suggest that early diagnosis and remission evaluation of myoblasts in the bone marrow are pivotal for improving patient survival. However, the current protocols for leukemic cells detection involve the use of expensive antibodies and flow cytometers. Thus, we have developed a new technology for detection of leukemia cells up to 300 cells/ml using a compact fiber HC-PCF, which offers a novel alternative to existing clinical standards. Furthermore, we were also able to accurately distinguish live, apoptotic and necrotic leukemic cells.

  4. Identification of Bloch-modes in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couny, F.; Benabid, F.; Roberts, P. J.; Burnett, M. T.; Maier, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the experimental visualization of the cladding Bloch-modes of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Both spectral and spatial field nformation is extracted using the approach, which is based on measurement of the near-field and Fresnel-zone that results after propagation over a short length of fiber. A detailed study of the modes near the edges of the band gap shows that it is formed by the influence of three types of resonator: the glass interstitial apex, the silica strut which joins the neighboring apexes, and the air hole. The cladding electromagnetic field which survives the propagation is found to be spatially coherent and to contain contributions from just a few types of cladding mode.

  5. Examining metal nanoparticle surface chemistry using hollow-core, photonic-crystal, fiber-assisted SERS.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Fatemeh; Lee, Anna; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Helmy, Amr S

    2012-02-15

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the efficacy of hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HCPCFs) as a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) platform for investigating the ligand exchange process on the surface of gold nanoparticles. Raman measurements carried out using this platform show the capability to monitor minute amounts of surface ligands on gold nanoparticles used as an SERS substrate. The SERS signal from an HCPCF exhibits a tenfold enhancement compared to that in a direct sampling scheme using a cuvette. Using exchange of cytotoxic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide with α-methoxy-ω-mercaptopoly(ethylene glycol) on the surface of gold nanorods as an exemplary system, we show the feasibility of using HCPCF SERS to monitor the change in surface chemistry of nanoparticles.

  6. Monitoring of heparin concentration in serum by Raman spectroscopy within hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khetani, Altaf; Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Harb, Alaa; Anis, Hanan

    2011-08-01

    The feasibility of using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy has been explored for real time monitoring of heparin concentration in serum. Heparin is an important blood anti-coagulant whose precise monitoring and controlling in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and dialysis is of utmost importance. Our method of heparin monitoring offers a novel alternative to existing clinical procedures in terms of accuracy, response time and sample volume. The optical design configuration simply involves a 785-nm laser diode whose light is coupled into HC-PCF filled with heparin-serum mixtures. By non-selectively filling HC-PCF, a strong modal field overlap is obtained. Consequently, an enhanced Raman signal (>90 times) is obtained from various heparin-serum mixtures filled HC-PCFs compared to its bulk counterpart (cuvette). The present scheme has the potential to serve as a `generic biosensing tool' for diagnosing a wide range of biological samples.

  7. Mechanism and characteristics of long period fiber gratings in simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhifang; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Yan-Ge; Han, Tingting; Li, Shuo; Wei, Huifeng

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of high-quality LPFGs in simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fibers, composed of a hollow hexagonal core and six crown-like air holes, using CO2-laser-irradiation method. Theoretical and experimental investigations indicate that the LPFGs are originated from the strong mode-coupling between the LP01 and LP11 core modes. And a dominant physical mechanism for the mode-coupling is experimentally confirmed to be the periodic microbends rather than the deformations of the cross-section or other common factors. In addition, the LPFGs are highly sensitive to strain and nearly insensitive to temperature, and are promising candidates for gas sensors and nonlinear optical devices.

  8. Mechanism and characteristics of long period fiber gratings in simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhifang; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Yan-ge; Han, Tingting; Li, Shuo; Wei, Huifeng

    2011-08-29

    We demonstrate the fabrication of high-quality LPFGs in simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fibers, composed of a hollow hexagonal core and six crown-like air holes, using CO2-laser-irradiation method. Theoretical and experimental investigations indicate that the LPFGs are originated from the strong mode-coupling between the LP01 and LP11 core modes. And a dominant physical mechanism for the mode-coupling is experimentally confirmed to be the periodic microbends rather than the deformations of the cross-section or other common factors. In addition, the LPFGs are highly sensitive to strain and nearly insensitive to temperature, and are promising candidates for gas sensors and nonlinear optical devices.

  9. Mode-based microparticle conveyor belt in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver A; Euser, Tijmen G; Russell, Philip St J

    2013-12-02

    We show how microparticles can be moved over long distances and precisely positioned in a low-loss air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber using a coherent superposition of two co-propagating spatial modes, balanced by a backward-propagating fundamental mode. This creates a series of trapping positions spaced by half the beat-length between the forward-propagating modes (typically a fraction of a millimeter). The system allows a trapped microparticle to be moved along the fiber by continuously tuning the relative phase between the two forward-propagating modes. This mode-based optical conveyor belt combines long-range transport of microparticles with a positional accuracy of 1 µm. The technique also has potential uses in waveguide-based optofluidic systems.

  10. Ultrahigh and persistent optical depths of cesium in Kagomé-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Krzysztof T; Saunders, Dylan J; Sprague, Michael R; Kolthammer, W Steven; Feizpour, Amir; Ledingham, Patrick M; Brecht, Benjamin; Poem, Eilon; Walmsley, Ian A; Nunn, Joshua

    2015-12-01

    Alkali-filled hollow-core fibers are a promising medium for investigating light-matter interactions, especially at the single-photon level, due to the tight confinement of light and high optical depths achievable by light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD). However, until now these large optical depths could only be generated for seconds, at most once per day, severely limiting the practicality of the technology. Here we report the generation of the highest observed transient (>10(5) for up to a minute) and highest observed persistent (>2000 for hours) optical depths of alkali vapors in a light-guiding geometry to date, using a cesium-filled Kagomé-type hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). Our results pave the way to light-matter interaction experiments in confined geometries requiring long operation times and large atomic number densities, such as generation of single-photon-level nonlinearities and development of single photon quantum memories.

  11. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber probe for remote fluorescence sensing with single molecule sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ghenuche, Petru; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2012-12-17

    Current optical fiber probes for fluorescence spectroscopy struggle with large luminescence background and low detection sensitivities that challenge the detection of fluorescent molecules at sub-micromolar concentration. Here we report the demonstration of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) probe for remote fluorescence sensing with single molecule sensitivity down to nanomolar concentrations, where both the excitation and fluorescence beams are counter-propagating through the same fiber. A 20 μm polystyrene microsphere is used to efficiently excite and collect the fluorescence from the sample solution thanks to a photonic nanojet effect. Compared to earlier work with silica fibers, the new HC-PCF-microsphere probe achieves a 200x improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio for a single molecule detection event, and a 1000x reduction of the minimum detectable concentration. The device is implemented with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to distinguish between molecules of similar fluorescence spectra based on the analysis of their translational diffusion properties, and provides similar performance as conventional confocal microscopes.

  12. A Raman cell based on hollow core photonic crystal fiber for human breath analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Kam Kong; Zeng, Haishan; Short, Michael; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Breath analysis has a potential prospect to benefit the medical field based on its perceived advantages to become a point-of-care, easy to use, and cost-effective technology. Early studies done by mass spectrometry show that volatile organic compounds from human breath can represent certain disease states of our bodies, such as lung cancer, and revealed the potential of breath analysis. But mass spectrometry is costly and has slow-turnaround time. The authors’ goal is to develop a more portable and cost effective device based on Raman spectroscopy and hollow core-photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) for breath analysis. Methods: Raman scattering is a photon-molecular interaction based on the kinetic modes of an analyte which offers unique fingerprint type signals that allow molecular identification. HC-PCF is a novel light guide which allows light to be confined in a hollow core and it can be filled with a gaseous sample. Raman signals generated by the gaseous sample (i.e., human breath) can be guided and collected effectively for spectral analysis. Results: A Raman-cell based on HC-PCF in the near infrared wavelength range was developed and tested in a single pass forward-scattering mode for different gaseous samples. Raman spectra were obtained successfully from reference gases (hydrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide gases), ambient air, and a human breath sample. The calculated minimum detectable concentration of this system was ∼15 parts per million by volume, determined by measuring the carbon dioxide concentration in ambient air via the characteristic Raman peaks at 1286 and 1388 cm{sup −1}. Conclusions: The results of this study were compared to a previous study using HC-PCF to trap industrial gases and backward-scatter 514.5 nm light from them. The authors found that the method presented in this paper has an advantage to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This SNR advantage, coupled with the better transmission of HC-PCF in the near-IR than in the

  13. Microwave-driven plasmas in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debord, B.; Alves, L. L.; Gérôme, F.; Jamier, R.; Leroy, O.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Benabid, F.

    2014-02-01

    Argon micro-plasmas a few centimetres long are generated at low gas pressure (6 mbar) in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres with 100 µm core diameter, using microwave excitation (2.45 GHz) based on a surfatron, with no damage to the host structure. Electromagnetic simulations assist the design of the surfatron cavity, finding optimal conditions for discharge ignition and maintenance. The plasma characterization reveals an electron density in the range 8 × 1014-1015 cm-3 (estimated from a semi-empirical analysis of the power coupled to the plasma, along the axial-direction) and a gas temperature of 1100-1300 K at the centre of the fibre (measured by optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics), thus showing an impressive ionization degree of ˜10-2 for power densities of ˜0.1 MW cm-3. The micro-plasma dynamics is investigated using a self-consistent one-dimensional (radial) fluid model, describing the charged particle and the electron energy transport, the electromagnetic excitation and the gas heating. Model results are used to confirm the diagnostics, revealing an extreme plasma confinement and a steep temperature gradient that give rise to the main operation features of this novel compact UV source.

  14. Coherent light transmission properties of commercial photonic crystal hollow core optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Cranch, G A; Miller, G A

    2015-11-01

    Photonic crystal hollow core fiber (PC-HCF) has enabled many exciting new applications in nonlinear optics and spectroscopy. However, to date there has been less impact in coherent applications where preservation of optical phase over long fiber lengths is crucial. This paper presents characteristics of three commercially available PC-HCFs relevant to coherent applications including higher-order mode analysis, birefringence and polarization-dependent loss, and their impact on coherent light transmission in PC-HCF. Multipath interference due to higher-order mode propagation and Fresnel reflection is shown to generate excess intensity noise in transmission, which can be suppressed by up to 20 dB through high frequency phase modulation of the source laser. To demonstrate the potential of PC-HCF in high performance sensing, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) incorporating 10 m of PC-HCF in each arm is characterized and demonstrates a phase resolution (59×10(-9)  rad/Hz(1/2) at 30 kHz) close to the shot noise limit, which is better than can be achieved in a MZI made with the same length of single mode solid core fiber because of the limit set by fundamental thermodynamic noise (74×10(-9)  rad/Hz(1/2) at 30 kHz).

  15. Compact, stable and efficient all-fibre gas cells using hollow-core photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabid, F.; Couny, F.; Knight, J. C.; Birks, T. A.; Russell, P. St J.

    2005-03-01

    Gas-phase materials are used in a variety of laser-based applications-for example, in high-precision frequency measurement, quantum optics and nonlinear optics. Their full potential has however not been realized because of the lack of a suitable technology for creating gas cells that can guide light over long lengths in a single transverse mode while still offering a high level of integration in a practical and compact set-up or device. As a result, solid-phase materials are still often favoured, even when their performance compares unfavourably with gas-phase systems. Here we report the development of all-fibre gas cells that meet these challenges. Our structures are based on gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibres, in which we have recently demonstrated substantially enhanced stimulated Raman scattering, and which exhibit high performance, excellent long-term pressure stability and ease of use. To illustrate the practical potential of these structures, we report two different devices: a hydrogen-filled cell for efficient generation of rotational Raman scattering using only quasi-continuous-wave laser pulses; and acetylene-filled cells, which we use for absolute frequency-locking of diode lasers with very high signal-to-noise ratios. The stable performance of these compact gas-phase devices could permit, for example, gas-phase laser devices incorporated in a `credit card' or even in a laser pointer.

  16. Modal content in hypocycloid Kagomé hollow core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Thomas D; Wheeler, Natalie V; Jasion, Gregory T; Gray, David; Hayes, John; Gouveia, Marcelo Alonso; Sandoghchi, Seyed R; Chen, Yong; Poletti, Francesco; Richardson, David; Petrovich, Marco

    2016-07-11

    The modal content of 7 and 19 cell Kagomé anti resonant hollow core fibers (K-ARF) with hypocycloid core surrounds is experimentally investigated through the spectral and spatial (S2) imaging technique. It is observed that the 7 and 19 cell K-ARF reported here, support 4 and 7 LP mode groups respectively, however the observation that K-ARF support few mode groups is likely to be ubiquitous to 7 and 19 cell K-ARFs. The transmission loss of the higher order modes (HOMs) was measured via S2 and a cutback method. In the 7 cell K-ARF it is found that the LP11 and LP21 modes have approximately 3.6 and 5.7 times the loss of the fundamental mode (FM), respectively. In the 19 cell it is found that the LP11 mode has approximately 2.57 times the loss of the FM, while the LP02 mode has approximately 2.62 times the loss of the FM. Additionally, bend loss in these fibers is studied for the first time using S2 to reveal the effect of bend on modal content. Our measurements demonstrate that K-ARFs support a few mode groups and indicate that the differential loss of the HOMs is not substantially higher than that of the FM, and that bending the fiber does not induce significant inter modal coupling. A study of three different input beam coupling configurations demonstrates increased HOM excitation at output and a non-Gaussian profile of the output beam if poor mode field matching is achieved.

  17. Improved hollow-core photonic crystal fiber design for delivery of nanosecond pulses in laser micromachining applications.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Jonathan D; Couny, Francois; Russell, Phillip St J; Jones, Julian D C; Knight, Jonathan C; Hand, Duncan P

    2005-07-20

    We report the delivery of high-energy nanosecond pulses (approximately 65 ns pulse width) from a high-repetition-rate (up to 100 kHz) Q-switched Nd:YAG laser through the fundamental mode of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) at 1064 nm. The guided mode in the HC-PCF has a low overlap with the glass, allowing delivery of pulses with energies above those attainable with other fibers. Energies greater than 0.5 mJ were delivered in a single spatial mode through the hollow-core fiber, providing the pulse energy and high beam quality required for micromachining of metals. Practical micromachining of a metal sheet by fiber delivery has been demonstrated.

  18. Behavior of a hollow core photonic crystal fiber under high radial pressure for downhole application

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, J. Chenari, Z.; Ziaee, F.; Latifi, H.; Santos, J. L.

    2014-02-17

    Pressure fiber sensors play an important role in downhole high pressure measurements to withstand long term operation. The purpose of this paper is to present an application of hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) as a high pressure sensor head for downhole application based on dispersion variation. We used a high pressure stainless steel unit to exert pressure on the sensor. The experimental results show that different wavelengths based on sagnac loop interferometer have additive sensitivities from 5 × 10{sup −5} nm/psi at 1480 nm to 1.3 × 10{sup −3} nm/psi at 1680 nm. We developed a simulation to understand the reason for difference in sensitivity of wavelengths and also the relationship between deformation of HC-PCF and dispersion variation under pressure. For this purpose, by using the finite element method, we investigated the effect of structural variation of HC-PCF on spectral transformation of two linear polarizations under 1000 psi pressure. The simulation and experimental results show exponential decay behavior of dispersion variation from −3.4 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi to −1.3 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi and from −5 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi to −1.8 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi, respectively, which were in a good accordance with each other.

  19. High-sensitivity molecular sensing using hollow-core photonic crystal fiber and surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Shi, Chao; Wheeler, Damon; Newhouse, Rebecca; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Jin Z; Gu, Claire

    2010-05-01

    A high-sensitivity molecular sensor using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analyzed. A factor of 100 in sensitivity enhancement is shown in comparison to direct sampling under the same conditions. With a silver nanoparticle colloid as the SERS substrate and Rhodamine 6G as a test molecule, the lowest detectable concentration is 10(-10) M with a liquid-core photonic crystal fiber (LCPCF) probe, and 10(-8) M for direct sampling. The high sensitivity provided by the LCPCF SERS probe is promising for molecular detection in various sensing applications.

  20. Improving femtosecond laser pulse delivery through a hollow core photonic crystal fiber for temporally focused two-photon endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Heejin; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a strategy to improve delivery of femtosecond laser pulses from a regenerative amplifier through a hollow core photonic crystal fiber for temporally focused wide-field two-photon endomicroscopy. For endomicroscope application, wide-field two-photon excitation has the advantage of requiring no scanning in the distal end. However, wide-field two-photon excitation requires peak power that is 104–105 times higher than the point scanning approach corresponding to femtosecond pulses with energy on the order of 1–10 μJ at the specimen plane. The transmission of these high energy pulses through a single mode fiber into the microendoscope is a significant challenge. Two approaches were pursued to partially overcome this limitation. First, a single high energy pulse is split into a train of pulses with energy below the fiber damage threshold better utilizing the available laser energy. Second, stretching the pulse width in time by introducing negative dispersion was shown to have the dual benefit of reducing fiber damage probability and compensating for the positive group velocity dispersion induced by the fiber. With these strategy applied, 11 fold increase in the two photon excitation signal has been demonstrated. PMID:25316120

  1. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber based multifunctional optical system for trapping, position sensing, and detection of fluorescent particles.

    PubMed

    Shinoj, V K; Murukeshan, V M

    2012-05-15

    We demonstrate a novel multifunctional optical system that is capable of trapping, imaging, position sensing, and fluorescence detection of micrometer-sized fluorescent test particles using hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). This multifunctional optical system for trapping, position sensing, and fluorescent detection is designed such that a near-IR laser light is used to create an optical trap across a liquid-filled HC-PCF, and a 473 nm laser is employed as a source for fluorescence excitation. This proposed system and the obtained results are expected to significantly enable an efficient integrated trapping platform employing HC-PCF for diagnostic biomedical applications.

  2. Ultra low-loss hypocycloid-core Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for green spectral-range applications.

    PubMed

    Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Benoît, A; Ghosh, D; Dontabactouny, M; Vincetti, L; Blondy, J-M; Gérôme, F; Benabid, F

    2014-11-01

    We report on the development of a hypocycloidal-core Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber guiding, with low transmission loss in the 450-650 nm visible spectral range. Transmission loss records have been achieved with 70  dB/km at 600 nm, and 130  dB/km at 532 nm. As a demonstration of the fiber potential applications, we report on a compact 600 THz wide Raman comb generator, centered around 532 nm, and on a 10 W average power frequency-doubled Yb-fiber picosecond laser beam delivery, along with its use for organic material laser micro-processing.

  3. Nonstationary coherent optical effects caused by pulse propagation through acetylene-filled hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocegueda, M.; Hernandez, E.; Stepanov, S.; Agruzov, P.; Shamray, A.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental observations of nonstationary coherent optical phenomena, i.e., optical nutation, free induction, and photon echo, in the acetylene (12C2H2) filled hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) are reported. The presented results were obtained for the acetylene vibration-rotational transition P9 at wavelength 1530.37 nm at room temperature under a gas pressure of <0.5 Torr. An all-fiber pumped-through cell based on the commercial 2.6-m-long PCF with a 10-μm hollow-core diameter was used. The characteristic relaxation time T2 during which the optical coherent effects were typically observed in our experiments was estimated to be ≈8 ns. This time is governed by the limited time of the acetylene molecules' presence inside the effective PCF modal area and by intermolecule collisions. An accelerated attenuation of the optical nutation oscillations is explained by a random orientation of acetylene molecules.

  4. Acousto-optic mode coupling excited by flexural waves in simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Qiu, Minghui; Wu, Zhifang; Dong, Hongguang; Liu, Bo; Miao, Yinping

    2013-05-01

    We have demonstrated the formation of an acoustic grating in a simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, which consists of a hollow hexagonal core and six crown-like air holes, by applying flexural acoustic waves along the fiber axis. The dependence of the resonance wavelength on the applied acoustic frequency has been acquired on the basis of the theoretical calculation of the phase matching curve; it is in good agreement with our experimental observation of the transmission spectral evolution as the applied acoustic frequency varies. Experimental results show that the acoustic grating resonance peak possesses acoustic frequency and strain dependences of 728 nm MHz-1 and -6.98 pm μɛ-1, respectively, based on which high-performance acousto-optic tunable filters and fiber-optic strain sensors with high sensitivity could be achieved. And furthermore, the research work presented in this paper indicates that microbending rather than physical deformation is the main physical mechanism that leads to the formation of equivalent long-period gratings, which would be of significance for developing related grating devices based on simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

  5. Toward cold atom guidance in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre using a blue detuned hollow laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Jerome

    This thesis describes advances and techniques toward the efficient coupling of cold 85Rb atoms into a low loss hollow core photonic crystal fibre using a blue-detuned first order hollow beam. In the proposed system, the low diffraction of the blue-detuned first order hollow beam acts as a repulsive potential optical funnel that allows the coupling of cold atoms under the influence of gravity into the fibre's hollow core. Using a low loss fibre with a blue detuned hollow beam shows potential for guiding atoms over an arbitrary path and longer distances on the laboratory scale, which would enable several new applications in nanofabrication and optical metrology. To realize this objective, a Magneto-Optical Trap of 85Rb was built from scratch and by using advanced polarization gradient cooling techniques was turned into a 9 muK cold optical molasses containing 10 7 atoms. These cold atoms were guided over 23 cm in a collimated blue detuned hollow beam tunnel and through a focused hollow beam mimicking as closely as possible the coupling conditions for a hollow core optical fibre. Three classes of atoms were observed: lost, trapped and guided atoms. The dynamics of the system as well as the optimal coupling conditions were identified through the use of a numerical model. A novel approach to modelling cold atom dynamics in an optical funnel was developed during the course of this thesis. This new model was not only able to reproduce the dynamics of atoms in the experiment but also simulate dense cold atoms cooled into the MOT and predict final temperatures attained. This was achieved by 3D modelling of the conservative and non-conservative components of optical forces acting on atoms but also through the implementation of known heat mechanisms: light scattering and momentum diffusion. The model identified the best coupling conditions of this system, confirmed by experiment, and an optimal light potential for a given distance of coupling that must not be exceeded. A

  6. Solid-core and hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for generation of bright ultraviolet light (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joly, Nicolas Y.; Jiang, Xin; Travers, John C.; Ermolov, Alexey; Russell, Philip S.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last two decades the interest in photonic crystal fiber (PCF) has grown considerably, particularly in nonlinear optics where it allows enhanced control over the dispersion landscape. Although silica is the material most commonly used to fabricate PCF, its limited window of transmission and its susceptibility to optical damage at wavelengths below 350nm is driving the development of fibers made from glasses with transmission windows extending into the deep ultraviolet and the mid-infrared. An alternative is offered by gas-filled hollow-core fiber, in which the light propagates predominantly in the gas. In kagomé-style hollow-core PCF filled with noble gas, the weak anomalous dispersion of the empty fiber is balanced by the normal dispersion of the filling gas, resulting in a versatile system whose dispersion landscape can be adjusted in real time [Travers et al., JOSAB 28, A11 (2011)]. Under appropriate conditions the launched pulse undergoes soliton self-compression followed by emission of a band of dispersive radiation in the UV. UV light tunable down to 113 nm has been generated with this technique [Russell et al., Nat. Photon. 8, 278 (2014)]. Solid-core ZBLAN (fluorozirconate) glass PCF is transparent from 0.2 to 7.8µm. Launching 1nJ 140fs pulses at 1µm wavelength into a 1µm diameter core resulted, after 4cm of propagation, in generation of a supercontinuum spectrum extending from 210nm to beyond 2µm. In strong contrast to silica PCF, the ZBLAN PCF showed no signs of any solarization-related damage, even when operating over many hours [Jiang et al., Nat. Photon. 9, 133 (2015)].

  7. Long-range optical binding in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber using higher order modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, Dmitry S.; Zeltner, Richard; Euser, Tijmen G.; Xie, Shangran; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2016-09-01

    We report long-range optical binding of multiple polystyrene nanoparticles (100-600 nm in diameter) at fixed interparticle distances that match multiples of the half-beat-lengths between the lowest order modes of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Analysis suggests that each nanoparticle converts the incoming optical mode into a superposition of co-propagating modes, within the beat pattern of which further particles can become trapped. Strikingly, the entire particle arrangement can be moved over a distance of several cm, without changing the inter-particle spacing, by altering the ratio of backward-to-forward optical power. Potential applications are in multi-dimensional nanoparticle-based quantum optomechanical systems.

  8. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high-power ultrashort pulse transportation and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M; Dutin, C Fourcade; Bradley, T D; Gérôme, F; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F

    2012-08-01

    We report on the recent design and fabrication of kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for the purpose of high-power ultrashort pulse transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all kagome fibers) of 40 dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500 nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single-mode guidance, and low dispersion make it an ideal host for high-power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74 μJ, 850 fs, and 40 kHz repetition rate ultrashort pulse at 1550 nm has been faithfully delivered at the fiber output with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105 μJ laser pulse from 850 fs down to 300 fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  9. Two techniques for temporal pulse compression in gas-filled hollow-core kagomé photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Travers, J C; Joly, N Y; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J

    2013-09-15

    We demonstrate temporal pulse compression in gas-filled kagomé hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) using two different approaches: fiber-mirror compression based on self-phase modulation under normal dispersion, and soliton effect self-compression under anomalous dispersion with a decreasing pressure gradient. In the first, efficient compression to near-transform-limited pulses from 103 to 10.6 fs was achieved at output energies of 10.3 μJ. In the second, compression from 24 to 6.8 fs was achieved at output energies of 6.6 μJ, also with near-transform-limited pulse shapes. The results illustrate the potential of kagomé-PCF for postprocessing the output of fiber lasers. We also show that, using a negative pressure gradient, ultrashort pulses can be delivered directly into vacuum.

  10. Phase-matched electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation in Xe-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Jean-Michel; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-08-01

    Second-order nonlinearity is induced inside a Xe-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) by applying an external dc field. The system uniquely allows the linear optical properties to be adjusted by changing the gas pressure, allowing for precise phase matching between the LP01 mode at 1064 nm and the LP02 mode at 532 nm. The dependence of the second-harmonic conversion efficiency on the gas pressure, launched pulse energy, and applied field agrees well with theory. The ultra-broadband guidance offered by anti-resonant reflecting hollow-core PCFs, for example, a kagomé PCF, offers many possibilities for generating light in traditionally difficult-to-access regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, such as the ultraviolet or the terahertz windows. The system can also be used for noninvasive measurements of the transmission loss in a hollow-core PCF over a broad spectrum, including the deep and vacuum UV regions.

  11. Passively mode-locked fiber laser based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with few-layered graphene oxide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Bo; He, Xiaoying; Wang, D. N.

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate a nanosecond-pulse erbium-doped fiber laser that is passively mode locked by a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with few-layered graphene oxide solution. Owing to the good solution processing capability of few-layered graphene oxide, which can be filled into the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber through a selective hole filling process, a graphene saturable absorber can be successfully fabricated. The output pulses obtained have a center wavelength, pulse width, and repetition rate of 1561.2nm, 4.85ns, and 7.68MHz, respectively. This method provides a simple and efficient approach to integrate the graphene into the optical fiber system.

  12. Passively mode-locked fiber laser based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with few-layered graphene oxide solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Bo; He, Xiaoying; Wang, D N

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate a nanosecond-pulse erbium-doped fiber laser that is passively mode locked by a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with few-layered graphene oxide solution. Owing to the good solution processing capability of few-layered graphene oxide, which can be filled into the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber through a selective hole filling process, a graphene saturable absorber can be successfully fabricated. The output pulses obtained have a center wavelength, pulse width, and repetition rate of 1561.2 nm, 4.85 ns, and 7.68 MHz, respectively. This method provides a simple and efficient approach to integrate the graphene into the optical fiber system.

  13. Towards the control of highly sensitive Fabry-Pérot strain sensor based on hollow-core ring photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marta S; Bierlich, Jörg; Kobelke, Jens; Schuster, Kay; Santos, José L; Frazão, Orlando

    2012-09-24

    A high sensitivity Fabry-Pérot (FP) strain sensor based on hollow-core ring photonic crystal fiber was investigated. A low-finesse FP cavity was fabricated by splicing a section of hollow-core ring photonic crystal fiber between two standard single mode fibers. The geometry presents a low cross section area of silica enabling to achieve high strain sensitivity. Strain measurements were performed by considering the FP cavity length in a range of 1000 μm. The total length of the strain gauge at which strain was applied was also studied for a range of 900 mm. The FP cavity length variation highly influenced the strain sensitivity, and for a length of 13 μm a sensitivity of 15.4 pm/με was attained. Relatively to the strain gauge length, its dependence to strain sensitivity is low. Finally, the FP cavity presented residual temperature sensitivity (~0.81 pm/°C).

  14. A new modality for minimally invasive CO2 laser surgery: flexible hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers.

    PubMed

    Shurgalin, Max; Anastassiou, Charalambos

    2008-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers have become one of the most common surgical lasers due to excellent tissue interaction properties that offer precise control of cutting and ablation depth, minimal thermal damage to surrounding tissue, and good hemostasis. However, realization of the benefits offered by using surgical CO2 lasers in many endoscopic, minimally invasive surgical procedures has been inhibited by the absence of reliable, flexible fiber laser beam delivery systems. Recently, novel hollow-core photonic bandgap optical fibers for CO2 lasers were developed that offer high flexibility and mechanical robustness with good optical performance under tight bends. These fibers can be used through rigid and flexible endoscopes and various handpieces and will allow surgeons to perform delicate and precise laser surgery procedures in a minimally invasive manner. This paper describes the basic design of laser beam delivery system, different surgical fiber designs and their characteristics, and usage with existing surgical CO2 laser models. A few examples of successful CO2 laser surgeries performed with these fibers are presented.

  15. Highly sensitive SERS detection of cancer proteins in low sample volume using hollow core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    U S, Dinish; Fu, Chit Yaw; Soh, Kiat Seng; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari; Kumar, Anil; Olivo, Malini

    2012-03-15

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) are commonly used for detecting cancer proteins at concentration in the range of about ng-μg/mL. Hence it often fails to detect tumor markers at the early stages of cancer and other diseases where the amount of protein is extremely low. Herein, we report a novel photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensing platform for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer proteins in an extremely low sample volume. As a proof of concept, epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) in a lysate solution from human epithelial carcinoma cells were immobilized into the hollow core PCF. Highly sensitive detection of protein was achieved using anti-EGFR antibody conjugated SERS nanotag. This SERS nanotag probe was realized by anchoring highly active Raman molecules onto the gold nanoparticles followed by bioconjugation. The proposed sensing method can detect low amount of proteins at ∼100 pg in a sample volume of ∼10 nL. Our approach may lead to the highly sensitive protein sensing methodology for the early detection of diseases.

  16. Anti-resonant reflecting guidance in alcohol-filled hollow core photonic crystal fiber for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuhui; Wang, Ying; Hou, Maoxiang; Guo, Jiangtao; Li, Zhihua; Lu, Peixiang

    2013-12-16

    Mechanism and sensing applications of antiresonant reflecting guidance in an alcohol-filled simplified hollow-core (SHC) photonic crystal fiber (PCF) are demonstrated. By filling one air hole in the air cladding of the PCF with alcohol, anti-resonant reflecting guidance of light can be achieved and energy leakage of the core modes can be induced at resonant wavelengths of the Fabry-Pérot (F-P) resonator formed by the alcohol-filled layer combined with the silica cladding in the cross-section of the PCF. The proposed structure exhibits periodic lossy dips in the transmission spectrum, of which the visibilities are sensitive to the refractive index of surrounding medium due to the reflectivity variation of the F-P resonator. Water level sensing is experimentally realized with this principle and the lossy dip exhibits a linear decrease against water level with a sensitivity of 1.1 dB/mm. The sensor is also sensitive to environmental temperature and a temperature sensitivity of -0.48 nm/°C is obtained between room temperature and 60 °C.

  17. In-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer for gas refractive index measurements based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Nicholas L P; Ross, Rachel; Munzke, Dorit; van Hoorn, Camiel; Brzezinski, Andrew; Barnes, Jack A; Reich, Oliver; Loock, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-27

    We describe an in-fiber interferometer based on a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Expressions for the sensitivity, figure of merit and refractive index resolution are derived, and values are experimentally measured and theoretically validated using mode field calculations. The refractive indices of nine monoatomic and molecular gases are measured with a resolution of δns < 10-6.

  18. Microjoule sub-10 fs VUV pulse generation by MW pump pulses using highly efficient chirped four-wave mixing in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Song-Jin

    2015-03-01

    We theoretically study chirped four-wave mixing for VUV pulse generation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers. We predict the generation of sub-10 fs VUV pulses with energy of up to hundreds of µJ by broad-band chirped idler pulses at 830 nm and MW pump pulses with narrow-band at 277 nm. The MW pump could be desirable to reduce the complexity of the laser system or use a high repetition rate laser system. The energy conversion efficiency from pump pulse to VUV pulse reaches to 30% . This generation can be realized in a kagome-lattice hollow-core PCF filled with noble gas of high pressure with core diameter less than 40 µm, which would enable technically simple or highly efficient coupling to the fundamental mode of the fiber.

  19. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberger, H. Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I.; Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C.; Calegari, F.; Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T.; Cavalleri, A.

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  20. Matched cascade of bandgap-shift and frequency-conversion using stimulated Raman scattering in a tapered hollow-core photonic crystal fibre.

    PubMed

    Beaudou, B; Couny, F; Wang, Y Y; Light, P S; Wheeler, N V; Gérôme, F; Benabid, F

    2010-06-07

    We report on a novel means which lifts the restriction of the limited optical bandwidth of photonic bandgap hollow-core photonic crystal fiber on generating high order stimulated Raman scattering in gaseous media. This is based on H(2)-filled tapered HC-PCF in which the taper slope is matched with the effective length of Raman process. Raman orders outside the input-bandwidth of the HC-PCF are observed with more than 80% quantum-conversion using a compact, low-power 1064 nm microchip laser. The technique opens prospects for efficient sources in spectral regions that are poorly covered by currently existing lasers such as mid-IR.

  1. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering in isolated air-guided modes of a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.B.; Zheltikov, A.M.; Konorov, S.O.; Mitrokhin, V.P.; Serebryannikov, E.E

    2004-10-01

    Hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers are shown to offer the unique possibility of coherent excitation and probing of Raman-active vibrations in molecules by isolated air-guided modes of electromagnetic radiation. A 3-cm section of a hollow photonic-crystal fiber is used to prepare isolated air-guided modes of pump and probe fields for a coherent excitation of 2331-cm{sup -1} Q-branch vibrations of molecular nitrogen in the gas filling the fiber core, enhancing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering through these vibrations by a factor of 15 relative to the regime of tight focusing.

  2. Fugitive methane leak detection using mid-infrared hollow-core photonic crystal fiber containing ultrafast laser drilled side-holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Jason; Challener, William; Kasten, Matthias; Choudhury, Niloy; Palit, Sabarni; Pickrell, Gary; Homa, Daniel; Floyd, Adam; Cheng, Yujie; Yu, Fei; Knight, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    The increase in domestic natural gas production has brought attention to the environmental impacts of persistent gas leakages. The desire to identify fugitive gas emission, specifically for methane, presents new sensing challenges within the production and distribution supply chain. A spectroscopic gas sensing solution would ideally combine a long optical path length for high sensitivity and distributed detection over large areas. Specialty micro-structured fiber with a hollow core can exhibit a relatively low attenuation at mid-infrared wavelengths where methane has strong absorption lines. Methane diffusion into the hollow core is enabled by machining side-holes along the fiber length through ultrafast laser drilling methods. The complete system provides hundreds of meters of optical path for routing along well pads and pipelines while being interrogated by a single laser and detector. This work will present transmission and methane detection capabilities of mid-infrared photonic crystal fibers. Side-hole drilling techniques for methane diffusion will be highlighted as a means to convert hollow-core fibers into applicable gas sensors.

  3. Health monitoring of engine blades by using an in-line fiber-optic F-P strain sensor based on hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yunjiang; Fan, Yanen; Li, Hong; Zhu, Tao

    2009-10-01

    We present the application of a fiber-optic F-P strain sensor based on hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) to measurement of stress of engine blades. The blade stress under different rotating speeds is tested by detecting the reflected wavelength shift of the HCPCF sensor. The experimental results show that the strain has a quadratic relationship with the rotating speed, which agrees well with the theoretical analysis. As such a HCPCF sensor with short cavity length can stand high temperature of up to 600°C and has low temperature sensitivity, it would be possible to realize real-time health monitoring of engine blades during operation.

  4. Prospects for diode-pumped alkali-atom-based hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Sintov, Yoav; Malka, Dror; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-08-15

    By employing large hollow-core Kagome fiber in a double-clad configuration, the performance of a potentially rubidium vapor-based fiber laser is explored. The absorbed power and laser efficiency versus pump power are calculated utilizing a simple laser model. Our results show that a Kagome-based high-power fiber laser is feasible provided that the value of the collisional fine-structure mixing rate will be elevated by increasing the ambient temperature or by increasing the helium pressure.

  5. Generation of surface-wave microwave microplasmas in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber based on a split-ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Vial, Florian; Gadonna, Katell; Debord, Benoît; Delahaye, Frédéric; Amrani, Foued; Leroy, Olivier; Gérôme, Frédéric; Benabid, Fetah

    2016-05-15

    We report on a new and highly compact scheme for the generation and sustainment of microwave-driven plasmas inside the core of an inhibited coupling Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The microwave plasma generator consists of a split-ring resonator that efficiently couples the microwave field into the gas-filled fiber. This coupling induces the concomitant generation of a microwave surface wave at the fiber core surround and a stable plasma column confined in the fiber core. The scheme allowed the generation of several centimeters long argon microplasma columns with a very low excitation power threshold. This result represents an important step toward highly compact plasma lasers or plasma-based photonic components.

  6. Design of photonic band gap fibers with suppressed higher-order modes: Towards the development of effectively single mode large hollow-core fiber platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Kunimasa; Florous, Nikolaos J.; Murao, Tadashi; Koshiba, Masanori

    2006-08-01

    The objective of the present investigation is to propose and theoretically demonstrate the effective suppression of higher-order modes in large-hollow-core photonic band gap fibers (PBGFs), mainly for low-loss data transmission platforms and/or high power delivery systems. The proposed design strategy is based on the index-matching mechanism of central air-core modes with defected outer core modes. By incorporating several air-cores in the cladding of the PBGF with 6-fold symmetry it is possible to resonantly couple the light corresponding to higher-order modes into the outer core, thus significantly increasing the leakage losses of the higher-order modes in comparison to the fundamental mode, thus making our proposed design to operate in an effectively single mode fashion with polarization independent propagation characteristics. The validation of the procedure is ensured with a detailed PBGF analysis based on an accurate finite element modal solver. Extensive numerical results show that the leakage losses of the higher-order modes can be enhanced in a level of at least 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to those of the fundamental mode. Our investigation is expected to remove an essential obstacle in the development of large-core single-mode hollow-core fibers, thus enabling them to surpass the attenuation of conventional fibers.

  7. Design of photonic band gap fibers with suppressed higher-order modes: towards the development of effectively single mode large hollow-core fiber platforms.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kunimasa; Florous, Nikolaos J; Murao, Tadashi; Koshiba, Masanori

    2006-08-07

    The objective of the present investigation is to propose and theoretically demonstrate the effective suppression of higher-order modes in large-hollow-core photonic band gap fibers (PBGFs), mainly for low-loss data transmission platforms and/or high power delivery systems. The proposed design strategy is based on the index-matching mechanism of central air-core modes with defected outer core modes. By incorporating several air-cores in the cladding of the PBGF with 6-fold symmetry it is possible to resonantly couple the light corresponding to higher-order modes into the outer core, thus significantly increasing the leakage losses of the higher-order modes in comparison to the fundamental mode, thus making our proposed design to operate in an effectively single mode fashion with polarization independent propagation characteristics. The validation of the procedure is ensured with a detailed PBGF analysis based on an accurate finite element modal solver. Extensive numerical results show that the leakage losses of the higher-order modes can be enhanced in a level of at least 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to those of the fundamental mode. Our investigation is expected to remove an essential obstacle in the development of large-core single-mode hollow-core fibers, thus enabling them to surpass the attenuation of conventional fibers.

  8. All-fiber reflecting temperature probe based on the simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with aqueous quantum dot solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Yin, Xiaojin; Wang, Wenyuan; Hong, Xueming; Du, Yu; Geng, Youfu; Li, Xuejin

    2016-02-10

    An all-fiber reflecting fluorescent temperature probe is proposed based on the simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (SHC-PCF) filled with an aqueous CdSe/ZnS quantum dot solution. SHC-PCF is an excellent PCF used to fill liquid materials, which has low loss transmission bands in the visible wavelength range and enlarged core sizes. Both end faces of the SHC-PCF were spliced with multimode fiber after filling in order to generate a more stable and robust waveguide structure. The obtained temperature sensitivity dependence of the emission wavelength and the self-referenced intensity are 126.23 pm/°C and -0.007/°C in the temperature range of -10°C-120°C, respectively.

  9. Non-resonant wavelength modulation saturation spectroscopy in acetylene-filled hollow-core photonic bandgap fibres applied to modulation-free laser diode stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Vadillo, Pablo; Lynch, Michael; Charlton, Christy; Donegan, John F; Weldon, Vincent

    2009-12-07

    In this paper the application of Wavelength Modulation (WM) techniques to non-resonant saturation spectroscopy in acetylene-filled Hollow-Core Photonic Bandgap Fibres (HC-PBFs) and modulation-free Laser Diode (LD) frequency stabilisation is investigated. In the first part WM techniques are applied to non-resonant pump-probe saturation of acetylene overtone rotational transitions in a HC-PBF. A high-power DFB chip-on-carrier mounted LD is used in conjunction with a tuneable External Cavity Laser (ECL) and the main saturation parameters are characterized. In the second part a novel feedback system to stabilize the DFB emission wavelength based on the WM saturation results is implemented. Modulation-free locking of the DFB laser frequency to the narrow linewidth saturation feature is achieved for both constant and variable LD temperatures.

  10. Temperature-insensitive refractive index sensing by use of micro Fabry-Pérot cavity based on simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, D N; Liao, C R; Hu, Tianyi; Guo, Jiangtao; Wei, Huifeng

    2013-02-01

    A temperature-insensitive micro Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity based on simplified hollow-core (SHC) photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is demonstrated. Such a device is fabricated by splicing a section of SHC PCF with single mode fibers at both cleaved ends. An extremely low temperature sensitivity of ~0.273 pm/°C is obtained between room temperature and 900°C. By drilling vertical micro-channels using a femtosecond laser, the micro FP cavity can be filled with liquids and functions as a sensitive refractometer and the refractive index sensitivity obtained is ~851.3 nm/RIU (refractive index unit), which indicates an ultra low temperature cross-sensitivity of ~3.2×10(-7) RIU/°C.

  11. A frequency-stabilized laser based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber CO2 gas cell and its application scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ze-Heng; Yang, Fei; Chen, Di-Jun; Cai, Hai-Wen

    2017-04-01

    A frequency-stabilized laser system based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) CO2 gas cell for the space-borne CO2 light detection and ranging (LIDAR) is proposed. This system will help realize precise measurement of the global atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The relation between the frequency stability and the temperature of the HC-PCF cell was studied in detail. It is proved that accurate control of the temperature of the HC-PCF cell is very important to realize high stability of the proposed system. The laser is locked to CO2 gas R18 absorption line at 1572.0179 nm, and its peak-to-peak frequency stability is approximately 485 kHz, satisfying the requirements for the integrated path differential absorption system for CO2 measurement with an accuracy of  <1 ppm over 5 h.

  12. Dramatic Raman Gain Suppression in the Vicinity of the Zero Dispersion Point in a Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerschmidt, S. T.; Novoa, D.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-12-01

    In 1964 Bloembergen and Shen predicted that Raman gain could be suppressed if the rates of phonon creation and annihilation (by inelastic scattering) exactly balance. This is only possible if the momentum required for each process is identical, i.e., phonon coherence waves created by pump-to-Stokes scattering are identical to those annihilated in pump-to-anti-Stokes scattering. In bulk gas cells, this can only be achieved over limited interaction lengths at an oblique angle to the pump axis. Here we report a simple system that provides dramatic Raman gain suppression over long collinear path lengths in hydrogen. It consists of a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber whose zero dispersion point is pressure adjusted to lie close to the pump laser wavelength. At a certain precise pressure, stimulated generation of Stokes light in the fundamental mode is completely suppressed, allowing other much weaker phenomena such as spontaneous Raman scattering to be explored at high pump powers.

  13. Full-vectorial coupled mode theory for the evaluation of macro-bending loss in multimode fibers. application to the hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers.

    PubMed

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim; Saitoh, Kunimasa; Koshiba, Masanori

    2008-09-15

    In the hollow core photonic bandgap fibers, modal losses are strongly differentiated, potentially enabling effectively single mode guidance. However, in the presence of macro-bending, due to mode coupling, power in the low-loss mode launched into a bend is partially transferred into the modes with higher losses, thus resulting in increased propagation loss, and degradation of the beam quality. We show that coupled mode theory formulated in the curvilinear coordinates associated with a bend can describe correctly both the bending induced loss and beam degradation. Suggested approach works both in absorption dominated regime in which fiber modes are square integrable over the fiber crossection, as well as in radiation dominated regime in which leaky modes are not square integrable. It is important to stress that for multimode fibers, full-vectorial coupled mode theory developed in this work is not a simple approximation, but it is on par with such "exact" numerical approaches as finite element and finite difference methods for prediction of macro-bending induced losses.

  14. Understanding the dynamics of photoionization-induced nonlinear effects and solitons in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, Mohammed F.; Biancalana, Fabio

    2011-12-15

    We present the details of our previously formulated model [Saleh et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 203902 (2011)] that governs pulse propagation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled by an ionizable gas. By using perturbative methods, we find that the photoionization process induces the opposite phenomenon of the well-known Raman self-frequency redshift of solitons in solid-core glass fibers, as was recently experimentally demonstrated [Hoelzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 203901 (2011)]. This process is only limited by ionization losses, and leads to a constant acceleration of solitons in the time domain with a continuous blueshift in the frequency domain. By applying the Gagnon-Belanger gauge transformation, multipeak ''inverted gravitylike'' solitary waves are predicted. We also demonstrate that the pulse dynamics shows the ejection of solitons during propagation in such fibers, analogous to what happens in conventional solid-core fibers. Moreover, unconventional long-range nonlocal interactions between temporally distant solitons, unique of gas plasma systems, are predicted and studied. Finally, the effects of higher-order dispersion coefficients and the shock operator on the pulse dynamics are investigated, showing that the conversion efficiency of resonant radiation into the deep UV can be improved via plasma formation.

  15. Mesoscale cavities in hollow-core waveguides for quantum optics with atomic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapamaki, C. M.; Flannery, J.; Bappi, G.; Al Maruf, R.; Bhaskara, S. V.; Alshehri, O.; Yoon, T.; Bajcsy, M.

    2016-08-01

    Single-mode hollow-core waveguides loaded with atomic ensembles offer an excellent platform for light-matter interactions and nonlinear optics at low photon levels. We review and discuss possible approaches for incorporating mirrors, cavities, and Bragg gratings into these waveguides without obstructing their hollow cores. With these additional features controlling the light propagation in the hollow-core waveguides, one could potentially achieve optical nonlinearities controllable by single photons in systems with small footprints that can be integrated on a chip. We propose possible applications such as single-photon transistors and superradiant lasers that could be implemented in these enhanced hollow-core waveguides.

  16. Towards Rydberg quantum optics in a hollow core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noaman, Mohammad; Langbecker, Maria; Windpassinger, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Cold atoms inside hollow-core fibers present a promising candidate to study strongly coupled light-matter systems. Adding coherent quantum state control and the intriguing features of Rydberg atoms, i.e. long range dipolar interactions leading to a dipole blockade, to the system should allow for the generation of exotic polaritonic and photonic states. This talk will review the current status of our experimental setup where laser cooled Rubidium atoms are transported into a hollow-core fiber. We present the first measurements of Rydberg EIT in the dipole trap in front of the fiber and discuss the progress towards Rydberg physics in a quasi-one-dimensional geometry. This work is supported by FP7, Marie Curie ITN 317485, QTea.

  17. Dual hollow-core anti-resonant fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, N. V.; Bradley, T. D.; Hayes, J. R.; Jasion, G. T.; Chen, Y.; Sandoghchi, S. R.; Horak, P.; Poletti, F.; Petrovich, M. N.; Richardson, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    While hollow core-photonic crystal fibres are now a well-established fibre technology, the majority of work on these speciality fibres has been on designs with a single core for optical guidance. In this paper we present the first dual hollow-core anti-resonant fibres (DHC-ARFs). The fibres have high structural uniformity and low loss (minimum loss of 0.5 dB/m in the low loss guidance window) and demonstrate regimes of both inter-core coupling and zero coupling, dependent on the wavelength of operation, input polarisation, core separation and bend radius. In a DHC-ARF with a core separation of 4.3 μm, we find that with an optimised input polarisation up to 65% of the light guided in the launch core can be coupled into the second core, opening up applications in power delivery, gas sensing and quantum optics.

  18. Ionization-induced blueshift of high-peak-power guided-wave ultrashort laser pulses in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A. B.; Serebryannikov, E. E.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2007-11-15

    Ionization-induced change in the refractive index of a gas is shown to give rise to a substantial spectral blueshift of megawatt light pulses transmitted through a gas-filled hollow photonic-crystal fiber (PCF). This effect suggests the ways of controlling not only the rate, but also the sign of the soliton frequency shift for high-peak-power ultrashort light pulses guided in hollow PCFs filled with Raman-active ionizing gases.

  19. Dispersion analysis of hollow-core modes in ultralarge-bandwidth all-silica Bragg fibers with nanosupports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, E.

    2006-03-01

    Dispersion of the fundamental confined modes in hollow-core all-silica Bragg fibers with nanosupports is analyzed. The transfer-matrix formalism is applied. Anomalies in the group-velocity dispersion are evidenced at long wavelengths, toward the upper limit of the bandgap. The results confirm that, as in microstructured photonic crystal fibers, this anomalous dispersion is due to prevention of the confined hollow-core modes from crossing the surface modes, the avoided crossings are more apparent in the variation of group velocity with wavelength. The dependence of these avoided crossings on the hollow-core radius and the layer thicknesses is briefly analyzed.

  20. Twin-hollow-core optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyros, Alexander; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; van Eijkelenborg, Martijn A.

    2009-05-01

    Twin-hollow-core microstructured optical fibres have been fabricated and characterised for the first time. The fibre cladding structure results in guidance by the inhibited coupling mechanism, in which there is a low overlap between the core modes and surrounding structure. This results in minimal interaction between the modes of each core in the transmission bands of the fibre and hence minimal coupling between the cores. It is shown that light is able to couple between the cores via coupling to cladding struts in the high loss wavelength bands.

  1. Sensing Features of Long Period Gratings in Hollow Core Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Iadicicco, Agostino; Campopiano, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    We report on the investigation of the sensing features of the Long-Period fiber Gratings (LPGs) fabricated in hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) by the pressure assisted Electric Arc Discharge (EAD) technique. In particular, the characterization of the LPG in terms of shift in resonant wavelengths and changes in attenuation band depth to the environmental parameters: strain, temperature, curvature, refractive index and pressure is presented. The achieved results show that LPGs in HC-PCFs represent a novel high performance sensing platform for measurements of different physical parameters including strain, temperature and, especially, for measurements of environmental pressure. The pressure sensitivity enhancement is about four times greater if we compare LPGs in HC and standard fibers. Moreover, differently from LPGs in standard fibers, these LPGs realized in innovative fibers, i.e., the HC-PCFs, are not sensitive to surrounding refractive index. PMID:25855037

  2. Sensing features of long period gratings in hollow core fibers.

    PubMed

    Iadicicco, Agostino; Campopiano, Stefania

    2015-04-03

    We report on the investigation of the sensing features of the Long-Period fiber Gratings (LPGs) fabricated in hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) by the pressure assisted Electric Arc Discharge (EAD) technique. In particular, the characterization of the LPG in terms of shift in resonant wavelengths and changes in attenuation band depth to the environmental parameters: strain, temperature, curvature, refractive index and pressure is presented. The achieved results show that LPGs in HC-PCFs represent a novel high performance sensing platform for measurements of different physical parameters including strain, temperature and, especially, for measurements of environmental pressure. The pressure sensitivity enhancement is about four times greater if we compare LPGs in HC and standard fibers. Moreover, differently from LPGs in standard fibers, these LPGs realized in innovative fibers, i.e., the HC-PCFs, are not sensitive to surrounding refractive index.

  3. Fabrication of an IR hollow-core Bragg fiber based on chalcogenide glass extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Minming; Wang, Xunsi; Pan, Zhanghao; Cheng, Ci; Zhu, Qingde; Jiang, Chen; Nie, Qiuhua; Zhang, Peiqing; Wu, Yuehao; Dai, Shixun; Xu, Tiefeng; Tao, Guangming; Zhang, Xianghua

    2015-05-01

    The theoretical analysis and experimental preparation of a hollow-core Bragg fiber based on chalcogenide glasses are demonstrated. The fiber has potential applications in bio-sensing and IR energy transmission. Two chalcogenide glasses with, respectively, high and low refractive indexes are investigated in detail for the fabrication of hollow-core Bragg fibers. The most appropriate structure is selected; this structure is composed of four concentric rings and a center air hole . Its band gap for the Bragg fiber is analyzed by the plane wave method. The chalcogenide glasses Ge15Sb20S58.5I13 and Ge15Sb10Se75 are chosen to extrude the robust multi-material glass preform with a specialized punch and glass container. The glass preform is simultaneously protected with a polyetherimide polymer. The hollow-core Bragg fibers are finally obtained after glass preform extrusion, fiber preform fabrication, and fiber drawing. Results showed that the fiber has a transparency window from 2.5 to 14 μm, including a low-loss transmission window from 10.5 to 12 μm. The location of this low-loss transmission window matches the predicted photonic band gap in the simulation.

  4. Liquid-filled hollow core microstructured polymer optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Cox, F M; Argyros, A; Large, M C J

    2006-05-01

    Guidance in a liquid core is possible with microstructured optical fibers, opening up many possibilities for chemical and biochemical fiber-optic sensing. In this work we demonstrate how the bandgaps of a hollow core microstructured polymer optical fiber scale with the refractive index of liquid introduced into the holes of the microstructure. Such a fiber is then filled with an aqueous solution of (-)-fructose, and the resulting optical rotation measured. Hence, we show that hollow core microstructured polymer optical fibers can be used for sensing, whilst also fabricating a chiral optical fiber based on material chirality, which has many applications in its own right.

  5. Hollow-core infrared fiber incorporating metal-wire metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Yan, Min; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-08-17

    Infrared (IR) light is considered important for short-range wireless communication, thermal sensing, spectroscopy, material processing, medical surgery, astronomy etc. However, IR light is in general much harder to transport than optical light or microwave radiation. Existing hollow-core IR waveguides usually use a layer of metallic coating on the inner wall of the waveguide. Such a metallic layer, though reflective, still absorbs guided light significantly due to its finite Ohmic loss, especially for transverse-magnetic (TM) light. In this paper, we show that metal-wire based metamaterials may serve as an efficient TM reflector, reducing propagation loss of the TM mode by two orders of magnitude. By further imposing a conventional metal cladding layer, which reflects specifically transverse-electric (TE) light, we can potentially obtain a low-loss hollow-core fiber. Simulations confirm that loss values for several low-order modes are comparable to the best results reported so far.

  6. Stationary light pulses and narrowband light storage in a laser-cooled ensemble loaded into a hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatt, Frank; Simeonov, Lachezar S.; Halfmann, Thomas; Peters, Thorsten

    2016-10-01

    We report on an observation of stationary light pulses and narrowband light storage inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Laser-cooled atoms were first loaded into the fiber core, providing strong light-matter coupling. Light pulses were then stored in a collective atomic excitation using a single control laser beam. By applying a second counterpropagating control beam, a light pulse could be brought to a standstill. Our work paves the way towards the creation of strongly correlated many-body systems with photons and applications in the field of quantum information processing.

  7. Extruded single ring hollow core optical fibers for Raman sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiminis, G.; Rowland, K. J.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H.; Spooner, N. A.; Monro, T. M.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report the fabrication of the first extruded hollow core optical fiber with a single ring of cladding holes. A lead-silicate glass billet is used to produce a preform through glass extrusion to create a larger-scale version of the final structure that is subsequently drawn to an optical fiber. The simple single suspended ring structure allows antiresonance reflection guiding. The resulting fibers were used to perform Raman sensing of liquid samples filling the length of the fiber, demonstrating its potential for fiber sensing applications.

  8. Ultralow thermal sensitivity of phase and propagation delay in hollow core optical fibres

    PubMed Central

    Slavík, Radan; Marra, Giuseppe; Fokoua, Eric Numkam; Baddela, Naveen; Wheeler, Natalie V.; Petrovich, Marco; Poletti, Francesco; Richardson, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation time through an optical fibre changes with the environment, e.g., a change in temperature alters the fibre length and its refractive index. These changes have negligible impact in many key fibre applications, e.g., telecommunications, however, they can be detrimental in many others. Examples are fibre-based interferometry (e.g., for precise measurement and sensing) and fibre-based transfer and distribution of accurate time and frequency. Here we show through two independent experiments that hollow-core photonic bandgap fibres have a significantly smaller sensitivity to temperature variations than traditional solid-core fibres. The 18 times improvement observed, over 3 times larger than previously reported, makes them the most environmentally insensitive fibre technology available and a promising candidate for many next-generation fibre systems applications that are sensitive to drifts in optical phase or absolute propagation delay. PMID:26490424

  9. Intensity modulated SMF cascaded tapers with a hollow core PCF based microcavity for curvature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dass, Sumit; Narayan Dash, Jitendra; Jha, Rajan

    2016-03-01

    We propose a highly sensitive curvature sensor based on cascaded single mode fiber (SMF) tapers with a microcavity. The microcavity is created by splicing a small piece of hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) at the end of an SMF to obtain a sharp interference pattern. Experimental results show that two SMF tapers enhance the curvature sensitivity of the system and by changing the tapering parameters of the second taper, the curvature sensitivity of the system can be tailored, together with the fringe contrast of the interference pattern. A maximum curvature sensitivity of 10.4 dB/m-1 is observed in the curvature range 0 to 1 m-1 for a second taper diameter of 18 μm. The sensing setup is highly stable and shows very low temperature sensitivity. As the interrogation is intensity based, a low cost optical power meter can be utilized to determine the curvature.

  10. Generation of three-octave-spanning transient Raman comb in hydrogen-filled hollow-core PCF.

    PubMed

    Tani, F; Belli, F; Abdolvand, A; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-03-15

    A noise-seeded transient comb of Raman sidebands spanning three octaves from 180 to 2400 nm, is generated by pumping a hydrogen-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber with 26-μJ, 300-fs pulses at 800 nm. The pump pulses are spectrally broadened by both Kerr and Raman-related self-phase modulation (SPM), and the broadening is then transferred to the Raman lines. In spite of the high intensity, and in contrast to bulk gas-cell based experiments, neither SPM broadening nor ionization are detrimental to comb formation.

  11. Hollow core anti-resonant fiber with split cladding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaosheng; Qi, Wenliang; Ho, Daryl; Yong, Ken-Tye; Luan, Feng; Yoo, Seongwoo

    2016-04-04

    An improved design for hollow core anti-resonant fibers (HAFs) is presented. A split cladding structure is introduced to reduce the fabrication distortion within design tolerance. We use numerical simulations to compare the Kagome fibers (KFs) and the proposed split cladding fibers (SCFs) over two normalized transmission bands. It reveals that SCFs are able to maintain the desired round shape of silica cladding walls, hence improving the confinement loss (CL) compared to the KF and is comparable to that of the nested antiresonant nodeless fiber (NANF) with the same core size. In addition, the SCF allows stacking multiple layers of cladding rings to control the CL. The influences of the number of cladding layers and the cladding gap width on the CL of the SCFs have been studied. SCF with three cladding rings is fabricated by the stack-and-draw technique. A measured attenuation spectrum matches well with the calculation prediction. The measured near field mode patterns also prove the feasibility of our fiber design.

  12. Gas-Filled Hollow Core Fiber Lasers Based on Population Inversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-05

    iodine (I2) and pumped at ~ 532 nm was studied. Toward improved fiber transmission measurements, novel thulium /holmium fiber laser near 2 microns...transmission, we have demonstrated a novel thulium /holmium fiber laser near 2 microns. Abstract (short): Hollow-core Optical Fiber Gas LASer...measurements, novel thulium /holmium fiber laser near 2 microns were created. H. Schlossberg Hollow-Core Optical Fiber Gas Lasers K. Corwin et al

  13. Pulsed photothermal interferometry for spectroscopic gas detection with hollow-core optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuechuan; Jin, Wei; Yang, Fan; Ma, Jun; Wang, Chao; Ho, Hoi Lut; Liu, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Gas detection with hollow-core photonic bandgap fibre (HC-PBF) and pulsed photothermal (PT) interferometry spectroscopy are studied theoretically and experimentally. A theoretical model is developed and used to compute the gas-absorption-induced temperature and phase modulation in a HC-PBF filled with low-concentration of C2H2 in nitrogen. The PT phase modulation dynamics for different pulse duration, peak power and energy of pump beam are numerically modelled, which are supported by the experimental results obtained around the P(9) absorption line of C2H2 at 1530.371 nm. Thermal conduction is identified as the main process responsible for the phase modulation dynamics. For a constant peak pump power level, the phase modulation is found to increase with pulse duration up to ~1.2 μs, while it increases with decreasing pulse duration for a constant pulse energy. It is theoretically possible to achieve ppb level detection of C2H2 with ~1 m length HC-PBF and a pump beam with ~10 ns pulse duration and ~100 nJ pulse energy.

  14. Raman-free nonlinear optical effects in high pressure gas-filled hollow core PCF.

    PubMed

    Azhar, M; Wong, G K L; Chang, W; Joly, N Y; Russell, P St J

    2013-02-25

    The effective Kerr nonlinearity of hollow-core kagomé-style photonic crystal fiber (PCF) filled with argon gas increases to ~15% of that of bulk silica glass when the pressure is increased from 1 to 150 bar, while the zero dispersion wavelength shifts from 300 to 900 nm. The group velocity dispersion of the system is uniquely pressure-tunable over a wide range while avoiding Raman scattering-absent in noble gases-and having an extremely high optical damage threshold. As a result, detailed and well-controlled studies of nonlinear effects can be performed, in both normal and anomalous dispersion regimes, using only a fixed-frequency pump laser. For example, the absence of Raman scattering permits clean observation, at high powers, of the interaction between a modulational instability side-band and a soliton-created dispersive wave. Excellent agreement is obtained between numerical simulations and experimental results. The system has great potential for the realization of reconfigurable supercontinuum sources, wavelength convertors and short-pulse laser systems.

  15. Pulsed photothermal interferometry for spectroscopic gas detection with hollow-core optical fibre

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuechuan; Jin, Wei; Yang, Fan; Ma, Jun; Wang, Chao; Ho, Hoi Lut; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Gas detection with hollow-core photonic bandgap fibre (HC-PBF) and pulsed photothermal (PT) interferometry spectroscopy are studied theoretically and experimentally. A theoretical model is developed and used to compute the gas-absorption-induced temperature and phase modulation in a HC-PBF filled with low-concentration of C2H2 in nitrogen. The PT phase modulation dynamics for different pulse duration, peak power and energy of pump beam are numerically modelled, which are supported by the experimental results obtained around the P(9) absorption line of C2H2 at 1530.371 nm. Thermal conduction is identified as the main process responsible for the phase modulation dynamics. For a constant peak pump power level, the phase modulation is found to increase with pulse duration up to ~1.2 μs, while it increases with decreasing pulse duration for a constant pulse energy. It is theoretically possible to achieve ppb level detection of C2H2 with ~1 m length HC-PBF and a pump beam with ~10 ns pulse duration and ~100 nJ pulse energy. PMID:28009011

  16. Coherent hollow-core waveguide bundles for thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Gal, Udi; Harrington, James; Ben-David, Moshe; Bledt, Carlos; Syzonenko, Nicholas; Gannot, Israel

    2010-09-01

    There has been very little work done in the past to extend the wavelength range of fiber image bundles to the IR range. This is due, in part, to the lack of IR transmissive fibers with optical and mechanical properties analogous to the oxide glass fibers currently employed in the visible fiber bundles. Our research is aimed at developing high-resolution hollow-core coherent IR fiber bundles for transendoscopic infrared imaging. We employ the hollow glass waveguide (HGW) technology that was used successfully to make single-HGWs with Ag/AgI thin film coatings to form coherent bundles for IR imaging. We examine the possibility of developing endoscopic systems to capture thermal images using hollow waveguide fiber bundles adjusted to the 8-10?mum spectral range and investigate the applicability of such systems. We carried out a series of measurements in order to characterize the optical properties of the fiber bundles. These included the attenuation, resolution, and temperature response. We developed theoretical models and simulation tools that calculate the light propagation through HGW bundles, and which can be used to calculate the optical properties of the fiber bundles. Finally, the HGW fiber bundles were used to transmit thermal images of various heated objects; the results were compared with simulation results. The experimental results are encouraging, show an improvement in the resolution and thermal response of the HGW fiber bundles, and are consistent with the theoretical results. Nonetheless, additional improvements in the attenuation of the bundles are required in order to be able to use this technology for medical applications.

  17. Novel design of hollow-core multi clad fiber for long haul optical communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palodiya, Vikram; Raghuwanshi, Sanjeev K.

    2016-09-01

    We have described a dispersion characteristics of hollow-core multi-clad index profiles, which include a hollow core. The designs satisfy the most important requirements for applications in long haul communication. This design fiber shows zero dispersion at 1550 nm can be obtained for the fundamental air core mode over a wide wavelength range by introducing the partial reflector layer around the core, optimizing expanded core size and silica cladding thickness. Also analyze dispersion compensating properties of these fibers. This unique structure of the fundamental air core mode is presented by the introduction of partial reflector cladding around the core. The potential applications of hollow-core multi clad fibers in long-haul optical communication system.

  18. Hollow-core microstructured ‘revolver’ fibre for the UV spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryamikov, A. D.; Kosolapov, A. F.; Alagashev, G. K.; Kolyadin, A. N.; Vel'miskin, V. V.; Biriukov, A. S.; Bufetov, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    We report the first silica-based hollow-core microstructured fibre for the UV spectral range, with a reflective cladding formed by a single ring of capillaries. The optical loss in the fibre at a wavelength of 250 {\\text{nm}} is 3 {\\text{dB m}}-1. We demonstrate distinctions between the propagation of high-order modes and the fundamental mode of the hollow core of a ‘revolver’ fibre with noncontacting cladding capillaries and examine the effect of multimode excitation on the transmission bandwidth of the fibre. Based on experimental data and numerical simulation results, we formulate recommendations how to reduce the level of losses and extend transmission bands in a hollow-core revolver fibre in the UV spectral range.

  19. Hollow core optical fibres made by glass billet extrusion as sensors for Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiminis, G.; Schartner, E. P.; Hutchinson, M. R.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H.

    2016-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors for Raman spectroscopy based on hollow core optical fibers have shown great promise due to their low glass background, and high signal collection efficiency. We have previously demonstrated how glass billet extrusion can be used to make simplified hollow core fibers based on a single suspended ring. In this work we investigate the performance of these optical fibers as sensors for Raman spectroscopy. These fibers are used to excite samples at a range of laser excitation wavelengths to scan across the transmission profile of the optical fibers, allowing comparison of the performance of these fibers against commercially-available alternatives.

  20. Antiresonant reflection and inhibited coupling in hollow-core square lattice optical fibres.

    PubMed

    Argyros, Alexander; Leon-Saval, Sergio G; Pla, Jarryd; Docherty, Andrew

    2008-04-14

    We propose a guidance mechanism in hollow-core optical fibres dominated by antiresonant reflection from struts of solid material in the cladding. Resonances with these struts determine the high loss bands of the fibres, and vector effects become important in determining the width of these bands through the non-degeneracy of the TE and TM polarised strut modes near cut-off. Away from resonances the light is confined through the inhibited coupling mechanism. This is demonstrated in a square lattice hollow-core microstructured polymer optical fibre.

  1. Optical and mechanical properties of hollow-core fibers with cobweb cladding structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingyang; Yu, Rongjin; Tian, Zhenguo; Bai, Xiangzhong

    2006-02-01

    This paper explores the possibility of realizing a hollow-core optical fiber, whose cladding is composed of cylindrical alternating layers of air and high-index material with supporting structure. The optical properties and the design criteria of the proposed fiber are evaluated by the compact two-dimensional (2D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. In particular, the influence of the number and width of supporting strips on the leakage loss of the fiber is investigated. Furthermore, the mechanical performances of the fiber are estimated by finite-element method, confirming that hollow-core fibers with a reasonable size and number of supporting strips are reliable.

  2. Effects of cholesterol on plasma membrane lipid order in MCF-7 cells by two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yixiu; Chen, Jianling; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and glycosphingolipids- enriched microdomains on plasma membrane surface of mammal cells, involved in a variety of cellular processes. Depleting cholesterol from the plasma membrane by drugs influences the trafficking of lipid raft markers. Optical imaging techniques are powerful tools to study lipid rafts in live cells due to its noninvasive feature. In this study, breast cancer cells MCF-7 were treated with different concentrations of MβCD to deplete cholesterol and an environmentally sensitive fluorescence probe, Laurdan was loaded to image lipid order by two-photon microscopy. The generalized polarization (GP) values were calculated to distinguish the lipid order and disorder phase. GP images and GP distributions of native and cholesterol-depleted MCF-7 cells were obtained. Our results suggest that even at low concentration (0.5 mM) of MβCD, the morphology of the MCF-7 cells changes. Small high GP areas (lipid order phase) decrease more rapidly than low GP areas (lipid disorder phase), indicating that lipid raft structure was altered more severely than nonraft domains. The data demonstrates that cholesterol dramatically affect raft coverage and plasma membrane fluidity in living cells.

  3. Sol-gel processing to form doped sol-gel monoliths inside hollow core optical fiber and sol-gel core fiber devices made thereby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Harry C. (Inventor); Ott, Melanie N. (Inventor); Manuel, Michele V. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A process of fabricating a fiber device includes providing a hollow core fiber, and forming a sol-gel material inside the hollow core fiber. The hollow core fiber is preferably an optical fiber, and the sol-gel material is doped with a dopant. Devices made in this manner includes a wide variety of sensors.

  4. Frequency stabilization of a 2.05 μm laser using hollow-core fiber CO2 frequency reference cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meras, Patrick; Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2010-04-01

    We have designed and built a hollow-core fiber frequency reference cell, filled it with CO2, and used it to demonstrate frequency stabilization of a 2.05 μm Tm:Ho:YLF laser using frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy technique. The frequency reference cell is housed in a compact and robust hermetic package that contains a several meter long hollow-core photonic crystal fiber optically coupled to index-guiding fibers with a fusion splice on one end and a mechanical splice on the other end. The package has connectorized fiber pigtails and a valve used to evacuate, refill it, or adjust the gas pressure. We have demonstrated laser frequency standard deviation decreasing from >450MHz (free-running) to <2.4MHz (stabilized). The 2.05 μm laser wavelength is of particular interest for spectroscopic instruments due to the presence of many CO2 and H20 absorption lines in its vicinity. To our knowledge, this is the first reported demonstration of laser frequency stabilization at this wavelength using a hollow-core fiber reference cell. This approach enables all-fiber implementation of the optical portion of laser frequency stabilization system, thus making it dramatically more lightweight, compact, and robust than the traditional free-space version that utilizes glass or metal gas cells. It can also provide much longer interaction length of light with gas and does not require any alignment. The demonstrated frequency reference cell is particularly attractive for use in aircraft and space coherent lidar instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 profile.

  5. Hollow core waveguide as mid-infrared laser modal beam filter

    SciTech Connect

    Patimisco, P.; Giglio, M.; Spagnolo, V.; Sampaolo, A.; Kriesel, J. M.; Tittel, F. K.

    2015-09-21

    A novel method for mid-IR laser beam mode cleaning employing hollow core waveguide as a modal filter element is reported. The influence of the input laser beam quality on fiber optical losses and output beam profile using a hollow core waveguide with 200 μm-bore size was investigated. Our results demonstrate that even when using a laser with a poor spatial profile, there will exist a minimum fiber length that allows transmission of only the Gaussian-like fundamental waveguide mode from the fiber, filtering out all the higher order modes. This essentially single mode output is preserved also when the waveguide is bent to a radius of curvature of 7.5 cm, which demonstrates that laser mode filtering can be realized even if a curved light path is required.

  6. Tunable mid-infrared emission from acetylene-filled hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zefeng; Zhou, Zhiyue; Li, Zhixian; Zhang, Naiqian; Chen, Yubin

    2016-11-01

    We report here a step tunable mid-infrared laser emission from acetylene-filled hollow-core fiber. Two kinds of anti-resonant hollow-core fibers are filled with mbar level of acetylene gas, and pumped with a modulated, amplified, narrow linewidth, fine tunable, 1.5 μm diode laser, then 3 μm laser emissions are generated by the intrinsic absorption of acetylene molecules. The laser wavelength is step-tunable in the range of 3.1 3.2 μm when the pump laser is precisely tuned to different absorption lines of P-branch of acetylene. By properly designing the fiber's transmission bands, and carefully selecting active gases and pump lasers, this paper provides a novel method for efficient, compact and tunable mid-infrared fiber lasers over a broad spectrum range.

  7. Guiding terahertz orbital angular momentum beams in multimode Kagome hollow-core fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Haisu; Ren, Guobin; Zhu, Bofeng; Gao, Yixiao; Yin, Bin; Wang, Jing; Jian, Shuisheng

    2017-01-15

    We explore terahertz (THz) orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes supported in multimode Kagome hollow-core fibers. Numerical models are adopted to characterize the effective indices and confinement losses of vector modes over 0.2-0.9 THz, where two low-loss transmission windows are observed. Linearly combining the vector modes, THz OAM states can be generated. Covering a broad bandwidth of 0.25 THz, the purity values of OAM modes are beyond 0.9. Using numerical simulations, the hollow-core THz fibers with one and two rings of Kagome structures are also comparably investigated. We reveal that the OAM purity is dependent upon the confinement performance of THz fiber.

  8. Negative curvature hollow core fibers for Raman lasing in the mid IR spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolyadin, A. N.; Alagashev, G. K.; Pryamikov, A. D.; Gladyshev, A. V.; Kosolapov, A. F.; Biriukov, A. S.; Bufetov, IA

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider a problem of using negative curvature hollow-core fibers for creation of Raman lasers in the mid IR spectral range. New designs of this type of fibers with cladding formed by one layer of double nested capillaries are discussed and their optical properties are investigated numerically and experimentally. It will be shown that it is possible to reduce the Raman generation threshold by decreasing an effective mode area in such fibers using nested capillaries in the cladding.

  9. Tailored loss discrimination in indefinite metamaterial-clad hollow-core fibers.

    PubMed

    Tuniz, Alessandro; Zeisberger, Matthias; Schmidt, Markus A

    2016-07-11

    We analyze the modal attenuation properties of silica hollow-core fibers with a gold-wire based indefinite metamaterial cladding at 10.6 µm. We find that by varying the metamaterial feature sizes and core diameter, the loss discrimination can be tailored such that either the HE11, TE01 or TM01 mode has the lowest loss, which is particularly difficult to achieve for the radially polarized mode in commonly used hollow-core fibers. Furthermore, it is possible to tailor the HE11 and TM01 modes in the metamaterial-clad waveguide so that they possess attenuations lower than in hollow tubes composed of the individual constituent materials. We show that S-parameter retrieval techniques in combination with an anisotropic dispersion equation can be used to predict the loss discrimination properties of such fibers. These results pave the way for the design of metamaterial hollow-core fibers with novel guidance properties, in particular for applications demanding cylindrically polarized modes.

  10. Broadband electric-field-induced LP01 and LP02 second harmonic generation in Xe-filled hollow-core PCF.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Jean-Michel; Köttig, Felix; St J Russell, Philip

    2016-08-15

    Second harmonic (SH) generation with 300 fs pump pulses is reported in a xenon-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) across which an external bias voltage is applied. Phase-matched intermodal conversion from a pump light in the LP01 mode to SH light in the LP02 mode is achieved at a particular gas pressure. Using periodic electrodes, quasi-phase-matched SH generation into the low-loss LP01 mode is achieved at a different pressure. The low linear dispersion of the gas enables phase-matching over a broad spectral window, resulting in a measured bandwidth of ∼10  nm at high pump energies. A conversion efficiency of ∼18%/mJ is obtained. Gas-filled anti-resonant-reflecting hollow-core PCF uniquely offers pressure-tunable phase-matching, ultra-broadband guidance, and a very high optical damage threshold, which hold great promise for efficient three-wave mixing, especially in difficult-to-access regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  11. Broadband robustly single-mode hollow-core PCF by resonant filtering of higher-order modes.

    PubMed

    Uebel, Patrick; Günendi, Mehmet C; Frosz, Michael H; Ahmed, Goran; Edavalath, Nitin N; Ménard, Jean-Michel; Russell, Philip St J

    2016-05-01

    We report a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber that is engineered so as to strongly suppress higher-order modes, i.e., to provide robust LP01 single-mode guidance in all the wavelength ranges where the fiber guides with low loss. Encircling the core is a single ring of nontouching glass elements whose modes are tailored to ensure resonant phase-matched coupling to higher-order core modes. We show that the resulting modal filtering effect depends on only one dimensionless shape parameter, akin to the well-known d/Λ parameter for endlessly single-mode solid-core PCF. Fabricated fibers show higher-order mode losses some ∼100 higher than for the LP01 mode, with LP01 losses <0.2  dB/m in the near-infrared and a spectral flatness ∼1  dB over a >110  THz bandwidth.

  12. Enhanced spontaneous Raman scattering using a photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Buric, M.P.; Falk, J.; Chen, K.; Woodruff, S.D.

    2008-07-22

    The output power from spontaneous gas-phase Raman scattering is enhanced using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for the gas cell and Stokes light collector, yielding >100 times enhancement over a free-space configuration.

  13. Preparation of hollow core/shell microspheres of hematite and its adsorption ability for samarium.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sheng-Hui; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2014-07-09

    Hollow core/shell hematite microspheres with diameter of ca. 1-2 μm have been successfully achieved by calcining the precursor composite microspheres of pyrite and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in air. The synthesized products were characterized by a wide range of techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) gas sorptometry. Temperature- and time-dependent experiments unveil that the precursor pyrite-PVP composite microspheres finally transform into hollow core/shell hematite microspheres in air through a multistep process including the oxidation and sulfation of pyrite, combustion of PVP occluded in the precursor, desulfation, aggregation, and fusion of nanosized hematite as well as mass transportation from the interior to the exterior of the microspheres. The formation of the hollow core/shell microspheres dominantly depends on the calcination temperature under current experimental conditions, and the aggregation of hematite nanocrystals and the core shrinking during the oxidation of pyrite are responsible for the formation of the hollow structures. Moreover, the adsorption ability of the hematite for Sm(III) was also tested. The results exhibit that the hematite microspheres have good adsorption activity for trivalent samarium, and that its adsorption capacity strongly depends on the pH of the solution, and the maximum adsorption capacity for Sm(III) is 14.48 mg/g at neutral pH. As samarium is a typical member of the lanthanide series, our results suggest that the hollow hematite microspheres have potential application in removal of rare earth elements (REEs) entering the water environment.

  14. Design, synthesis and applications of core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle multifunctional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Habila, Mohamed A.; Labis, Joselito Puzon; Alothman, Zeid A.; Alhoshan, Mansour; Elzatahry, Ahmed A.; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    With the evolution of nanoscience and nanotechnology, studies have been focused on manipulating nanoparticle properties through the control of their size, composition, and morphology. As nanomaterial research has progressed, the foremost focus has gradually shifted from synthesis, morphology control, and characterization of properties to the investigation of function and the utility of integrating these materials and chemical sciences with the physical, biological, and medical fields, which therefore necessitates the development of novel materials that are capable of performing multiple tasks and functions. The construction of multifunctional nanomaterials that integrate two or more functions into a single geometry has been achieved through the surface-coating technique, which created a new class of substances designated as core-shell nanoparticles. Core-shell materials have growing and expanding applications due to the multifunctionality that is achieved through the formation of multiple shells as well as the manipulation of core/shell materials. Moreover, core removal from core-shell-based structures offers excellent opportunities to construct multifunctional hollow core architectures that possess huge storage capacities, low densities, and tunable optical properties. Furthermore, the fabrication of nanomaterials that have the combined properties of a core-shell structure with that of a hollow one has resulted in the creation of a new and important class of substances, known as the rattle core-shell nanoparticles, or nanorattles. The design strategies of these new multifunctional nanostructures (core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle) are discussed in the first part of this review. In the second part, different synthesis and fabrication approaches for multifunctional core-shell, hollow core-shell and rattle core-shell architectures are highlighted. Finally, in the last part of the article, the versatile and diverse applications of these nanoarchitectures in

  15. A simplified hollow-core microstructured optical fibre laser with microring resonators and strong radial emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Li; Liu, Yan-Ge; Yan, Min; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Ying, Cui-Feng; Ye, Qing; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-01

    A simplified hollow-core microstructured optical fibre (SHMOF) laser with microring resonators and strong radial emission is demonstrated. We propose that a submicron thickness silica ring embedded in the SHMOF can act as a microring resonator, with the advantages of being both compact and solid. Furthermore, the microfluidics can be easily controlled with a side pumping scheme. We also obtained a highly stable and tunable laser. The attractive possibility of developing microfluidic dye lasers within single SHMOFs presents opportunities for integrated optics applications and biomedical analysis.

  16. Few-cycle pulse compression through cascade of bulk media and hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Li, D. X.; Chen, X. W.; Leng, Y. X.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2010-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a new few-cycle pulse compression technique through the cascade of bulk media and hollow-core fiber (HCF) and this compression system has been intensively studied. The pulses with the duration of ˜5 fs and the energy of 0.33 mJ near 800 nm have been generated by compressing the ˜40 fs input pulse from a commercial laser system. In principle, this technique allows compression of pulses with duration of picoseconds to a few cycles (sub-7 fs) and the output can be above 1 mJ.

  17. Direct experimental observation of periodic intensity modulation along a straight hollow-core optical waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, T.; Downer, M. C.

    2007-05-15

    We report the direct observation of periodic intensity modulation of a laser pulse propagating in a hollow-core waveguide. A series of equally spaced plasma sparks along the gas-filled capillary is produced. This effect can be explained by the beating of different fiber modes, which are excited by controlling the size of the focal spot at the capillary entrance. As compared with an artificial modulated waveguide structure, our presented approach represents an easier and more flexible quasi-phase-matching scheme for nonlinear-optical frequency conversion.

  18. Single-ring hollow core optical fibers made by glass billet extrusion for Raman sensing.

    PubMed

    Tsiminis, G; Rowland, K J; Schartner, E P; Spooner, N A; Monro, T M; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H

    2016-03-21

    We report the fabrication of the first extruded hollow core optical fiber with a single ring of cladding holes, and its use in a chemical sensing application. These single suspended ring structures show antiresonance reflection optical waveguiding (ARROW) features in the visible part of the spectrum. The impact of preform pressurization on the geometry of these fibers is determined by the size of the different hole types in the preform. The fibers are used to perform Raman sensing of methanol, demonstrating their potential for future fiber sensing applications.

  19. Structural characterization of cup-stacked-type nanofibers with an entirely hollow core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, M.; Kim, Y. A.; Hayashi, T.; Fukai, Y.; Oshida, K.; Terrones, M.; Yanagisawa, T.; Higaki, S.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2002-02-01

    Straight long carbon nanofibers with a large hollow core obtained by a floating reactant method show a stacking morphology of truncated conical graphene layers, which in turn exhibit a large portion of open edges on the outer surface and also in the inner channels. Through a judicious choice of oxidation conditions, nanofibers with increased active edge sites are obtained without disrupting the fiber's morphology. A graphitization process induces a morphological change from a tubular type to a reversing saw-toothed type and the formation of loops along the inner channel of the nanofibers, accompanied by a decrease in interlayer spacing.

  20. Hollow Core Fiber Optics for Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kriesel, J.M.; Gat, N.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    The development and testing of hollow core glass waveguides (i.e., fiber optics) for use in Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) spectroscopy systems is described. LWIR fiber optics are a key enabling technology needed to improve the utility and effectiveness of trace chemical detection systems based in the 8 to 12 micron region. This paper focuses on recent developments in hollow waveguide technology geared specifically for LWIR spectroscopy, including a reduction in both the length dependent loss and the bending loss while maintaining relatively high beam quality. Results will be presented from tests conducted with a Quantum Cascade Laser.

  1. Hollow-core revolver fibre with a double-capillary reflective cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Kosolapov, A F; Alagashev, G K; Kolyadin, A N; Pryamikov, A D; Dianov, E M; Biryukov, A S; Bufetov, I A

    2016-03-31

    We report the fabrication of the first hollow-core revolver fibre with a core diameter as small as 25 μm and an optical loss no higher than 75 dB km{sup -1} at a wavelength of 1850 nm. The decrease in core diameter, with no significant increase in optical loss, is due to the use of double nested capillaries in the reflective cladding design. A number of technical problems pertaining to the fabrication of such fibres are resolved. (fiber optics)

  2. Thermal and Structural Analysis of a Hollow Core Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Turbine Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Kalluri, Sreeramesh; McGaw, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of primary and secondary orientations on the elastic response of a hollow core, (001)-oriented nickel base single-crystal superalloy turbine blade, was investigated under combined thermal and mechanical conditions. Finite element techniques is employed through MARC finite element code to conduct the analyses on a hollow core SSME turbine blade made out of PWA 1480 single crystal material. Primary orientation of the single crystal superalloy was varied in increments of 2 deg, from 0 to 10 deg, from the (001) direction. Two secondary orientations (0 and 45 deg) were considered with respect to the global coordinate system, as the primary orientation angle was varied. The stresses developed within the single crystal blade were determined for different orientations of the blade. The influence of angular offsets such as the single crystal's primary and secondary orientations and the loading conditions on the elastic stress response of the PWA 1480 hollow blade are summarized. The influence of he primary orientation angle, when constrained between the bounds considered, was not found to be as significant as the influence of the secondary orientation angle.

  3. Gas analysis in the UV region using a long-length hollow core waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotschau, R.; Eckhardt, Hanns-S.; Klein, Karl-Friedrich; Behler, Klaus; Hillrichs, Georg

    2003-07-01

    In the DUV-region and MIR-region, the so-called Hollow-Core-Waveguide is an alternative for light-delivery systems, because flexible silica-based fibers are no lnoger useable due to the high intrinsic absorption of silica. In additionl to light-transportation, only the HCW can be used as an intrinsic sensor: due to the long path-length through the HCW with similar intensity profiles at the input and output, the spectral absorption of the gas under test can easily be monitored. Up to now, the gases are analyzed in the MIR-region, mainly. However, the UV-region offers a lot of advantages. Using commercially available components for the UV-light source and the detector-system, the whole system with UV hollow-core-waveguides has to be studied in the wavelength-region from 170 nm up to 350 nm. With this experimental system, it is obvious to observe the UV-absorption of air and carbon dioxide below 200 nm, using nitrogen as a reference gas. In addition, ozone generated by the deuterium-lamp itself and several gas mixtures (e.g. 2 ppm toluene or xylene in cabon dioxide) were studied in detail.

  4. Demonstration of CO2-laser power delivery through chalcogenide-glass fiber with negative-curvature hollow core.

    PubMed

    Kosolapov, Alexey F; Pryamikov, Andrey D; Biriukov, Alexander S; Shiryaev, Vladimir S; Astapovich, Maxim S; Snopatin, Gennady E; Plotnichenko, Victor G; Churbanov, Mikhail F; Dianov, Evgeny M

    2011-12-05

    A technologically simple optical fiber cross-section structure with a negative-curvature hollow-core has been proposed for the delivery of the CO2 laser radiation. The structure was optimized numerically and then realized using Te20As30Se50 (TAS) chalcogenide glass. Guidance of the 10.6 µm СО2-laser radiation through this TAS-glass hollow-core fiber has been demonstrated. The loss at λ=10.6 μm was amounted ~11 dB/m. A resonance behavior of the fiber bend loss as a function of the bend radius has been revealed.

  5. Single-Photon Nonlinear Optics in Integrated Hollow-Core Waveguides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    figure1.2 (b) ] due to the Kramers– Kronig relation 6 -2000 -1500 -1000 -500 0 500 1000 1500 2000 Frequency (a.u.) R ef ra ct iv e in de x (a...FWHM) of exactly 12 .The last relation in equation (1.6) and (1.7) is a particular form of the more general Kramer– Kronig relation between the

  6. Terahertz Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on a hollow-core metallic ridge waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, M.; Beigang, R.; Rahm, M.

    2015-04-01

    While terahertz time-domain spectroscopy directly measures amplitude and phase of pulsed terahertz electric fields, the use of more compact terahertz continuous wave sources requires interferometric measurement techniques to obtain phase information. Since constructive and destructive interference are governed by the relative phase of the superimposing fields the phase information can be retrieved from the amplitude modulation signal at the output of the interferometer. Here, we present phase-sensitive measurements of terahertz electric fields in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer that is integrated in a hollow-core metallic ridge waveguide. With lactose in one of the interferometer arms, we measured the modulated amplitude spectrum of the interferometer output signal which carries information about the dielectric properties of the investigated lactose. We explain the measured transmission spectra and the observed dielectric resonances by analytic and numerical means and further confirmed the results by a spectroscopic reference measurement of lactose in a conventional waveguide.

  7. Mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in supercritical xenon-filled hollow-core negative curvature fibers.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Imran; Akhmediev, Nail; Chang, Wonkeun

    2016-11-01

    We present an investigation on the generation of supercontinuum in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral region. Namely, we study a silica-based anti-resonant hollow-core fiber which has good guidance properties in the mid-IR filled with supercritical xenon providing the necessary high nonlinearity. Our numerical study shows that by launching a 200 nJ pump of 100 fs centered at 3.70 μm, a supercontinuum that spans from 1.85 to 5.20 μm can be generated. Such sources are potentially useful for applications, such as the remote sensing of various molecules, medical imaging diagnosis, and surgery.

  8. A novel fabrication of fiber Bragg grating in hollow-core fiber with HPDLCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Hao; Choi, Wing-Kit; Wang, Lon A.

    2015-02-01

    An electrically controllable fiber Bragg grating (FBG) for working in the communication band is demonstrated by utilizing holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLCs). PDLC is infiltrated in hollow-core fibers which are about 2μm and 5μm by means of capillarity. For the purpose of periodically separating polymer and liquid crystal to form an FBG, a two-beam interference system based on an argon laser (wavelength: 364nm) is used. To reduce coupling loss, we directly connect single-mode fibers (SMFs) to input and output ports. A maximum transmission loss dip of approximately 5-dB band rejection is obtained. After the cladding diameter is etched by buffered oxide etchant (BOE) solution to 12μm and a 150V external voltage is applied, a dip shift by ~ 15nm is measured

  9. Polarization maintaining single-mode low-loss hollow-core fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fini, John M.; Nicholson, Jeffrey W.; Mangan, Brian; Meng, Linli; Windeler, Robert S.; Monberg, Eric M.; Desantolo, Anthony; Dimarcello, Frank V.; Mukasa, Kazunori

    2014-10-01

    Hollow-core fibre (HCF) is a powerful technology platform offering breakthrough performance improvements in sensing, communications, higher-power pulse delivery and other applications. Free from the usual constraints on what materials can guide light, it promises qualitatively new and ideal operating regimes: precision signals transmitted free of nonlinearities, sensors that guide light directly in the samples they are meant to probe and so on. However, these fibres have not been widely adopted, largely because uncontrolled coupling between transverse and polarization modes overshadows their benefits. To deliver on their promises, HCFs must retain their unique properties while achieving the modal and polarization control that are essential for their most compelling applications. Here we present the first single-moded, polarization-maintaining HCF with large core size needed for loss scaling. Single modedness is achieved using a novel scheme for resonantly coupling out unwanted modes, whereas birefringence is engineered by fabricating an asymmetrical glass web surrounding the core.

  10. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements. Part 3: Prestressed hollow-core slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    This paper deals with the shear strength of prestressed hollow-core slabs determined by the theory of plasticity. Two failure mechanisms are considered in order to derive the solutions. In the case of sliding failure in a diagonal crack, the shear strength is determined by means of the crack sliding model developed by Jin-Ping Zhang. The model takes into account the resistance against the formation of cracks due to prestressing as well as the variation of the prestressing force in the transfer zone. Due to the fact that the anchorage of the reinforcement takes place by bond, a rotation failure, which is indeed by a crack formed at the support with subsequent slip of the reinforcement, is also considered. This failure mode is likely to occur in cases with a high prestressing force combined with a short shear span. The theoretical calculations are compared with test results form the literature. A good agreement has been found.

  11. Induction spectrometry using an ultrafast hollow-cored toroidal-coil (HTC) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbelo, Yunieski; Bleiner, Davide

    2017-02-01

    Ultrafast photoelectron and photoion spectroscopy (as well as their combination known as "coincidence spectroscopy") utilizes detectors based on different electron multipliers such as microchannel plates or single-channel electron multipliers. These detectors have a few important limitations such as fast-signal distortion (low pass operation), mutually exclusive positive or negative mode, dead time, and requirement of trigger. A high-pass induction detector, based on a hollow-cored toroidal coil, was developed that overcomes the above-mentioned limitations. The frequency-dispersive response and linearity of different configurations were analyzed. It is shown that the response is enhanced for ultrafast electron signals, dependent on construction parameters, thus offering response flexibility by design. Kinetic energy distributions of pseudospark-induced electron pulses are characterized in order to validate the capabilities in real applications.

  12. Propagation of femtosecond pulses in a hollow-core revolver fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsenko, Yu P.; Krylov, A. A.; Pryamikov, A. D.; Kosolapov, A. F.; Kolyadin, A. N.; Gladyshev, A. V.; Bufetov, I. A.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied for the first time the propagation of femtosecond pulses through an optical fibre with an air-filled hollow core and a cladding in the form of one ring of noncontacting cylindrical capillaries for high-power radiation transmission in the 1.55-μm telecom range. Numerical analysis results demonstrate that the parameters of the fibre enable radiation transmission in the form of megawatt-power Raman solitons through up to a 25-m length of the fibre and tuning of the emission wavelength over 130 nm. We have experimentally demonstrated femtosecond pulse transmission through fibres up to 5 m in length in the linear propagation regime, without distortions of the pulse spectrum, with a dispersion-induced temporal pulse broadening within 20%.

  13. Engineering of Hollow Core-Shell Interlinked Carbon Spheres for Highly Stable Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; He, Bin; Zhang, Xiang-Qian; Lu, An-Hui

    2015-08-25

    We report engineered hollow core-shell interlinked carbon spheres that consist of a mesoporous shell, a hollow void, and an anchored carbon core and are expected to be ideal sulfur hosts for overcoming the shortage of Li-S batteries. The hollow core-shell interlinked carbon spheres were obtained through solution synthesis of polymer spheres followed by a pyrolysis process that occurred in the hermetical silica shell. During the pyrolysis, the polymer sphere was transformed into the carbon core and the carbonaceous volatiles were self-deposited on the silica shell due to the blocking effect of the hermetical silica shell. The gravitational force and the natural driving force of lowering the surface energy tend to interlink the carbon core and carbon/silica shell, resulting in a core-shell interlinked structure. After the SiO2 shell was etched, the mesoporous carbon shell was generated. When used as the sulfur host for Li-S batteries, such a hierarchical structure provides access to Li(+) ingress/egress for reactivity with the sulfur and, meanwhile, can overcome the limitations of low sulfur loading and a severe shuttle effect in solid carbon-supported sulfur cathodes. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy images provide visible evidence that sulfur is well-encapsulated in the hollow void. Importantly, such anchored-core carbon nanostructures can simultaneously serve as a physical buffer and an electronically connecting matrix, which helps to realize the full potential of the active materials. Based on the many merits, carbon-sulfur cathodes show a high utilization of sulfur with a sulfur loading of 70 wt % and exhibit excellent cycling stability (i.e., 960 mA h g(-1) after 200 cycles at a current density of 0.5 C).

  14. Recent developments in laser-driven and hollow-core fiber optic gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digonnet, M. J. F.; Chamoun, J. N.

    2016-05-01

    Although the fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) continues to be a commercial success, current research efforts are endeavoring to improve its precision and broaden its applicability to other markets, in particular the inertial navigation of aircraft. Significant steps in this direction are expected from the use of (1) laser light to interrogate the FOG instead of broadband light, and (2) a hollow-core fiber (HCF) in the sensing coil instead of a conventional solid-core fiber. The use of a laser greatly improves the FOG's scale-factor stability and eliminates the source excess noise, while an HCF virtually eliminates the Kerr-induced drift and significantly reduces the thermal and Faraday-induced drifts. In this paper we present theoretical evidence that in a FOG with a 1085-m coil interrogated with a laser, the two main sources of noise and drift resulting from the use of coherent light can be reduced below the aircraft-navigation requirement by using a laser with a very broad linewidth, in excess of 40 GHz. We validate this concept with a laser broadened with an external phase modulator driven with a pseudo-random bit sequence at 2.8 GHz. This FOG has a measured noise of 0.00073 deg/√h, which is 30% below the aircraft-navigation requirement. Its measured drift is 0.03 deg/h, the lowest reported for a laser-driven FOG and only a factor of 3 larger than the navigation-grade specification. To illustrate the potential benefits of a hollow-core fiber in the FOG, this review also summarizes the previously reported performance of an experimental FOG utilizing 235 m of HCF and interrogated with broadband light.

  15. Nonlinear compression of ultrafast industrial lasers in hypocyloid-core Kagome hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giree, A.; Guichard, F.; Machinet, G.; Zaouter, Y.; Hagen, Y.; Debords, B.; Dupriez, P.; Gérôme, F.; Hanna, M.; Benabid, F.; Hönninger, C.; Georges, P.; Mottay, E.

    2015-03-01

    The duration of energetic ultrashort pulses is usually limited by the available gain bandwidth of ultrashort amplifiers used to amplify nJ or pJ level seed to hundreds of μμJ or even several mJ. In the case of Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers, the available bandwidth is of the order of 40 nm, typically limiting the pulse duration of high-energy fiber chirped-pulse amplifiers to durations above 300 fs. In the case of solid-state amplifier based on Yb:YAG crystals, the host matrix order restricts the amplification bandwidth even more leading to pulses in the low picosecond range. Both architecture would greatly benefit from pulse durations well-below what is allowed by their respective gain bandwidth e.g. sub-100 fs for fiber amplifier and sub-300 fs for solid-state Yb:YAG amplifier. In this contribution, we report on the post-compression of two high energy industrial ultrashort fiber and thin-disk amplifiers using an innovative and efficient hollow core fiber structure, namely the hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber. This fiber exhibits remarkably low propagation losses due to the unique inhibited guidance mechanism that minimize that amount of light propagating in the silica cladding surrounding the hollow core. Spectral broadening is realized in a short piece of Kagome fiber filled with air at 1 atmosphere pressure. For both amplifiers, we were able to demonstrate more than 200 μJ of energy per pulse with duration <100 fs in the case of the fiber amplifier and <300 fs in the case of the thin disk amplifier. Limitations and further energy scaling will also be discussed.

  16. Nonlinear endoscopy with Kagomé lattice hollow-core fibers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardini, Alberto; Sivankutty, Siddharth; Chen, Xueqin; Wenger, Jérôme; Habert, Rémi; Fourcade-Dutin, Coralie; Andresen, Esben R.; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Rigneault, Hervé

    2016-03-01

    The development of nonlinear fiber-endoscopes capable of imaging deeper in tissues and accessing internal organs represents a very attractive perspective for application of nonlinear optical microscopes to in-vivo research and diagnostics. The transmission of ultra-short laser pulses within a fiber is a critical issue in the development of such endoscopes. For instance, self-phase modulation (SPM), four-wave mixing (FWM) and Raman scattering occurring in conventional fibers severely affect transmitted pulses profiles in the time and frequency domains. Hollow-core (HC) fibers bring a solution to the problem, since propagation of the pulses in the air core limits nonlinear interactions. We employ here a novel double clad Kagomé-lattice HC fiber for the delivery of ultrafast pulses across a large spectral window (~400nm) with no pulse distortion. The epi-collection of the signal generated at the sample is efficiently performed with a specially designed outer multimode cladding. The fiber is incorporated in a prototype endoscope using a four-quartered piezo-electric tube to scan the laser beam on the sample. The low numerical aperture of the hollow-core (0.02) is efficiently increased by means of a dielectric microsphere attached to the fiber face. This results in tight focusing (~1 micron) of the beam at the HC fiber output. Resonant scanning of the fiber tip allows imaging over a field of 300 microns using low driving voltages. High-resolution images with different contrast mechanisms, such as SHG and TPEF, acquired with the prototype endoscope illustrate the potential of these fibers for nonlinear imaging in regions otherwise inaccessible to conventional optical microscopes.

  17. Photonic-Crystal-Fiber Raman Spectroscopy for Real-Time, Gas-Composition Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Buric, M.P.; Chen, K.P.; Falk, J.; Woodruff, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy in a hollow-core, photonic crystal fiber is reported. The fiber is used as the sample cell and the Stokes light collector. Raman signals were observed for major species in air and natural gas.

  18. Bending loss characterization in nodeless hollow-core anti-resonant fiber.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shou-Fei; Wang, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Lu; Ding, Wei; Wang, Pu

    2016-06-27

    We report high performance nodeless hollow-core anti-resonant fibers (HARFs) with broadband guidance from 850 nm to >1700 nm and transmission attenuation of ~100 dB/km. We systematically investigate their bending loss behaviors using both theoretical and experimental approaches. While a low bending loss value of 0.2 dB/m at 5 cm bending radius is attained in the long wavelength side (LWS) of the spectrum, in this paper, we pursue light guidance in the short wavelength side (SWS) under tight bending, which is yet to be explored. We analytically predict and experimentally verify a sub transmission band in the SWS with a broad bandwidth of 110 THz and an acceptable loss of 4.5 dB/m at 2 cm bending radius, indicating that light can be simultaneously guided in LWS and SWS even under tight bending condition. This provides an unprecedented degree of freedom to tailor the transmission spectrum under a tight bending state and opens new opportunities for HARFs to march into practical applications where broadband guidance under small bending radius is a prerequisite.

  19. Yeast cells-derived hollow core/shell heteroatom-doped carbon microparticles for sustainable electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoxi; Zou, Xiaoxin; Meng, Yuying; Mikmeková, Eliška; Chen, Hui; Voiry, Damien; Goswami, Anandarup; Chhowalla, Manish; Asefa, Tewodros

    2015-01-28

    The use of renewable resources to make various synthetic materials is increasing in order to meet some of our sustainability challenges. Yeast is one of the most common household ingredients, which is cheap and easy to reproduce. Herein we report that yeast cells can be thermally transformed into hollow, core-shell heteroatom-doped carbon microparticles that can effectively electrocatalyze the oxygen reduction and hydrazine oxidation reactions, reactions that are highly pertinent to fuel cells or renewable energy applications. We also show that yeast cell walls, which can easily be separated from the cells, can produce carbon materials with electrocatalytic activity for both reactions, albeit with lower activity compared with the ones obtained from intact yeast cells. The results reveal that the intracellular components of the yeast cells such as proteins, phospholipids, DNAs and RNAs are indirectly responsible for the latter's higher electrocatalytic activity, by providing it with more heteroatom dopants. The synthetic method we report here can serve as a general route for the synthesis of (electro)catalysts using microorganisms as raw materials.

  20. Comparison of the filamentation and the hollow-core fibercharacteristics for pulse compression into the few-cycle regime

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmann, L.; Pfeifer, T.; Nagel, P.M.; Abel, M.J.; Neumark,D.M.; Leone, S.R.

    2006-10-23

    The gas-filled hollow-core fiber compression and the opticalfilamentation technique are compared experimentally in a parameter regimesuitable for intense few-cycle pulse generation. In particular, pointingstability, spectral properties, and spatial chirp are investigated. It isfound that in the case of filamentation, the critical parameter forpointing stability is gas pressure inside the generation cell whereas forthe hollow-core fiber it is alignment that plays this role. Thehollow-core fiber technique yields spectra that are better suited forchirped-mirror pulse compression whereas filamentation offers higherthroughput and prospects for easy-to-implement self-compression. Wepresent spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-fieldreconstruction (SPIDER) measurements that directly show the transition inthe spectral phase of the output continua into the self-compressionregime as the gas pressure is increased.

  1. Efficient 1.5-μm Raman generation in ethane-filled hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yubin; Gu, Bo; Wang, Zefeng; Lu, Qisheng

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrated for the first time a novel and effective method for obtaining both high peak-power and narrow linewidth 1.5 μm fiber sources through gas Raman effect in hollow core fibers. An Ethane-filled ice-cream antiresonance hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak-power pulse 1064 nm microchip laser, generating 1552.7 nm Stokes wave by pure vibrational stimulated Raman scattering of ethane molecules. A maximum peak-power of about 400 kW is achieved with 6 meter fiber length at 2 bar pressure, and the linewidth is about 6.3 GHz. The maximum Raman conversion efficiency of 1064 nm to 1552.7 nm is about 38%, and the corresponding laser slope efficiency is about 61.5%.

  2. Photonic crystal fibers for food quality analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinin, A. V.; Zanishevskaja, A. A.; Tuchin, V. V.; Skibina, Yu. S.; Silokhin, I. Y.

    2012-06-01

    The aspects of application of the hollow core photonic crystal waveguides for spectroscopic analysis of liquid medium were considered. The possibility of using these structures for analysis of a fruit juice was evaluated. The principles of processing of photonic crystal waveguide transmission spectra, which is sensitive to quality of juice, its composition, and main component concentration, were revealed.

  3. Tuning the synthesis of platinum-copper nanoparticles with a hollow core and porous shell for the selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shuangshuang; Yang, Nating; Wang, Shibin; Sun, Yuhan; Zhu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Pt-Cu nanoparticles constructed with a hollow core and porous shell have been synthesized in which Pt-Cu cages with multiporous outermost shells are formed at the initial stage and then the Pt and Cu atoms in solution continuously fed these hollow-core of cages by passing through the porous tunnels of the outermost shells, finally leading to the formation of hollow structures with different sizes. Furthermore, these hollow-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles are more effective than the solid-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles for the catalytic hydrogenation of furfural toward furfuryl alcohol. The former can achieve almost 100% conversion of furfural with 100% selectivity toward the alcohol.Pt-Cu nanoparticles constructed with a hollow core and porous shell have been synthesized in which Pt-Cu cages with multiporous outermost shells are formed at the initial stage and then the Pt and Cu atoms in solution continuously fed these hollow-core of cages by passing through the porous tunnels of the outermost shells, finally leading to the formation of hollow structures with different sizes. Furthermore, these hollow-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles are more effective than the solid-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles for the catalytic hydrogenation of furfural toward furfuryl alcohol. The former can achieve almost 100% conversion of furfural with 100% selectivity toward the alcohol. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03894h

  4. Determination of blood types using a chirped photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinin, A. V.; Zanishevskaja, A. A.; Skibina, Yu. S.; Silokhin, I. Yu.; Tuchin, V. V.; Dubrovskiy, V. A.; Dolmashkin, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    A new type of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) that can be used as sensitive elements of chemical and biological sensors is presented. Hollow core photonic crystal fibers refer to a type of optical waveguides, showing unique optical properties such as photonic band gap formation and high sensitivity for refraction index, absorption and scattering coefficient of a medium within a hollow core. A significant influence of internal medium scattering coefficient on a PCF's guiding properties becomes basis for design of blood typing automatization technique specifically. Recently obtained experimental results, regarding PCF's sensitivity for internal medium optical properties changing, are presented as well.

  5. Efficient 1.9-μm Raman generation in a hydrogen-filled hollow-core fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Gladyshev, A V; Kolyadin, A N; Kosolapov, A F; Yatsenko, Yu P; Pryamikov, A D; Biryukov, A S; Bufetov, I A; Dianov, E M

    2015-09-30

    Efficient Raman generation in a molecular hydrogenfilled hollow-core fibre having a cladding in the form of a single ring of capillaries has been demonstrated for the first time. The pump source used was a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 125 ns, and a single-pass (cavity-free) configuration was employed. The maximum average output power at 1.9 μm was 300 mW, and the differential quantum efficiency was 87%, a record level for such experiments. (lasers)

  6. Tuning the synthesis of platinum-copper nanoparticles with a hollow core and porous shell for the selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuangshuang; Yang, Nating; Wang, Shibin; Sun, Yuhan; Zhu, Yan

    2016-08-07

    Pt-Cu nanoparticles constructed with a hollow core and porous shell have been synthesized in which Pt-Cu cages with multiporous outermost shells are formed at the initial stage and then the Pt and Cu atoms in solution continuously fed these hollow-core of cages by passing through the porous tunnels of the outermost shells, finally leading to the formation of hollow structures with different sizes. Furthermore, these hollow-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles are more effective than the solid-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles for the catalytic hydrogenation of furfural toward furfuryl alcohol. The former can achieve almost 100% conversion of furfural with 100% selectivity toward the alcohol.

  7. Intense optical pulse compression with gas-filled hollow-core fibers and bulk materials in anomalous dispersion regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ding; Leng, Yuxin

    2013-10-01

    We numerically study the propagation dynamics and compression of ultrashort laser pulses in a hollow-core fiber (HCF) filled with noble gases at different carrier wavelengths from 1.8 μm to 3.9 μm. In the optimal parameter range, single-cycle or even sub-cycle pulses with clean spatial and temporal profiles can be obtained due to chirp compensation beyond 3rd order by bulk material. It is found that the intensity-dependent group velocity sets the upper limits on both the gas pressures and input pulse energies if a clean and well-compressed pulse is required only through compression with bulk materials. In order to use higher gas pressures and larger input energies, two ways are demonstrated to deal with the limitations imposed by the intensity-dependent group velocity.

  8. Generation of few-cycle laser pulses: Comparison between atomic and molecular gases in a hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Yuan, Huang; Ye, Dai; Rui-Rui, Zhao; Ding, Wang; Yu-Xin, Leng

    2016-07-01

    We numerically study the pulse compression approaches based on atomic or molecular gases in a hollow-core fiber. From the perspective of self-phase modulation (SPM), we give the extensive study of the SPM influence on a probe pulse with molecular phase modulation (MPM) effect. By comparing the two compression methods, we summarize their advantages and drawbacks to obtain the few-cycle pulses with micro- or millijoule energies. It is also shown that the double pump-probe approach can be used as a tunable dual-color source by adjusting the time delay between pump and probe pulses to proper values. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204328, 61221064, 61078037, 11127901, 11134010, and 61205208), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808101), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 13ZR1414800).

  9. Hollow-Core Optical Fiber Gas Correlation Radiometer for CH4, H2CO, and H2O vapor measurements on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaps, W. S.; Georgieva, E. M.; Wilson, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    We present the development of a reduced mass and volume gas correlation radiometer that implements a hollow-core fiber gas correlation cell. The reduction in size makes this technology appropriate for a Mars orbital or aircraft probe mission - capable of pin-pointing sources of atmospheric trace gases potentially indicative of life (methane, formaldehyde and water). The relative simplicity of this technique allows it to be easily expanded to include other species measurements such as 12C/13C ratios of methane. This instrument will consist of three sub-instruments for detecting CH4, H2CO, and H2O at 3.44 μm, 3.63 μm, and 3.12 μm respectively. Within each sub-instrument, a hollow-core optical fiber filled with a sample of the gas of interest acts as a spectral filter. Performance of a Mars orbiting version of the hollow-core fiber instrument has been simulated assuming a 2 meter long, 500 micron inner diameter hollow- core fiber gas correlation cell, a 92.8 degree sun-synchronous orbit from 400 km with a horizontal sampling scale of 10 km x 10 km. Initial results indicate that for one second of averaging, a detection limit of 1 ppbv is possible for formaldehyde, with slightly better than 1 ppbv. Preliminary results are presented for the formaldehyde sub-instrument development.

  10. Characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by vibrational stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bo; Chen, Yubin; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-12-01

    We report here the characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from a gas-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). A 6.5-m hydrogen-filled ice-cream negative curvature hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak-power, narrow linewidth, linearly polarized subnanosecond pulsed 1064-nm microchip laser, generating a pulsed vibrational Stokes wave at 1908.5 nm. The maximum quantum efficiency of about 48% is obtained, which is mainly limited by the mode mismatch between the pump laser beam and the Stokes wave in the hollow-core fiber. The linewidths of the pump laser and the first-order vibrational Stokes wave are measured to be about 1 and 2 GHz, respectively, by a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The pressure selection phenomenon of the vibrational anti-Stokes waves is also investigated. The pulse duration of the vibrational Stokes wave is recorded to be narrower than that of the pump laser. The polarization properties of the hollow-core fiber and the polarization dependence of the vibrational and the rotational SRS are also studied. The beam profile of the vibrational Stokes wave shows good quality.

  11. Calculation of Coupling Efficiencies for Laser-Driven Photonic Bandgap Structures

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.; Noble, R.; Spencer, J. E.

    2010-11-04

    We present a technique for calculating the power coupling efficiency for a laser-driven photonic bandgap structure using electromagnetic finite element simulations, and evaluate the efficiency of several coupling scenarios for the case of a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber accelerator structure.

  12. Spectral characterization of a photonic bandgap fiber for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Aref, S Hashem; Amezcua-Correac, Rodrigo; Carvalho, Joel P; Frazão, Orlando; Santos, José L; Araújo, Francisco M; Latifi, Hamid; Farahi, Faramarz; Ferreira, Luis A; Knight, Jonathan C

    2010-04-01

    We study the measurand-induced spectral shift of the photonic bandgap edge of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The physical measurands considered are strain, temperature, curvature, and twist. A noticeable sensitivity to strain, temperature, and twist is observed, with a blueshift to increase strain and twist. An increase in temperature induces a redshift. On the other hand, curvature has no observable effect on the spectral position of the photonic bandgap edge.

  13. 1.56 µm sub-microjoule femtosecond pulse delivery through low-loss microstructured revolver hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Alexander A.; Senatorov, Andrey K.; Pryamikov, Andrey D.; Kosolapov, Alexey F.; Kolyadin, Anton N.; Alagashev, Grigory K.; Gladyshev, Alexey V.; Bufetov, Igor A.

    2017-03-01

    We report for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on ~1 MW peak power femtosecond pulse delivery through  ≈10 m-long air-filled microstructured revolver hollow-core fiber (RHCF) in the telecom spectral band near 1.56 µm wavelength. We have developed a high-power all-fiber master oscillator power amplifier source based on the novel large-mode area erbium-doped double-clad fiber with 980 nm multi-mode diode pumping that emits up to 530 nJ pulses shorter than 400 fs with 1.42 W maximum average power. These pulses have been further launched into low-loss (<30 dB km‑1) RHCF with eight non-touched cylindrical capillaries-based cladding and 61 µm core size with more than 80% efficiency. Owing to low dispersion and nonlinearity of the RHCF developed, the output pulse characteristics (spectral and temporal) are close to the input ones for low and moderate pulse energies. However, we have observed significant nonlinear spectral filtering together with pulse shortening (down to 353 fs) at the maximum output average power of 0.94 W. We believe that the system developed may be highly promising for high-precision material processing and other high-energy and high-power laser applications.

  14. Picosecond pulses compression at 1053-nm center wavelength by using a gas-filled hollow-core fiber compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Ding; Leng, Yu-Xin; Dai, Ye

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically study the nonlinear compression of picosecond pulses with 10-mJ of input energy at the 1053-nm center wavelength by using a one-meter-long gas-filled hollow-core fiber (HCF) compressor and considering the third-order dispersion (TOD) effect. It is found that when the input pulse is about 1 ps/10 mJ, it can be compressed down to less than 20 fs with a high transmission efficiency. The gas for optimal compression is krypton gas which is filled in a HCF with a 400-μm inner diameter. When the input pulse duration is increased to 5 ps, it can also be compressed down to less than 100 fs efficiently under proper conditions. The results show that the TOD effect has little impact on picosecond pulse compression and the HCF compressor can be applied on compressing picosecond pulses efficiently with a high compression ratio, which will benefit the research of high-field laser physics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204328, 61221064, 61078037, 11127901, and 11134010), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808101), the Commission of Science and Technology of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 12dz1100700), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 13ZR1414800), and the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2011DFA11300).

  15. Glass-NiP-CoFeP triplex-shell particles with hollow cores and tunable magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    An, Zhenguo; Zhang, Jingjie

    2013-02-01

    Low density (0.55-0.92g/mL, depending on the shell thickness and composition) glass-metal-metal triplex-shell hollow particles (TSHP) were prepared by a three-step route. First, micrometer-sized silicate glass particles with hollow cores, uniform shells, and high sphericity were prepared through spray drying and subsequent melting. NiP shell was uniformly assembled to the previously obtained glass hollow particles by silver seed induced chemical reduction of Ni(2+) by sodium hypophosphite, and glass-NiP double-shell hollow particles (DSHP) with compact and uniform shells were formed. The as-formed NiP particles further acted as the seeds for the directed formation and assembly of the CoFeP shell on the NiP shell to form the final glass-NiP-CoFeP triplex-shell hollow particles (TSHP). The influences of the component of the reaction system on the composition, structure, and magnetic properties of the hollow particles were studied. The multishell hollow particles thus obtained may have some promising applications in the fields of low-density magnetic materials, conduction, microwave absorbers, catalysis, etc. This work provides an additional strategy to fabricate multishell structured hollow particles with tailored shell composition and magnetic properties, which can be extended to the controlled preparation of multishell composite particles with the shells consisting of metal, oxides, or other compounds.

  16. Dual hollow core fiber-based Fabry-Perot interferometer for measuring the thermo-optic coefficients of liquids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Ling; Ho, Hsuan-Yu; Gu, Jheng-Hong; Yeh, Tung-Yuan; Tseng, Chung-Hao

    2015-02-15

    A microcavity fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (MFFPI) that is based on dual hollow core fibers (HCFs) is developed for measuring the thermo-optic coefficients (TOCs) of liquids. The proposed MFFPI was fabricated by fusion-splicing a tiny segment of the main-HCF with a diameter D of 30 μm and another section of feeding-HCF with a diameter of 5 μm. Then, the main-HCF was filled with liquid by capillary action through the feeding-HCF by immersing the MFFPI in the liquid. The TOCs of the Cargille liquid (n(D)=1.3), deionized (DI) water, and ethanol were accurately determined from the shift of the interference wavelength, which was due to the temperature variation. Our experimental results were also compared with other published studies to investigate the effectiveness of the proposed sensing scheme. The major advantage is that the miniature MFFPI can achieve the measurement of the TOCs of the liquids with picoliter volume, and the measured liquids also can be sealed off and stored inside the HCF to prevent contamination.

  17. Characteristics of 1.9 μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bo; Chen, Yubin; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-11-01

    We report here the detailed characteristics of 1.9 μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering. A 6.5 m hydrogen-filled Ice-cream negative curvature hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak power, narrow linewidth, liner polarized subnanosecond pulsed 1064 nm microchip laser, generating pulsed 1908.5 nm vibrational Stokes wave. The linewidth of the pump laser and the vibrational Stokes wave is about 1 GHz and 2 GHz respectively. And the maximum Raman conversion quantum efficiency is about 48%. We also studied the pulse shapes of the pump laser and the vibrational Stokes wave. The polarization dependence of the vibrational and the rotational stimulated Raman scattering is also investigated. In addition, the beam profile of vibrational Stokes wave shows good quality, which may be taken advantage of in many applications.

  18. Low-threshold 1.9 µm Raman generation in microstructured hydrogen-filled hollow-core revolver fibre with nested capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, A. V.; Kolyadin, A. N.; Kosolapov, A. F.; Yatsenko, Yu P.; Pryamikov, A. D.; Biriukov, A. S.; Bufetov, I. A.; Dianov, E. M.

    2017-02-01

    Efficient Raman laser based on the revolver hollow-core fibre (HCF) with a cladding formed by one layer of double nested capillaries was realized for the first time. Using hydrogen gas as a nonlinear medium we demonstrated single-pass single-stage 1064 nm-1907 nm Raman conversion with quantum efficiency as high as 40%. Improved mode confinement in the hollow core and low optical losses of the fibre enabled us to achieve Raman threshold as low as 270 W of peak power, which is 4-7 times improvement compared to previously reported results on 1.9 µm Raman generation in other types of HCFs. Further progress in revolver fibre technology could be a promising way to develop low-threshold, efficient, compact gas fibre lasers for various applications in the mid-infrared spectral range.

  19. Enhancement of Alkaline Protease Activity and Stability via Covalent Immobilization onto Hollow Core-Mesoporous Shell Silica Nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Abdelnasser Salah Shebl; Al-Salamah, Ali A.; El-Toni, Ahmed M.; Almaary, Khalid S.; El-Tayeb, Mohamed A.; Elbadawi, Yahya B.; Antranikian, Garabed

    2016-01-01

    The stability and reusability of soluble enzymes are of major concerns, which limit their industrial applications. Herein, alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto hollow core-mesoporous shell silica (HCMSS) nanospheres. Subsequently, the properties of immobilized proteases were evaluated. Non-, ethane- and amino-functionalized HCMSS nanospheres were synthesized and characterized. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto the synthesized nano-supports by physical and covalent immobilization approaches. However, protease immobilization by covalent attachment onto the activated HCMSS–NH2 nanospheres showed highest immobilization yield (75.6%) and loading capacity (88.1 μg protein/mg carrier) and was applied in the further studies. In comparison to free enzyme, the covalently immobilized protease exhibited a slight shift in the optimal pH from 10.5 to 11.0, respectively. The optimum temperature for catalytic activity of both free and immobilized enzyme was seen at 60 °C. However, while the free enzyme was completely inactivated when treated at 60 °C for 1 h the immobilized enzyme still retained 63.6% of its initial activity. The immobilized protease showed higher Vmax, kcat and kcat/Km, than soluble enzyme by 1.6-, 1.6- and 2.4-fold, respectively. In addition, the immobilized protease affinity to the substrate increased by about 1.5-fold. Furthermore, the enzyme stability in various organic solvents was significantly enhanced upon immobilization. Interestingly, the immobilized enzyme exhibited much higher stability in several commercial detergents including OMO, Tide, Ariel, Bonux and Xra by up to 5.2-fold. Finally, the immobilized protease maintained significant catalytic efficiency for twelve consecutive reaction cycles. These results suggest the effectiveness of the developed nanobiocatalyst as a candidate for detergent formulation and peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media. PMID:26840303

  20. Enhancement of Alkaline Protease Activity and Stability via Covalent Immobilization onto Hollow Core-Mesoporous Shell Silica Nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdelnasser Salah Shebl; Al-Salamah, Ali A; El-Toni, Ahmed M; Almaary, Khalid S; El-Tayeb, Mohamed A; Elbadawi, Yahya B; Antranikian, Garabed

    2016-01-29

    The stability and reusability of soluble enzymes are of major concerns, which limit their industrial applications. Herein, alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto hollow core-mesoporous shell silica (HCMSS) nanospheres. Subsequently, the properties of immobilized proteases were evaluated. Non-, ethane- and amino-functionalized HCMSS nanospheres were synthesized and characterized. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto the synthesized nano-supports by physical and covalent immobilization approaches. However, protease immobilization by covalent attachment onto the activated HCMSS-NH₂ nanospheres showed highest immobilization yield (75.6%) and loading capacity (88.1 μg protein/mg carrier) and was applied in the further studies. In comparison to free enzyme, the covalently immobilized protease exhibited a slight shift in the optimal pH from 10.5 to 11.0, respectively. The optimum temperature for catalytic activity of both free and immobilized enzyme was seen at 60 °C. However, while the free enzyme was completely inactivated when treated at 60 °C for 1 h the immobilized enzyme still retained 63.6% of its initial activity. The immobilized protease showed higher V(max), k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), than soluble enzyme by 1.6-, 1.6- and 2.4-fold, respectively. In addition, the immobilized protease affinity to the substrate increased by about 1.5-fold. Furthermore, the enzyme stability in various organic solvents was significantly enhanced upon immobilization. Interestingly, the immobilized enzyme exhibited much higher stability in several commercial detergents including OMO, Tide, Ariel, Bonux and Xra by up to 5.2-fold. Finally, the immobilized protease maintained significant catalytic efficiency for twelve consecutive reaction cycles. These results suggest the effectiveness of the developed nanobiocatalyst as a candidate for detergent formulation and peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media.

  1. Photonics crystal fiber Raman sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuan; Bond, Tiziana C.; Zhang, Jin Z.; Li, Yat; Gu, Claire

    2012-11-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) employs a guiding mechanism fundamentally different from that in conventional index guiding fibers. In an HCPCF, periodic air channels in a glass matrix act as reflectors to confine light in an empty core. As a result, the interaction between light and glass can be very small. Therefore, HCPCF has been used in applications that require extremely low non-linearity, high breakdown threshold, and zero dispersion. However, their applications in optical sensing, especially in chemical and biological sensing, have only been extensively explored recently. Besides their well-recognized optical properties the hollow cores of the fibers can be easily filled with liquid or gas, providing an ideal sampling mechanism in sensors. Recently, we have demonstrated that by filling up a HCPCF with gas or liquid samples, it is possible to significantly increase the sensitivity of the sensors in either regular Raman or surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. This is because the confinement of both light and sample inside the hollow core enables direct interaction between the propagating wave and the analyte. In this paper, we report our recent work on using HCPCF as a platform for Raman or SERS in the detection of low concentration greenhouse gas (ambient CO2), biomedically significant molecules (e.g., glucose), and bacteria. We have demonstrated that by filling up a HCPCF with gas or liquid samples, it is possible to significantly increase the sensitivity of the sensors in either regular Raman or SERS applications.

  2. Spectral phase transfer from near IR to deep UV by broadband phase-matched four-wave mixing in an argon-filled hollow core waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, J. P.; Mendonça, C. R.; Zilio, S. C.; Misoguti, L.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the implementation of a spectral phase transfer scheme from near IR to deep UV, in which the frequency conversion step is based on the broadband phase-matched four-wave mixing in a gas-filled hollow core waveguide. Micro joule level femtosecond pulses at 260 nm were generated by nonlinear mixing of a Ti:sapphire laser and its second-harmonic. The transfer of a π-step phase in a controllable manner was proposed and confirmed by a modulation observed in the generated deep UV femtosecond pulse spectrum due to an interference process. Numerical simulations confirmed our results.

  3. Nonlinear compression of picosecond chirped pulse from thin-disk amplifier system through a gas-filled hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Huang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Ding; Xu, Yi; Liu, Yan-Qi; Guo, Xiao-Yang; Li, Wen-Kai; Wu, Fen-Xiang; Liu, Zheng-Zheng; Leng, Yu-Xin

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically study the nonlinear compression of a 20-mJ, 1030-nm picosecond chirped pulse from the thin-disk amplifier in a krypton gas-filled hollow-core fiber. The chirp from the thin-disk amplifier system has little influence on the initial pulse, however, it shows an effect on the nonlinear compression in hollow-core fiber. We use a large diameter hollow waveguide to restrict undesirable nonlinear effects such as ionization; on the other hand, we employ suitable gas pressure and fiber length to promise enough spectral broadening; with 600-μm, 6-bar (1 bar = 105 Pa), 1.8-m hollow fiber, we obtain 31.5-fs pulse. Moreover, we calculate and discuss the optimal fiber lengths and gas pressures with different initial durations induced by different grating compression angles for reaching a given bandwidth. These results are meaningful for a compression scheme from picoseconds to femtoseconds. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808101), the Funds from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 1112790, 10734080, 61221064, 60908008, and 61078037).

  4. Flexible carbon cloth electrode modified by hollow core-mesoporous shell carbon as a novel efficient bio-anode for biofuel cell.

    PubMed

    Olyveira, Gabriel M; Kim, Jung Ho; Martins, Marccus V A; Iost, Rodrigo M; Chaudhari, Kiran N; Yu, Jong-Sung; Crespilho, Frank N

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is described to produce an efficient electrode material for biofuel cells using flexible carbon cloth (FCC) and hollow core-mesoporous shell carbon (HCMSC) nanospheres as bio-anode materials. The bio-electrochemical activity of glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme adsorbed on this bio-anode was evaluated, with the maximum anodic current density varying from 80 microA cm(-2) to 180 microA cm-2 for glucose concentrations up to 5.0 mmol L(-1) for the FCC modified electrode with HCMSCs. The open circuit cell voltage was E(0) = 380 mV, and the catalytic electro-oxidation current of glucose reached 0.1 mA cm(-2) at 0.0 V versus Ag/AgCl. This new system employing HCMSC-based FCC is promising toward novel bio-anodes for biofuel cells using glucose as a fuel.

  5. Midinfrared sensors meet nanotechnology: Trace gas sensing with quantum cascade lasers inside photonic band-gap hollow waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, Christy; Temelkuran, Burak; Dellemann, Gregor; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2005-05-01

    An integrated midinfrared sensing system for trace level (ppb) gas analysis combining a quantum cascade laser with an emission frequency of 10.3μm with a frequency matched photonic band-gap hollow core waveguide has been developed, demonstrating the sensing application of photonic band-gap fibers. The photonic band-gap fiber simultaneously acts as a wavelength selective waveguide and miniaturized gas cell. The laser emission wavelength corresponds to the vibrational C-H stretch band of ethyl chloride gas. This sensing system enabled the detection of ethyl chloride at concentration levels of 30ppb (v/v) with a response time of 8s probing a sample volume of only 1.5mL in a transmission absorption measurement within the photonic band-gap hollow core waveguide, which corresponds to a sensitivity improvement by three orders of magnitude compared to previously reported results obtained with conventional hollow waveguides.

  6. Emerging Applications of Photonic Crystal Fibers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Philip S. J.

    2016-03-01

    The well-controlled guided modes and long path-lengths offered by both solid and hollow core photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) permit remarkable enhancements (and in some cases reductions) in many kinds of light-matter interaction. Recent examples include: Ultrafast spectrally bright deep and vacuum UV sources based on gas-filled hollow core PCF (pressure-tunable dispersion is a unique feature); generation of stable bright deep UV supercontinuum light in PCF drawn from the fluorozirconate glass ZBLAN; OAM-birefringent helically twisted PCF that preserves the sign of orbital angular momentum; and light-driven optoacoustic devices that permit stable high harmonic mode-locking of fiber ring lasers at GHz repetition rates.

  7. Enhanced high harmonic generation driven by high-intensity laser in argon gas-filled hollow core waveguide.

    PubMed

    Cassou, Kevin; Daboussi, Sameh; Hort, Ondrej; Guilbaud, Olivier; Descamps, Dominique; Petit, Stéphane; Mével, Eric; Constant, Eric; Kazamias, Sophie

    2014-07-01

    We show that a significant enhancement of the photon flux produced by high harmonic generation can be obtained through guided configuration at high laser intensity largely above the saturation intensity. We identify two regimes. At low pressure, we observe an intense second plateau in the high harmonic spectrum in argon. At relatively high pressure, complex interplay between strongly time-dependent ionization processes and propagation effects leads to important spectral broadening without loss of spectral brightness. We show that the relevant parameter for this physical process is the product of laser peak power by gas pressure. We compare source performances with high harmonic generation using a gas jet in loose focusing geometry and conclude that the source developed is a good candidate for injection devices such as seeded soft x-ray lasers or free electron lasers in the soft x-ray range.

  8. Hollow core-shell structured silicon@carbon nanoparticles embed in carbon nanofibers as binder-free anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanli; Hu, Yi; Shen, Zhen; Chen, Renzhong; He, Xia; Zhang, Xiangwu; Li, Yongqiang; Wu, Keshi

    2017-02-01

    Silicon is regarded as one of the most promising candidates for lithium-ion battery anodes owing to its large theoretical energy density (about 4200 mAh g-1) and low working potential (vs. Li/Li+). However, its practical application is limited by structure degradation and a comparatively poor capacity retention caused by large volume changes during cycling. In this study, we have prepared a novel nanofiber form of silicon/carbon with hollow core-shell structured silicon@carbon (Si@C) nanoparticles embedded in carbon nanofibers. Voids between the silicon nanoparticle (SiNP) core and carbon shell help to accommodate the volume expansion associated with the lithiation/delithiation process in a working electrode and allow formation of a stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film. The obtained electrodes exhibited good cycle performance with a high reversible capacity of 1020.7 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 0.2 A g-1, and also delivered excellent cycling performance at a high current density of 3.2 A g-1. The design of this new structure provides a potential method for developing other functional composite anode materials with high reversible capacities and long-term cycle stabilities.

  9. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-12

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  10. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  11. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  12. Defect guidance in kagome-clad fibers: the role of photonic band gaps and self-similarity of the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, H.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the influence of the structural self-similarity of the kagome lattice on the defect modes and waveguiding properties of hollow-core kagome-cladding fibers. We show that the guidance of such fibers is influenced by photonic band gaps (PBGs) which appear for a subset of the kagome lattice. Using these insights, we provide design considerations to further decrease loss in kagome-clad fibers.

  13. Effects of structure parameters on the sensor performance of photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Rui; Rong, Zhen; Pang, Yuanfeng; Bo, Xiaochen

    2015-02-01

    A simple and compact sensor based on a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) for the in-situ detection of fluorescence signals with high sensitivity is demonstrated. Several different kinds of PCF probes are studied. The effect of PCF parameters on sensitivity and the guiding mechanisms are analyzed, and the performance of PCF probes is experimentally evaluated by measuring the fluorescence signal of Cy3 dye. In addition, the detection sensitivity of the hollow-core PCF probe and the flat-tippedmulti-mode fiber probe is compared. The experimental results show that the hollow-core PCF probe provides a greater than five-fold increase in detection sensitivity compared with direct measurements by a flat-tippedmulti-mode fiber probe, which shows its potential for wide applications to in-situ detection in the medical, forensic, biological, geological, and environmental fields with high sensitivity.

  14. Experiment to Detect Accelerating Modes in a Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.J.; Colby, E.R.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.M.; Noble, R.; Plettner, T.; Sears, C.M.S.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2011-11-21

    An experimental effort is currently underway at the E-163 test beamline at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to use a hollow-core photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber as a high-gradient laser-based accelerating structure for electron bunches. For the initial stage of this experiment, a 50pC, 60 MeV electron beam will be coupled into the fiber core and the excited modes will be detected using a spectrograph to resolve their frequency signatures in the wakefield radiation generated by the beam. They will describe the experimental plan and recent simulation studies of candidate fibers.

  15. Experiment to Detect Accelerating Modes in a Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Colby, E. R.; McGuinness, C. M.; Noble, R.; Plettner, T.; Siemann, R. H.; Spencer, J. E.; Walz, D.; Ischebeck, R.; Sears, C. M. S.

    2009-01-22

    An experimental effort is currently underway at the E-163 test beamline at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to use a hollow-core photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber as a high-gradient laser-based accelerating structure for electron bunches. For the initial stage of this experiment, a 50 pC, 60 MeV electron beam will be coupled into the fiber core and the excited modes will be detected using a spectrograph to resolve their frequency signatures in the wakefield radiation generated by the beam. We will describe the experimental plan and recent simulation studies of candidate fibers.

  16. Photochemistry in photonic crystal fiber nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jocelyn S Y; Euser, Tijmen G; Farrer, Nicola J; Sadler, Peter J; Scharrer, Michael; Russell, Philip St J

    2010-05-17

    We report the use of a liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as a highly controlled photochemical reactor. Hollow-core PCFs have several major advantages over conventional sample cells: the sample volume per optical path length is very small (2.8 nL cm(-1) in the fiber used), long optical path lengths are possible as a result of very low intrinsic waveguide loss, and furthermore the light travels in a diffractionless single mode with a constant transverse intensity profile. As a proof of principle, the (very low) quantum yield of the photochemical conversion of vitamin B(12), cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) to hydroxocobalamin ([H(2)OCbl](+)) in aqueous solution was measured for several pH values from 2.5 to 7.5. The dynamics of the actively induced reaction were monitored in real-time by broadband absorption spectroscopy. The PCF nanoreactor required ten thousand times less sample volume compared to conventional techniques. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity and optical pump intensity implied that even systems with very small quantum yields can be measured very quickly--in our experiments one thousand times faster than in a conventional cuvette.

  17. Fiber transport of spatially entangled photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, W.; Eliel, E. R.; Woerdman, J. P.; Euser, T. G.; Scharrer, M.; Russell, P.

    2012-03-01

    High-dimensional entangled photons pairs are interesting for quantum information and cryptography: Compared to the well-known 2D polarization case, the stronger non-local quantum correlations could improve noise resistance or security, and the larger amount of information per photon increases the available bandwidth. One implementation is to use entanglement in the spatial degree of freedom of twin photons created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, which is equivalent to orbital angular momentum entanglement, this has been proven to be an excellent model system. The use of optical fiber technology for distribution of such photons has only very recently been practically demonstrated and is of fundamental and applied interest. It poses a big challenge compared to the established time and frequency domain methods: For spatially entangled photons, fiber transport requires the use of multimode fibers, and mode coupling and intermodal dispersion therein must be minimized not to destroy the spatial quantum correlations. We demonstrate that these shortcomings of conventional multimode fibers can be overcome by using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, which follows the paradigm to mimic free-space transport as good as possible, and are able to confirm entanglement of the fiber-transported photons. Fiber transport of spatially entangled photons is largely unexplored yet, therefore we discuss the main complications, the interplay of intermodal dispersion and mode mixing, the influence of external stress and core deformations, and consider the pros and cons of various fiber types.

  18. Low-Loss Coupling of Quantum Cascade Lasers into Hollow-Core Waveguides with Single-Mode Output in the 3.7-7.6 μm Spectral Range.

    PubMed

    Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Mihai, Laura; Giglio, Marilena; Kriesel, Jason; Sporea, Dan; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-04-13

    We demonstrated low-loss and single-mode laser beam delivery through hollow-core waveguides (HCWs) operating in the 3.7-7.6 μm spectral range. The employed HCWs have a circular cross section with a bore diameter of 200 μm and metallic/dielectric internal coatings deposited inside a glass capillary tube. The internal coatings have been produced to enhance the spectral response of the HCWs in the range 3.5-12 µm. We demonstrated Gaussian-like outputs throughout the 4.5-7.6 µm spectral range. A quasi single-mode output beam with only small beam distortions was achieved when the wavelength was reduced to 3.7 μm. With a 15-cm-long HCW and optimized coupling conditions, we measured coupling efficiencies of >88% and transmission losses of <1 dB in the investigated infrared spectral range.

  19. Low-Loss Coupling of Quantum Cascade Lasers into Hollow-Core Waveguides with Single-Mode Output in the 3.7–7.6 μm Spectral Range

    PubMed Central

    Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Mihai, Laura; Giglio, Marilena; Kriesel, Jason; Sporea, Dan; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated low-loss and single-mode laser beam delivery through hollow-core waveguides (HCWs) operating in the 3.7–7.6 μm spectral range. The employed HCWs have a circular cross section with a bore diameter of 200 μm and metallic/dielectric internal coatings deposited inside a glass capillary tube. The internal coatings have been produced to enhance the spectral response of the HCWs in the range 3.5–12 µm. We demonstrated Gaussian-like outputs throughout the 4.5–7.6 µm spectral range. A quasi single-mode output beam with only small beam distortions was achieved when the wavelength was reduced to 3.7 μm. With a 15-cm-long HCW and optimized coupling conditions, we measured coupling efficiencies of >88% and transmission losses of <1 dB in the investigated infrared spectral range. PMID:27089343

  20. Broadband dynamic phase matching of high-order harmonic generation by a high-peak-power soliton pump field in a gas-filled hollow photonic-crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Serebryannikov, Evgenii E; von der Linde, Dietrich; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2008-05-01

    Hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers are shown to enable dynamically phase-matched high-order harmonic generation by a gigawatt soliton pump field. With a careful design of the waveguide structure and an appropriate choice of input-pulse and gas parameters, a remarkably broadband phase matching can be achieved for a soliton pump field and a large group of optical harmonics in the soft-x-ray-extreme-ultraviolet spectral range.

  1. Shock-induced PT-symmetric potentials in gas-filled photonic-crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Mohammed F.; Marini, Andrea; Biancalana, Fabio

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated the interaction between a strong soliton and a weak probe with certain configurations that allow optical trapping in gas-filled hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers in the presence of the shock effect. We have shown theoretically and numerically that the shock term can lead to an unbroken parity-time- (PT-) symmetric potential in these kinds of fibers. Time irreversible behavior, a signature feature of the PT symmetry, is also demonstrated numerically. Our results will open different configurations and avenues for observing PT-symmetry breaking in optical fibers, without the need to resort to complex optical systems.

  2. Lateral access to the holes of photonic crystal fibers - selective filling and sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Cristiano M B; Dos Santos, Eliane M; Brito Cruz, C H; de Matos, Christiano J; Ferreiira, Daniel S

    2006-09-04

    A new, simple, technique is demonstrated to laterally access the cladding holes of solid-core photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) or the central hole of hollow-core PCFs by blowing a hole through the fiber wall (using a fusion splicer and the application of pressure). For both fiber types material was subsequently and successfully inserted into the holes. The proposed method compares favorably with other reported selective filling techniques in terms of simplicity and reproducibility. Also, since the holes are laterally filled, simultaneous optical access to the PCFs is possible, which can prove useful for practical sensing applications. As a proof-of-concept experiment, Rhodamine fluorescence measurements are shown.

  3. Analysis of strictly bound modes in photonic crystal fibers by use of a source-model technique.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Amit; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2004-06-01

    We describe a source-model technique for the analysis of the strictly bound modes propagating in photonic crystal fibers that have a finite photonic bandgap crystal cladding and are surrounded by an air jacket. In this model the field is simulated by a superposition of fields of fictitious electric and magnetic current filaments, suitably placed near the media interfaces of the fiber. A simple point-matching procedure is subsequently used to enforce the continuity conditions across the interfaces, leading to a homogeneous matrix equation. Nontrivial solutions to this equation yield the mode field patterns and propagation constants. As an example, we analyze a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Symmetry characteristics of the modes are discussed and exploited to reduce the computational burden.

  4. Controlled chemical modification of the internal surface of photonic crystal fibers for application as biosensitive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidenko, Sergey A.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.; Pidenko, Pavel S.; Shuvalov, Andrey A.; Chibrova, Anastasiya A.; Skibina, Yulia S.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-10-01

    Photonic crystal fibers (PCF) are one of the most promising materials for creation of constructive elements for bio-, drug and contaminant sensing based on unique optical properties of the PCF as effective nanosized optical signal collectors. In order to provide efficient and controllable binding of biomolecules, the internal surface of glass hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCF) has been chemically modified with silanol groups and functionalized with (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES). The shift of local maxima in the HC-PCF transmission spectrum has been selected as a signal for estimating the amount of silanol groups on the HC-PCF inner surface. The relationship between amount of silanol groups on the HC-PCF inner surface and efficiency of following APTES functionalization has been evaluated. Covalent binding of horseradish peroxidase (chosen as a model protein) on functionalized PCF inner surface has been performed successively, thus verifying the possibility of creating a biosensitive element.

  5. Generation and photonic guidance of multi-octave optical-frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Couny, F; Benabid, F; Roberts, P J; Light, P S; Raymer, M G

    2007-11-16

    Ultrabroad coherent comb-like optical spectra spanning several octaves are a chief ingredient in the emerging field of attoscience. We demonstrate generation and guidance of a three-octave spectral comb, spanning wavelengths from 325 to 2300 nanometers, in a hydrogen-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The waveguidance results not from a photonic band gap but from the inhibited coupling between the core and cladding modes. The spectrum consists of up to 45 high-order Stokes and anti-Stokes lines and is generated by driving the confined gas with a single, moderately powerful (10-kilowatt) infrared laser, producing 12-nanosecond-duration pulses. This represents a reduction by six orders of magnitude in the required laser powers over previous equivalent techniques and opens up a robust and much simplified route to synthesizing attosecond pulses.

  6. Reversed dispersion slope photonic bandgap fibers for broadband dispersion control in femtosecond fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Várallyay, Z; Saitoh, K; Fekete, J; Kakihara, K; Koshiba, M; Szipocs, R

    2008-09-29

    Higher-order-mode solid and hollow core photonic bandgap fibers exhibiting reversed or zero dispersion slope over tens or hundreds of nanometer bandwidths within the bandgap are presented. This attractive feature makes them well suited for broadband dispersion control in femtosecond pulse fiber lasers, amplifiers and optical parametric oscillators. The canonical form of the dispersion profile in photonic bandgap fibers is modified by a partial reflector layer/interface placed around the core forming a 2D cylindrical Gires-Tournois type interferometer. This small perturbation in the index profile induces a frequency dependent electric field distribution of the preferred propagating higher-order-mode resulting in a zero or reversed dispersion slope.

  7. Transmission and Propagation of an Accelerating Mode in a Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-K.; England, R.J.; Lee, L.-Q.; Noble, R.; Rawat, V.; Spencer, J.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    A hollow core photonic bandgap (PBG) lattice in a dielectric fiber can provide high gradient acceleration in the optical regime, where the accelerating mode resulting from a defect in the PBG fiber can be excited by high-power lasers. Efficient methods of coupling laser power into the PBG fiber are an area of active research. In this paper, we develop a simulation method using the parallel finite-element electromagnetic suite ACE3P to study the propagation of the accelerating mode in the PBG fiber and determine the radiation pattern into free space at the end of the PBG fiber. The far-field radiation will be calculated and the mechanism of coupling power from an experimental laser setup will be discussed.

  8. Solitary pulse generation by backward Raman scattering in H2-filled photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Abdolvand, A; Nazarkin, A; Chugreev, A V; Kaminski, C F; Russell, P St J

    2009-10-30

    Using a hydrogen-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber as a nonlinear optical gas cell, we study amplification of ns-laser pulses by backward rotational Raman scattering. We find that the amplification process has two characteristic stages. Initially, the pulse energy grows and its duration shortens due to gain saturation at the trailing edge of the pulse. This phase is followed by formation of a symmetric pulse with a duration significantly shorter than the phase relaxation time of the Raman transition. Stabilization of the Stokes pulse profile to a solitonlike hyperbolic secant shape occurs as a result of nonlinear amplification at its front edge and nonlinear absorption at its trailing edge (caused by energy conversion back to the pump field), leading to a reshaped pulse envelope that travels at superluminal velocity.

  9. Refractive index measurement using photonic crystal fiber-based Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ming; Tang, Chang-Ping; Zhu, Tao; Rao, Yun-Jiang; Xu, Lai-Cai; Han, Meng

    2010-03-20

    We have constructed a novel refractive index (RI) sensor based on a fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) by splicing a section of hollow core fiber between a single-mode fiber and a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). Owing to the air holes in the cladding of the PCF, various substances, such as liquids and gases with different RI, can enter or leave the in-fiber air cavity, which makes the device usable as a refractometer. In this paper, the fiber optic FPI sensor has been used to monitor the RI changes of air with different pressures, and the experimental results show that such a sensor has an RI sensitivity of 805.1 microm/RIU, and hysteresis is not observed. Moreover, the easy fabrication method gives the in-fiber refractometer many potential applications in the sensing field.

  10. Extrusion of hollow waveguide preforms with a one-dimensional photonic bandgap structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Daniel J.; Harrington, James A.

    2004-04-01

    An extrusion technique is used to make an all-dielectric, hollow waveguide preform. The structure consists of radially alternating dielectric layers of high/low refractive index pairs. By requiring that the two dielectric materials have a high index contrast, it is possible to make a preform that will have a photonic bandgap structure when drawn into a fiber optic. The preform is made by an extrusion process in which a stack-of-plates, composed of alternating disks of chalcogenide glass and a polymer, is extruded through a die into both solid and hollow-core structures. Laminar flow during extrusion forces the periodicity from an axial to a radial orientation in the final extruded preform. For these experiments the high index material was arsenic selenide glass (As2Se3,n=2.6) and the low index material was polysulfone (PSU,n=1.55), which gives an index contrast of 1.68.

  11. 3D printed low-loss THz waveguide based on Kagome photonic crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Jiayu; Gong, Cheng; Tian, Haolin; Sun, Lu; Chen, Ping; Lin, Lie; Liu, Weiwei

    2016-10-03

    A low-loss hollow core terahertz waveguide based on Kagome photonic crystal structure has been designed and fabricated by 3D printing. The 3D printed waveguide has been characterized by using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that the obtained waveguide features average power propagation loss of 0.02 cm-1 for 0.2-1.0 THz (the minimum is about 0.002 cm-1 at 0.75 THz). More interesting, it could be simply mechanically spliced without any additional alignment, while maintaining the excellent performance. The 3D printing technique will be a promising solution to fabricate Kagome THz waveguide with well controllable characteristics and low cost.

  12. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  13. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Optical quantum memory for ultrafast photons using molecular alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thekkadath, G. S.; Heshami, K.; England, D. G.; Bustard, P. J.; Sussman, B. J.; Spanner, M.

    2016-11-01

    The absorption of broadband photons in atomic ensembles requires either an effective broadening of the atomic transition linewidth, or an off-resonance Raman interaction. Here, we propose a scheme for a quantum memory capable of storing and retrieving ultrafast photons in an ensemble of two-level atoms using a propagation medium with a time-dependent refractive index generated from aligning an ensemble of gas-phase diatomic molecules. The refractive index dynamics generates an effective longitudinal inhomogeneous broadening of the two-level transition. We numerically demonstrate this scheme for storage and retrieval of a weak pulse as short as 50 fs, with a storage time of up to 20 ps. With additional optical control of the molecular alignment dynamics, the storage time can be extended about one nanosecond leading to time-bandwidth products of order 104. This scheme could in principle be achieved using either a hollow-core fibre or a high-pressure gas cell, in a gaseous host medium comprised of diatomic molecules and a two-level atomic vapour at room temperature.

  15. Raman-resonance-enhanced composite nonlinearity of air-guided modes in hollow photonic-crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Il'ya V; Fedotov, Andrei B; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2006-09-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used to measure relations between the resonant (Raman) and nonresonant (Kerr-type) optical nonlinearities of air-guided modes in a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber (PCF). We demonstrate that, due to its interference nature, CARS provides a convenient tool for measuring the contribution of the fiber cladding to the total nonlinearity sensed by air-guided modes in hollow PCFs. On a Raman resonance with molecular vibrations in the gas that fills the fiber core, a two-color laser field is shown to induce optical nonlinearities that are several orders of magnitude higher than the nonresonant Kerr-type nonlinearities typical of air-guided PCF modes.

  16. Design of high-bandwidth one- and two-dimensional photonic bandgap dielectric structures at grazing incidence of light.

    PubMed

    Fekete, J; Várallyay, Z; Szipocs, R

    2008-10-10

    We propose one-dimensional photonic bandgap (PB) dielectric structures to be used at grazing incidence in order to obtain an extended bandgap exhibiting considerably reduced reflection loss and dispersion compared to similar structures used at a normal incidence of light. The well-known quarter-wave condition is applied for the design in this specific case, resulting in resonance-free reflection bands without drops in reflection versus wavelength function and a monotonous variation of the group delay dispersion versus wavelength function, which are important issues in femtosecond pulse laser applications. Based on these results we extend our studies to two-dimensional PB structures and provide guidelines to the design of leaking mode-free hollow-core Bragg PB fibers providing anomalous dispersion over most of the bandgap.

  17. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-07-01

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm--a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra.

  18. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization.

    PubMed

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F

    2016-07-25

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm-a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra.

  19. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm—a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra. PMID:27452975

  20. Phase-matched four-wave mixing of sub-100-TW/ cm2 femtosecond laser pulses in isolated air-guided modes of a hollow photonic-crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Konorov, S O; Serebryannikov, E E; Akimov, D A; Ivanov, A A; Alfimov, M V; Zheltikov, A M

    2004-12-01

    Hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers are shown to allow propagation and nonlinear-optical frequency conversion of high-intensity ultrashort laser pulses in the regime of isolated guided modes confined in the hollow gas-filled fiber core. With a specially designed dispersion of such modes, the 3omega=2omega+2omega-omega four-wave mixing of fundamental (omega) and second-harmonic (2omega) sub-100- TW/ cm(2) femtosecond pulses of a Cr:forsterite laser can be phase matched in a hollow photonic-crystal fiber within a spectral band of more than 10 nm, resulting in the efficient generation of femtosecond pulses in a well-resolved higher-order air-guided mode of 417-nm radiation.

  1. Resonant Biochemical Sensors Based on Photonic Bandgap Waveguides and Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    I describe photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber-based resonant optical sensors of analyte's refractive index which have recently invoked strong interest due to the development of novel fiber types and of techniques for the activation of fiber microstructure with functional materials. Particularly, I consider two sensors types. One employs hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers where the core-guided mode is confined in the analyte's filled core through resonant effect in the surrounding periodic reflector. The other employs metallized photonic bandgap waveguides and fibers, where core-guided mode is phase-matched with a plasmon wave propagating at the fiber/analyte interface. In resonant sensors, one typically employs fibers with strongly nonuniform spectral transmission characteristics that are sensitive to changes in the real part of the analyte's refractive index. Moreover, if narrow absorption lines are present in the analyte transmission spectrum, due to Kramers-Kronig relation, this will also result in strong variation in the real part of the refractive index in the vicinity of an absorption line. Therefore, resonant sensors allow detection of minute changes both in the real part of the analyte's refractive index ( {10^{ - 6}} - {10^{ - 4}}{ RIU} ) and in the imaginary part of the analyte's refractive index in the vicinity of absorption lines. Although the operational principle of almost all PBG fiber-based sensors relies on strong sensitivity of the PBG fiber losses to the value of the analyte's refractive index, particular transduction mechanisms for biodetection vary significantly. Finally, I detail various sensor implementations, modes of operation, as well as analysis of sensitivities for some of the common transduction mechanisms for biosensing applications.

  2. Modification of inner surface of photonic crystal fibers with self-assembled polyaniline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidenko, Sergei A.; Pidenko, Pavel S.; Bondarenko, Sergei D.; Shuvalov, Andrei A.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-04-01

    Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with a hollow core are one of the most promising solid support of fiber-optic sensors. The main advantages of PCF as sensor elements in clinical analysis are minimization of optical interactions from the sample and the ability to analyze small volume of samples. At the same time, low sorption capacity of glass which is the basic material for the fabrication of the PCF, limits their use in the development of biosensors. Modification of the inner surface of the PCF can be the solution of the problem. In this work the synthesis of self-assembled films of polyaniline (PANI) on the inner surface of the PCFs was carried out. The modified PCFs were studied by spectroscopy and electron microscopy. It was found that the covering of the inner surface of the PCFs with PANI leads to a shift of the local maximums of the transmission spectrum PCFs up to 25 nm. These makes possible to design the method of varying of photonic bandgaps location.

  3. A hollow waveguide Bragg reflector: A tunable platform for integrated photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Hollow waveguides are promising candidates for applications in sensing and high-power transmission. Flexible design and cost effective fabrication of hollow waveguides make it possible to realize integrated devices with small temperature dependence, tight control on optical confinement and tailorable characteristics. One of the potential applications of hollow waveguide is a tunable Bragg reflector, which can be used as building block for integrated photonics. In this review, integrated tunable Bragg reflector based on hollow-core optical waveguide is reviewed and presented; this Bragg reflector offers variable characteristics and design flexibility for applications in reconfigurable integrated photonic devices and circuits. Variety of tunable optical functions can be realized with on-chip Bragg reflector based on hollow waveguide, few of them are discussed in this review. Ultra-wide tuning in Bragg wavelength and on-chip polarization control can be realized using 3D hollow waveguide. A tapered 3D hollow waveguide Bragg reflector for an adjustable compensation of polarization mode dispersion (PMD) is then discussed. The utilization of a high-index contrast grating in hollow waveguide is demonstrated to reduce the polarization dependence and reflection-bandwidth. The polarization- and bandwidth control may be useful for realizing polarization insensitive devices and semiconductor lasers with ultra-wide tuning.

  4. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  5. Photonic Hypercrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new "universality class" of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  6. Topological photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2008-03-01

    We associate intrinsic energy equal to hν /2 with the spin angular momentum of photon, and propose a topological model based on orbifold in space and tifold in time as topological obstructions. The model is substantiated using vector wavefield disclinations. The physical photon is suggested to be a particlelike topological photon and a propagating wave such that the energy hν of photon is equally divided between spin energy and translational energy, corresponding to linear momentum of hν /c. The enigma of wave-particle duality finds natural resolution, and the proposed model gives new insights into the phenomena of interference and emission of radiation.

  7. Hollow core anti-resonant fibres with split cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaosheng; Qi, Wenliang; Ho, Daryl; Luan, Feng; Yong, Ken-Tye; Yoo, Seongwoo

    2016-03-01

    A split cladding fibers (SCF) is proposed as an additional design to the anti-resonant type fiber. The introduced split cladding helps to reduce the fabrication distortion. We use numerical simulations to compare the Kagome fibers (KFs) and the proposed split cladding fibers (SCFs) over two normalized transmission bands. It reveals that SCFs are able to maintain the desired round shape of silica cladding walls, hence improving the confinement loss (CL) compared to the KF. Fabrication of the SCF is demonstrated by the stack-and-draw technique. The near filed mode patterns are measured to prove the feasibility of this fiber design.

  8. The photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Russell L.

    2009-10-01

    There are no TEM waves, only photons. Lets build a photon, using a radio antenna. A short antenna (2L<< λ) simplifies the calculation, letting B fall off everywhere as 1/r^2. The Biot-Savart law finds B = (μ0/4π)(LI0/r^2)θφt. The magnetic flux thru a semi-circle of radius λ/2 is set equal to the flux quantum h/e, determining the needed source strength, LI0. From this, one can integrate the magnetic energy density over a sphere of radius λ/2 and finds it to be 1.0121 hc/λ. Pretty close. A B field collapses when the current ceases, but the photon evades this by creating a ɛ0E / t displacement current at center that fully supports the toroidal B assembly as it moves at c. This E=vxB arises because the photon moves at c. Stopped, a photon decays. At every point along the photon's path, an observer will note a transient oscillation of an E field. This sources the EM ``guiding wave'', carrying little or no energy and expanding at c. At the head of the photon, all these spherical guiding waves gather ``in-phase'' as a planar wavefront. This model speaks to all the many things we know about light. The photon is tiny, but its guiding wave is huge.

  9. Turkish propolis supresses MCF-7 cell death induced by homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Tartik, Musa; Darendelioglu, Ekrem; Aykutoglu, Gurkan; Baydas, Giyasettin

    2016-08-01

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) level is a most important risk factor for various vascular diseases including coronary, cerebral and peripheral arterial and venous thrombosis. Propolis is produced by honeybee from various oils, pollens and wax materials. Therefore, it has various biological properties including antioxidant, antitumor and antimicrobial activities. This study investigated the effects of propolis and Hcy on apoptosis in cancer cells. According to our findings, Hcy induced apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells by regulating numerous genes and proteins involved in the apoptotic signal transduction pathway. In contrast, treatment with propolis inhibited caspase- 3 and -9 induced by Hcy in MCF-7 cells. It can be concluded that Hcy may augment the activity of anticancer agents that induce excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptosis in their target cells. In contrast to the previous studies herein we found that propolis in low doses protected cancer cells inhibiting cellular apoptosis mediated by intracellular ROS-dependent mitochondrial pathway.

  10. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  11. Photonic lanterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Argyros, Alexander; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-12-01

    Multimode optical fibers have been primarily (and almost solely) used as "light pipes" in short distance telecommunications and in remote and astronomical spectroscopy. The modal properties of the multimode waveguides are rarely exploited and mostly discussed in the context of guiding light. Until recently, most photonic applications in the applied sciences have arisen from developments in telecommunications. However, the photonic lantern is one of several devices that arose to solve problems in astrophotonics and space photonics. Interestingly, these devices are now being explored for use in telecommunications and are likely to find commercial use in the next few years, particularly in the development of compact spectrographs. Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail. Furthermore, we foreshadow future applications of this technology to the field of nanophotonics.

  12. Photon diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2009-11-01

    In current light models, a particle-like model of light is inconsistent with diffraction observations. A model of light is proposed wherein photon inferences are combined with the cosmological scalar potential model (SPM). That the photon is a surface with zero surface area in the travel direction is inferred from the Michelson-Morley experiment. That the photons in slits are mathematically treated as a linear antenna array (LAA) is inferred from the comparison of the transmission grating interference pattern and the single slit diffraction pattern. That photons induce a LAA wave into the plenum is inferred from the fractal model. Similarly, the component of the photon (the hod) is treated as a single antenna radiating a potential wave into the plenum. That photons are guided by action on the surface of the hod is inferred from the SPM. The plenum potential waves are a real field (not complex) that forms valleys, consistent with the pilot waves of the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. Therefore, the Afshar experiment result is explained, supports Bohm, and falsifies Copenhagen. The papers may be viewed at http://web.citcom.net/˜scjh/.

  13. A study on the application of chirped photonic crystal fiber in multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiali; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey; Skibina, Julia S.; Steinmeyer, Günter; Tang, Shuo

    2013-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a powerful technique for high resolution imaging of biological tissues. A specially-designed chirped photonic crystal fiber (CPCF) is introduced for MPM applications. The CPCF eliminates most pulse broadening effects in a broad transmission window because its cell-size radial chirp in the cladding structure localizes the reflection of different wavelengths in different resonant layers of the cladding, similar to chirped mirrors. In contrast, traditional hollow core fiber (HCF) consists of several identical reflective layers that produce substantial higher-order dispersion. The feasibility of applying the CPCF for MPM imaging is studied. The propagation properties of the CPCF are characterized by autocorrelation traces measured with and without the CPCF, which confirms an extremely low dispersion of the CPCF. The dispersion from other optics in the MPM imaging system is further compensated by a double-folded prism pair. In the autocorrelation trace measurement, satellite peaks are observed when the length of the CPCF is short (~40 cm), which disappear when the fiber length is chosen sufficiently long. The satellite peaks appear to originate from modal dispersion. With propagation lengths above 1 m, single mode propagation can be achieved in the CPCF. The extremely low dispersion of CPCF over a wide transmission window is promising in MPM applications for the fiber delivery of femtosecond pulses, especially in sub-20fs or tunable laser illumination.

  14. Universality of Coherent Raman Gain Suppression in Gas-Filled Broadband-Guiding Photonic Crystal Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, P.; Mridha, M. K.; Novoa, D.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2017-03-01

    As shown in the early 1960s, the gain in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is drastically suppressed when the rate of creation of phonons (via a pump-to-Stokes conversion) is exactly balanced by the rate of phonon annihilation (via a pump-to-anti-Stokes conversion). This occurs when the phonon coherence waves—synchronized vibrations of a large population of molecules—have identical propagation constants for both processes; i.e., they are phase-velocity matched. As recently demonstrated, hydrogen-filled photonic crystal fiber pumped in the vicinity of its zero-dispersion wavelength provides an ideal system for observing this effect. Here we report that Raman gain suppression is actually a universal feature of SRS in gas-filled hollow-core fibers and that it can strongly impair SRS even when the phase mismatch is high, particularly at high pump powers when it is normally assumed that nonlinear processes become more (not less) efficient. This counterintuitive result means that intermodal stimulated Raman scattering (for example, between LP01 and LP11 core modes) begins to dominate at high power levels. The results reported have important implications for fiber-based Raman shifters, amplifiers, or frequency combs, especially for operation in the ultraviolet, where the Raman gain is much higher.

  15. Green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-02-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas.

  16. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  17. Photonic Bandgaps in Photonic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will focus on photonic bandgaps that arise due to nearly free photon and tight-binding effects in coupled microparticle and ring-resonator systems. The Mie formulation for homogeneous spheres is generalized to handle core/shell systems and multiple concentric layers in a manner that exploits an analogy with stratified planar systems, thereby allowing concentric multi-layered structures to be treated as photonic bandgap (PBG) materials. Representative results from a Mie code employing this analogy demonstrate that photonic bands arising from nearly free photon effects are easily observed in the backscattering, asymmetry parameter, and albedo for periodic quarter-wave concentric layers, though are not readily apparent in extinction spectra. Rather, the periodicity simply alters the scattering profile, enhancing the ratio of backscattering to forward scattering inside the bandgap, in direct analogy with planar quarter-wave multilayers. PBGs arising from tight-binding may also be observed when the layers (or rings) are designed such that the coupling between them is weak. We demonstrate that for a structure consisting of N coupled micro-resonators, the morphology dependent resonances split into N higher-Q modes, in direct analogy with other types of oscillators, and that this splitting ultimately results in PBGs which can lead to enhanced nonlinear optical effects.

  18. Improved Performance of JLab 7-Cell Cavities by Electropolishing

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece, Rongli Geng, Anthony Crawford

    2009-05-01

    The great majority of experience in niobium SRF cavity processing at Jefferson Lab is with BCP etching. This has been used on CEBAF cavities and others totalling over 600 in number. With improved process quality control, field emission is now largely controlled and other factors limit performance. All of the prototype cavities developed for the 12 GeV upgrade, although meeting minimum requirements, have demonstrated a Q-drop in the 17?23 MV/m range that is not remedied by 120 C bake. Most of these cavities received >250 micron removal by BCP etch. Two of these cavities have been electropolished using the protocol under development within ILC R&D activities. The first such cavity was transformed from Q = 3×109 at 17 MV/m to quench from 1×1010 at 35 MV/m. The details of this and subsequent electropolished JLab 7-cell cavities will be reported.

  19. Investigation of MEK activity in COS7 cells entering mitosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaiping; Zhang, Tianying; Yi, Yongqing; Luo, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Although the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been extensively investigated, numerous events remain unclear. In the present study, we examined mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) expression from interphase to mitosis. Following nocodazole treatment, COS7 cells gradually became round as early as 4 h after treatment. Cyclin B1 expression gradually increased from 4 to 24 h in the presence of nocodazole. When cells were treated with nocodazole for 4 h, the level of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated MEK phosphorylation did not significantly change between nocodazole-untreated and -treated (4 h) cells (P>0.05). However, EGF-mediated MEK phosphorylation was significantly inhibited upon treatment with nocodazole for 8 and 24 h compared to nocodazole-untreated cells (P<0.05). MEK phosphorylation levels were comparable between 1, 5, 10 and 50 ng/ml EGF treatments. Phorbol 12-myristic 13-acetate (PMA) did not activate MEK in mitotic cells. Following treatment of COS7 cells at the interphase with AG1478 or U0126, MEK phosphorylation was blocked. In addition, the investigation of the expression of proteins downstream of MEK demonstrated that EGF does not significantly affect the phosphorylation level of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK) and Elk in mitotic cells (P>0.05). The results showed that MEK expression is gradually inhibited from cell interphase to mitosis, and that MEK downstream signaling is affected by this inhibition, which probably reflects the requirements of cell physiology during mitosis.

  20. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  1. Microalgae photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floume, Timmy; Coquil, Thomas; Sylvestre, Julien

    2011-05-01

    Due to their metabolic flexibility and fast growth rate, microscopic aquatic phototrophs like algae have a potential to become industrial photochemical converters. Algae photosynthesis could enable the large scale production of clean and renewable liquid fuels and chemicals with major environmental, economic and societal benefits. Capital and operational costs are the main issues to address through optical, process and biochemical engineering improvements. In this perspective, a variety of photonic approaches have been proposed - we introduce them here and describe their potential, limitations and compatibility with separate biotechnology and engineering progresses. We show that only sunlight-based approaches are economically realistic. One of photonics' main goals in the algae field is to dilute light to overcome photosaturation effects that impact upon cultures exposed to full sunlight. Among other approaches, we introduce a widely-compatible broadband spectral adaptation technique called AlgoSun® that uses luminescence to optimize sunlight spectrum in view of the bioconverter's requirements.

  2. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  3. Photonic homeostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Li, Fan-Hui

    2010-11-01

    Photonic homeostatics is a discipline to study the establishment, maintenance, decay, upgrading and representation of function-specific homoestasis (FSH) by using photonics. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stress may increase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activities above FSH-specific SIRT1 activity to induce a function far from its FSH. On the one hand, low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LLL) can not modulate a function in its FSH or a stress in its stress-specific homeostasis (StSH), but modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. On the other hand, the biophotons from a biosystem with its function in its FSH should be less than the one from the biosystem with its function far from its FSH. The non-resonant interaction of low intensity laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LIL) and a kind of membrane protein can be amplified by all the membrane proteins if the function is far from its FSH. This amplification might hold for biophoton emission of the membrane protein so that the photonic spectroscopy can be used to represent the function far from its FSH, which is called photonomics.

  4. Responses of photonic crystal fibres to pressure, axial strain and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Meng

    Photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) show different elastic and optical properties from conventional silica fibres because they contain periodic transverse microstructures in their profiles. In this dissertation, the microstructure cladding of PCF is regarded as a honeycomb structure which has inhomogeneous elastic properties. Both Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this region are anisotropic, and are the functions of the air-filling ratio of the microstructure cladding. Based on this assumption, three theoretical models for three types of PCFs (solid-core PCF, hollow-core photonic bandgap fibre and hybrid PCF) are constructed. Using the theoretical models, the responses of PCFs to axial strain, acoustic pressure, temperature and lateral pressure are investigated respectively. The simulation results show that compared with conventional silica fibres, PCFs are predicted to have several novel or improved responses to external measurands, which can be used to enhance the performance of the fibre sensors or construct new PCF-based devices. Hybrid PCF guides light by a novel guiding mechanism, which is a combination of index-guiding and bandgap-guiding. Because the guiding mechanisms of the hybrid PCF are different in two orthogonal directions, high birefringence property is expected. To our knowledge, there is no theoretical model that can simulate the birefringence properties of hybrid PCFs. In this dissertation, a theoretical model for hybrid PCFs is constructed to simulate the birefringence property of hybrid PCFs and the responses of hybrid fibres' birefringence to axial strain and temperature. Using this theoretical model, the birefringence/responses of hybrid PCFs are predicted, as the functions of their design parameters. In experiment, the birefringence of one type of hybrid PCF and its responses to axial strain and temperature is measured. The experimental results agree well with the simulation results, which give us the confidence to use this theoretical model

  5. Pulse-shaping based two-photon FRET stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Daniel C; Bhagwat, Amar R; Brenner, Meredith H; Núñez, Marcos F; Mork, Briana E; Cai, Dawen; Swanson, Joel A; Ogilvie, Jennifer P

    2015-02-09

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) based measurements that calculate the stoichiometry of intermolecular interactions in living cells have recently been demonstrated, where the technique utilizes selective one-photon excitation of donor and acceptor fluorophores to isolate the pure FRET signal. Here, we present work towards extending this FRET stoichiometry method to employ two-photon excitation using a pulse-shaping methodology. In pulse-shaping, frequency-dependent phases are applied to a broadband femtosecond laser pulse to tailor the two-photon excitation conditions to preferentially excite donor and acceptor fluorophores. We have also generalized the existing stoichiometry theory to account for additional cross-talk terms that are non-vanishing under two-photon excitation conditions. Using the generalized theory we demonstrate two-photon FRET stoichiometry in live COS-7 cells expressing fluorescent proteins mAmetrine as the donor and tdTomato as the acceptor.

  6. Fabry-Perot based strain insensitive photonic crystal fiber modal interferometer for inline sensing of refractive index and temperature.

    PubMed

    Dash, Jitendra Narayan; Jha, Rajan

    2015-12-10

    We report a highly stable, compact, strain insensitive inline microcavity-based solid-core photonic crystal fiber (SCPCF) modal interferometer for the determination of the refractive index (RI) of an analyte and its temperature. The interferometer is fabricated by splicing one end of SCPCF with single-mode fiber (SMF) and the other end with hollow-core PCF. This is followed by cleaving the part of the solid glass portion possibly present after the microcavity. The formation of the cavities at the end faces of the SCPCF results in reduction of the period of the interference pattern that helps in achieving distinctiveness in the measurement. Three sensor heads have been fabricated, and each has a different length of the collapsed region formed by splicing SMF with SCPCF. The response of the sensors is found to be sensitive to the length of this collapsed region between SMF and SCPCF with a sensitivity of 53 nm/RI unit (RIU) and resolution of 1.8×10(-4) RIU. The temperature response of the sensor is found to be linear, having a temperature sensitivity of 12 pm/°C. In addition to these findings, the effect of strain on the proposed structure is analyzed in both wavelength and intensity interrogation.

  7. Photonic Nanojets.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, Alexander; Kong, Soon-Cheol; Sahakian, Alan V; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the substantial body of literature emerging since 2004 concerning photonic nanojets. The photonic nanojet is a narrow, high-intensity, non-evanescent light beam that can propagate over a distance longer than the wavelength λ after emerging from the shadow-side surface of an illuminated lossless dielectric microcylinder or microsphere of diameter larger than λ. The nanojet's minimum beamwidth can be smaller than the classical diffraction limit, in fact as small as ~λ/3 for microspheres. It is a nonresonant phenomenon appearing for a wide range of diameters of the microcylinder or microsphere if the refractive index contrast relative to the background is less than about 2:1. Importantly, inserting within a nanojet a nanoparticle of diameter d(ν) perturbs the far-field backscattered power of the illuminated microsphere by an amount that varies as d(ν)3 for a fixed λ. This perturbation is much slower than the d(ν)6 dependence of Rayleigh scattering for the same nanoparticle, if isolated. This leads to a situation where, for example, the measured far-field backscattered power of a 3-μm diameter microsphere could double if a 30-nm diameter nanoparticle were inserted into the nanojet emerging from the microsphere, despite the nanoparticle having only 1/10,000(th) the cross-section area of the microsphere. In effect, the nanojet serves to project the presence of the nanoparticle to the far field. These properties combine to afford potentially important applications of photonic nanojets for detecting and manipulating nanoscale objects, subdiffraction-resolution nanopatterning and nanolithography, low-loss waveguiding, and ultrahigh-density optical storage.

  8. Photonic Nanojets

    PubMed Central

    Heifetz, Alexander; Kong, Soon-Cheol; Sahakian, Alan V.; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the substantial body of literature emerging since 2004 concerning photonic nanojets. The photonic nanojet is a narrow, high-intensity, non-evanescent light beam that can propagate over a distance longer than the wavelength λ after emerging from the shadow-side surface of an illuminated lossless dielectric microcylinder or microsphere of diameter larger than λ. The nanojet’s minimum beamwidth can be smaller than the classical diffraction limit, in fact as small as ~λ/3 for microspheres. It is a nonresonant phenomenon appearing for a wide range of diameters of the microcylinder or microsphere if the refractive index contrast relative to the background is less than about 2:1. Importantly, inserting within a nanojet a nanoparticle of diameter dν perturbs the far-field backscattered power of the illuminated microsphere by an amount that varies as dν3 for a fixed λ. This perturbation is much slower than the dν6 dependence of Rayleigh scattering for the same nanoparticle, if isolated. This leads to a situation where, for example, the measured far-field backscattered power of a 3-μm diameter microsphere could double if a 30-nm diameter nanoparticle were inserted into the nanojet emerging from the microsphere, despite the nanoparticle having only 1/10,000th the cross-section area of the microsphere. In effect, the nanojet serves to project the presence of the nanoparticle to the far field. These properties combine to afford potentially important applications of photonic nanojets for detecting and manipulating nanoscale objects, subdiffraction-resolution nanopatterning and nanolithography, low-loss waveguiding, and ultrahigh-density optical storage. PMID:19946614

  9. Photon Calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1989-01-01

    A photon calorimeter (20, 40) is provided that comprises a laminar substrate (10, 22, 42) that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating (28, 48, 52), that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions (30, 50, 54) are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly.

  10. Photon calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1988-04-22

    A photon calorimeter is provided that comprises a laminar substrate that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating, that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions, are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly. 4 figs.

  11. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  13. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave mixing between photons and phonons, and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong non-local effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a multicavity optomechanical device in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of this 'photon see-saw', are modulated antisymmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation, which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other empty cavity during every oscillation cycle in a well-regulated fashion.

  14. Sensitive multiplex detection of serological liver cancer biomarkers using SERS-active photonic crystal fiber probe.

    PubMed

    Dinish, U S; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Chang, Young Tae; Olivo, Malini

    2014-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy possesses the most promising advantage of multiplex detection for biosensing applications, which is achieved due to the narrow 'fingerprint' Raman spectra from the analyte molecules. We developed an ultrasensitive platform for the multiplex detection of cancer biomarkers by combining the SERS technique with a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF). Axially aligned air channels inside the HCPCF provide an excellent platform for optical sensing using SERS. In addition to the flexibility of optical fibers, HCPCF provides better light confinement and a larger interaction length for the guided light and the analyte, resulting in an improvement in sensitivity to detect low concentrations of bioanalytes in extremely low sample volumes. Herein, for the first time, we demonstrate the sensitive multiplex detection of biomarkers immobilized inside the HCPCF using antibody-conjugated SERS-active nanoparticles (SERS nanotags). As a proof-of-concept for targeted multiplex detection, initially we carried out the sensing of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarker in oral squamous carcinoma cell lysate using three different SERS nanotags. Subsequently, we also achieved simultaneous detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biomarkers-alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) secreted in the supernatant from Hep3b cancer cell line. Using a SERS-HCPCF sensing platform, we could successfully demonstrate the multiplex detection in an extremely low sample volume of ∼20 nL. In future, this study may lead to sensitive biosensing platform for the low concentration detection of biomarkers in an extremely low sample volume of body fluids to achieve early diagnosis of multiple diseases. (© 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  15. Numerical simulation of coherent visible-to-near-infrared supercontinuum generation in the CHCl3-filled photonic crystal fiber with 1.06 μm pump pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-can; Li, Wei-min; Li, Na; Wang, Wen-quan

    2017-02-01

    The hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is filled by highly nonlinear liquid chloroform (CHCl3) in the center core. The CHCl3-filled PCF with an appropriate geometric parameters exhibits a normal dispersion profile in the visible-to-near-infrared (NIR) region, where the values of group velocity dispersion (GVD) in the vicinity of 1060-nm pump wavelength can be tuned in the range from -20 to -50 ps/nm/km. Furthermore, the nonlinear parameters at wavelengths <1100 nm are higher than 0.7 W-1 m-1, which can lead to a significant enhancement of the spectral broadening, especially on the blue side. The numerical results show that, when 100-fs pulses centered at 1060 nm are launched in the 0.01 m-long fiber (47 kW peak power), the generated supercontinuum (SC) spectra with high degree of coherence can cover near 2 octaves spanning from 340 to 1360 nm at -20 dB level. The spectral variations are < 5 dB in the wavelength range of 365-1315 nm.

  16. 10 kHz accuracy of an optical frequency reference based on (12)C2H2-filled large-core kagome photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Knabe, Kevin; Wu, Shun; Lim, Jinkang; Tillman, Karl A; Light, Philip S; Couny, Francois; Wheeler, Natalie; Thapa, Rajesh; Jones, Andrew M; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Washburn, Brian R; Benabid, Fetah; Corwin, Kristan L

    2009-08-31

    Saturated absorption spectroscopy reveals the narrowest features so far in molecular gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The 48-68 mum core diameter of the kagome-structured fiber used here allows for 8 MHz full-width half-maximum sub-Doppler features, and its wavelength-insensitive transmission is suitable for high-accuracy frequency measurements. A fiber laser is locked to the (12)C2H2 nu(1); + nu(3) P(13) transition inside kagome fiber, and compared with frequency combs based on both a carbon nanotube fiber laser and a Cr:forsterite laser, each of which are referenced to a GPS-disciplined Rb oscillator. The absolute frequency of the measured line center agrees with those measured in power build-up cavities to within 9.3 kHz (1 sigma error), and the fractional frequency instability is less than 1.2 x 10(-11) at 1 s averaging time.

  17. Exopolysaccharide from Trichoderma pseudokoningii induces the apoptosis of MCF-7 cells through an intrinsic mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bo; Li, Ping; Qin, Guozheng; Xu, Yanghui; Chen, Ke; Liu, Huixia; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-01-20

    In this study, we reported the anticancer efficacy of exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from Trichoderma pseudokoningii, on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Our results showed that EPS inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells and induced lactic dehydrogenase release by inducing apoptosis and cell arrest at S phase. Further study revealed that EPS-induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells was associated with alteration of nuclear morphology, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Sequentially, EPS increased the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner; however, caspase-8 remained intact. Western blot analysis revealed that EPS increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and promoted the release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. Taken together, these findings provided evidence that EPS induced the apoptosis of MCF-7 cells through an intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and that EPS may therefore be considered as an effective adjuvant agent against human breast cancer.

  18. Nuclear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  19. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  20. Construction of porcine CCK pDNA and its expression in COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jigang; Lü, Yi; Bai, Qiaoling

    2007-06-01

    CCK correlates with the generation and progression of pancreatic cancer. The research aims to construct eukaryotic expression plasmid pIRES2-EGFP/CCK (CCK pDNA) and transiently express it in COS-7 cells. Total RNA was extracted from porcine intestinal mucosa. RT-PCR was used to amplify the aimed segments CCKcDNA which was then digested with EcoR1 and BamH1 and inserted into a eukaryotic expression plasmid pIRES2-EGFP to construct CCK pDNA. The constructed plasmid was transfected into COS-7 cells by lepofectamin 2000-mediated transfer method. The expression of CCK in transfected COS-7 cells was detected 24, 48 and 72 h post-transfection with fluorescence microscopy and the expression level of CCK mRNA in transfected COS-7 cells was assayed by using RT-PCR. The results showed CCK pDNA was successfully constructed and expressed transiently in COS-7 cells. Green fluorescent protein could be detected in the COS-7 cells transfected with porcine CCK pDNA 24 h post-transfection. At 48th h post-transfection, the number of positive cells was increased significantly and much brighter green fluorescence could be detected. And 72 h post-transfection, the green fluorescence of positive cells became even stronger, while no green fluorescence was detected in the control group. The expression of CCK mRNA in the cells was detectable by using RT-PCR. In COS-7 cells transfected with CCK pDNA a high level of porcine CCK mRNA was detected while no expression of porcine CCKmRNA was found in the cells transfected with null plasmid. It was concluded CCK pDNA was expressed successfully in COS-7 cells, which lays a foundation for further research on the relationship between CCK and tumor.

  1. High energy photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  2. Accelerator prospects for photon-photon physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, A.

    1992-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the accelerators in the world where two-photon physics could be carried out in the future. The list includes facilities where two-photon physics is already an integral part of the scientific program but also mentions some other machines where initiating new programs may be possible.

  3. Simulating single photons with realistic photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao; Zhang, Zhen; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-12-01

    Quantum information processing provides remarkable advantages over its classical counterpart. Quantum optical systems have been proved to be sufficient for realizing general quantum tasks, which, however, often rely on single-photon sources. In practice, imperfect single-photon sources, such as a weak-coherent-state source, are used instead, which will inevitably limit the power in demonstrating quantum effects. For instance, with imperfect photon sources, the key rate of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol will be very low, which fortunately can be resolved by utilizing the decoy-state method. As a generalization, we investigate an efficient way to simulate single photons with imperfect ones to an arbitrary desired accuracy when the number of photonic inputs is small. Based on this simulator, we can thus replace the tasks that involve only a few single-photon inputs with the ones that make use of only imperfect photon sources. In addition, our method also provides a quantum simulator to quantum computation based on quantum optics. In the main context, we take a phase-randomized coherent state as an example for analysis. A general photon source applies similarly and may provide some further advantages for certain tasks.

  4. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  5. Photon structure function - theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    The theoretical status of the photon structure function is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the hadronic mixing problem and the ability of perturbative QCD to make definitive predictions for the photon structure function. 11 references.

  6. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  7. Lipid Profiling Reveals Arachidonate Deficiency in RAW264.7 Cells: Structural and Functional Implications†

    PubMed Central

    Rouzer, Carol A.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Byrne, Mark O.; Milne, Stephen B.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Brown, H. Alex

    2008-01-01

    Glycerophospholipids containing arachidonic acid (20:4) serve as the precursors for an array of biologically active lipid mediators, most of which are produced by macrophages. We have applied mass spectrometry-based lipid profiling technology to evaluate the glycerophospholipid structure and composition of two macrophage populations, resident peritoneal macrophages and RAW264.7 cells, with regard to their potential for 20:4-based lipid mediator biosynthesis. Fatty acid analysis indicated that RAW264.7 cells were deficient in 20:4 (10 ± 1 mole percent) as compared to peritoneal macrophages (26 ± 1 mole percent). Mass spectrometry of total glycerophospholipids demonstrated a marked difference in the distribution of lipid species, including reduced levels of 20:4-containing lipids, in RAW264.7 cells as compared to peritoneal macrophages. Enrichment of RAW264.7 cells with 20:4 increased the fatty acid to 20 ± 1 mole percent. However, the distribution of the incorporated 20:4 remained different from that of peritoneal macrophages. RAW264.7 cells pretreated with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor followed by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma mobilized similar quantities of 20:4 and produced similar amounts of prostaglandins as peritoneal macrophages treated with LPS alone. LPS treatment resulted in detectable changes in specific 20:4-containing glycerophospholipids in peritoneal cells, but not in RAW264.7 cells. 20:4-enriched RAW264.7 cells lost 88% of the incorporated fatty acid during the LPS incubation without additional prostaglandin synthesis. These results illustrate that large differences in glycerophospholipid composition may exist, even in closely related cell populations, and demonstrate the importance of interpreting the potential for lipid-mediator biosynthesis in the context of overall glycerophospholipid composition. PMID:17144673

  8. Photon track evolution.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A D

    2005-01-01

    Given the time scale of biological, biochemical, biophysical and physical effects in a radiation exposure of living tissue, the first physical stage can be considered to be independent of time. All the physical interactions caused by the incident photons happen at the same starting time. From this point of view it would seem that the evolution of photon tracks is not a relevant topic for analysis; however, if the photon track is considered as a sequence of several interactions, there are several steps until the total degradation of the energy of the primary photon. We can characterise the photon track structure by the probability p(E,j), that is, the probability that a photon with energy E suffers j secondary interactions. The aim of this work is to analyse the photon track structure by considering j as a step of the photon track evolution towards the total degradation of the photon energy. Low energy photons (<150 keV) are considered, with water phantoms and half-extended geometry. The photon track evolution concept is presented and compared with the energy deposition along the track and also with the spatial distribution of the several steps in the photon track.

  9. Pathway of cytotoxicity induced by folic acid modified selenium nanoparticles in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Pi, Jiang; Jin, Hua; Liu, Ruiying; Song, Bing; Wu, Qing; Liu, Li; Jiang, Jinhuan; Yang, Fen; Cai, Huaihong; Cai, Jiye

    2013-02-01

    Selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) have been recognized as promising materials for biomedical applications. To prepare Se NPs which contained cancer targeting methods and to clarify the cellular localization and cytotoxicity mechanisms of these Se NPs against cancer cells, folic acid protected/modified selenium nanoparticles (FA-Se NPs) were first prepared by a one-step method. Some morphologic and spectroscopic methods were obtained to prove the successfully formation of FA-Se NPs while free folate competitive inhibition assay, microscope, and several biological methods were used to determine the in vitro uptake, subcellular localization, and cytotoxicity mechanism of FA-Se NPs in MCF-7 cells. The results indicated that the 70-nm FA-Se NPs were internalized by MCF-7 cells through folate receptor-mediated endocytosis and targeted to mitochondria located regions through endocytic vesicles transporting. Then, the FA-Se NPs entered into mitochondria; triggered the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis of MCF-7 cells which involved oxidative stress, Ca(2)+ stress changes, and mitochondrial dysfunction; and finally caused the damage of mitochondria. FA-Se NPs released from broken mitochondria were transported into nucleus and further into nucleolus which then induced MCF-7 cell cycle arrest. In addition, FA-Se NPs could induce cytoskeleton disorganization and induce MCF-7 cell membrane morphology alterations. These results collectively suggested that FA-Se NPs could be served as potential therapeutic agents and organelle-targeted drug carriers in cancer therapy.

  10. Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol enhances MCF-7 cell proliferation via cannabinoid receptor-independent signaling.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Yamaori, Satoshi; Motoya, Erina; Matsunaga, Tamihide; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuhito

    2008-03-12

    We recently reported that Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) has the ability to stimulate the proliferation of human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells. However, the mechanism of action remains to be clarified. The present study focused on the relationship between receptor expression and the effects of Delta(9)-THC on cell proliferation. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that there was no detectable expression of CB receptors in MCF-7 cells. In accordance with this, no effects of cannabinoid 1/2 (CB1/2) receptor antagonists and pertussis toxin on cell proliferation were observed. Although MCF-7 cell proliferation is suggested to be suppressed by Delta(9)-THC in the presence of CB receptors, it was revealed that Delta(9)-THC could exert upregulation of living cells in the absence of the receptors. Interestingly, Delta(9)-THC upregulated human epithelial growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression, which is known to be a predictive factor of human breast cancer and is able to stimulate cancer cells as well as MCF-7 cells. Actinomycin D-treatment interfered with the upregulation of HER2 and cell proliferation by cannabinoid. Taken together, these studies suggest that, in the absence of CB receptors, Delta(9)-THC can stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by modulating, at least in part, HER2 transcription.

  11. Econazole Nitrate Induces Apoptosis in MCF-7 Cells via Mitochondrial and Caspase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Juan; Yu, Chun-Hui; Zhao, Xue-Ling; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Shou-Gang; Gong, Xian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Econazole nitrate (EN), a synthetic compound, is now in use as a routine antifungal drug. EN was shown to have antitumor effect, the tumor cell killing mechanisms, however, remain unclear. In this research, the apoptosis-inducing effect of EN on MCF-7 cells was investigated. The results showed that EN inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner by MTT method and colony forming assay. MCF-7 cells treated with EN showed typical characteristics of apoptosis including the morphological changes and DNA fragmentation. Meanwhile, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was showed by flow cytometry. In addition, western blot analysis showed that EN resulted in the decrease expression of procaspase-3, procaspase-9 and bcl-2. In conclusion, these findings suggest that EN may be an effective way for treating human breast cancer. The anti-tumor mechanisms of EN might involve mitochondrial and caspase pathways. PMID:25587322

  12. Single-photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, Brahim; Orrit, Michel

    2005-05-01

    The concept of the photon, central to Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect, is exactly 100 years old. Yet, while photons have been detected individually for more than 50 years, devices producing individual photons on demand have only appeared in the last few years. New concepts for single-photon sources, or 'photon guns', have originated from recent progress in the optical detection, characterization and manipulation of single quantum objects. Single emitters usually deliver photons one at a time. This so-called antibunching of emitted photons can arise from various mechanisms, but ensures that the probability of obtaining two or more photons at the same time remains negligible. We briefly recall basic concepts in quantum optics and discuss potential applications of single-photon states to optical processing of quantum information: cryptography, computing and communication. A photon gun's properties are significantly improved by coupling it to a resonant cavity mode, either in the Purcell or strong-coupling regimes. We briefly recall early production of single photons with atomic beams, and the operation principles of macroscopic parametric sources, which are used in an overwhelming majority of quantum-optical experiments. We then review the photophysical and spectroscopic properties and compare the advantages and weaknesses of various single nanometre-scale objects used as single-photon sources: atoms or ions in the gas phase and, in condensed matter, organic molecules, defect centres, semiconductor nanocrystals and heterostructures. As new generations of sources are developed, coupling to cavities and nano-fabrication techniques lead to improved characteristics, delivery rates and spectral ranges. Judging from the brisk pace of recent progress, we expect single photons to soon proceed from demonstrations to applications and to bring with them the first practical uses of quantum information.

  13. Modeling loss and backscattering in a photonic-bandgap fiber using strong perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani Aghaie, Kiarash; Digonnet, Michel J. F.; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-02-01

    We use coupled-mode theory with strong perturbation to model the loss and backscattering coefficients of a commercial hollow-core fiber (NKT Photonics' HC-1550-02 fiber) induced by the frozen-in longitudinal perturbations of the fiber cross section. Strong perturbation is used, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, because the large difference between the refractive indices of the two fiber materials (silica and air) makes conventional weak-perturbation less accurate. We first study the loss and backscattering using the mathematical description of conventional surface-capillary waves (SCWs). This model implicitly assumes that the mechanical waves on the core wall of a PBF have the same power spectral density (PSD) as the waves that develop on an infinitely thick cylindrical tube with the same diameter as the PBF core. The loss and backscattering coefficients predicted with this thick-wall SCW roughness are 0.5 dB/km and 1.1×10-10 mm-1, respectively. These values are more than one order of magnitude smaller than the measured values (20-30 dB/km and ~1.5×10-9 mm-1, respectively). This result suggests that the thick-wall SCW PSD is not representative of the roughness of our fiber. We found that this discrepancy occurs at least in part because the effect of the finite thickness of the silica membranes (only ~120 nm) is neglected. We present a new expression for the PSD that takes into account this finite thickness and demonstrates that the finite thickness substantially increases the roughness. The predicted loss and backscattering coefficients predicted with this thin-film SCW PSD are 30 dB/km and 1.3×10-9 mm-1, which are both close to the measured values. We also show that the thin-film SCW PSD accurately predicts the roughness PSD measured by others in a solid-core photonic-crystal fiber.

  14. Photonic quantum well composed of photonic crystal and quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaohui; Zhu, Yiping; Wang, Lianwei; Yang, Pingxiong; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-02-01

    A photonic quantum well structure composed of photonic crystal and Fibonacci quasicrystal is investigated by analyzing the transmission spectra and electric field distributions. The defect band in the photonic well can form confined quantized photonic states that can change in the band-gap of the photonic barriers by varying the thickness ratio of the two stacking layers. The number of confined states can be tuned by adjusting the period of the photonic well. The photons traverse the photonic quantum well by resonance tunneling and the coupling effect leads to the high transmission intensity of the confined photonic states.

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  16. [Expression of angiogenin in COS-7 cells and analysis of its biological activity].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Zou, Min-Jig; Cai, Xin; Liu, Shen; Wang, Jin-Feng; Xu, Tao; Wang, Jia-Xi; Su, Hang; Xu, Dong-Gan

    2008-06-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the angiogenin (ANG) expression in COS-7 cells and its biological activity. The gene of angiogenin was obtained from mononuclear cells of peripheral blood by using RT-PCR and inserted into eukaryotic expression vector of pcDNA3.1. After being transfected into COS-7 cells, the recombinant ANG was identified by Western blot assay. The function of promoting proliferation of ANG to ECV304 cells was detected by MTT method, and its activity of vascularization was analyzed by chick embryo chorioallantois treated by the culture supernatant after transfection with pcDNA3.1-ang. The result showed that recombinant ANG was expressed in COS-7 cells after transfection for 24 to 36 hours. It could specifically react with monoclonal antibody against ANG. The recombinant ANG could obviously promote the proliferation of ECV304 cells. In contrast with the control group, the culture supernatant of pcDNA3.1-ang transfected group could stimulate the angiogenesis in embryo chorioallantois. It is concluded that the ang transiently expresses in COS-7 cells, and its expression product obviously stimulates the cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  17. Subcellular localization of human heparanase and its alternative splice variant in COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mayumi; Amemiya, Kana; Hayakawa, Sumio; Munakata, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    Heparanase, the enzyme that degrades heparan sulfate, has been implicated to play important and characteristic roles in organogenesis, tissue organization, cell migration, and tumor metastasis. Clarification of its expression, its intracellular sorting, and its secretion is, therefore, of much importance to understand its role in cell biology. In addition to the 1.7 Kb transcript previously reported, we detected a 1.5 Kb transcript of human heparanase by RT-PCR. The smaller transcript was shown to be an alternatively spliced variant lacking exon 5, which contains the essential glutamic acid residue required for enzyme activity. When expressed in COS-7 cells this variant did not show any heparanase activity. Full-length heparanase and the exon 5-deleted splice variant were expressed in COS-7 cells and examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both proteins co-localized with calnexin, a marker protein for the endoplasmic reticulum, and they co-immunoprecipitated with calnexin. Both proteins were postulated to be precursors based upon the results of SDS-PAGE analyses. Treatment with endoglycosidases revealed that all potential N-glycosylation sites in the proteins were glycosylated. Tunicamycin treatment of transfected COS-7 cells inhibited N-glycosylation but did not change the subcellular localization. These results indicate that overexpressed heparanase and its splice variant localize to the endoplasmic reticulum independent of glycosylation in COS-7 cells.

  18. Synthesis, Characterization, and Anticancer Activity of New Quinazoline Derivatives against MCF-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Faraj, Fadhil Lafta; Zahedifard, Maryam; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Looi, Chung Yeng; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Ahmad, Noraini; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2014-01-01

    Two new synthesized and characterized quinazoline Schiff bases 1 and 2 were investigated for anticancer activity against MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. Compounds 1 and 2 demonstrated a remarkable antiproliferative effect, with an IC50 value of 6.246 × 10−6 mol/L and 5.910 × 10−6 mol/L, respectively, after 72 hours of treatment. Most apoptosis morphological features in treated MCF-7 cells were observed by AO/PI staining. The results of cell cycle analysis indicate that compounds did not induce S and M phase arrest in cell after 24 hours of treatment. Furthermore, MCF-7 cells treated with 1 and 2 subjected to apoptosis death, as exhibited by perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release as well as increase in ROS formation. We also found activation of caspases-3/7, -8, and -9 in compounds 1 and 2. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB translocation in MCF-7 cells treated by compound 1 significantly exhibited the association of extrinsic apoptosis pathway. Acute toxicity results demonstrated the nontoxic nature of the compounds in mice. Our results showed significant activity towards MCF-7 cells via either intrinsic or extrinsic mitochondrial pathway and are potential candidate for further in vivo and clinical breast cancer studies. PMID:25548779

  19. Inhibitory effects and molecular mechanisms of tetrahydrocurcumin against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Deng, Shan; Wang, Ning; Liu, Yafei; Yang, Xingbin

    2016-01-01

    Background Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), an active metabolite of curcumin, has been reported to have similar biological effects to curcumin, but the mechanism of the antitumor activity of THC is still unclear. Methods The present study was to investigate the antitumor effects and mechanism of THC in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells using the methods of MTT assay, LDH assay, flow cytometry analysis, and western blot assay. Results THC was found to have markedly cytotoxic effect and antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner with the IC50 for 24 h of 107.8 μM. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that THC mediated the cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, and 32.8% of MCF-7 cells entered the early phase of apoptosis at 100 μM for 24 h. THC also dose-dependently led to apoptosis in MCF-7 cells via the mitochondrial pathway, as evidenced by the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, the elevation of intracellular ROS, a decrease in Bcl-2 and PARP expression, and an increase in Bax expression. Meanwhile, cytochrome C was released to cytosol and the loss of mitochondria membrane potential (Δψm) was observed after THC treatment. Conclusion THC is an excellent source of chemopreventive agents in the treatment of breast cancer and has excellent potential to be explored as antitumor precursor compound. PMID:26899573

  20. Chemosensitivity of MCF-7 cells to eugenol: release of cytochrome-c and lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Al Wafai, Rana; El-Rabih, Warde; Katerji, Meghri; Safi, Remi; El Sabban, Marwan; El-Rifai, Omar; Usta, Julnar

    2017-03-08

    Phytochemicals have been extensively researched for their potential anticancer effects. In previous study, direct exposure of rat liver mitochondria to eugenol main ingredient of clove, uncoupled mitochondria and increased F0F1ATPase activity. In the present study, we further investigated the effects of eugenol on MCF-7 cells in culture. Eugenol demonstrated: a dose-dependent decrease in viability (MTT assay), and proliferation (real time cell analysis) of MCF-7 cells, (EC50: 0.9 mM); an increase in reactive oxygen species; a decrease in ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential (MitoPT JC-1 assay); and a release of cytochrome-c and lactate dehydrogenase (Cytotoxicity Detection Kit (PLUS)) into culture media at eugenol concentration >EC50. Pretreatment with the antioxidants Trolox and N-acetyl cysteine partially restored cell viability and decreased ROS, with Trolox being more potent. Expression levels of both anti- and pro-apoptotic markers (Bcl-2 and Bax, respectively) decreased with increasing eugenol concentration, with no variation in their relative ratios. Eugenol-treated MCF-7 cells overexpressing Bcl-2 exhibited results similar to those of MCF-7. Our findings indicate that eugenol toxicity is non-apoptotic Bcl-2 independent, affecting mitochondrial function and plasma membrane integrity with no effect on migration or invasion. We report here the chemo-sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to eugenol, a phytochemical with anticancer potential.

  1. Electrochemical estrogen screen method based on the electrochemical behavior of MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinlian; Song, Jia; Bi, Sheng; Zhou, Shi; Cui, Jiwen; Liu, Jiguang; Wu, Dongmei

    2016-08-05

    It was an urgent task to develop quick, cheap and accurate estrogen screen method for evaluating the estrogen effect of the booming chemicals. In this study, the voltammetric behavior between the estrogen-free and normal fragmented MCF-7 cell suspensions were compared, and the electrochemical signal (about 0.68V attributed by xanthine and guanine) of the estrogen-free fragmented MCF-7 cell suspension was obviously lower than that of the normal one. The electrochemistry detection of ex-secretion purines showed that the ability of ex-secretion purines of cells sharp decreased due to the removing of endogenous estrogen. The results indicated that the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells was related to the level of intracellular estrogen. When the level of intracellular estrogen was down-regulated, the concentrations of the xanthine and hypoxanthine decreased, which led to the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells fall. Based on the electrochemical signal, the electrochemical estrogen screen method was established. The estrogen effect of estradiol, nonylphenol and bisphenol A was evaluated with the electrochemical method, and the result was accordant with that of MTT assay. The electrochemical estrogen screen method was simple, quickly, cheap, objective, and it exploits a new way for the evaluation of estrogenic effects of chemicals.

  2. Chemosensitivity of MCF-7 cells to eugenol: release of cytochrome-c and lactate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Al Wafai, Rana; El-Rabih, Warde; Katerji, Meghri; Safi, Remi; El Sabban, Marwan; El-Rifai, Omar; Usta, Julnar

    2017-01-01

    Phytochemicals have been extensively researched for their potential anticancer effects. In previous study, direct exposure of rat liver mitochondria to eugenol main ingredient of clove, uncoupled mitochondria and increased F0F1ATPase activity. In the present study, we further investigated the effects of eugenol on MCF-7 cells in culture. Eugenol demonstrated: a dose-dependent decrease in viability (MTT assay), and proliferation (real time cell analysis) of MCF-7 cells, (EC50: 0.9 mM); an increase in reactive oxygen species; a decrease in ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential (MitoPT JC-1 assay); and a release of cytochrome-c and lactate dehydrogenase (Cytotoxicity Detection Kit PLUS) into culture media at eugenol concentration >EC50. Pretreatment with the antioxidants Trolox and N-acetyl cysteine partially restored cell viability and decreased ROS, with Trolox being more potent. Expression levels of both anti- and pro-apoptotic markers (Bcl-2 and Bax, respectively) decreased with increasing eugenol concentration, with no variation in their relative ratios. Eugenol-treated MCF-7 cells overexpressing Bcl-2 exhibited results similar to those of MCF-7. Our findings indicate that eugenol toxicity is non-apoptotic Bcl-2 independent, affecting mitochondrial function and plasma membrane integrity with no effect on migration or invasion. We report here the chemo-sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to eugenol, a phytochemical with anticancer potential. PMID:28272477

  3. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  4. Photonically engineered incandescent emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2003-08-26

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  5. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Scott; Krainak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  6. Drug Transporter Expression and Activity in Human Hepatoma HuH-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jouan, Elodie; Le Vée, Marc; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Fardel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatoma cells may represent a valuable alternative to the use of human hepatocytes for studying hepatic drug transporters, which is now a regulatory issue during drug development. In the present work, we have characterized hepatic drug transporter expression, activity and regulation in human hepatoma HuH-7 cells, in order to determine the potential relevance of these cells for drug transport assays. HuH-7 cells displayed notable multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) activity, presumed to reflect expression of various hepatic MRPs, including MRP2. By contrast, they failed to display functional activities of the uptake transporters sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) and organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1), and of the canalicular transporters P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Concomitantly, mRNA expressions of various sinusoidal and canalicular hepatic drug transporters were not detected (NTCP, OATP1B1, organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2), OCT1 and bile salt export pump) or were found to be lower (OATP1B3, OATP2B1, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1, BCRP and MRP3) in hepatoma HuH-7 cells than those found in human hepatocytes, whereas other transporters such as OAT7, MRP4 and MRP5 were up-regulated. HuH-7 cells additionally exhibited farnesoid X receptor (FXR)- and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-related up-regulation of some transporters. Such data indicate that HuH-7 cells, although expressing rather poorly some main hepatic drug transporters, may be useful for investigating interactions of drugs with MRPs, notably MRP2, and for studying FXR- or Nrf2-mediated gene regulation. PMID:28036031

  7. Three-dimensional Huh7 cell culture system for the study of Hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Bruno; TenCate, Veronica; Uprichard, Susan L

    2009-01-01

    Background In order to elucidate how Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) interacts with polarized hepatocytes in vivo and how HCV-induced alterations in cellular function contribute to HCV-associated liver disease, a more physiologically relevant hepatocyte culture model is needed. As such, NASA-engineered three-dimensional (3-D) rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors were used in effort to promote differentiation of HCV-permissive Huh7 hepatoma cells. Results When cultured in the RWV, Huh7 cells became morphologically and transcriptionally distinct from more standard Huh7 two-dimensional (2-D) monolayers. Specifically, RWV-cultured Huh7 cells formed complex, multilayered 3-D aggregates in which Phase I and Phase II xenobiotic drug metabolism genes, as well as hepatocyte-specific transcripts (HNF4α, Albumin, TTR and α1AT), were upregulated compared to 2-D cultured Huh7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that these HCV-permissive 3-D cultured Huh7 cells were more polarized than their 2D counterparts with the expression of HCV receptors, cell adhesion and tight junction markers (CD81, scavenger receptor class B member 1, claudin-1, occludin, ZO-1, β-Catenin and E-Cadherin) significantly increased and exhibiting apical, lateral and/or basolateral localization. Conclusion These findings show that when cultured in 3-D, Huh7 cells acquire a more differentiated hepatocyte-like phenotype. Importantly, we show that these 3D cultures are highly permissive for HCV infection, thus providing an opportunity to study HCV entry and the effects of HCV infection on host cell function in a more physiologically relevant cell culture system. PMID:19604376

  8. Resonances in photon-photon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1984-11-01

    A quantity called stickiness is introduced which should be largest for J not equal to 0 glueballs and can be measured in two photon scattering and radiative J/psi decay. An argument is reviewed suggesting that light J = 0 glueballs may have large couplings to two photons. The analysis of radiative decays of eta and eta' is reviewed and a plea made to desist from false claims that they are related to GAMMA(..pi../sup 0/ ..-->.. ..gamma gamma..) by SU(3) symmetry. It is shown that two photon studies can refute the difficult-to-refute hypothesis that xi(2220) or zeta(8320) are Higgs bosons. A gallery of rogue resonances and resonance candidates is presented which would usefully be studied in ..gamma gamma.. scattering, including especially the low mass dipion. 34 references.

  9. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  10. Exponential Localization of Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    1998-06-01

    It is shown that photons can be localized in space with an exponential falloff of the energy density and photodetection rates. The limits of localization are determined by the fundamental Paley-Wiener theorem. A direct mathematical connection between the spatial localization of photons and the decay in time of quantum mechanical systems is established.

  11. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  12. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  13. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  14. Nonlinear Photonics 2014: introduction.

    PubMed

    Akhmediev, N; Kartashov, Yaroslav

    2015-01-12

    International Conference "Nonlinear Photonics-2014" took place in Barcelona, Spain on July 27-31, 2014. It was a part of the "Advanced Photonics Congress" which is becoming a traditional notable event in the world of photonics. The current focus issue of Optics Express contains contributions from the participants of the Conference and the Congress. The articles in this focus issue by no means represent the total number of the congress contributions (around 400). However, it demonstrates wide range of topics covered at the event. The next conference of this series is to be held in 2016 in Australia, which is the home of many researchers working in the field of photonics in general and nonlinear photonics in particular.

  15. A novel photonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a novel oscillator for photonic RF systems. This oscillator is capable of generating high-frequency signals up to 70 GHz in both electrical and optical domains and is a special voltage-controlled oscillator with an optical output port. It can be used to make a phase-locked loop (PLL) and perform all functions that a PLL is capable of for photonic systems. It can be synchronized to a reference source by means of optical injection locking, electrical injection locking, and PLL. It can also be self-phase locked and self-injection locked to generate a high-stability photonic RF reference. Its applications include high-frequency reference regeneration and distribution, high-gain frequency multiplication, comb-frequecy and square-wave generation, carrier recovery, and clock recovery. We anticipate that such photonic voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) will be as important to photonic RF systems as electrical VCOs are to electrical RF systems.

  16. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O'Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  17. Photonic Crystal Fiber Based Entangled Photon Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    at 77K. The HNLF in plastic buffer coating is cooled to 77K by immersing it into a liquid nitrogen filled Dewar. Advancement of photons arrival...collected by using fiber-to-free space coupler (NA=0.25), which is placed closely right after the PBS. The multiple scattering random media is

  18. Using Heterologous COS-7 Cells to Identify Semaphorin-Signaling Components.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Atsuko; Doçi, Colleen L; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2017-01-01

    Semaphorins are a family of membrane-bound and secreted type of proteins which were initially identified as chemorepulsive axon guidance molecules. Plexins and neuropilins are two major receptor families of semaphorins, and their common downstream targets are the actin cytoskeleton and cell-to-extracellular matrix adhesions. Semaphorins promote the collapse of growth cones by inducing rapid changes in the cytoskeleton and disassembly of focal adhesion structures. When transfected with appropriate receptors, non-neuronal COS-7 cells exhibit a similar cell collapse phenotype upon semaphorin stimulation. This heterologous system using COS-7 cells has been developed and widely used to investigate semaphorin-signaling pathways. In this chapter, we describe a COS-7 collapse assay protocol used to identify semaphorin-signaling components and a method to produce recombinant class 3 semaphorin proteins.

  19. Expression of Cryptosporidium parvum thioredoxin peroxidase in COS-7 cells confers radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Hong, Semie; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Yoon, Sejoung; Kim, Kyoungjin; Sim, Seobo; Park, Woo-Yoon; Yu, Jae-Ran

    2016-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is one of the most radioresistant organisms identified to date. In a previous study, we found that thioredoxin peroxidase (CpTPx) was significantly upregulated in this species following exposure to high dose (10 kGy) of γ-irradiation. To assess the potential of CpTPx to confer radioprotection in mammalian cells, it was expressed in COS-7 African green monkey kidney cells (CpTPx-COS7). For comparison, the thioredoxin peroxidase of Cryptosporidium muris (CmTPx) was also expressed in these cells (CmTPx-COS7 cells), which has been confirmed to have lesser antioxidant activity than CpTPx in the previous study. Notably, the survival rates of CpTPx-COS7 cells were significantly higher (12-22%) at 72 h after 8 Gy irradiation than CmTPx-COS7 or non-transfected COS-7 (ntCOS-7) counterparts. In addition, CpTPx revealed a 50% of ROS reduction in irradiated CpTPx-COS7 cells, while γ-H2AX DNA damage marker expression was not significantly changed. Furthermore, the amount of apoptosis only increased to about 120% after 2-8 Gy irradiation compared to 200-300% increase observed in ntCOS-7 cells. CmTPx was shown to have antioxidant and DNA damage protection activities; however, these activities were always lower than those of CpTPx. These results suggest that the potent antioxidant and protective activities of CpTPx are well conserved in this cell-based system and that CpTPx contributed to the radioprotection of mammalian cells through its exceptional antioxidant activity.

  20. The Effect of Melatonin Adsorbed to Polyethylene Glycol Microspheres on the Survival of MCF-7 Cells.

    PubMed

    França, Eduardo Luzía; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina; Fernandes, Rubian Trindade da Silva; Marins, Camila Moreira Ferreira; Pereira, Claudia Cristina de Souza; Varotti, Fernando de Pilla

    2016-01-01

    Although melatonin exhibits oncostatic properties such as antiproliferative effects, the oral bioavailability of this hormone is less than 20%. Modified drug release systems have been used to improve the pharmacological efficiency of drugs. These systems can change the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of the associated drugs. Thus, this study investigated the effect of melatonin adsorbed to polyethylene glycol (PEG) microspheres on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The MCF-7 cells were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection. MCF-7 cells were preincubated for 24 h with or without melatonin (100 ng/ml), PEG microspheres or melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres (100 ng/ml). Viability, intracellular calcium release and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells were determined by flow cytometry. MCF-7 cells incubated with melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres showed a lower viability rate (40.0 ± 8.3 with melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres compared to 54.1 ± 7.3 with melatonin; 81.8 ± 12.5 with PEG microsphere and 92.7 ± 4.1 with medium), increased spontaneous intracellular Ca2+ release (27.0 ± 8.6 with melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres compared to 21.5 ± 13.4 with melatonin; 10.1 ± 5.4 with PEG microsphere and 9.1 ± 5.6 with medium) and increased apoptosis index (51.2 ± 2.7 with melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres compared to 36.0 ± 2.1 with melatonin; 4.9 ± 0.5 with PEG microsphere and 3.1 ± 0.6 with medium). The results indicate that melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres exerts antitumor effects on human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. However, clinical tests must be performed to confirm the use of melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres as an alternative therapy against cancer.

  1. Murine RAW 264.7 cell line as an immune target: are we missing something?

    PubMed

    Merly, Liza; Smith, Sylvia L

    2017-04-01

    The popular murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, is often used to initially screen natural products for bioactivity and to predict their potential effect in vivo or on primary cells. The cell line response is considered to reflect the potential human de novo response, and is used to evaluate the effective bioactivity of the product. Here, we compared the cytokine response of RAW 264.7 cells to shark cartilage (SC) with that of human leukocytes to determine whether the cell line response was a reliable predictor of the cytokine response one can expect from similarly stimulated human primary cells. Results not only revealed significant differences in the nature and level of TNFα produced by cells in vitro, but also showed that while the primary cell response included an upregulation in the production of IL-1β such a response was absent in RAW 264.7 cells. This suggests that had we relied on RAW 264.7 cells alone to assess the cytokine-inducing capacity of SC, the comprehensive Th1 response (shown in an earlier study) induced by SC in primary cells, consisting of release of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, would not have been revealed. We conclude, therefore, that assays using only RAW 264.7 cells to initially screen for and assess immune reactivity of test products will not necessarily provide a comprehensive picture of the immunomodulatory properties of the substance under investigation, and can in fact be misleading with regard to the overall bioactive potential of the substance on an initial screen.

  2. Long-Term Alteration of Reactive Oxygen Species Led to Multidrug Resistance in MCF-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Juan; Zhang, Li; Liu, Fangfang

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in multidrug resistance (MDR). This study aimed to investigate the effects of long-term ROS alteration on MDR in MCF-7 cells and to explore its underlying mechanism. Our study showed both long-term treatments of H2O2 and glutathione (GSH) led to MDR with suppressed iROS levels in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, the MDR cells induced by 0.1 μM H2O2 treatment for 20 weeks (MCF-7/ROS cells) had a higher viability and proliferative ability than the control MCF-7 cells. MCF-7/ROS cells also showed higher activity or content of intracellular antioxidants like glutathione peroxidase (GPx), GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). Importantly, MCF-7/ROS cells were characterized by overexpression of MDR-related protein 1 (MRP1) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp), as well as their regulators NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α), and the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in upstream. Moreover, several typical MDR mediators, including glutathione S-transferase-π (GST-π) and c-Myc and Protein Kinase Cα (PKCα), were also found to be upregulated in MCF-7/ROS cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ROS may be critical in the generation of MDR, which may provide new insights into understanding of mechanisms of MDR. PMID:28058088

  3. Amplification of rabbit hepatocyte growth factor and detection of its expression in COS-7 cell line.

    PubMed

    Yao, H; Han, J; Wang, J; Wang, L; Gong, C; Li, L; Liang, Z; Tian, Y

    2015-11-25

    We used RT-PCR, nested PCR to acquire the partial 5'- race fragment of rabbit HGF cDNA and the partial 3'- race fragment of rabbit HGF cDNA. Then, we used recombination PCR to acquire rabbit HGF successfully. Homology analysis was conducted among the sequence of RABHGF and known human and rat HGF by DNAStar. It was proved that high level of homology existed among the sequences of those three HGF genes. We used the acquired gene of RABHGF to construct its recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+)-RABHGF (pRABHGF). The identification of the eukaryotic expression vector pRABHGF by PCR, restriction enzyme and sequencing analysis showed that rabbit HGF gene was correctly inserted into the vector. pRABHGF and pcDNA3.1(+) as controls were transfected into COS-7 cells by lipofectamine. It takes 24h-36h after transfection to detect the expression of RABHGF protein by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The proliferation of cos-7 cells were evaluated by MTT assay. The result displayed positive effect of RABHGF protein on the proliferation of COS-7 cells. This study lays the foundation for a new gene therapy method for ischemic heart disease.

  4. Troglitazone enhances tamoxifen-induced growth inhibitory activity of MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hong-Nu; Noh, Eun-Mi; Lee, Young-Rae; Roh, Si-Gyun; Song, Eun-Kyung; Han, Myung-Kwan; Lee, Yong-Chul; Shim, In Kyong; Lee, Seung Jin; Jung, Sung Hoo; Kim, Jong-Suk Youn, Hyun Jo

    2008-12-05

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) ligands have been identified as a potential source of therapy for human cancers. However, PPAR{gamma} ligands have a limitation for breast cancer therapy, since estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{sub {alpha}}) negatively interferes with PPAR{gamma} signaling in breast cancer cells. Here we show that ER{sub {alpha}} inhihits PPAR{gamma} transactivity and ER{sub {alpha}}-mediated inhibition of PPAR{gamma} transactivity is blocked by tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor blocker. The activation of ER{sub {alpha}} with 17-{beta}-estradiol blocked PPRE transactivity induced by troglitazone, a PPAR{gamma} ligand, indicating the resistance of ER{sub {alpha}}-positive breast cancer cells to troglitazone. Indeed, troglitazone inhibited the growth of ER{sub {alpha}}-negative MDA-MB-231 cells more than that of ER{sub {alpha}}-positive MCF-7 cells. Combination of troglitazone with tamoxifen led to a marked increase in growth inhibition of ER{sub {alpha}}-positive MCF-7 cells compared to either agent alone. Our data indicates that troglitazone enhances the growth inhibitory activity of tamoxifen in ER{sub {alpha}}-positive MCF-7 cells.

  5. Downregulation of SOK1 promotes the migration of MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xu-Dong; Cho, Chien-Yu

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} SOK1 is a member of GCK-III subfamily. It is activated by oxidative stress or chemical anoxia. {yields} Barr's group have found that autophosphorylation of SOK1 is triggered by binding to the Golgi matrix protein GM130 and made the cells migration through dimeric adaptor protein 14-3-3. {yields} But what we found is that downregulation of SOK1 promotes cell migration and leads to the upregulation of GM130 and Tyr861 of FAK in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: SOK1 is a member of the germinal center kinase (GCK-III) subfamily but little is known about it, particularly with respect to its role in signal transduction pathways relative to tumor metastasis. By stably transfecting SOK1 siRNA into the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line we found that SOK1 promotes the migration of MCF-7 cells, as determined using wound-healing and Boyden chamber assays. However, cell proliferation assays revealed that silencing SOK1 had no effect on cell growth relative to the normal cells. Silencing SOK1 also had an effect on the expression and phosphorylation status of a number of proteins in MCF-7 cells, including FAK and GM130, whereby a decrease in SOK1 led to an increase in the expression of these proteins.

  6. Caffeine prevents LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Kui-Jin; Ryu, Su-Jung; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2016-03-25

    Caffeine is a white crystalline xanthine alkaloid found in the seeds of coffee plants and leaves of the tea bush. In this study, we evaluated whether caffeine exerts anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. RAW264.7 cells were treated with various concentrations of caffeine in the presence or absence of LPS. Caffeine decreased the LPS-induced inflammatory mediator, nitric oxide (NO). Caffeine treatment also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-3, IL-6 and IL-12, and decreased both IL-6 secretion and phosphorylated p38MAPK expression in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Caffeine inhibited nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) via IκBα phosphorylation. In addition, caffeine inhibited LPS-induced NO production in zebrafish. These results suggest that caffeine may suppress LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells by regulating NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation.

  7. Direct Photons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor,D.

    2008-07-29

    Direct photons are ideal tools to investigate kinematical and thermodynamical conditions of heavy ion collisions since they are emitted from all stages of the collision and once produced they leave the interaction region without further modification by the medium. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured direct photon production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV over a wide transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range. The p+p measurements allow a fundamental test of QCD, and serve as a baseline when we try to disentangle more complex mechanisms producing high p{sub T} direct photons in Au+Au. As for thermal photons in Au+Au we overcome the difficulties due to the large background from hadronic decays by measuring 'almost real' virtual photons which appear as low invariant mass e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs: a significant excess of direct photons is measured above the above next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. Additional insights on the origin of direct photons can be gained with the study of the azimuthal anisotropy which benefits from the increased statistics and reaction plane resolution achieved in RHIC Year-7 data.

  8. Photon detector system

    DOEpatents

    Ekstrom, Philip A.

    1981-01-01

    A photon detector includes a semiconductor device, such as a Schottky barrier diode, which has an avalanche breakdown characteristic. The diode is cooled to cryogenic temperatures to eliminate thermally generated charge carriers from the device. The diode is then biased to a voltage level exceeding the avalanche breakdown threshold level such that, upon receipt of a photon, avalanche breakdown occurs. This breakdown is detected by appropriate circuitry which thereafter reduces the diode bias potential to a level below the avalanche breakdown threshold level to terminate the avalanche condition. Subsequently, the bias potential is reapplied to the diode in preparation for detection of a subsequently received photon.

  9. Photonics: Technology project summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  10. Integrated photonics research, 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberberg, Yaron

    1994-06-01

    Summaries of papers from the Integrated Photonics Research Topical Meeting, March 22-24, 1993, in Palm Springs, California are presented. Sessions include Novel Material and Devices, Time Domain Methods, Photonic Circuits and Lightwave Reception, III-V Semiconductor Switches and Modulators, Wavelength Selective Components, Optical Waveguide Simulators, Optical Switching, Silica on Silicon, Nonlinear Wave Propagation, Semiconductor Lasers, LiNbO3 and LiTaO3 Devices, Beam Propagation Methods, Photonic Integrated Circuits and Applications, Semiconductor Device Modeling, Waveguide Frequency Conversion, and Spatial and Temporal Solitons.

  11. Effect of polarization entanglement in photon-photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätzel, Dennis; Wilkens, Martin; Menzel, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    It is found that the differential cross section of photon-photon scattering is a function of the degree of polarization entanglement of the two-photon state. A reduced general expression for the differential cross section of photon-photon scattering is derived by applying simple symmetry arguments. An explicit expression is obtained for the example of photon-photon scattering due to virtual electron-positron pairs in quantum electrodynamics. It is shown how the effect in this explicit example can be explained as an effect of quantum interference and that it fits with the idea of distance-dependent forces.

  12. Microwave background constraints on mixing of photons with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Redondo, Javier; Sigl, Guenter E-mail: javier.redondo@desy.de

    2009-03-15

    Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of hidden photons kinetically mixing with the ordinary photon. This mixing leads to oscillations between photons and hidden photons, analogous to the observed oscillations between different neutrino flavors. In this context, we derive new bounds on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameters using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. Requiring the distortions of the CMB induced by the photon-hidden photon mixing to be smaller than experimental upper limits, this leads to a bound on the mixing angle {chi}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup -7}-10{sup -5} for hidden photon masses between 10{sup -14} eV and 10{sup -7} eV. This low-mass and low-mixing region of the hidden photon parameter space was previously unconstrained.

  13. New results for a photon-photon collider

    SciTech Connect

    David Asner et al.

    2002-09-26

    We present new results from studies in progress on physics at a two-photon collider. We report on the sensitivity to top squark parameters of MSSM Higgs boson production in two-photon collisions; Higgs boson decay to two photons; radion production in models of warped extra dimensions; chargino pair production; sensitivity to the trilinear Higgs boson coupling; charged Higgs boson pair production; and we discuss the backgrounds produced by resolved photon-photon interactions.

  14. Smart packaging for photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Carson, R.F.; Sullivan, C.T.; McClellan, G.; Palmer, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Unlike silicon microelectronics, photonics packaging has proven to be low yield and expensive. One approach to make photonics packaging practical for low cost applications is the use of {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} packages. {open_quotes}Smart{close_quotes} in this context means the ability of the package to actuate a mechanical change based on either a measurement taken by the package itself or by an input signal based on an external measurement. One avenue of smart photonics packaging, the use of polysilicon micromechanical devices integrated with photonic waveguides, was investigated in this research (LDRD 3505.340). The integration of optical components with polysilicon surface micromechanical actuation mechanisms shows significant promise for signal switching, fiber alignment, and optical sensing applications. The optical and stress properties of the oxides and nitrides considered for optical waveguides and how they are integrated with micromechanical devices were investigated.

  15. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  16. Photonics Explorer: revolutionizing photonics in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie; Cords, Nina; Fischer, Robert; Vlekken, Johan; Euler, Manfred; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-10-01

    The `Photonics Explorer' is a unique intra-curricular optics kit designed to engage, excite and educate secondary school students about the fascination of working with light - hands-on, in their own classrooms. Developed with a pan European collaboration of experts, the kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental material provided within a supporting didactic framework, distributed in conjunction with teacher training courses. The material has been specifically designed to integrate into European science curricula. Each kit contains robust and versatile components sufficient for a class of 25-30 students to work in groups of 2-3. The didactic content is based on guided inquiry-based learning (IBL) techniques with a strong emphasis on hands-on experiments, team work and relating abstract concepts to real world applications. The content has been developed in conjunction with over 30 teachers and experts in pedagogy to ensure high quality and ease of integration. It is currently available in 7 European languages. The Photonics Explorer allows students not only to hone their essential scientific skills but also to really work as scientists and engineers in the classroom. Thus, it aims to encourage more young people to pursue scientific careers and avert the imminent lack of scientific workforce in Europe. 50 Photonics Explorer kits have been successfully tested in 7 European countries with over 1500 secondary school students. The positive impact of the kit in the classroom has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated. A non-profit organisation, EYESTvzw [Excite Youth for Engineering Science and Technology], is responsible for the large scale distribution of the Photonics Explorer.

  17. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    passive and active versions of each fiber designed under this task. Crystal Fibre shall provide characteristics of the fiber fabricated to include core...passive version of multicore fiber iteration 2. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Laser physics, Fibre Lasers, Photonic Crystal, Multicore, Fiber Laser 16...9 00* 0 " CRYSTAL FIBRE INT ODUCTION This report describes the photonic crystal fibers developed under agreement No FA8655-o5-a- 3046. All

  18. Happy centenary, photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton; Weihs, Gregor; Jennewein, Thomas; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2005-01-01

    One hundred years ago Albert Einstein introduced the concept of the photon. Although in the early years after 1905 the evidence for the quantum nature of light was not compelling, modern experiments - especially those using photon pairs - have beautifully confirmed its corpuscular character. Research on the quantum properties of light (quantum optics) triggered the evolution of the whole field of quantum information processing, which now promises new technology, such as quantum cryptography and even quantum computers.

  19. Ultrastable Multigigahertz Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Novel photonic oscillator developed to serve as ultrastable source of microwave and millimeter-wave signals. In system, oscillations generated photonically, then converted to electronic form. Includes self-mode-locked semiconductor laser producing stream of pulses, detected and fed back to laser as input. System also includes fiber-optic-delay-line discriminator, which detects fluctuations of self-mode-locking frequency and generates error signal used in negative-feedback loop to stabilize pulse-repetition frequency.

  20. Photonic quantum technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeremy

    2013-03-01

    Of the approaches to quantum computing, photons are appealing for their low-noise properties and ease of manipulation, and relevance to other quantum technologies, including communication, metrology and measurement. We report an integrated waveguide approach to photonic quantum circuits for high performance, miniaturization and scalability [6-10]. We address the challenges of scaling up quantum circuits using new insights into how controlled operations can be efficiently realised, demonstrating Shor's algorithm with consecutive CNOT gates and the iterative phase estimation algorithm. We have shown how quantum circuits can be reconfigured, using thermo-optic phase shifters to realise a highly reconfigurable quantum circuit, and electro-optic phase shifters in lithium niobate to rapidly manipulate the path and polarisation of telecomm wavelength single photons. We have addressed miniaturisation using multimode interference architectures to directly implement NxN Hadamard operations, and by using high refractive index contrast materials such as SiOxNy, in which we have implemented quantum walks of correlated photons, and Si, in which we have demonstrated generation of orbital angular momentum states of light. We have incorporated microfluidic channels for the delivery of samples to measure the concentration of a blood protein with entangled states of light. We have begun to address the integration of superconducting single photon detectors and diamond and non-linear single photon sources. Finally, we give an overview of recent work on fundamental aspects of quantum measurement, including a quantum version of Wheeler's delayed choice experiment.

  1. Virtual and real photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenberg, Andrew, Jr.

    2011-09-01

    Maxwell did not believe in photons. However, his equations lead to electro-magnetic field structures that are considered to be photonic by Quantum ElectroDynamics (QED). They are complete, relativistically correct, and unchallenged after nearly 150 years. However, even though his far-field solution has been considered as the basis for photons, as they stand and are interpreted, they are better fitted to the concept of virtual rather than to real photons. Comparison between staticcharge fields, near-field coupling, and photonic radiation will be made and the distinctions identified. The question of similarities in, and differences between, the two will be addressed. Implied assumptions in Feynman's "Lectures" could lead one to believe that he had provided a general classical electrodynamics proof that an orbital electron must radiate. While his derivation is correct, two of the conditions defined do not always apply in this case. As a result, the potential for misinterpretation of his proof (as he himself did earlier) for this particular case has some interesting implications. He did not make the distinction between radiation from a bound electron driven by an external alternating field and one falling in a nuclear potential. Similar failures lead to misinterpreting the differences between virtual and real photons.

  2. Photonic band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonovitch, E.

    1993-05-01

    We learned how to create 3-dimensionally periodic dielectric structures which are to photon waves, as semiconductor crystals are to electron waves. That is, these photonic crystals have a photonic bandgap, a band of frequencies in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, irrespective of propagation direction in space. Photonic bandgaps provide for spontaneous emission inhibition and allow for a new class of electromagnetic micro-cavities. If the perfect 3-dimensional periodicity is broken by a local defect, then local electromagnetic modes can occur within the forbidden bandgap. The addition of extra dielectric material locally, inside the photonic crystal, produces {open_quotes}donor{close_quotes} modes. Conversely, the local removal of dielectric material from the photonic crystal produces {open_quotes}acceptor{close_quotes} modes. Therefore, it will now be possible to make high-Q electromagnetic cavities of volume {approx_lt}1 cubic wavelength, for short wavelengths at which metallic cavities are useless. These new dielectric micro-resonators can cover the range all the way from millimeter waves, down to ultraviolet wavelengths.

  3. Apigenin induced MCF-7 cell apoptosis-associated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haihua; Jin, Hua; Yang, Fen; Zhu, Haiyan; Cai, Jiye

    2014-01-01

    Apigenin is a flavonoid, which has been proved to possess effective anti-cancer bioactivities against variety of cell lines. However, little is known about its effect on the cell-surface and the interaction between cell-surface and the reacting drug. In this study, human breast cancer line (MCF-7) was selected to be as a cell model to investigate the effects of apigenin on cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, cellular morphology, etc. MTT assay showed that the growth inhibition induced by apigenin was in a dose-dependent manner when treated with different concentrations of apigenin while had little cytotoxic effects on human normal cells (MCF-10A). Fluorescence-based flow cytometry was used to detect cellular apoptosis and ROS production. The results showed that 80 µM apigenin could effectively induce apoptosis and overproduction of ROS in MCF-7 cells. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was utilized to detect the shapes and membrane structures of MCF-7 cells at cellular or subcellular level. The results showed that the control MCF-7 cells presented typical elongated-spindle shapes with abundant pseudopodia, while after treated with apigenin, the cells shrunk and became round, the pseudopodia diminished. Moreover, the images of ultrastructure indicated that the cell membrane was composed of nanoparticles of 49 nm, but with the treated concentrations of apigenin increasing, the sizes of membrane particles significantly increased to 400 nm. These results can improve our understanding of apigenin, which can be potentially developed as a new agent for treatment of cancers.

  4. Copper ferrite nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws

    2016-06-01

    Copper ferrite (CuFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) are important magnetic materials currently under research due to their applicability in nanomedicine. However, information concerning the biological interaction of copper ferrite NPs is largely lacking. In this study, we investigated the cellular response of copper ferrite NPs in human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. Copper ferrite NPs were prepared by co-precipitation technique with the thermal effect. Prepared NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Characterization data showed that copper ferrite NPs were crystalline, spherical with smooth surfaces and average diameter of 15nm. Biochemical studies showed that copper ferrite NPs induce cell viability reduction and membrane damage in MCF-7 cells and degree of induction was dose- and time-dependent. High SubG1 cell population during cell cycle progression and MMP loss with a concomitant up-regulation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 genes suggested that copper ferrite NP-induced cell death through mitochondrial pathway. Copper ferrite NP was also found to induce oxidative stress in MCF-7 cells as indicated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and glutathione depletion. Cytotoxicity due to copper ferrite NPs exposure was effectively abrogated by N-acetyl-cysteine (ROS scavenger) suggesting that oxidative stress could be the plausible mechanism of copper ferrite NPs toxicity. Further studies are underway to explore the toxicity mechanisms of copper ferrite NPs in different types of human cells. This study warrants further generation of extensive biointeraction data before their application in nanomedicine.

  5. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; de Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-11-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources.

  6. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources. PMID:24186400

  7. Photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect in photon-phonon interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Enbang; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Fang, Kejie; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect is one of the most intriguing phenomena in both classical and quantum physics, and associates with a number of important and fundamental issues in quantum mechanics. The Aharonov-Bohm effects of charged particles have been experimentally demonstrated and found applications in various fields. Recently, attention has also focused on the Aharonov-Bohm effect for neutral particles, such as photons. Here we propose to utilize the photon-phonon interactions to demonstrate that photonic Aharonov-Bohm effects do exist for photons. By introducing nonreciprocal phases for photons, we observe experimentally a gauge potential for photons in the visible range based on the photon-phonon interactions in acousto-optic crystals, and demonstrate the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect. The results presented here point to new possibilities to control and manipulate photons by designing an effective gauge potential.

  8. Improving the reproducibility of the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay for the detection of xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Payne, J; Jones, C; Lakhani, S; Kortenkamp, A

    2000-03-29

    The MCF-7 cell proliferation assay is potentially a simple and highly reproducible tool for the identification of estrogenic compounds. However, its widespread use has been complicated by the lack of a standardised protocol, resulting in considerable inter-laboratory variability. We have explored the sources of variability both in relation to cell lines and test regimens and report on optimised procedures for the identification of estrogenic agents. Two supposedly identical MCF-7 parent cell lines (designated UCL and SOP), and the BUS subline were cultured according to an existing protocol, and responses to 17-estradiol (E2) assessed. Despite yielding almost identical EC50 values, the proliferative response varied widely between cell lines from 0.98-fold over controls (UCL) to 8.9-fold (BUS) indicating major differences between them. The underlying causes may be genetic, and to assess this we used comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH), a technique which allows the detection of DNA sequence copy number changes on a genome-wide scale. Although numerous similarities existed between the different cell lines, the least oestrogen-responsive line (MCF-7/UCL) exhibited the greatest number of cytogenetic changes, many of which were not seen in MCF-7/SOP cells. We suggest that care must be taken, therefore, when choosing a cell line for MCF-7 cell-based experiments. Selecting the MCF-7/SOP line for further work, we carried out a thorough and systematic optimisation of the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, finding that a 72-h period in oestrogen-free medium before treatment strongly influenced the cells response to E2. With 1 nM E2, proliferation increased from 1.5-fold to 6.5-fold relative to vehicle-treated controls, a response similar to that seen with MCF-7/BUS cells in the E-SCREEN protocol devised by Soto et al. With parent MCF-7 cells, other laboratories have reported only 4.5-fold increases as maximal. Here we present evidence that the choice of cell line and culture

  9. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  10. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  11. Hollow core and other infrared waveguides for instrumentation in intense radiation environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this LDRD was to study the effect of steady-state neutron and gamma irradiation on the transmission of waveguides designed to operate well in the near- or mid-IR region of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this context, near-IR refers to the region between 1.3 {mu}m and about 2.4 {mu}m, and mid-IR between 3.0 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m. Such radiation environments could exist in nuclear power plants or nuclear weapons. Pulsed and steady-state radiation effects had been extensively studied on silica-based optical fibers because they have been the most readily available, most widely used in communications and sensing, and the least expensive. However, silica-based fibers do not transmit well beyond about 1.8 {mu}m and they are virtually opaque in the mid-IR. The mid-IR, as defined above, and beyond, is where vibrational spectroscopy is carried out. This type of sensing is one important application of infrared optical fibers.

  12. Diffusion of Rubidium Vapor through Hollow-Core Fibers for Gas-Phased Fiber-Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    is used to collisionally relax the electron to the 2P1/2 excited (D1) state. If a population inversion is present on the D1 level, the system will...ends with flowing chilled water. Buffer gases are introduced to collisionally relax the excited electrons from the 2P3/2 state to the 2P1/2 state. heat...Creating a DPAL system within a fiber would create an abundant number of collisions between the alkali atoms and the fiber walls, which would broaden the

  13. Singlet Oxygen Delivery Through the Porous Cap of a Hollow-Core Fiber Optic Device†

    PubMed Central

    Zamadar, Matibur; Aebisher, David

    2012-01-01

    The development of the first photosensitizer/fiber optic device is reported. An oxygen-flowing fiber-capped configuration is used for the application of heterogeneous, spatially confined singlet oxygen delivery in aqueous media. This is a unique device, unlike other heterogeneous photosensitizers, in which local concentrations of singlet oxygen can be delivered via introduction and withdrawal of the fiber tip. PMID:19929010

  14. Design of the low-loss wide bandwidth hollow-core terahertz inhibited coupling fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Yang, Bo; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Weiwei

    2015-05-01

    A multi-perspective numerical analysis of propagation loss in inhibited coupling fibers (ICFs) in terahertz (THz) band is presented. It is shown that the core boundary strut shape is a critical factor affecting the confinement loss. The simulation results demonstrate that the closer to a circular arc the struts, the lower the confinement loss. Furthermore, the strut thickness and the material refractive index determine the frequencies and the bandwidths of the low loss region. With the decrease of the strut thickness and material refractive index, the low loss region will be shifted toward the higher frequency, and the widths of low loss regions will be broadened. Besides, when material absorption is considered in simulation, the ICFs averaged propagation loss is still about three orders of magnitude lower than the material absorption loss itself. The conclusions could give valuable guidance for the design and fabrication of THz ICFs.

  15. Effect of Ag Templates on the Formation of Au-Ag Hollow/Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shih-Yun; Song, Jenn-Ming; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Au-Ag alloy nanostructures with various shapes were synthesized using a successive reduction method in this study. By means of galvanic replacement, twined Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and single-crystalline Ag nanowires (NWs) were adopted as templates, respectively, and alloyed with the same amount of Au(+) ions. High angle annular dark field-scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images observed from different rotation angles confirm that Ag NPs turned into AuAg alloy rings with an Au/Ag ratio of 1. The shifts of surface plasmon resonance and chemical composition reveal the evolution of the alloy ring formation. On the other hand, single-crystalline Ag NWs became Ag@AuAg core-shell wires instead of hollow nanostructure through a process of galvanic replacement. It is proposed that in addition to the ratio of Ag templates and Au ion additives, the twin boundaries of the Ag templates were the dominating factor causing hollow alloy nanostructures.

  16. Ultra-Low Loss, Chip-Based Hollow-Core Waveguide Using High-Contrast Grating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-28

    also the first experimental verification for 2D HCG-HW design using the 1D w- k diagram for HCG-HCW [8] and the effective index method [9] to this new...cladding are defined by different HCG parameters to provide lateral confinement. b, Ray optics illustration for a I D slab HCG-HCW. k vector is decomposed...into the propagation constant k , and transverse component kx. 8 is the angle between k and k :· d is the waveguide height, and E indicates the

  17. The Hollow Core: Failure of the General Education Curriculum. A Fifty College Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latzer, Barry

    2004-01-01

    This report provides empirical proof of a disturbing trend in higher education. Over the last several decades colleges and universities have substituted so-called "distribution requirements" for a solid core curriculum. Distribution requirements enable students freely to choose their general education courses, the courses outside their…

  18. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chunle; Bell, Bryn; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2016-09-01

    Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon) and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  19. Two-photon interference with non-identical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbin; Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Hui; Li, Fu-li; Xu, Zhuo

    2015-11-01

    Two-photon interference with non-identical photons is studied based on the superposition principle in Feynman's path integral theory. The second-order temporal interference pattern is observed by superposing laser and pseudothermal light beams with different spectra. The reason why there is two-photon interference for photons of different spectra is that non-identical photons can be indistinguishable for the detection system when Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is taken into account. These studies are helpful to understand the second-order interference of light in the language of photons.

  20. Observing Photons in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Martin C. E.; Pauluhn, Anuschka; Timothy, J. Gethyn

    This first chapter of the book "Observing Photons in Space" serves to illustrate the rewards of observing photons in space, to state our aims, and to introduce the structure and the conventions used. The title of the book reflects the history of space astronomy: it started at the high-energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum, where the photon aspect of the radiation dominates. Nevertheless, both the wave and the photon aspects of this radiation will be considered extensively. In this first chapter we describe the arduous efforts that were needed before observations from pointed, stable platforms, lifted by rocket above the Earth"s atmosphere, became the matter of course they seem to be today. This exemplifies the direct link between technical effort -- including proper design, construction, testing and calibration -- and some of the early fundamental insights gained from space observations. We further report in some detail the pioneering work of the early space astronomers, who started with the study of γ- and X-rays as well as ultraviolet photons. We also show how efforts to observe from space platforms in the visible, infrared, sub-millimetre and microwave domains developed and led to today"s emphasis on observations at long wavelengths.

  1. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  2. Photonics for life.

    PubMed

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Bassi, Andrea; Comelli, Daniela; Cova, Sergio; Farina, Andrea; Ghioni, Massimo; Rech, Ivan; Pifferi, Antonio; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto; Valentini, Gianluca; Zappa, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Light is strictly connected with life, and its presence is fundamental for any living environment. Thus, many biological mechanisms are related to light interaction or can be evaluated through processes involving energy exchange with photons. Optics has always been a precious tool to evaluate molecular and cellular mechanisms, but the discovery of lasers opened new pathways of interactions of light with biological matter, pushing an impressive development for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in biomedicine. The use of light in different fields has become so widespread that the word photonics has been utilized to identify all the applications related to processes where the light is involved. The photonics area covers a wide range of wavelengths spanning from soft X-rays to mid-infrared and includes all devices related to photons as light sources, optical fibers and light guides, detectors, and all the related electronic equipment. The recent use of photons in the field of telecommunications has pushed the technology toward low-cost, compact, and efficient devices, making them available for many other applications, including those related to biology and medicine where these requirements are of particular relevance. Moreover, basic sciences such as physics, chemistry, mathematics, and electronics have recognized the interdisciplinary need of biomedical science and are translating the most advanced researches into these fields. The Politecnico school has pioneered many of them,and this article reviews the state of the art of biomedical research at the Politecnico in the field internationally known as biophotonics.

  3. Gravitation, photons, clocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okun, L. B.; Selivanov, K. G.; Telegdi, V.

    1999-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the classical phenomenon of gravitational red shift, the decrease in the measured frequency of a photon moving away from a gravitating body (e.g., the Earth) of the two current interpretations, one is that at higher altitudes the frequency-measuring clocks (atoms or atomic nuclei) run faster, i.e., their characteristic frequencies are higher, while the photon frequency in a static gravitational field is independent of the altitude and so the photon only reddens relative to the clocks. The other approach is that the photon reddens because it loses the energy when overcoming the attraction of the gravitational field. This view, which is especially widespread in popular science literature, ascribes such notions as a "gravitational mass" and "potential energy" to the photon. Unfortunately, also scientific papers and serious books on the general theory of relativity often employ the second interpretation as a "graphic" illustration of mathematically immaculate results. The authors show that this approach is misleading and only serves to create confusion in a simple subject.

  4. Antigravity Acts on Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2002-04-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity assumes that photons don't change frequency as they move from Sun to Earth. This assumption is correct in classical physics. All experiments proving the general relativity are in the domain of classical physics. This include the tests by Pound et al. of the gravitational redshift of 14.4 keV photons; the rocket experiments by Vessot et al.; the Galileo solar redshift experiments by Krisher et al.; the gravitational deflection of light experiments by Riveros and Vucetich; and delay of echoes of radar signals passing close to Sun as observed by Shapiro et al. Bohr's correspondence principle assures that quantum mechanical theory of general relativity agrees with Einstein's classical theory when frequency and gravitational field gradient approach zero, or when photons cannot interact with the gravitational field. When we treat photons as quantum mechanical particles; we find that gravitational force on photons is reversed (antigravity). This modified theory contradicts the equivalence principle, but is consistent with all experiments. Solar lines and distant stars are redshifted in accordance with author's plasma redshift theory. These changes result in a beautiful consistent cosmology.

  5. Melittin inhibits the invasion of MCF-7 cells by downregulating CD147 and MMP-9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianjun; Li, Fengyu; Tan, Jiang; Peng, Xuewei; Sun, Lili; Wang, Ping; Jia, Shengnan; Yu, Qingmiao; Huo, Hongliang; Zhao, Hongyan

    2017-01-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis are the critical steps in determining the aggressive phenotype of human cancers. Melittin, a major component of bee venom, has been reported to induce apoptosis in several cancer cells. However, the mechanisms of melittin involvement in cancer invasion and metastasis remain unclear. Our previous study indicated that melittin inhibits cyclophilin A (CypA), a ubiquitously distributed peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase, in macrophage cells. In the present study, the Transwell assay results showed that melittin may downregulate the invasion level of MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, it was also found, using flow cytometry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, that melittin decreased the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)147 and matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9), whereas CypA upregulated the expression of CD147 and MMP-9. Overall, the present study indicated that melittin decreased the invasion level of MCF-7 cells by downregulating CD147 and MMP-9 by inhibiting CypA expression. The results of the present study provide an evidence for melittin in anticancer therapy and mechanisms. PMID:28356935

  6. Effects of Environmental Pollutants on MCF-7 Cells: A Metabolic Approach.

    PubMed

    Norberto, Sónia; Calhau, Conceição; Pestana, Diogo; Faria, Ana

    2017-02-01

    Several environmental pollutants (EPs) have been associated with biological and molecular processes leading to adverse human health effects, including different types of cancer. Nevertheless, the effects exerted on tumor glucose metabolism are unclear. To evaluate the effects on cellular and molecular mechanisms, namely glucose metabolism, MCF-7 cells were exposed to EPs during short- and long-term exposures. The effect of both, organochlorine pesticides and plasticizing agents, on glucose uptake by MCF-7 cells was not dose-dependent and was affected by time of exposure. The ΣHCH and BPA increased glucose uptake after 20 min. Long-term exposure to 250 nM of organochlorine pesticides (p,p'-DDE and ΣHCH) and BPA increased cell proliferation. However, only the organochlorine pesticides were able to increase lactate production, without a concomitant higher glucose uptake or glycolytic enzymes transcription. Given their distinct persistent profiles, the biological significance of their exposure should be considered accordingly. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 366-375, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Subunit profiling and functional characteristics of acetylcholine receptors in GT1-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yuki; Ishii, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Makito; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2017-03-01

    GnRH neurons form a final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Although the involvement of acetylcholine in GnRH secretion has been reported, direct effects of acetylcholine and expression profiles of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) still remain to be studied. Using immortalized GnRH neurons (GT1-7 cells), we analyzed molecular expression and functionality of AChRs. Expression of the mRNAs were identified in the order α7 > β2 = β1 ≧ α4 ≧ α5 = β4 = δ > α3 for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits and m4 > m2 for muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes. Furthermore, this study revealed that α7 nAChRs contributed to Ca(2+) influx and GnRH release and that m2 and m4 mAChRs inhibited forskolin-induced cAMP production and isobutylmethylxanthine-induced GnRH secretion. These findings demonstrate the molecular profiles of AChRs, which directly contribute to GnRH secretion in GT1-7 cells, and provide one possible regulatory action of acetylcholine in GnRH neurons.

  8. The JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 inhibits hepatitis A virus replication in Huh7 cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Saito, Kengo; Nakamura, Masato; Wu, Shuang; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Sakamoto, Naoya; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-03-20

    The JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 has been reported to inhibit La protein expression. We previously demonstrated that the inhibition of La expression could inhibit hepatitis A virus (HAV) internal ribosomal entry-site (IRES)-mediated translation and HAV replication in vitro. In this study, we analyzed the effects of AZD1480 on HAV IRES-mediated translation and replication. HAV IRES-mediated translation in COS7-HAV-IRES cells was inhibited by 0.1-1 μM AZD1480, a dosage that did not affect cell viability. Results showed a significant reduction in intracellular HAV HA11-1299 genotype IIIA RNA levels in Huh7 cells treated with AZD1480. Furthermore, AZD1480 inhibited the expression of phosphorylated-(Tyr-705)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and La in Huh7 cells. Therefore, we propose that AZD1480 can inhibit HAV IRES activity and HAV replication through the inhibition of the La protein.

  9. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements of MCF7 cells adhesion in confined micro-environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vitis, Stefania; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Malara, Natalia; Perozziello, Gerardo; Dattola, Elisabetta; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Undoubtedly cells can perceive the external environment, not only from a biochemical point of view with the related signalling pathways, but also from a physical and topographical perspective. In this sense controlled three dimensional micro-structures as well as patterns at the nano-scale can affect and guide the cell evolution and proliferation, due to the fact that the surrounding environment is no longer isotropic (like the flat surfaces of standard cell culturing) but possesses well defined symmetries and anisotropies. In this work regular arrays of silicon micro-pillars with hexagonal arrangement are used as culturing substrates for MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The characteristic size and spacing of the pillars are tens of microns, comparable with MCF-7 cell dimensions and then well suited to induce acceptable external stimuli. It is shown that these cells strongly modify their morphology for adapting themselves to the micro-structured landscape, by means of protrusions from the main body of the cell. Scanning electron microscopy along with both Raman micro-spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy are used for topographical and biochemical studies of the new cell arrangement. We have revealed that single MCF-7 cells exploit their capability to produce invadopodia, usually generated to invade the neighboring tissue in metastatic activity, for spanning and growing across separate pillars.

  10. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Erdosteine in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Sun; Park, Mi-Young; Cho, Young-Jae; Lee, Jae Ho; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Lee, Choon-Taek; Lee, Sang-Min

    2016-08-01

    Erdosteine is widely used as a mucolytic agent and also has free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities. However, little is known about the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory effect of erdosteine. We investigated the effect of erdosteine on the activation of the nuclear factor (NF)-kB/inhibitor of NFkB (IkB), and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt pathways in the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Cultured RAW 264.7 cells were pretreated with erdosteine and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In Western blotting, pretreatment with erdosteine inhibited the IkBα degradation induced in RAW 264.7 cells by LPS. LPS-induced IkB kinase (IKK) activity and NF-kB transcription were inhibited by pretreatment with erdosteine. Production of IL-6 and IL-1β was also inhibited by erdosteine pretreatment. However, erdosteine did not inhibit LPS-induced phosphorylation of Akt and MAPKs. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of erdosteine in mouse macrophages is mediated through inhibition of LPS-induced NF-kB activation.

  11. Calnexin-dependent regulation of tunicamycin-induced apoptosis in breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Delom, F; Emadali, A; Cocolakis, E; Lebrun, J-J; Nantel, A; Chevet, E

    2007-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has evolved specific mechanisms to ensure protein folding as well as the maintenance of its own homeostasis. When these functions are not achieved, specific ER stress signals are triggered to activate either adaptive or apoptotic responses. Here, we demonstrate that MCF-7 cells are resistant to tunicamycin-induced apoptosis. We show that the expression level of the ER chaperone calnexin can directly influence tunicamycin sensitivity in this cell line. Interestingly, the expression of a calnexin lacking the chaperone domain (DeltaE) partially restores their sensitivity to tunicamycin-induced apoptosis. Indeed, we show that DeltaE acts as a scaffold molecule to allow the cleavage of Bap31 and thus generate the proapoptotic p20 fragment. Utilizing the ability of MCF-7 cells to resist tunicamycin-induced apoptosis, we have characterized a molecular mechanism by which calnexin regulates ER-stress-mediated apoptosis in a manner independent of its chaperone functions but dependent of its binding to Bap31.

  12. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  13. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser.

    PubMed

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-29

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M(2) reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  14. Compact photonic spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yougang; Liu, Zhenxing; Liu, Yachao; Zhou, Junxiao; Shu, Weixing; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2016-10-01

    In this letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a compact photonic spin filter formed by integrating a Pancharatnam-Berry phase lens (focal length of ±f ) into a conventional plano-concave lens (focal length of -f). By choosing the input port of the filter, photons with a desired spin state, such as the right-handed component or the left-handed one, propagate alone its original propagation direction, while the unwanted spin component is quickly diverged after passing through the filter. One application of the filter, sorting the spin-dependent components of vector vortex beams on higher-order Poincaré sphere, is also demonstrated. Our scheme provides a simple method to manipulate light, and thereby enables potential applications for photonic devices.

  15. Photon physics with PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.

    1995-07-15

    In this Paper the author discusses briefly the physics motivation for extending measurements of particle production with high granularity and particle id capabilities to neutrals in PHENIX. The author then discusses the technique of direct photon measurement in the presence of copious background photons from {pi}{sup o} decays. The experiment will measure relatively low p{sub t} photons near y=0 in the lab frame. This new experimental environment of high multiplicity and low {gamma} momenta will affect both the techniques used and the type of analysis which can be performed. The Phenix Electromagnetic calorimeter is described and its capabilities illustrated with results from simulation and beam tests of the first production array.

  16. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    PubMed Central

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation. PMID:27683066

  17. [Overexpression of NHE1 suppresses ABCA1 protein expression via increasing calpain activity in RAW264.7 cells].

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiangang; Wang, Lan; Guo, Jing; Hong, Wei; Long, Shiqi; Zhang, Li; Xiang, Ning; Yang, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of over-expressed Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) on the protein expression of adenosine three phosphate binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in RAW264.7 cells. Methods RAW264.7 cells were infected with the adenoviral vector encoding NHE1-EGFP (AdNHE1). The infected RAW264.7 cells were subjected to Western blot analysis for NHE1-EGFP fusion protein. The subcellular localization of NHE1-EGFP fusion protein was observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. NHE1 activity was measured by the method of pH recovery in response to an acute acid pulse. Furthermore, Western blotting was performed to determine ABCA1 protein levels and calpain activity in NHE1-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells. The effect of calpain inhibitor N-acetyl-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-norleucinal (ALLN) on ABCA1 protein levels in the presence of TO-901317 was examined by Western blotting. Results NHE1-EGFP fusion protein was highly expressed and localized in cytoplasm and cell membrane of RAW264.7 cells infected with AdNHE1. NHE1-EGFP fusion protein reduced ABCA1 protein expression and increased calpain activity. The calpain inhibitor ALLN blocked the decrease of ABCA1 protein expression. Conclusion Overexpressed NHE1 suppresses the expression of ABCA1 protein via increasing the calpain activity in RAW264.7 cells.

  18. Coherent terahertz photonics.

    PubMed

    Seeds, Alwyn J; Fice, Martyn J; Balakier, Katarzyna; Natrella, Michele; Mitrofanov, Oleg; Lamponi, Marco; Chtioui, Mourad; van Dijk, Frederic; Pepper, Michael; Aeppli, Gabriel; Davies, A Giles; Dean, Paul; Linfield, Edmund; Renaud, Cyril C

    2013-09-23

    We present a review of recent developments in THz coherent systems based on photonic local oscillators. We show that such techniques can enable the creation of highly coherent, thus highly sensitive, systems for frequencies ranging from 100 GHz to 5 THz, within an energy efficient integrated platform. We suggest that such systems could enable the THz spectrum to realize its full applications potential. To demonstrate how photonics-enabled THz systems can be realized, we review the performance of key components, show recent demonstrations of integrated platforms, and give examples of applications.

  19. Two-photon interference of temporally separated photons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-10-06

    We present experimental demonstrations of two-photon interference involving temporally separated photons within two types of interferometers: a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a polarization-based Michelson interferometer. The two-photon states are probabilistically prepared in a symmetrically superposed state within the two interferometer arms by introducing a large time delay between two input photons; this state is composed of two temporally separated photons, which are in two different or the same spatial modes. We then observe two-photon interference fringes involving both the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference effect and the interference of path-entangled two-photon states simultaneously in a single interferometric setup. The observed two-photon interference fringes provide simultaneous observation of the interferometric properties of the single-photon and two-photon wavepackets. The observations can also facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the origins of the interference phenomena arising from spatially bunched/anti-bunched two-photon states comprised of two temporally separated photons within the interferometer arms.

  20. Two-photon interference of temporally separated photons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental demonstrations of two-photon interference involving temporally separated photons within two types of interferometers: a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a polarization-based Michelson interferometer. The two-photon states are probabilistically prepared in a symmetrically superposed state within the two interferometer arms by introducing a large time delay between two input photons; this state is composed of two temporally separated photons, which are in two different or the same spatial modes. We then observe two-photon interference fringes involving both the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference effect and the interference of path-entangled two-photon states simultaneously in a single interferometric setup. The observed two-photon interference fringes provide simultaneous observation of the interferometric properties of the single-photon and two-photon wavepackets. The observations can also facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the origins of the interference phenomena arising from spatially bunched/anti-bunched two-photon states comprised of two temporally separated photons within the interferometer arms. PMID:27708380

  1. Two-photon interference of temporally separated photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-10-01

    We present experimental demonstrations of two-photon interference involving temporally separated photons within two types of interferometers: a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a polarization-based Michelson interferometer. The two-photon states are probabilistically prepared in a symmetrically superposed state within the two interferometer arms by introducing a large time delay between two input photons; this state is composed of two temporally separated photons, which are in two different or the same spatial modes. We then observe two-photon interference fringes involving both the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference effect and the interference of path-entangled two-photon states simultaneously in a single interferometric setup. The observed two-photon interference fringes provide simultaneous observation of the interferometric properties of the single-photon and two-photon wavepackets. The observations can also facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the origins of the interference phenomena arising from spatially bunched/anti-bunched two-photon states comprised of two temporally separated photons within the interferometer arms.

  2. Palytoxin induces cell lysis by priming a two-step process in mcf-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Prandi, Simone; Sala, Gian Luca; Bellocci, Mirella; Alessandrini, Andrea; Facci, Paolo; Bigiani, Albertino; Rossini, Gian Paolo

    2011-08-15

    The cytolytic action of palytoxin (PlTX) was recognized long ago, but its features have remained largely undetermined. We used biochemical, morphological, physiological, and physical tools, to study the cytolytic response in MCF-7 cells, as our model system. Cytolysis represented a stereotyped response induced by the addition of isotonic phosphate buffer (PBS) to cells that had been exposed to PlTX, after toxin removal and under optimal and suboptimal experimental conditions. Cytolysis was sensitive to osmolytes present during cell exposure to PlTX but not in the course of the lytic phase. Fluorescence microscopy showed that PlTX caused cell rounding and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to monitor PlTX effects in real time, and we found that morphological and mechanical properties of MCF-7 cells did not change during toxin exposure, but increased cell height and decreased stiffness at its surface were observed when PBS was added to PlTX-treated cells. The presence of an osmolyte during PlTX treatment prevented the detection of changes in morphological and mechanical properties caused by PBS addition to toxin-treated cells, as detected by AFM. By patch-clamp technique, we confirmed that PlTX action involved the transformation of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase into a channel and found that cell membrane capacitance was not changed by PlTX, indicating that the membrane surface area was not greatly affected in our model system. Overall, our findings show that the cytolytic response triggered by PlTX in MCF-7 cells includes a first phase, which is toxin-dependent and osmolyte-sensitive, priming cells to lytic events taking place in a separate phase, which does not require the presence of the toxin and is osmolyte-insensitive but is accompanied by marked reorganization of actin-based cytoskeleton and altered mechanical properties at the cell's surface. A model of the two-step process of PlTX-induced cytolysis is presented.

  3. Why photonic systems for space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Norman P.; Brost, George A.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Hunter, James R.; Nichter, James E.; Payson, Paul M.; Repak, Paul L.

    2000-09-01

    Future space-based platforms can and will benefit from the implementation of photonics in both analog and digital subsystems. This paper will discuss potential applications and advantages to the platforms through the use of photonics.

  4. Quantum optics: Arithmetic with photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajcsy, Michal; Majumdar, Arka

    2016-01-01

    Extracting a single photon from a light pulse is deceptively complicated to accomplish. Now, a deterministic experimental implementation of photon subtraction could bring a host of opportunities in quantum information technology.

  5. Bridging Between Photonic Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-29

    Science Foundation’s CAREER Grant Lett. 29, 1626 (2004). No. 0446571. The authors would also like to thank [15] C. Pollock and M. Lipson, Integrated ... Photonics (Kluwer Gernot Pomrenke from the Air Force Office of Scientific Academic, Dordrecht, 2003). Research for supporting the work under Grants [16

  6. Photonic curvilinear data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Clyde; Quaglio, Thomas; Figueiro, Thiago; Pauliac, Sébastien; Belledent, Jérôme; Fay, Aurélien; Bustos, Jessy; Marusic, Jean-Christophe; Schiavone, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    With more and more photonic data presence in e-beam lithography, the need for efficient and accurate data fracturing is required to meet acceptable manufacturing cycle time. Large photonic based layouts now create high shot count patterns for VSB based tools. Multiple angles, sweeping curves, and non-orthogonal data create a challenge for today's e-beam tools that are more efficient on Manhattan style data. This paper describes techniques developed and used for creating fractured data for VSB based pattern generators. Proximity Effect Correction is also applied during the fracture process, taking into account variable shot sizes to apply for accuracy and design style. Choosing different fracture routines for pattern data on-the-fly allows for fast and efficient processing. Data interpretation is essential for processing curvilinear data as to its size, angle, and complexity. Fracturing complex angled data into "efficient" shot counts is no longer practical as shot creation now requires knowledge of the actual data content as seen in photonic based pattern data. Simulation and physical printing results prove the implementations for accuracy and write times compared to traditional VSB writing strategies on photonic data. Geometry tolerance is used as part of the fracturing algorithm for controlling edge placement accuracy and tuning to different e-beam processing parameters.

  7. Two-photon cryomicroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Köhler, C.; König, K.

    2012-03-01

    We report on a new two-photon cryomicroscope which consist of a compact laser-scanning microscope combined with a motorized heating and freezing stage. Samples can be cooled down to -196 °C (77 K) and heated up to 600 °C (873 K) with adjustable heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K / min and 150 K / min. Two-photon imaging is realized by near infrared femtosecond-laser pulse excitation. The abilities of the two-photon cryomicroscope are illustrated in several measurements: imaging of fluorescent microspheres inside a piece of ice illustrates the feasibility of deep-microscopic imaging inside frozen sample. The temperature-dependent structural integrity of collagen is monitored by detection of second harmonic generation signals from porcine cornea. The measurements reveal also the dependence of the collagendenaturation temperature on hydration state of the cornea collagen. Furthermore, the potential of the two-photon cryomicroscope for optimization of freezing and thawing procedures as well as to evaluate the viability of frozen cells and tissue is discussed.

  8. Photonics in cardiovascular medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, Gijs; Regar, Evelyn; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2015-10-01

    The use of photonics technology is bringing new capabilities and insights to cardiovascular medicine. Intracoronary imaging and sensing, laser ablation and optical pacing are just some of the functions being explored to help diagnose and treat conditions of the heart and arteries.

  9. Photon collider at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-10-01

    High energy photon colliders ( γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e +e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3) Le +e -. Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e +e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e +e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is "an optical storage ring (optical trap)" with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  10. Photonics and Optoelectronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-07

    Distribution Outline/Agenda • Nanophotonics: plasmonics, nanostructures, metasurfaces etc • Integrated Nanophotonics & Silicon Photonics...Highlights Nanophotonics Nanophotonics: metasurfaces , nanostructures, plasmonics etc • Shalaev – Broadband Light Bending with Plasmonic...solitons, slot waveguide, “ Metasurface ” collimator etc " World Changing Ideas 2012” Electronic Tattoos, sciencemag , J. Rogers UICU P

  11. Membrane photon sieve telescopes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Geoff

    2010-11-20

    We present results of research into the design and construction of membrane photon sieves as primaries for next-generation lightweight space telescopes. We have created prototypes in electroformed nickel as well as diazo and CP-1 polymer films. In two such cases, diffraction-limited imaging performance was demonstrated over a narrow bandwidth.

  12. Photonics in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Bishnu

    2011-08-01

    India has long been active in the field of photonics, dating back to famous scientists such as Raman and Bose. Today, India is home to numerous research groups and telecommunications companies that own a sizeable amount of the fibre-optic links installed around the globe.

  13. Photons, photon jets, and dark photons at 750 GeV and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Kopp, Joachim; Schwaller, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    In new physics searches involving photons at the LHC, one challenge is to distinguish scenarios with isolated photons from models leading to "photon jets". For instance, in the context of the 750 GeV diphoton excess, it was pointed out that a true diphoton resonance [Formula: see text] can be mimicked by a process of the form [Formula: see text], where S is a new scalar with a mass of 750 GeV and a is a light pseudoscalar decaying to two collinear photons. Photon jets can be distinguished from isolated photons by exploiting the fact that a large fraction of photons convert to an [Formula: see text] pair inside the inner detector. In this note, we quantify this discrimination power, and we study how the sensitivity of future searches differs for photon jets compared to isolated photons. We also investigate how our results depend on the lifetime of the particle(s) decaying to the photon jet. Finally, we discuss the extension to [Formula: see text], where there are no photons at all but the dark photon [Formula: see text] decays to [Formula: see text] pairs. Our results will be useful in future studies of the putative 750 GeV signal, but also more generally in any new physics search involving hard photons.

  14. Photons, photon jets, and dark photons at 750 GeV and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Kopp, Joachim; Schwaller, Pedro

    2016-05-01

    In new physics searches involving photons at the LHC, one challenge is to distinguish scenarios with isolated photons from models leading to "photon jets". For instance, in the context of the 750 GeV diphoton excess, it was pointed out that a true diphoton resonance S → γ γ can be mimicked by a process of the form p p → S → a a → 4γ , where S is a new scalar with a mass of 750 GeV and a is a light pseudoscalar decaying to two collinear photons. Photon jets can be distinguished from isolated photons by exploiting the fact that a large fraction of photons convert to an e^+e^- pair inside the inner detector. In this note, we quantify this discrimination power, and we study how the sensitivity of future searches differs for photon jets compared to isolated photons. We also investigate how our results depend on the lifetime of the particle(s) decaying to the photon jet. Finally, we discuss the extension to S→ A^' A^' → e^+e^-e^+e^-, where there are no photons at all but the dark photon A^' decays to e^+e^- pairs. Our results will be useful in future studies of the putative 750 GeV signal, but also more generally in any new physics search involving hard photons.

  15. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of Euphorbia hirta in MCF-7 cell line model using comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Kwan Yuet; Darah, Ibrahim; Chen, Yeng; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity activity of Euphorbia hirta (E. hirta) in MCF-7 cell line model using comet assay. Methods The cytotoxicity of E. hirta extract was investigated by employing brine shrimp lethality assay and the genotoxicity of E. hirta was assessed by using Comet assay. Results Both toxicity tests exhibited significant toxicity result. In the comet assay, the E. hirta extract exhibited genotoxicity effects against MCF-7 DNA in a time-dependent manner by increasing mean percentage of DNA damage. The extract of E. hirta showed significant toxicity against brine shrimp with an LC50 value of 620.382 µg/mL (24 h). Comparison with positive control potassium dichromate signifies that cytotoxicity exhibited by the methanol extract might have moderate activity. Conclusion The present work confirmed the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of E. hirta. However, the observed toxicity of E. hirta extracts needs to be confirmed in additional studies. PMID:23998008

  16. Effect of prolonged hydroxytamoxifen treatment of MCF-7 cells on mitogen activated kinase cascade.

    PubMed

    Rabenoelina, Fanjaniriana; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Duchesne, Marie-Josèphe; Freiss, Gilles; Pons, Michel; Badia, Eric

    2002-04-10

    Resistance to the antiestrogen tamoxifen is the main stumbling block for the success of breast cancer therapy. We focused our study on cellular alterations induced by a prolonged treatment with the active tamoxifen metabolite hydroxytamoxifen (OHT). We show that a prolonged OHT treatment (for up to 7 days) led to a progressive increase in the level of phosphorylated p44/42 mitogen activated kinase (MAP kinase) induced by 10(-7) M TPA stimulation, without any significant change in the protein level. This effect was also observed in MCF-7 cells grown first in medium containing dextran-coated charcoal-treated FCS (DCC medium) for 20 days prior to OHT treatment, indicating a specific effect of the antiestrogen and not an effect of estrogen deprivation. It was prevented by cotreatment with estradiol and not observed in the estrogen receptor negative HeLa cell line, suggesting that it was mediated by the estrogen receptor. TPA induced phosphorylation of MEK1/2 was also raised by OHT treatment, without any change in their protein level or Raf-1 and H-Ras levels. When the MCF-7R OHT resistant cell line was grown in antiestrogen containing medium, the level of phosphorylated p44/42 MAP kinase was also high but reversed when the antiestrogen was removed. The 2 other MAP kinase, JNK and P38 pathways were not affected in the same way by OHT treatment. In conclusion, our data reveal that a prolonged OHT treatment, by increasing p44/42 MAPK activity, affects a key step in the growth control of MCF-7 cells, although not sufficiently to overcome the growth inhibitory effect of the drug.

  17. The E-screen assay: a comparison of different MCF7 cell stocks.

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos, M; Olea, N; Brotons, J A; Olea-Serrano, M F; Ruiz de Almodovar, J M; Pedraza, V

    1995-01-01

    MCF7 human breast cancer cells have been studied extensively as a model for hormonal effects on breast cancer cell growth and specific protein synthesis. Because the proliferative effect of natural estrogen is considered the hallmark of estrogen action, it was proposed that this property be used to determine whether a substance is an estrogen. The E-screen assay, developed for this purpose, is based on the ability of MCF7 cells to proliferate in the presence of estrogens. The aim of our study was to characterize the response of four MCF7 cell stocks (BUS, ATCC, BB, and BB104) and determine which of them performed best in the E-screen test. The four stocks assayed were distinguishable by their biological behavior. In the absence of estrogen, MCF7 BUS cells stopped proliferating and accumulated in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle; estrogen receptors increased, progesterone receptors decreased, and small amounts of pS2 protein were secreted. Of all the MCF7 stocks tested, MCF7 BUS cells showed the highest proliferative response to estradiol-17 beta: cell yields increased up to sixfold over those of nontreated cells in a 144-hr period. The differences between estrogen-supplemented and nonsupplemented MCF7 BUS cells were due mostly to G0/G1 proliferative arrest mediated by charcoal dextran-stripped serum. MCF7 BUS cell stocks and others showing a similar proliferative pattern should be chosen for use in the E-screen test, or whenever a proliferative effect of estrogen is to be demonstrated. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. C Figure 1. D Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 2. C Figure 2. D Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C Figure 5. D PMID:7498097

  18. Diamagnetic levitation promotes osteoclast differentiation from RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Long; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Xiao-Hu; Yin, Chong; Li, Di-Jie; Ma, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Fan; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-03-01

    The superconducting magnet with a high magnetic force field can levitate diamagnetic materials. In this study, a specially designed superconducting magnet with large gradient high magnetic field (LGHMF), which provides three apparent gravity levels (μg, 1 g, and 2 g), was used to study its influence on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation from preosteoclast cell line RAW264.7. The effects of LGHMF on the viability, nitric oxide (NO) production, morphology in RAW264.7 cells were detected by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method, the Griess method, and the immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The changes induced by LGHMF in osteoclast formation, mRNA expression, and bone resorption were determined by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, semiquantity PCR, and bone resorption test, respectively. The results showed that: 1) LGHMF had no lethal effect on osteoclast precursors but attenuated NO release in RAW264.7 cells. 2) Diamagnetic levitation (μg) enhanced both the formation and bone resorption capacity of osteoclast. Moreover, diamagnetic levitation up-regulated mRNA expression of RANK, Cathepsin K, MMP-9, and NFATc1, while down-regulated RunX2 in comparison with controls. Furthermore, diamagnetic levitation induced obvious morphological alterations in osteoclast, including active cytoplasmic peripheral pseudopodial expansion, formation of pedosome belt, and aggregation of actin ring. 3) Magnetic field produced by LGHMF attenuated osteoclast resorption activity. Collectively, LGHMF with combined effects has multiple effects on osteoclast, which attenuated osteoclast resorption with magnetic field, whereas promoted osteoclast differentiation with diamagnetic levitation. Therefore, these findings indicate that diamagnetic levitation could be used as a novel ground-based microgravity simulator, which facilitates bone cell research of weightlessness condition.

  19. In vitro model to estimate Edwardsiella tarda-macrophage interactions using RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lei; Sun, Yuying; Zhao, Yanjing; Xu, Jing; Bi, Keran

    2017-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda has been recognized as an important facultative intracellular pathogen of fish with capability of survival and replication within macrophages. E. tarda-macrophage interactions play a very important role in the defense mechanism of fish against infection. The mechanisms that E. tarda use to infect and persist inside macrophages are not well characterized. To gain insight concerning this process, RAW264.7 cells was used to investigate the interactions between E. tarda and macrophages. Using an in vitro model involving RAW264.7 cells, internalization assay demonstrated that MOIs of 10:1 and 100:1 could result in a satisfactory infection rate after a 2 h infection period. Consistent with the performance in fish macrophages, E. tarda could survive, replicate and induce iNOS-mediated NO production in RAW264.7 cells. Light and electron microscopy confirmed the internalization and replication of E. tarda in RAW264.7 cells, showing once inside macrophages, numberous bacteria may be destroyed within phagolysosomes and those that successfully subvert phagocyte defenses are capable of extensively replicating within the vacuolar-like compartment in macrophages. In addition, E. tarda-induced apoptosis was observed in RAW264.7 cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner, characterized by increased Annexin V binding and the activation of caspase-3. The results described here indicate that RAW264.7 cells could model the behavior of fish macrophages in response to E. tarda in many ways and may serve as a cell model for study on interactions between E. tarda and macrophages. The successful establishment of E. tarda-invaded RAW264.7 cells model may contribute to providing a basis for more detailed understanding of E. tarda pathogenesis.

  20. Photonics in Processing (BRIEFING CHARTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-06

    nm ena ble s PIGGYBANK ON CMOS INFRASTRUCTURE AND PROGRESS Seamless Photonics-Electronics Interface Slide 5 Signal Processing with Integrated ... Photonics “Application Specific Electronic-Photonic Integrated Circuit” (AS-EPIC) demonstration vehicle: Broadband RF Receiver (HF to Ku) using optical

  1. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Karthik

    2011-12-01

    Silicon Photonics is quickly proving to be a suitable interconnect technology for meeting the future goals of on-chip bandwidth and low power requirements. However, it is not clear how silicon photonics will be integrated into CMOS chips, particularly microprocessors. The issue of integrating photonic circuits into electronic IC fabrication processes to achieve maximum flexibility and minimum complexity and cost is an important one. In order to minimize usage of chip real estate, it will be advantageous to integrate in three-dimensions. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is emerging as a promising material for the 3-D integration of silicon photonics for on-chip optical interconnects. In addition, a-Si:H film can be deposited using CMOS compatible low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at any point in the fabrication process allowing maximum flexibility and minimal complexity. In this thesis, we demonstrate a-Si:H as a high performance alternate platform to crystalline silicon, enabling backend integration of optical interconnects in a hybrid photonic-electronic network-on-chip architecture. High quality passive devices are fabricated on a low-loss a-Si:H platform enabling wavelength division multiplexing schemes. We demonstrate a broadband all-optical modulation scheme based on free-carrier absorption effect, which can enable compact electro-optic modulators in a-Si:H. Furthermore, we comprehensively characterize the optical nonlinearities in a-Si:H and observe that a-Si:H exhibits enhanced nonlinearities as compared to crystalline silicon. Based on the enhanced nonlinearities, we demonstrate low-power four-wave mixing in a-Si:H waveguides enabling high speed all-optical devices in an a-Si:H platform. Finally, we demonstrate a novel data encoding scheme using thermal and all-optical tuning of silicon waveguides, increasing the spectral efficiency in an interconnect link.

  2. Two-photon spectroscopy of excitons with entangled photons.

    PubMed

    Schlawin, Frank; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-12-28

    The utility of quantum light as a spectroscopic tool is demonstrated for frequency-dispersed pump-probe, integrated pump-probe, and two-photon fluorescence signals which show Ramsey fringes. Simulations of the frequency-dispersed transmission of a broadband pulse of entangled photons interacting with a three-level model of matter reveal how the non-classical time-bandwidth properties of entangled photons can be used to disentangle congested spectra, and reveal otherwise unresolved features. Quantum light effects are most pronounced at weak intensities when entangled photon pairs are well separated, and are gradually diminished at higher intensities when different photon pairs overlap.

  3. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  4. Faking ordinary photons by displaced dark photon decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yuhsin; Wang, Lian-Tao; Zhao, Yue

    2017-01-01

    A light metastable dark photon decaying into a collimated electron/positron pair can fake a photon, either converted or unconverted, at the LHC. The detailed object identification relies on the specifics of the detector and strategies for the reconstruction. We study the fake rate based on the ATLAS (CMS) detector geometry and show that it can be O(1) with a generic choice of parameters. Especially, the probability of being registered as a photon is angular dependent. Such detector effects can induce bias to measurements on certain properties of new physics. In this paper, we consider the scenario where dark photons in final states are from a heavy resonance decay. Consequently, the detector effects can dramatically affect the results when determining the spin of a resonance. Further, if the decay products from the heavy resonance are one photon and one dark photon, which has a large probability to fake a diphoton event, the resonance is allowed to be a vector. Because of the difference in detectors, the cross sections measured in ATLAS and CMS do not necessarily match. Furthermore, if the diphoton signal is given by the dark photons, the standard model Z γ and Z Z final states do not necessarily come with the γ γ channel, which is a unique signature in our scenario. The issue studied here is relevant also for any future new physics searches with photon(s) in the final state. We discuss possible ways of distinguishing dark photon decay and a real photon in the future.

  5. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, Stephen N.; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C.

    2013-01-22

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  6. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, Stephen N; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C

    2014-06-24

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  7. Highly integrated photonic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmulovich, J.; Frolov, S.; Paunescu, A.; Lee, D. C.; DeHazan, Y.; Hanjani, A.; Bruce, A.

    2006-02-01

    From its foundation Inplane Photonics focused on developing integrated solutions based on Planar Lightwave Circuit(PLC) technology. It is universally agreed that the path to lower cost-per-function in Photonics, as in Electronics, leads to integration. The timing of introduction of a new technological solution and the rate at which it will penetrate the market very much depends on the interplay between the size of the market, advantages the new technology offers, and the investment needed to achieve the level of performance that is envisioned. In telecom applications, where the main drivers for technology selection are cost and performance, such large-scale investment did not materialized yet for the PLC technology mostly due to a limited market size.

  8. Natural photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  9. Photonics meet digital art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curticapean, Dan; Israel, Kai

    2014-09-01

    The paper focuses on the work of an interdisciplinary project between photonics and digital art. The result is a poster collection dedicated to the International Year of Light 2015. In addition, an internet platform was created that presents the project. It can be accessed at http://www.magic-of-light.org/iyl2015/index.htm. From the idea to the final realization, milestones with tasks and steps will be presented in the paper. As an interdisciplinary project, students from technological degree programs were involved as well as art program students. The 2015 Anniversaries: Alhazen (1015), De Caus (1615), Fresnel (1815), Maxwell (1865), Einstein (1905), Penzias Wilson, Kao (1965) and their milestone contributions in optics and photonics will be highlighted.

  10. A photon thermal diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Wong, Carlaton; Lubner, Sean; Yee, Shannon; Miller, John; Jang, Wanyoung; Hardin, Corey; Fong, Anthony; Garay, Javier E; Dames, Chris

    2014-11-17

    A thermal diode is a two-terminal nonlinear device that rectifies energy carriers (for example, photons, phonons and electrons) in the thermal domain, the heat transfer analogue to the familiar electrical diode. Effective thermal rectifiers could have an impact on diverse applications ranging from heat engines to refrigeration, thermal regulation of buildings and thermal logic. However, experimental demonstrations have lagged far behind theoretical proposals. Here we present the first experimental results for a photon thermal diode. The device is based on asymmetric scattering of ballistic energy carriers by pyramidal reflectors. Recent theoretical work has predicted that this ballistic mechanism also requires a nonlinearity in order to yield asymmetric thermal transport, a requirement of all thermal diodes arising from the second Law of Thermodynamics, and realized here using an 'inelastic thermal collimator' element. Experiments confirm both effects: with pyramids and collimator the thermal rectification is 10.9 ± 0.8%, while without the collimator no rectification is detectable (<0.3%).

  11. Photon Sieve Space Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    create in zero-g. An alternative is to use a flat diffractive element, which removes the need for out of plane deformation. In this case, the primary...is a photon sieve – a diffractive element consisting of millions of holes arranged in circular rings A Fresnel Zone Plate (FZP) is a diffractive ...they rely on higher order diffraction , and reduce the intensity of the final focal spot. For example, it is possible to create an antihole sieve by

  12. Nanowire Photonic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-22

    synthesis of silicon and gallium-indium nitride alloy nanowire heterostructures to provide building blocks for photonic devices that can span the...the Si-nanowire etching profile follows the order in which dopants were introduced during synthesis : First boron for p-type, no dopant for i-type... synthesis of nanoscale building blocks, (ii) characterization of fundamental physical properties of the building blocks, and (iii) assembly of

  13. Integrated photonic quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Lebugle, Maxime; Guzman-Silva, Diego; Perez-Leija, Armando; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 20 years quantum walks (QWs) have gained increasing interest in the field of quantum information science and processing. In contrast to classical walkers, quantum objects exhibit intrinsic properties like non-locality and non-classical many-particle correlations, which renders QWs a versatile tool for quantum simulation and computation as well as for a deeper understanding of genuine quantum mechanics. Since they are highly controllable and hardly interact with their environment, photons seem to be ideally suited quantum walkers. In order to study and exploit photonic QWs, lattice structures that allow low loss coherent evolution of quantum states are demanded. Such requirements are perfectly met by integrated optical waveguide devices that additionally allow a substantial miniaturization of experimental settings. Moreover, by utilizing the femtosecond direct laser writing technique three-dimensional waveguide structures are capable of analyzing QWs also on higher dimensional geometries. In this context, advances and findings of photonic QWs are discussed in this review. Various concepts and experimental results are presented covering, such as different quantum transport regimes, the Boson sampling problem, and the discrete fractional quantum Fourier transform.

  14. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  15. Nonlocal Structures: Bilocal Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Roger E.

    1980-01-01

    As a starting point, it is postulated that all particles and fields are built from a single primitive field, which must then be a massless fermion with a σ spin of one-half. Two helicities are embodied in a τ spin of one-half. The vacuum is an open Fermi sea whose height is a wave number κ. Elementary particles are structures having the form of standing-wave systems floating on the vacuum sea, with the height κ providing both the scale of inner structural size and the mass unit for the elementary particle mass spectrum. A bilocal photon starts with a function describing two primitive quanta with parallel σ spin and opposite τ spin. A centroid-time wave equation then couples-in an infinite set of orthogonal functions. The introduction of an operator Q λ permits the reduction of the infinite secular determinant to a finite six-by-six determinant. Solutions (for the infinite expansion) are obtained describing photons with right-handed and left-handed polarizations. Superpositions of these give linearly polarized photons. Electric and magnetic field vectors, satisfying the vacuum Maxwell equations, are obtained from a bilocal Hertz vector given by п= (2/κ3 c)(∂/∂ t r)∇rΨ(1,2), where Ψ(1,2) is the bilocal wave function, and tr and r are the relative time and relative position variables.

  16. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  17. Photon strength functions from photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwengner, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    We present photon-scattering experiments using bremsstrahlung at the γELBE facility of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and using quasi-monoenergetic, polarized γ rays at the HI γS facility of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) in Durham. In the analysis of the spectra measured by using bremsstrahlung at γELBE, we include intensity in the quasi-continuum and perform simulations of statistical γ-ray cascades using the code γDEX to estimate intensities of inelastic transitions to low-lying excited states. Simulated average branching ratios are compared with model-independent branching ratios obtained from spectra measured by using monoenergetic γ beams at HI γS. Photoabsorption cross sections deduced in this way are presented for selected nuclides. Strength in the energy region of the so-called pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) is considered in nuclei around mass 80 and in xenon isotopes. In collaboration with Ralph Massarczyk, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  18. Topological Photonic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Cheng; Lin, Liang; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    As exotic phenomena in optics, topological states in photonic crystals have drawn much attention due to their fundamental significance and great potential applications. Because of the broken time-reversal symmetry under the influence of an external magnetic field, the photonic crystals composed of magneto-optical materials will lead to the degeneracy lifting and show particular topological characters of energy bands. The upper and lower bulk bands have nonzero integer topological numbers. The gapless edge states can be realized to connect two bulk states. This topological photonic states originated from the topological property can be analogous to the integer quantum Hall effect in an electronic system. The gapless edge state only possesses a single sign of gradient in the whole Brillouin zone, and thus the group velocity is only in one direction leading to the one-way energy flow, which is robust to disorder and impurity due to the nontrivial topological nature of the corresponding electromagnetic states. Furthermore, this one-way edge state would cross the Brillouin center with nonzero group velocity, where the negative-zero-positive phase velocity can be used to realize some interesting phenomena such as tunneling and backward phase propagation. On the other hand, under the protection of time-reversal symmetry, a pair of gapless edge states can also be constructed by using magnetic-electric coupling meta-materials, exhibiting Fermion-like spin helix topological edge states, which can be regarded as an optical counterpart of topological insulator originating from the spin-orbit coupling. The aim of this article is to have a comprehensive review of recent research literatures published in this emerging field of photonic topological phenomena. Photonic topological states and their related phenomena are presented and analyzed, including the chiral edge states, polarization dependent transportation, unidirectional waveguide and nonreciprocal optical transmission, all

  19. Photonics21 and the perspectives from the European photonics industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertin, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Photonics provide indispensable technology buildings bricks that enable a wide range of products as well as driving the development of entirely new industries. The European Commission recognized the potential of photonics to strengthen Europe's industrial and innovation capacity and consequently declared photonics as a Key Enabling Technology. Photonics21 as partner of the European Commission developed a Multiannual Strategic Roadmap which aims at boosting European photonics along the whole innovation chain with special focus on the gap between generating knowledge and products. The roadmap will be realized in a Public Private Partnership between the European photonics industry and the European Commission until 2020. In this PPP it is intended that the industry commits to leverage the public funds by the factor of 4.

  20. Synthetic Landau levels for photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic photonic materials are an emerging platform for exploring the interface between microscopic quantum dynamics and macroscopic material properties. Photons experiencing a Lorentz force develop handedness, providing opportunities to study quantum Hall physics and topological quantum science. Here we present an experimental realization of a magnetic field for continuum photons. We trap optical photons in a multimode ring resonator to make a two-dimensional gas of massive bosons, and then employ a non-planar geometry to induce an image rotation on each round-trip. This results in photonic Coriolis/Lorentz and centrifugal forces and so realizes the Fock-Darwin Hamiltonian for photons in a magnetic field and harmonic trap. Using spatial- and energy-resolved spectroscopy, we track the resulting photonic eigenstates as radial trapping is reduced, finally observing a photonic Landau level at degeneracy. To circumvent the challenge of trap instability at the centrifugal limit, we constrain the photons to move on a cone. Spectroscopic probes demonstrate flat space (zero curvature) away from the cone tip. At the cone tip, we observe that spatial curvature increases the local density of states, and we measure fractional state number excess consistent with the Wen-Zee theory, providing an experimental test of this theory of electrons in both a magnetic field and curved space. This work opens the door to exploration of the interplay of geometry and topology, and in conjunction with Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, enables studies of photonic fractional quantum Hall fluids and direct detection of anyons.

  1. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  2. Effect of sesamin on apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer mcf-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Siao, An-Ci; Hou, Chien-Wei; Kao, Yung-Hsi; Jeng, Kee-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Dietary prevention has been known to reduce breast cancer risk. Sesamin is one of the major components in sesame seeds and has been widely studied and proven to have anti-proliferation and anti-angiogenic effects on cancer cells. In this study, the influence of sesamin was tested in the human breast cancer MCF-7 cell line for cell viability (MTT assay) and cell cycling (flow cytometry). Results showed that sesamin dose-dependently (1, 10 and 50 μM) reduced the cell viability and increased LDH release and apoptosis (TUNEL assay). In addition, there was a significant increase of sub-G1 phase arrest in the cell cycle after sesamin treatment. Furthermore, sesamin increased the expression of apoptotic markers of Bax, caspase-3, and cell cycle control proteins, p53 and checkpoint kinase 2. Taken together, these results suggested that sesamin might be used as a dietary supplement for prevention of breast cancer by modulating apoptotic signal pathways and inhibiting tumor cell growth.

  3. Lactobacillus plantarum L67 glycoprotein protects against cadmium chloride toxicity in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Sooyeon; Oh, Sejong; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-03-01

    The food and water we consume may be contaminated with a range of chemicals and heavy metals, such as lead, cadmium, arsenic, chromium, and mercury by accumulation through the food chain. Cadmium is known to be one of the major components in cigarette smoke and can cause lesions in many organs. Some lactobacilli can bind and remove heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, and copper. However, the mechanisms of cadmium toxicity and inhibition by probiotics are not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that glycoprotein (18 kDa) isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum L67 protected RAW 264.7 cells from expression of inflammation-related factors stimulated by cadmium chloride (100 µM). Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of cadmium using the MTT assay and intracellular Ca(2+) using fluorescence, and assessed activities of activator protein kinase C (PKC-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase, activator protein (AP)-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases using immunoblot. Our results indicated that glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 inhibited intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. It also significantly suppressed inflammatory factors such as AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38), and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Our findings suggest that the 24-kDa glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 might be used as a food component for protection of inflammation caused by cadmium ion.

  4. INOSITOL HEXAKISPHOSPHATE MEDIATES APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN BREAST ADENOCARCINOMA MCF-7 CELL LINE VIA INTRINSIC PATHWAY

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Rakhee; Ali, Nawab

    2010-04-12

    Inositol polyphosphates (InsP{sub s}) are naturally occurring compounds ubiquitously present in plants and animals. Inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}) is the most abundant among all InsP{sub s} and constitutes the major portion of dietary fiber in most cereals, legumes and nuts. Certain derivatives of InsP{sub s} also regulate cellular signaling mechanisms. InsP{sub s} have also been shown to reduce tumor formation and induce apoptosis in cancerous cells. Therefore, in this study, the effects of InsPs on apoptosis were studied in an attempt to investigate their potential anti-cancer therapeutic application and understand their mechanism of action. Acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining suggested that InsP{sub 6} dose dependently induced apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. Among InsP{sub s} tested (InsP{sub 3}, InsP{sub 4}, InsP{sub 5}, and InsP{sub 6}), InsP{sub 6} was found to be the most effective in inducing apoptosis. Furthermore, effects of InsP{sub 6} were found most potent inducing apoptosis. Etoposide, the drug known to induce apoptosis in both in vivo and in vitro, was used as a positive control. Western blotting experiments using specific antibodies against known apoptotic markers suggested that InsP{sub 6} induced apoptotic changes were mediated via an intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  5. RAW264.7 Cell Activating Glucomannans Extracted from Rhizome of Polygonatum sibiricum

    PubMed Central

    Yelithao, Khamphone; Surayot, Utoomporn; Lee, Ju Hun; You, SangGuan

    2016-01-01

    Water-soluble polysaccharides isolated from the rhizome of Polygonatum sibiricum and fractionated using ion-exchange chromatography were investigated to determine their structure and immunostimulating activity. Crude and fractions (F1 and F2) consisted of carbohydrates (85.1~88.3%) with proteins (4.51~11.9%) and uronic acid (1.79~7.47%), and included different levels of mannose (62.3~76.3%), glucose (15.2~20.3%), galactose (4.35~15.3%), and arabinose (4.00~7.65%). The crude contained two peaks with molecular weights (Mw) of 151×103 and 31.8×103, but F1 and F2 exhibited one major peak with Mw of 103×103 and 628×103, respectively. Little immunostimulatory activity was observed by the crude; however, F1 and F2 significantly activated RAW264.7 cells to release nitric oxide and various cytokines, suggesting they were potent immunostimulators. The backbone of the most immunostimulating fraction (F1) was (1→4)-manno- and (1→4)-gluco-pyranosyl residues with galactose and glucose attached to O-6 of manno-pyranoside. PMID:27752501

  6. Inositol Hexakisphosphate Mediates Apoptosis in Human Breast Adenocarcinoma MCF-7 Cell Line via Intrinsic Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Rakhee; Ali, Nawab

    2010-04-01

    Inositol polyphosphates (InsPs) are naturally occurring compounds ubiquitously present in plants and animals. Inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) is the most abundant among all InsPs and constitutes the major portion of dietary fiber in most cereals, legumes and nuts. Certain derivatives of InsPs also regulate cellular signaling mechanisms. InsPs have also been shown to reduce tumor formation and induce apoptosis in cancerous cells. Therefore, in this study, the effects of InsPs on apoptosis were studied in an attempt to investigate their potential anti-cancer therapeutic application and understand their mechanism of action. Acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining suggested that InsP6 dose dependently induced apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. Among InsPs tested (InsP3, InsP4, InsP5, and InsP6), InsP6 was found to be the most effective in inducing apoptosis. Furthermore, effects of InsP6 were found most potent inducing apoptosis. Etoposide, the drug known to induce apoptosis in both in vivo and in vitro, was used as a positive control. Western blotting experiments using specific antibodies against known apoptotic markers suggested that InsP6 induced apoptotic changes were mediated via an intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  7. Fenugreek induced apoptosis in breast cancer MCF-7 cells mediated independently by fas receptor change.

    PubMed

    Alshatwi, Ali Abdullah; Shafi, Gowhar; Hasan, Tarique Noorul; Syed, Naveed Ahmed; Khoja, Kholoud Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Trigonella foenum in graecum (Fenugreek) is a traditional herbal plant used to treat disorders like diabetes, high cholesterol, wounds, inflammation, gastrointestinal ailments, and it is believed to have anti-tumor properties, although the mechanisms for the activity remain to be elucidated. In this study, we prepared a methanol extract from Fenugreek whole plants and investigated the mechanism involved in its growth-inhibitory effect on MCF- 7 human breast cancer cells. Apoptosis of MCF-7 cells was evidenced by investigating trypan blue exclusion, TUNEL and Caspase 3, 8, 9, p53, FADD, Bax and Bak by real-time PCR assays inducing activities, in the presence of FME at 65 μg/mL for 24 and 48 hours. FME induced apoptosis was mediated by the death receptor pathway as demonstrated by the increased level of Fas receptor expression after FME treatment. However, such change was found to be absent in Caspase 3, 8, 9, p53, FADD, Bax and Bak, which was confirmed by a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. In summary, these data demonstrate that at least 90% of FME induced apoptosis in breast cell is mediated by Fas receptor-independently of either FADD, Caspase 8 or 3, as well as p53 interdependently.

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Chloranthalactone B in LPS-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueqin; Shen, Jun; Jiang, Yunyao; Shen, Ting; You, Long; Sun, Xiaobo; Xu, Xudong; Hu, Weicheng; Wu, Haifeng; Wang, Gongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Chloranthalactone B (CTB), a lindenane-type sesquiterpenoid, was obtained from the Chinese medicinal herb Sarcandra glabra, which is frequently used as a remedy for inflammatory diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of CTB have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. CTB strongly inhibited the production of nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 in RAW264.7 cells stimulated with LPS. A reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay and Western blot further confirmed that CTB inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, TNF-α, and IL-1β at the transcriptional level, and decreased the luciferase activities of activator protein (AP)-1 reporter promoters. These data suggest that inhibition occurred at the transcriptional level. In addition, CTB blocked the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Furthermore, CTB suppressed the phosphorylation of MKK3/6 by targeting the binding sites via formation of hydrogen bonds. Our findings clearly show that CTB inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators by inhibiting the AP-1 and p38 MAPK pathways. Therefore, CTB could potentially be used as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:27879664

  9. Oligomer formation of histamine H2 receptors expressed in Sf9 and COS7 cells.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Y; Asano, T; Saitoh, T; Anai, M; Funaki, M; Ogihara, T; Katagiri, H; Matsuhashi, N; Yazaki, Y; Sugano, K

    1997-06-09

    A histamine H2 receptor, which had been mutated at its glycosylation site and tagged at its N-terminus with an HA tag (HA-H2 receptor), was expressed in Sf9 cells and COS7 cells. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting of HA-H2 receptors with alphaHA antibody revealed four bands of 31.5 +/- 2.5 kDa, 59.0 +/- 6.0 kDa, 80.5 +/- 4.5 kDa and 120 kDa. These bands were also detected by immunoblot using anti-H2 receptor serum (C-terminus). In addition, H2 receptors without the HA-tag coimmunoprecipitated with HA-tagged H2 receptors devoid of the 51 C-terminal amino acids, via immunoprecipitation with alphaHA antibody, when the two receptors were coexpressed. These results suggest that H2 receptors are present as receptor oligomers and that the C-terminal portion is not involved in the formation of these oligomers.

  10. Programmable atom-photon quantum interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Christoph; Eich, Pascal; Schug, Michael; Müller, Philipp; Eschner, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We present the implementation of a programmable atom-photon quantum interface, employing a single trapped +40Ca ion and single photons. Depending on its mode of operation, the interface serves as a bidirectional atom-photon quantum-state converter, as a source of entangled atom-photon states, or as a quantum frequency converter of single photons. The interface lends itself particularly to interfacing ions with spontaneous parametric down-conversion-based single-photon or entangled-photon-pair sources.

  11. Charmonium production in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Avery, R.E.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barker, A.R.; Barnett, B.A.; Bauer, D.A.; Bengtsson, H.U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bolognese, T.S.; Bross, A.D.; Buchanan, C.D.; Buijs, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chao, H.Y.; Chun, S.B.; Clark, A.R.; Cowan, G.D.; Crane, D.A.; Dahl, O.I.; Daoudi, M.; Derby, K.A.; Eastman, J.J.; Eberhard, P.H.; Edberg, T.K.; Eisner, A.M.; Enomoto, R.; Erne, F.C.; Fujii, T.; Gary, J.W.; Gorn, W.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hofmann, W.; Hylen, J.; Kamae, T.; Kaye, H.S.; Kees, K.H.; Kenney, R.W.; Winston, K.; Kofler, R.R.; Lander, R.L.; Langeveld, W.G.J.; Layter, J.G.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Loken, S.C.; Lu, A.; Lu, X.Q.; Lynch, G.R.; Madaras, R.J.; Maeshima, K.; Magnuson, B.D.; Masek, G.E.; Mathis, L.G.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Miller, E.S.; Moses, W.; McNeil, R.R.; Nygren, D.R.; Oddone, P.R.; Paar, H.P.; Park, S.K.; Pellett, D.E.; Pripstein, M.; Ronan, M.T.; Ross, R.R.; Rouse, F.R.; Schwitkis, K.A.; Sens, J.C.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.C.; Slater, W.E.; Smit

    1987-01-01

    We have searched for the two-photon production of the /eta//sub c/, /chi//sub 0/ and /chi//sub 2/ charmonium states at the e/sup +/e/sup -/ collider PEP in the channels /gamma//gamma/ /yields/ K/sup +-/K/sub S//sup 0//pi//sup -+/, /gamma//gamma/ /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup -//pi//sup +//pi//sup -/, /gamma//gamma/ /yields/ /pi//sup +//pi//sup -//pi//sup +//pi//sup -/ and /gamma//gamma/ /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup -/K/sup +/K/sup -/. We identify four /eta//sub c/ candidates in the K/sup +/K/sup -/K/sup +/K/sup -/ channel, on a negligible background; this leads to a preliminary 95% C.L. lower limit for /Gamma//sub /gamma//gamma//(/eta//sup c/) of 1.6 keV. In the other channels we find no evidence for any of the three states and establish preliminary 95% C.L. upper limits /Gamma//sub /gamma//gamma//(/eta//sub c/) < 15 keV, /Gamma//sub /gamma//gamma//(/chi//sub 0/)< 14 keV and /Gamma//sub /gamma//gamma//(/chi//sub 2/) < 4.0 keV. Combining the results on the /eta//sub c/ from all channels we obtain the value /Gamma//sub /gamma//gamma//(/eta//sub c/) = 4.5/sub -3.6///sup -5.5 keV. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Photon-photon collisions at the next linear collider: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1993-08-01

    The collisions of photons at a high energy electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions, and extensions of the standard model. It is expected that by using back-scattered laser beams that the effective luminosity and energy of photon-photon collisions will be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this talk, I will focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs boson, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkable background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. I also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  13. Resonant photonic States in coupled heterostructure photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jd; Sabarinathan, J; Singh, Mr

    2010-02-09

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  14. Photon correlation in single-photon frequency upconversion.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaorong; Huang, Kun; Pan, Haifeng; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2012-01-30

    We experimentally investigated the intensity cross-correlation between the upconverted photons and the unconverted photons in the single-photon frequency upconversion process with multi-longitudinal mode pump and signal sources. In theoretical analysis, with this multi-longitudinal mode of both signal and pump sources system, the properties of the signal photons could also be maintained as in the single-mode frequency upconversion system. Experimentally, based on the conversion efficiency of 80.5%, the joint probability of simultaneously detecting at upconverted and unconverted photons showed an anti-correlation as a function of conversion efficiency which indicated the upconverted photons were one-to-one from the signal photons. While due to the coherent state of the signal photons, the intensity cross-correlation function g(2)(0) was shown to be equal to unity at any conversion efficiency, agreeing with the theoretical prediction. This study will benefit the high-speed wavelength-tunable quantum state translation or photonic quantum interface together with the mature frequency tuning or longitudinal mode selection techniques.

  15. Topological photonics: an observation of Landau levels for optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    Creating photonic materials with nontrivial topological characteristics has seen burgeoning interest in recent years; however, a major route to topology, a magnetic field for continuum photons, has remained elusive. We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We will discuss the conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids. This work was supported by DOE, DARPA, and AFOSR.

  16. Quantum simulation with interacting photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Enhancing optical nonlinearities so that they become appreciable on the single photon level and lead to nonclassical light fields has been a central objective in quantum optics for many years. After this has been achieved in individual micro-cavities representing an effectively zero-dimensional volume, this line of research has shifted its focus towards engineering devices where such strong optical nonlinearities simultaneously occur in extended volumes of multiple nodes of a network. Recent technological progress in several experimental platforms now opens the possibility to employ the systems of strongly interacting photons, these give rise to as quantum simulators. Here we review the recent development and current status of this research direction for theory and experiment. Addressing both, optical photons interacting with atoms and microwave photons in networks of superconducting circuits, we focus on analogue quantum simulations in scenarios where effective photon-photon interactions exceed dissipative processes in the considered platforms.

  17. Single-photon quadratic optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    We present exact analytical solutions to study the coherent interaction between a single photon and the mechanical motion of a membrane in quadratic optomechanics. We consider single-photon emission and scattering when the photon is initially inside the cavity and in the fields outside the cavity, respectively. Using our solutions, we calculate the single-photon emission and scattering spectra, and find relations between the spectral features and the system's inherent parameters, such as: the optomechanical coupling strength, the mechanical frequency, and the cavity-field decay rate. In particular, we clarify the conditions for the phonon sidebands to be visible. We also study the photon-phonon entanglement for the long-time emission and scattering states. The linear entropy is employed to characterize this entanglement by treating it as a bipartite one between a single mode of phonons and a single photon. PMID:25200128

  18. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  19. Experimental interference of independent photons.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Blauensteiner, Bibiane; Zukowski, Marek; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Zeilinger, Anton

    2006-06-23

    Interference of photons emerging from independent sources is essential for modern quantum-information processing schemes, above all quantum repeaters and linear-optics quantum computers. We report an observation of nonclassical interference of two single photons originating from two independent, separated sources, which were actively synchronized with a rms timing jitter of 260 fs. The resulting (two-photon) interference visibility was (83+/-4)%.

  20. 'Photonic jets' from dielectric microaxicons

    SciTech Connect

    Geints, Yu E; Zemlyanov, A A; Panina, E K

    2015-08-31

    We consider a specific spatially localised light structure, namely, a 'photonic jet' formed in the near field upon scattering of an optical wave in a dielectric micron particle. Dimensional parameters and intensity of a photonic jet from microaxicons of different spatial orientation are studied theoretically. It is found for the first time that an axicon-generated photonic jet has in this case a substantially larger length compared with the case of a jet formed on a spherical particle. (scattering of light)

  1. Physics at a photon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Soldner-Rembold

    2002-09-30

    A Photon Collider will provide unique opportunities to study the SM Higgs boson and to determine its properties. MSSM Higgs bosons can be discovered at the Photon Collider for scenarios where they might escape detection at the LHC. As an example for the many other physics topics which can be studied at a Photon Collider, recent results on Non-Commutative Field Theories are also discussed.

  2. [Construction of nonsense-mutated eukaryotic expression vector of factor IX gene and its expression in COS-7 cells].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin; Yang, Lin-Hua; Chai, Bao-Feng; Shen, Quan; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Yao-Fang; Chen, Jian-Fang

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct 4 types of nonsense-mutated eukaryotic expression plasmids of fIX gene, using pcDNA3.1 plasmid containing fIX cDNA as template, and to identify, then to perform their expression in COS-7 cells. These stop mutants constructed by site-directed mutagenesis based on PCR, and further confirmed by DNA sequencing. COS-7 cells were transfected with either the wild-type or mutated fIX expression constructs, then the relative expression levels of fIX mRNA were detected by real time fluorescent quantitative PCR. The result showed that except the designed sites, there were no other nucleotide mutation in the sequences of four nonsense mutants. The results of real time PCR proved that the nonsense-mutated vectors can be effectively expressed in COS-7 cells. It is concluded that the nonsense-mutated eukaryotic expression vectors of fIX gene have been successfully constructed and can express in COS-7 cells, which provides the material basis for further researches on mechanism and treatment of FIX deficiency and the function defects caused by nonsense mutation.

  3. RUNX3 gene promoter demethylation by 5-Aza-CdR induces apoptosis in breast cancer MCF-7 cell line.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hua-Feng; Dai, Zhi-Jun; Bai, He-Ping; Lu, Wang-Feng; Ma, Xiao-Bin; Bao, Xing; Lin, Shuai; Wang, Xi-Jing

    2013-01-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is a tumor suppressor gene, its inactivation due to hypermethylation related to carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) on cell proliferation and apoptosis by demethylation of the promoter region and restoring the expression of RUNX3 in the breast cancer MCF-7 cell line. MCF-7 cells were cultured with different concentrations (0.4-102.4 μmol/L) of 5-Aza-CdR in vitro. MTT assay was used to determine the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Flow cytometry and Hoechst staining were used for analyzing cell apoptosis. The methylation status and expression of RUNX3 in mRNA and protein levels were measured by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR [MSP]), reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, and Western blot. It was shown that the RUNX3 gene downregulated and hypermethylated in MCF-7 cells. 5-Aza-CdR induced demethylation, upregulated the expression of RUNX3 on both mRNA and protein levels in cancer cells, and induced growth suppression and apoptosis in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The results demonstrate that RUNX3 downregulation in breast cancer is frequently due to hypermethylation, and that 5-Aza-CdR can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis by eliminating the methylation status of RUNX3 promoter and restoring its expression.

  4. Photonic crystal microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, A. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Sukhinina, N. S.; Matveev, D. V.; Dolganov, P. V.; Dolganov, V. K.; Emelchenko, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spherical samples of photonic crystals formed by colloidal SiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized. Synthesis of microspheres from 160 nm, 200 nm and 430 nm diameter colloidal nanoparticles was performed over a wide size range, from 5 μm to 50 μm. The mechanism of formation of void microparticles exceeding 50 μm is discussed. The spectral measurements verified the association of the spectra with the peaks of selective reflection from the cubic lattice planes. The microparticle morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  5. Robust Photon Locking

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, T.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Sarpe-Tudoran, C.; Baumert, T.

    2009-01-16

    We experimentally demonstrate a strong-field coherent control mechanism that combines the advantages of photon locking (PL) and rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). Unlike earlier implementations of PL and RAP by pulse sequences or chirped pulses, we use shaped pulses generated by phase modulation of the spectrum of a femtosecond laser pulse with a generalized phase discontinuity. The novel control scenario is characterized by a high degree of robustness achieved via adiabatic preparation of a state of maximum coherence. Subsequent phase control allows for efficient switching among different target states. We investigate both properties by photoelectron spectroscopy on potassium atoms interacting with the intense shaped light field.

  6. Silicon active photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  7. Spaceborne Photonics Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Farrukh, U. O.; Han, K. S.; Hwang, I. H.; Jalufka, N. W.; Lowe, C. W.; Tabibi, B. M.; Lee, C. J.; Lyons, D.; Maclin, A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes in chronological detail the development of the Spaceborne Photonics Institute as a sustained research effort at Hampton University in the area of optical physics. This provided the research expertise to initiate a PhD program in Physics. Research was carried out in the areas of: (1) modelling of spaceborne solid state laser systems; (2) amplified spontaneous emission in solar pumped iodine lasers; (3) closely simulated AM0 CW solar pumped iodine laser and repeatedly short pulsed iodine laser oscillator; (4) a materials spectroscopy and growth program; and (5) laser induced fluorescence and atomic and molecular spectroscopy.

  8. Determinations of Photon Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    COVERED O14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 115. PAGE COUNT THESIS/ftFROW*W FROM TO 1989 1 54 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION A ?RQVk;U kOR 3UB LIC RELEASE...IAW AFR 190- 1 ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, 1st Lt, USAF Executive Officer, Civilian Institution ProQrams 17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on...spectra from measurements obtained with a sodium iodide counting system. A response matrix is computed by combining photon cross sections with

  9. Visualizing electrons and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Azizul; Haque, Adam

    2015-09-01

    Our investigation shows that the wave properties associated with fermions implies their finite size. However, existing quantum theories are based on the point particle concept, and fail to maintain relativistic invariance for finite sized charged particles. Notably, the quantum uncertainty principle introduces finite size in all elementary particles. Recently, we have developed a theory for understanding the quantum properties of finite sized fermions and bosons that incorporates both special relativity and quantum uncertainty. Using this theory, we are able to demonstrate theoretically the physical appearance of bosons and fermions. Understanding of the physical structure of electrons and photons will definitely help us advance our technology.

  10. Photon Induced Electron Attachment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    initial measure- ments was that high switch currents and long pulse durations appear to lead to substantially enhanced attachment rates in C3F8 ...similar conditions, but with 1.9 x 1015 C3F8 molecules/cm 3 added to the switch gas mixture. The initial current rise is comparable in both plots, but the...enhanced attachment during the switch opening time period. B. C0O Laser Excitation The photon enhanced attachment of the three gases NF3, C3F8 I and

  11. Generalized Fibonacci photon sieves.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong

    2015-08-20

    We successfully extend the standard Fibonacci zone plates with two on-axis foci to the generalized Fibonacci photon sieves (GFiPS) with multiple on-axis foci. We also propose the direct and inverse design methods based on the characteristic roots of the recursion relation of the generalized Fibonacci sequences. By switching the transparent and opaque zones, according to the generalized Fibonacci sequences, we not only realize adjustable multifocal distances but also fulfill the adjustable compression ratio of focal spots in different directions.

  12. Nanoimprinted photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jayan; Gangopadhyay, Palash; Munoz, Ramon; Peyghambarian, N.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a simple yet efficient approach for nanoimprinting sub-50 nm dimensions starting from a low molecular weight plasticized polymer melt. This technique enabled us to successfully imprint versatile large area nanopatterns with high degrees of fidelity and rational control over the residual layers. The key advantage is its reliability in printing versatile nanostructures and nanophotonic devices doped with organic dyes owing to its low processing temperature. Since nanopatterns can be fabricated easily at low costs, this approach offers an easy pathway for achieving excellent nanoimprinted structures for a variety of photonic, electronic and biological research and applications.

  13. Dirac tensor with heavy photon

    SciTech Connect

    Bytev, V. V.; Kuraev, E. A.; Scherbakova, E. S.

    2013-03-15

    For the large-angle hard-photon emission by initial leptons in the process of high-energy annihilation of e{sup +}e{sup -} to hadrons, the Dirac tensor is obtained by taking the lowest-order radiative corrections into account. The case of large-angle emission of two hard photons by initial leptons is considered. In the final result, the kinematic case of collinear emission of hard photons and soft virtual and real photons is included; it can be used for the construction of Monte-Carlo generators.

  14. Photonic Landau levels on cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Creating photonic materials with nontrivial topological characteristics has seen burgeoning interest in recent years; however, a major route to topology, a magnetic field for continuum photons, has remained elusive. We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We will discuss the conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids.

  15. Fiber-mesh photonic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Subodha; Satpathy, Sashi

    2008-03-01

    Analogous to the photonic crystal, we introduce the concept of a fiber-mesh photonic molecule made up of optical fibers and study its transmission characteristics. We consider a specific example of a photonic molecule, inspired by the well-known C60 molecule, with the arms of the molecule formed out of single-moded optical fibers. The transmittance consists of sharp peaks determined by the pole structure of the scattering matrix in the complex energy plane. A molecule can be designed to control the positions and the widths of the transmission peaks, opening up the possibility of building new photonic devices such as high quality band-pass filters.

  16. Effects of low dose treatment of tributyltin on the regulation of estrogen receptor functions in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sharan, Shruti; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha

    2013-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are the natural/synthetic compounds which mimic or inhibit the actions of endogenous hormones. Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) are typical environmental contaminants and suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical. The present study evaluates the estrogenic potential of this compound in vitro in ER (+) breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 cell line. Our data showed that tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) had agonistic activities for estrogen receptor-α (ER-α). Its estrogenic potential was checked using cell proliferation assay, aromatase assay, transactivation assay, and protein expression analysis. Low dose treatment of TBTCl had a proliferative effect on MCF-7 cells and resulted in up-regulation of aromatase enzyme activity and enhanced estradiol production in MCF-7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining showed translocation of ER-α from cytoplasm to nucleus and increased expression of ER-α, 3β-HSD and aromatase on treatment with increasing doses of TBTCl. Further, to decipher the probable signaling pathways involved in its action, the MCF-7 cells were transfected with different pathway dependent luciferase reporter plasmids (CRE, SRE, NF-κB and AP1). A significant increase in CRE and SRE and decrease in NF-κB regulated pathway were observed (p < 0.05). Our results thus showed that the activation of SRE by TBTCl may be due to ligand dependent ER-α activation of the MAPK pathway and increased phosphorylation of ERK. In summary, the present data suggests that low dose of tributyltin genomically and non-genomically augmented estrogen dependent signaling by targeting various pathways. - Highlights: • Tributyltin chloride is agonistic to ER-α in MCF-7 cell line at low doses. • Tributyltin chloride up regulated aromatase activity and estradiol production. • Tributyltin chloride also activates MAPK pathway inducing ERK activation.

  17. Cell-in-Cell Death Is Not Restricted by Caspase-3 Deficiency in MCF-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; He, Meifang; Li, Linmei; Liang, Zhihua; Zou, Zehong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cell-in-cell structures are created by one living cell entering another homotypic or heterotypic living cell, which usually leads to the death of the internalized cell, specifically through caspase-dependent cell death (emperitosis) or lysosome-dependent cell death (entosis). Although entosis has attracted great attention, its occurrence is controversial, because one cell line used in its study (MCF-7) is deficient in caspase-3. Methods We investigated this issue using MCF-7 and A431 cell lines, which often display cell-in-cell invasion, and have different levels of caspase-3 expression. Cell-in-cell death morphology, microstructures, and signaling pathways were compared in the two cell lines. Results Our results confirmed that MCF-7 cells are caspase-3 deficient with a partial deletion in the CASP-3 gene. These cells underwent cell death that lacked typical apoptotic properties after staurosporine treatment, whereas caspase-3-sufficient A431 cells displayed typical apoptosis. The presence of caspase-3 was related neither to the lysosome-dependent nor to the caspase-dependent cell-in-cell death pathway. However, the existence of caspase-3 was associated with a switch from lysosome-dependent cell-in-cell death to the apoptotic cell-in-cell death pathway during entosis. Moreover, cellular hypoxia, mitochondrial swelling, release of cytochrome C, and autophagy were observed in internalized cells during entosis. Conclusion The occurrence of caspase-independent entosis is not a cell-specific process. In addition, entosis actually represents a cellular self-repair system, functioning through autophagy, to degrade damaged mitochondria resulting from cellular hypoxia in cell-in-cell structures. However, sustained autophagy-associated signal activation, without reduction in cellular hypoxia, eventually leads to lysosome-dependent intracellular cell death. PMID:27721872

  18. Combined effect of navelbine with medroxyprogesterone acetate against human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, K.; Shimizu, M.; Akiyama, T.; Ishida, H.; Okabe, M.; Tamaoki, T.; Akinaga, S.

    1998-01-01

    Navelbine (NVB, vinorelbine ditartrate, KW-2307), a new vinca alkaloid analogue, has been shown to be clinically effective against advanced breast cancer. In this report, the combined effect of NVB with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), a synthetic progesterone derivative, was examined in vitro against human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells. The combined effect was demonstrated to be synergistic using the isobologram and median-effect plot analyses. To elucidate the mechanism of action, we further examined effects of both drugs on cell cycle distribution of the cells in combination and/or alone. NVB at 2 nM induced apparent G1-phase accumulation as well as the induction of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1) protein and the dephosphorylated form of retinoblastoma protein (pRb). In contrast, MPA at 0.1 microM also induced G1-phase accumulation as well as the reduced expression of cyclin D1 protein. In addition, the combination of both drugs induced augmented G1-phase accumulation, which occurred along with p21(WAF1/CIP1) protein induction, cyclin D1 protein reduction and pRb dephosphorylation. These results demonstrate that the synergistic combined effect of NVB with MPA was mediated through enhancement of G1-phase accumulation that resulted from the different action point(s) of each drug. Furthermore, the synergistic combined effect of NVB with MPA was also observed in other human breast carcinoma cell lines, such as T-47D and ZR-75-1. These results suggest that combination therapy of NVB with MPA in breast cancer might be effective in clinical studies. Images Figure 6 PMID:9667641

  19. Lipogenesis in Huh7 cells is promoted by increasing the fructose: Glucose molar ratio

    PubMed Central

    Windemuller, Fernando; Xu, Jiliu; Rabinowitz, Simon S; Hussain, M Mahmood; Schwarz, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether hepatocyte lipogenesis, in an in vitro cell culture model, is modulated by adjusting culture media monosaccharide content and concentration. METHODS: Hepatocytes (Huh7), demonstrating glucose and fructose uptake and lipid biosynthesis, were incubated in culture media containing either glucose alone (0.65-0.72 mmol/L) or isosmolar monosaccharide (0.72 mmol/L) comprising fructose:glucose (F:G) molar ratios ranging from 0.58-0.67. Following a 24-h incubation, cells were harvested and analyzed for total protein, triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol (C) content. Significant differences (P < 0.05) among groups were determined using analysis of variance followed by Dunnett’s test for multiple comparisons. RESULTS: After a 24 h incubation period, Huh7 cell mass and viability among all experimental groups were not different. Hepatocytes cultured with increasing concentrations of glucose alone did not demonstrate a significant change either in C or in TG content. However, when the culture media contained increasing F:G molar ratios, at a constant total monosaccharide concentration, synthesis both of C and of TG increased significantly [F:G ratio = 0.58, C/protein (μg/μg) = 0.13; F:G = 0.67, C/protein = 0.18, P < 0.01; F:G ratio = 0.58, TG/protein (μg/μg) = 0.06; F:G ratio = 0.67, TG/protein = 0.11, P < 0.01]. CONCLUSION: In an in vitro hepatocyte model, glucose or fructose plus glucose support total cell mass and lipogenic activity. Increasing the fructose:glucose molar ratio (but not glucose alone) enhances triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis. These investigations demonstrate fructose promotes hepatocellular lipogenesis, and they provide evidence supporting future, in vivo studies of fructose’s role in the development of hepatic steatosis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27458503

  20. CTCF and CTCFL mRNA expression in 17β-estradiol-treated MCF7 cells

    PubMed Central

    DEL CAMPO, EDUARDO PORTILLO; MÁRQUEZ, JOSÉ JORGE TALAMÁS; REYES-VARGAS, FRANCIANELLA; INTRIAGO-ORTEGA, MARÍA DEL PILAR; QUINTANAR-ESCORZA, MARTHA ANGÉLICA; BURCIAGA-NAVA, JORGE ALBERTO; SIFUENTES-ALVAREZ, ANTONIO; REYES-ROMERO, MIGUEL

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play a key role in breast cancer, with 60–70% of the cases expressing estrogen receptors (ERs), which are encoded by the ESR1 gene. CTCFL, a paralogue of the chromatin organizer CTCF, is a potential biomarker of breast cancer, but its expression in this disease is currently controversial. A positive correlation has been reported between CTCFL and ERs in breast tumors and there also exists a coordinated interaction between CTCF and ERs in breast cancer cells. Therefore, there appears to be an association between CTCF, CTCFL and estrogens in breast cancer; however, there has been no report on the effects of estrogens on CTCF and CTCFL expression. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 17β-estradiol (E2) on the CTCF and CTCFL mRNA expression in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. The promoter methylation status of CTCFL and data mining for estrogen response elements in promoters of the CTCF and CTCFL genes were also determined. The transcription of CTCF and CTCFL was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and the promoter methylation status of CTCFL was determined by methylation-specific PCR. The MCF7 cells exhibited basal transcription of CTCF, which was significantly downregulated to 0.68 by 1 μM E2; basal or E2-regulated transcription of CTCFL was not detected. Under basal conditions, the CTCFL promoter was methylated. Through data mining, an estrogen response element was identified in the CTCF promoter, but no such element was found in CTCFL. These results suggested that estrogens may modulate CTCF expression, although there was no apparent association between ERs and CTCFL. PMID:24649078

  1. Better photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. C.

    2008-11-01

    The development of optical fibers with two-dimensional patterns of air holes running down their length has reinvigorated research in the field of fiber optics. It has greatly - and fundamentally - broadened the range of specialty optical fibers, by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more 'special" than previously thought. Applications of such special fibers have not been hard to find. Fibers with air cores have made it possible to deliver energetic femtosecond-scale optical pulses, transform limited, as solitons, using single-mode fiber. Other fibers with anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths have spawned a new generation of single-mode optical supercontinuum sources, spanning visible and near-infrared wavelengths and based on compact pump sources. A third example is in the field of fiber lasers, where the use of photonic crystal fiber concepts has led to a new hybrid laser technology, in which the very high numerical aperture available using air holes have enabled fibers so short they are more naturally held straight than bent. However, commercial success demands more than just a fiber and an application. The useful properties of the fibers need to be optimized for the specific application. This tutorial will describe some of the basic physics and technology behind these photonic crystal fibers (PCF's), illustrated with some of the impressive demonstrations of the past 18 months.

  2. The ubiquitous photonic wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Andrea; Banzer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    A circularly polarized electromagnetic plane wave carries an electric field that rotates clockwise or counterclockwise around the propagation direction of the wave. According to the handedness of this rotation, its longitudinal spin angular momentum (AM) density is either parallel or antiparallel to the propagation of light. However, there are also light waves that are not simply plane and carry an electric field that rotates around an axis perpendicular to the propagation direction, thus yielding transverse spin AM density. Electric field configurations of this kind have been suggestively dubbed ‘photonic wheels’. It has been recently shown that photonic wheels are commonplace in optics as they occur in electromagnetic fields confined by waveguides, in strongly focused beams, in plasmonic and evanescent waves. In this work we establish a general theory of electromagnetic waves propagating along a well defined direction, and carrying transverse spin AM density. We show that depending on the shape of these waves, the spin density may be either perpendicular to the mean linear momentum (globally transverse spin) or to the linear momentum density (locally transverse spin). We find that the latter case generically occurs only for non-diffracting beams, such as the Bessel beams. Moreover, we introduce the concept of meridional Stokes parameters to operationally quantify the transverse spin density. To illustrate our theory, we apply it to the exemplary cases of Bessel beams and evanescent waves. These results open a new and accessible route to the understanding, generation and manipulation of optical beams with transverse spin AM density.

  3. Silicon photonics manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Zortman, William A; Trotter, Douglas C; Watts, Michael R

    2010-11-08

    Most demonstrations in silicon photonics are done with single devices that are targeted for use in future systems. One of the costs of operating multiple devices concurrently on a chip in a system application is the power needed to properly space resonant device frequencies on a system's frequency grid. We asses this power requirement by quantifying the source and impact of process induced resonant frequency variation for microdisk resonators across individual die, entire wafers and wafer lots for separate process runs. Additionally we introduce a new technique, utilizing the Transverse Electric (TE) and Transverse Magnetic (TM) modes in microdisks, to extract thickness and width variations across wafers and dice. Through our analysis we find that a standard six inch Silicon on Insulator (SOI) 0.35 μm process controls microdisk resonant frequencies for the TE fundamental resonances to within 1 THz across a wafer and 105 GHz within a single die. Based on demonstrated thermal tuner technology, a stable manufacturing process exhibiting this level of variation can limit the resonance trimming power per resonant device to 231 μW. Taken in conjunction with the power to compensate for thermal environmental variations, the expected power requirement to compensate for fabrication-induced non-uniformities is 17% of that total. This leads to the prediction that thermal tuning efficiency is likely to have the most dominant impact on the overall power budget of silicon photonics resonator technology.

  4. Smart photonic carbon brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Kuznetsov, Artem A.; Morozov, Gennady A.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Sakhabutdinov, Airat Z.; Faskhutdinov, Lenar M.; Artemev, Vadim I.

    2016-03-01

    Aspects of the paper relate to a wear monitoring system for smart photonic carbon brush. There are many applications in which regular inspection is not feasible because of a number of factors including, for example, time, labor, cost and disruptions due to down time. Thus, there is a need for a system that can monitor the wear of a component while the component is in operation or without having to remove the component from its operational position. We propose a new smart photonic method for characterization of carbon brush wear. It is based on the usage of advantages of the multiplicative response of FBG and LPFG sensors and its double-frequency probing. Additional measuring parameters are the wear rate, the brush temperature, the engine rotation speed, the hangs control, and rotor speed. Sensor is embedded in brush. Firstly the change of sensor length is used to measure wear value and its central wavelength shift for temperature ones. The results of modeling and experiments are presented.

  5. Gravitational Repulsion of Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2012-03-01

    Plasma redshift explains the cosmological redshift, the redshift of stars and galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, the cosmic X-ray background, the observed redshift relation for magnitude and surface-brightness for supernovae, the solar redshift, the transition zone for the solar corona, the high temperatures of the solar corona. Plasma redshift makes it clear that the optical solar lines are not gravitationally redshifted when observed on Earth. Instead their gravitational redshifts in the Sun are reversed, as the photons travel from the Sun to the Earth. This means that the photons are repelled and not attracted by the gravitational field. There is, therefore, no need for Einstein's Lambda for explaining the static Universe. When the matter concentrates and falls towards the center of galaxies, it becomes so hot that it disintegrates matter to reform primordial like matter. In this way the universe can renew itself forever. This is all based on conventional physics, using only more accurate physics and calculations than those usually used. There is no need for Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Accelerated Expansion, nor Black Holes for explaining the everlasting Universe.

  6. Microfluidic photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Godin, Jessica; Chen, Chun Hao; Tsai, Frank S.; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2008-11-01

    We report on the development of an inexpensive, portable lab-on-a-chip flow cytometer system in which microfluidics, photonics, and acoustics are integrated together to work synergistically. The system relies on fluid-filled twodimensional on-chip photonic components such as lenses, apertures, and slab waveguides to allow for illumination laser beam shaping, light scattering and fluorescence signal detection. Both scattered and fluorescent lights are detected by photodetectors after being collected and guided by the on-chip optics components (e.g. lenses and waveguides). The detected light signal is imported and amplified in real time and triggers the piezoelectric actuator so that the targeted samples are directed into desired reservoir for subsequent advanced analysis. The real-time, closed-loop control system is developed with field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) implementation. The system enables high-throughput (1- 10kHz operation), high reliability and low-powered (<1mW) fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) on a chip. The microfabricated flow cytometer can potentially be used as a portable, inexpensive point-of-care device in resource poor environments.

  7. Photon Sieve Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G.; Dearborn, M.; Hcharg, G.

    2010-09-01

    We are investigating new technologies for creating ultra-large apertures (>20m) for space-based imagery. Our approach has been to create diffractive primaries in flat membranes deployed from compact payloads. These structures are attractive in that they are much simpler to fabricate, launch and deploy compared to conventional three-dimensional optics. In this case the flat focusing element is a photon sieve which consists of a large number of holes in an otherwise opaque substrate. A photon sieve is essentially a large number of holes located according to an underlying Fresnel Zone Plate (FZP) geometry. The advantages over the FZP are that there are no support struts which lead to diffraction spikes in the far-field and non-uniform tension which can cause wrinkling of the substrate. Furthermore, with modifications in hole size and distribution we can achieve improved resolution and contrast over conventional optics. The trade-offs in using diffractive optics are the large amounts of dispersion and decreased efficiency. We present both theoretical and experimental results from small-scale prototypes. Several key solutions to issues of limited bandwidth and efficiency have been addressed. Along with these we have studied the materials aspects in order to optimize performance and achieve a scalable solution to an on-orbit demonstrator. Our current efforts are being directed towards an on-orbit 1m solar observatory demonstration deployed from a CubeSat bus.

  8. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  9. Octonacci photonic quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, E. R.; Costa, C. H.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Anselmo, D. H. A. L.; Mello, V. D.

    2015-08-01

    We study theoretically the transmission spectra in one-dimensional photonic quasicrystals, made up of SiO2(A) and TiO2(B) materials, organized following the Octonacci sequence, where the nth-stage of the multilayer Sn is given by the rule Sn =Sn-1Sn-2Sn-1 , for n ⩾ 3 and with S1 = A and S2 = B . The expression for transmittance was obtained by employing a theoretical calculation based on the transfer-matrix method. For normally incident waves, we observe that, for a same generation, the transmission spectra for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves are equal, at least qualitatively, and they present a scaling property where a self-similar behavior is obtained, as an evidence that these spectra are fractals. The spectra show regions where the omnidirectional band gaps emerges for specific generations of Octonacci photonic structure, except to TM waves. For TE waves, we note that all of them have almost the same width, for different generations. We also report the localization of modes as a consequence of the quasiperiodicity of the heterostructure.

  10. Photonic module: An on-demand resource for photonic entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Devitt, Simon J.; Greentree, Andrew D.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Ionicioiu, Radu; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Munro, William J.

    2007-11-15

    Photonic entanglement has a wide range of applications in quantum computation and communication. Here we introduce a device: the photonic module, which allows for the rapid, deterministic preparation of a large class of entangled photon states. The module is an application independent, ''plug and play'' device, with sufficient flexibility to prepare entanglement for all major quantum computation and communication applications in a completely deterministic fashion without number-discriminated photon detection. We present two alternative constructions for the module, one using free-space components and one in a photonic band-gap structure. The natural operation of the module is to generate states within the stabilizer formalism and we present an analysis on the cavity requirements to experimentally realize this device.

  11. Origin of strong photon antibunching in weakly nonlinear photonic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Motoaki; Ciuti, Cristiano; Imamoglu, Atac; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2011-02-15

    In a recent work [Liew and Savona, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 183601 (2010)] it was numerically shown that a resonantly driven photonic ''molecule'' consisting of two coupled cavities can exhibit strong photon antibunching with a surprisingly weak Kerr nonlinearity. Here, we analytically identify the subtle quantum interference effect that is responsible for the predicted efficient photon blockade effect. We then extend the theory to the experimentally relevant Jaynes-Cummings system consisting of a single quantum emitter in a coupled-cavity structure and predict the strong antibunching even for single-atom cooperativity on the order of or smaller than unity. The potential of this quantum interference effect in the realization of strongly correlated photonic systems with only weak material nonlinearities is assessed by comparing on-site and inter-site correlations in a ring of three coupled photonic molecules.

  12. Compact Photon Source Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyarenko, Pavel V.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2016-04-01

    We describe options for the production of an intense photon beam at the CEBAF Hall D Tagger facility, needed for creating a high-quality secondary K 0 L delivered to the Hall D detector. The conceptual design for the Compact Photon Source apparatus is presented.

  13. The Impact of Silicon Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-29

    integrated photonics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18.NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Richard Soref...The impact of present and potential applications is discussed. key words: silicon, optoelectronics, integrated photonics 1. Introduction Silicon

  14. XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database (Web, free access)   A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.

  15. Photonics: Maintaining Competitiveness in the Information Era

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Photonics Maintaining Competitiveness in the Information Era \\ATIONAL RESEIARCII COUVIIII, -mail Photonics: Maintaining Competitiveness in the... Information Era Panel on Photonics Science and Tcchnology Assessment Solid State Sciences Committee Board on Physics and Astronomy Commission on Physical

  16. Photon Entanglement Through Brain Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Galvez, Enrique J.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-12-01

    Photon entanglement, the cornerstone of quantum correlations, provides a level of coherence that is not present in classical correlations. Harnessing it by study of its passage through organic matter may offer new possibilities for medical diagnosis technique. In this work, we study the preservation of photon entanglement in polarization, created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, after one entangled photon propagates through multiphoton-scattering brain tissue slices with different thickness. The Tangle-Entropy (TS) plots show the strong preservation of entanglement of photons propagating in brain tissue. By spatially filtering the ballistic scattering of an entangled photon, we find that its polarization entanglement is preserved and non-locally correlated with its twin in the TS plots. The degree of entanglement correlates better with structure and water content than with sample thickness.

  17. Collimator-free photon tomography

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Barbour, Randall L.

    1998-10-06

    A method of uncollimated single photon emission computed tomography includes administering a radioisotope to a patient for producing gamma ray photons from a source inside the patient. Emissivity of the photons is measured externally of the patient with an uncollimated gamma camera at a plurality of measurement positions surrounding the patient for obtaining corresponding energy spectrums thereat. Photon emissivity at the plurality of measurement positions is predicted using an initial prediction of an image of the source. The predicted and measured photon emissivities are compared to obtain differences therebetween. Prediction and comparison is iterated by updating the image prediction until the differences are below a threshold for obtaining a final prediction of the source image.

  18. Collimator-free photon tomography

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Barbour, R.L.

    1998-10-06

    A method of uncollimated single photon emission computed tomography includes administering a radioisotope to a patient for producing gamma ray photons from a source inside the patient. Emissivity of the photons is measured externally of the patient with an uncollimated gamma camera at a plurality of measurement positions surrounding the patient for obtaining corresponding energy spectrums thereat. Photon emissivity at the plurality of measurement positions is predicted using an initial prediction of an image of the source. The predicted and measured photon emissivities are compared to obtain differences therebetween. Prediction and comparison is iterated by updating the image prediction until the differences are below a threshold for obtaining a final prediction of the source image. 6 figs.

  19. Photon Entanglement Through Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lingyan; Galvez, Enrique J.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Photon entanglement, the cornerstone of quantum correlations, provides a level of coherence that is not present in classical correlations. Harnessing it by study of its passage through organic matter may offer new possibilities for medical diagnosis technique. In this work, we study the preservation of photon entanglement in polarization, created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, after one entangled photon propagates through multiphoton-scattering brain tissue slices with different thickness. The Tangle-Entropy (TS) plots show the strong preservation of entanglement of photons propagating in brain tissue. By spatially filtering the ballistic scattering of an entangled photon, we find that its polarization entanglement is preserved and non-locally correlated with its twin in the TS plots. The degree of entanglement correlates better with structure and water content than with sample thickness. PMID:27995952

  20. Single Photon diffraction and interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2015-04-01

    A previous paper based on the Scalar Theory of Everything studied photon diffraction and interference (IntellectualArchive, Vol.1, No. 3, P. 20, Toronto, Canada July 2012. http://intellectualarchive.com/?link=item&id=597). Several photons were required in the experiment at the same time. Interference experiments with one photon in the experiment at a time also showed interference patterns. The previous paper with the Bohm Interpretation, models of the screen and mask, and the Transaction Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics were combined. The reverse wave required by the Transaction Interpretation was provided by a reflected plenum wave rather than a reverse time wave. The speed of the plenum wave was assumed to be much faster than the speed of photons/light. Using the assumptions of Fraunhofer diffraction resulted in the same equation for the photon distribution on a screen as the intensity pattern of the Fraunhofer diffraction. (http://myplace.frontier.com/ ~ jchodge/)

  1. Biocompatibility of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and their cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Daozhen; Tang, Qiusha; Li, Xiangdong; Zhou, Xiaojin; Zang, Jia; Xue, Wen-qun; Xiang, Jing-ying; Guo, Cai-qin

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the synthesis and biocompatibility of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and investigate their therapeutic effects when combined with magnetic fluid hyperthermia on cultured MCF-7 cancer cells. Methods Magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared using a coprecipitation method. The appearance, structure, phase composition, functional groups, surface charge, magnetic susceptibility, and release in vitro were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and a vibrating sample magnetometer. Blood toxicity, in vitro toxicity, and genotoxicity were investigated. Therapeutic effects were evaluated by MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] and flow cytometry assays. Results Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the shapes of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles were approximately spherical, with diameters of about 26.1 ± 5.2 nm. Only the spinel phase was indicated in a comparison of the x-ray diffraction data with Joint Corporation of Powder Diffraction Standards (JCPDS) X-ray powder diffraction files. The O-to-Fe ratio of the Fe3O4 was determined by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis, and approximated pure Fe3O4. The vibrating sample magnetometer hysteresis loop suggested that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles were superparamagnetic at room temperature. MTT experiments showed that the toxicity of the material in mouse fibroblast (L-929) cell lines was between Grade 0 to Grade 1, and that the material lacked hemolysis activity. The acute toxicity (LD50) was 8.39 g/kg. Micronucleus testing showed no genotoxic effects. Pathomorphology and blood biochemistry testing demonstrated that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles had no effect on the main organs and blood biochemistry in a rabbit model. MTT and flow cytometry assays revealed that Fe3O4 nano magnetofluid thermotherapy inhibited MCF-7

  2. Photonic quantum information: science and technology.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological progress in the generation, manipulation and detection of individual single photons has opened a new scientific field of photonic quantum information. This progress includes the realization of single photon switches, photonic quantum circuits with specific functions, and the application of novel photonic states to novel optical metrology beyond the limits of standard optics. In this review article, the recent developments and current status of photonic quantum information technology are overviewed based on the author's past and recent works.

  3. Fabrication of Metamaterials by Drawing Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-27

    modes in uniaxial metamaterial clad fibers ,” Meta’12 — 3rd International Conference on Metamaterials, Photonic Crystals and Plasmonics, (Paris, April...Fleming and B T. Kuhlmey “ Hollow - core uniaxial metamaterial clad fibers : Part I – modal equations and guidance conditions” [11] S. Atakaramians, A...Argyros, S. C. Fleming and B T. Kuhlmey “ Hollow - core uniaxial metamaterial clad fibers : Part II – dispersive metamaterials”

  4. The photon: issues of integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, D. L.

    2013-10-01

    A richly diverse range of phenomena and applications, frequently in the context of laser applications, owe their means of operation to the properties of the photon. Yet, since the arrival of the laser, the distinctive and often paradoxical nature of the photon has become more than ever evident, and what the optics community now understands by a `photon' has become richer - certainly less simple, than Einstein's original conception. There has been a marked expansion in the pace of development since the now familiar derivative term `photonics' first emerged, and in much current theory any dividing line between `real' and `virtual' photons proves to be illusory. So if, in this technical sense, no photon can ever be regarded as entirely real, one is drawn to deeper questions of whether the photon is `real' in the broader sense of reality. Some would argue that electromagnetic fields are closer to irreducible reality. Yet whether we elect to describe optical phenomena in terms of fields or photons, neither represents what is actually measured. The surest ground has to be found where theory is cast in terms that explain or predict actual observations, under given conditions. It is consistent with the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics that derivations should not prescribe what intervenes between setup and measurement, but instead allow for all possibilities. Indeed, one of the beauties of the associated mathematics is its capacity to home in on possibilities that most closely conform to post-event physical interpretation. Still, we can ask: how much do or can we know about the photon itself? How much information could this entity contain or convey? And, how essential is a photonic formulation of theory? This study focuses on some of the key issues.

  5. Perovskite photonic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Brandon R.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-05-01

    The field of solution-processed semiconductors has made great strides; however, it has yet to enable electrically driven lasers. To achieve this goal, improved materials are required that combine efficient (>50% quantum yield) radiative recombination under high injection, large and balanced charge-carrier mobilities in excess of 10 cm2 V-1 s-1, free-carrier densities greater than 1017 cm-3 and gain coefficients exceeding 104 cm-1. Solid-state perovskites are -- in addition to galvanizing the field of solar electricity -- showing great promise in photonic sources, and may be the answer to realizing solution-cast laser diodes. Here, we discuss the properties of perovskites that benefit light emission, review recent progress in perovskite electroluminescent diodes and optically pumped lasers, and examine the remaining challenges in achieving continuous-wave and electrically driven lasing.

  6. Regenerative photonic therapy: Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salansky, Natasha; Salansky, Norman

    2012-09-01

    After four decades of research of photobiomodulation phenomena in mammals in vitro and in vivo, a solid foundation is created for the use of photobiomodulation in regenerative medicine. Significant accomplishments are achieved in animal models that demonstrate opportunities for photo-regeneration of injured or pathological tissues: skin, muscles and nerves. However, the use of photobiomodulation in clinical studies leads to controversial results while negative or marginal clinical efficacy is reported along with positive findings. A thor ough analysis of requirements to the optical parameters (dosimetry) for high efficacy in photobimodulation led us to the conclusion that there are several misconceptions in the clinical applications of low level laser therapy (LLLT). We present a novel appr oach of regenerative photonic therapy (RPT) for tissue healing and regeneration that overcomes major drawbacks of LLLT. Encouraging clinical results on RPT efficacy are presented. Requirements for RPT approach and vision for its future development for tissue regeneration is discussed.

  7. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  8. Ferrofluid Photonic Dipole Contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Michael; Frederick, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Understanding magnetic fields is important to facilitate magnetic applications in diverse fields in industry, commerce, and space exploration to name a few. Large electromagnets can move heavy loads of metal. Magnetic materials attached to credit cards allow for fast, accurate business transactions. And the Earth's magnetic field gives us the colorful auroras observed near the north and south poles. Magnetic fields are not visible, and therefore often hard to understand or characterize. This investigation describes and demonstrates a novel technique for the visualization of magnetic fields. Two ferrofluid Hele-Shaw cells have been constructed to facilitate the imaging of magnetic field lines [1,2,3,4]. We deduce that magnetically induced photonic band gap arrays similar to electrostatic liquid crystal operation are responsible for the photographed images and seek to mathematically prove the images are of exact dipole nature. We also note by comparison that our photographs are very similar to solar magnetic Heliosphere photographs.

  9. The Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7-GeV third-generation synchrotron radiation storage ring and full-energy positron injector. Construction project funding began in 1989, and ground breaking took place on 5 May 1990. Construction of all accelerator facilities was completed in January 1995 and storage ring commissioning is underway. First observation of x-rays from a bending magnet source took place on 26 March 1995. Nearly all performance specifications of the injector have been reached, and first observations indicate that the reliability, dynamic aperture, emittance, and orbit stability in the storage ring are satisfactory. Observation of radiation from the first of 20 insertion device beamlines is scheduled for October 1995. Start of regular operations is expected to take place well before the APS Project target date of December 1996.

  10. The advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, J.N.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7-GeV third-generation synchrotron radiation storage ring and full-energy positron injector. Construction project funding began in 1989, and ground breaking took place on 5 May 1990. Construction of all accelerator facilities was completed in January 1995 and storage ring commissioning is underway. First observation of x-rays from a bending magnet source took place on 26 March 1995. Nearly all performance specifications of the injector have been reached, and first observations indicate that the reliability, dynamic aperture, emittance, and orbit stability in the storage ring are satisfactory. Observation of radiation from the first of 20 insertion device beamlines is scheduled for October 1995. Start of regular operations is expected to take place well before the APS Project target date of December 1996.

  11. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen; Zhang, Ru; Wang, Chuan

    2016-06-01

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  12. Topological photonics: an observation of Landau levels for optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Using a digital micromirror device to control both amplitude and phase, we inject arbitrary optical modes into our resonator. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We show that there is a conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids. This work was supported by DOE, DARPA, and AFOSR.

  13. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen; Zhang, Ru; Wang, Chuan

    2016-06-15

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  14. Photon-efficient imaging with a single-photon camera

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dongeek; Xu, Feihu; Venkatraman, Dheera; Lussana, Rudi; Villa, Federica; Zappa, Franco; Goyal, Vivek K.; Wong, Franco N. C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing a scene's 3D structure and reflectivity accurately with an active imaging system operating in low-light-level conditions has wide-ranging applications, spanning biological imaging to remote sensing. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a depth and reflectivity imaging system with a single-photon camera that generates high-quality images from ∼1 detected signal photon per pixel. Previous achievements of similar photon efficiency have been with conventional raster-scanning data collection using single-pixel photon counters capable of ∼10-ps time tagging. In contrast, our camera's detector array requires highly parallelized time-to-digital conversions with photon time-tagging accuracy limited to ∼ns. Thus, we develop an array-specific algorithm that converts coarsely time-binned photon detections to highly accurate scene depth and reflectivity by exploiting both the transverse smoothness and longitudinal sparsity of natural scenes. By overcoming the coarse time resolution of the array, our framework uniquely achieves high photon efficiency in a relatively short acquisition time. PMID:27338821

  15. Polymeric photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Yoel

    Two novel and practical methods for controlling the propagation of light are presented: First, a design criterion that permits truly omnidirectional reflectivity for all polarizations of incident light over a wide selectable range of frequencies is derived and used in fabricating an alldielectric omnidirectional reflector consisting of multilayer films. Because the omnidirectionality criterion is general, it can be used to design omnidirectional reflectors in many frequency ranges of interest. Potential uses depend on the geometry of the system. For example, coating of an enclosure will result in an optical cavity. A hollow tube will produce a low-loss, broadband waveguide, planar film could be used as an efficient radiative heat barrier or collector in thermoelectric devices. A comprehensive framework for creating one-, two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals out of self- assembling block copolymers has been formulated. In order to form useful band gaps in the visible regime, periodic dielectric structures made of typical block copolymers need to be modified to obtain appropriate characteristic distances and dielectric constants. Moreover, the absorption and defect concentration must also be controlled. This affords the opportunity to tap into the large structural repertoire, the flexibility and intrinsic tunability that these self-assembled block copolymer systems offer. A block copolymer was used to achieve a self assembled photonic band gap in the visible regime. By swelling the diblock copolymer with lower molecular weight constituents control over the location of the stop band across the visible regime is achieved. One and three- dimensional crystals have been formed by changing the volume fraction of the swelling media. Methods for incorporating defects of prescribed dimensions into the self-assembled structures have been explored leading to the construction of a self assembled microcavity light- emitting device. (Copies available exclusively from MIT

  16. How photons start vision.

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, D

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have elucidated how the absorption of a photon in a rod or cone cell leads to the generation of the amplified neural signal that is transmitted to higher-order visual neurons. Photoexcited visual pigment activates the GTP-binding protein transducin, which in turn stimulates cGMP phosphodiesterase. This enzyme hydrolyzes cGMP, allowing cGMP-gated cationic channels in the surface membrane to close, hyperpolarize the cell, and modulate transmitter release at the synaptic terminal. The kinetics of reactions in the cGMP cascade limit the temporal resolution of the visual system as a whole, while statistical fluctuations in the reactions limit the reliability of detection of dim light. Much interest now focuses on the processes that terminate the light response and dynamically regulate amplification in the cascade, causing the single photon response to be reproducible and allowing the cell to adapt in background light. A light-induced fall in the internal free Ca2+ concentration coordinates negative feedback control of amplification. The fall in Ca2+ stimulates resynthesis of cGMP, antagonizes rhodopsin's catalytic activity, and increases the affinity of the light-regulated cationic channel for cGMP. We are using physiological methods to study the molecular mechanisms that terminate the flash response and mediate adaptation. One approach is to observe transduction in truncated, dialyzed photoreceptor cells whose internal Ca2+ and nucleotide concentrations are under experimental control and to which exogenous proteins can be added. Another approach is to observe transduction in transgenic mouse rods in which specific proteins within the cascade are altered or deleted. PMID:8570595

  17. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. PMID:27877676

  18. Nonlinearity in MCF7 Cell Survival Following Exposure to Modulated 6 MV Radiation Fields

    PubMed Central

    Castiella, Marion; Franceries, Xavier; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Vieillevigne, Laure; Pereda, Veronica; Bardies, Manuel; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The study of cell survival following exposure to nonuniform radiation fields is taking on particular interest because of the increasing evidence of a nonlinear relationship at low doses. We conducted in vitro experiments using the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. A 2.4 × 2.4 cm2 square area of a T25 flask was irradiated by a Varian Novalis accelerator delivering 6 MV photons. Cell survival inside the irradiation field, in the dose gradient zone and in the peripheral zone, was determined using a clonogenic assay for different radiation doses at the isocenter. Increased cell survival was observed inside the irradiation area for doses of 2, 10, and 20 Gy when nonirradiated cells were present at the periphery, while the cells at the periphery showed decreased survival compared to controls. Increased survival was also observed at the edge of the dose gradient zone for cells receiving 0.02 to 0.01 Gy when compared with cells at the periphery of the same flask, whatever the isocenter dose. These data are the first to report cell survival in the dose gradient zone. Radiotherapists must be aware of this nonlinearity in dose response. PMID:26740805

  19. A study on the inhibitory effect of polysaccharides from Radix ranunculus ternati on human breast cancer MCF-7 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sun, De-Li; Xie, Han-Bing; Xia, Yun-Zhan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the in vitro anti-breast cancer activity of polysaccharides from Radix ranunculus ternati. Different concentrations of polysaccharide extracts were selected, and MTT assay and flow cytometry (FCM) were used to investigate their growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects on human breast cancer MCF-7 cell lines. Radix ranunculus ternati polysaccharides had varying degrees of effects on the growth of human breast cancer MCF-7 cell lines, and the differences were significant compared with the blank control group. FCM showed that the polysaccharides can induce apoptosis. In addition, it can also enhance NK cell activity. Radix ranunculus ternati polysaccharides have a relatively good in-vitro anti-breast cancer activity.

  20. Different chemo- and endocrino-sensitivity of MCF-7 cells with or without estradiol supplement in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tanino, H; Kubota, T; Saikawa, Y; Kuo, T H; Takeuchi, T; Kase, S; Furukawa, T; Kitajima, M; Sakurai, T; Naito, Y

    1993-01-01

    The sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to tamoxifen (TAM) and mitomycin C (MMC) was assessed in rapidly and slowly growing cells with or without estradiol supplementation, respectively. The growth of MCF-7 was inhibited by MMC in a concentration-dependent manner with or without estradiol (E2) supplementation. Preincubation with MMC suppressed subsequent E2 stimulated growth of MCF-7. TAM inhibited the growth of MCF-7 supplemented with E2 and preincubation with TAM prevented subsequent E2 stimulated growth of MCF-7. However, TAM did not inhibit the growth of MCF-7 cells in E2 free medium. These results suggested that MMC may be more effective than TAM on breast cancer cells in the dormant or slow-growth phase.

  1. Study of cytotoxic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups on human MCF7 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Maoyong; Zeng, Luzhe; Yuan, Shaopeng; Yin, Junfa; Wang, Hailin; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-07-01

    Functionalization is an important technique to increase the solubility and biocompatibility of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of four types of SWCNTs functionalized with hydroxyl, amino, carboxyl and polyethyleneglycol on MCF7 cells. These functionalized SWCNTs (f-SWCNTs) have insignificant effects on mitochondrial activity and ROS production in MCF7 cells at all test concentrations. However, explicit results revealed that all the tested f-SWCNTs could cause changes of cell morphology, induce cell membrane damage, decrease cell adhesion, and increase cell apoptosis. Therefore, this study shows the potential side effects of f-SWCNTs accompanying with the increase of dispersibility and stability in environment or serum (to prevent their aggregation), and highlights the need for further research to examine the potential toxicity of f-SWCNTs before they are used in the environmental and biomedical fields.

  2. [Construction of eukaryotic expressing vector of multiple myeloma mucin-1 and its expression in COS-7 cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Luo, Yun-Jiao; Liu, Yue-Bo; Yao, Jin; Yang, Hong; Mou, Hong; Huang, Gui-Yun; Zhang, You

    2009-08-01

    In order to construct an eukaryotic expression vector for gene of multiple myeloma mucin1 (muc1-2vntr) gene and to express it in COS-7 cells in vitro, so to provide the basic material for further research of multiple myeloma DNA vaccine. muc1-2vntr coding gene was used as a research gene and a KOZAK sequence was inserted before the gene Hind III and XbaI restriction sites were inserted before and after the coding gene. Then the whole sequence was synthesized and inserted into pcDNA3.1/myc-his B vector, and the resulted recombinant vector was transformed into E.coil competent cells to get an engineering strain, the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1-2vntr/myc-his B identified by restriction analysis and DNA sequencing were transfected into COS-7 cells by liposome-mediated gene transfer method. Finally, fluorescent microscopy was used to assess GFP expression and Western blot analysis using muc1 monoclonal antibody was used to recognize vntr, confirming the expression of vntr. The results showed that the full length of synthesized muc1-2vntr gene, as expected, was 140 bp. Both restriction analysis and DNA sequencing demonstrated that pcDNA3.1-2vntr/myc-his B included the whole translation frame region and muc1-2vntr gene. Furthermore, the fluorescence microscopy proved that the recombinant plasmid had been successfully transfected into COS-7 cells. The expression of mucin-1 protein was observed both in the transfected cell and the cell supernatant by Western blot. It is concluded that the pcDNA3.1-2vntr/myc-his B has been successfully constructed and expressed in COS-7 cells in vitro, which provides the basic material for further researches of mucin-1 function and possible multiple myloma DNA vaccine.

  3. Evidence for anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of dried plum polyphenols in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Hooshmand, Shirin; Kumar, Ajay; Zhang, Ji Yao; Johnson, Sarah A; Chai, Sheau C; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2015-05-01

    This study presents the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of dried plum (Prunus domestica L.) polyphenols in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. We hypothesized that dried plum polyphenols have strong anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of the pro-inflammatory markers, nitric oxide (NO) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and the lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde, in activated macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. To test this hypothesis, macrophage RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with either 1 μg ml(-1) (for measurement of NO production) or 1 ng ml(-1) (for measurement of COX-2 expression) of LPS to induce inflammation and were treated with different doses of dried plum polyphenols (0.0, 0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 1000 μg ml(-1)). Dried plum polyphenols at a dose of 1000 μg ml(-1) was able to significantly (P < 0.05) reduce NO production by 43%. Additionally, LPS-induced expression of COX-2 was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced by 100 and 1000 μg ml(-1) dried plum polyphenols. To investigate the antioxidant activity of dried plum polyphenols, macrophage RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with 100 μg ml(-1) of FeSO4 + 1 mM ml(-1) of H2O2 to induce lipid peroxidation. Dried plum polyphenols at a dose of 1000 μg ml(-1) showed a 32% reduction in malondialdehyde production. These findings indicate that dried plum polyphenols are potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidative agents in vitro.

  4. Differential effect of vinorelbine versus paclitaxel on ERK2 kinase activity during apoptosis in MCF-7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X M; Wang, L G; Kreis, W; Budman, D R; Adams, L M

    2001-01-01

    The effects of vinorelbine and paclitaxel on the activity of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase2 (ERK2), a member of MAP kinase, and its role in the induction of bcl-2 phosphorylation and apoptosis were evaluated in MCF-7 cells. We demonstrated that ERK2 was activated rapidly by vinorelbine, and was inhibited by either paclitaxel or estramustine. A 3-fold increase of ERK2 kinase activity was observed within 30 min when MCF-7 cells were treated with 0.1 μM vinorelbine. In contrast, the same treatment with paclitaxel resulted in a significant decrease of ERK2 kinase activity. We also demonstrated that elevated bcl-2 phosphorylation induced by vinorelbine is paralleled by decrease of a complex formation between bcl-2 and bax, cleavage of poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) protein, activation of caspase-7, and apoptosis. The levels of bcl-2 phosphorylation, bax, and PARP were not significantly affected by 2′-amino-3′-methoxyflavone (PD 98059), an ERK kinase specific inhibitor. Thus, our data suggest that the apoptosis induced by vinorelbine in MCF-7 cells is mediated through the bcl-2 phosphorylation/bax/caspases pathways, and that activation of ERK2 by vinorelbine does not directly lead to the drug-mediated apoptosis. Since decrease of PARP occurred quickly following the treatment of MCF-7 cells with either 0.1 μM of vinorelbine or paclitaxel, this protein may serve as an early indicator of apoptosis induced not only by DNA damaging agents, but also by antimicrotubule drugs.   http://www.bjcancer.com © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11720482

  5. Effects of low dose treatment of tributyltin on the regulation of estrogen receptor functions in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Shruti; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha

    2013-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are the natural/synthetic compounds which mimic or inhibit the actions of endogenous hormones. Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) are typical environmental contaminants and suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical. The present study evaluates the estrogenic potential of this compound in vitro in ER (+) breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 cell line. Our data showed that tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) had agonistic activities for estrogen receptor-α (ER-α). Its estrogenic potential was checked using cell proliferation assay, aromatase assay, transactivation assay, and protein expression analysis. Low dose treatment of TBTCl had a proliferative effect on MCF-7 cells and resulted in up-regulation of aromatase enzyme activity and enhanced estradiol production in MCF-7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining showed translocation of ER-α from cytoplasm to nucleus and increased expression of ER-α, 3β-HSD and aromatase on treatment with increasing doses of TBTCl. Further, to decipher the probable signaling pathways involved in its action, the MCF-7 cells were transfected with different pathway dependent luciferase reporter plasmids (CRE, SRE, NF-κB and AP1). A significant increase in CRE and SRE and decrease in NF-κB regulated pathway were observed (p<0.05). Our results thus showed that the activation of SRE by TBTCl may be due to ligand dependent ER-α activation of the MAPK pathway and increased phosphorylation of ERK. In summary, the present data suggests that low dose of tributyltin genomically and non-genomically augmented estrogen dependent signaling by targeting various pathways.

  6. PTEN enhances G2/M arrest in etoposide-treated MCF‑7 cells through activation of the ATM pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruopeng; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Lirong; Xu, Anli; Li, Zhengwei; Xu, Yijuan; He, Pei; Wu, Maoqing; Wei, Fengxiang; Wang, Chenhong

    2016-05-01

    As an effective tumor suppressor, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) has attracted the increased attention of scientists. Recent studies have shown that PTEN plays unique roles in the DNA damage response (DDR) and can interact with the Chk1 pathway. However, little is known about how PTEN contributes to DDR through the ATM-Chk2 pathway. It is well-known that etoposide induces G2/M arrest in a variety of cell lines, including MCF-7 cells. The DNA damage-induced G2/M arrest results from the activation of protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), followed by the activation of Chk2 that subsequently inactivates CDC25C, resulting in G2/M arrest. In the present study, we assessed the contribution of PTEN to the etoposide-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. PTEN was knocked down in MCF-7 cells by specific shRNA, and the effects of PTEN on the ATM-Chk2 pathway were investigated through various approaches. The results showed that knockdown of PTEN strongly antagonized ATM activation in response to etoposide treatment, and thereby reduced the phosphorylation level of ATM substrates, including H2AX, P53 and Chk2. Furthermore, depletion of PTEN reduced the etoposide-induced phosphorylation of CDC25C and strikingly compromised etoposide-induced G2/M arrest in the MCF-7 cells. Altogether, we demonstrated that PTEN plays a unique role in etoposide-induced G2/M arrest by facilitating the activation of the ATM pathway, and PTEN was required for the proper activation of checkpoints in response to DNA damage in MCF-7 cells.

  7. Estrogenic activity of osthole and imperatorin in MCF-7 cells and their osteoblastic effects in Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Min; Li, Yuan; Xin, Hai-Liang; Hou, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Nai-Dai; Xu, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing interest in phytoestrogens due to their potential medical usage in hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The present study was designed to investigate the in vitro effects of estrogen-like activities of two widespread coumarins, osthole and imperatorin, using the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay and their alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities in osteoblasts Saos-2 cells. The two compounds were found to strongly stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. The estrogen receptor-regulated ERα, progesterone receptor (PR) and PS2 mRNA levels were increased by treatment with osthole and imperatorin. All these effects were significantly inhibited by the specific estrogen receptor antagonist ICI182, 780. Cell cycle analysis revealed that their proliferation stimulatory effect was associated with a marked increase in the number of MCF-7 cells in S phase, which was similar to that observed with estradiol. It was also observed that they significantly increased ALP activity, which was reversed by ICI182,780. These results suggested that osthole and imperatorin could stimulate osteoblastic activity by displaying estrogenic properties or through the ER pathway. In conclusion, osthole and imperatorin may represent new pharmacological tools for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  8. Effect of Egg White Combined with Chalcanthite on Lipopolysaccharide induced Inflammatory Cytokine Expression in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun-A; Yoon, Jeung-Won; Choi, Hak-Joo; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yoo, Hwa-Seung

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Historically, mineral compound herbal medicines have long been used in treatments of immune-related diseases in Korea, China and other Asian countries. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of egg white combined with chalcanthite (IS4) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Methods: RAW 264.7 cells cultured with LPS and various concentrations of IS4 were analyzed to determine the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators by using enzyme-linked immune sorbent assays (ELISAs). Results: IS4 concentration inhibited the production of interleukin-1beta (IL-1 β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and granulocyte -macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induced by LPS. IS4 at high concentrations (25 and 50㎍/ml) inhibited, in concentration-dependent manner, the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF– α) stimulated by LPS. Conclusion: IS4 has shown an anti-inflammatory effect in RAW 264.7 cells. PMID:25780629

  9. Susceptibility of GT1-7 cells to mouse-passaged field scrapie isolates with a long incubation.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Masujin, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A typical feature of scrapie in sheep and goats is the accumulation of disease-associated prion protein. Scrapie consists of many strains with different biological properties. Nine natural sheep scrapie cases were transmitted to wild-type mice and mouse-passaged isolates were classified into 2 types based on incubation time: short and long. These 2 types displayed a distinct difference in their pathology. We attempted to transmit these mouse-passaged isolates to 2 murine cell lines (GT1-7 and L929) to compare their properties. All of the isolates were transmitted to L929 cells. However, only mouse-passaged field isolates with a long incubation time were transmitted to GT1-7 cells. This specific susceptibility of GT1-7 cells was also confirmed with a primary-passaged isolate that was not completely adapted to the new host species. Characterization of the mechanisms of the specific susceptibility of GT1-7 cells to isolates with a long incubation time may lead to a greater understanding of the differences among prion strains.

  10. Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Activities of Broccoli Florets in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Joon-Ho; Lim, Sang-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italia) florets were extracted with 80% methanol and the extract was sequentially fractionated with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and distilled water. The extract and the fractions were evaluated for total phenolic content, sulforaphane content, antioxidant activity, and anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. The total phenolic content and sulforaphane content of the ethyl acetate fraction (EF) were 35.5 mg gallic acid equivalents/g and 620.2 μg/g, respectively. These values were higher than those of the 80% methanol extract and organic solvent fractions. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity of the EF [1,588.7 μM Trolox equivalents (TE)/mg] was 11-fold higher than that of the distilled water fraction (143.7 μM TE/mg). The EF inhibited nitric oxide release from LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner and inhibited IκB-α degradation and nuclear factor-κB activation in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. In conclusion, the EF of broccoli florets exerted potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:25054107

  11. O-Alkylated derivatives of quercetin induce apoptosis of MCF-7 cells via a caspase-independent mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Liao, Han; Bao, Xinran; Zhu, Jie; Qu, Jiao; Sun, Yong; Ma, Xiaodong; Wang, Enxia; Guo, Xin; Kang, Qi; Zhen, Yuhong

    2015-12-05

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor effects of two novel alkylated derivatives of quercetin, 7-O-butylquercetin (BQ) and 7-O-geranylquercetin (GQ), in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and explore the possible cellular mechanism of the related apoptotic effects. Our data showed that BQ and GQ were more toxic to MCF-7 cells and had better accumulation ability in MCF-7 cells than quercetin. Morphological observations and DNA fragmentation pattern suggested that the derivatives could induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Derivatives-induced apoptosis could not be reversed by Z-VAD-FMK and N-acetyl cysteine demonstrated that the apoptosis was independent on caspase and reactive oxygen species. Western blot assay showed that endonuclease G and apoptosis inducing factor might be relative to the apoptosis. Alkylation of quercetin at 7-O position can enhance the apoptosis inducing effect and cell accumulation ability relative to quercetin. This structural alteration brings changes on apoptosis pathway as well.

  12. Multi-Photon Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2007-06-01

    Based on the investigation of multi-photon entanglement, as produced by stimulated parametric down-conversion, a technique is presented to create heralded ``noon'' states. The relevance for interferometry will be discussed. Furthermore we explored the use of photon-number resolving detectors in Mach-Zehnder type of interferometers. Our current detectors can distinguish 0, 1, 2, to7, photon impacts. Although the overall collection and detection efficiency of photons is well below unity (about 0.3) the photon number resolving property is still very useful if combined with coherent input states since those state are eigenstates of the photon annihilation operator. First we analyze the coherent state interferometer with a single photon-number resolving detector, revealing the strong non-linear response of an interferometer in the case of Fock-state projection. Second, we use two such detectors together with a Baysian phase estimation strategy to demonstrate that it is possible to achieve the standard quantum limit independently from the true value of the phase shift. This protocol is unbiased and saturates the Cramer-Rao phase uncertainty bound and, therefore, is an optimal phase estimation strategy. As a final topic it will be shown how quantum interferometry combined with micromechanical structures can be used to investigate quantum superpositions and quantum decoherence of macroscopic objects.

  13. ITMO Photonics: center of excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Bougrov, Vladislav; Kozlov, Sergey; Vasilev, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    ITMO University, the leading Russian center in photonics research and education, has the mission to train highlyqualified competitive professionals able to act in conditions of fast-changing world. This paradigm is implemented through creation of a strategic academic unit ITMO Photonics, the center of excellence concentrating organizational, scientific, educational, financial, laboratory and human resources. This Center has the following features: dissemination of breakthrough scientific results in photonics such as advanced photonic materials, ultrafast optical and quantum information, laser physics, engineering and technologies, into undergraduate and graduate educational programs through including special modules into the curricula and considerable student's research and internships; transformation of the educational process in accordance with the best international educational practices, presence in the global education market in the form of joint educational programs with leading universities, i.e. those being included in the network programs of international scientific cooperation, and international accreditation of educational programs; development of mechanisms for the commercialization of innovative products - results of scientific research; securing financial sustainability of research in the field of photonics of informationcommunication systems via funding increase and the diversification of funding sources. Along with focusing on the research promotion, the Center is involved in science popularization through such projects as career guidance for high school students; interaction between student's chapters of international optical societies; invited lectures of World-famous experts in photonics; short educational programs in optics, photonics and light engineering for international students; contests, Olympics and grants for talented young researchers; social events; interactive demonstrations.

  14. Photonic Landau levels on cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Using a digital micromirror device to control both amplitude and phase, we inject arbitrary optical modes into our resonator. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We show that there is a conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids.

  15. Photonic crystal enhanced cytokine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Cunningham, Brian T

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces are demonstrated as a means for enhancing the detection sensitivity and resolution for assays that use a fluorescent tag to quantify the concentration of an analyte protein molecule in a liquid test sample. Computer modeling of the spatial distribution of resonantly coupled electromagnetic fields on the photonic crystal surface are used to estimate the magnitude of enhancement factor compared to performing the same fluorescent assay on a plain glass surface, and the photonic crystal structure is fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the performance using a sandwich immunoassay for the protein Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The demonstrated photonic crystal fabrication method utilizes a nanoreplica molding technique that allows for large-area inexpensive fabrication of the structure in a format that is compatible with confocal microarray laser scanners. The signal-to-noise ratio for fluorescent spots on the photonic crystal is increased by at least five-fold relative to the glass slide, allowing a TNF-alpha concentration of 1.6 pg/ml to be distinguished from noise on a photonic crystal surface. In addition, the minimum quantitative limit of detection on the photonic crystal surface is one-third the limit on the glass slide - a decrease from 18 pg/ml to 6 pg/ml. The increased performance of the immunoassay allows for more accurate quantitation of physiologically relevant concentrations of TNF-alpha in a protein microarray format that can be expanded to multiple cytokines.

  16. Single photon, photon-jet and diphoton production at DO

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; DO Collaboration

    1995-07-01

    Results are described on the observation of isolated single photons by the DO detector at the Fermilab {anti p}p collider. The inclusive cross section has been measured for photons in the central rapidity region ({vert_bar} {eta} {vert_bar}< 0.9) above 10 GeV E{sub T}. Studies of jets recoiling against the single photon permit the measurement of the fundamental hard scattering cos{theta}* distribution. An analysis of the {eta} correlations between high-E{sub T} photons and the leading jet probes the gluon x distribution. Diphoton production measurements are used both as a test of QCD processes and as a search for resonant structure, including bosonic Higgs production.

  17. Photonic crystals as optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevi, P.; Krokhin, A. A.; Arriaga, J.

    1999-11-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have already found numerous applications associated with the photonic band gap. We point out that PCs could be also employed as custom-made optical components in the linear region well below the photonic gap. As an example, we discuss a birefringent PC lens that acts as a polarizing beam splitter. This idea is supported by a precise method of calculation of the optical constants of a transparent two-dimensional (2D) PC. Such a process of homogenization is performed for hexagonal arrays of polymer-based PCs and also for the mammalian cornea. Finally, 2D PCs are classified as optically uniaxial or biaxial.

  18. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  19. Summary of Lepton Photon 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2012-03-14

    In this lecture, I summarize developments presented at the Lepton Photon 2011 conference and give my perspective on the current situation in high-energy physics. I am grateful to the organizers of Lepton Photon 2011 for providing us a very pleasant and simulating week in Mumbai. This year's Lepton Photon conference has covered the full range of subjects that fall within the scope of high-energy physics, including connections to cosmology, nuclear physics, and atomic physics. The experiments that were discussed detect particles ranging in energy from radio frequencies to EeV.

  20. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.