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Sample records for 7-wave dispersion relation

  1. Relative dispersion in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCasce, Joe; Graff, Lise; Guttu, Sigmund

    2014-05-01

    The relative dispersion of pairs of particles in flows is of central importance when describing environmental dispersion, for example of volcanic ash. Atmospheric relative dispersion was examined previously in two balloon experiments in the Southern Hemisphere (the EOLE and TWERLE experiments). In both cases, the dispersion at scales below 1000 km grew exponentially in time, indicating the kinetic energy spectrum is steep. Subsequent analyses suggested though that the dispersion had a power law dependence on time, implying a shallower kinetic energy spectrum. The results from studies employing synthetic particles advected by reanalysis winds are similarly inconsistent, with indications of exponential growth in some cases and power law growth in others. Here we use a different statistic---the probability density function (PDF) of pair displacements---to study dispersion the dispersion of large numbers of synthetic particles, advected by ERA-Interim reanalysis winds. The particles were deployed in the troposphere and stratosphere, both in the tropics and the extra-tropics. We examine the PDFs for the different deployments and compare them to analytical expressions derived for different turbulent inertial ranges. In line with the earlier balloon experiments, the results indicate exponential growth at the sub-deformation (1000 km) scales. At larger scales, the dispersion is anisotropic (predominantly zonal) and pair motion becomes decorrelated. Structure functions calculated from the wind data are in line with these conclusions.

  2. The General Fishbone Like Dispersion Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Fulvio

    2015-12-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Motivation and outline * Fundamental equations * The collisionless gyrokinetic equation * Vorticity equation * Quasi-neutrality condition * Perpendicular Ampère's law * Studying collective modes in burning plasmas * Ideal plasma equilibrium in the low-β limit * Approximations for the energetic population * Characteristic frequencies of particle motions * Alfvén wave frequency and wavelength orderings * Applications of the general theoretical framework * The general fishbone like dispersion relation * Properties of the fishbone like dispersion relation * Derivation of the fishbone like dispersion relation * Special cases of the fishbone like dispersion relation * Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE) * Alfvén Cascades * Summary and discussions * Acknowledgments * References

  3. Hybrid interlayer excitons with tunable dispersion relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Brian

    When two semiconducting materials are layered on top of each other, interlayer excitons can be formed by the Coulomb attraction of an electron in one layer to a hole in the opposite layer. The resulting exciton is a composite boson with a dispersion relation that is a hybrid between the dispersion relations of the electron and the hole separately. In this talk I show how such hybridization is particularly interesting when one layer has a ``Mexican hat''-shaped dispersion relation and the other has a conventional parabolic dispersion. In this case the interlayer exciton can have a range of qualitatively different dispersion relations, which can be continuously altered by an external field. This tunability in principle allows one to continuously tune a collection of interlayer excitons between different quantum many-body phases, including Bose-Einstein condensate, Wigner crystal, and fermion-like ``moat band'' phases.

  4. Interlayer excitons with tunable dispersion relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Interlayer excitons, comprising an electron in one material bound by Coulomb attraction to a hole in an adjacent material, are composite bosons that can assume a variety of many-body phases. The phase diagram of the bosonic system is largely determined by the dispersion relation of the bosons, which itself arises as a combination of the dispersion relations of the electron and hole separately. Here I show that in situations where either the electron or the hole has a nonmonotonic, "Mexican hat-shaped" dispersion relation, the exciton dispersion relation can have a range of qualitatively different forms, each corresponding to a different many-body phase at low temperature. This diversity suggests a platform for continuously tuning between different quantum phases using an external field.

  5. Dispersion relations in weakly degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchi, F.; Molinari, V. G.; Mostacci, D.; Sumini, M.

    2001-06-01

    From a quantum mechanical point of view, electrons in laser produced plasmas can be regarded as weakly degenerate. For instance, for a plasma with electron density of 10 22 cm -3 and electron temperature of 1 eV, Sommerfeld's parameter is between 1 and 2. Under these conditions the usual dispersion relations for waves in plasmas need be corrected to account for degeneracy. In the present work, starting from the transport equation with a simplified version of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck collision kernel the propagation of waves impinging on a plasma with weakly degenerate electrons is investigated and dispersion relations accounting for degeneracy are derived. These dispersion relations give the classical ones in the limit for Sommerfeld's parameter approaching zero. A shift of the wavenumber value and a non-collisional damping due to degeneracy effects are predicted which render a weakly degenerate plasma more opaque to radiation than a non-degenerate one.

  6. Statistical dispersion relation for spatially broadband fields.

    PubMed

    Shan, Mingguang; Nastasa, Viorel; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    The dispersion relation is fundamental to a physical phenomenon that develops in both space and time. This equation connects the spatial and temporal frequencies involved in the dynamic process through the material constants. Electromagnetic plane waves propagating in homogeneous media are bound by simple dispersion relation, which sets the magnitude of the spatial frequency, k, as being proportional to the temporal frequency, ω, with the proportionality constant dependent on the refractive index, n, and the speed of light in vacuum, c. Here we show that, for spatially broadband fields, an analog dispersion relation can be derived, except in this case the k-vector variance is connected with the temporal frequency through the statistics of the refractive index fluctuations in the medium. We discuss how this relationship can be used to retrieve information about refractive index distributions in biological tissues. This result is particularly significant in measurements of angular light scattering and quantitative phase imaging of biological structures. PMID:27244396

  7. Analytic models of warm plasma dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Seough, J. J.; Yoon, P. H.

    2009-09-15

    The present paper is concerned with analytic models of warm plasma dispersion relations for electromagnetic waves propagating parallel to the ambient magnetic field. Specifically, effects of finite betas on two slow modes, namely, the left-hand circularly polarized ion-cyclotron mode and the right-hand circularly polarized whistler mode, are investigated. Analytic models of the warm plasma dispersion relations are constructed on the basis of conjecture and upon comparisons with numerically found roots. It is shown that the model solutions are good substitutes for actual roots. The significance of the present work in the context of nonlinear plasma research is discussed.

  8. On the mathematics underlying dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Cecille; Labuda, Iwo

    2014-12-01

    The history of mathematical methods underlying the study of dispersion relations in physics is discussed. In particular, some misconceptions connected with a theorem known in the physics literature as Titchmarsh's Theorem are addressed. It is pointed out that the aforementioned theorem is a compilation of two well-known theorems in mathematics, the Paley-Wiener theorem and the Marcel Riesz theorem.

  9. Two-point derivative dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Erasmo; Sesma, Javier

    2013-03-01

    A new derivation is given for the representation, under certain conditions, of the integral dispersion relations of scattering theory through local forms. The resulting expressions have been obtained through an independent procedure to construct the real part and consist of new mathematical structures of double infinite summations of derivatives. In this new form the derivatives are calculated at the generic value of the energy E and separately at the reference point E = m that is the lower limit of the integration. This new form may be more interesting in certain circumstances and directly shows the origin of the difficulties in convergence that were present in the old truncated forms called standard-derivative dispersion relations (DDR). For all cases in which the reductions of the double to single sums were obtained in our previous work, leading to explicit demonstration of convergence, these new expressions are seen to be identical to the previous ones. We present, as a glossary, the most simplified explicit results for the DDR's in the cases of imaginary amplitudes of forms (E/m)λ[ln (E/m)]n that cover the cases of practical interest in particle physics phenomenology at high energies. We explicitly study the expressions for the cases with λ negative odd integers, that require identification of cancelation of singularities, and provide the corresponding final results.

  10. Vlasov multi-dimensional model dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.; Rose, Harvey A.; Silantyev, Denis A.; Vladimirova, Natalia

    2014-07-15

    A hybrid model of the Vlasov equation in multiple spatial dimension D > 1 [H. A. Rose and W. Daughton, Phys. Plasmas 18, 122109 (2011)], the Vlasov multi dimensional model (VMD), consists of standard Vlasov dynamics along a preferred direction, the z direction, and N flows. At each z, these flows are in the plane perpendicular to the z axis. They satisfy Eulerian-type hydrodynamics with coupling by self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. Every solution of the VMD is an exact solution of the original Vlasov equation. We show approximate convergence of the VMD Langmuir wave dispersion relation in thermal plasma to that of Vlasov-Landau as N increases. Departure from strict rotational invariance about the z axis for small perpendicular wavenumber Langmuir fluctuations in 3D goes to zero like θ{sup N}, where θ is the polar angle and flows are arranged uniformly over the azimuthal angle.

  11. Dispersal in relation to carrying capacity

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P. R.

    1978-01-01

    Dispersal of the herbivorous vole Microtus pennsylvanicus from grassland to woodland was studied in an experimental field system during spring to autumn 1969. Dispersal first occurred when there was at least 100 times more energy available than was required by the population. Sodium and phosphorus were in short supply in the food. By feeding selectively or copiously, voles could make up nutrient deficits and still consume only 10% of what was available. However, calculations show that depletion of the food was potentially severe in the forthcoming winter; consumption of energy- and nutrient-sufficient food had the potential of approaching 100%. These results suggest the following explanation of presaturation dispersal. Nutrients may be more limiting to herbivores than is total energy. Selective or copious harvesting becomes increasingly necessary as density increases. Natural selection, acting upon known genetic variation in dispersal propensity, has favored a dispersal response to environmental conditions that presage food shortage. Aggressive behavior and other forms of interactive behavior are the means by which land-tenured breeding individuals control their access to food resources and by which nontenured individuals are excluded and induced to disperse. Herbivore populations in general are limited well below carrying capacity. Carrying capacity may have been overestimated by ignoring chemical quality of the food, but the relationship is still probably true. The above explanation helps us to understand it. Because animals need to feed selectively, exploitation is based on cost-benefit balances and is less than total. PMID:16592536

  12. Dispersion relations for 1D high-gain FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.D.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2010-08-23

    We present analytical results for the one-dimensional dispersion relation for high-gain FELs. Using kappa-n distributions, we obtain analytical relations between the dispersion relations for various order kappa distributions. Since an exact solution exists for the kappa-1 (Lorentzian) distribution, this provides some insight into the number of modes on the way to the Gaussian distribution.

  13. Investigation of dust vertical dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jie; Qiao, Ke; Hyde, Truell

    2007-11-01

    The dust acoustic wave (DAW) was first theoretically predicted in 1990 by Rao et al. [Ref] and later observed experimentally by Barkan, et al. [Ref. 2], Pieper and Goree [Ref. 3] and others. The charge on the dust, Debye length and various other fundamental complex plasma parameters can be obtained experimentally through measurement of the DAW. Since under normal laboratory conditions, ordered structures formed within a complex plasma are generally two dimensional in nature, the majority of experiments to date examining such a system's dispersion relationships have been conducted on the horizontal plane. We will present an experimental method providing for a vertical dispersion relationship measurement, and present corresponding data. References [1]. N. N. Rao, P. K. Shukla, and M. Y. Yu, ``Dust-acoustic waves in dusty plasmas,'' Planet. Space Sci. 38, 543-546 (1990). [2]. A. Barkan, R. L. Merlino, and N. D'Angelo, ``Laboratory observation of the dust-acoustic wave mode,'' Phys. Plasmas, 2, 3563-3565, 1995. [3]. J. B. Pieper, J. Goree, ``Dispersion of Plasma Dust Acoustic Waves in the Strong-Coupling Regime,'' Phys. Rev. Lett., 77, 3137-3140, 1996.

  14. Dispersal patterns of red foxes relative to population density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, S.H.; Sargeant, A.B.

    1993-01-01

    Factors affecting red fox (Vulpes vulpes) dispersal patterns are poorly understood but warranted investigation because of the role of dispersal in rebuilding depleted populations and transmission of diseases. We examined dispersal patterns of red foxes in North Dakota based on recoveries of 363 of 854 foxes tagged as pups and relative to fox density. Foxes were recovered up to 8.6 years after tagging; 79% were trapped or shot. Straight-line distances between tagging and recovery locations ranged from 0 to 302 km. Mean recovery distances increased with age and were greater for males than females, but longest individual recovery distances were by females. Dispersal distances were not related to population density for males (P = 0.36) or females (P = 0.96). The proportion of males recovered that dispersed was inversely related to population density (r = -0.94; n = 5; P = 0.02), but not the proportion of females (r = -0.49; n = 5; P = 0.40). Dispersal directions were not uniform for either males (P = 0.003) or females (P = 0.006); littermates tended to disperse in similar directions (P = 0.09). A 4-lane interstate highway altered dispersal directions (P = 0.001). Dispersal is a strong innate behavior of red foxes (especially males) that results in many individuals of both sexes traveling far from natal areas. Because dispersal distance was unaffected by fox density, populations can be rebuilt and diseases transmitted long distances regardless of fox abundance.

  15. Phonons in slow motion: dispersion relations in ultrathin Si membranes.

    PubMed

    Cuffe, John; Chávez, Emigdio; Shchepetov, Andrey; Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; El Boudouti, El Houssaine; Alzina, Francesc; Kehoe, Timothy; Gomis-Bresco, Jordi; Dudek, Damian; Pennec, Yan; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Prunnila, Mika; Ahopelto, Jouni; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M

    2012-07-11

    We report the changes in dispersion relations of hypersonic acoustic phonons in free-standing silicon membranes as thin as ∼8 nm. We observe a reduction of the phase and group velocities of the fundamental flexural mode by more than 1 order of magnitude compared to bulk values. The modification of the dispersion relation in nanostructures has important consequences for noise control in nano- and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) as well as opto-mechanical devices. PMID:22650605

  16. Ferromagnetic resonance dispersion relation of spin valve systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.

    2005-08-01

    We derive the FMR dispersion relation of spin valve systems taking into account the competition that can appears between the direct exchange bias coupling and the indirect interlayer coupling. For uncoupled ferromagnetic (FM) layers, the system exhibits a dispersion relation corresponding to two independent systems: a single FM layer (free layer) and an exchange-coupled bilayer (reference/antiferromagnetic layers). In the interlayer coupled regime a unidirectional anisotropy is induced in the free layer and the FMR field is overall downshifted.

  17. Dispersion relation for air via Kramers-Kronig analysis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Fernando J; Kuc, Roman

    2008-08-01

    A general expression for the dispersion of acoustic waves in air is obtained by combining the attenuation coefficient given by the ISO:9613-1 standard and the twice-subtracted Kramers-Kronig relation. Good agreement is found with published data of sound velocity at different frequencies and relative humidities. The resulting expression is used to investigate changes in local dispersion with temperature and humidity. PMID:18681503

  18. Dispersion relation for bianisotropic materials and its symmetry properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graglia, Roberto D.; Uslenghi, Piergiorgio L. E.; Zich, Riccardo E.

    1991-01-01

    The dispersion relation for an arbitrary general bianisotropic medium is derived in Cartesian coordinates, in a form well suited to imposing the boundary conditions when dealing with layered media with planar and parallel interfaces. Special cases of practical interest are also considered. Eleven fundamental coefficient families are identified by considering in detail all the symmetries present in the dispersion relation. An ad hoc expression of the determinant of the sum of two 3 x 3 matrices permits the use of a simple procedure to obtain the coefficients of the dispersion equation. The discussed symmetry properties have general validity, and this technique to evaluate the coefficients may be useful in other fields of application where dispersion relations are of importance.

  19. Understanding the relative role of dispersion mechanisms across basin scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lazzaro, M.; Zarlenga, A.; Volpi, E.

    2016-05-01

    Different mechanisms are understood to represent the primary sources of the variance of travel time distribution in natural catchments. To quantify the fraction of variance introduced by each component, dispersion coefficients have been earlier defined in the framework of geomorphology-based rainfall-runoff models. In this paper we compare over a wide range of basin sizes and for a variety of runoff conditions the relative role of geomorphological dispersion, related to the heterogeneity of path lengths, and hillslope kinematic dispersion, generated by flow processes within the hillslopes. Unlike previous works, our approach does not focus on a specific study case; instead, we try to generalize results already obtained in previous literature stemming from the definition of a few significant parameters related to the metrics of the catchment and flow dynamics. We further extend this conceptual framework considering the effects of two additional variance-producing processes: the first covers the random variability of hillslope velocities (i.e. of travel times over hillslopes); the second deals with non-uniform production of runoff over the basin (specifically related to drainage density). Results are useful to clarify the role of hillslope kinematic dispersion and define under which conditions it counteracts or reinforces geomorphological dispersion. We show how its sign is ruled by the specific spatial distribution of hillslope lengths within the basin, as well as by flow conditions. Interestingly, while negative in a wide range of cases, kinematic dispersion is expected to become invariantly positive when the variability of hillslope velocity is large.

  20. Analytic approximations to the modon dispersion relation. [in oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Three explicit analytic approximations are given to the modon dispersion relation developed by Flierl et al. (1980) to describe Gulf Stream rings and related phenomena in the oceans and atmosphere. The solutions are in the form of k(q), and are developed in the form of a power series in q for small q, an inverse power series in 1/q for large q, and a two-point Pade approximant. The low order Pade approximant is shown to yield a solution for the dispersion relation with a maximum relative error for the lowest branch of the function equal to one in 700 in the q interval zero to infinity.

  1. Applications of dispersion relations to the geomagnetic transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcuello, A.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J.

    2005-05-01

    The geomagnetic transfer function is nowadays used to constrain the magnetotelluric inversion procedure given that this function contains complementary information to the impedance tensor. For the models usually employed by inversions, the real and imaginary parts of the geomagnetic transfer function are related by dispersion relations. The computation of the dispersion relations involves the Hilbert transform, and here we discuss different expressions to compute them. This computation was verified using synthetically generated geomagnetic transfer function from 2D and 3D models. The dispersion relations were applied on two cases: (a) to study the consistency between the real and imaginary parts of field recorded data, and (b) to develop a procedure to complete or extend the amount of measured data.

  2. Planck-scale-modified dispersion relations in FRW spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Giacomo; Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Marcianò, Antonino; Matassa, Marco

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, Planck-scale modifications of the dispersion relation have been attracting increasing interest also from the viewpoint of possible applications in astrophysics and cosmology, where spacetime curvature cannot be neglected. Nonetheless, the interplay between Planck-scale effects and spacetime curvature is still poorly understood, particularly in cases where curvature is not constant. These challenges have been so far postponed by relying on an ansatz, first introduced by Jacob and Piran. We propose here a general strategy of analysis of the effects of modifications of the dispersion relation in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes, applicable both to cases where the relativistic equivalence of frames is spoiled ("preferred-frame scenarios") and to the alternative possibility of "DSR-relativistic theories," theories that are fully relativistic but with relativistic laws deformed so that the modified dispersion relation is observer independent. We show that the Jacob-Piran ansatz implicitly assumes that spacetime translations are not affected by the Planck scale, while under rather general conditions, the same Planck-scale quantum-spacetime structures producing modifications of the dispersion relation also affect translations. Through the explicit analysis of one of the effects produced by modifications of the dispersion relation, an effect amounting to Planck-scale corrections to travel times, we show that our concerns are not merely conceptual but rather can have significant quantitative implications.

  3. PDRK: A General Kinetic Dispersion Relation Solver for Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huasheng; Xiao, Yong

    2016-02-01

    A general, fast, and effective approach is developed for numerical calculation of kinetic plasma linear dispersion relations. The plasma dispersion function is approximated by J-pole expansion. Subsequently, the dispersion relation is transformed to a standard matrix eigenvalue problem of an equivalent linear system. Numerical solutions for the least damped or fastest growing modes using an 8-pole expansion are generally accurate; more strongly damped modes are less accurate, but are less likely to be of physical interest. In contrast to conventional approaches, such as Newton's iterative method, this approach can give either all the solutions in the system or a few solutions around the initial guess. It is also free from convergence problems. The approach is demonstrated for electrostatic dispersion equations with one-dimensional and two-dimensional wavevectors, and for electromagnetic kinetic magnetized plasma dispersion relation for bi-Maxwellian distribution with relative parallel velocity flows between species. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2015GB110003, 2011GB105001, 2013GB111000), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 91130031), the Recruitment Program of Global Youth Experts

  4. Dispersion relations for electromagnetic wave propagation in chiral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, M. X.; Guo, B. Peng, L.; Cai, X.

    2014-11-15

    The dispersion relations for electromagnetic wave propagation in chiral plasmas are derived using a simplified method and investigated in detail. With the help of the dispersion relations for each eignwave, we explore how the chiral plasmas exhibit negative refraction and investigate the frequency region for negative refraction. The results show that chirality can induce negative refraction in plasmas. Moreover, both the degree of chirality and the external magnetic field have a significant effect on the critical frequency and the bandwidth of the frequency for negative refraction in chiral plasmas. The parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed.

  5. Langmuir wave dispersion relation in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ouazene, M.; Annou, R.

    2010-05-15

    The Langmuir wave dispersion relation is derived in partially ionized plasmas, where free electrons are confined to move in a nearest neighbor ions' potential well. The equilibrium velocity distribution function experiences then, a departure from Maxwell distribution function. The effect of the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function on the Langmuir phase and group velocities as well as the phase matching conditions and the nonlinear growth rate of decay instability is investigated. The proposed Langmuir wave dispersion relation is relevant to dense and cryogenic plasmas.

  6. Dispersion relation of dust electrostatic oscillations in a nonextensive plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hui-Bin; Song, Hai-Ying; Liu, Shi-Bing

    2015-10-01

    The generalized dispersion equation for longitudinal oscillation in an unmagnetized, collisionless and isotropic dusty plasma composed of nonextensive distributed electrons, ions and dust grains is derived based on kinetic theory. The analytical dispersion relation of dust acoustic waves which is related to nonextensive parameters {q}α (α =e,i,d) is obtained. In the limit {q}α \\to 1, the result based on the Maxwellian distribution is recovered. Using the numerical method, we obtain the complete numerical dispersion curve of longitudinal oscillation which is in good agreement with the analytical result of dust acoustic wave at {v}{Td}\\ll {v}\\varphi \\ll {v}{Ti}\\ll {v}{Te}.

  7. On Clifford Space Relativity, Black Hole Entropy, Rainbow Metrics, Generalized Dispersion and Uncertainty Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    An analysis of some of the applications of Clifford space relativity to the physics behind the modified black hole entropy-area relations, rainbow metrics, generalized dispersion and minimal length stringy uncertainty relations is presented.

  8. On Clifford Space Relativity, Black Hole Entropy, Rainbow Metrics, Generalized Dispersion and Uncertainty Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    An analysis of some of the applications of Clifford space relativity to the physics behind the modified black hole entropy-area relations, rainbow metrics, generalized dispersion and minimal length stringy uncertainty relations is presented.

  9. Higgs boson decay to two photons and dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Kirill; Vainshtein, Arkady

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the computation of the Higgs boson decay amplitude to two photons through the W -loop using dispersion relations. The imaginary part of the form factor FW(s ) that parametrizes this decay is unambiguous in four dimensions. When it is used to calculate the unsubtracted dispersion integral, the finite result for the form factor FW(s ) is obtained. However, the FW(s ) obtained in this way differs by a constant term from the result of a diagrammatic computation, based on dimensional regularization. It is easy to accommodate the missing constant by writing a once-subtracted dispersion relation for FW(s ) but it is unclear why the subtraction needs to be done. The goal of this paper is to investigate this question in detail. We show that the correct constant can be recovered within a dispersive approach in a number of ways that, however, either require an introduction of an ultraviolet regulator or unphysical degrees of freedom; unregulated and unsubtracted computations in the unitary gauge are insufficient, in spite of the fact that such computations give a finite result.

  10. Dispersion Relation and the Associated Instabilities Occurring in the Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parhi, S.; Suess, S. T.

    2000-05-01

    The velocity shear which exists between three layers in an ideal plasma is studied. This configuration is very similar to a polar plume embedded in solar wind and can be modelled as a jet (or, strictly speaking a wake) using a MHD code developed for astrophysical jet simulations. Weak and strong magnetic fields are considered both inside and outside the jet with varying shear Mach numbers of the jet. The shear can be Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable and evolve into a new less sheared pattern as observed in plumes down a few solar radii. This numerical result is compared with the recently derived analytical result obtained from the dispersion relations which govern the MHD shear instabilities. These analytical results suggest that there exist two more dispersion relations apart from the two known relations which have been used over the past few years for compressible fluid or plasma studies. These dispersion relations in their incompressible limit exactly reduce to the relations studied elsewhere. The necessary condition for stability is now that both the Alfven Mach number of the jet and of the ambient should be less than unity, in contrast to the earlier observation that only one of them should be less than unity. This clearly elucidates the competition between plasma and magnetic shear confirming our numerical observations and is a consequence of finding the two extra modes.

  11. Dispersion-relation-preserving finite difference schemes for computational acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Webb, Jay C.

    1993-01-01

    Time-marching dispersion-relation-preserving (DRP) schemes can be constructed by optimizing the finite difference approximations of the space and time derivatives in wave number and frequency space. A set of radiation and outflow boundary conditions compatible with the DRP schemes is constructed, and a sequence of numerical simulations is conducted to test the effectiveness of the DRP schemes and the radiation and outflow boundary conditions. Close agreement with the exact solutions is obtained.

  12. Dispersion Relation of Linear Waves in Quantum Magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    The quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model is applied in investigating the propagation of linear waves in quantum magnetoplasmas. Using the QMHD model, the dispersion equation for quantum magnetoplasmas and the dispersion relations of linear waves are deduced. Results show that quantum effects affect the propagation of electron plasma waves and extraordinary waves (X waves). When we select the plasma parameters of the laser-based plasma compression (LBPC) schemes for calculation, the quantum correction cannot be neglected. Meanwhile, the corrections produced by the Fermi degeneracy pressure and Bohm potential are compared under different plasma parameter conditions. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11447125) and the Research Training Program for Undergraduates of Shanxi University of China (Nos. 2014012167, 2015013182)

  13. Partial Wave Dispersion Relations: Application to Electron-Atom Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.; Drachman, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    In this Letter we propose the use of partial wave dispersion relations (DR's) as the way of solving the long-standing problem of correctly incorporating exchange in a valid DR for electron-atom scattering. In particular a method is given for effectively calculating the contribution of the discontinuity and/or poles of the partial wave amplitude which occur in the negative E plane. The method is successfully tested in three cases: (i) the analytically solvable exponential potential, (ii) the Hartree potential, and (iii) the S-wave exchange approximation for electron-hydrogen scattering.

  14. Determination of surface-plasmon dispersion relation by ricochet photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longe, Pierre; Bose, Shyamalendu M.

    1986-11-01

    Photoelectrons emitted along a metal surface from atoms located at a small distance outside that surface have a high probability to ricochet with the excitation of a surface plasmon if the angle of emergence α is less than a critical angle αM. The line shape of the surface-plasmon satellite I1(ɛk,α) peaks strongly at α=0 and presents another peak at α=αM. Experiments are suggested to locate the second peak and thereby determine αM(ɛk), a function which should yield direct information on the form and the parameters of the surface-plasmon dispersion relation.

  15. Testing the validity of terahertz reflection spectra by dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiponen, K.-E.; Gornov, E.; Svirko, Y.; Ino, Y.; Kuwata-Gonokami, M.; Lucarini, V.

    2005-12-01

    Complex response function obtained in reflection spectroscopy at the terahertz range is examined with algorithms based on dispersion relations for integer powers of complex reflection coefficient, which emerge as a powerful and yet uncommon tools in examining the consistency of the spectroscopic data. It is shown that these algorithms can be used in particular for checking the success of the correction of the spectra by the methods of Vartiainen [J. Appl. Phys. 96, 4171 (2004)] and Lucarini [Phys. Rev. B. 72, 125107 (2005)] to remove the negative misplacement error in the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

  16. Nucleon effects on the photon dispersion relations in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'olivo, Juan Carlos; Nieves, José F.

    1998-03-01

    We calculate the nucleon contribution to the photon self-energy in a plasma, including the effect of the anomalous magnetic moment of the nucleons. General formulas for the transverse and longitudinal components of the self-energy are obtained and we give explicit results in various limits of physical interest. The formulas are relevant for the study of the photon dispersion relations and the dynamical susceptibility in a nuclear medium such as the core of a supernova, and has implications with regard to the recent suggestion that the Cherenkov process ν-->νγ can take place in such a system.

  17. Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Harwell, Corey C.; Fuentealba, Luis C.; Gonzalez-Cerrillo, Adrian; Parker, Phillip R.L.; Gertz, Caitlyn C.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Turrero Garcia, Miguel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cepko, Constance L.; Kriegstein, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin. PMID:26299474

  18. Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Harwell, Corey C; Fuentealba, Luis C; Gonzalez-Cerrillo, Adrian; Parker, Phillip R L; Gertz, Caitlyn C; Mazzola, Emanuele; Garcia, Miguel Turrero; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cepko, Constance L; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon, respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping, and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin. PMID:26299474

  19. Energy-entropy dispersion relation in DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, H.; Haeussler, P.

    2013-10-01

    For a number of virus- and bacterium genomes we use the concept of block entropy from information theory and compare it with the corresponding configurational energy, defined via the ionization energies of the nucleotides and a hopping term for their interactions in the sense of a tight-binding model. Additionally to the four-letter alphabet of the nucleotides we discuss a reduction to a two-letter alphabet. We find a well defined relation between block entropy and block energy for a not too large block length which can be interpreted as a generalized dispersion relation for all genome sequences. The relation can be used to look for enhanced interactions between virus and bacterium genomes. Well known examples for virus-virus and virus-bacterium interactions are analyzed along this line.

  20. Dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  1. Phonon dispersion relation in PbTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomeno, Izumi; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime; Marty, Karol; Oka, Kunihiko; Tsunoda, Yorihiko

    2013-03-01

    The phonon dispersion relations for cubic PbTiO3 (Tc = 763 K) have been determined along the high symmetry directions at T = 793 K using inelastic neutron scattering. A set of the TO branches drops significantly toward the zone center. This is quite different from the soft mode anomaly in the Pb-based relaxors, named as the waterfall phenomenon. The zone-center TO mode energy softens with decreasing temperature from 1173 to 793 K. The TA branch along [ ξ , ξ , ξ ] shows significant softening around ξ = 0.25 and 0.5. These two anomalies persist up to 1173 K and are weakly temperature dependent. Moreover, the TA branches along [1,0,0] and [1,1,0] soften in the entire q range as the temperature approaches Tc. Although the phonon softening occurs simultaneously, the softening of the zone center TO mode plays an important role in the single phase transition. The phonon dispersion relations for cubic and tetragonal PbTiO3 are discussed in connection with BaTiO3, KTaO3, Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3, and Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3. U.S.-Japan cooperative program on neutron scattering

  2. Radiation of charged black holes and modified dispersion relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, A. D.; Pedram, P.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the effects of a modified dispersion relation proposed by Majhi and Vagenas on the Reissner-Nordström black hole thermodynamics in a universe with large extra dimensions. It is shown that entropy, temperature and heat capacity receive new corrections and charged black holes in this framework have less degrees of freedom and decay faster compared to black holes in the Hawking picture. We also study the emission rate of black hole and compare our results with other quantum gravity approaches. In this regard, the existence of the logarithmic prefactor and the relation between dimensions and charge are discussed. This procedure is not only valid for a single horizon spacetime but it is also valid for the spacetimes with inner and outer horizons.

  3. Source of the Stellar Age-Velocity Dispersion Relation in Simulated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, Drew; Christensen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the source of the stellar age-velocity dispersion relation using six high-resolution simulated galaxies. Observations show that velocity dispersion increases with stellar age. This trend is thought to be due to a combination of the evolution of the velocity dispersion of the interstellar media (ISM), interactions within the disk, and galactic mergers. Our simulated galaxies show redshift zero age-velocity dispersion relations consistent with those of observed galaxies. In order to determine how the velocity dispersion of stars evolves after their formation, we calculated the velocity dispersion versus the age of the stars at both redshift zero and at their time of formation. We found that while the ISM velocity dispersion evolves, it cannot be the sole source of the relation. Additionally, dwarf galaxies display a greater relative change in their velocity dispersion than more massive galaxies. Furthermore, we show that major mergers markedly increase the velocity dispersion of stars.

  4. A Generalized Brownian Motion Model for Turbulent Relative Particle Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen

    2015-11-01

    A generalized Brownian motion model has been applied to the turbulent relative particle dispersion problem (Shivamoggi). The fluctuating pressure forces acting on a fluid particle are taken to follow an Uhlenbeck-Ornstein process while it appears plausible to take their correlation time to have a power-law dependence on the flow Reynolds number Re. This ansatz provides an insight into the result that the Richardson-Obukhov scaling holds only in the infinite-Re limit and disappears otherwise. It provides a determination of the Richardson-Obukhov constant g as a function of Re, with an asymptotic constant value in the infinite-Re limit. This ansatz is further shown to be in quantitative agreement, in the small-Re limit, with the Batchelor-Townsend ansatz for the rate of change of the mean square interparticle separation in 3D FDT. My thanks to The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research for Support.

  5. Study on longitudinal dispersion relation in one-dimensional relativistic plasma: Linear theory and Vlasov simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.; Key Laboratory of HEDP of the Ministry of Education, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 ; Zhu, S. P.

    2013-09-15

    The dispersion relation of one-dimensional longitudinal plasma waves in relativistic homogeneous plasmas is investigated with both linear theory and Vlasov simulation in this paper. From the Vlasov-Poisson equations, the linear dispersion relation is derived for the proper one-dimensional Jüttner distribution. Numerically obtained linear dispersion relation as well as an approximate formula for plasma wave frequency in the long wavelength limit is given. The dispersion of longitudinal wave is also simulated with a relativistic Vlasov code. The real and imaginary parts of dispersion relation are well studied by varying wave number and plasma temperature. Simulation results are in agreement with established linear theory.

  6. Cytoskeleton dynamics studied by dispersion-relation fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru; Lei, Lei; Wang, Yingxiao; Levine, Alex; Popescu, Gabriel

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence is the most widely used microscopy technique for studying the dynamics and function in both medical and biological sciences due to its sensitivity and specificity. Inspired by the spirit of spatial fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we propose a new method to study the transport dynamics over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. The molecules of interest are labeled with a fluorophore whose motion gives rise to spontaneous fluorescence intensity fluctuations that can be further analyzed to quantify the governing molecular mass transport dynamics. We analyze these data by the dispersion relation in the form of a power law, Γ(q) ~qα , which describe the relaxation rate of fluorescence intensity fluctuations, Γ, vs. the wavenumber, q. We used this approach to study the interplay of various cytoskeletal components in intracellular transport under the influence of protein-motor inhibitors. We found that after actin is depolymerized, the transport becomes completely random for a few minutes and then it starts to organize deterministically again. We conclude that the disrupted cytoskeletal components first diffuse in the cytoplasm, but then become attached to microtubules and get transported deterministically.

  7. Collisional ballooning mode dispersion relation in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Tessarotto, M.

    1995-08-01

    Collisional ballooning mode theory in the banana regime is developed for tokamak configurations from the gyrokinetic formalism. A general dispersion relation is obtained, which in principle can deal with a collision operator of any type. However, investigation of an approximate Fokker--Planck collision operator developed in recent neoclassical transport theory is detailed. The most significant feature of the present theory as compared to the customary treatment lies in that the distinction between particle and fluid velocities is made in the ordering analyses. This reveals that the eigenfrequency of modes is determined by balancing the small-parallel-ion-velocity (SPIV) effect [L.-J. Zheng and M. Tessarotto, Phys. Plasmas {bold 1}, 3928 (1994)], instead of the fluid inertia one, with the instability drives. Since the parallel-electric-field effect is found to be negligible as compared to the SPIV effect, in contrast to the customary resistive ballooning mode picture, the leading collisional effect is demonstrated to be the modification of the SPIV effect instead of the relaxation of the frozen-in-law. The ion--ion collisions are the cause for this modification, while the electron collisional effect is shown to be negligible. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. Bose gas with generalized dispersion relation plus an energy gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, M. A.; Martinez, J. G.; Garcia, J.

    We report the critical temperature, the condensed fraction, the internal energy and the specific heat for a d-dimensional Bose gas with a generalized dispersion relation plus an energy gap, i.e., ɛ =ɛ0 for k = 0 and ɛ =ɛ0 + Δ +csks , for k > 0 , where ℏk is the particle momentum, ɛ0 the lowest particle energy, cs a constant with dimension of energy multiplied by a length to the power s > 0 . When Δ > 0 , a Bose-Einstein critical temperature Tc ≠ 0 exists for any d / s >= 0 at which the internal energy shows a peak and the specific heat shows a jump. The critical temperature and the specific heat jump increase as functions of the gap but they decrease as functions of d / s . Thermodynamic properties are ɛ0 independent since this is just a reference energy. For Δ = 0 we recover the results reported in Ref. [1]. V. C. Aguilera-Navarro, M. de Llano y M. A. Solís, Eur. J. Phys. 20, 177 (1999). We acknowledge partial support from Grants PAPIIT IN111613 and CONACyT 221030.

  9. A generalized Brownian motion model for turbulent relative particle dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, B. K.

    2016-08-01

    There is speculation that the difficulty in obtaining an extended range with Richardson-Obukhov scaling in both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations is due to the finiteness of the flow Reynolds number Re in these situations. In this paper, a generalized Brownian motion model has been applied to describe the relative particle dispersion problem in more realistic turbulent flows and to shed some light on this issue. The fluctuating pressure forces acting on a fluid particle are taken to be a colored noise and follow a stationary process and are described by the Uhlenbeck-Ornstein model while it appears plausible to take their correlation time to have a power-law dependence on Re, thus introducing a bridge between the Lagrangian quantities and the Eulerian parameters for this problem. This ansatz is in qualitative agreement with the possibility of a connection speculated earlier by Corrsin [26] between the white-noise representation for the fluctuating pressure forces and the large-Re assumption in the Kolmogorov [4] theory for the 3D fully developed turbulence (FDT) as well as a similar argument of Monin and Yaglom [23] and a similar result of Sawford [13] and Borgas and Sawford [24]. It also provides an insight into the result that the Richardson-Obukhov scaling holds only in the infinite-Re limit and disappears otherwise. This ansatz further provides a determination of the Richardson-Obukhov constant g as a function of Re, with an asymptotic constant value in the infinite-Re limit. It is shown to lead to full agreement, in the small-Re limit as well, with the Batchelor-Townsend [27] scaling for the rate of change of the mean square interparticle separation in 3D FDT, hence validating its soundness further.

  10. On the dispersion relations for parametric instabilities of parallel-progagating Alfvén waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanti, Venku; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1993-08-01

    We consider the dispersion relation for the parametric instabilities of large-amplitude, circularly polarized Alfvén waves, propagating parallel to the ambient magnetic field. A linear perturbation analysis is employed, and the perturbations are taken to propagate along the ambient field. The standard analysis which has been used previously assumes that density perturbations vary as exp[i(kz-ωt)] this defines the meaning of ω and k. However, the differential equations have periodic coefficients, implying that Floquet analysis should be used. We here present an analysis based on Floquet's theorem. The result is a hierarchy of dispersion relations. However, all the dispersion relations are found to be equivalent to the one obtained via the standard analysis; the differences between them are due only to how ω and k are defined. Thus we conclude that physically there is really only one dispersion relation, namely the ``electrostatic dispersion relation,'' which is in agreement with earlier works. However, we disagree with Viñas and Goldstein (1991b), who obtained additional dispersion relations which they have called the ``electromagnetic dispersion relations.'' Their additional dispersion relations are a consequence of first truncating the dispersion relation for obliquely propagating perturbations and then taking the limit of parallel-propagating perturbations.

  11. Skewness of cloud droplet spectrum and an improved estimation for its relative dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Lu, Chunsong; Li, Weiliang

    2016-05-01

    The relative dispersion of the cloud droplet spectrum is a very important parameter in describing and modeling cloud microphysical processes. Based on the definition of skewness as well as theoretical and data analyses, a linear fitting relationship (α = 2.91ɛ-0.59) between skewness (α) and relative dispersion (ɛ) is established and a new method is developed to estimate the relative dispersion of the cloud droplet spectrum. The new method does not depend on any assumption of a particular distribution for the cloud droplet spectrum and has broader applicability than the previous methods. Comparisons of the three methods for the relative dispersion with the observed data supported the following conclusions. (1) The skewness of the cloud droplet spectrum is asymmetrically distributed. An assumption of zero skewness in quantifying the relative dispersion inevitably results in relatively large deviations from the observations. Errors of the estimated relative dispersion due to the omission of the skewness term are not solely related to the skewness, but rather to the product of the skewness and relative dispersion. (2) The use of the assumption that the cloud droplet spectrum takes a gamma distribution is similar to the assumption that the skewness is twice the relative dispersion. This leads to a better accuracy in estimating the relative dispersion than that with zero skewness assumption. (3) Comparisons with observations show that the new method is more accurate than the one under gamma distribution assumption and is the best among all the three methods. (4) It is believed that finding a better correlation between the skewness and the relative dispersion would further reduce the deviations for the estimated relative dispersion.

  12. Oil, oil dispersants and related substances in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunkel, W.; Gassmann, G.

    1980-03-01

    Of all substances threatening life in the seas, oil has received by far the most attention from the public, administrators, politicians and scientists. The main reasons for this are: (1) even limited amounts of oil are easily visible; (2) oil can exert obvious negative effects, e. g. extensive damage to birds and other animals, impairment of the recreational value of beaches and marinas, losses in fisheries due to tainting of catches and rejection by the public of seafood from areas known to have been recently polluted. In addition, dramatic tanker accidents are widely publicized. During the last decade tens of thousands of papers have been published about the impact of oil on the marine environment, and we are well informed about most basic facts, such as input and fate of oil, toxicity to adult organisms and recolonization. Due to considerable sophistication of analytical techniques, especially the introduction of glass-capillary gas chromatography, we are well aware that recently formed biogenic hydrocarbons by far extend the input directly due to pollution. Large gaps exist in our knowledge about sedimentation and transport of weathered oil, natural degradation rates, and the flow of hydrocarbons through the food web. Relatively little is known about the influence of oil and dispersants upon complex ecosystems. The often mentioned suspicion of increased cancer probability in humans due to seafood contaminated by hydrocarbons has not been substantiated; in fact, it seems unlikely that such an effect exists. By far the greatest uncertainty about potential oil impact concerns possible negative effects of hydrocarbons on chemical communication mechanisms between organisms. Intensive studies of behaviour scientists working with concentrations far below the toxic level are needed in fisheries biology, zoology and botany. Most cases of oil contamination known thus far have been limited in space and time; the oil has turned out to be degradable by natural processes

  13. Dispersion relations of externally and thermally excited dust lattice modes in 2D complex plasma crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xuefeng; Cui Jian; Zhang Yuan; Liu Yue

    2012-07-15

    The dispersion relations of the externally and thermally (naturally) excited dust lattice modes (both longitudinal and transverse) in two-dimensional Debye-Yukawa complex plasma crystals are investigated. The dispersion relations are calculated numerically by taking the neutral gas damping effects into account and the numerical results are in agreement with the experimental data given by Nunomura et al.[Phys. Rev. E 65, 066402 (2002)]. It is found that for the mode excited by an external disturbance with a real frequency, the dispersion properties are changed at a critical frequency near where the group velocity of the mode goes to zero. Therefore, the high frequency branch with negative dispersion cannot be reached. In contrast, for the thermally excited mode, the dispersion curve can extend all the way to the negative dispersion region, while a 'cut-off' wave number exists at the long wavelength end of the dispersion in the transverse mode.

  14. Dispersion relation for hadronic light-by-light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procura, Massimiliano; Colangelo, Gilberto; Hoferichter, Martin; Stoffer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The largest uncertainties in the Standard Model calculation of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (g - 2)μ come from hadronic contributions. In particular, in a few years the subleading hadronic light-by-light (HLbL) contribution might dominate the theory uncertainty. We present a dispersive description of the HLbL tensor, which is based on unitarity, analyticity, crossing symmetry, and gauge invariance. This opens up the possibility of a data-driven determination of the HLbL contribution to (g - 2)μ with the aim of reducing model dependence and achieving a reliable error estimate. Our dispersive approach defines unambiguously the pion-pole and the pion-box contribution to the HLbL tensor. Using Mandelstam's double-spectral representation, we have proven that the pion-box contribution coincides exactly with the one-loop scalar QED amplitude, multiplied by the appropriate pion vector form factors.

  15. The local dispersion relation for magneto-atmospheric waves. [in solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The local dispersion relation for magneto-atmospheric waves is discussed in terms of the linearized theory of waves in a plane-stratified, inviscid, perfectly conducting atmosphere under uniform gravity. The normally used local dispersion relation is demonstrated to not be unique, depending instead on the order of derivation from the fundamental first-order perturbation equations of continuity, momentum, energy, and induction. Furthermore, it is shown that the local dispersion relation predicts that the cutoff frequency decreases with increasing magnetic field strength, while the WKB approximation method projects an increase in the cutoff frequency with increasing magnetic field strength. A new form of the local dispersion relation is developed, and consideration is given to the special case of a global dispersion relation in conditions of an isothermal atmosphere with a horizontal magnetic field.

  16. The relation between velocity dispersion and central galaxy density in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, N. A.

    1981-01-01

    A correlation between cluster velocity dispersion and average central galaxy density is reported. The correlation covers the range from rich clusters to small groups of galaxies, or, in terms of velocity dispersion, from v sub r approximately 1500 to approximately 100 km/s. This result is useful for estimating unknown velocity dispersions in clusters with the aid of the relatively easily determined 0.5 Mpc central galaxy density parameter. When combined with the virial theorem, the above relation also suggests that the mass-to-light ratio of galaxy systems increases with the system's velocity dispersion.

  17. Dispersion Relations for Meson-Proton and Proton-Proton Forward Elastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkin, A.; Cudell, J. R.; Martynov, E.

    2012-07-01

    An analysis of the data on forward {pp, bar pp, π^{±}p} and {K^{±}p} scattering is performed making use of the single- and double-subtraction integral and comparing with derivative dispersion relations for amplitudes. Various pomeron and odderon models for the total cross sections are considered and compared. The real part of the amplitude is calculated via dispersion relations. It is shown that the integral dispersion relations lead to a better description of the data for {sqrt{s} > 5 GeV}. Predictions of the considered models for the TOTEM experiment at LHC energies are given.

  18. Modified dispersion relations and the response of the rotating Unruh-DeWitt detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gutti, Sashideep; Kulkarni, Shailesh; Sriramkumar, L.

    2011-03-15

    We study the response of a rotating monopole detector that is coupled to a massless scalar field which is described by a nonlinear dispersion relation in flat spacetime. Since it does not seem to be possible to evaluate the response of the rotating detector analytically, we resort to numerical computations. Interestingly, unlike the case of the uniformly accelerated detector that has been considered recently, we find that defining the transition probability rate of the rotating detector poses no difficulties. Further, we show that the response of the rotating detector can be computed exactly (albeit, numerically) even when it is coupled to a field that is governed by a nonlinear dispersion relation. We also discuss the response of the rotating detector in the presence of a cylindrical boundary on which the scalar field is constrained to vanish. While superluminal dispersion relations hardly affect the standard results, we find that subluminal dispersion relations can lead to relatively large modifications.

  19. A linear dispersion relation for the hybrid kinetic-ion/fluid-electron model of plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Told, D.; Cookmeyer, J.; Astfalk, P.; Jenko, F.

    2016-07-01

    A dispersion relation for a commonly used hybrid model of plasma physics is developed, which combines fully kinetic ions and a massless-electron fluid description. Although this model and variations of it have been used to describe plasma phenomena for about 40 years, to date there exists no general dispersion relation to describe the linear wave physics contained in the model. Previous efforts along these lines are extended here to retain arbitrary wave propagation angles, temperature anisotropy effects, as well as additional terms in the generalized Ohm’s law which determines the electric field. A numerical solver for the dispersion relation is developed, and linear wave physics is benchmarked against solutions of a full Vlasov–Maxwell dispersion relation solver. This work opens the door to a more accurate interpretation of existing and future wave and turbulence simulations using this type of hybrid model.

  20. How cooperatively breeding birds identify relatives and avoid incest: New insights into dispersal and kin recognition.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Christina; Stern, Caitlin A

    2015-12-01

    Cooperative breeding in birds typically occurs when offspring - usually males - delay dispersal from their natal group, remaining with the family to help rear younger kin. Sex-biased dispersal is thought to have evolved in order to reduce the risk of inbreeding, resulting in low relatedness between mates and the loss of indirect fitness benefits for the dispersing sex. In this review, we discuss several recent studies showing that dispersal patterns are more variable than previously thought, often leading to complex genetic structure within cooperative avian societies. These empirical findings accord with recent theoretical models suggesting that sex- biased dispersal is neither necessary, nor always sufficient, to prevent inbreeding. The ability to recognize relatives, primarily by learning individual or group-specific vocalizations, may play a more important role in incest avoidance than currently appreciated. PMID:26577076

  1. Generalized dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Deeba, F.; Ahmad, Zahoor; Murtaza, G.

    2010-10-15

    A generalized dielectric constant for the electron Bernstein waves using non-Maxwellian distribution functions is derived in a collisionless, uniform magnetized plasma. Using the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions, we can derive the dispersion relations for both kappa and the generalized (r,q) distributions in a straightforward manner. The dispersion relations now become dependent upon the spectral indices {kappa} and (r,q) for the kappa and the generalized (r,q) distribution, respectively. Our results show how the non-Maxwellian dispersion curves deviate from the Maxwellian depending upon the values of the spectral indices chosen. It may be noted that the (r,q) dispersion relation is reduced to the kappa distribution for r=0 and q={kappa}+1, which, in turn, is further reducible to the Maxwellian distribution for {kappa}{yields}{infinity}.

  2. Dispersion relation for small amplitude sound waves in rotating newtonian fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín-Antuña, José; Hernández-Rodríguez, Arezky; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    1996-11-01

    For a rotating newtonian fluid (which is viscous and compressible), the linearized Navier-Stokes equation, the continuity equation and the equation for isoentropic process are simultaneosly considered to obtain an equation for pressure waves. This equation is solved to get the dispersion law for such waves. In the dispersion law an adimensional parameter τ is used, which is given by the relation between the characteristic damping wave time and the period of the fluid rotation. The limit of a viscous compressible static fluid is obtained. The numerical results of the dispersion relation are given for different values of the angle between the direction of the wave propagation and the rotation axis and for the values of τ. The existence of gaps and of a typical wave guide effect are reported. The dispersion relation of the modes are given for the real and the imaginary parts of the wave vector.

  3. Statistically Determined Dispersion Relations of Magnetic Field Fluctuations in the Terrestrial Foreshock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnat, B.; O’Connell, D.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Sundberg, T.

    2016-08-01

    We obtain dispersion relations of magnetic field fluctuations for two crossings of the terrestrial foreshock by Cluster spacecraft. These crossings cover plasma conditions that differ significantly in their plasma β and in the density of the reflected ion beam, but not in the properties of the encountered ion population, both showing shell-like distribution function. Dispersion relations are reconstructed using two-point instantaneous wave number estimations from pairs of Cluster spacecraft. The accessible range of wave vectors, limited by the available spacecraft separations, extends to ≈2 × 104 km. Results show multiple branches of dispersion relations, associated with different powers of magnetic field fluctuations. We find that sunward propagating fast magnetosonic waves and beam resonant modes are dominant for the high plasma β interval with a dense beam, while the dispersions of the interval with low beam density include Alfvén and fast magnetosonic modes propagating sunward and anti-sunward.

  4. Planck-scale modified dispersion relations and Finsler geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Girelli, F.; Liberati, S.; Sindoni, L.

    2007-03-15

    A common feature of all quantum gravity (QG) phenomenology approaches is to consider a modification of the mass-shell condition of the relativistic particle to take into account quantum gravitational effects. The framework for such approaches is therefore usually set up in the cotangent bundle (phase space). However it was recently proposed that this phenomenology could be associated with an energy dependent geometry that has been coined 'rainbow metric'. We show here that the latter actually corresponds to a Finsler geometry, the natural generalization of Riemannian geometry. We provide in this way a new and rigorous framework to study the geometrical structure possibly arising in the semiclassical regime of QG. We further investigate the symmetries in this new context and discuss their role in alternative scenarios like Lorentz violation in emergent spacetimes or deformed special relativity-like models.

  5. Dispersion of Nanocrystalline Fe3O4 within Composite Electrodes: Insights on Battery-Related Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Bock, David C; Pelliccione, Christopher J; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jiajun; Knehr, K W; Wang, Jun; Wang, Feng; West, Alan C; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2016-05-11

    Aggregation of nanosized materials in composite lithium-ion-battery electrodes can be a significant factor influencing electrochemical behavior. In this study, aggregation was controlled in magnetite, Fe3O4, composite electrodes via oleic acid capping and subsequent dispersion in a carbon black matrix. A heat treatment process was effective in the removal of the oleic acid capping agent while preserving a high degree of Fe3O4 dispersion. Electrochemical testing showed that Fe3O4 dispersion is initially beneficial in delivering a higher functional capacity, in agreement with continuum model simulations. However, increased capacity fade upon extended cycling was observed for the dispersed Fe3O4 composites relative to the aggregated Fe3O4 composites. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of electrodes post cycling indicated that the dispersed Fe3O4 electrodes are more oxidized in the discharged state, consistent with reduced reversibility compared with the aggregated sample. Higher charge-transfer resistance for the dispersed sample after cycling suggests increased surface-film formation on the dispersed, high-surface-area nanocrystalline Fe3O4 compared to the aggregated materials. This study provides insight into the specific effects of aggregation on electrochemistry through a multiscale view of mechanisms for magnetite composite electrodes. PMID:27096464

  6. Dispersion of nanocrystalline Fe3O4 within composite electrodes: Insights on battery-related electrochemistry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    David C. Bock; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Pelliccione, Christopher J.; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jiajun; Knehr, K. W.; Wang, Jun; Wang, Feng; West, Alan C.; Marschilok, Amy C.; et al

    2016-04-20

    Aggregation of nanosized materials in composite lithium-ion-battery electrodes can be a significant factor influencing electrochemical behavior. In this study, aggregation was controlled in magnetite, Fe3O4, composite electrodes via oleic acid capping and subsequent dispersion in a carbon black matrix. A heat treatment process was effective in the removal of the oleic acid capping agent while preserving a high degree of Fe3O4 dispersion. Electrochemical testing showed that Fe3O4 dispersion is initially beneficial in delivering a higher functional capacity, in agreement with continuum model simulations. However, increased capacity fade upon extended cycling was observed for the dispersed Fe3O4 composites relative to themore » aggregated Fe3O4 composites. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of electrodes post cycling indicated that the dispersed Fe3O4 electrodes are more oxidized in the discharged state, consistent with reduced reversibility compared with the aggregated sample. Higher charge-transfer resistance for the dispersed sample after cycling suggests increased surface-film formation on the dispersed, high-surface-area nanocrystalline Fe3O4 compared to the aggregated materials. Furthermore, this study provides insight into the specific effects of aggregation on electrochemistry through a multiscale view of mechanisms for magnetite composite electrodes.« less

  7. Dispersion relation for pure dust Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Deeba, F.; Ahmad, Zahoor; Murtaza, G.

    2011-07-15

    Pure dust Bernstein waves are investigated using non-Maxwellian kappa and (r,q) distribution functions in a collisionless, uniform magnetized dusty plasma. Dispersion relations for both the distributions are derived by considering waves whose frequency is of the order of dust cyclotron frequency, and dispersion curves are plotted. It is observed that the propagation band for dust Bernstein waves is rather narrow as compared with that of the electron Bernstein waves. However, the band width increases for higher harmonics, for both kappa and (r,q) distributions. Effect of dust charge on dispersion curves is also studied, and one observes that with increasing dust charge, the dispersion curves shift toward the lower frequencies. Increasing the dust to ion density ratio ((n{sub d0}/n{sub i0})) causes the dispersion curve to shift toward the higher frequencies. It is also found that for large values of spectral index kappa ({kappa}), the dispersion curves approach to the Maxwellian curves. The (r,q) distribution approaches the kappa distribution for r = 0, whereas for r > 0, the dispersion curves show deviation from the Maxwellian curves as expected. Relevance of this work can be found in astrophysical plasmas, where non-Maxwellian velocity distributions as well as dust particles are commonly observed.

  8. General dispersion and dissipation relations in a one-dimensional viscoelastic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenqiang; Yu, Jidong; Tang, Zhiping

    2008-12-01

    We derive the general dispersion and dissipation relations for a one-dimensional viscoelastic lattice, demonstrate the relevance of these relations to viscoelastic fracture and phase transition, and show a procedure to determine the suitable mesh size in numerical simulation of stress waves propagating in viscoelastic continuum.

  9. Dispersion relations with crossing symmetry for {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, R.

    2011-04-01

    A set of once subtracted dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition for the {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes is derived and analyzed. An example of numerical calculations in the effective two-pion mass range from the threshold to 1.1 GeV is presented. It is shown that these new dispersion relations impose quite strong constraints on the analyzed {pi}{pi} interactions and are very useful tools to test the {pi}{pi} amplitudes. One of the goals of this work is to provide a complete set of equations required for easy use. Full analytical expressions are presented. Along with the well-known dispersion relations successful in testing the {pi}{pi} S- and P-wave amplitudes, those presented here for the D and F waves give a complete set of tools for analyses of the {pi}{pi} interactions.

  10. Two-dimensional pentagonal crystals and possible spin-polarized Dirac dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chi-Pui; Xiong, Shi-Jie Shi, Wu-Jun; Cao, Jie

    2014-03-21

    Based on first-principles calculations we show that the two-dimensional pentagonal (pt) structures, the compositions of pt-BN{sub 2}, pt-C, and pt-Fe{sub 2}S, are stable. As a common feature, they are composed of 3 components: 2 stretched honeycomb sublattices and 1 square sublattice, conferring flexibility of tailoring the properties peculiar to the graphene. Although the Dirac dispersion relation is removed in metallic pt-BN{sub 2} and insulating pt-C due to the hybridization of two honeycomb sublattices, it survives in pt-Fe{sub 2}S because of the suppression of such hybridization between different spins. As a result, in the dispersion relation of pt-Fe{sub 2}S spin-polarized and anisotropic Dirac cones occur. We suggest that such type of dispersion relation can be used to produce spin-filter effect by applying electric bias in a specific direction.

  11. The general dispersion relation of induced streaming instabilities in quantum outflow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdian, H. Hajisharifi, K.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2015-11-15

    In this manuscript the dispersion relations of streaming instabilities, by using the unique property (neutralized in charge and current by default) of plasma shells colliding, have been generalized and studied. This interesting property for interpenetrating beams enables one to find the general dispersion relations without any restrictions used in the previous works in this area. In our previous work [H. Mehdian et al., ApJ. 801, 89 (2015)], employing the plasma shell concept and boost frame method, the general dispersion relation for filamentation instability has been derived in the relativistic classical regime. But in this paper, using the above mentioned concepts, the general dispersion relations (for each of streaming instabilities, filamentation, two-stream and multi-stream) in the non-relativistic quantum regime have been derived by employing the quantum fluid equations together with Maxwell equations. The derived dispersion relations enable to describe any arbitrary system of interacting two and three beams, justified neutralization condition, by choosing the inertial reference frame embedded on the one of the beams. Furthermore, by the numerical and analytical study of these dispersion relations, many new features of streaming instabilities (E.g. their cut-off wave numbers and growth rates) in terms of all involved parameters have been illustrated. The obtained results in this paper can be used to describe many astrophysical systems and laboratory astrophysics setting, such as collision of non-parallel plasma shells over a background plasma or the collision of three neutralized plasma slabs, and justifying the many plasma phenomena such as particle accelerations and induced fields.

  12. Dispersion relation approach to sub-barrier heavy-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Franzin, V.L.M.; Hussein, M.S.

    1988-11-01

    We discuss the conditions under which the dispersion relation technique, extensively employed in the context of elastic scattering, can be used in the analysis of heavy-ion fusion reactions. General unitarity defect arguments are used for this purpose. With the aid of an inverse dispersion relation, which gives the imaginary part of the fusion inclusive polarization potential in terms of the principal part integral involving the real part of the inclusive polarization potential, the sub-barrier fusion of heavy ions is discussed. The system /sup 16/O+/sup A/Sm is taken as an example.

  13. Numerical calculation of electromagnetic eigenfields and dispersion relations for slow-wave device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oslake, J.M.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    Slow-wave structures support microwave amplification via electromagnetic coupling with an injected electron beam. Critical in the design of such devices is the dependence of the dispersion relation on the geometry of the guiding structure. The dispersion relation provides phase and group velocities, and the fields provide the impedance as seen by the beam. To this end, a computer model is developed which first numerically solves a wave equation in finite difference form subject to boundary conditions periodic in z and conducting elsewhere. For decades, the desired dispersion and impedance have been obtained experimentally from cold tests (no beam) on slow-wave structures by varying structure dimensions. However, the numerical approach condenses this process to a few minutes of simulation.

  14. Blueshifted Flat Dispersion Relation of Exciton-Polariton Condensates in a CuBr Microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Masaaki; Murakami, Katsuya; Kim, DaeGwi

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated cavity-polariton condensation effects on the dispersion relation of the lower polariton branch (LPB) at 77 K in a CuBr microcavity by angle-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The intrinsic cavity-polariton dispersion relations were characterized by the analysis of the incident light angle (in-plane wave vector k∥) dependence of cavity-polariton energies obtained using angle-resolved reflectance spectroscopy. It was found that a blueshifted PL band appears with a threshold-like nature as a function of excitation power density. The in-plane wave vector dependence of the blueshifted PL energy exhibits a flat dispersion relation in the k∥ range from 0 to ˜4.4 µm-1, which is clearly separated from the intrinsic LPB because of the large blueshift of ˜15 meV. We show that the blueshifted flat dispersion relation is possibly explained by the theory for a diffusive Goldstone mode peculiar to nonequilibrium cavity-polariton condensation.

  15. Determination of phonon dispersion relations by X-ray thermal diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, R.; Chiang, T.-C.

    2010-07-20

    Thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) of X-rays from crystals contains information on phonons. This paper reviews the general theory of TDS and some recent experiments aimed at further developing TDS into a useful and efficient method for studying phonon dispersion relations.

  16. The Dispersion Relation for the 1/sinh(exp 2) Potential in the Classical Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The dispersion relation for the inverse hyperbolic potential is calculated in the classical limit. This is shown for both the low amplitude phonon branch and the high amplitude soliton branch. It is shown these results qualitatively follow that previously found for the inverse squared potential where explicit analytic solutions are known.

  17. Scale-dependent relative dispersion measurements from the Grand LAgrangian Deployment (GLAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haza, Angelique; Poje, Andrew; Ozgokmen, Tamay; Griffa, Annalisa; Haus, Brian; Huntley, Helga; Hogan, Patrick; Jacobs, Gregg; Kirwan, Danny; Lipphardt, Bruce; Novelli, Guillaume; Olascoaga, Josefina; Beron-Vera, Francisco; Reniers, Ad; Ryan, Edward

    2013-04-01

    The scale-dependent Lagrangian dispersion metrics, such as the Finite Scale Lyapunov Exponent, are suitable to study multi-scale interaction of ocean flows. Of particular interest is the possible impact of submesoscale flows on transport in the ocean, for applied problems such as oil spill. Results will be presented from the GLAD experiment, which was configured to optimize in-situ submesoscale relative dispersion measurements in the Gulf of Mexico near DeSoto Canyon from a release of more than 300 surface drifters.

  18. Efficient approximations of dispersion relations in optical waveguides with varying refractive-index profiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yutian; Zhu, Jianxin

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of computing the eigen-modes for the varying refractive-index profile in an open waveguide. We first approximate the refractive-index by a piecewise polynomial of degree two, and the corresponding Sturm-Liouville problem (eigenvalue problem) of the Helmholtz operator in each layer can be solved analytically by the Kummer functions. Then, analytical approximate dispersion equations are established for both TE and TM cases. Furthermore, the approximate dispersion equations converge fast to the exact ones for the continuous refractive-index function as the maximum value of the subinterval sizes tends to zero. Suitable numerical methods, such as Müller's method or the chord secant method, may be applied to the dispersion relations to compute the eigenmodes. Numerical simulations show that our method is very practical and efficient for computing eigenmodes. PMID:25969285

  19. The relative effect of behaviour in larval dispersal in a low energy embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Rémi M.; Chassé, Joël; Metaxas, Anna

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the relative importance of tidal phase, larval behaviour, release site, depth layer, and vertical swimming velocity on mean in-sea dispersal distance, retention, distance from shore, and population connectivity. Using a biophysical model, we simulated larval dispersal of marine benthic invertebrates for 6 taxonomic groups representing different combinations of swimming speed, and depth preference in St. George's Bay, NS, Canada, a shallow bay with low energy (e.g. lack of estuarine circulation). The biophysical model was run over a period of 3 months, from Jul to Sep, representing the period when larvae of the targeted species were present, and at each of 3 years. Overall, release site had the strongest effect of all factors on the dispersal metrics. Although less important than release site in our system, vertical distribution and swim speed had a significant effect which would likely be more pronounced in high (i.e. with features such as estuarine circulation or internal waves) than low energy environments. Retention and distance from shore were more responsive to our manipulations than dispersal distance, both in terms of the number of ecologically significant effects and the magnitudes of their effect size. These findings allow for the prioritization of biophysical model parameters and improved simulations of larval dispersal.

  20. Methods for estimating dispersal probabilities and related parameters using marked animals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennetts, R.E.; Nichols, J.D.; Pradel, R.; Lebreton, J.D.; Kitchens, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Deriving valid inferences about the causes and consequences of dispersal from empirical studies depends largely on our ability reliably to estimate parameters associated with dispersal. Here, we present a review of the methods available for estimating dispersal and related parameters using marked individuals. We emphasize methods that place dispersal in a probabilistic framework. In this context, we define a dispersal event as a movement of a specified distance or from one predefined patch to another, the magnitude of the distance or the definition of a `patch? depending on the ecological or evolutionary question(s) being addressed. We have organized the chapter based on four general classes of data for animals that are captured, marked, and released alive: (1) recovery data, in which animals are recovered dead at a subsequent time, (2) recapture/resighting data, in which animals are either recaptured or resighted alive on subsequent sampling occasions, (3) known-status data, in which marked animals are reobserved alive or dead at specified times with probability 1.0, and (4) combined data, in which data are of more than one type (e.g., live recapture and ring recovery). For each data type, we discuss the data required, the estimation techniques, and the types of questions that might be addressed from studies conducted at single and multiple sites.

  1. Gyro-viscosity and linear dispersion relations in pair-ion magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, M.; Vranjes, J.

    2015-11-01

    A fluid theory has been developed by taking account of gyro-viscosity to study wave propagation characteristics in a homogeneous pair-ion magnetized plasma with a cylindrical symmetry. The exact dispersion relations derived by the Hankel-Fourier transformation are shown comparable with those observed in the experiment by Oohara and co-workers. The gyro-viscosity is responsible for the change in propagation characteristics of the ion cyclotron wave from forward to backward by suppressing the effect of the thermal pressure which normally causes the forward nature of dispersion. Although the experiment has been already explained by a kinetic theory by the present authors, the kinetic derivations are so involved because of exact particle orbits in phase space, finite Lamor radius effects, and higher order ion cyclotron resonances. The present fluid theory provides a simple and transparent structure to the dispersion relations since the gyro-viscosity is renormalized into the ion cyclotron frequency which itself indicates the backward nature of dispersion. The usual disadvantage of a fluid theory, which treats only fundamental modes of eigen-waves excited in a system and is not able to describe higher harmonics that a kinetic theory does, is compensated by simple derivations and clear picture based on the renormalization of the gyro-viscosity.

  2. Gyro-viscosity and linear dispersion relations in pair-ion magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, M.; Vranjes, J.

    2015-11-15

    A fluid theory has been developed by taking account of gyro-viscosity to study wave propagation characteristics in a homogeneous pair-ion magnetized plasma with a cylindrical symmetry. The exact dispersion relations derived by the Hankel-Fourier transformation are shown comparable with those observed in the experiment by Oohara and co-workers. The gyro-viscosity is responsible for the change in propagation characteristics of the ion cyclotron wave from forward to backward by suppressing the effect of the thermal pressure which normally causes the forward nature of dispersion. Although the experiment has been already explained by a kinetic theory by the present authors, the kinetic derivations are so involved because of exact particle orbits in phase space, finite Lamor radius effects, and higher order ion cyclotron resonances. The present fluid theory provides a simple and transparent structure to the dispersion relations since the gyro-viscosity is renormalized into the ion cyclotron frequency which itself indicates the backward nature of dispersion. The usual disadvantage of a fluid theory, which treats only fundamental modes of eigen-waves excited in a system and is not able to describe higher harmonics that a kinetic theory does, is compensated by simple derivations and clear picture based on the renormalization of the gyro-viscosity.

  3. Photoemission line-shapes and dispersion relations in the superconducting state of BISCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Gromko, A. D.; Sun, Z.; Douglas, J.; Koralek, J. D.; Dessau, D. S.; Aiura, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Oka, K.; Ando, Yoichi

    2003-03-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission on BISCO we have studied the dispersion relations and photoemission line-shapes close to the Fermi level. Results taken near (p,0) points of the Brilloin zone indicate that traditional peak-dip-hump structure is largely due to the presence of bonding and anti-bonding bands. However, a separate much weaker peak and hump structure can be detected if the bilayer splitting is resolved properly. This true peak-dip hump lineshape develops in the superconducting state. At the same time, the dispersion relations show the kink" or mass enhancement with the true quasiparticles occurring within the kink energy. We will argue that "kinks" detected in the vicinity of (p,0) points and along the nodal direction are distinctly different in nature.

  4. The relative dispersion of cloud droplets: its robustness with respect to key cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, E.; Teller, A.; Altaratz, O.; Axisa, D.; Bruintjes, R.; Levin, Z.; Koren, I.

    2015-02-01

    Flight data measured in warm convective clouds near Istanbul in June 2008 were used to investigate the relative dispersion of cloud droplet size distribution. The relative dispersion (ϵ), defined as the ratio between the standard deviation (σ) of the cloud droplet size distribution and cloud droplet average radius (⟨r⟩), is a key factor in regional and global models. The relationship between ɛ and the clouds' microphysical and thermodynamic characteristics is examined. The results show that ɛ is constrained with average values in the range of ~0.25-0.35. ɛ is shown not to be correlated with cloud droplet concentration or liquid water content (LWC). However, ɛ variance is shown to be sensitive to droplet concentration and LWC, suggesting smaller variability of ϵ in the clouds' most adiabatic regions. A criterion for use of in situ airborne measurement data for calculations of statistical moments (used in bulk microphysical schemes), based on the evaluation of ϵ, is suggested.

  5. On the Sensitivity of Neutrino Telescopes to a Modified Dispersion Relation

    SciTech Connect

    Bustamante, M.; Gago, A. M.; Bazo, J. L.; Miranda, O. G.

    2008-07-02

    We consider a modified dispersion relation and its effect on the flavour ratios of high-energy neutrinos originated at distant astrophysical sources such as active galactic nuclei. This dispersion relation arise naturally in different new physics (NP) effects such as violation of CPT invariance, of the equivalence principle and of Lorentz invariance. It is a common notion in the literature that by using the flux of high-energy neutrinos expected from distant astrophysical sources, the sensitivity to possible NP effects may be improved beyond the current bounds. However, performing a realistic analysis that takes into account the expected number of events in future neutrino telescopes, we find that the average detected flavour ratios with and without the inclusion of new physics have essentially the same value, making difficult to obtain an improved bound for this type of new physics.

  6. Spatial backward planar projection in absorbing media possessing an arbitrary dispersion relation

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Gregory T.

    2011-01-01

    Planar projection methods have been shown to rapidly relate fields between two planes. Such an approach is particularly useful for characterizing transducers, since only a single plane needs to be measured in order to characterize an entire field. The present work considers the same approach in the presence of an arbitrary dispersion relation. Unlike traditional methods that use Fourier solutions of the time-domain wave equation, the approach starts from a frequency-domain Helmholtz equation for waves in a dispersive medium. It is shown that a transfer function similar to that derived from time domain equations can be utilized. Both the forward- and backward-projection behaviors are examined and it is demonstrated that the approach is invariant to propagation direction. PMID:21611135

  7. Effects Of Relative Strength Of Dispersion On The Formation Of Nonlinear Waves In Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.

    2009-07-07

    In this paper, we studied the effect of strength of dispersion on the formation of solitons and shock waves in un-magnetized dusty plasma using the reductive perturbative technique. Different relational forms of strength parameter epsilon were chosen such a way that it altered the stretching of space, x and time, t variables, thereby leading to different nonlinearities. First, we considered the form zeta = sq root(epsilon(x-v{sub 0}t)) and tau = sq root(epsilont), where v{sub 0} is the phase velocity, with 0dispersion. We obtained the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for un-modulated dust acoustic wave with solitary wave-type solution. The effect of dissipation on the wave propagation was analyzed with coordinate transformations zeta epsilon(x-v{sub 0}t) and tau = epsilon{sup 2}t, with 0dispersion, dust charge fluctuations can only change the amplitude of solitary wave, as observed in the KdV case. However, when the system is not sufficiently dispersive, the dissipation due to dust charge fluctuations can play dominant role and eventually leads to the formation of dust-acoustic shock wave.

  8. Building a Dispersion Relation Solver for Hot Plasmas with Arbitrary Non-relativistic Parallel Velocity Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Waters, T.; Gary, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Collisionless space plasmas often deviate from Maxwellian-like velocity distributions. To study kinetic waves and instabilities in such plasmas, the dispersion relation, which depends on the velocity distribution, needs to be solved numerically. Most current dispersion solvers (e.g. WHAMP) take advantage of mathematical properties of the Gaussian (or generalized Lorentzian) function, and assume that the velocity distributions can be modeled by a combination of several drift-Maxwellian (or drift-Lorentzian) components. In this study we are developing a kinetic dispersion solver that admits nearly arbitrary non-relativistic parallel velocity distributions. A key part of any dispersion solver is the evaluation of a Hilbert transform of the velocity distribution function and its derivative along Landau contours. Our new solver builds upon a recent method to compute the Hilbert transform accurately and efficiently using the fast Fourier transform, while simultaneously treating the singularities arising from resonances analytically. We have benchmarked our new solver against other codes dealing with Maxwellian distributions. As an example usage of our code, we will show results for several instabilities that occur for electron velocity distributions observed in the solar wind.

  9. Predictions of three-body-decays of mesons from pole-dominated dispersion relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thews, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation shows that the method of finite dispersion relations (FDR) as developed by Aviv and Nussinov (1970) is consistent with a wide range of three-body meson decays. The specific results vary with each reaction. For each possibility a definite form for the t-channel Regge-pole terms is selected. The results of the investigation indicate the basic reliability of an approach based on the FDR method and the finite-energy sum rules.

  10. O (p6) extension of the large-NC partial wave dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z. H.; Sanz-Cillero, J. J.; Zheng, H. Q.

    2008-04-01

    Continuing our previous work [Z.H. Guo, J.J. Sanz-Cillero, H.Q. Zheng, JHEP 0706 (2007) 030], large-NC techniques and partial wave dispersion relations are used to discuss ππ scattering amplitudes. We get a set of predictions for O (p6) low-energy chiral perturbation theory couplings. They are provided in terms of the masses and decay widths of scalar and vector mesons.

  11. Electron thermal effects on the Farley--Buneman fluid dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect

    Kissack, R.S.; St-Maurice, J.; Moorcroft, D.R.

    1995-04-01

    The traditional linear fluid dispersion relation of Farley--Buneman waves has been generalized by including, for the electron gas, the effects of collisional energy exchange, as well as thermal force and thermoelectric effects associated with heat flow. The formalism used is that of Schunk [Rev. Geophys. Space Phys. {bold 15}, 429 (1977)] for Grad`s 8-moment approximation, to which inelastic energy exchange has been added phenomenologically. The resulting dispersion relation recovers both the traditional isothermal and adiabatic limits, as well as the dispersion relation of Pecseli {ital et} {ital al}. [J. Geophys. Res. {bold 94}, 5337 (1989)] as a special case. Owing to the fact that the electron--neutral interaction is far from being of the Maxwell molecule type, it is found that, contrary to suggestions in the literature, adiabaticity does not hold at the larger wavelengths of the instability. In the small wave-number limit, the linear instability threshold speed of the waves takes the form [({gamma}{sub {ital e}T}{sub {ital e}0}+{ital T}{sub {ital i}0})/{ital m}{sub {ital i}}]{sup 1/2}, with the effective {gamma}{sub {ital e}} being a sensitive function of aspect angle. Its value can be as small as 0.28 or as large as 3.4 depending on conditions. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Electron thermal effects on the Farley-Buneman fluid dispersion relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissack, R. S.; St-Maurice, J.-P.; Moorcroft, D. R.

    1995-04-01

    The traditional linear fluid dispersion relation of Farley-Buneman waves has been generalized by including, for the electron gas, the effects of collisional energy exchange, as well as thermal force and thermoelectric effects associated with heat flow. The formalism used is that of Schunk [Rev. Geophys. Space Phys. 15, 429 (1977)] for Grad's 8-moment approximation, to which inelastic energy exchange has been added phenomenologically. The resulting dispersion relation recovers both the traditional isothermal and adiabatic limits, as well as the dispersion relation of Pécseli et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 94, 5337 (1989)] as a special case. Owing to the fact that the electron-neutral interaction is far from being of the Maxwell molecule type, it is found that, contrary to suggestions in the literature, adiabaticity does not hold at the larger wavelengths of the instability. In the small wave-number limit, the linear instability threshold speed of the waves takes the form [(γeTe0+Ti0)/mi]1/2, with the effective γe being a sensitive function of aspect angle. Its value can be as small as 0.28 or as large as 3.4 depending on conditions.

  13. Numerical calculation of electromagnetic eigenfields and dispersion relation for slow-wave device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oslake, J.M.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    Slow-wave structures support microwave amplification via electromagnetic coupling with an injected electron beam. Critical in the design of such devices is the dependence of the dispersion relation on the geometry of the guiding structure. The dispersion relation provides phase and group velocities, and the fields provide the impedance as seen by the beam. To this end, a computer model is developed which first numerically solves a wave equation in finite difference from subject to boundary conditions periodic in z and conducting elsewhere. Here the direction of wave propagation is along the z-axis. The solution produces a sequence of eigenfrequencies and eigenfields beginning with cut-off. Fourier decomposition of each eigenfield along selected mesh lines coincident with the location of the electron beam is then performed to establish a correspondence between eigenfrequency and wave number. From this data the dispersion relation for the slow-wave structure can then be formed. An example showing the first two TM passbands and E{sub z} fields for a slotted waveguide in xz coordinates is demonstrated. The authors plan to incorporate plasma loading with space-time dependent dielectric constant.

  14. Dispersion relations of director fluctuations along the direction perpendicular to the helical axis in cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, J.; Takanishi, Y.; Yamamoto, J.

    2012-04-01

    We theoretically analyzed the dispersion relations of director fluctuations along the direction perpendicular to the helical axis in cholesteric liquid crystals, and experimentally verified the validity of the analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement. It is found that the dispersion relations are well explained by two independent modes, which we call "splay-bend" and "undulation" modes.

  15. Selfing ability and dispersal are positively related, but not affected by range position: a multispecies study on southern African Asteraceae.

    PubMed

    de Waal, C; Rodger, J G; Anderson, B; Ellis, A G

    2014-05-01

    Dispersal and breeding system traits are thought to affect colonization success. As species have attained their present distribution ranges through colonization, these traits may vary geographically. Although several theories predict associations between dispersal ability, selfing ability and the relative position of a population within its geographic range, there is little theoretical or empirical consensus on exactly how these three variables are related. We investigated relationships between dispersal ability, selfing ability and range position across 28 populations of 13 annual, wind-dispersed Asteraceae species from the Namaqualand region of South Africa. Controlling for phylogeny, relative dispersal ability--assessed from vertical fall time of fruits--was positively related to an index of autofertility--determined from hand-pollination experiments. These findings support the existence of two discrete syndromes: high selfing ability associated with good dispersal and obligate outcrossing associated with lower dispersal ability. This is consistent with the hypothesis that selection for colonization success drives the evolution of an association between these traits. However, no general effect of range position on dispersal or breeding system traits was evident. This suggests selection on both breeding system and dispersal traits acts consistently across distribution ranges. PMID:24735437

  16. Curves to determine the relative importance of advection and dispersion for solute and vapor transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garges, J.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of advection and dispersion for both solute and vapor transport can be determined from type curves or concentration, flux, or cumulative flux. The dimensionless form of the type curves provides a means to directly evaluate the importance of mass transport by advection relative to that of mass transport by diffusion and dispersion. Type curves based on an analytical solution to the advection-dispersion equation are plotted in terms of dimensionless time and Peclet number. Flux and cumulative flux type curves provide additional rationale for transport regime determination in addition to the traditional concentration type curves. The extension of type curves to include vapor transport with phase partitioning in the unsaturated zone is a new development. Type curves for negative Peclet numbers also are presented. A negative Peclet number characterizes a problem in which one direction of flow is toward the contamination source, and thereby diffusion and advection can act in opposite directions. Examples are the diffusion of solutes away from the downgradient edge of a pump-and-treat capture zone, the upward diffusion of vapors through the unsaturated zone with recharge, and the diffusion of solutes through a low hydraulic conductivity cutoff wall with an inward advective gradient.

  17. FTIR spectroscopic study of poly(ethylene glycol)-nifedipine dispersion stability in different relative humidities.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Waleed S; Chan, K L

    2015-01-01

    Solid dispersion has shown to be a promising formulation strategy to enhance dissolution for hydrophobic drugs. However, solid dispersions are often thermodynamically unstable, there is a continuous interest in studying their stabilities. In this study, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) was used to compare the amount of crystalline nifedipine formed in different formula of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-nifedipine solid dispersions when exposed at various relative humidities (RHs) for 2 h at 40°C. The ratio of the crystalline nifedipine band and an internal reference band in the out of plane δ(C-H) region has been used to indicate the relative degree of drug crystallisation in a sample. A band ratio of ∼0.05 and 0.5 was respectively indicative of a fully amorphous or crystallised drug in the formula. Results show that increasing the RH generally increases the amount of crystalline nifedipine. Formulations with low (5%, w/w) nifedipine concentration in higher molecular weight PEG were found to be better at resisting crystallisation. Deliquescence of the 10% nifedipine in PEG 4000 was observed at 77% and 100% RH with a reduction in crystalline nifedipine. All 5% (w/w) nifedipine samples were stable at RH below 77%. Crystallisation of nifedipine occurred at all RH when drug loading was increased to 10% (w/w). PMID:25410816

  18. Measurement of average density and relative volumes in a dispersed two-phase fluid

    DOEpatents

    Sreepada, Sastry R.; Rippel, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for measuring the average density and relative volumes in an essentially transparent, dispersed two-phase fluid. A laser beam with a diameter no greater than 1% of the diameter of the bubbles, droplets, or particles of the dispersed phase is directed onto a diffraction grating. A single-order component of the diffracted beam is directed through the two-phase fluid and its refraction is measured. Preferably, the refracted beam exiting the fluid is incident upon a optical filter with linearly varing optical density and the intensity of the filtered beam is measured. The invention can be combined with other laser-based measurement systems, e.g., laser doppler anemometry.

  19. A Wind Tunnel Study of the Effect of Roadway Configurations on the Dispersion of Traffic-Related Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we examine the effect of different roadway configurations, including noise barriers and roadway elevation or depression relative to surrounding terrain, on the dispersion of traffic-related pollutants from winds perpendicular to the roadway.

  20. Impact of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2007-01-01

    Effect of the ring current ions in the real part of electromagnetic ion Cyclotron wave dispersion relation is studied on global scale. Recent Cluster observations by Engebretson et al. showed that although the temperature anisotropy of is energetic (> 10 keV) ring current protons was high during the entire 22 November 2003 perigee pass, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves were observed only in conjunction with intensification of the ion fluxes below 1 keV by over an order of magnitude. To study the effect of the ring current ions on the wave dispersive properties and the corresponding global wave redistribution, we use a self-consistent model of interacting ring current and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows: First, the plasma density enhancement in the night MLT sector during the main and recovery storm phases is mostly caused by injection of suprathermal plasma sheet H + (approximately < 1 keV), which dominate the thermal plasma density. Second, during the recovery storm phases, the ring current modification of the wave dispersion relation leads to a qualitative change of the wave patterns in the postmidnight-dawn sector for L > 4.75. This "new" wave activity is well organized by outward edges of dense suprathermal ring current spots, and the waves are not observed if the ring current ions are not included in the real part of dispersion relation. Third, the most intense wave-induced ring current precipitation is located in the night MLT sector and caused by modification of the wave dispersion relation. The strongest precipitating fluxes of about 8 X 10(exp 6)/ (cm(exp 2) - s X st) are found near L=5.75, MLT=2 during the early recovery phase on 4 May. Finally, the nightside precipitation is more intense than the dayside fluxes, even if there are less intense waves, because the convection field moves ring current ions into the loss cone on the nightside, but drives

  1. Relative dispersion in isotropic turbulence. Part 2. A new stochastic model with Reynolds-number dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgas, Michael S.; Yeung, P. K.

    2004-03-01

    A new model for Lagrangian particle-pair separation in turbulent flows is developed and compared with data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of isotropic turbulence. The model formulation emphasizes (i) non-Gaussian behaviour in Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics, (ii) the occurrence of large separation velocities, (iii) the role of straining and streaming flow structure as recognized in kinematic simulations of turbulence, and (iv) the role of conditionally averaged accelerations in stochastic modelling of turbulent relative dispersion. Previous stochastic models of relative dispersion have produced unrealistic behaviour, particularly in the dissipation subrange where viscous effects are important, which have led to questions on the adequacy of stochastic modelling. However, this failure can now be recognized as inadequate detail in formulation, which is explained and rectified in this paper. The model is quasi-one-dimensional in nature, and is focused on the statistics of particle-pair separation distance and its rate of change, referred to as the separation speed. Detailed comparisons are presented at several Reynolds numbers using the DNS database reported in a companion paper (Part 1). Up to fourth-order moments for these quantities are examined, as well as the separation-distance probability density function, which is discussed in the context of recent claims of Richardson scaling in the literature. The model is able to account for the spatial representation of straining regions as well as incompressibility of the flow, and is shown to reproduce strong non-Gaussianity and intermittency in the Lagrangian separation statistics observed in DNS. Comparisons with recent physical experiments are also remarkably consistent. This work demonstrates that stochastic models when properly formulated are effective and efficient representations of the dispersion process and this general class of models therefore possess great utility for calculations of both one

  2. Optical glass: deviation of relative partial dispersion from the normal line-need for a common definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The design of high-quality imaging lenses continues to strive for the best color trueness over wider and wider wavelength ranges such as for multiwavelength fluorescence microscopy or hyperspectral imaging. Glasses suitable for sharp images at more than two wavelengths must differ in their dispersion from the classical crown and flint glass types, which gather along a straight line in a plot of the relative partial dispersion against the Abbe number. Glasses suitable for multicolor correction can be recognized by a considerable deviation of their relative partial dispersion from this normal line. Originally, the normal lines for different relative partial dispersions were defined by using the SCHOTT glass types K7 and F2. Today's data sheets of all glass manufacturers contain numerical values for deviations of relative partial dispersions from the normal lines. A comparison of almost identical glasses shows differences between these deviations being too large, obviously coming from different versions of K7 and F2 dispersion curves used. For preselection in designs and for direct comparison of glass types, it is necessary to agree on common dispersion curves each for K7 and for F2 in order to obtain really comparable values for deviations of the relative partial dispersion from the normal line.

  3. Black hole radiation with modified dispersion relation in tunneling paradigm: free-fall frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang; Ying, Shuxuan

    2016-01-01

    Due to the exponential high gravitational red shift near the event horizon of a black hole, it might appear that the Hawking radiation would be highly sensitive to some unknown high energy physics. To study the effects of any unknown physics at the Planck scale on the Hawking radiation, the dispersive field theory models have been proposed, which are variations of Unruh's sonic black hole analogy. In this paper, we use the Hamilton-Jacobi method to investigate the dispersive field theory models. The preferred frame is the free-fall frame of the black hole. The dispersion relation adopted agrees with the relativistic one at low energy but is modified near the Planck mass mp. The corrections to the Hawking temperature are calculated for massive and charged particles to {O}( mp^{-2}) and neutral and massless particles with λ =0 to all orders. The Hawking temperature of radiation agrees with the standard one at the leading order. After the spectrum of radiation near the horizon is obtained, we use the brick wall model to compute the thermal entropy of a massless scalar field near the horizon of a 4D spherically symmetric black hole and a 2D one. Finally, the luminosity of a Schwarzschild black hole is calculated by using the geometric optics approximation.

  4. Derivation and generalization of the dispersion relation of rising-sun magnetron with sectorial and rectangular cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Di-Fu; Qian, Bao-Liang; Wang, Hong-Gang; Li, Wei

    2013-12-15

    Field analysis method is used to derive the dispersion relation of rising-sun magnetron with sectorial and rectangular cavities. This dispersion relation is then extended to the general case in which the rising-sun magnetron can be with multi-group cavities of different shapes and sizes, and from which the dispersion relations of conventional magnetron, rising-sun magnetron, and magnetron-like device can be obtained directly. The results show that the relative errors between the theoretical and simulation values of the dispersion relation are less than 3%, the relative errors between the theoretical and simulation values of the cutoff frequencies of π mode are less than 2%. In addition, the influences of each structure parameter of the magnetron on the cutoff frequency of π mode and on the mode separation are investigated qualitatively and quantitatively, which may be of great interest to designing a frequency tuning magnetron.

  5. Dispersion relations of electron density fluctuations in a Hall thruster plasma, observed by collective light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsikata, S.; Pisarev, V.; Gresillon, D. M.; Lemoine, N.

    2009-03-15

    Kinetic models and numerical simulations of E-vectorxB-vector plasma discharges predict microfluctuations at the scales of the electron cyclotron drift radius and the ion plasma frequency. With the help of a specially designed collective scattering device, the first experimental observations of small-scale electron density fluctuations inside the plasma volume are obtained, and observed in the expected ranges of spatial and time scales. The anisotropy, dispersion relations, form factor, amplitude, and spatial distribution of these electron density fluctuations are described and compared to theoretical expectations.

  6. Determine the Dispersion Relation of an A6 Magnetron Using Conformal Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Nieter, C.; Stoltz, P. H.; Smithe, D. N.

    2009-05-01

    This work introduces a conformal finite difference time domain (CFDTD) method to accurately determine the dispersion relation of an A6 relativistic magnetron. The accuracy is measured by comparing with accurate SUPERFISH calculations based on finite element method. The results show that an accuracy of 99.4% can be achieved by using only 10,000 mesh points with Dey-Mittra algorithm. By comparison, a mesh number of 360,000 is needed to preserve 99% accuracy using conventional FDTD method. This suggests one can efficiently and accurately study the hot tests of microwave tubes using CFDTD particle-in-cell method instead of conventional FDTD one.

  7. New generalized dispersion relation for low-frequency electromagnetic waves in Hall-magnetohydrodynamic dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Padma Kant; Kourakis, Ioannis; Stenflo, Lennart

    2005-10-31

    A generalized linear theory for electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous dusty magnetoplasma is presented. The waves described are characterized by a frequency which is much smaller (larger) than the electron gyrofrequency (dust plasma and dust gyrofrequencies), and a long wavelength (in comparison with the ion gyroradius and the electron skin depth). The generalized Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (GH-MHD) equations are derived by assuming massive charged dust macroparticles to be immobile, and Fourier transformed to obtain a general dispersion relation. The latter is analyzed to understand the influence of immobile charged dust grains on various electromagnetic wave modes in a magnetized dusty plasma.

  8. A dispersion relation in bidust acoustic wave in non uniform stratified plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Valdeblanquez, E.

    2006-12-04

    Low frequencies waves are studied in plasma with two kind of dusty grains. Also considered are stratified plasma with layers of different densities to that of the main plasma. In this analysis each dust species is treated with a simplified model of fluid equations, and electrons and ions are determined by a Boltzmann factor. Relative velocities between each species and the non uniform plasma is considered in order to study instabilities. In cases in which the speed or the density of current of the charged dust grains is zero, the dispersion equation is recovered.

  9. Noncommutative Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory: One-loop dispersion relation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemkhani, M.; Bufalo, R.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study the three-dimensional noncommutative Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory. In the present analysis, a complete account for the gauge field two-point function renormalizability is presented and physical significant quantities are carefully established. The respective form factor expressions from the gauge field self-energy are computed at one-loop order. More importantly, an analysis of the gauge field dispersion relation, in search of possible noncommutative anomalies and infrared finiteness, is performed for three special cases, with particular interest in the highly noncommutative limit.

  10. Further study of a new dispersion relation for electron-atom scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, A.K.; Temkin, A.

    1988-03-01

    A new recently proposed dispersion relation (DR) (Temkin, Bhatia, and Kim, J. Phys. B 19, L707 (1986)) is tested for e-He scattering; the results show that the new DR is not satisfied. Therefore we start to investigate the analytic structure of the difference amplitude, previously assumed to be nonsingular, on the negative scattering energy axis. Even under severe approximations we find that the difference amplitude contains both poles and branch points. This suggests, however, a useful approximation of these contributions to the DR which gives very satisfactory agreement in both e-H and e-He scattering. We conclude with some brief general remarks on this problem.

  11. Formulation of stability-dependent empirical relations for turbulent intensities from surface layer turbulence measurements for dispersion parameterization in a lagrangian particle dispersion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari Prasad, K. B. R. R.; Srinivas, C. V.; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Naidu, C. V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-08-01

    Season- and stability-dependent turbulence intensity ( σ u / u *, σ v / u *, σ w / u *) relationships are derived from experimental turbulence measurements following surface layer scaling and local stability at the tropical coastal site Kalpakkam, India for atmospheric dispersion parameterization. Turbulence wind components ( u', v', w') measured with fast response UltraSonic Anemometers during an intense observation campaign for wind field modeling called Round Robin Exercise are used to formulate the flux-profile relationships using surface layer similarity theory and Fast Fourier Transform technique. The new relationships (modified Hanna scheme) are incorporated in a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion model FLEXPART-WRF and tested by conducting simulations for a field tracer dispersion experiment at Kalpakkam. Plume dispersion analysis of a ground level hypothetical release indicated that the new turbulent intensity formulations provide slightly higher diffusivity across the plume relative to the original Hanna scheme. The new formulations for σ u , σ v , σ w are found to give better agreement with observed turbulent intensities during both stable and unstable conditions under various seasonal meteorological conditions. The simulated concentrations using the two methods are compared with those obtained from a classical Gaussian model and the observed SF6 concentration. It has been found that the new relationships provide comparatively higher diffusion across the plume relative to the model default Hanna scheme and provide downwind concentration results in better agreement with observations.

  12. The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion - temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Susan; Hilton, Matt; Rooney, Philip J.; Caldwell, Caroline; Kay, Scott T.; Collins, Chris A.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Romer, A. Kathy; Bermeo, Alberto; Bernstein, Rebecca; da Costa, Luiz; Gifford, Daniel; Hollowood, Devon; Hoyle, Ben; Jeltema, Tesla; Liddle, Andrew R.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Mann, Robert G.; Mayers, Julian A.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Ogando, Ricardo; Sahlén, Martin; Stahl, Benjamin; Stott, John P.; Thomas, Peter A.; Viana, Pedro T. P.; Wilcox, Harry

    2016-08-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature (σv-TX) relation up to z = 1 using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 z > 0.5 clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero (σv∝T0.86 ± 0.14E(z)-0.37 ± 0.33). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.

  13. Investigation of multiple roots of the resistive wall mode dispersion relation, including kinetic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.

    2011-07-15

    The resistive wall mode instability in tokamak plasmas has a complex frequency which can be determined by a dispersion relation that is cubic, in general, leading to three distinct roots. A simplified model of the dispersion relation, including kinetic effects, is presented and used to explore the behavior of these roots. By changing the plasma rotation frequency, it is shown that one root has a slow mode rotation frequency (less than the inverse wall time) while the other two rotate more quickly, one leading and one lagging the plasma rotation frequency. When realistic experimental parameters from the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are used, however, only one slow rotating, near-marginal stability root is found, consistent with present experiments and more detailed calculations with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)]. Electron collisionality acts to stabilize one of the rotating roots, while ion collisionality can stabilize the other. In devices with low rotation and low collisionality, these two rotating roots may manifest themselves, but they are likely to remain stable.

  14. Relative diffusion and dispersion at the Antarctic Peninsula: observations of pairs and triplets of drifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandet, Marion D.; Thompson, Andrew F.; Heywood, Karen J.; Thorpe, Sally E.

    2010-05-01

    Forty surface drifters were deployed in 2007 at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula as part of the ADELIE research project to map the near surface currents around the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and to determine the role of these currents in the retention or dispersion of krill. Here we use the ADELIE drifters, together with 55 historical drifters that pass close to the Antarctic Peninsula, to evaluate the strength of advection and diffusion in this region. Relative eddy dispersion and diffusivities have been calculated using drifter pairs and triplets. The relative eddy diffusivity along and across isobaths is presented for various areas around the peninsula based on current paths and data availability. Combined together, the ADELIE and historical drifters provide a data set of up to 148 pairs for which we use a maximum initial separation varying between 15 and 60 km and a temporal resolution of 30 days. The triplets, although limited in number, allow the anisotropy of the diffusivity to be quantified. They provide insight into the stretching and straining deformations of krill or tracer patches. The results are compared with a previous analysis of the same data set using single drifters (Thompson et al. 2009, J. Phys. Oceanogr.). Data from ARGO floats deployed in the region will also be used to bring additional information about the flow structure in the vicinity of the Antarctic Peninsula.

  15. Quantitative study on dispersion relations of TIDs observed by an HF Doppler array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsutsui, M.; Ogawa, T.

    1985-01-01

    A quantitative study on the dispersion relation of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) was performed by using data obtained by an HF Doppler array. Observed data at three stations are digitized continuously with a sampling period of 10 sec. A schematic illustration of a running analysis method is given. Fourier components omega's and their wave vectors k's of the TIDs are calculated from these subset data from three stations by means of the cross-spectrum analysis. Diagrams of horizontal trace velocity V sub ph versus wave period T were also obtained. From these diagrams one can see clear cutoff periods of the internal mode of the atmospheric gravity waves. A morphological classification of the mode of the omega - k and V sub ph - T obtained through one year was performed. The estimation of the horizontal velocity vectors of the thermospheric wind form their dispersion relations was performed also. A key point of the method of obtaining the vectors is to estimate the tilt, in azimuthally different omega - k diagrams, of a resonant branch ascribed to the Brunt oscillations.

  16. The influence of the directional energy distribution on the nonlinear dispersion relation in a random gravity wave field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, N. E.; Tung, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the directional distribution of wave energy on the dispersion relation is calculated numerically using various directional wave spectrum models. The results indicate that the dispersion relation varies both as a function of the directional energy distribution and the direction of propagation of the wave component under consideration. Furthermore, both the mean deviation and the random scatter from the linear approximation increase as the energy spreading decreases. Limited observational data are compared with the theoretical results. The agreement is favorable.

  17. Multi-particle and tetrad statistics in numerical simulations of turbulent relative dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, J. F.; Yeung, P. K.; Sawford, B. L.

    2011-06-01

    The evolution in size and shape of three and four-particle clusters (triangles and tetrads, respectively) in isotropic turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulations at grid resolution up to 40963 and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers from 140 to 1000. A key issue is the attainment of inertial range behavior at high Reynolds number, while the small- and large-time limits of ballistic and diffusive regimes, respectively, are also considered in some detail. Tetrad size expressed by the volume (V) and (more appropriately) the gyration radius (R) is shown to display inertial range scaling consistent with a Richardson constant close to 0.56 for two-particle relative dispersion. For tetrads of initial size in a suitable range moments of shape parameters, including the ratio V2/3/R2 and normalized eigenvalues of a moment-of-inertia-like dispersion tensor, show a regime of near-constancy which is identified with inertial-range scaling. Sheet-like structures are dominant in this period, while pancakes and needles are more prevalent at later times. For triangles taken from different faces of each tetrad effects of the initial shape (isosceles right-angled or equilateral) are retained only for about one Batchelor time scale. In the inertial range there is a prevalence of nearly isosceles triangles of two long sides and one short side, representing one particle moving away from the other two which are still close together. In general, measures of shape display asymptotic scaling ranges more readily than measures of size. With some caveats, the simulation results are also compared with the limited literature available for multiparticle cluster dispersion in turbulent flow.

  18. Are Ring Current Ions Lost in Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  19. Effect of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  20. High frequency dielectric dispersion of polyelectrolyte solutions and its relation to counterion condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penafiel, L. Miguel; Litovitz, Theodore A.

    1992-07-01

    The dielectric properties of polyelectrolyte solutions are studied in terms of counterion condensation by measurements of the dielectric response of pH buffered Na polyacrylate solutions. pH values are selected to allow variation of the charge density parameter ξ in the range between 0.5-2.8, that is, across ξ=1, the theoretical critical level for counterion condensation. The dielectric increment of the high frequency dispersion, Δɛ2, is found to have nonzero values only above the counterion condensation threshold and is therefore linked to the occurrence of counterion condensation. Above the condensation threshold Δɛ2 (≊6) and its corresponding polarizability α∥2 (≊6×10-16 cm3) are found to be approximately constant with increasing ξ. This result is predicted by Manning's polarizability model for condensed counterions which results in a good fit to the experimental data when the average length of the polyion segments parallel to the external field, Ls, is set to 284 Å. This value of Ls is also shown to be in relatively close agreement with the value calculated for the length of a rigid subunit in Mandel's polyion model, obtained using the relaxation time of the high frequency dispersion. The length Ls, which is larger than the persistence length, is estimated to be of the order of magnitude of the correlation length between segments.

  1. Poroelastic model to relate seismic wave attenuation and dispersion to permeability anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.

    2000-02-01

    A transversely isotropic model with a horizontal axis of symmetry, based on the Biot and squirt-flow mechanisms, predicts seismic waves in poroelastic media. The model estimates velocity dispersion and attenuation of waves propagating in the frequency range of crosswell and high-resolution reverse vertical seismic profiling (VSP) (250--1,250 HZ) for vertical permeability value much greater than horizontal permeability parameters. The model assumes the principal axes of the stiffness constant tensor are aligned with the axes of the permeability and squirt-flow tensors. In addition, the unified Biot and squirt-flow mechanism (BISQ) model is adapted to simulate cracks in permeable media. Under these conditions, the model simulations demonstrate that the preferential direction of fluid flow in a reservoir containing fluid-filled cracks can be determined by analyzing the phase velocity and attenuation of seismic waves propagating at different azimuth and incident angles. As a result, the fast compressional wave can be related to permeability anisotropy in a reservoir. The model results demonstrate that for fast quasi-P-wave propagating perpendicular to fluid-filled cracks, the attenuation is greater than when the wave propagates parallel to the plane of the crack. Theoretical predictions and velocity dispersion of interwell seismic waves in the Kankakee Limestone Formation at the Buckhorn test site (Illinois) demonstrate that the permeable rock matrix surrounding a low-velocity heterogeneity contains vertical cracks.

  2. Evidence of scaling in the high pressure phonon dispersion relations of some elemental solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Divya; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Sarkar, Subir K.

    2014-07-01

    First principles searches are carried out for the existence of an asymptotic scaling law for the zero temperature phonon dispersion relation of several elemental crystalline solids in the high pressure regime. The solids studied are Cu, Ni, Pd, Au, Al, and Ir in the face-centered-cubic (fcc) geometry and Fe, Re, and Os in the hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) geometry. At higher pressures, the dependence of the scale of frequency on pressure can be fitted well by a power law. Elements with a given crystalline geometry have values of the scaling exponent very close to each other (0.32 for fcc and 0.27 for hcp - with a scatter below five percent of the average).

  3. Computation of Transonic Nozzle Sound Transmission and Rotor Problems by the Dispersion-Relation-Preserving Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Aganin, Alexei

    2000-01-01

    The transonic nozzle transmission problem and the open rotor noise radiation problem are solved computationally. Both are multiple length scales problems. For efficient and accurate numerical simulation, the multiple-size-mesh multiple-time-step Dispersion-Relation-Preserving scheme is used to calculate the time periodic solution. To ensure an accurate solution, high quality numerical boundary conditions are also needed. For the nozzle problem, a set of nonhomogeneous, outflow boundary conditions are required. The nonhomogeneous boundary conditions not only generate the incoming sound waves but also, at the same time, allow the reflected acoustic waves and entropy waves, if present, to exit the computation domain without reflection. For the open rotor problem, there is an apparent singularity at the axis of rotation. An analytic extension approach is developed to provide a high quality axis boundary treatment.

  4. Dispersion relations for a plasma-filled helix-loaded-waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, M.A.; Hooper, E.B.; Stallard, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    The propagation of waves on bounded, magnetized plasma columns arises in connection with a variety of applications. To this end dispersion relations axe developed for a variety of multi-region circularly symmetric configurations. These include, a sheath helix in free space, a plasma column in free space, a plasma filled conducting tube, a plasma filled sheath-helix in free space, a sheath helix within a conducting cylinder, a plasma filled sheath-helix within a conducting cylinder, and a plasma column within a sheath-helix contained within a conducting cylinder. The latter configuration is of the most interest for whistler wave excitation for plasma thruster applications, since it includes the effect of a vacuum region separating the plasma column from the helical excitation structure.

  5. Parametric forcing of waves with a nonmonotonic dispersion relation: Domain structures in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Raitt, D.; Riecke, H.

    1997-05-01

    Surface waves on ferrofluids exposed to a dc magnetic field exhibit a nonmonotonic dispersion relation. The effect of a parametric driving on such waves is studied within suitable coupled Ginzburg-Landau equations. Due to the nonmonotonicity the neutral curve for the excitation of standing waves can have up to three minima. The stability of the waves with respect to long-wave perturbations is determined via a phase-diffusion equation. It shows that the band of stable wave numbers can split up into two or three subbands. The resulting competition between the wave numbers corresponding to the respective subbands leads quite naturally to patterns consisting of multiple domains of standing waves which differ in their wave number. The coarsening dynamics of such domain structures is addressed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2013-12-15

    A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread.

  7. Diffusion related isotopic fractionation effects with one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bruce S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Passeport, Elodie; Sleep, Brent E

    2016-04-15

    Aqueous phase diffusion-related isotope fractionation (DRIF) for carbon isotopes was investigated for common groundwater contaminants in systems in which transport could be considered to be one-dimensional. This paper focuses not only on theoretically observable DRIF effects in these systems but introduces the important concept of constraining "observable" DRIF based on constraints imposed by the scale of measurements in the field, and on standard limits of detection and analytical uncertainty. Specifically, constraints for the detection of DRIF were determined in terms of the diffusive fractionation factor, the initial concentration of contaminants (C0), the method detection limit (MDL) for isotopic analysis, the transport time, and the ratio of the longitudinal mechanical dispersion coefficient to effective molecular diffusion coefficient (Dmech/Deff). The results allow a determination of field conditions under which DRIF may be an important factor in the use of stable carbon isotope measurements for evaluation of contaminant transport and transformation for one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport. This study demonstrates that for diffusion-dominated transport of BTEX, MTBE, and chlorinated ethenes, DRIF effects are only detectable for the smaller molar mass compounds such as vinyl chloride for C0/MDL ratios of 50 or higher. Much larger C0/MDL ratios, corresponding to higher source concentrations or lower detection limits, are necessary for DRIF to be detectable for the higher molar mass compounds. The distance over which DRIF is observable for VC is small (less than 1m) for a relatively young diffusive plume (<100years), and DRIF will not easily be detected by using the conventional sampling approach with "typical" well spacing (at least several meters). With contaminant transport by advection, mechanical dispersion, and molecular diffusion this study suggests that in field sites where Dmech/Deff is larger than 10, DRIF effects will likely not be

  8. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T. -C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found tomore » be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.« less

  9. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepütz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T.-C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations ℏ ωj (q), phonon densities of states g (ℏ ω ), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv(T ) . We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv(T ) , computed within the harmonic approximation from ℏ ωj (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 ×10-4eV /atom K at 100 K to 1.4 ×10-4eV /atom K at 200 K and 1.9 ×10-4eV /atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp(T ) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲θc , where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲10 nm .

  10. Dispersion relations of short surface gravity waves over vertically sheared currents from stereo-video measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peureux, Charles; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    The stereo-video reconstuction method [Leckler et al. 2015] allows now for the full reconstruction of 3D frequency-wavenumber spectra of short waves. A new field campaign in 2013 on the Katsiveli platform (Black Sea) provided such spectra in various wind and waves conditions, and particularly a stormy event, after which very mature waves had been generated. The short waves energies are found to be mostly located around a dispersion relation of the form, () ° ----------- ω ⃗k = gktanh(kH)+ ⃗kṡ ⃗Ueff The effective advection velocity [Kirby and Chen 1989] ⃗Ueff(k) integrates contributions from both the Stokes drift and quasi-eulerian current [Groeneweg and Klopman 1998]. We find that the effective drift velocity has a very weak wavenumber dependancy, as a result the eulerian current must be vertically sheared. This shear is relevant to the breaking of small scale waves [Banner and Phillips 1974]. It is possible that in field conditions the wind drift is much less important than in the laboratory. Bibliography Banner, M. L. and Phillips, O. M., On the incipient breaking of small scale waves, J. Fluid Mech., 1974, 65, 647. Groeneweg, J. and Klopman, G., Changes of the mean velocity profiles in the combined wave-current motion described in a GLM formulation, J. Fluid Mech., 1998, 370, 271-296. Kirby, J. T. and Chen, T. M., Surface waves on vertically sheared flows : Approximate dispersion relations, J. Geophys. Res., 1989, 94, 1013. Leckler, F., Ardhuin, F., Peureux, C.,Benetazzo, A., Bergamasco, F. and Dulov, V., Analysis and interpretation of frequency-wavenumber spectra of young wind-waves, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 2015, 45, 2484-2496.

  11. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T. -C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.

  12. Dispersion relations and polarizations of low-frequency waves in two-fluid plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinsong

    2015-04-15

    Analytical expressions for the dispersion relations and polarizations of low-frequency waves in magnetized plasmas based on two-fluid model are obtained. The properties of waves propagating at different angles (to the ambient magnetic field B{sub 0}) and β (the ratio of the plasma to magnetic pressures) values are investigated. It is shown that two linearly polarized waves—namely, the fast and Alfvén modes in the low-β (β≪1) plasmas, the fast and slow modes in the β∼1 plasmas, and the Alfvén and slow modes in the high-β (β≫1) plasmas—become circularly polarized at the near-parallel (to B{sub 0}) propagation. The negative magnetic-helicity of the Alfvén mode occurs only at small or moderate angles in the low-β plasmas, and the ion cross-helicity of the slow mode is nearly the same as that of the Alfvén mode in the high-β plasmas. It is also shown that the electric polarization δE{sub z}/δE{sub y} decreases with the temperature ratio T{sub e}/T{sub i} for the long-wavelength waves, and the transition between left- and right-hand polarizations of the Alfvén mode in T{sub e}/T{sub i}≠0 plasmas can disappear when T{sub e}/T{sub i}=0. The approximate dispersion relations in the near-perpendicular propagation, low-β, and high-β limits can quite accurately describe the three modes.

  13. Dispersion relations for slow and fast resistive wall modes within the Haney-Freidberg model

    SciTech Connect

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2014-04-15

    The dispersion relation for the resistive wall modes (RWMs) is derived by using the trial function for the magnetic perturbation proposed in S. W. Haney and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Fluids B 1, 1637 (1989). The Haney-Freidberg (HF) approach is additionally based on the expansion in d{sub w}/s≪1, where d{sub w} is the wall thickness and s is the skin depth. Here, the task is solved without this constraint. The derivation procedure is different too, but the final result is expressed in a similar form with the use of the quantities entering the HF relation. The latter is recovered from our more general relation as an asymptote at d{sub w}≪s, which proves the equivalence of the both approaches in this case. In the opposite limit (d{sub w}≫s), we obtain the growth rate γ of the RWMs as a function of γ{sub HF} calculated by the HF prescription. It is shown that γ∝γ{sub HF}{sup 2} and γ≫γ{sub HF} in this range. The proposed relations give γ for slow and fast RWMs in terms of the integrals calculated by the standard stability codes for toroidal systems with and without a perfectly conducting wall. Also, the links between the considered and existing toroidal and cylindrical models are established with estimates explicitly showing the relevant dependencies.

  14. Investigation of dispersion-relation-preserving scheme and spectral analysis methods for acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanel, Florence O.; Baysal, Oktay

    1995-01-01

    Important characteristics of the aeroacoustic wave propagation are mostly encoded in their dispersion relations. Hence, a computational aeroacoustic (CAA) algorithm, which reasonably preserves these relations, was investigated. It was derived using an optimization procedure to ensure, that the numerical derivatives preserved the wave number and angular frequency of the differential terms in the linearized, 2-D Euler equations. Then, simulations were performed to validate the scheme and a compatible set of discretized boundary conditions. The computational results were found to agree favorably with the exact solutions. The boundary conditions were transparent to the outgoing waves, except when the disturbance source was close to a boundary. The time-domain data generated by such CAA solutions were often intractable until their spectra was analyzed. Therefore, the relative merits of three different methods were included in the study. For simple, periodic waves, the periodogram method produced better estimates of the steep-sloped spectra than the Blackman-Tukey method. Also, for this problem, the Hanning window was more effective when used with the weighted-overlapped-segment-averaging and Blackman-Tukey methods gave better results than the periodogram method. Finally, it was demonstrated that the representation of time domain-data was significantly dependent on the particular spectral analysis method employed.

  15. The relation between seismic P- and S-wave velocity dispersion in saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.; Jizba, D.

    1994-01-01

    Seismic velocity dispersion in fluid-saturated rocks appears to be dominated by two mechanisms: the large scale mechanism modeled by Biot, and the local flow or squirt mechanism. The two mechanisms can be distinguished by the ratio of P- to S-wave dispersions, or more conveniently, by the ratio of dynamic bulk to shear compliance dispersions derived from the wave velocities. The authors` formulation suggests that when local flow dominates, the dispersion of the shear compliance will be approximately 4/15 the dispersion of the compressibility. When the Biot mechanism dominates, the constant of proportionality is much smaller. Their examination of ultrasonic velocities from 40 sandstones and granites shows that most, but not all, of the samples were dominated by local flow dispersion, particularly at effective pressures below 40 MPa.

  16. Cooperation is related to dispersal patterns in Sino-Tibetan populations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Jia; Ji, Ting; He, Qiao-Qiao; Du, Juan; Mace, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition in both evolutionary biology and anthropology that dispersal is key to establishing patterns of cooperation. However, some models predict that cooperation is more likely to evolve in low dispersal (viscous) populations, while others predict that local competition for resources inhibits cooperation. Sex-biased dispersal and extra-pair mating may also have an effect. Using economic games in Sino-Tibetan populations with strikingly different dispersal patterns, we measure cooperation in 36 villages in southwestern China; we test whether social structure is associated with cooperative behaviour toward those in the neighbourhood. We find that social organization is associated with levels of cooperation in public goods and dictator games and a resource dilemma; people are less cooperative towards other villagers in communities where dispersal by both sexes is low. This supports the view that dispersal for marriage played an important role in the evolution of large-scale cooperation in human society. PMID:26478534

  17. Characteristics of backward and forward two-particle relative dispersion in turbulence at different Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buaria, D.; Sawford, Brian L.; Yeung, P. K.

    2015-10-01

    A new algorithm based on post-processing of saved trajectories has been developed and applied to obtain well-sampled backward and forward relative dispersion statistics in stationary isotropic turbulence, over a range of initial separations ranging from Kolmogorov to energy-containing scales. Detailed results are obtained over a range of Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers, up to 1000, which is higher than in recent work in the literature. Backward dispersion is faster, especially at intermediate times after the ballistic range and before long-time diffusive behavior is reached. Richardson scaling has been demonstrated for the mean-squared separation, and forward and backward Richardson constants estimated to be gf = 0.55 and gb = 1.5, which are close to or comparable to other estimates. However, because of persistent dissipation sub-range effects no corresponding scaling was observed for higher order moments of the separation. Analysis of the separation probability density function showed only transitory agreement with the well-known Richardson prediction. The strong exponential growth of the separation on dissipation sub-range scales was analyzed in terms of a central limit theory approximation. The resulting predictions for the ratio of the growth rates of the third- and fourth-order moments are reasonably consistent with the theory. The backward growth rates, corresponding to the ratio of the magnitude of the smallest to largest Lyapunov exponents, are about 50% greater than the forward growth rates, somewhat higher than other estimates. The predicted asymmetry between backward and forward relative displacements at early times, manifested in a t3 variation of the difference in the backward and forward mean-square relative displacement, was confirmed numerically and explicitly traced to Eulerian properties at the small scales. However, this t3 growth is not simply connected to the t3 growth in the Richardson regime and the asymmetry manifested there by the difference

  18. On the sensitivity of droplet size relative dispersion to warm cumulus cloud evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, E.; Koren, I.; Altaratz, O.

    2012-07-01

    Relative dispersion (ɛ), defined as the ratio between cloud droplet size distribution width (σ) and cloud droplet average radius (), is a key factor used to parameterize various cloud processes in global circulation models (GCMs) and bulk microphysical scheme models (BSMs). Recent studies indicate that the impact of aerosol loading (N) and atmospheric thermodynamic conditions on ɛ are far from fully understood. Currently, a fixed value per hydrometeor type is used in most BSMs and GCMs, which imposes significant limitations on our ability to model and predict cloud processes and their impact on the environment, on regional to global scales. In this study, we use a detailed bin microphysics single cloud model to investigate the combined impact of atmospheric thermodynamic conditions and N on ɛ, in warm cumulus clouds. As initial conditions, we used different lapse-rates combined with 8 scenarios of aerosol loading, representing very clean (N = 25 cm-3) to heavily polluted (N = 1600 cm-3) conditions. Moreover, the results are analyzed per cloud evolutionary stage according to the dominance of microphysical processes. The use of this method indicated a different pattern of ɛ at each stage. Specifically, during the mature stage fitting of ɛ to rv is relatively resilient to changes in the environmental conditions. Such findings suggest a new view of the effect of aerosols on clouds, via changes in the cloud evolution patterns and a new approach to parameterization of ɛ based on rv, which can significantly improve the prediction of cloud processes by GCMs and BSMs.

  19. People On The Move: Some Thoughts On Human Dispersal In Relation To Rapid Climatic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, W.

    It is still generally assumed that the default situation for past humans must have been to be sedentary. That is to say, given a chance people would have settled in one area (with a good supply of resources) and established clearly-defined territories. Such concepts presuppose that much of human existence was conducted in climatic conditions sim- ilar to the relatively stable ones seen in the Holocene. What effects do rapid climatic fluctuations have upon environmental carrying capacity, and thus upon human mobil- ity and exploitation patterns? Such an approach could be called 'non-analogue', as it does not seek to impose [current] Holocene patterns upon the Pleistocene, in the same way that 'non-analogue' animal and plant communities are now routinely described for the same period. If one adopts non-analogue perspectives, perhaps one could also argue that in many cases mobility was the rule and not the exception. Turning the conventional wisdom around, we can ask why people should remain in an area. What are the characteristics of that area which could have encouraged people to become less mobile? I do not argue that all groups were mobile: some cannot have been, and not every member of other groups would have been equally mobile (differentiation on grounds of age and sex). In addition, mobility patterns must also have varied over time, although we should not necessarily expect a discernible linear trend either towards or away from greater mobility, because such behaviour operates within a climatic and environmental framework as well as a socio-economic one. If climate oscillated rapidly, it is feasible to suggest that such fluctuations affected environmental stability and thus carrying capacity. The resource species present and their availability would therefore affect the possibilities for human mobility. When discussing the possibilities for human dispersal into new regions, we essentially have a choice between two competing models: the Wave of Advance (sensu

  20. Multipolar resonant particle modes as elementary excitations in chain waveguides: Theory, dispersion relations and mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrennikov, Aleksey M.

    2011-10-01

    In the framework of linear electrodynamics, the theory of the resonant interaction of multipolar modes in the many body system and associated numerical techniques are proposed in the present paper. The theory rests upon certain integral field equations derived on the basis of the Stratton-Chu integral transforms, the Atkinson-Wilcox and multipole expansions. For the case of spherical geometry of the bodies, the half part of these field equations is reduced to a set of closed form dispersion relations which describe the excitation of nonradiating modes in the particle cluster of arbitrary complexity. For clusters with developed translation symmetry, we propose the method for solving the field equations which is characterized by an effective numerical scaling. For perfectly periodic one dimensional systems (chains), this scaling has a linear character. On the basis of the proposed theory and numerical technique the method of synthesis of chain plasmonic waveguides with low radiation losses is considered. Different checks targeted on the verification of the approaches are fulfilled.

  1. A perpendicular ion beam instability - Solutions to the linear dispersion relation. [for F region ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Kelley, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    A 200-eV Xe(+) ion beam directed perpendicular to the terrestrial magnetic field in the F region ionosphere produced very narrow band electrostatic emissions just above multiples of the hydrogen cyclotron frequency. Although the plasma conditions associated with the ion beam were undoubtedly very complex, a simple ion beam in a background ionosphere is considered first. The dispersion relation for flute mode waves and an unmagnetized perpendicular ion beam is solved for a diffuse H(+) plasma and then for a combination of dense O(+) and diffuse H(+). These solutions account for most of the wave properties, including the observation of narrow spectral peaks separated by the hydrogen cyclotron frequency and the observation of no spectral peaks below 2000 Hz. We cannot dismiss field-aligned currents associated with the Xe(+) beam as an alternate source of free energy for the narrow band emissions. However, our intention here is to examine closely the Xe(+) beam as a source for directly exciting the plasma waves.

  2. On the dispersion relation of the transit time instability in inverted fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwald, J.

    2014-08-15

    Recently discovered inverted fireballs are non-linear plasma phenomena, which are formed in hollow grid anodes with high transparency in an existing background plasma. If a sufficiently large potential is applied, accelerated electrons from the bulk start to oscillate through the grid. Experimental investigations have shown that they produce different types of plasma instabilities. One of those oscillations is a transit time instability which originates from strong electron beams that travel through the inverted fireball. This type of instability is similar to vircator reflex oscillations and produces radio frequency waves. Hence, it is suitable to convert DC signals into signals oscillating in the MHz range. This paper analyses the dispersion relation of the transit time instability for three different plasma regimes. The regimes can be divided into a collision less regime, a regime with high collisionality and one in between those former two. It is demonstrated that the plasma properties of the surrounding background plasma have a strong influence on the behavior of the instability itself.

  3. On the dispersion relation of the transit time instability in inverted fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenwald, J.

    2014-08-01

    Recently discovered inverted fireballs are non-linear plasma phenomena, which are formed in hollow grid anodes with high transparency in an existing background plasma. If a sufficiently large potential is applied, accelerated electrons from the bulk start to oscillate through the grid. Experimental investigations have shown that they produce different types of plasma instabilities. One of those oscillations is a transit time instability which originates from strong electron beams that travel through the inverted fireball. This type of instability is similar to vircator reflex oscillations and produces radio frequency waves. Hence, it is suitable to convert DC signals into signals oscillating in the MHz range. This paper analyses the dispersion relation of the transit time instability for three different plasma regimes. The regimes can be divided into a collision less regime, a regime with high collisionality and one in between those former two. It is demonstrated that the plasma properties of the surrounding background plasma have a strong influence on the behavior of the instability itself.

  4. Nucleon-nucleon scattering from dispersion relations: Next-to-next-to-leading order study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oller, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    Nucleon-nucleon (NN ) scattering is studied by applying an approach based on the N /D method and chiral perturbation theory (ChPT), whose dynamical input per partial wave consists of the imaginary part of the NN partial-wave amplitude along the left-hand cut. The latter is calculated in one-loop ChPT up to and including next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). A power counting for the subtraction constants is established, which is appropriate for those subtractions attached to both the left- and the right-hand cuts. A quite good reproduction of the Nijmegen partial-wave analysis phase shifts and mixing angles results, which implies a steady improvement in the accurateness achieved by increasing the chiral order in the calculation of the dynamical input. I discuss that it is not necessary to fine tune the chiral counterterms ci determined from pion-nucleon scattering to agree with NN data, but instead one should perform the iteration of two-nucleon intermediate states in a well-defined way so as to keep proper unitarity and analyticity. It is also confirmed at NNLO the long-range correlations between the NN S -wave effective ranges and scattering lengths, when employing only once-subtracted dispersion relations, that hold up to around 10% when compared with experimental values.

  5. Heat flux effects on the dispersion relation for geodesic modes in rotating plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, V. N.; Sgalla, R. J. F.; Elfimov, A. G.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2015-03-01

    The MHD theory of the effect of toroidal and poloidal rotations on the dynamics of Zonal Flows - ZFs and Geodesic Acoustic Modes - GAMs in axisymmetric magnetic confinement configurations is revisited. The MHD model has an arbitrariness regarding the energy conservation equation and previous works on the effect of rotation on ZFs and GAMs adopted an adiabatic law, or other simplifying assumptions, to treat this problem. However, in fusion grade plasmas, the heat transport along the magnetic field lines is rather fast and, therefore, a somewhat more appropriate model is to assume isothermal flux surfaces. This implies to take into account the heat transport equation in the model and, in the presence of rotation, this leads to an increase in the degree of the dispersion relation for these modes, giving rise to a low-frequency third branch of these modes. This has been previously obtained by Elfimov, Galvão and Sgalla [1] employing a model of circular flux surfaces from the outset. In this paper, the theoretical development is generalized by using flux coordinates, following the method of Ilgisonis et al [2]. This allows a better assessment of the applicability of the results and to investigate the relevance of the low frequency mode in non-circular tokamaks. Specific results for the TCABR tokamak are presented.

  6. Dispersion Relation and Numerical Simulation of Hydrodynamic Waves In Mar's Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.-S.; Nielsen, E.

    The dispersion relation for hydrodynamic waves in an ionosphere with at most a weak magnetic field shows, hydrodynamic hybrid waves may be excited in the topside iono- sphere of Mars and Venus owing to fluctuations in the solar wind pressure. The hy- brid waves result from coupling between two different hydrodynamic wave modes: the classic acoustic-gravity wave(AGW) and the newly developed background gradi- ent wave(BGW). Numerical simulations show that these waves will cause wave-like structures in the altitude profiles of the ionospheric plasma density. The wavelength and frequency are various but their prevailing values in Martian ionosphere are about 60km and 0.001-0.0001Hz, respectively. The amplitudes of the plasma density vari- ations decrease nearly exponentially with increasing altitude, and are of the same or- der of the magnitude as the uncertainty on all the previous measurements of Mar- tian ionospheric electron densities. Radio occultation observations at Mars and Venus show electron density fluctuations in the high altitude ionosphere. The fluctuations are mainly noise, but they may in part be caused by hydrodynamic wave activity. To verify wave activity more detailed measurements are required, and may be obtained with the low frequency radar planned for the Mars Express mission.

  7. Generalized linear transport theory in dilute neutral gases and dispersion relation of sound waves.

    PubMed

    Bendib, A; Bendib-Kalache, K; Gombert, M M; Imadouchene, N

    2006-10-01

    The transport processes in dilute neutral gases are studied by using the kinetic equation with a collision relaxation model that meets all conservation requirements. The kinetic equation is solved keeping the whole anisotropic part of the distribution function with the use of the continued fractions. The conservative laws of the collision operator are taken into account with the projection operator techniques. The generalized heat flux and stress tensor are calculated in the linear approximation, as functions of the lower moments, i.e., the density, the flow velocity and the temperature. The results obtained are valid for arbitrary collision frequency nu with the respect to kv(t) and the characteristic frequency omega, where k(-1) is the characteristic length scale of the system and v(t) is the thermal velocity. The transport coefficients constitute accurate closure relations for the generalized hydrodynamic equations. An application to the dispersion and the attenuation of sound waves in the whole collisionality regime is presented. The results obtained are in very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:17155048

  8. The Magnesium-Velocity Dispersion Relation and the Genesis of Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthey, Guy; Collobert, Maela

    2003-03-01

    Available data on the magnesium-velocity dispersion (Mg-σ) relation for ~2000 early-type galaxies is analyzed. As noted previously, the Mg residuals from a fitted line are roughly Gaussian near the median but have an asymmetric blue tail, probably from subpopulations of relatively young stars. We define statistics for scatter and asymmetry of scatter in the Mg dimension and find impressive uniformity among data sets. We construct models of galaxy formation built to be as unbiased as possible toward the question of the importance of mergers in the formation of early-type galaxies. The observational constraints (Mg-σ width, asymmetry, and mean Mg strength, plus mean age and width of abundance distribution) are severe enough to eliminate almost all models. Eliminated are models with merger rates proportional to (1+z)n with n>0, models that assume early formation followed by recent drizzling of new stars, merger-only models in which the number of mergers exceeds ~80, merger-only models with less than ~20 mergers, and models with a cold dark matter power spectrum (at least within our approximations). The most successful models were those with merger probability constant or mildly declining with time, with the number of mergers needed to form the galaxy around 50 and gas fractions of ~0.2-0.35. These models are characterized by mean light-weighted ages of 8-9 Gyr (consistent with spectroscopic studies), an abundance distribution that does not exceed local constraints, and a look-back time behavior nearly indistinguishable from passive evolution of old stellar populations. Our simulations suggest that the evolution of median Mg index strength is not a good discriminator between mergers and passive evolution and that better discriminators such as Mg-σ scatter and asymmetry require N>1000 sample sizes with accuracies similar to today's local measurements.

  9. Black hole corrections due to minimal length and modified dispersion relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasser Tawfik, Abdel; Magied Diab, Abdel

    2015-04-01

    The generalized uncertainty principles (GUP) and modified dispersion relations (MDR) are much like two faces for one coin in research for the phenomenology of quantum gravity which apparently plays an important role in estimating the possible modifications of the black hole thermodynamics and the Friedmann equations. We first reproduce the horizon area for different types of black holes and investigate the quantum corrections to Bekenstein-Hawking entropy (entropy-area law). Based on this, we study further thermodynamical quantities and accordingly the modified Friedmann equation in four-dimensional de Sitter-Schwarzschild, Reissner-Nördstrom and Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black holes. In doing this, we applied various quantum gravity approaches. The MDR parameter relative to the GUP one is computed and the properties of the black holes are predicted. This should play an important role in estimating response of quantum gravity to the various metric-types of black holes. We found a considerable change in the thermodynamics quantities. We find that the modified entropy of de Sitter-Schwarzshild and Reissner-Nördstrom black holes starts to exist at a finite standard entropy. The Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole shows a different entropic property. The modified specific heat due to GUP and MDR approaches vanishes at large standard specific heat, while the corrections due to GUP result in different behaviors. The specific heat of modified de Sitter-Schwarzshild and Reissner-Nördstrom black holes seems to increase, especially at large standard specific heat. In the early case, the black hole cannot exchange heat with the surrounding space. Accordingly, we would predict black hole remnants which may be considered as candidates for dark matter.

  10. Modeling dispersion of traffic-related pollutants in the NEXUS health study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dispersion modeling tools have traditionally provided critical information for air quality management decisions, but have been used recently to provide exposure estimates to support health studies. However, these models can be challenging to implement, particularly in near-road s...

  11. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wavemore » intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.« less

  12. Pion-kaon scattering amplitude constrained with forward dispersion relations up to 1.6 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelaez, J. R.; Rodas, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we provide simple and precise parametrizations of the existing π K scattering data from threshold up to 1.6 GeV, which are constrained to satisfy forward dispersion relations as well as three additional threshold sum rules. We also provide phenomenological values of the threshold parameters and of the resonance poles that appear in elastic scattering.

  13. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, D P; Chen, Y; Kletzing, C A; Denton, M H; Kurth, W S

    2015-01-01

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10−3 nT2, using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons. PMID:26167444

  14. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.

  15. Unitarity, analyticity, dispersion relations, and resonances in strongly interacting WLWL, ZLZL, and h h scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Rafael L.; Dobado, Antonio; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2015-04-01

    If the electroweak symmetry breaking sector turns out to be strongly interacting, the actively investigated effective theory for longitudinal gauge bosons plus Higgs can be efficiently extended to cover the regime of saturation of unitarity (where the perturbative expansion breaks down). This is achieved by dispersion relations, whose subtraction constants and left cut contribution can be approximately obtained in different ways, giving rise to different unitarization procedures. We illustrate the ideas with the inverse amplitude method, one version of the N/D method, and another improved version of the K matrix. In the three cases we get partial waves which are unitary, analytical with the proper left and right cuts, and in some cases poles in the second Riemann sheet that can be understood as dynamically generated resonances. In addition, they reproduce at next to leading order the perturbative expansion for the five partial waves not vanishing (up to J =2 ), and they are renormalization scale (μ ) independent. Also the unitarization formalisms are extended to the coupled channel case. Then we apply the results to the elastic scattering amplitude for the longitudinal components of the gauge bosons V =W ,Z at high energy. We also compute h h →h h and the inelastic process V V →h h which are coupled to the elastic V V channel for custodial isospin I =0 . We numerically compare the three methods for various values of the low-energy couplings and explain the reasons for the differences found in the I =J =1 partial wave. Then we study the resonances appearing in the different elastic and coupled channels in terms of the effective Lagrangian parameters.

  16. Kinetic transverse dispersion relation for relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    López, Rodrigo A.; Moya, Pablo S.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, J. Alejandro

    2014-09-15

    We use a kinetic treatment to study the linear transverse dispersion relation for a magnetized isotropic relativistic electron-positron plasma with finite relativistic temperature. The explicit linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves propagating along a constant background magnetic field is presented, including an analytical continuation to the whole complex frequency plane for the case of Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions. This dispersion relation is studied numerically for various temperatures. For left-handed solutions, the system presents two branches, the electromagnetic ordinary mode and the Alfvén mode. In the low frequency regime, the Alfvén branch has two dispersive zones, the normal zone (where ∂ω/∂k > 0) and an anomalous zone (where ∂ω/∂k < 0). We find that in the anomalous zone of the Alfvén branch, the electromagnetic waves are damped, and there is a maximum wave number for which the Alfvén branch is suppressed. We also study the dependence of the Alfvén velocity and effective plasma frequency with the temperature. We complemented the analytical and numerical approaches with relativistic full particle simulations, which consistently agree with the analytical results.

  17. Computation of generalized and exact dispersion relations for longitudinal plasma waves in nonextensive statistics and the effects of the nonextensivity on the oscillation modes and damps

    SciTech Connect

    Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.; Ebrahimi, V.

    2014-03-15

    We have derived generalized dispersion relations for longitudinal waves in collisionless thermal plasma using linear Vlasov-Poisson kinetic model and nonextensive distributions for electrons. The Maxwellian limit of the dispersion relations, where the q-nonextensive parameter tends to one, is calculated. The generalized dispersion relations are reduced to polynomials for some specific values of q. The well-known modes of oscillations such as the Langmuir and electron acoustic waves have been obtained by solving the dispersion relations. Some new modes of oscillation are also found. Finally, the dependence of the oscillation modes and damps on q is discussed.

  18. Relation between size dispersion and line shape in quantum dot ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, V. V.; Averkiev, N. S.

    2009-12-01

    We propose a method to model the density of optical transitions, absorption, and differential-absorption spectra of quantum dot ensembles. The developed approach combines physical straightforwardness of the conventional Gaussian-peak modeling with a more preside account of the influence of size dispersion on the line shape of quantum dots.

  19. Relative dispersal ability of a key agricultural pest and its predators in an annual agroecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In annual agroecosystems staggered planting dates, pesticide treatments, and harvesting events create a “shifting mosaic” of habitats that leads to frequent recolonization by herbivores and natural enemies. In these systems, an untested assumption is that herbivores have higher rates of dispersal re...

  20. Nanoparticle dispersion in polymer nanocomposites by spin-diffusion-averaged paramagnetic enhanced NMR relaxometry: scaling relations and applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Leisen, Johannes; Beckham, Haskell W

    2014-08-21

    Scaling relationships are identified between NMR longitudinal relaxation times and clay dispersion quality in polymer-paramagnetic clay nanocomposites. Derived from a previously published analytical relationship developed from a lamella-based model, the scaling relationships are based on the enhancement of NMR relaxation rates with increasing exfoliation and dispersion homogeneity. The paramagnetic contribution to the NMR relaxation rate is inversely proportional to the square of the clay interparticle spacing, and directly proportional to the square of the clay weight fraction. These scaling relationships allow the prediction of relative exfoliation of clay particles for a given series of polymer-clay nanocomposites. With independent knowledge of clay exfoliation in a single sample (e.g., from transmission electron microscopy), NMR relaxometry data may be converted into absolute measures of exfoliation. These scaling relations are confirmed with samples of fully exfoliated poly(vinyl alcohol)-montmorillonite nanocomposites, and then used to reveal exfoliation and dispersion quality in a series of nylon-6-montmorillonite nanocomposites. This characterization route is advantageous because NMR relaxometry can more rapidly provide clay dispersion information that is averaged over larger sample volumes than transmission electron microscopy. PMID:25000915

  1. Dispersion Relation in a Ferrofluid Layer of Any Thickness and Viscosity in a Normal Magnetic Field; Asymptotic Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou, B.; Néron de Surgy, G.; Wesfreid, J. E.

    1997-08-01

    We have calculated the general dispersion relationship for surface waves on a ferrofluid layer of any thickness and viscosity, under the influence of a uniform vertical magnetic field. The amplification of these waves can induce an instability called peaks instability (Rosensweig instability). The expression of the dispersion relationship requires that the critical magnetic field and the critical wavenumber of the instability depend on the thickness of the ferrofluid layer. The dispersion relationship has been simplified into four asymptotic regimes: thick or thin layer and viscous or inertial behaviour. The corresponding critical values are presented. We show that a typical parameter of the ferrofluid enables one to know in which regime, viscous or inertial, the ferrofluid will be near the onset of instability. Nous avons calculé la relation de dispersion des ondes de surface dans une couche de ferrofluide d'épaisseur et de viscosité quelconques, soumise à un champ magnétique normal à sa surface (instabilité de pics de Rosensweig). Cette relation montre que le champ magnétique critique et le vecteur d'onde critique de l'instabilité dépendent de l'épaisseur de la couche de fluide. La relation de dispersion a été simplifiée pour quatre régimes asymptotiques: couche épaisse ou mince et comportement visqueux ou inertiel. Nous avons calculé les valeurs critiques de l'instabilité dans ces quatre cas. Nous montrons qu'un paramètre typique du ferrofluide permet de savoir dans quel régime, visqueux ou inertiel, se situe le ferrofluide près du seuil de l'instabilité.

  2. Solutions of the benchmark problems by the dispersion-relation-preserving scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Shen, H.; Kurbatskii, K. A.; Auriault, L.

    1995-01-01

    The 7-point stencil Dispersion-Relation-Preserving scheme of Tam and Webb is used to solve all the six categories of the CAA benchmark problems. The purpose is to show that the scheme is capable of solving linear, as well as nonlinear aeroacoustics problems accurately. Nonlinearities, inevitably, lead to the generation of spurious short wave length numerical waves. Often, these spurious waves would overwhelm the entire numerical solution. In this work, the spurious waves are removed by the addition of artificial selective damping terms to the discretized equations. Category 3 problems are for testing radiation and outflow boundary conditions. In solving these problems, the radiation and outflow boundary conditions of Tam and Webb are used. These conditions are derived from the asymptotic solutions of the linearized Euler equations. Category 4 problems involved solid walls. Here, the wall boundary conditions for high-order schemes of Tam and Dong are employed. These conditions require the use of one ghost value per boundary point per physical boundary condition. In the second problem of this category, the governing equations, when written in cylindrical coordinates, are singular along the axis of the radial coordinate. The proper boundary conditions at the axis are derived by applying the limiting process of r approaches 0 to the governing equations. The Category 5 problem deals with the numerical noise issue. In the present approach, the time-independent mean flow solution is computed first. Once the residual drops to the machine noise level, the incident sound wave is turned on gradually. The solution is marched in time until a time-periodic state is reached. No exact solution is known for the Category 6 problem. Because of this, the problem is formulated in two totally different ways, first as a scattering problem then as a direct simulation problem. There is good agreement between the two numerical solutions. This offers confidence in the computed results. Both

  3. Atmospheric transport and dispersion of pollutants and related meteorological studies. Progress report, FY 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, R.R.; Ferber, G.J.; Heffter, J.L.; Cordella, R.H. Jr.; Miller, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    Research emphasizes model simulation and experimental verification of the transport and dispersion of atmospheric pollutants. Field experiments of mechanisms affecting long-range transport which provide dispersion data for verification of regional and continental models are stressed. A multi-layer trajectory-dispersion model that incorporates the effects of wind shear was tested against long-range concentration data. Models for prognostic trajectory calculations, using wind fields, have been recoded to permit operational procedures on interactive terminals; and will be used in tracer experiments and emergencies. A new tracer system, using perfluorocarbons, has been developed to provide for long-range dispersion experiments and model validation studies. The tracer system was used in the DOE-ASCOT studies of nocturnal drainage flows in the Geysers geothermal development area. A long-range dispersion study, the Cross-Appalachian Tracer Experiments (CAPTEX) is planned. There will be a series of perfluorocarbon tracer releases in the Ohio Valley with tracer concentration measurements from Ohio to the East Coast. A trial run is planned for September 1982 and a full-scale program in the summer of 1983. A high voluem version of the automatic sequential sampler and an inexpensive adsorption tube sampler were developed. Another tracer experiment is being carried out in collaboration with the DOE Savnnah River Laboratory to provide long-term, regional-scale transport and diffusion data for air pollution model verification. Krypton-85, is sampled at five stations from 300 to 1000 km to the northeast. This one-year twice daily sampling program may be extended to 18 months.

  4. The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M.R.; McKay, T.A.; Koester, B.; Wechsler, R.H.; Rozo, E.; Evrard, A.; Johnston, D.; Sheldon, E.; Annis, J.; Lau, E.; Nichol, R.; Miller, C.; /Michigan U.

    2007-06-05

    The distribution of galaxies in position and velocity around the centers of galaxy clusters encodes important information about cluster mass and structure. Using the maxBCG galaxy cluster catalog identified from imaging data obtained in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we study the BCG--galaxy velocity correlation function. By modeling its non-Gaussianity, we measure the mean and scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness. The mean velocity dispersion increases from 202 {+-} 10 km s{sup -1} for small groups to more than 854 {+-} 102 km s{sup -1} for large clusters. We show the scatter to be at most 40.5{+-}3.5%, declining to 14.9{+-}9.4% in the richest bins. We test our methods in the C4 cluster catalog, a spectroscopic cluster catalog produced from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR2 spectroscopic sample, and in mock galaxy catalogs constructed from N-body simulations. Our methods are robust, measuring the scatter to well within one-sigma of the true value, and the mean to within 10%, in the mock catalogs. By convolving the scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness with the observed richness space density function, we measure the velocity dispersion function of the maxBCG galaxy clusters. Although velocity dispersion and richness do not form a true mass--observable relation, the relationship between velocity dispersion and mass is theoretically well characterized and has low scatter. Thus our results provide a key link between theory and observations up to the velocity bias between dark matter and galaxies.

  5. Absorption and related optical dispersion effects on the spectral response of a surface plasmon resonance sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakkach, Mohamed; Lecaruyer, Pierre; Bardin, Fabrice; Sakly, Jaouhar; Lakhdar, Zohra Ben; Canva, Michael

    2008-11-20

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing is an optical technique that allows real time detection of small changes in the physical properties, in particular in the refractive index, of a dielectric medium near a metal film surface. One way to increase the SPR signal shift is then to incorporate a substance possessing a strong dispersive refractive index in the range of the plasmon resonance band. In this paper, we investigate the impact of materials possessing a strong dispersive index integrated to the dielectric medium on the SPR reflectivity profile. We present theoretical results based on chromophore absorption spectra and on their associated refractive index obtained from the Lorentz approach and Kramers-Kroenig equations. As predicted by the theory, the experimental results show an enhancement of the SPR response, maximized when the chromophore absorption band coincides with the plasmon resonant wavelength. This shows that chromophores labeling can provide a potential way for SPR response enhancement.

  6. Density-dependent nest predation in waterfowl: the relative importance of nest density versus nest dispersion.

    PubMed

    Ringelman, Kevin M; Eadie, John M; Ackerman, Joshua T

    2012-07-01

    When nest predation levels are very high or very low, the absolute range of observable nest success is constrained (a floor/ceiling effect), and it may be more difficult to detect density-dependent nest predation. Density-dependent nest predation may be more detectable in years with moderate predation rates, simply because there can be a greater absolute difference in nest success between sites. To test this, we replicated a predation experiment 10 years after the original study, using both natural and artificial nests, comparing a year when overall rates of nest predation were high (2000) to a year with moderate nest predation (2010). We found no evidence for density-dependent predation on artificial nests in either year, indicating that nest predation is not density-dependent at the spatial scale of our experimental replicates (1-ha patches). Using nearest-neighbor distances as a measure of nest dispersion, we also found little evidence for "dispersion-dependent" predation on artificial nests. However, when we tested for dispersion-dependent predation using natural nests, we found that nest survival increased with shorter nearest-neighbor distances, and that neighboring nests were more likely to share the same nest fate than non-adjacent nests. Thus, at small spatial scales, density-dependence appears to operate in the opposite direction as predicted: closer nearest neighbors are more likely to be successful. We suggest that local nest dispersion, rather than larger-scale measures of nest density per se, may play a more important role in density-dependent nest predation. PMID:22179311

  7. Density-dependent nest predation in waterfowl: the relative importance of nest density versus nest dispersion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Ringelman, KM; Eadie, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    When nest predation levels are very high or very low, the absolute range of observable nest success is constrained (a floor/ceiling effect), and it may be more difficult to detect density-dependent nest predation. Density-dependent nest predation may be more detectable in years with moderate predation rates, simply because there can be a greater absolute difference in nest success between sites. To test this, we replicated a predation experiment 10 years after the original study, using both natural and artificial nests, comparing a year when overall rates of nest predation were high (2000) to a year with moderate nest predation (2010). We found no evidence for density-dependent predation on artificial nests in either year, indicating that nest predation is not density-dependent at the spatial scale of our experimental replicates (1-ha patches). Using nearest-neighbor distances as a measure of nest dispersion, we also found little evidence for “dispersion-dependent” predation on artificial nests. However, when we tested for dispersion-dependent predation using natural nests, we found that nest survival increased with shorter nearest-neighbor distances, and that neighboring nests were more likely to share the same nest fate than non-adjacent nests. Thus, at small spatial scales, density-dependence appears to operate in the opposite direction as predicted: closer nearest neighbors are more likely to be successful. We suggest that local nest dispersion, rather than larger-scale measures of nest density per se, may play a more important role in density-dependent nest predation.

  8. Dispersion relation of longitudinal waves in liquid He-4 in the framework of quantum macroscopic equations derived from Bohm's potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Vincenzo; Mostacci, Domiziano

    2015-10-01

    He-4 is known to become superfluid at very low temperatures. This effect is now generally accepted to be connected with BEC (Bose-Einstein Condensation). The dispersion relation of pressure waves in superfluid He-4 has been determined at 1.1 °K by Yarnell et al., and exhibits a non monotonic behavior-with a maximum and a minimum-usually explained in terms of excitations called rotons, introduced by Landau. In the present work an attempt is made to describe the phenomenon within the Bohmian interpretation of QM. To this end, the effects of the intermolecular potential, taken to be essentially of the Lennard-Jones type modified to account for molecule finiteness, are included as a Vlasov-type self-consistent field. A dispersion relation is found, that is in quite good agreement with Yarnell's curve.

  9. Ocean current observations near McMurdo Station, Antarctica from 1991 to 1993: Relation to wastewater discharge dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, J.P.

    1994-08-01

    Analyses of ocean currents in the vicinity of McMurdo Station, Antarctica, are relevant to the transport and dispersal of wastewater from the McMurdo Station sewage outfall pipe. Observations of ocean currents during the initial phases of this study have been presented by Howington and McFeters. These studies, using coliform bacterial counts as an indicator of dispersion of the wastewater plume and current meters to measure flow patterns, indicated that dispersal of the plume by local currents does not effectively remove the plume from the vicinity of McMurdo Sound, under the present outfall pipe location. Moreover, these studies suggest that, although the flow pattern is generally consistent with transport of the plume away from McMurdo Station, episodes of current reversal are sufficient to transport the wastewater plume along the shore toward the southeast, eventually overlapping the seawater intake area near the McMurdo jetty. Several concerns included (a) impacts of wastewater inputs to nearshore benthic and pelagic habitats adjacent to McMurdo Station, (b) effects of wastewater input to the McMurdo Station fresh water intake source, and (c) reduction in human impacts on the McMurdo Sound ecosystem. These concerns motivated studies to characterize nearshore currents more extensively in relation to dispersal of the wastewater plume. This report discusses analysis results of current observations from November 1992 to November 1993.

  10. Dispersion relations of elastic waves in one-dimensional piezoelectric/piezomagnetic phononic crystal with functionally graded interlayers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao; Wei, Peijun; Lan, Man; Li, Li

    2016-08-01

    The effects of functionally graded interlayers on dispersion relations of elastic waves in a one-dimensional piezoelectric/piezomagnetic phononic crystal are studied in this paper. First, the state transfer equation of the functionally graded interlayer is derived from the motion equation by the reduction of order (from second order to first order). The transfer matrix of the functionally graded interlayer is obtained by solving the state transfer equation with the spatial-varying coefficient. Based on the transfer matrixes of the piezoelectric slab, the piezomagnetic slab and the functionally graded interlayers, the total transfer matrix of a single cell is obtained. Further, the Bloch theorem is used to obtain the resultant dispersion equations of in-plane and anti-plane Bloch waves. The dispersion equations are solved numerically and the numerical results are shown graphically. Five kinds of profiles of functionally graded interlayers between a piezoelectric slab and a piezomagnetic slab are considered. It is shown that the functionally graded interlayers have evident influences on the dispersion curves and the band gaps. PMID:27179141

  11. Measuring the Relative Contributions of Viscous Accretion and Photoevaporation to the Dispersal of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M. N.; Pascucci, I.; Rigliaco, E.; Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.

    2014-03-01

    Models of protoplanetary disk evolution suggest that photoevaporation driven by the central star and viscous evolution via gas accretion onto the star are the main mechanisms that drive disk dispersal. Viscous evolution has the ability to smoothly decrease the disk surface density, but photoevaporation can drastically change it by creating gaps in planet-forming regions that widen quickly over time. This quick gas dispersal can stop the migration of giant planets whose location affects the final delivery of volatiles (including water) to terrestrial planets. We selected a sample of twenty protoplanetary disks around T. Tauri stars in the Taurus region spanning all three main disk evolutionary stages, with a range of mass accretion rates. For this sample we have acquired high-resolution optical spectra with Keck/HIRES covering gas lines that trace both accretion and photoevaporation. We will present an analysis of the forbidden OI, SII, and NII lines and provide empirically determined mass loss rates as a function of disk evolutionary stage and mass accretion rate. This will enhance our understanding of the disk stage at which photoevaporation starts to dominate over viscous accretion.

  12. Dispersion relation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-component magneto-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khaira, Vibhooti Ahirwar, G.

    2015-07-31

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi component plasma composed of electrons (denoted by e{sup −}), hydrogen ions (denoted by H{sup +}), helium ions (denoted by He{sup +}) and positively charged oxygen ions (denoted by O{sup +})in magnetized cold plasma. The wave is assumed to propagate perpendicular to the static magnetic field. It is found that the addition of heavy ions in the plasma dispersion modified the lower hybrid mode and also allowed an ion-ion mode. The frequencies of the lower hybrid and ion- ion hybrid modes are derived using cold plasma theory. It is observed that the effect of multi-ionfor different plasma densities on electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is to enhance the wave frequencies. The results are interpreted for the magnetosphere has been applied parameters by auroral acceleration region.

  13. Dispersion Modeling of Traffic-Related Air Pollutant Exposures and Health Effects Among Children with Asthma in Detroit, Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Ganguly, Rajiv; Isakov, Vlad; Burke, Janet; Arunachalam, Saravanan; Snyder, Michelle; Robins, Thomas; Lewis, Toby

    2015-01-01

    Vehicular traffic is a major source of ambient air pollution in urban areas. Traffic-related air pollutants, including carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter, and diesel exhaust emissions, have been associated with adverse human health effects, especially in areas near major roads. In addition to emissions from vehicles, ambient concentrations of air pollutants include contributions from stationary sources and background (or regional) sources. Although dispersion models have been widely used to evaluate air quality strategies and policies and can represent the spatial and temporal variation in environments near roads, the use of these models in health studies to estimate air pollutant exposures has been relatively limited. This paper summarizes the modeling system used to estimate exposures in the Near-Roadway Exposure and Urban Air Pollutant Study, an epidemiological study that examined 139 children with asthma or symptoms consistent with asthma, most of whom lived near major roads in Detroit, Michigan. Air pollutant concentrations were estimated with a hybrid modeling framework that included detailed inventories of mobile and stationary sources on local and regional scales; the RLINE, AERMOD, and CMAQ dispersion models; and monitored observations of pollutant concentrations. The temporal and spatial variability in emissions and exposures over the 2.5-year study period and at more than 300 home and school locations was characterized. The paper highlights issues with the development and understanding of the significance of traffic-related exposures through the use of dispersion models in urban-scale exposure assessments and epidemiology studies. PMID:26139957

  14. Differential equations and dispersion relations for Feynman amplitudes. The two-loop massive sunrise and the kite integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remiddi, Ettore; Tancredi, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that the study of the imaginary part and of the corresponding dispersion relations of Feynman graph amplitudes within the differential equations method can provide a powerful tool for the solution of the equations, especially in the massive case. The main features of the approach are illustrated by discussing the simple cases of the 1-loop self-mass and of a particular vertex amplitude, and then used for the evaluation of the two-loop massive sunrise and the QED kite graph (the problem studied by Sabry in 1962), up to first order in the (d - 4) expansion.

  15. Dispersion of the Nabro volcanic plume and its relation to the Asian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairlie, T. D.; Vernier, J.-P.; Natarajan, M.; Bedka, K. M.

    2014-07-01

    We use nighttime measurements from the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, together with a Lagrangian trajectory model, to study the initial dispersion of volcanic aerosol from the eruption of Mt. Nabro (Ethiopia/Eritrea) in June 2011. The Nabro eruption reached the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) directly, and the plume was initially entrained by the flow surrounding the Asian anticyclone, which prevails in the UTLS from the Mediterranean Sea to East Asia during boreal summer. CALIPSO detected aerosol layers, with optical properties consistent with sulfate, in the lower stratosphere above the monsoon convective region in South and Southeast Asia within 10 days of the eruption. We show that quasi-isentropic differential advection in the vertically sheared flow surrounding the Asian anticyclone explains many of these stratospheric aerosol layers. We use Meteosat-7 data to examine the possible role of deep convection in the Asian monsoon in transporting volcanic material to the lower stratosphere during this time, but find no evidence that convection played a direct role, in contrast with claims made in earlier studies. On longer timescales, we use CALIPSO data to illustrate diabatic ascent of the Nabro aerosol in the lower stratosphere at rates of ~ 10 K per month for the first two months after the eruption, falling to ~ 3 K per month after the Asian anticyclone dissipates. Maps of stratospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD) show local peaks of ~ 0.04-0.06 in July in the region of the Asian anticyclone; we find associated estimates of radiative forcing small, ~ 5-10% of those reported for the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in 1991. Additionally, we find no clear response in outgoing shortwave (SW) flux due to the presence of Nabro aerosol viewed in the context of SW flux variability as measured by CERES (Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System).

  16. The age-metallicity-velocity dispersion relation in the solar neighborhood and a simple evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusinger, H.; Stecklum, B.; Reimann, H.-G.

    1991-05-01

    An analysis of the age-metallicity relation (AMR) based on previous data is conducted again and the age-velocity relation (AVR) is estimated for some nearby stars to examine connections between the relations. In the period of evolution of the galactic disk, an important relationship with age is determined for both AMR and AVR. The observed metallicity-velocity relation is compared to the predicted relation to verify the AVR and AMR derivations. A model is presented in which the star formation rate, the infall rate of gas, and the initial mass function are constant. The model is found to agree with observed constraints on star counts in the solar neighborhood and constraints on the chemical and kinematical evolution of the local disk. A theory regarding the primary heating mechanism of the galactic disk is developed in terms of the AVR, and possible explanations - massive gas clouds and transient spiral waves - are discussed.

  17. Microbial communities related to biodegradation of dispersed Macondo oil at low seawater temperature with Norwegian coastal seawater

    PubMed Central

    Brakstad, Odd G; Throne-Holst, Mimmi; Netzer, Roman; Stoeckel, Donald M; Atlas, Ronald M

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident in 2010 created a deepwater plume of small oil droplets from a deepwater well in the Mississippi Canyon lease block 252 (‘Macondo oil’). A novel laboratory system was used in the current study to investigate biodegradation of Macondo oil dispersions (10 μm or 30 μm median droplet sizes) at low oil concentrations (2 mg l−1) in coastal Norwegian seawater at a temperature of 4–5°C. Whole metagenome analyses showed that oil biodegradation was associated with the successive increased abundances of Gammaproteobacteria, while Alphaproteobacteria (Pelagibacter) became dominant at the end of the experiment. Colwellia and Oceanospirillales were related to n-alkane biodegradation, while particularly Cycloclasticus and Marinobacter were associated with degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons (HCs). The larger oil droplet dispersions resulted in delayed sequential changes of Oceanospirillales and Cycloclasticus, related with slower degradation of alkanes and aromatic HCs. The bacterial successions associated with oil biodegradation showed both similarities and differences when compared with the results from DWH field samples and laboratory studies performed with deepwater from the Gulf of Mexico. PMID:26485443

  18. Analysis of the dispersion relation for resistive wall modes in tokamaks with account of the skin effect

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D. Yanovskiy, V. V.

    2013-05-15

    The accuracy of the dispersion relations derived earlier analytically for the resistive wall modes (RWMs) in tokamaks is evaluated. Existing models use the expansions in the ratio of the wall thickness d{sub w} to the skin depth s. This parameter is small in the standard theory of 'slow' RWMs, but it is large in the recently developed approach for the 'fast' RWMs. Here, a dispersion relation applicable not only to these extreme cases, but also to the intermediate range is derived in the single-mode cylindrical approximation without restrictions on s/d{sub w}. The derived equation is solved numerically, the result is compared with the predictions of the earlier analytical models with either s Much-Greater-Than d{sub w} or s Much-Less-Than d{sub w}. The applicability limits of the asymptotic expressions for the RWM growth rate are clarified. In particular, the limits are specified in which their error does not exceed 10%. It is shown that these expressions always underestimate the growth rate. The study confirms the necessity of the skin effect incorporation in the description of RWM dynamics.

  19. Microbial communities related to biodegradation of dispersed Macondo oil at low seawater temperature with Norwegian coastal seawater.

    PubMed

    Brakstad, Odd G; Throne-Holst, Mimmi; Netzer, Roman; Stoeckel, Donald M; Atlas, Ronald M

    2015-11-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident in 2010 created a deepwater plume of small oil droplets from a deepwater well in the Mississippi Canyon lease block 252 ('Macondo oil'). A novel laboratory system was used in the current study to investigate biodegradation of Macondo oil dispersions (10 μm or 30 μm median droplet sizes) at low oil concentrations (2 mg l(-1)) in coastal Norwegian seawater at a temperature of 4-5°C. Whole metagenome analyses showed that oil biodegradation was associated with the successive increased abundances of Gammaproteobacteria, while Alphaproteobacteria (Pelagibacter) became dominant at the end of the experiment. Colwellia and Oceanospirillales were related to n-alkane biodegradation, while particularly Cycloclasticus and Marinobacter were associated with degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons (HCs). The larger oil droplet dispersions resulted in delayed sequential changes of Oceanospirillales and Cycloclasticus, related with slower degradation of alkanes and aromatic HCs. The bacterial successions associated with oil biodegradation showed both similarities and differences when compared with the results from DWH field samples and laboratory studies performed with deepwater from the Gulf of Mexico. PMID:26485443

  20. Linear Dispersion Relation and Depth Sensitivity to Swell Parameters: Application to Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging and Bathymetry

    PubMed Central

    Boccia, Valentina; Renga, Alfredo; Rufino, Giancarlo; D'Errico, Marco; Moccia, Antonio; Aragno, Cesare; Zoffoli, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Long gravity waves or swell dominating the sea surface is known to be very useful to estimate seabed morphology in coastal areas. The paper reviews the main phenomena related to swell waves propagation that allow seabed morphology to be sensed. The linear dispersion is analysed and an error budget model is developed to assess the achievable depth accuracy when Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data are used. The relevant issues and potentials of swell-based bathymetry by SAR are identified and discussed. This technique is of particular interest for characteristic regions of the Mediterranean Sea, such as in gulfs and relatively close areas, where traditional SAR-based bathymetric techniques, relying on strong tidal currents, are of limited practical utility. PMID:25789333

  1. Linear dispersion relation and depth sensitivity to swell parameters: application to synthetic aperture radar imaging and bathymetry.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Valentina; Renga, Alfredo; Rufino, Giancarlo; D'Errico, Marco; Moccia, Antonio; Aragno, Cesare; Zoffoli, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Long gravity waves or swell dominating the sea surface is known to be very useful to estimate seabed morphology in coastal areas. The paper reviews the main phenomena related to swell waves propagation that allow seabed morphology to be sensed. The linear dispersion is analysed and an error budget model is developed to assess the achievable depth accuracy when Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data are used. The relevant issues and potentials of swell-based bathymetry by SAR are identified and discussed. This technique is of particular interest for characteristic regions of the Mediterranean Sea, such as in gulfs and relatively close areas, where traditional SAR-based bathymetric techniques, relying on strong tidal currents, are of limited practical utility. PMID:25789333

  2. Transport of temperature-velocity covariance in gas-solid flow and its relation to the axial dispersion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Shankar; Sun, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The presence of solid particles in a steady laminar flow generates velocity fluctuations with respect to the mean fluid velocity that are termed pseudo-turbulence. The level of these pseudo-turbulent velocity fluctuations has been characterized in statistically homogeneous fixed particle assemblies and freely evolving suspensions using particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) by Mehrabadi et al. (JFM, 2015), and it is found to be a significant contribution to the total kinetic energy associated with the flow. The correlation of these velocity fluctuations with temperature (or a passive scalar) generates a flux term that appears in the transport equation for the average fluid temperature (or average scalar concentration). The magnitude of this transport of temperature-velocity covariance is quantified using PR-DNS of thermally fully developed flow past a statistically homogeneous fixed assembly of particles, and the budget of the average fluid temperature equation is presented. The relation of this transport term to the axial dispersion coefficient (Brenner, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. A, 1980) is established. The simulation results are then interpreted in the context of our understanding of axial dispersion in gas-solid flow. NSF CBET 1336941.

  3. Ocean current observations near McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 1993 to 1994: Relation to wastewater discharge dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents analyses of current measurements from McMurdo Sound, Antarctica during December, 1993 to November, 1994, in relation to dispersal of the McMurdo Station wastewater plume. Data collected from 1991 to 1993 are also discussed here. Six current meters were deployed near McMurdo Station, Antarctica, from December 1993 to November 1994. Five functioned properly throughout the observation period, and one failed. Analyses of 5 data series include: (1) summaries of current speed and direction, (2) directional analyses of flow, (3) time series current vectors averaged over 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h, (4) principal axes of flow, (5) maps of mean seasonal flow, (6) progressive vector plots, (7) spectral analyses, and (8) low-pass filtered (30h) time series of currents at McMurdo Station. Observations of flow near McMurdo Station during 1994 were generally similar to 1993. Short term variation in flow was related principally to diurnal tidal motions. Longer period oscillations in flow such as seasonal shifts, and non-periodic changes in current speed and direction were likely related to changes in ice cover and wind stress in the vicinity of McMurdo Station or over much larger scales or both. Three distinct oceanographic {open_quote}seasons{close_quote} were apparent in time series from 1992 to 1994, from stations furthest offshore, where the effects of local topography are minimal. The spring-summer (Oct.-Jan.) period of both years was dominated by regional southward flow, which generates a counter-clockwise eddy (McMurdo Gyre) adjacent to McMurdo Station. With regard to dispersal of the wastewater plume from McMurdo Station, observations of currents during 1994 generally corroborate those from 1993, and the recommendation that the outfall pipe should be repositioned offshore of the McMurdo Gyre is supported.

  4. A wind tunnel study of the effect of roadway configurations on the dispersion of traffic-related pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heist, D. K.; Perry, S. G.; Brixey, L. A.

    In this paper we examine the effect of different roadway configurations, including noise barriers and roadway elevation or depression relative to the surrounding terrain, on the dispersion of traffic-related pollutants for winds perpendicular to the roadway. A wind tunnel experiment modeling 12 different configurations was performed to study the flow fields and the concentration distributions resulting from emissions from a simulated six-lane highway. All of the configurations examined here reduced the downwind ground-level concentrations relative to that for a flat, unobstructed roadway; however, the degree to which the concentrations were reduced varied widely depending on the particular situation. Ground-level concentration data from the cases considered in this research indicate that a constant entrainment velocity can be used over the region beginning downwind of any initial disturbance to the flow resulting from the roadway configuration (e.g., a recirculation region behind a noise barrier) and extending at least to the end of our measurements. For example, for the case of a single noise barrier on the downwind side of the road, this region extends from approximately four barrier heights downwind of the roadway to 40 barrier heights. It was also found that the virtual origin concept is useful in describing the initial mixing created by the particular roadway configuration. To effectively model the influence of the roadway configuration on the dispersion, a combination of a virtual origin and an entrainment velocity may be effective. The magnitude of the virtual origin shift appears to depend on the particular roadway configuration, while the entrainment velocity appears to be a function of the friction velocity and the roadway geometry. These results suggest that road configuration must be taken into account in modeling near-road air quality.

  5. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  6. Surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals: Dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Degang; Liu Zhengyou; Qiu Chunyin; He Zhaojian; Cai Feiyan; Ke Manzhu

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the existence of surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals with fluid matrix, which is composed of a square array of steel cylinders put in air background. By using the supercell method, we investigate the dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes. Surface waves can be easily excited at the surface of a finite size phononic crystal by line source or Gaussian beam placed in or launched from the background medium, and they propagate along the surface with the form of 'beat.' Taking advantage of these surface modes, we can obtain a highly directional emission wave beam by introducing an appropriate corrugation layer on the surface of a waveguide exit.

  7. Surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals: Dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Degang; Liu, Zhengyou; Qiu, Chunyin; He, Zhaojian; Cai, Feiyan; Ke, Manzhu

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the existence of surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals with fluid matrix, which is composed of a square array of steel cylinders put in air background. By using the supercell method, we investigate the dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes. Surface waves can be easily excited at the surface of a finite size phononic crystal by line source or Gaussian beam placed in or launched from the background medium, and they propagate along the surface with the form of “beat.” Taking advantage of these surface modes, we can obtain a highly directional emission wave beam by introducing an appropriate corrugation layer on the surface of a waveguide exit.

  8. Generalization of the model of Hawking radiation with modified high frequency dispersion relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himemoto, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2000-03-01

    Hawking radiation is one of the most interesting phenomena predicted by the theory of quantum fields in curved space. The origin of Hawking radiation is closely related to the fact that a particle which marginally escapes from collapsing into a black hole is observed at future infinity with an infinitely large redshift. In other words, such a particle had a very high frequency when it was near the event horizon. Motivated by the possibility that the property of Hawking radiation may be altered by some unknown physics which may exist beyond some critical scale, Unruh proposed a model which has higher order spatial derivative terms. In his model, the effects of unknown physics are modeled so as to be suppressed for waves with a wavelength much longer than the critical scale k-10. Surprisingly, it was shown that the thermal spectrum is recovered for such modified models. To introduce such higher order spatial derivative terms, Lorentz invariance must be violated because one special direction needs to be chosen. In previous works, the rest frame of freely falling observers was employed as this special reference frame. Here we give an extension by allowing a more general choice of the reference frame. Developing the method taken by Corley, we show that the resulting spectrum of created particles again becomes the thermal one at the Hawking temperature even if the choice of the reference frame is generalized. Using the technique of the matched asymptotic expansion, we also show that the correction to the thermal radiation stays of order k-20 or smaller when the spectrum of radiated particle around its peak is concerned.

  9. Axonal Transmission in the Retina Introduces a Small Dispersion of Relative Timing in the Ganglion Cell Population Response

    PubMed Central

    Zeck, Günther; Lambacher, Armin; Fromherz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background Visual stimuli elicit action potentials in tens of different retinal ganglion cells. Each ganglion cell type responds with a different latency to a given stimulus, thus transforming the high-dimensional input into a temporal neural code. The timing of the first spikes between different retinal projection neurons cells may further change along axonal transmission. The purpose of this study is to investigate if intraretinal conduction velocity leads to a synchronization or dispersion of the population signal leaving the eye. Methodology/Principal Findings We ‘imaged’ the initiation and transmission of light-evoked action potentials along individual axons in the rabbit retina at micron-scale resolution using a high-density multi-transistor array. We measured unimodal conduction velocity distributions (1.3±0.3 m/sec, mean ± SD) for axonal populations at all retinal eccentricities with the exception of the central part that contains myelinated axons. The velocity variance within each piece of retina is caused by ganglion cell types that show narrower and slightly different average velocity tuning. Ganglion cells of the same type respond with similar latency to spatially homogenous stimuli and conduct with similar velocity. For ganglion cells of different type intraretinal conduction velocity and response latency to flashed stimuli are negatively correlated, indicating that differences in first spike timing increase (up to 10 msec). Similarly, the analysis of pair-wise correlated activity in response to white-noise stimuli reveals that conduction velocity and response latency are negatively correlated. Conclusion/Significance Intraretinal conduction does not change the relative spike timing between ganglion cells of the same type but increases spike timing differences among ganglion cells of different type. The fastest retinal ganglion cells therefore act as indicators of new stimuli for postsynaptic neurons. The intraretinal dispersion of the population

  10. New insights into the phylogeny and worldwide dispersion of two closely related nematode species, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Bursaphelenchus mucronatus.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Filipe; Moreira, Cláudia; Fonseca, Luís; van Asch, Barbara; Mota, Manuel; Abrantes, Isabel; Amorim, António

    2013-01-01

    The pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is one of the greatest threats to coniferous forests worldwide, causing severe ecological damage and economic loss. The biology of B. xylophilus is similar to that of its closest relative, B. mucronatus, as both species share food resources and insect vectors, and have very similar morphological characteristics, although little pathogenicity to conifers has been associated with B. mucronatus. Using both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers, we show that B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus form distinct phylogenetic groups with contrasting phylogeographic patterns. B. xylophilus presents lower levels of intraspecific diversity than B. mucronatus, as expected for a species that evolved relatively recently through geographical or reproductive isolation. Genetic diversity was particularly low in recently colonised areas, such as in southwestern Europe. By contrast, B. mucronatus displays high levels of genetic diversity and two well-differentiated clades in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA phylogenies. The lack of correlation between genetic and geographic distances in B. mucronatus suggests intense gene flow among distant regions, a phenomenon that may have remained unnoticed due to the reduced pathogenicity of the species. Overall, our findings suggest that B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus have different demographic histories despite their morphological resemblance and ecological overlap. These results suggest that Bursaphelenchus species are a valuable model for understanding the dispersion of invasive species and the risks posed to native biodiversity and ecosystems. PMID:23409167

  11. New Insights into the Phylogeny and Worldwide Dispersion of Two Closely Related Nematode Species, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Bursaphelenchus mucronatus

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Filipe; Moreira, Cláudia; Fonseca, Luís; van Asch, Barbara; Mota, Manuel; Abrantes, Isabel; Amorim, António

    2013-01-01

    The pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is one of the greatest threats to coniferous forests worldwide, causing severe ecological damage and economic loss. The biology of B. xylophilus is similar to that of its closest relative, B. mucronatus, as both species share food resources and insect vectors, and have very similar morphological characteristics, although little pathogenicity to conifers has been associated with B. mucronatus. Using both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers, we show that B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus form distinct phylogenetic groups with contrasting phylogeographic patterns. B. xylophilus presents lower levels of intraspecific diversity than B. mucronatus, as expected for a species that evolved relatively recently through geographical or reproductive isolation. Genetic diversity was particularly low in recently colonised areas, such as in southwestern Europe. By contrast, B. mucronatus displays high levels of genetic diversity and two well-differentiated clades in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA phylogenies. The lack of correlation between genetic and geographic distances in B. mucronatus suggests intense gene flow among distant regions, a phenomenon that may have remained unnoticed due to the reduced pathogenicity of the species. Overall, our findings suggest that B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus have different demographic histories despite their morphological resemblance and ecological overlap. These results suggest that Bursaphelenchus species are a valuable model for understanding the dispersion of invasive species and the risks posed to native biodiversity and ecosystems. PMID:23409167

  12. Matrix product state based algorithm for determining dispersion relations of quantum spin chains with periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirvu, B.; Haegeman, J.; Verstraete, F.

    2012-01-01

    We study a matrix product state algorithm to approximate excited states of translationally invariant quantum spin systems with periodic boundary conditions. By means of a momentum eigenstate ansatz generalizing the one of Östlund and Rommer [see S. Östlund and S. Rommer, Phys. Rev. Lett. PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.75.353775, 3537 (1995);S. Rommer and S. Östlund, Phys. Rev. B1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.55.2164 55, 2164 (1997)], we separate the Hilbert space of the system into subspaces with different momentum. This gives rise to a direct sum of effective Hamiltonians, each one corresponding to a different momentum, and we determine their spectrum by solving a generalized eigenvalue equation. Surprisingly, many branches of the dispersion relation are approximated to a very good precision. We benchmark the accuracy of the algorithm by comparison with the exact solutions and previous numerical results for the quantum Ising, the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin-1/2, and the bilinear-biquadratic spin-1 models.

  13. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis using fundamental parameter approach of Catha edulis and other related plant samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, Abdallah A.; Moharram, Mohammed A.; Mostafa, Nasser Y.

    2012-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify trace elements in the Catha edulis plant (Khat) with a fundamental parameter approach. C. edulis is a famous drug plant in east Africa and Arabian Peninsula. We have previously confirmed that hydroxyapatite represents one of the main inorganic compounds in the leaves and stalks of C. edulis. Comparable plant leaves from basil, mint and green tea were included in the present investigation as well as trifolium leaves were included as a non-related plant. The elemental analyses of the plants were done by Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) spectroscopy. Standard-less quantitative WDXRF analysis was carried out based on the fundamental parameter approaches. According to the standard-less analysis algorithms, there is an essential need for an accurate determination of the amount of organic material in the sample. A new approach, based on the differential thermal analysis, was successfully used for the organic material determination. The obtained results based on this approach were in a good agreement with the commonly used methods. Depending on the developed method, quantitative analysis results of eighteen elements including; Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Na, Ni, Mg, Mn, P, Rb, S, Si, Sr, Ti and Zn were obtained for each plant. The results of the certified reference materials of green tea (NCSZC73014, China National Analysis Center for Iron and Steel, Beijing, China) confirmed the validity of the proposed method.

  14. Computation of dispersion relations for axially symmetric guided waves in cylindrical structures by means of a spectral decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Höhne, Christian; Prager, Jens; Gravenkamp, Hauke

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a method to determine the complex dispersion relations of axially symmetric guided waves in cylindrical structures is presented as an alternative to the currently established numerical procedures. The method is based on a spectral decomposition into eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator on the cross-section of the waveguide. This translates the calculation of real or complex wave numbers at a given frequency into solving an eigenvalue problem. Cylindrical rods and plates are treated as the asymptotic cases of cylindrical structures and used to generalize the method to the case of hollow cylinders. The presented method is superior to direct root-finding algorithms in the sense that no initial guess values are needed to determine the complex wave numbers and that neither starting at low frequencies nor subsequent mode tracking is required. The results obtained with this method are shown to be reasonably close to those calculated by other means and an estimate for the achievable accuracy is given. PMID:26126952

  15. Vessel heterogeneity of TIMI frame count and its relation to P-wave dispersion in patients with coronary slow flow

    PubMed Central

    Peng, You; Bardeesi, Adham Sameer A.; Bardisi, Ekhlas Samir A.; Liao, Xinxue

    2016-01-01

    Background The vessel heterogeneity of thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count (TFC) in patients with coronary slow flow (CSF) remains to be further evaluated, and the correlation between TFC heterogeneity and P-wave dispersion (PWD) has not been elucidated. We aim to investigate the vessel heterogeneity of TFC in coronary arteries, and its relation to PWD in patients with CSF and otherwise normal coronary arteries. Methods We studied 72 patients with angiographically documented CSF and 66 age- and gender-matched control subjects. The coefficient of variation (CV) and mean TFC of the three vessels were calculated. P-wave duration and PWD were measured on the standard electrocardiograms (ECGs). Results The mean TFC and CV were both significantly higher in CSF patients than in controls (P<0.001 for both comparisons). The maximum P-wave duration (Pmax) and PWD were found to be significantly higher in CSF patients than in controls (P<0.001 for both comparisons). In patients with CSF, both Pmax and PWD were mildly correlated to mean TFC (r=0.318, P=0.009; and r=0.307, P=0.010), and were more significantly correlated to CV (r=0.506, P<0.001; and r=0.579, P<0.001). Conclusions These data demonstrate that variability of TFC in three coronary arteries is increased in CSF patients, and that the vessel heterogeneity in coronary flow might be intimately associated with PWD. PMID:27076943

  16. Breakdown of electrostatic predictions for the nonlinear dispersion relation of a stimulated Raman scattering driven plasma wave

    SciTech Connect

    Benisti, Didier; Gremillet, Laurent

    2008-03-15

    The kinetic nonlinear dispersion relation, and frequency shift {delta}{omega}{sub srs}, of a plasma wave driven by stimulated Raman scattering are presented. Our theoretical calculations are fully electromagnetic, and use an adiabatic expression for the electron susceptibility which accounts for the change in phase velocity as the wave grows. When k{lambda}{sub D} > or approx. 0.35 (k being the plasma wave number and {lambda}{sub D} the Debye length), {delta}{omega}{sub srs} is significantly larger than could be inferred by assuming that the wave is freely propagating. Our theory is in excellent agreement with 1D Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell simulations when 0.3{<=}k{lambda}{sub D}{<=}0.58, and allows discussion of previously proposed mechanisms for Raman saturation. In particular, we find that no ''loss of resonance'' of the plasma wave would limit the Raman growth rate, and that saturation through a phase detuning between the plasma wave and the laser drive is mitigated by wave number shifts.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of Dispersion Model Results in the NEXUS Health Study Due to Uncertainties in Traffic-Related Emissions Inputs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dispersion modeling tools have traditionally provided critical information for air quality management decisions, but have been used recently to provide exposure estimates to support health studies. However, these models can be challenging to implement, particularly in near-road s...

  18. The modified dispersion relation for ionacoustic instabilities of ionospheric plasma at 80-200 km altitudes and its usage for interpretation of 150km equatorial radioecho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berngardt, O. I.; Potekhin, A. P.

    2009-04-01

    Ionacoustic instabilities of the ionospheric plasma and corresponding small-scale irregularities of the electron density significantly affect to the HF and UHF radiowaves propagation. Due to this an investigation of their characteristics is the important task staying on the border of the radiowaves propagation theory, geophysics and plasmaphysics. The theory of these instabilities in the E-layer, that are qualitatively divided into the two-stream and gradient-drift ones, is under development for a long time. The most part of the linear theories replaces investigation of the irregularities by analysis of the dispersion relation for the plasma irregularities. This dispersion relation connects oscillation frequency of the irregularities with their wave vector and defines conditions for the growth of the irregularities and their spectral characteristics in terms of plane waves approximation. There are two traditional limitations of such theories, limiting their region of applicability: 1)Magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions requirement; 2)Low oscillation frequency of irregularities in comparison with ion-neutral and electron-neutral collision frequencies. In the paper within the approximation of the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics and geometrooptical approximation the dispersion relation without noted limitations was obtained. The relation describes ionacoustic instabilities of the ionospheric plasma at 80-200km altitudes in three-dimensional weakly irregular ionosphere. The dispersion relation obtained has a form of the 6-th order polynomial for the oscillation frequency. Within limitations 1,2 the obtained relation has approximate solutions, close to the traditional ones for two-stream and gradient-drift instabilities. The difference between obtained and standard dispersion relation becomes significant at altitudes above 140 km. For this situation, in some special cases this new dispersion relation can be significantly simplified and some analytical solutions of

  19. Oil dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a symposium of the American Society for Testing and Materials. The topics covered include: The effect of elastomers on the efficiency of oil spill dispersants; planning for dispersant use; field experience with dispersants for oil spills on land; and measurements on natural dispersion.

  20. The 21 centimeter line width as an extragalactic distance indicator. III - The correction for velocity dispersion and the B- and H-band Tully-Fisher relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottinelli, L.; Gouguenheim, L.; Paturel, G.; de Vaucouleurs, G.

    1984-05-01

    The curvature of the H-band Tully-Fisher relation reported by Aaronson and Mould (1983) is demonstrated to be wholly a result of neglecting the corrections for bandwidth and turbulent velocities. The application of the correction model of Bottinelli et al. (1980, 1982, 1983) eliminates the curvature and decreases the slope of the linearized H-band relation to the previously determined value of 9.7. The curvature of the H-band relation disappears when the correction for velocity dispersion derived for the B-band is applied to the H-band data. After correction for the effect of bandwidth and velocity dispersion, the slope and zero point of the H-band relation are nearly independent of type. For well observed galaxies, it is shown that the distance moduli derived from the B- and H-band relations, both corrected for line broadening, have mean errors of, respectively, 0.3 and 0.4 mag.

  1. THE STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION OF A COMPACT MASSIVE GALAXY AT z = 1.80 USING X-SHOOTER: CONFIRMATION OF THE EVOLUTION IN THE MASS-SIZE AND MASS-DISPERSION RELATIONS {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Kriek, Mariska; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Brammer, Gabriel; Groot, Paul J.; Kaper, Lex

    2011-07-20

    Recent photometric studies have shown that early-type galaxies at fixed stellar mass were smaller and denser at earlier times. In this Letter, we assess that finding by deriving the dynamical mass of such a compact quiescent galaxy at z = 1.8. We have obtained a high-quality spectrum with full UV-NIR wavelength coverage of galaxy NMBS-C7447 using X-Shooter on the Very Large Telescope. We determined a velocity dispersion of 294 {+-} 51 km s{sup -1}. Given this velocity dispersion and the effective radius of 1.64 {+-} 0.15 kpc (as determined from Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 F160W observations) we derive a dynamical mass of (1.7 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}. Comparison of the full spectrum with stellar population synthesis models indicates that NMBS-C774 has a relatively young stellar population (0.40 Gyr) with little or no star formation and a stellar mass of M{sub *} {approx} 1.5 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}. The dynamical and photometric stellar masses are in good agreement. Thus, our study supports the conclusion that the mass densities of quiescent galaxies were indeed higher at earlier times, and this earlier result is not caused by systematic measurement errors. By combining available spectroscopic measurements at different redshifts, we find that the velocity dispersion at fixed dynamical mass was a factor of {approx}1.8 higher at z = 1.8 compared with z = 0. Finally, we show that the apparent discrepancies between the few available velocity dispersion measurements at z > 1.5 are consistent with the intrinsic scatter of the mass-size relation.

  2. Suppressing Short-term Polarization Noise and Related Spectral Decoherence in All-normal Dispersion Fiber Supercontinuum Generation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Youbo; Lyngsø, Jens; You, Sixian; Wilson, William L.; Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    The supercontinuum generated exclusively in the normal dispersion regime of a nonlinear fiber is widely believed to possess low optical noise and high spectral coherence. The recent development of flattened all-normal dispersion fibers has been motivated by this belief to construct a general-purpose broadband coherent optical source. Somewhat surprisingly, we identify a large short-term polarization noise in this type of supercontinuum generation that has been masked by the total-intensity measurement in the past, but can be easily detected by filtering the supercontinuum with a linear polarizer. Fortunately, this hidden intrinsic noise and the accompanied spectral decoherence can be effectively suppressed by using a polarization-maintaining all-normal dispersion fiber. A polarization-maintaining coherent supercontinuum laser is thus built with a broad bandwidth (780–1300 nm) and high spectral power (~1 mW/nm). PMID:26166939

  3. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  4. When is dispersal for dispersal? Unifying marine and terrestrial perspectives.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Scott C; Baskett, Marissa L; Grosberg, Richard K; Morgan, Steven G; Strathmann, Richard R

    2016-08-01

    Recent syntheses on the evolutionary causes of dispersal have focused on dispersal as a direct adaptation, but many traits that influence dispersal have other functions, raising the question: when is dispersal 'for' dispersal? We review and critically evaluate the ecological causes of selection on traits that give rise to dispersal in marine and terrestrial organisms. In the sea, passive dispersal is relatively easy and specific morphological, behavioural, and physiological adaptations for dispersal are rare. Instead, there may often be selection to limit dispersal. On land, dispersal is relatively difficult without specific adaptations, which are relatively common. Although selection for dispersal is expected in both systems and traits leading to dispersal are often linked to fitness, systems may differ in the extent to which dispersal in nature arises from direct selection for dispersal or as a by-product of selection on traits with other functions. Our analysis highlights incompleteness of theories that assume a simple and direct relationship between dispersal and fitness, not just insofar as they ignore a vast array of taxa in the marine realm, but also because they may be missing critically important effects of traits influencing dispersal in all realms. PMID:26118564

  5. NO2 and SO2 dispersion modeling and relative roles of emission sources over Map Ta Phut industrial area, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chusai, Chatinai; Manomaiphiboon, Kasemsan; Saiyasitpanich, Phirun; Thepanondh, Sarawut

    2012-08-01

    Map Ta Phut industrial area (MA) is the largest industrial complex in Thailand. There has been concern about many air pollutants over this area. Air quality management for the area is known to be difficult, due to lack of understanding of how emissions from different sources or sectors (e.g., industrial, power plant, transportation, and residential) contribute to air quality degradation in the area. In this study, a dispersion study of NO2 and SO2 was conducted using the AERMOD model. The area-specific emission inventories of NOx and SO2 were prepared, including both stack and nonstack sources, and divided into 11 emission groups. Annual simulations were performed for the year 2006. Modeled concentrations were evaluated with observations. Underestimation of both pollutants was Jbund, and stack emission estimates were scaled to improve the modeled results before quantifying relative roles of individual emission groups to ambient concentration overfour selected impacted areas (two are residential and the others are highly industrialized). Two concentration measures (i.e., annual average area-wide concentration or AC, and area-wide robust highest concentration or AR) were used to aggregately represent mean and high-end concentrations Jbfor each individual area, respectively. For AC-NO2, on-road mobile emissions were found to be the largest contributor in the two residential areas (36-38% of total AC-NO2), while petrochemical-industry emissions play the most important role in the two industrialized areas (34-51%). For AR-NO2, biomass burning has the most influence in all impacted areas (>90%) exceptJor one residential area where on-road mobile is the largest (75%). For AC-SO2, the petrochemical industry contributes most in all impacted areas (38-56%). For AR-SO2, the results vary. Since the petrochemical industry was often identified as the major contributor despite not being the largest emitter, air quality workers should pay special attention to this emission group

  6. Cauchy's dispersion equation reconsidered : dispersion in silicate glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. Y.; Inokuti, M.; Karstens, W.; Physics; Univ. of Vermont; St. Michael's College

    2002-01-01

    We formulate a novel method of characterizing optically transparent substances using dispersion theory. The refractive index is given by a generalized Cauchy dispersion equation with coefficients that are moments of the uv and ir absorptions. Mean dispersion, Abbe number, and partial dispersion are combinations of these moments. The empirical relation between index and dispersion for families of glasses appears as a consequence of Beer's law applied to the uv spectra.

  7. Stability of the surface layer and its relation to the dispersion of primary pollutants in St. Louis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Woodbury, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of atmospheric stability on the dispersion of primary pollutants such as CO, total hydrocarbons (THC), and NO were examined in St. Louis. The pollutant levels were measured at 25 stations, temperature at 12 stations at 5 and 30 m height, and wind speed and direction at the 30 m level at 12 stations. Correlation coefficients were generated for pairs of the vertical temperature differences, the log of the mean wind speed reciprocal, the bulk Richardson number, and specific pollutant concentrations. A high correlation was obtained between the thermal stability and the urban concentration of the primary pollutants in the lowest part of the boundary layer. A restricted nighttime dispersion of the pollutants was observed, indicating near-ground increased concentrations at times when the source emissions actually decrease.

  8. Dispersion relations near quantum criticality in the quasi one-dimensional Ising chain CoNb2O6 in transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Ivelisse; Thompson, Jordan; Coldea, Radu; Robinson, Neil; Essler, Fabian; Prabhakaran, Dharmalingam; Bewley, Robert; Guidi, Tatiana

    2013-03-01

    The Ising chain in a transverse magnetic field is one of the canonical examples of a quantum phase transition. We have recently realized this model experimentally in the quasi-one-dimensional (1D) Ising-like ferromagnet CoNb2O6. Here, we present single-crystal inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the magnetic dispersion relations in the full three-dimensional (3D) Brillouin zone for magnetic fields near the critical point and in the high field paramagnetic phase. We explore the gap dependence as a function of field and quantify the cross-over to 3D physics at the lowest energies due to the finite interchain couplings. We parametrize the dispersion relations in the high-field paramagnetic phase to a spin wave model to quantify the sub-leading terms in the spin Hamiltonian beyond the dominant 1D Ising exchange.

  9. The planar age-velocity dispersion relation from a polar sample of F stars with solar composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knude, J.; Winther, M.; Schnedler Nielsen, H.

    1987-06-01

    A photometric catalog of A and F stars at the North Galactic Pole is compared to the AGK 3. The intersection contains 2359 stars. Due to the high latitude of these stars, b > +70°, an accurate estimate of the plane parallel velocities U and V is obtainable from proper motions and distances alone. Complete subsamples of unevolved and slightly evolved F stars of solar composition are used to study the variation of the velocity dispersions σU and σV with time. Both dispersions are found to follow power laws very closely but the two laws have significantly different powers. The axial ratio σV/σU is found to change from 1 to about 0.5 during a period lasting five billion years signifying a changing shape of the velocity ellipsoid. The age variation's power may discriminate between disk heating mechanisms. It is therefore interesting that the two resulting powers almost are identical to those suggested for spiral wave heating (+1/2) and heating by gravitational collisions with giant molecular clouds (+1/4) respectively. The dispersion of the velocity parallel to the plane is found to obey a law with power ≈1/2.

  10. Spores Disperse, Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, Donna N.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests the use of spores and spore-producing structures to show adaptations facilitating spore dispersal and dispersal to favorable environments. Describes several activities using horsetails, ferns, and mosses. Lists five safety factors related to use of mold spores in the classroom. (DS)

  11. Shaping the relation between the mass of supermassive black holes and the velocity dispersion of galactic bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. H.

    2013-05-01

    I use the fact that the radiation emitted by the accretion disk of supermassive black hole can heat up the surrounding gas in the protogalaxy to achieve hydrostatic equilibrium during the galaxy formation. The correlation between the black hole mass M BH and velocity dispersion σ thus naturally arises. The result generally agrees with empirical fittings from observational data, even with M BH ≤106 M ⊙. This model provides a clear picture on how the properties of the galactic supermassive black holes are connected with the kinetic properties of the galactic bulges.

  12. Molecular vibrations of [n]oligoacenes (n=2-5 and 10) and phonon dispersion relations of polyacene.

    PubMed

    Yamakita, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Jin; Ohno, Koichi

    2007-02-14

    As model compounds for nanosize carbon clusters, the phonon dispersion curves of polyacene are constructed based on density functional theory calculations for [n]oligoacenes (n=2-5, 10, and 15). Complete vibrational assignments are given for the observed Fourier-transform infrared and Raman spectra of [n]oligoacenes (n=2-5). Raman intensity distributions by the 1064-nm excitation are well reproduced by the polarizability-approximation calculations for naphthalene and anthracene, whereas several bands of naphthacene and pentacene at 1700-1100 cm(-1) are calculated to be enhanced by the resonance Raman effect. It is found from vibronic calculations that the coupled a(g) modes between the Kekulé deformation and joint CC stretching give rise to the Raman enhancements of the Franck-Condon type, and that the b(3g) mode corresponding to the graphite G mode is enhanced by vibronic coupling between the (1)L(a)((1)B(1u)) and (1)B(b)((1)B(2u)) states. The phonon dispersion curves of polyacene provide a uniform foundation for understanding molecular vibrations of the oligoacenes in terms of the phase difference. The mode correlated with the defect-sensitive D mode of the bulk carbon networks is also found for the present one-dimensional system. PMID:17313241

  13. On the computational modeling of the viscosity of colloidal dispersions and its relation with basic molecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama Goicochea, A.; Balderas Altamirano, M. A.; Lopez-Esparza, R.; Waldo-Mendoza, Miguel A.; Perez, E.

    2015-09-01

    The connection between fundamental interactions acting in molecules in a fluid and macroscopically measured properties, such as the viscosity between colloidal particles coated with polymers, is studied here. The role that hydrodynamic and Brownian forces play in colloidal dispersions is also discussed. It is argued that many-body systems in which all these interactions take place can be accurately solved using computational simulation tools. One of those modern tools is the technique known as dissipative particle dynamics, which incorporates Brownian and hydrodynamic forces, as well as basic conservative interactions. A case study is reported, as an example of the applications of this technique, which consists of the prediction of the viscosity and friction between two opposing parallel surfaces covered with polymer chains, under the influence of a steady flow. This work is intended to serve as an introduction to the subject of colloidal dispersions and computer simulations, for final-year undergraduate students and beginning graduate students who are interested in beginning research in soft matter systems. To that end, a computational code is included that students can use right away to study complex fluids in equilibrium.

  14. 3D acoustic wave modelling with time-space domain dispersion-relation-based finite-difference schemes and hybrid absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2011-09-01

    Most conventional finite-difference methods adopt second-order temporal and (2M)th-order spatial finite-difference stencils to solve the 3D acoustic wave equation. When spatial finite-difference stencils devised from the time-space domain dispersion relation are used to replace these conventional spatial finite-difference stencils devised from the space domain dispersion relation, the accuracy of modelling can be increased from second-order along any directions to (2M)th-order along 48 directions. In addition, the conventional high-order spatial finite-difference modelling accuracy can be improved by using a truncated finite-difference scheme. In this paper, we combine the time-space domain dispersion-relation-based finite difference scheme and the truncated finite-difference scheme to obtain optimised spatial finite-difference coefficients and thus to significantly improve the modelling accuracy without increasing computational cost, compared with the conventional space domain dispersion-relation-based finite difference scheme. We developed absorbing boundary conditions for the 3D acoustic wave equation, based on predicting wavefield values in a transition area by weighing wavefield values from wave equations and one-way wave equations. Dispersion analyses demonstrate that high-order spatial finite-difference stencils have greater accuracy than low-order spatial finite-difference stencils for high frequency components of wavefields, and spatial finite-difference stencils devised in the time-space domain have greater precision than those devised in the space domain under the same discretisation. The modelling accuracy can be improved further by using the truncated spatial finite-difference stencils. Stability analyses show that spatial finite-difference stencils devised in the time-space domain have better stability condition. Numerical modelling experiments for homogeneous, horizontally layered and Society of Exploration Geophysicists/European Association of

  15. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  16. Conversion of electrostatic plasma waves into electromagnetic waves - Numerical calculation of the dispersion relation for all wavelengths.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oya, H.

    1971-01-01

    The dispersion curves have been computed for a wide range of wavelengths from electromagnetic waves to electrostatic waves in a magnetoactive warm plasma with a Maxwellian velocity distribution function. The computation was carried out mainly for the perpendicular propagation mode. The upper hybrid resonance is the connection point of the electrostatic waves and the electromagnetic waves. The electrostatic waves not associated with the upper hybrid resonance are subjected to electron cyclotron damping when the wavelength becomes long. Oblique propagation is allowed for the electrostatic waves in a frequency range from the plasma frequency to the upper hybrid resonance frequency in the long-wavelength region where Landau damping can be neglected and where the electrostatic mode smoothly connects to the electromagnetic X-mode. In a slightly inhomogeneous plasma, the Bernstein-mode electrostatic wave can escape by being converted into the O-mode electromagnetic wave; two reflections take place during this escape process.

  17. Numerical simulation of advection fog formation on multi-disperse aerosols due to combustion-related pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of multi-disperse distribution of the aerosol population are presented. Single component and multi-component aerosol species on the condensation/nucleation processes which affect the reduction in visibility are described. The aerosol population with a high particle concentration provided more favorable conditions for the formation of a denser fog than the aerosol population with a greater particle size distribution when the value of the mass concentration of the aerosols was kept constant. The results were used as numerical predictions of fog formation. Two dimensional observations in horizontal and vertical coordinates, together with time-dependent measurements were needed as initial values for the following physical parameters: (1)wind profiles; (2) temperature profiles; (3) humidity profiles; (4) mass concentration of aerosol particles; (5) particle size distribution of aerosols; and (6) chemical composition of aerosols. Formation and dissipation of advection fog, thus, can be forecasted numerically by introducing initial values obtained from the observations.

  18. Dendrochemical patterns of calcium, zinc, and potassium related to internal factors detected by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kevin T.; Balouet, Jean Christophe; Shortle, Walter C.; Chalot, Michel; Beaujard, François; Grudd, Håkan; Vroblesky, Don A.; Burkem, Joel G.

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provides highly sensitive and precise spatial resolution of cation content in individual annual growth rings in trees. The sensitivity and precision have prompted successful applications to forensic dendrochemistry and the timing of environmental releases of contaminants. These applications have highlighted the need to distinguish dendrochemical effects of internal processes from environmental contamination. Calcium, potassium, and zinc are three marker cations that illustrate the influence of these processes. We found changes in cation chemistry in tree rings potentially due to biomineralization, development of cracks or checks, heartwood/sapwood differentiation, intra-annual processes, and compartmentalization of infection. Distinguishing internal from external processes that affect dendrochemistry will enhance the value of EDXRF for both physiological and forensic investigations.

  19. Dendrochemical patterns of calcium, zinc, and potassium related to internal factors detected by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF).

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin T; Balouet, Jean Christophe; Shortle, Walter C; Chalot, Michel; Beaujard, François; Grudd, Håkan; Vroblesky, Don A; Burken, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provides highly sensitive and precise spatial resolution of cation content in individual annual growth rings in trees. The sensitivity and precision have prompted successful applications to forensic dendrochemistry and the timing of environmental releases of contaminants. These applications have highlighted the need to distinguish dendrochemical effects of internal processes from environmental contamination. Calcium, potassium, and zinc are three marker cations that illustrate the influence of these processes. We found changes in cation chemistry in tree rings potentially due to biomineralization, development of cracks or checks, heartwood/sapwood differentiation, intra-annual processes, and compartmentalization of infection. Distinguishing internal from external processes that affect dendrochemistry will enhance the value of EDXRF for both physiological and forensic investigations. PMID:24034830

  20. Thermal stability of the surface layer and its relation to the dispersion of primary pollutants in St. Louis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Woodbury, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the applicability of the vertical temperature gradient, DT, as a dispersion parameter for urban area sources. Data on DT were tabulated from temperature measurements at 5 m and 30 m obtained on 30 m towers at 12 stations. DT was obtained by subtracting the value at 5 m from that at 30 m. Positive DT values represent an inversion. Accuracy of the DT data is 0.1 K. Hourly measurements of DT along with concentrations of the primary pollutants, CO, NO, and total hydrocarbons (THC), are available from the 1976 RAPS data base for St. Louis. Linear correlations between a given pollutant species concentration and DT are developed from that data set. It could be confirmed that a strong positive correlation exists at night between the thermal stability of the lowest part of the boundary layer and the urban concentration of the primary pollutants CO, NO, and hydrocarbons.

  1. Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russel, W. B.; Saville, D. A.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1992-03-01

    The book covers the physical side of colloid science from the individual forces acting between submicron particles suspended in a liquid through the resulting equilibrium and dynamic properties. The relevant forces include Brownian motion, electrostatic repulsion, dispersion attraction, both attraction and repulsion due to soluble polymer, and viscous forces due to relative motion between the particles and the liquid. The balance among Brownian motion and the interparticle forces decides the questions of stability and phase behavior. Imposition of external fields produces complex effects, i.e. electrokinetic phenomena (electric field), sedimentation (gravitational field), diffusion (concentration/chemical potential gradient), and non-Newtonian rheology (shear field). The treatment aims to impart a sound, quantitative understanding based on fundamental theory and experiments with well-characterized model systems. This broad grasp of the fundamentals lends insight and helps to develop the intuitive sense needed to isolate essential features of technological problems and design critical experiments. Some exposure to fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and electricity and magnetism is assumed, but each subject is reintroduced in a self-contained manner.

  2. Comment on “Generalized dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized anisotropic plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 17, 102114 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, M. Parvazian, A.

    2015-02-15

    In a recent paper [Deeba et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102114 (2010)], a generalized dielectric constant for the electron Bernstein waves using non-Maxwellian distribution functions was derived in a collisionless, uniform magnetized plasma. Using the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions, Deeba, Ahmad, and Murtaza derived the dispersion relations for both kappa and the generalized (r, q) distributions in a straightforward manner. However, their results are questionable, since the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions is valid for small argument, while for perpendicular propagation, it is necessary to evaluate special integrands for small as well as large arguments.

  3. Measurement of the Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton in Virtual Compton Scattering at Q2=0.92 and 1.76 Gev2: II. Dispersion Relation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Geraud Laveissiere; Luminita Todor; Natalie Degrande; S. Jaminion; Christophe Jutier; Rachele Di Salvo; L. Van Hoorebeke; et. Al.

    2003-12-01

    Virtual Compton Scattering is studied at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in the energy domain below pion threshold and in the Delta(1232) resonance region. The data analysis is based on the Dispersion Relation (DR) approach. The electric and magnetic Generalized Polarizabilities (GPs) of the proton and the structure functions Pll-Ptt/epsilon and Plt are determined at four-momentum transfer squared Q2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV2. The DR analysis is consistent with the low-energy expansion analysis. The world data set indicates that neither the electric nor magnetic GP follows a simple dipole form.

  4. Application of elastic wave dispersion relations to estimate thermal properties of nanoscale wires and tubes of varying wall thickness and diameter.

    PubMed

    Bifano, Michael F P; Kaul, Pankaj B; Prakash, Vikas

    2010-06-11

    This paper reports dependency of specific heat and ballistic thermal conductance on cross-sectional geometry (tube versus rod) and size (i.e., diameter and wall thickness), in free-standing isotropic non-metallic crystalline nanostructures. The analysis is performed using dispersion relations found by numerically solving the Pochhammer-Chree frequency equation for a tube. Estimates for the allowable phonon dispersion relations within the crystal lattice are obtained by modifying the elastic acoustic dispersion relations so as to account for the discrete nature of the material's crystal lattice. These phonon dispersion relations are then used to evaluate the specific heat and ballistic thermal conductance in the nanostructures as a function of the nanostructure geometry and size. Two major results are revealed in the analysis: increasing the outer diameter of a nanotube while keeping the ratio of the inner to outer tube radius (gamma) fixed increases the total number of available phonon modes capable of thermal population. Secondly, decreasing the wall thickness of a nanotube (i.e., increasing gamma) while keeping its outer diameter fixed, results in a drastic decrease in the available phonon mode density and a reduction in the frequency of the longitudinal and flexural acoustic phonon modes in the nanostructure. The dependency of the nanostructure's specific heat on temperature indicates 1D, 2D, and 3D geometric phonon confinement regimes. Transition temperatures for each phonon confinement regime are shown to depend on both the nanostructure's wall thickness and outer radius. Compared to nanowires (gamma = 0), the frequency reduction of acoustic phonon modes in thinner walled nanotubes (gamma = 0.96) is shown to elevate the ballistic thermal conductance of the thin-walled nanotube between 0.2 and 150 K. At 20 K, the ballistic thermal conductance of the thin-walled nanotube (gamma = 0.96) becomes 300% greater than that of a solid nanowire. For temperatures above

  5. On the Waveguide Modelling of Dynamic Stiffness of Cylindrical Vibration Isolators. Part II: the Dispersion Relation Solution, Convergence Analysis and Comparison with Simple Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KARI, L.

    2001-07-01

    Based on a waveguide model presented in a companion paper (L. Kari 2001 Journal of Sound and Vibration244, 211-233 [1]), the influences of higher order modes and structure-borne sound dispersion on the axial dynamic stiffness for cylindrical vibration isolators are investigated. On the whole, a moderate mode number results in an accurate stiffness prediction while an accurate stress point value prediction requires more modes. The dispersion relation is solved by a modified Newton-Raphson method with initial values given by an asymptotic expansion or a winding integral method. The integral technique is based on the argument principle; but, as the square root operators in the dispersion relation yield branch points, some modifications are needed. To create single-valued functions conforming to the argument principle, the winding integral search domain is split into branch cut absent subdomains, containing adaptively defined square root operators. The subregion method used for the fulfilment of the boundary conditions at the lateral surfaces is shown to converge faster than for the point-matching method. However, the latter reveals a similar convergence rate as the former at overdetermination. Comparisons with simple stiffness models are made. These models, known as the long rod, the Love, the Bishop, the Kynch, the Mindlin and Herrmann and the Mindlin and McNiven theories are shown to diverge substantially from the presented “exact” theory. To a great extent, the pertinent stress and displacement fields, derived from the presented waveguide model, explain the discrepancies reported for the approximate theories.

  6. Dispersion Modeling of Traffic-Related Air Pollutant Exposures and Health Effects among Children with Asthma in Detroit, Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicular traffic is a major source of ambient air pollution in urban areas, and traffic-related air pollutants, including carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter under 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5) and diesel exhaust emissions, have been associated with...

  7. Determination of optical characteristics of a dispersive medium from the measured relative angular distribution of radiation emerging from a layer

    SciTech Connect

    Berdnik, V.V.; Loiko, V.A.; Ivanov, A.P.

    1995-04-01

    A method is suggested that allows one to determine the photon survival probability and the coefficients in the Legendre polynomial expansion of the scattering indicatrix from the relative intensities of radiation emerging from a layer. The method consists in solving the nonlinear equations of the radiation-transfer theory for the radiation intensities at layer boundaries. Estimates are also given for the errors in the restoration procedure.

  8. Relation of structure to mechanical properties of thin thoria dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium (TD-NiCr alloy sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the relation between structure and mechanical properties of thin TD-NiCr sheet indicated that the elevated temperature tensile, stress-rupture, and creep strength properties depend primarily on the grain aspect ratio and sheet thickness. In general, the strength properties increased with increasing grain aspect ratio and sheet thickness. Tensile testing revealed an absence of ductility at elevated temperatures. A threshold stress for creep appears to exist. Even small amounts of prior creep deformation at elevated temperatures can produce severe creep damage.

  9. Dispersion Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the need for more accurate and complete input data and field verification of the various models of air pollutant dispension. Consideration should be given to changing the form of air quality standards based on enhanced dispersion modeling techniques. (Author/RE)

  10. THE MASSIVE-BLACK-HOLE-VELOCITY-DISPERSION RELATION AND THE HALO BARYON FRACTION: A CASE FOR POSITIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Nusser, Adi E-mail: adi@physics.technion.ac.i

    2010-12-10

    Force balance considerations put a limit on the rate of active galactic nucleus radiation momentum output, L/c, capable of driving galactic superwinds and reproducing the observed M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion. We show that black holes cannot supply enough momentum in radiation to drive the gas out by pressure alone. Energy-driven winds give a M{sub BH}-{sigma} scaling favored by a recent analysis but also fall short energetically once cooling is incorporated. We propose that outflow triggering of star formation by enhancing the intercloud medium turbulent pressure and squeezing clouds can supply the necessary boost and suggest possible tests of this hypothesis. Our hypothesis simultaneously can account for the observed halo baryon fraction.

  11. Device convolution effects on the collective scattering signal of the E Multiplication-Sign B mode from Hall thruster experiments: 2D dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalier, J.; Lemoine, N.; Bonhomme, G.; Tsikata, S.; Honore, C.; Gresillon, D.

    2012-08-15

    The effect of the collective light scattering diagnostic transfer function is considered in the context of the dispersion relation of the unstable E Multiplication-Sign B mode previously reported. This transfer function is found to have a contribution to the measured frequencies and mode amplitudes which is more or less significant depending on the measurement wavenumbers and angles. After deconvolution, the experimental data are found to be possibly compatible with the idea that the mode frequency in the jet frame (after subtraction of the Doppler effect due to the plasma motion along the thruster axis) is independent of the orientation of the wave vector in the plane orthogonal to the local magnetic field.

  12. Theory on excitations of drift Alfvén waves by energetic particles. II. The general fishbone-like dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2014-07-15

    The theoretical framework of the general fishbone-like dispersion relation (GFLDR), presented and discussed in the Companion Paper [Phys. Plasmas 21, 072120 (2014)], is applied to cases of practical interest of shear/drift Alfvén waves (SAWs/DAWs) excited by energetic particles (EPs) in toroidal fusion plasmas. These applications demonstrate that the GFLDR provides a unified approach that allows analytical and numerical calculations of stability properties, as well as mode structures and, in general, nonlinear evolutions, based on different models and with different levels of approximation. They also show the crucial importance of kinetic descriptions, accurate geometries and boundary conditions for predicting linear as well as nonlinear SAW/DAW and EP behaviors in burning plasmas. Thus, the GFLDR unified theoretical framework elevates the interpretative capability for both experimental and numerical simulation results.

  13. Wavelength calibration of dispersive near-infrared spectrometer using relative k-space distribution with low coherence interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-hyun; Han, Jae-Ho; Jeong, Jichai

    2016-05-01

    The commonly employed calibration methods for laboratory-made spectrometers have several disadvantages, including poor calibration when the number of characteristic spectral peaks is low. Therefore, we present a wavelength calibration method using relative k-space distribution with low coherence interferometer. The proposed method utilizes an interferogram with a perfect sinusoidal pattern in k-space for calibration. Zero-crossing detection extracts the k-space distribution of a spectrometer from the interferogram in the wavelength domain, and a calibration lamp provides information about absolute wavenumbers. To assign wavenumbers, wavelength-to-k-space conversion is required for the characteristic spectrum of the calibration lamp with the extracted k-space distribution. Then, the wavelength calibration is completed by inverse conversion of the k-space into wavelength domain. The calibration performance of the proposed method was demonstrated with two experimental conditions of four and eight characteristic spectral peaks. The proposed method elicited reliable calibration results in both cases, whereas the conventional method of third-order polynomial curve fitting failed to determine wavelengths in the case of four characteristic peaks. Moreover, for optical coherence tomography imaging, the proposed method could improve axial resolution due to higher suppression of sidelobes in point spread function than the conventional method. We believe that our findings can improve not only wavelength calibration accuracy but also resolution for optical coherence tomography.

  14. Variation in local abundance and species richness of stream fishes in relation to dispersal barriers: Implications for management and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nislow, K.H.; Hudy, M.; Letcher, B.H.; Smith, E.P.

    2011-01-01

    1.Barriers to immigration, all else being equal, should in principle depress local abundance and reduce local species richness. These issues are particularly relevant to stream-dwelling species when improperly designed road crossings act as barriers to migration with potential impacts on the viability of upstream populations. However, because abundance and richness are highly spatially and temporally heterogeneous and the relative importance of immigration on demography is uncertain, population- and community-level effects can be difficult to detect. 2.In this study, we tested the effects of potential barriers to upstream movements on the local abundance and species richness of a diverse assemblage of resident stream fishes in the Monongahela National Forest, West Virginia, U.S.A. Fishes were sampled using simple standard techniques above- and below road crossings that were either likely or unlikely to be barriers to upstream fish movements (based on physical dimensions of the crossing). We predicted that abundance of resident fishes would be lower in the upstream sections of streams with predicted impassable barriers, that the strength of the effect would vary among species and that variable effects on abundance would translate into lower species richness. 3.Supporting these predictions, the statistical model that best accounted for variation in abundance and species richness included a significant interaction between location (upstream or downstream of crossing) and type (passable or impassable crossing). Stream sections located above predicated impassable culverts had fewer than half the number of species and less than half the total fish abundance, while stream sections above and below passable culverts had essentially equivalent richness and abundance. 4.Our results are consistent with the importance of immigration and population connectivity to local abundance and species richness of stream fishes. In turn, these results suggest that when measured at

  15. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  16. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  17. Fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Christensen, L. S.; Collins, F. G.; Camp, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of economically viable techniques for dispersing warm fog at commercial airports is presented. Five fog dispersion techniques are examined: evaporation suppression, downwash, mixing, seeding with hygroscopic material, thermal techniques, and charged particle techniques. Thermal techniques, although effective, were found to be too expensive for routine airport operations, and detrimental to the environment. Seeding or helicopter downwash are practical for small-scale or temporary fog clearing, but are probably not useful for airport operations on a routine basis. Considerable disagreement exists on the capability of charged particle techniques, which stems from the fact that different assumptions and parameter values are used in the analytical models. Recommendations resulting from the review of this technique are listed, and include: experimental measurements of the parameters in question; a study to ascertain possible safety hazards, such as increased electrical activity or fuel ignition during refueling operations which could render charged particle techniques impractical; and a study of a single charged particle generator.

  18. Better Resolved Low Frequency Dispersions by the Apt Use of Kramers-Kronig Relations, Differential Operators, and All-In-1 Modeling.

    PubMed

    van Turnhout, J

    2016-01-01

    The dielectric spectra of colloidal systems often contain a typical low frequency dispersion, which usually remains unnoticed, because of the presence of strong conduction losses. The KK relations offer a means for converting ε' into ε″ data. This allows us to calculate conduction free ε″ spectra in which the l.f. dispersion will show up undisturbed. This interconversion can be done on line with a moving frame of logarithmically spaced ε' data. The coefficients of the conversion frames were obtained by kernel matching and by using symbolic differential operators. Logarithmic derivatives and differences of ε' and ε″ provide another option for conduction free data analysis. These difference-based functions actually derived from approximations to the distribution function, have the additional advantage of improving the resolution power of dielectric studies. A high resolution is important because of the rich relaxation structure of colloidal suspensions. The development of all-in-1 modeling facilitates the conduction free and high resolution data analysis. This mathematical tool allows the apart-together fitting of multiple data and multiple model functions. It proved also useful to go around the KK conversion altogether. This was achieved by the combined approximating ε' and ε″ data with a complex rational fractional power function. The all-in-1 minimization turned out to be also highly useful for the dielectric modeling of a suspension with the complex dipolar coefficient. It guarantees a secure correction for the electrode polarization, so that the modeling with the help of the differences ε' and ε″ can zoom in on the genuine colloidal relaxations. PMID:27242997

  19. Better resolved low frequency dispersions by the apt use of Kramers-Kronig relations, differential operators and all-in-1 modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnhout, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The dielectric spectra of colloidal systems often contain a typical low frequency dispersion, which usually remains unnoticed, because of the presence of strong conduction losses. The KK relations offer a means for converting ɛ' into ɛ'' data. This allows us to calculate conduction free ɛ'' spectra in which the l.f. dispersion will show up undisturbed. This interconversion can be done on line with a moving frame of logarithmically spaced ɛ' data. The coefficients of the conversion frames were obtained by kernel matching and by using symbolic differential operators. Logarithmic derivatives and differences of ɛ' and ɛ'' provide another option for conduction free data analysis. These difference-based functions actually derived from approximations to the distribution function, have the additional advantage of improving the resolution power of dielectric studies. A high resolution is important because of the rich relaxation structure of colloidal suspensions. The development of all-in-1 modelling facilitates the conduction free and high resolution data analysis. This mathematical tool allows the apart-together fitting of multiple data and multiple model functions. It proved also useful to go around the KK conversion altogether. This was achieved by the combined approximating ɛ' and ɛ'' data with a complex rational fractional power function. The all-in-1 minimization turned out to be also highly useful for the dielectric modelling of a suspension with the complex dipolar coefficient. It guarantees a secure correction for the electrode polarization, so that the modelling with the help of the differences ɛ' and ɛ'' can zoom in on the genuine colloidal relaxations.

  20. Better Resolved Low Frequency Dispersions by the Apt Use of Kramers-Kronig Relations, Differential Operators, and All-In-1 Modeling

    PubMed Central

    van Turnhout, J.

    2016-01-01

    The dielectric spectra of colloidal systems often contain a typical low frequency dispersion, which usually remains unnoticed, because of the presence of strong conduction losses. The KK relations offer a means for converting ε′ into ε″ data. This allows us to calculate conduction free ε″ spectra in which the l.f. dispersion will show up undisturbed. This interconversion can be done on line with a moving frame of logarithmically spaced ε′ data. The coefficients of the conversion frames were obtained by kernel matching and by using symbolic differential operators. Logarithmic derivatives and differences of ε′ and ε″ provide another option for conduction free data analysis. These difference-based functions actually derived from approximations to the distribution function, have the additional advantage of improving the resolution power of dielectric studies. A high resolution is important because of the rich relaxation structure of colloidal suspensions. The development of all-in-1 modeling facilitates the conduction free and high resolution data analysis. This mathematical tool allows the apart-together fitting of multiple data and multiple model functions. It proved also useful to go around the KK conversion altogether. This was achieved by the combined approximating ε′ and ε″ data with a complex rational fractional power function. The all-in-1 minimization turned out to be also highly useful for the dielectric modeling of a suspension with the complex dipolar coefficient. It guarantees a secure correction for the electrode polarization, so that the modeling with the help of the differences ε′ and ε″ can zoom in on the genuine colloidal relaxations. PMID:27242997

  1. KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

    1996-12-01

    Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

  2. Linear relation between H I circular velocity and stellar velocity dispersion in early-type galaxies, and slope of the density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Paolo; Oosterloo, Tom; Cappellari, Michele; den Heijer, Milan; Józsa, Gyula I. G.

    2016-04-01

    We report a tight linear relation between the H I circular velocity measured at 6 Re and the stellar velocity dispersion measured within 1 Re for a sample of 16 early-type galaxies with stellar mass between 1010 and 1011 M⊙. The key difference from previous studies is that we only use spatially resolved vcirc(H I) measurements obtained at large radius for a sizeable sample of objects. We can therefore link a kinematical tracer of the gravitational potential in the dark-matter dominated outer regions of galaxies with one in the inner regions, where baryons control the distribution of mass. We find that vcirc(H I) = 1.33 σe with an observed scatter of just 12 percent. This indicates a strong coupling between luminous and dark matter from the inner- to the outer regions of early-type galaxies, analogous to the situation in spirals and dwarf irregulars. The vcirc(H I)-σe relation is shallower than those based on vcirc measurements obtained from stellar kinematics and modelling at smaller radius, implying that vcirc declines with radius - as in bulge-dominated spirals. Indeed, the value of vcirc(H I) is typically 25 percent lower than the maximum vcirc derived at ˜0.2 Re from dynamical models. Under the assumption of power-law total density profiles ρ∝r-γ, our data imply an average logarithmic slope <γ> = 2.18 ± 0.03 across the sample, with a scatter of 0.11 around this value. The average slope and scatter agree with recent results obtained from stellar kinematics alone for a different sample of early-type galaxies.

  3. Linear relation between H I circular velocity and stellar velocity dispersion in early-type galaxies, and slope of the density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Paolo; Oosterloo, Tom; Cappellari, Michele; den Heijer, Milan; Józsa, Gyula I. G.

    2016-08-01

    We report a tight linear relation between the H I circular velocity measured at 6 Re and the stellar velocity dispersion measured within 1 Re for a sample of 16 early-type galaxies with stellar mass between 1010 and 1011 M⊙. The key difference from previous studies is that we only use spatially resolved vcirc(H I) measurements obtained at large radius for a sizeable sample of objects. We can therefore link a kinematical tracer of the gravitational potential in the dark-matter dominated outer regions of galaxies with one in the inner regions, where baryons control the distribution of mass. We find that vcirc(H I)= 1.33 σe with an observed scatter of just 12 per cent. This indicates a strong coupling between luminous and dark matter from the inner- to the outer regions of early-type galaxies, analogous to the situation in spirals and dwarf irregulars. The vcirc(H I)-σe relation is shallower than those based on vcirc measurements obtained from stellar kinematics and modelling at smaller radius, implying that vcirc declines with radius - as in bulge-dominated spirals. Indeed, the value of vcirc(H I) is typically 25 per cent lower than the maximum vcirc derived at ˜0.2 Re from dynamical models. Under the assumption of power-law total density profiles ρ ∝ r-γ, our data imply an average logarithmic slope <γ> = 2.18 ± 0.03 across the sample, with a scatter of 0.11 around this value. The average slope and scatter agree with recent results obtained from stellar kinematics alone for a different sample of early-type galaxies.

  4. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone-related protein release by extracellular calcium in dispersed cells from human parathyroid hyperplasia secondary to chronic renal failure and adenoma.

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, H.; Hara, M.; Honda, K.; Kuroda, M.; Usui, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Hara, S.; Shishiba, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) release from parathyroid cells and extracellular calcium ion concentration was investigated in three cases of parathyroid hyperplasia secondary to chronic renal failure and in four cases of parathyroid adenoma. Amounts of PTHrP released from individual parathyroid cells dispersed from surgical specimens were estimated by cell immunoblot assay. Parathyroid cells from both hyperplasias and adenomas showed significant suppression in the release of PTHrP with increase in extracellular calcium ions, but the amounts of PTHrP released from adenoma cells were significantly larger than from hyperplasia cells. The maximal value for PTHrP released within 120 minutes from adenoma cells was 2.91 +/- 2.11 x 10(-2) fmol/cell ([Ca2+], 0.4 mmol/L), and the minimal value was 1.32 +/- 0.35 x 10(-2) fmol/cell ([Ca2+], 2.0 mmol/L). On the other hand, the maximal value for PTHrP released from hyperplasia cells was 1.79 +/- 1.56 x 10(-2) fmol/cell ([Ca2+], 0.4 mmol/L), and the minimal value was 0.32 +/- 0.19 x 10(-2) fmol/cell ([Ca2+], 2.0 mmol/L). These results demonstrate actual release of PTHrP from abnormal parathyroid tissues into the extracellular space with the response to extracellular calcium ions depending on the cell status. Given the lack of definite histological criteria to differentiate between hyperplasias and adenomas in the parathyroid gland, the presently demonstrated significant difference in the ability to release PTHrP is important in pointing to parathyroid hyperplasia secondary to chronic renal failure as a distinct pathological entity separate from parathyroid adenoma. Images Figure 3 PMID:7778690

  5. Aspects of numerical and representational methods related to the finite-difference simulation of advective and dispersive transport of freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of the transport of injected freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer, overlain and underlain by confining layers containing more saline water, is shown to be influenced by the choice of the finite-difference approximation method, the algorithm for representing vertical advective and dispersive fluxes, and the values assigned to parametric coefficients that specify the degree of vertical dispersion and molecular diffusion that occurs. Computed potable water recovery efficiencies will differ depending upon the choice of algorithm and approximation method, as will dispersion coefficients estimated based on the calibration of simulations to match measured data. A comparison of centered and backward finite-difference approximation methods shows that substantially different transition zones between injected and native waters are depicted by the different methods, and computed recovery efficiencies vary greatly. Standard and experimental algorithms and a variety of values for molecular diffusivity, transverse dispersivity, and vertical scaling factor were compared in simulations of freshwater storage in a thin brackish aquifer. Computed recovery efficiencies vary considerably, and appreciable differences are observed in the distribution of injected freshwater in the various cases tested. The results demonstrate both a qualitatively different description of transport using the experimental algorithms and the interrelated influences of molecular diffusion and transverse dispersion on simulated recovery efficiency. When simulating natural aquifer flow in cross-section, flushing of the aquifer occurred for all tested coefficient choices using both standard and experimental algorithms. ?? 1993.

  6. Evaluation of rockfish conservation area networks in the United States and Canada relative to the dispersal distance for black rockfish (Sebastes melanops)

    PubMed Central

    Lotterhos, Katie E; Dick, Stefan J; Haggarty, Dana R

    2014-01-01

    Marine reserves networks are implemented as a way to mitigate the impact of fishing on marine ecosystems. Theory suggests that a reserve network will function synergistically when connected by dispersal, but the scale of dispersal is often unknown. On the Pacific coast of the United States and Canada, both countries have recently implemented a number of rockfish conservation areas (RCAs) to protect exploited rockfish species, but no study has evaluated the connectivity within networks in each country or between the two countries. We used isolation-by-distance theory to estimate the scale of dispersal from microsatellite data in the black rockfish, Sebastes melanops, and compared this estimate with the distance between RCAs that would protect this species. Within each country, we found that the distance between RCAs was generally within the confidence intervals of mean dispersal per generation. The distance between these two RCA networks, however, was greater than the average dispersal per generation. The data were also consistent with a genetic break between southern Oregon and central Oregon. We discuss whether additional nearshore RCAs in southern Oregon and Washington would help promote connectivity between RCA's for shallow-water rockfishes. PMID:24567745

  7. Improved carbon nanotubes dispersion through polar dispersant agents in polyamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morici, Elisabetta; Arrigo, Rossella; Teresi, Rosalia; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova

    2016-05-01

    The potential enhancement of the nanocomposite properties, with respect to the neat matrix, is strictly related to uniform distribution and dispersion of the nanofillers in the host polymer. In this work, two dispersant agents, particularly a polar wax and a silanol polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes POSS, have been used in order to improve the dispersion of bare and functionalized carbon nanotubes in polyamide matrix. To ensure a good compatibility between matrix and nanofillers, the dispersing agents having specific polarity have been chosen, in order to match that of the matrix. Significant alterations of the mechanical and rheological behaviour due to dispersion action of used additives have been noticed and discussed, also considering the obtained morphology.

  8. Relative neutronic performance of proposed high-density dispersion fuels in water-moderated and D{sub 2}O-reflected research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bretscher, M.M.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1996-12-01

    This paper provides an overview of the neutronic performance of an idealized research reactor using several high density LEU fuels that are being developed by the RERTR program. High-density LEU dispersion fuels are needed for new and existing high-performance research reactors and to extend the lifetime of fuel elements in other research reactors. This paper discusses the anticipated neutronic behavior of proposed advanced fuels containing dispersions of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, UN, U{sub 2}Mo and several uranium alloys with Mo, or Zr and Nb. These advanced fuels are ranked based on the results of equilibrium depletion calculations for a simplified reactor model having a small H{sub 2}O-cooled core and a D{sub 2}O reflector. Plans have been developed to fabricate and irradiate several uranium alloy dispersion fuels in order to test their stability and compatibility with the matrix material and to establish practical loading limits.

  9. Dispersion Analysis Research Tool

    1998-11-10

    The DART thermomechanical model, for the prediction of fission-product-induced swelling in aluminum dispersion fuels, calculates irradiation-induced fission gas bubbles as a function of fuel morphology. DART calculates the behavior of a rod, tube, or plate during closure of as-fabricated porosity, during which the fuel particle swelling is accommodated by the relatively soft aluminum matrix flowing into the existing porosity. The code also determines the subsequent macroscopic changes in rod diameter or plate/tube thickness caused bymore » additional fuel deformation processes. In addition, a calculation for the effect of irradiation on the thermal conductivity of the dispersion fuel, and for fuel restructuring and swelling due to the aluminum fuel reaction, amorphization, and recrystallization is included.« less

  10. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-06-08

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  11. Safety evaluation report related to the evaluation of low-enriched uranium silicide-aluminum dispersion fuel for use in non-power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Low-enriched uranium silicide-aluminum dispersion plate-type fuels have been extensively researched and developed under the international program, Reduced Enrichment in Research and Test Reactors. The international effort was led by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in the United States. This evaluation is based primarily on reports issued by ANL that discuss and summarize the developmental tests and experiments, including postirradiation examinations, of both miniature and full-sized plates of prototypical fuel compositions. This evaluation concludes that plate-type fuels suitable and acceptable for use in research and test reactors can be fabricated with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al dispersion compacts with uranium densities up to 4.8 g/cm/sup 3/. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Theoretical Analysis of the Relative Significance of Thermodynamic and Kinetic Dispersion in the dc and ac Voltammetry of Surface-Confined Molecules.

    PubMed

    Morris, Graham P; Baker, Ruth E; Gillow, Kathryn; Davis, Jason J; Gavaghan, David J; Bond, Alan M

    2015-05-01

    Commonly, significant discrepancies are reported in theoretical and experimental comparisons of dc voltammograms derived from a monolayer or close to monolayer coverage of redox-active surface-confined molecules. For example, broader-than-predicted voltammetric wave shapes are attributed to the thermodynamic or kinetic dispersion derived from distributions in reversible potentials (E(0)) and electrode kinetics (k(0)), respectively. The recent availability of experimentally estimated distributions of E(0) and k(0) values derived from the analysis of data for small numbers of surface-confined modified azurin metalloprotein molecules now allows more realistic modeling to be undertaken, assuming the same distributions apply under conditions of high surface coverage relevant to voltammetric experiments. In this work, modeling based on conventional and stochastic kinetic theory is considered, and the computationally far more efficient conventional model is shown to be equivalent to the stochastic one when large numbers of molecules are present. Perhaps unexpectedly, when experimentally determined distributions of E(0) and k(0) are input into the model, thermodynamic dispersion is found to be unimportant and only kinetic dispersion contributes significantly to the broadening of dc voltammograms. Simulations of ac voltammetric experiments lead to the conclusion that the ac method, particularly when the analysis of kinetically very sensitive higher-order harmonics is undertaken, are far more sensitive to kinetic dispersion than the dc method. ac methods are therefore concluded to provide a potentially superior strategy for addressing the inverse problem of determining the k(0) distribution that could give rise to the apparent anomalies in surface-confined voltammetry. PMID:25853230

  13. Light dispersion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, L. C.

    2015-09-01

    Considering an idea of F. Arago in 1853 regarding light dispersion through the light ether in the interstellar space, this paper presents a new idea on an alternative interpretation of the cosmological red shift of the galaxies in the universe. The model is based on an analogy with the temporal material dispersion that occurs with light in the optical fiber core. Since intergalactic space is transparent, according to the model, this phenomenon is related to the gravitational potential existing in the whole space. Thus, it is possible to find a new interpretation to Hubble's constant. In space, light undergoes a dispersion process in its path, which is interpreted by a red shift equation of the type Δz = HL, since H = (d2n/dλ2 Δv Δλ), where H means the Hubble constant, n is the refractive index of the intergalactic space, Δλ is the spectral width of the extragalactic source, and Δv is the variation of the speed of light caused by the gravitational potential. We observe that this "constant" is governed by three new parameters. Light traveling the intergalactic space undergoes red shift due to this mechanism, while light amplitude decreases with time, and the wavelength always increases, thus producing the same type of behavior given by Hubble's Law. It can be demonstrated that the dark matter phenomenon is produced by the apparent speed of light of the stars on the periphery of the galaxies, without the existence of dark energy. Based on this new idea, the model of the universe is static, lacking expansion. Other phenomena may be interpreted based on this new model of the universe. We have what we call temporal gravitational dispersion of light in space produced by the variations of the speed of light, due to the presence of the gravitational potential in the whole space.

  14. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, Albertinka J

    2015-11-15

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and transport of the oil. We aim to identify how natural, chemical and mechanical dispersion could be quantified in oil spill models. For each step in the dispersion process, we review available experimental data in order to identify overall trends and propose an algorithm or calculation method. Additionally, the conditions for successful mechanical and chemical dispersion are defined. Two commonly identified key parameters in surface oil dispersion are: oil properties (viscosity and presence of dispersants) and mixing energy (often wind speed). Strikingly, these parameters play a different role in several of the dispersion sub-processes. This may explain difficulties in simply relating overall dispersion effectiveness to the individual parameters. PMID:26412415

  15. Discontinuous Galerkin particle-in-cell simulation of longitudinal plasma wave damping and comparison to the Landau approximation and the exact solution of the dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, F. R.; Bell, T. F.; Spasojevic, M.; Inan, U. S.

    2011-06-15

    We present results showing the measured Landau damping rate using a high-order discontinuous Galerkin particle-in-cell (DG-PIC) [G. B. Jacobs and J. S. Hesthaven, J. Comput. Phys. 214, 96 (2006)] method. We show that typical damping rates measured in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations can differ significantly from the linearized Landau damping coefficient and propose a simple numerical method to solve the plasma dispersion function exactly for moderate to high damping rates. Simulation results show a high degree of agreement between the high-order PIC results and this calculated theoretical damping rate.

  16. The anomalous memory effect related to the relaxation of surface and core moments observed in well-dispersed CoFe2O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Ma, Y. Q.; Xu, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Well-dispersed uniform cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition of a metal-organic salt in organic solvent with a high boiling point, and characterized by XRD, TEM and detailed magnetic measurements. The moments of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles consist of the core and canted surface moments below 200 K, and the exchange-coupling between the surface and core spins enhanced the remanence (Mr) to saturation (Ms) magnetization ratio (Mr/Ms) at the temperature of 10 K. Interestingly, the anomalous memory effect was observed in a broad temperature range which can be attributed to the relaxation of surface spins below 200 K and the one from the moments of magnetically ordered entity larger than one particle above 200 K.

  17. Dispersion in alluvial convergent estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhilin; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2016-04-01

    The Van der Burgh's equation for longitudinal effective dispersion is a purely empirical method with practical implications. Its application to the effective tidal average dispersion under equilibrium conditions appears to have excellent performance in a wide range of alluvial estuaries. In this research, we try to find out the physical meaning of Van der Burgh's coefficient. Researchers like MacCready, Fischer, Kuijper, Hansen and Rattray have tried to split up dispersion into its constituents which did not do much to explain overall behaviour. In addition, traditional literature on dispersion is mostly related to flumes with constant cross-section. This research is about understanding the Van der Burgh's coefficient facing the fact that natural estuaries have exponentially varying cross-section. The objective is to derive a simple 1-D model considering both longitudinal and lateral mixing processes based on field observations (theoretical derivation). To that effect, we connect dispersion with salinity using the salt balance equation. Then we calculate the salinity along the longitudinal direction and compare it to the observed salinity. Calibrated dispersion coefficients in a range of estuaries are then compared with new expressions for the Van der Burgh's coefficient K and it is analysed if K varies from estuary to estuary. The set of reliable data used will be from estuaries: Kurau, Perak, Bernam, Selangor, Muar, Endau, Maputo, Thames, Corantijn, Sinnamary, Mae Klong, Lalang, Limpopo, Tha Chin, Chao Phraya, Edisto and Elbe.

  18. The relation between pre-eruptive bubble size distribution, ash particle morphology, and their internal density: Implications to volcanic ash transport and dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proussevitch, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Parameterization of volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models strongly depends on particle morphology and their internal properties. Shape of ash particles affects terminal fall velocities (TFV) and, mostly, dispersion. Internal density combined with particle size has a very strong impact on TFV and ultimately on the rate of ash cloud thinning and particle sedimentation on the ground. Unlike other parameters, internal particle density cannot be measured directly because of the micron scale sizes of fine ash particles, but we demonstrate that it varies greatly depending on the particle size. Small simple type ash particles (fragments of bubble walls, 5-20 micron size) do not contain whole large magmatic bubbles inside and their internal density is almost the same as that of volcanic glass matrix. On the other side, the larger compound type ash particles (>40 microns for silicic fine ashes) always contain some bubbles or the whole spectra of bubble size distribution (BSD), i.e. bubbles of all sizes, bringing their internal density down as compared to simple ash. So, density of the larger ash particles is a function of the void fraction inside them (magmatic bubbles) which, in turn, is controlled by BSD. Volcanic ash is a product of the fragmentation of magmatic foam formed by pre-eruptive bubble population and characterized by BSD. The latter can now be measured from bubble imprints on ash particle surfaces using stereo-scanning electron microscopy (SSEM) and BubbleMaker software developed at UNH, or using traditional high-resolution X-Ray tomography. In this work we present the mathematical and statistical formulation for this problem connecting internal ash density with particle size and BSD, and demonstrate how the TFV of the ash population is affected by variation of particle density.

  19. Dispersion y dinamica poblacional

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal behavior of fruit flies is appetitive. Measures of dispersion involve two different parameter: the maximum distance and the standard distance. Standard distance is a parameter that describes the probalility of dispersion and is mathematically equivalent to the standard deviation around ...

  20. The role of relativity and dispersion controlled inter-chain interaction on the band gap of thiophene, selenophene, and tellurophene oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyaya, Mausumi; Sen, Sabyasachi; Alam, Md. Mehboob; Chakrabarti, Swapan

    2012-03-01

    Ab initio relativistic density functional theoretical calculations have been carried out on π-conjugated oligomers of increasing length with S, Se, and Te as heteroatoms. The band gap of the corresponding polymers has been obtained by plotting lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO)-highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)gap against the reciprocal of the number of monomer units (1/N) and extrapolating the curve to 1/N = 0. With B3LYP functional, we predict that role of relativistic correction terms is not very significant in the determination of final band gap of thiophene, selenophene, and tellurophene polymer. The origin of this observation is provided through the density of states (DOS) analysis which manifests that DOS contribution across the Fermi level of these polymers is mostly governed by C atoms and as a consequence relativistic correction terms due to heavy heteroatom remain insignificant to the band gap modification. We also inspected the role of inter-chain interaction in determining the net LUMO-HOMO gap of π-stacked double chain oligomers of increasing length. We have found that due to the exciton splitting in the stacked configurations, the LUMO-HOMO gap decreases steadily. Furthermore, we have noticed that dispersion force has important role in the reduction of the LUMO-HOMO gap of the oligomers studied.

  1. Stress dependent dispersion relations of acoustic waves travelling on a chain of point masses connected by anharmonic linear and torsional springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluta, Mieczysław; Amjad, Umar; Klinghammer, Hermann; Jha, Diwaker; Tarar, Khurram; Grill, Wolfgang

    2012-05-01

    The propagation of a deformation along a flexural beam or plate depends on material properties, geometrical conditions like the beam cross-section, effects of stiffening or softening due to external stress, and last but not least the mode of the wave including its polarization. The time-of-flight (TOF) of acoustic waves is influenced by any of the above listed parameters. This effect is utilized in ultrasonic NDE and structural health monitoring applications. It was shown in earlier publications that the solutions of wave equations for a linear chain model consisting of identical mass points, subject to a direction and distance dependent potential, show the dispersion properties and dependencies on externally applied stress of the lowest longitudinal and transversal plate modes. In the model presented here anharmonic potentials are introduced. The potentials are represented by torsional springs at each mass point and linear springs between them. Dynamic equations are derived, based on interactions with next and second next neighbors. The results obtained with the developed model are compared with experimental observations concerning the reaction of the TOF for the lowest Lamb modes in an aluminum plate under variable in plane stress. The developed models are capable to demonstrate general aspects of the mode and frequency dependence of the acousto-elastic coefficients for the lowest symmetric and antisymmetric Lamb waves. The introduced anharmonicities allow furthermore for a close approximation of the experimental findings.

  2. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  3. Bioaerosol Dispersion in Relation with Wastewater Reuse for Crop Irrigation. (Experiments to understand emission processes with enteric virus and risks modeling).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courault, D.; Girardin, G.; Capowiez, L.; Albert, I.; Krawczyk, C.; Ball, C.; Salemkour, A.; Bon, F.; Perelle, S.; Fraisse, A.; Renault, P.; Amato, P.

    2014-12-01

    Bio-aerosols consist of microorganisms or biological particles that become airborne depending on various environmental factors. Recycling of wastewater (WW) for irrigation can cope with the issues of water availability, and it can also threaten Human health if the pathogens present in WW are aerosolized during sprinkling irrigation or wind events. Among the variety of micro-organisms found in WW, enteric viruses can reach significant amounts, because most of the WW treatments are not completely efficient. These viruses are particularly resistant in the environment and responsibles of numerous digestive diseases (gastroenteritis, hepatitis…). Few quantities are enough to make people sick (102 pfu). Several knowledge gaps exist to better estimate the risks for Human exposure, and on the virus transfer from irrigation up to the respiratory track. A research program funded by the French government (INSU), gathering multi disciplinary teams aims at better understanding virus fate in air and health risks from WW reuse. Experiments were conducted under controlled conditions in order to prioritize the main factors impacting virus aerosolization. Irrigation with water loaded with safe surrogates of Hepatitis A virus (Murine Mengo Virus) was applied on small plots covered by channels in which the wind speed varied. Various situations have been investigated (wet/dry surfaces, strong/mild winds, clean/waste water). Air samples were collected above plots using impingers and filters after irrigation for several days. Viruses were quantified by RT-qPCR. The results showed that impingers were more efficient in airborne virus recovering than filters. Among environmental factors, Wind speed was the main factor explaining virus concentration in the air after irrigation. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment approach has been chosen to assess the health effects on the population. The main modeling steps will be presented, including a simplified dispersion model coupled with a

  4. Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

    1989-12-01

    The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Magnetic particle dispersion in polymer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Kwang Seoung

    Magnetic particle dispersions were prepared in order to observe the effect of particle surface properties, concentration and functional group of binder, milling time, and solvent on dispersion properties. Rheology and transverse susceptibility measurements were used to characterize the dispersion quality of the magnetic paints macroscopically and microscopically, respectively. In this study, by applying the acid-base concept, methods to optimize magnetic dispersions were established. Initially, interaction between acid-base sites on particles and binder was investigated by poisoning the sites with chemicals, then quantifying each type of adsorption (hydrogen and chemical adsorption) using thermogravimetric analysis. With this fundamental information, effects of typical dispersion parameters were investigated. The acid base interaction between binder solution and particles was related to the magnetic and rheological properties of magnetic inks. The results have significant implications for high density particulate media where dispersion will become increasingly important.

  6. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and its Relation to Carbon Cycle Perturbations During Ocean Anoxic Event 1d: A High Resolution Record From Dispersed Plant Cuticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, J. D.; Upchurch, G. R.; Joeckel, R.; Smith, J. J.; Ludvigson, G. A.; Lomax, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    Past geological greenhouse intervals are associated with Ocean Anoxic Events (OAEs), which result from an increase in marine primary productivity and/or an increase in the preservation of organic matter. The end point is widespread black shale deposition combined with a long-term atmospheric positive δ13C excursion and an increase in the burial of 12C. Some OAEs show a negative δ13C excursion preceding the positive excursion, indicating a perturbation in the global carbon cycle prior to the initiation of these events. The Rose Creek (RCP) locality, southeastern Nebraska, is the only known terrestrial section that preserves OAE1d (Cretaceous, Albian-Cenomanian Boundary) and has abundant charcoal and plant cuticle. These features allow for a combined carbon isotope and stomatal index (SI) analysis to determine both changes in the cycling between carbon pools (C isotope analysis) and changes in paleo-CO2 via changes in SI. Preliminary (and ongoing) SI data analysis using dispersed cuticle of Pandemophyllum kvacekii (an extinct Laurel) collected at 30 cm intervals indicate changes in SI consistent with changes in CO2. Fitting our samples to a published RCP δ13C profile, pre-excursion CO2 concentrations are high. CO2 decreases to lower concentrations in the basal 1.2 m of the RCP section, where δ13Cbulk shows a negative excursion and δ13Ccharcoal remains at pre-excursion values. CO2 concentrations become higher toward the top of the negative δ13C excursion, where δ13Cbulk and δ13Ccharcoal are at their most negative values, and drop as the negative carbon excursion terminates. Using published transfer functions, we estimate that pre-excursion CO2 concentrations were a maximum of 900 ppm. In the basal 1.2 m of RCP, CO2 drops to a maximum of 480 ppm, and rises to a maximum of 710 ppm near the top of the negative excursion. As δ13C values rise towards pre-excursion values, CO2 declines to a maximum of 400 ppm. The trend in SI is comparable to the trend in δ13

  7. Is dispersal neutral?

    PubMed

    Lowe, Winsor H; McPeek, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    Dispersal is difficult to quantify and often treated as purely stochastic and extrinsically controlled. Consequently, there remains uncertainty about how individual traits mediate dispersal and its ecological effects. Addressing this uncertainty is crucial for distinguishing neutral versus non-neutral drivers of community assembly. Neutral theory assumes that dispersal is stochastic and equivalent among species. This assumption can be rejected on principle, but common research approaches tacitly support the 'neutral dispersal' assumption. Theory and empirical evidence that dispersal traits are under selection should be broadly integrated in community-level research, stimulating greater scrutiny of this assumption. A tighter empirical connection between the ecological and evolutionary forces that shape dispersal will enable richer understanding of this fundamental process and its role in community assembly. PMID:24962790

  8. USE OF CHEMICAL DISPERSANTS FOR MARINE OIL SPILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical dispersants are one of the tools available to oil spill response personnel to control the spread of an oil slick. The manual presents information from the literature relative to dispersant effectiveness, toxicity and other environmental factors, regulatory and administra...

  9. USE OF CHEMICAL DISPERSANTS FOR MARINE OIL SPILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical dispersants are one of the tools available to oil spill response personnel to control the spread of an oil slick. his manual presents information from the literature relative to dispersant effectiveness, toxicity and other environmental factors, regulatory and administra...

  10. Justification for change in AXAIR dispersion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    1994-02-01

    AXAIR is the primary dose assessment code used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to predict doses following hypothetical releases of relatively short durations. The atmospheric dispersion coefficients currently used in AXAIR are analytical expressions developed to fit the curves in the Turner Workbook as referred to in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.145. This report explores the ramifications and benefits of changing the dispersion coefficients to a combination of Pasquill`s lateral dispersion coefficients and Briggs` vertical dispersion coefficients. The differences in the dispersion coefficients have a minor effect on the relative air concentrations for stability classes A--D, but a significant difference is seen for classes E, F, and G.

  11. Comparative Toxicity of Eight Oil Dispersants, Louisiana Sweet Crude Oil (LSC) and Chemically Dispersed LSC to Two Aquatic Test Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study describes the acute toxicity of eight commercial oil dispersants, Louisiana sweet crude oil (LSC), and chemically dispersed LSC. The approach utilized consistent test methodologies within a single laboratory in assessing the relative acute toxicity of the eight dispers...

  12. An investigation into pellet dispersion ballistics.

    PubMed

    Nag, N K; Sinha, P

    1992-08-01

    Existing works on pellet dispersion ballistics are confined to some data-based models derived from statistical analysis of observed patterns on targets but the underlying process causing the dispersion lacks due attention. The present article delves into the relatively unexplored areas of dispersion phenomena, and attempts to develop a theoretical model for general application. The radial velocity distribution of pellets has been worked out by probing into the physical process of dispersion based on transfer of momentum from undispersed shot mass to dispersed pellets. The ratio 2u/v0 (u = root mean square (r.m.s.) radial velocity and v0 = muzzle velocity of the pellets) is found to be fairly constant for a fixed gun-ammunition combination and has been suitably designated as 'Dispersion Index' (DI) characterising its dispersion capability. The present model adequately accounts for pellet distribution on targets and it appears that 'Effective Shot Dispersion' (ESD) as introduced by Mattoo and Nabar [ESD = [(4/N0)sigma Ri2]1/2, where N(0) is the total number of pellets and Ri is the radial distance of the i-th pellet from centre of pattern], gives a faithful numerical measure of overall dispersion at a given distance. A relationship between ESD and firing distance, incorporating the effects of air resistance and gravity has been worked out, which reveals that DI controls the dispersion at a given distance. For small distances (less than 20 m) the relation reduces to a linear one, as already observed empirically and looks like ESD = E0+DI x firing distance, E0 being a parameter dependent on gun and ammunition. The present model, unlike earlier ones, is versatile enough to explain the natures of the dependence of dispersion on firing distance as well as on gun-ammunition parameters, which are essential for a faithful reconstruction of a crime scene. The model has been tested with such experimental data as are available and reasonable agreement is observed. PMID:1398370

  13. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  14. Dispersal of forest insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  15. A Column Dispersion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corapcioglu, M. Y.; Koroglu, F.

    1982-01-01

    Crushed glass and a Rhodamine B solution are used in a one-dimensional optically scanned column experiment to study the dispersion phenomenon in porous media. Results indicate that the described model gave satisfactory results and that the dispersion process in this experiment is basically convective. (DC)

  16. Dispersion and space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, Marco; Kishek, Rami A.; Reiser, Martin

    1998-11-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed in [1]. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring.

  17. The trajectory of dispersal research in conservation biology. Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Don A; Banks, Sam C; Barton, Philip S; Ikin, Karen; Lentini, Pia; Lindenmayer, David B; Smith, Annabel L; Berry, Laurence E; Burns, Emma L; Edworthy, Amanda; Evans, Maldwyn J; Gibson, Rebecca; Heinsohn, Rob; Howland, Brett; Kay, Geoff; Munro, Nicola; Scheele, Ben C; Stirnemann, Ingrid; Stojanovic, Dejan; Sweaney, Nici; Villaseñor, Nélida R; Westgate, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Dispersal knowledge is essential for conservation management, and demand is growing. But are we accumulating dispersal knowledge at a pace that can meet the demand? To answer this question we tested for changes in dispersal data collection and use over time. Our systematic review of 655 conservation-related publications compared five topics: climate change, habitat restoration, population viability analysis, land planning (systematic conservation planning) and invasive species. We analysed temporal changes in the: (i) questions asked by dispersal-related research; (ii) methods used to study dispersal; (iii) the quality of dispersal data; (iv) extent that dispersal knowledge is lacking, and; (v) likely consequences of limited dispersal knowledge. Research questions have changed little over time; the same problems examined in the 1990s are still being addressed. The most common methods used to study dispersal were occupancy data, expert opinion and modelling, which often provided indirect, low quality information about dispersal. Although use of genetics for estimating dispersal has increased, new ecological and genetic methods for measuring dispersal are not yet widely adopted. Almost half of the papers identified knowledge gaps related to dispersal. Limited dispersal knowledge often made it impossible to discover ecological processes or compromised conservation outcomes. The quality of dispersal data used in climate change research has increased since the 1990s. In comparison, restoration ecology inadequately addresses large-scale process, whilst the gap between knowledge accumulation and growth in applications may be increasing in land planning. To overcome apparent stagnation in collection and use of dispersal knowledge, researchers need to: (i) improve the quality of available data using new approaches; (ii) understand the complementarities of different methods and; (iii) define the value of different kinds of dispersal information for supporting management

  18. The Trajectory of Dispersal Research in Conservation Biology. Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Don A.; Banks, Sam C.; Barton, Philip S.; Ikin, Karen; Lentini, Pia; Lindenmayer, David B.; Smith, Annabel L.; Berry, Laurence E.; Burns, Emma L.; Edworthy, Amanda; Evans, Maldwyn J.; Gibson, Rebecca; Heinsohn, Rob; Howland, Brett; Kay, Geoff; Munro, Nicola; Scheele, Ben C.; Stirnemann, Ingrid; Stojanovic, Dejan; Sweaney, Nici; Villaseñor, Nélida R.; Westgate, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Dispersal knowledge is essential for conservation management, and demand is growing. But are we accumulating dispersal knowledge at a pace that can meet the demand? To answer this question we tested for changes in dispersal data collection and use over time. Our systematic review of 655 conservation-related publications compared five topics: climate change, habitat restoration, population viability analysis, land planning (systematic conservation planning) and invasive species. We analysed temporal changes in the: (i) questions asked by dispersal-related research; (ii) methods used to study dispersal; (iii) the quality of dispersal data; (iv) extent that dispersal knowledge is lacking, and; (v) likely consequences of limited dispersal knowledge. Research questions have changed little over time; the same problems examined in the 1990s are still being addressed. The most common methods used to study dispersal were occupancy data, expert opinion and modelling, which often provided indirect, low quality information about dispersal. Although use of genetics for estimating dispersal has increased, new ecological and genetic methods for measuring dispersal are not yet widely adopted. Almost half of the papers identified knowledge gaps related to dispersal. Limited dispersal knowledge often made it impossible to discover ecological processes or compromised conservation outcomes. The quality of dispersal data used in climate change research has increased since the 1990s. In comparison, restoration ecology inadequately addresses large-scale process, whilst the gap between knowledge accumulation and growth in applications may be increasing in land planning. To overcome apparent stagnation in collection and use of dispersal knowledge, researchers need to: (i) improve the quality of available data using new approaches; (ii) understand the complementarities of different methods and; (iii) define the value of different kinds of dispersal information for supporting management

  19. Tachyonic dispersion in coherent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. D.; Rechtsman, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a technique to realize a tachyonic band structure in a coherent network, such as an array of coupled ring resonators. This is achieved by adding ‘PT symmetric’ spatially balanced gain and loss to each node of the network. In a square-lattice network, the quasi-energy bandstructure exhibits a tachyonic dispersion relation, centered at either the center or corner of the Brillouin zone. There is one tachyonic hyperboloid in each gap, unlike in PT-symmetric tight-binding honeycomb lattices where the hyperboloids occur in pairs. The dispersion relation can be probed by measuring the peaks in transmission across a finite network as the gain/loss parameter is varied.

  20. Magnetic effects in anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Blume, M.

    1992-12-31

    Spectacular enhancements of magnetic x-ray scattering have been predicted and observed experimentally. These effects are the result of resonant phenomena closely related to anomalous dispersion, and they are strongest at near-edge resonances. The theory of these resonances will be developed with particular attention to the symmetry properties of the scatterer. While the phenomena to be discussed concern magnetic properties the transitions are electric dipole or electric quadrupole in character and represent a subset of the usual anomalous dispersion phenomena. The polarization dependence of the scattering is also considered, and the polarization dependence for magnetic effects is related to that for charge scattering and to Templeton type anisotropic polarization phenomena. It has been found that the strongest effects occur in rare-earths and in actinides for M shell edges. In addition to the scattering properties the theory is applicable to ``forward scattering`` properties such as the Faraday effect and circular dichroism.

  1. Molecular mobility in glassy dispersions.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Mehak; McKenna, Gregory B; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-28

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to characterize the structural relaxation in pharmaceutical dispersions containing nifedipine (NIF) and either poly(vinyl) pyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). The shape of the dielectric response (permittivity versus log time) curve was observed to be independent of temperature. Thus, for the pure NIF as well as the dispersions, the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle was established. Furthermore, though the shape of the full dielectric response varied with polymer concentration, the regime related to the α- or structural relaxation was found to superimpose for the dispersions, though not with the response of the NIF itself. Hence, there is a limited time-temperature-concentration superposition for these systems as well. Therefore, in this polymer concentration range, calculation of long relaxation times in these glass-forming systems becomes possible. We found that strong drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions improved the physical stability (i.e., delayed crystallization) by reducing the molecular mobility. The strength of hydrogen bonding, structural relaxation time, and crystallization followed the order: NIF-PV P>NIF-HPMCAS>NIF. With an increase in polymer concentration, the relaxation times were longer indicating a decrease in molecular mobility. The temperature dependence of relaxation time, in other words fragility, was independent of polymer concentration. This is the first application of the superposition principle to characterize structural relaxation in glassy pharmaceutical dispersions. PMID:27250315

  2. Molecular mobility in glassy dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Mehak; McKenna, Gregory B.; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to characterize the structural relaxation in pharmaceutical dispersions containing nifedipine (NIF) and either poly(vinyl) pyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). The shape of the dielectric response (permittivity versus log time) curve was observed to be independent of temperature. Thus, for the pure NIF as well as the dispersions, the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle was established. Furthermore, though the shape of the full dielectric response varied with polymer concentration, the regime related to the α- or structural relaxation was found to superimpose for the dispersions, though not with the response of the NIF itself. Hence, there is a limited time-temperature-concentration superposition for these systems as well. Therefore, in this polymer concentration range, calculation of long relaxation times in these glass-forming systems becomes possible. We found that strong drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions improved the physical stability (i.e., delayed crystallization) by reducing the molecular mobility. The strength of hydrogen bonding, structural relaxation time, and crystallization followed the order: NIF-PV P>NIF-HPMCAS>NIF. With an increase in polymer concentration, the relaxation times were longer indicating a decrease in molecular mobility. The temperature dependence of relaxation time, in other words fragility, was independent of polymer concentration. This is the first application of the superposition principle to characterize structural relaxation in glassy pharmaceutical dispersions.

  3. Surface dispersion in the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala Sansón, L.

    2015-09-01

    Surface dispersion is measured in the Gulf of California by means of Argos drifters released along this semi-enclosed, elongated basin. First, basic one-particle statistics (Lagrangian scales, absolute dispersion and diffusion coefficients) are estimated along and across the Gulf. Absolute dispersion shows a nearly ballistic regime during the Lagrangian time scale (<2 days) in both directions (it grows as ∼t2, where t is time). During the subsequent 30 days, absolute dispersion enters a random-walk regime (∼t) along the Gulf, while being saturated across the basin due to the lateral boundaries. Secondly, the analysis is extended to two-particle statistics (relative dispersion between pairs of drifters and Finite Scale Lyapunov Exponents, FSLE). Relative dispersion is nearly exponential in both directions during the first few days, though evidence is not conclusive. During the subsequent 30 days, it grows as ∼t1.5 along the Gulf, while being saturated across the basin again. It is shown that relative dispersion along the Gulf is proportional to t̂3 , where t ̂ represents a shifted time that depends on the initial separation of the particles. This form of the Richardson regime is consistently measured for particles that are sufficiently separated (30 km or more). The Richardson regime is verified with the FSLE for particle separations ranging from 30 to 140 km, approximately. The obtained dispersion properties are discussed in terms of the main circulation features within the basin, such as mesoscale vortices that occupy the width of the Gulf. These structures might retain buoys during days or weeks, thus preventing or delaying further displacements and therefore affecting the particle dispersion. The vortices are also an important mechanism to translate particles across the Gulf, between the Peninsula and the continent, thus promoting the saturation of dispersion along this direction.

  4. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  5. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-22

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  6. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  7. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  8. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  9. Ultrasound Propagation in Colloidal Dispersions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Nigel E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis describes apparatus and techniques for making ultrasonic measurements in fluids and applications of them to measurements of ultrasonic parameters in colloidal dispersions. A brief description of the properties and uses of ultrasound propagation in dispersions is followed by an extensive review of theories which relate the particulate properties of the dispersions to the measurable ultrasonic parameters, velocity (c) and attenuation (alpha ). Measurement principles are outlined related to the design of near-field measurement methods and the development of three techniques is described. These are shown to give results which are both highly self-consistent and in excellent agreement with a far-field method. Measurements of alpha and c for model dispersions of glass spheres in Newtonian liquids are shown to be in good agreement with the relevant theory when particle polydispersity is taken into account. For structured fluids as the continuous phase, the alpha and c data for suspensions of spheres are used to obtain the continuous phase viscosity ( eta). The alpha data agree approximately with the macroscopic viscosity, but the velocity data requires the introduction of a shear elastic term and the revision of theory in order to obtain agreement. Attenuation as a function of barite concentration in Newtonian liquids was investigated and the ultrasonic particle radius was found to be systematically larger than expected. This is attributed to particle rugosity. Measurements of alpha and c using non-gelling aqueous kaolinite suspensions are shown to agree well with theory when the eccentricity and the interactions of particles are taken into account. For gelling aqueous bentonite suspensions, alpha and c were found to be time-dependent over a period of several days following initial dispersion. The observed increases in both alpha and c are interpreted in terms of a growth in gel fraction and shear

  10. Dispersal kernel estimation: A comparison of empirical and modelled particle dispersion in a coastal marine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrycik, Janelle M.; Chassé, Joël; Ruddick, Barry R.; Taggart, Christopher T.

    2013-11-01

    Early life-stage dispersal influences recruitment and is of significance in explaining the distribution and connectivity of marine species. Motivations for quantifying dispersal range from biodiversity conservation to the design of marine reserves and the mitigation of species invasions. Here we compare estimates of real particle dispersion in a coastal marine environment with similar estimates provided by hydrodynamic modelling. We do so by using a system of magnetically attractive particles (MAPs) and a magnetic-collector array that provides measures of Lagrangian dispersion based on the time-integration of MAPs dispersing through the array. MAPs released as a point source in a coastal marine location dispersed through the collector array over a 5-7 d period. A virtual release and observed (real-time) environmental conditions were used in a high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to estimate the dispersal of virtual particles (VPs). The number of MAPs captured throughout the collector array and the number of VPs that passed through each corresponding model location were enumerated and compared. Although VP dispersal reflected several aspects of the observed MAP dispersal, the comparisons demonstrated model sensitivity to the small-scale (random-walk) particle diffusivity parameter (Kp). The one-dimensional dispersal kernel for the MAPs had an e-folding scale estimate in the range of 5.19-11.44 km, while those from the model simulations were comparable at 1.89-6.52 km, and also demonstrated sensitivity to Kp. Variations among comparisons are related to the value of Kp used in modelling and are postulated to be related to MAP losses from the water column and (or) shear dispersion acting on the MAPs; a process that is constrained in the model. Our demonstration indicates a promising new way of 1) quantitatively and empirically estimating the dispersal kernel in aquatic systems, and 2) quantitatively assessing and (or) improving regional hydrodynamic

  11. Temporal dispersion of a spectrometera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, A.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Pollock, B. B.

    2008-10-01

    The temporal dispersion of an optical spectrometer has been characterized for a variety of conditions related to optical diagnostics to be fielded at the National Ignition Facility (e.g., full-aperture backscatter station, Thomson scattering). Significant time smear is introduced into these systems by the path length difference through the spectrometer. The temporal resolution is shown to depend only on the order of the grating, wavelength, and the number of grooves illuminated. To enhance the temporal resolution, the spectral gratings can be masked limiting the number of grooves illuminated. Experiments have been conducted to verify these calculations. The size and shape of masks are investigated and correlated with the exact shape of the temporal instrument function, which is required when interpreting temporally resolved data. The experiments used a 300 fs laser pulse and a picosecond optical streak camera to determine the temporal dispersion. This was done for multiple spectral orders, gratings, and optical masks.

  12. Temporal dispersion of a spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Visco, A; Drake, R P; Froula, D H; Glenzer, S H; Pollock, B B

    2008-10-01

    The temporal dispersion of an optical spectrometer has been characterized for a variety of conditions related to optical diagnostics to be fielded at the National Ignition Facility (e.g., full-aperture backscatter station, Thomson scattering). Significant time smear is introduced into these systems by the path length difference through the spectrometer. The temporal resolution is shown to depend only on the order of the grating, wavelength, and the number of grooves illuminated. To enhance the temporal resolution, the spectral gratings can be masked limiting the number of grooves illuminated. Experiments have been conducted to verify these calculations. The size and shape of masks are investigated and correlated with the exact shape of the temporal instrument function, which is required when interpreting temporally resolved data. The experiments used a 300 fs laser pulse and a picosecond optical streak camera to determine the temporal dispersion. This was done for multiple spectral orders, gratings, and optical masks. PMID:19044687

  13. Phonon dispersion in thalous halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    1984-07-01

    The phonon dispersion relations, phonon density of states, g( v), and Debye-characteristic temperature, θ D, of TlCl and TlBr have been studied. The theoretical model adopted for this purpose is a 9-parameter bond-bending force model (BBFM) which was recently developed and successfully applied to study the crystal dynamics of CsCl-structure crystals. The theoretical results compare well with the available measurements for phonon dispersion in the high symmetry directions. The discrepancy between calculated and experimental values of θ D, particularly at higher temperatures, is reasonably attributed to the predominating anharmonic effects. The values of the compressibilities (χ), calculated using the Brout sum rule, are in a reasonably good agreement with the existing observed values. A critical-point-phonon analysis has also been performed to interpret the observed infrared (IR) and Raman peaks.

  14. Estimating fitness consequences of dispersal: a road to 'know-where'? Non-random dispersal and the underestimation of dispersers' fitness.

    PubMed

    Doligez, Blandine; Pärt, Tomas

    2008-11-01

    1. Many studies investigating fitness correlates of dispersal in vertebrates report dispersers to have lower fitness than philopatric individuals. However, if dispersers are more likely to produce dispersing young or are more likely to disperse again in the next year(s) than philopatric individuals, there is a risk that fitness estimates based on local adult survival and local recruitment will be underestimated for dispersers. 2. We review the available empirical evidence on parent-offspring resemblance and individual lifelong consistency in dispersal behaviour, and relate these studies to recent studies of fitness correlates of dispersal in vertebrates. 3. Of the 12 studies testing directly for parent-offspring resemblance in dispersal propensity, five report a significant resemblance. The average effect size (r) of parent-offspring resemblance in dispersal was 0.15 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.07-0.22], with no difference between the sexes (average weighted effect size of 0.12 (0.08-0.16) and 0.16 (0.11-0.20) for females and males, respectively). Only three studies report data on within-individual consistency in dispersal propensity, of which two suggest dispersers to be more likely to disperse again. 4. To assess the magnitude of fitness underestimation expected for dispersing individuals depending on the heritability of dispersal distance and study area size, we used a simulation approach. Even when study area size is 10 times the mean dispersal distance, local recruitment per breeding event may be underestimated by 4-10%, generating a potential difference of 4-60% in average lifetime production of recruits between dispersing and philopatric individuals, with larger differences in long-lived species. 5. Estimates of both fitness correlates of dispersal and parent-offspring resemblance or within-individual consistency in dispersal behaviour have been reported for 11 species. Although some comparisons suggest genuine differences in fitness components between

  15. Plasma Dispersion Function for the Kappa Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podesta, John J.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma dispersion function is computed for a homogeneous isotropic plasma in which the particle velocities are distributed according to a Kappa distribution. An ordinary differential equation is derived for the plasma dispersion function and it is shown that the solution can be written in terms of Gauss' hypergeometric function. Using the extensive theory of the hypergeometric function, various mathematical properties of the plasma dispersion function are derived including symmetry relations, series expansions, integral representations, and closed form expressions for integer and half-integer values of K.

  16. Spontaneous dispersion of particles on liquid surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra; Joseph, Daniel D.; Gurupatham, Sathish K.; Dalal, Bhavin; Nudurupati, Sai

    2009-01-01

    When small particles (e.g., flour, pollen, etc.) come in contact with a liquid surface, they immediately disperse. The dispersion can occur so quickly that it appears explosive, especially for small particles on the surface of mobile liquids like water. This explosive dispersion is the consequence of capillary force pulling particles into the interface causing them to accelerate to a relatively large velocity. The maximum velocity increases with decreasing particle size; for nanometer-sized particles (e.g., viruses and proteins), the velocity on an air-water interface can be as large as ≈47 m/s. We also show that particles oscillate at a relatively high frequency about their floating equilibrium before coming to stop under viscous drag. The observed dispersion is a result of strong repulsive hydrodynamic forces that arise because of these oscillations. PMID:19906995

  17. Dispersive suspended microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Yu; Lu, Yue-Le; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Hui

    2011-11-14

    A novel sample pre-treatment technique termed dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) has been developed for the determination of eight organophosphorus pesticides (ethoprophos, malathion, chlorpyrifos, isocarbophos, methidathion, fenamiphos, profenofos, triazophos) in aqueous samples. In this method, both extraction and two phases' separation process were performed by the assistance of magnetic stirring. After separating the two phases, 1 μL of the suspended phase was injected into GC for further instrument analysis. Varieties of experiment factors which could affect the experiment results were optimized and the following were selected: 12.0 μL p-xylene was selected as extraction solvent, extraction speed was 1200 rpm, extraction time was 30 s, the restoration speed was 800 rpm, the restoration time was 8 min, and no salt was added. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detections (LODs) varied between 0.01 and 0.05 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSDs, n=6) ranged from 4.6% to 12.1%. The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 0.1-100.0 μg L(-1). Correlation coefficients (r) varied from 0.9964 to 0.9995. The enrichment factors (EFs) were between 206 and 243. In the final experiment, the developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in wine and tap water samples and the obtained recoveries were between 83.8% and 101.3%. Compared with other pre-treatment methods, DSME has its own features and could achieve satisfied results for the analysis of trace components in complicated matrices. PMID:22023861

  18. Life-history syndromes: integrating dispersal through space and time.

    PubMed

    Buoro, Mathieu; Carlson, Stephanie M

    2014-06-01

    Recent research has highlighted interdependencies between dispersal and other life-history traits, i.e. dispersal syndromes, thereby revealing constraints on the evolution of dispersal and opportunities for improved ability to predict dispersal by considering suites of dispersal-related traits. This review adds to the growing list of life-history traits linked to spatial dispersal by emphasising the interdependence between dispersal through space and time, i.e. life-history diversity that distributes individuals into separate reproductive events. We reviewed the literature that has simultaneously investigated spatial and temporal dispersal to examine the prediction that traits of these two dispersal strategies are negatively correlated. Our results suggest that negative covariation is widely anticipated from theory. Empirical studies often reported evidence of weak negative covariation, although more complicated patterns were also evident, including across levels of biological organisation. Existing literature has largely focused on plants with dormancy capability, one or two phases of the dispersal process (emigration and/or transfer) and a single level of biological organisation (theory: individual; empirical: species). We highlight patterns of covariation across levels of organisation and conclude with a discussion of the consequences of dispersal through space and time and future research areas that should improve our understanding of dispersal-related life-history syndromes. PMID:24690406

  19. Fog dispersal technology.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in fog dispersal technology is briefly discussed. Fog is categorized as supercooled fog, occurring in air temperatures below freezing, and warm fog, occurring at above-freezing temperatures. Operational techniques are available to disperse supercooled fog in the airport area. It is much more difficult to cope with warm fog. Various known concepts to disperse warm fog are evaluated as to their operational merits. The most effective concept for immediate use involves heating the air to cause fog evaporation. Use of helicopter downwash has some application, possibly complementing the promising concept of seeding with sized hygroscopic particles. These latter two concepts appear to have future application, pending further research. The concept using polyelectrolytes is of uncertain value, lacking both a scientific explanation and a substantive evaluation of reported operational successes.

  20. Drilling mud dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, P. A.; Brase, I. E.

    1985-05-21

    Dispersants useful in aqueous drilling mud formulations employed in the drilling of subterranean wells where high temperature and high pressure environments are encountered are disclosed. The dispersants, when used in amounts of about 0.1 to 25 ppb provide muds containing colloidal material suspended in an aqueous medium with improved high temperature and high pressure stability. The dispersants are water soluble sulfonated vinyl toluene-maleic anhydride copolymers which have a molar ratio of vinyl toluene to maleic anhydride of about 1:1 to less than about 2:1, a molecular weight of 1,000 to 25,000 and at least about 0.7 sulfonic acid groups per vinyl toluene unit.

  1. About measuring velocity dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellhauer, M.

    A lot of our knowledge about the dynamics and total masses of pressure dominated stellar systems relies on measuring the internal velocity disper- sion of the system. We assume virial equilibrium and that we are able to measure only the bound stars of the system without any contamination. This article shows how likely it is to measure the correct velocity dispersion in reality. It will show that as long as we have small samples of velocity mea- surements the distribution of possible outcomes can be very large and as soon as we have a source of error the velocity dispersion can wrong by several standard deviations especially in large samples.

  2. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL,; MOMENI, H.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for application to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.

  3. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for applicationmore » to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.« less

  4. Juvenile dispersal in Calomys venustus (Muridae: Sigmodontinae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priotto, José; Steinmann, Andrea; Provensal, Cecilia; Polop, Jaime

    2004-05-01

    Both spacing behaviour and dispersal movement are viewed as hierarchical processes in which the effects may be expressed at spatial scale. This research was carried out to examine the hypothesis that the presence of parents promotes the dispersal of juveniles from their natal nest and their father or mother home-range, in Calomys venustus.The study was carried out in four 0.25 ha fences (two controls and two experimentals), in a natural pasture. This study had two periods: Father Removal (FR) (August and December 1997; year one) and Mother Removal (MR) (August 1998 and January 1999; year two). For the FR treatment fathers were removed after juveniles were born, but in the MR treatment mothers were removed after the juveniles were weaned. The effect of parents on the dispersal distance of juveniles was analysed with respect to their natal nest and their mother and father home-range. Dispersal distance from the nest of C. venustus was independent of either male or female parent. Juveniles were more dispersing in relation to the centre of activity of their mothers than to that of their fathers, and females were more dispersing than males. Female juveniles overlap their home-range with their parents less than male juveniles do. The differences observed between female and male juveniles would be related to their different sexual maturation times, as well as to the female territoriality.

  5. Warm fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1983-01-01

    The charged particle generator was further tested after some design modification. The generator performance was measured with additional instrumentation and found to confirm previous measurements. Plans for a field testing were than developed. The overall status of the program and the field test plans were presented to a group of atmospheric scientists and electrostatic experts at the NASA/MSFC sponsored USRA Workshop on Electrostatic Fog Dispersal at NCAR, Boulder, Colorado discussed in previous sections. The recommendations from this workshop are being evaluated as to whether NASA should proceed with the field test or whether further theoretical research on the phenomenon of electrostatic fog dispersal and additional development of the charged particle generator should be carried out. Information obtained from the USRA Workshop clearly identified three physical mechanisms that could possibly influence the fog dispersal process, which heretofore have not been considered, and which may provide additional insight to the direction of further fog dispersal work. These mechanisms are: the effect of corona discharge on the electric field strength at the surface, the influx of fog into the cleared volume by turbulent diffusion, and the increase in supersaturation as liquid water is removed, activating haze particles, and thus generating more fog. Plans are being formulated to investigate these mechanisms.

  6. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  7. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  8. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  9. Gone with the wind and the stream: Dispersal in the invasive species Ailanthus altissima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planchuelo, Greg; Catalán, Pablo; Delgado, Juan Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Dispersal is a key process in plant invasions and is strongly related to diaspore morphology. Often, dispersal comprises more than one step, and morphologies adapted to a primary dispersal mechanism can aid or detract from a secondary one. The aim of this work was to assess the relationship between primary wind dispersal and secondary water dispersal in Ailanthus altissima, an invasive tree species. Wind and water dispersal potential and their association with the morphological characteristics of samaras were assessed under controlled conditions to ensure the repeatability of the measurements. We found a direct positive relationship between primary wind and secondary water dispersal in A. altissima. The main morphological characteristics of the samara that affected the success of the two types of dispersal were side perimeter and mass. However, a possibility of dispersal specialisation exists, as one morphological characteristic (samara width) affects wind dispersal negatively but water dispersal positively, and dispersal potential and samara morphology have been shown to differ across individuals.

  10. Predicting species' maximum dispersal distances from simple plant traits.

    PubMed

    Tamme, Riin; Götzenberger, Lars; Zobel, Martin; Bullock, James M; Hooftman, Danny A P; Kaasik, Ants; Pärtel, Meelis

    2014-02-01

    Many studies have shown plant species' dispersal distances to be strongly related to life-history traits, but how well different traits can predict dispersal distances is not yet known. We used cross-validation techniques and a global data set (576 plant species) to measure the predictive power of simple plant traits to estimate species' maximum dispersal distances. Including dispersal syndrome (wind, animal, ant, ballistic, and no special syndrome), growth form (tree, shrub, herb), seed mass, seed release height, and terminal velocity in different combinations as explanatory variables we constructed models to explain variation in measured maximum dispersal distances and evaluated their power to predict maximum dispersal distances. Predictions are more accurate, but also limited to a particular set of species, if data on more specific traits, such as terminal velocity, are available. The best model (R2 = 0.60) included dispersal syndrome, growth form, and terminal velocity as fixed effects. Reasonable predictions of maximum dispersal distance (R2 = 0.53) are also possible when using only the simplest and most commonly measured traits; dispersal syndrome and growth form together with species taxonomy data. We provide a function (dispeRsal) to be run in the software package R. This enables researchers to estimate maximum dispersal distances with confidence intervals for plant species using measured traits as predictors. Easily obtainable trait data, such as dispersal syndrome (inferred from seed morphology) and growth form, enable predictions to be made for a large number of species. PMID:24669743

  11. Octave spanning wedge dispersive mirrors with low dispersion oscillations.

    PubMed

    Habel, Florian; Shirvanyan, Vage; Trubetskov, Michael; Burger, Christian; Sommer, Annkatrin; Kling, Matthias F; Schultze, Martin; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A novel concept for octave spanning dispersive mirrors with low spectral dispersion oscillations is presented. The key element of the so-called wedge dispersive mirror is a slightly wedged layer which is coated on a specially optimized dispersive multilayer stack by a common sputter coating process. The group delay dispersion (GDD) of a pulse reflected on a wedge dispersive mirror is nearly free of oscillations. Fabricated mirrors with negative GDD demonstrate the compression of a pulse down to 3.8 fs as good as double angled mirrors optimized for the same bandwidth. PMID:27137538

  12. Spectral-temporal analysis of dispersive wave generation in photonic crystal fibers of different dispersion slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hua; Han, Fang; Hu, Hui; Wang, Weibin; Zeng, Qilin

    2014-03-01

    Based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we present a numerical investigation of dispersive wave generation in photonic crystal fibers pumped with femtosecond pulses in the anomalous dispersion region. Both positive dispersion slope and negative dispersion slope for pump wavelength are studied. It is demonstrated that the wavelength of the dispersive wave can be blue-shifted or red-shifted relative to the center wavelength of the soliton, depending on the dispersion slope of the pump wavelength. The spectral-temporal dynamics of dispersive wave generation is shown using the cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating (X-FROG) technique, which is numerically computed with a windowed Fourier transform. Further, we find a phenomenon that the X-FROG spectrogram of the corresponding output signal exhibits a parabolic shape, which is consistent with the wavelength dependence of the group delay. In particular, the phenomenon of soliton trapping of the dispersive wave is observed with an increase of pump power.

  13. Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, Hans

    2004-02-01

    Preface; Notation; Part I. Special Relativity: 1. Introduction: inertial systems and Galilei invariance of classical mechanics; 2. Light propagation in moving coordinate systems and Lorentz transformations; 3. Our world as a Minkowski space; 4. Mechanics of special relativity; 5. Optics of plane waves; 6. Four-dimensional vectors and tensors; 7. Electrodynamics in vacuo; 8. Transformation properties of electromagnetic fields: examples; 9. Null vectors and the algebraic properties of electromagnetic field tensors; 10. Charged point particles and their field; 11. Pole-dipole particles and their field; 12. Electrodynamics in media; 13. Perfect fluids and other physical theories; Part II. Riemannian Geometry: 14. Introduction: the force-free motion of particles in Newtonian mechanics; 15. Why Riemannian geometry?; 16. Riemannian space; 17. Tensor algebra; 18. The covariant derivative and parallel transport; 19. The curvature tensor; 20. Differential operators, integrals and integral laws; 21. Fundamental laws of physics in Riemannian spaces; Part III. Foundations of Einstein's Theory of Gravitation: 22. The fundamental equations of Einstein's theory of gravitation; 23. The Schwarzschild solution; 24. Experiments to verify the Schwarzschild metric; 25. Gravitational lenses; 26. The interior Schwarzschild solution; Part IV. Linearized Theory of Gravitation, Far Fields and Gravitational Waves: 27. The linearized Einstein theory of gravity; 28. Far fields due to arbitrary matter distributions and balance equations for momentum and angular momentum; 29. Gravitational waves; 30. The Cauchy problem for the Einstein field equations; Part V. Invariant Characterization of Exact Solutions: 31. Preferred vector fields and their properties; 32. The Petrov classification; 33. Killing vectors and groups of motion; 34. A survey of some selected classes of exact solutions; Part VI. Gravitational Collapse and Black Holes: 35. The Schwarzschild singularity; 36. Gravitational collapse

  14. Dispersion and separation of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, Brian J. (Inventor); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Inventor); Ruf, Herbert J. (Inventor); Evans, Christopher M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to dispersions of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents containing alkyl amide compounds and/or diamide compounds. The invention also relates to methods of dispersing nanostructured carbon in organic solvents and methods of mobilizing nanostructured carbon. Also disclosed are methods of determining the purity of nanostructured carbon.

  15. Extending of flat normal dispersion profile in all-solid soft glass nonlinear photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwicki, Bartłomiej; Kasztelanic, Rafał; Klimczak, Mariusz; Cimek, Jarosław; Pysz, Dariusz; Stępień, Ryszard; Buczyński, Ryszard

    2016-06-01

    The bandwidth of coherent supercontinuum generated in optical fibres is strongly determined by the all-normal dispersion characteristic of the fibre. We investigate all-normal dispersion limitations in all-solid oxide-based soft glass photonic crystal fibres with various relative inclusion sizes and lattice constants. The influence of material dispersion on fibre dispersion characteristics for a selected pair of glasses is also examined. A relation between the material dispersion of the glasses and the fibre dispersion has been described. We determined the parameters which limit the maximum range of flattened all-normal dispersion profile achievable for the considered pair of heavy-metal-oxide soft glasses.

  16. Surgical Management of Iatrogenic Pigment Dispersion Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mierlo, Camille Van; Pinto, Luis Abegão

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Iatrogenic pigment dispersion syndrome generally originates from a repetitive, mechanical trauma to the pigmented posterior epithelium of the iris. This trauma can arise after intraocular surgery, most commonly due to an abnormal contact between the intraocular lens (IOL) and the iris. Whether surgical removal of this primary insult can lead to a successful intraocular pressure (IOP) control remains unclear. Methods: Case-series. Patients with IOP elevation and clinical signs of pigment dispersion were screened for a diagnosis of iatrogenic IOL-related pigment dispersion. Results: Three patients in which the IOL or the IOL-bag complex caused a pigment dispersion through a repetitive iris chafing were selected. In two cases, replacement of a sulcus-based single-piece IOL (patient 1) or a sub-luxated in-the-bag IOL (patient 2) by an anterior-chamber (AC) iris-fixed IOL led to a sustained decrease in IOP. In the third case, extensive iris atrophy and poor anatomical AC parameters for IOL implantation precluded further surgical intervention. Conclusion: IOL-exchange appears to be a useful tool in the management of iatrogenic pigment dispersion glaucoma due to inappropriate IOL implantation. This cause-oriented approach seems to be effective in controlling IOP, but should be offered only if safety criteria are met. How to cite this article: Van Mierlo C, Abegao Pinto L, Stalmans I. Surgical Management of Iatrogenic Pigment Dispersion Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(1):28-32. PMID:26997830

  17. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  18. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  19. Tomography of dispersive media

    PubMed

    Ernst; Herman

    2000-07-01

    When waves propagate through layered structures, the phase velocity is frequency dependent (dispersive). If one wants to reconstruct the velocity variations in this medium, conventional traveltime-based tomographic methods cannot be used, since each frequency component has a different traveltime. A tomographic method is presented for reconstructing the phase velocity of guided waves in laterally varying media. The dispersive character of guided waves is explicitly accounted for by using a phase-based error criterium instead of "picked" traveltimes. Phase velocity and source waveform can be reconstructed to within a few percent, and the algorithm is shown to be robust in the presence of interference noise. When applied to seismic field data, the reconstructed phase velocity field correlates well with the topography of the area. PMID:10923876

  20. Dispersion suppressors with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    Dispersion suppressors of two main types are usually used. In one the cell quadrupole focussing structure is the same as in normal cells but some of the dipoles are replaced by drifts. In the other, the quadrupole strengths and/or spacings are different from those of the normal cells, but the bending is about the same as it is in the cells. In SSC designs to date, dispersion suppressors of the former type have been used, consisting of two cells with bending equivalent to one. In this note a suppressor design with normal bending and altered focussing is presented. The advantage of this scheme is that circumference is reduced. The disadvantages are that additional special quadrupoles must be provided (however, they need not be adjustable), and the maximum beta values within them are about 30% higher than the cell maxima.

  1. Nikolaevskiy equation with dispersion.

    PubMed

    Simbawa, Eman; Matthews, Paul C; Cox, Stephen M

    2010-03-01

    The Nikolaevskiy equation was originally proposed as a model for seismic waves and is also a model for a wide variety of systems incorporating a neutral "Goldstone" mode, including electroconvection and reaction-diffusion systems. It is known to exhibit chaotic dynamics at the onset of pattern formation, at least when the dispersive terms in the equation are suppressed, as is commonly the practice in previous analyses. In this paper, the effects of reinstating the dispersive terms are examined. It is shown that such terms can stabilize some of the spatially periodic traveling waves; this allows us to study the loss of stability and transition to chaos of the waves. The secondary stability diagram ("Busse balloon") for the traveling waves can be remarkably complicated. PMID:20365845

  2. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  3. Ascent trajectory dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The results of a Space Transportation System ascent trajectory dispersion analysis are documented. Critical trajectory parameter values useful for the definition of lightweight external tank insulation requirements are provided. This analysis was conducted using two of the critical missions specified for the Space Transportation System: a 28.5 deg inclination trajectory launched from the Eastern Test Range (ETR) and a Western Test Range (WTR) trajectory launched into a 104 deg orbital inclination.

  4. Dispersibility of Amphibious Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Meng-Heng; Hwang, Weng-Sing; Kuo, Wuei-Jueng

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a suitable method to convert hydrophilic montmorillonite into amphibious montmorillonite by replacing the sodium ions normally found in clay with poly(oxyethylene) (POE)-amide chlorite cations. Amphibious montmorillonite has a high d-spacing and good dispersion characteristics in many different types of solutions, including those having an intermediate hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) value. Four different modifying cations are tested and X-ray diffraction analysis is performed to measure the resulting changes in the d-spacing of the MMT. Scanning electron microscopy is employed to investigate the morphology of the modified clays. A laser-doppler particle analyzer is used to measure the particle size of the clays in various solutions. Dobrat’s method is applied to calculate the dispersibility of each clay and Stoke’s law is used to evaluate the settling rate. The results indicate that the d-spacing of the POE-amide chlorite cation modified montmorillonite increases from 1.28 to 3.51 nm. The amphibious montmorillonite demonstrates good dispersion characteristics in eight commonly employed coating solutions with intermediate HLB values.

  5. Succinimide lubricating oil dispersant

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Bloch, R.; Brownwell, D.W.; Chen, F.J.; Gutierrez, A.

    1987-08-11

    A lubricating oil composition is described exhibiting improved dispersancy in both gasoline and diesel engines comprising a major amount of lubricating oil and 0.5 to 10 weight percent of a dispersant, the dispersant being prepared in a sequential process comprising the steps of: (a) in a first step reacting an oil-soluble polyolefin succinic anhydride, the olefin being a C/sub 3/ or C/sub 4/ olefin and an alkylene polyamine of the formula H/sub 2/N(CH/sub 2/)/sub n/(NH(CH/sub 2/)/sub n/)/sub m/sup -// NH/sub 2/ wherein n is 2 or 3 and m is 0 to 10, in a molar ratio of about 1.0 to 2.2 moles of polyolefin succinic anhydride per mole of polyamine, and (b) reacting the product of step (a) with dicarboxylic acid anhydride selected from the group consisting of maleic anhydride and succinic anhydride in sufficient molar proportions to provide a total mole ratio of about 2,3 to 3.0 moles of anhydride compounds per mole of polyamine.

  6. Can non-breeding be a cost of breeding dispersal?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danchin, E.; Cam, E.

    2002-01-01

    Breeding habitat selection and dispersal are crucial processes that affect many components of fitness. Breeding dispersal entails costs, one of which has been neglected: dispersing animals may miss breeding opportunities because breeding dispersal requires finding a new nesting site and mate, two time- and energy-consuming activities. Dispersers are expected to be prone to non-breeding. We used the kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) to test whether breeding dispersal influences breeding probability. Breeding probability was associated with dispersal, in that both were negatively influenced by private information (previous individual reproductive success) and public information (average reproductive success of conspecifics) about patch quality. Furthermore, the probability of skipping breeding was 1.7 times higher in birds that settled in a new patch relative to those that remained on the same patch. Finally, non-breeders that resumed breeding were 4.4 times more likely to disperse than birds that bred in successive years. Although private information may influence breeding probability directly, the link between breeding probability and public information may be indirect, through the influence of public information on breeding dispersal, non-breeding thus being a cost of dispersal. These results support the hypothesis that dispersal may result in not being able to breed. More generally, non-breeding (which can be interpreted as an extreme form of breeding failure) may reveal costs of various previous activities. Because monitoring the non-breeding portion of a population is difficult, non-breeders have been neglected in many studies of reproduction trade-offs.

  7. Ecomorphological predictors of natal dispersal distances in birds.

    PubMed

    Dawideit, Britta A; Phillimore, Albert B; Laube, Irina; Leisler, Bernd; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin

    2009-03-01

    1. Dispersal is one of the key ecological parameters but it is very difficult to quantify directly. As a consequence, empirical studies often ignore dispersal or use indirect measures. 2. Ringing data have previously been used to estimate the natal dispersal distances of 47 British passerine bird species. This provides an excellent opportunity to examine the potential of various indirect measures to predict natal dispersal distances in British birds. 3. We use a phylogenetic comparative framework and single- and multipredictor models including ecomorphological, behavioural or ecological traits to predict natal dispersal distance. 4. A multipredictor model that includes Kipp's distance (a measure of wing tip length), bill depth and tail graduation explains 45% of the interspecific variation in natal dispersal distance. These morphological characters all relate to aerodynamics with stronger flyers dispersing further. 5. However, an index of migration is a strong (but less informative) correlate of dispersal distance and Kipp's distance and bill depth are strong correlates of migration. Thus, we cannot disentangle whether these ecomorphological traits influence dispersal distance directly or whether the relationship between ecomorphology and dispersal is mediated through migratory behaviour. 6. Notwithstanding uncertainties regarding the causal links between dispersal distance and wing morphology, we suggest that two ecomorphological traits, Kipp's distance and bill depth, may provide a useful surrogate. PMID:19040685

  8. Design and development of a dust dispersion chamber to quantify the dispersibility of rock dust

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Inoka E.; Sapko, Michael J.; Harris, Marcia L.; Zlochower, Isaac A.; Weiss, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Dispersible rock dust must be applied to the surfaces of entries in underground coal mines in order to inert the coal dust entrained or made airborne during an explosion and prevent propagating explosions. 30 CFR. 75.2 states that “… [rock dust particles] when wetted and dried will not cohere to form a cake which will not be dispersed into separate particles by a light blast of air …” However, a proper definition or quantification of “light blast of air” is not provided. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has, consequently, designed a dust dispersion chamber to conduct quantitative laboratory-scale dispersibility experiments as a screening tool for candidate rock dusts. A reproducible pulse of air is injected into the chamber and across a shallow tray of rock dust. The dust dispersed and carried downwind is monitored. The mass loss of the dust tray and the airborne dust measurements determine the relative dispersibility of the dust with respect to a Reference rock dust. This report describes the design and the methodology to evaluate the relative dispersibility of rock dusts with and without anti-caking agents. Further, the results of this study indicate that the dispersibility of rock dusts varies with particle size, type of anti-caking agent used, and with the untapped bulk density. Untreated rock dusts, when wetted and dried forming a cake that was much less dispersible than the reference rock dust used in supporting the 80% total incombustible content rule. PMID:26834390

  9. Determination of hydraulic conductivity in three dimensions and its relation to dispersivity: Chapter D in Ground-water contamination by crude oil at the Bemidji, Minnesota, research site; US Geological Survey Toxic Waste--ground-water contamination study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1984-01-01

    Recent investigations suggest that dispersion in aquifers is scale dependent and a function of the heterogeneity of aquifer materials. Theoretical stochastic studies indicate that determining hydraulic-conductivity variability in three dimensions is important in analyzing the dispersion process. Even though field methods are available to approximate hydraulic conductivity in three dimensions, the methods are not generally used because of high cost of field equipment and because measurement and analysis techniques are cumbersome and time consuming. The hypothesis of this study is that field-determined values of dispersivity are scale dependent and that they may be described as a function of hydraulic conductivity in three dimensions. The objectives of the study at the Bemidji research site are to (1) determine hydraulic conductivity of the porous media in three dimensions, (2) determine field values of dispersivity and its scale dependence on hydraulic conductivity, and (3) develop and apply a computerized data-collection, storage, and analysis system for field use in comprehensive determination of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivity. Plans for this investigation involve a variety of methods of analysis. Hydraulic conductivity will be determined separately in the horizontal and vertical planes of the hydraulic-conductivity ellipsoid. Field values of dispersivity will be determined by single-well and doublet-well injection or withdrawal tests with tracers. A computerized data-collection, storage, and analysis system to measure pressure, flow rate, tracer concentrations, and temperature will be designed for field testing. Real-time computer programs will be used to analyze field data. The initial methods of analysis will be utilized to meet the objectives of the study. Preliminary field data indicate the aquifer underlying the Bemidji site is vertically heterogeneous, cross-bedded outwash. Preliminary analysis of the flow field around a hypothetical doublet

  10. Does Environmental Knowledge Inhibit Hominin Dispersal?

    PubMed

    Wren, Colin D; Costopoulos, Andre

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between the dispersal potential of a hominin population, its local-scale foraging strategies, and the characteristics of the resource environment using an agent-based modeling approach. In previous work we demonstrated that natural selection can favor a relatively low capacity for assessing and predicting the quality of the resource environment, especially when the distribution of resources is highly clustered. That work also suggested that the more knowledge foraging populations had about their environment, the less likely they were to abandon the landscape they know and disperse into novel territory. The present study gives agents new individual and social strategies for learning about their environment. For both individual and social learning, natural selection favors decreased levels of environmental knowledge, particularly in low-heterogeneity environments. Social acquisition of detailed environmental knowledge results in crowding of agents, which reduces available reproductive space and relative fitness. Agents with less environmental knowledge move away from resource clusters and into areas with more space available for reproduction. These results suggest that, rather than being a requirement for successful dispersal, environmental knowledge strengthens the ties to particular locations and significantly reduces the dispersal potential as a result. The evolved level of environmental knowledge in a population depends on the characteristics of the resource environment and affects the dispersal capacity of the population. PMID:26932570

  11. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1996-04-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  12. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1995-11-07

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  13. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1998-06-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  14. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  15. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  16. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  17. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1998-04-14

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  18. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  19. Photoevaporation and Disk Dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorti, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks are depleted of their mass on short timescales by viscous accretion, which removes both gas and solids, and by photoevaporation which removes mainly gas. Photoevaporation may facilitate planetesimal formation by lowering the gas/dust mass ratio in disks. Disk dispersal sets constraints on planet formation timescales, and by controlling the availability of gas determines the type of planets that form in the disk. Photoevaporative wind mass loss rates are theoretically estimated to range from ~ 10-10 to 10-8 M ⊙, and disk lifetimes are typically ~ few Myr.

  20. Solitonization of a dispersive wave.

    PubMed

    Braud, F; Conforti, M; Cassez, A; Mussot, A; Kudlinski, A

    2016-04-01

    We report the observation of a nonlinear propagation scenario in which a dispersive wave is transformed into a fundamental soliton in an axially varying optical fiber. The dispersive wave is initially emitted in the normal dispersion region and the fiber properties change longitudinally so that the dispersion becomes anomalous at the dispersive wave wavelength, which allows it to be transformed into a soliton. The solitonic nature of the field is demonstrated by solving the direct Zakharov-Shabat scattering problem. Experimental characterization performed in spectral and temporal domains show evidence of the solitonization process in an axially varying photonic crystal fiber. PMID:27192249

  1. Ion temperature anisotropy effects on the dispersion relation and threshold conditions of a sheared current-driven electrostatic ion-acoustic instability with applications to the collisional high-latitude F-region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, Patrick J. G.; Noël, J.-M.; St-Maurice, J.-P.; Kabin, K.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma instabilities play a important role in producing small-scale irregularities in the ionosphere. In particular, current-driven electrostatic ion-acoustic (CDEIA) instabilities contribute to high-latitude F-region electrodynamics. Ion temperature anisotropies with enhanced perpendicular temperature often exist in the high-latitude F-region. In addition to temperature anisotropies, ion velocity shears are observed near auroral arc edges, sometimes coexisting with thermal ion upflow processes and field-aligned currents (FAC). We investigated whether ion temperature anisotropy lowers the threshold conditions required for the onset of sheared CDEIA instabilities. We generalised a dispersion relation to include ion thermal anisotropy, finite Larmor radius corrections and collisions. We derived new fluid-like analytical expressions for the threshold conditions required for instability that depend explicitly on ion temperature anisotropy. We studied how the instability threshold conditions vary as a function of the wave vector direction in both fluid and kinetic regimes. We found that, despite the dampening effect of collisions on ion-acoustic waves, ion temperature anisotropy lowers in some cases the threshold drift requirements for a large range of oblique wave vector angles. More importantly, realistic ion temperature anisotropies contribute to reducing the instability threshold velocity shears that are associated with small drift thresholds, for modes propagating almost perpendicularly to the geomagnetic field. Small shear thresholds that seem to be sustainable in the ionospheric F-region are obtained for low-frequency waves. Such instabilities could play a role in the direct generation of field-aligned irregularities in the collisional F-region that could be observed with the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) array of high-frequency radars. These modes would be very sensitive to the radar probing direction since they are restricted to very narrow

  2. Plume dispersion investigated by landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiato, F.; Ciminelli, M. G.

    Suspended particulate in the atmosphere may be detected by satellite sensors due to scattered radiation. A number of LANDSAT TM images presenting the evidence of the pollutant plumes emitted at the stack of the electric power plants located at two Italian coastal sites, dispersing mainly over the sea surface, have been selected. The satellite data of Band 1 of the visible channel have been elaborated to estimate the lateral dispersion as a function of the travel time. The results show the presence of an accelerated diffusion regime at a rate slower than the one predicted by the relative diffusion theory.

  3. Dispersion corrections to parity violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gorchtein, M.; Horowitz, C. J.; Ramsey-Musolf, M. J.

    2010-08-04

    We consider the dispersion correction to elastic parity violating electron-proton scattering due to {gamma}Z exchange. In a recent publication, this correction was reported to be substantially larger than the previous estimates. In this paper, we study the dispersion correction in greater detail. We confirm the size of the disperion correction to be {approx}6% for the QWEAK experiment designed to measure the proton weak charge. We enumerate parameters that have to be constrained to better than relative 30% in order to keep the theoretical uncertainty for QWEAK under control.

  4. Dispersion Representation of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, B.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the dispersive representation of the D-term form factor for hard exclusive reactions, using unsubtracted t-channel dispersion relations. This representation provides a microscopical interpretation of the physical content of the D-term form factor in terms of t-channel exchanges with the appropriate quantum numbers. The contribution from two-pion intermediate states is explicitly evaluated, and the corresponding results for the D-term form factor as function of t as well as at t = 0 are discussed in comparison with available model predictions and phenomenological parametrizations.

  5. A meta-analysis of dispersal in butterflies.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Virginie M; Turlure, Camille; Baguette, Michel

    2010-08-01

    Dispersal has recently gained much attention because of its crucial role in the conservation and evolution of species facing major environmental changes such as habitat loss and fragmentation, climate change, and their interactions. Butterflies have long been recognized as ideal model systems for the study of dispersal and a huge amount of data on their ability to disperse has been collected under various conditions. However, no single 'best' method seems to exist leading to the co-occurrence of various approaches to study butterfly mobility, and therefore a high heterogeneity among data on dispersal across this group. Accordingly, we here reviewed the knowledge accumulated on dispersal and mobility in butterflies, to detect general patterns. This meta-analysis specifically addressed two questions. Firstly, do the various methods provide a congruent picture of how dispersal ability is distributed across species? Secondly, is dispersal species-specific? Five sources of data were analysed: multisite mark-recapture experiments, genetic studies, experimental assessments, expert opinions, and transect surveys. We accounted for potential biases due to variation in genetic markers, sample sizes, spatial scales or the level of habitat fragmentation. We showed that the various dispersal estimates generally converged, and that the relative dispersal ability of species could reliably be predicted from their relative vagrancy (records of butterflies outside their normal habitat). Expert opinions gave much less reliable estimates of realized dispersal but instead reflected migration propensity of butterflies. Within-species comparisons showed that genetic estimates were relatively invariable, while other dispersal estimates were highly variable. This latter point questions dispersal as a species-specific, invariant trait. PMID:20055815

  6. Chemical dispersants: Oil biodegradation friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Rahsepar, Shokouh; Smit, Martijn P J; Murk, Albertinka J; Rijnaarts, Huub H M; Langenhoff, Alette A M

    2016-07-15

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodegradation by alkane and/or aromatic degrading bacterial culture in artificial seawater at different dispersant to oil ratios (DORs). Our results show that dispersant addition did not enhance oil biodegradation. At DOR 1:20, biodegradation was inhibited, especially when only the alkane degrading culture was present. With a combination of cultures, this inhibition was overcome after 10days. This indicates that initial inhibition of oil biodegradation can be overcome when different bacteria are present in the environment. We conclude that the observed inhibition is related to the enhanced dissolution of aromatic compounds into the water, inhibiting the alkane degrading bacteria. PMID:27156037

  7. Dispersal of Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source; 2) close stellar encounters; 3) stellar winds; and 4) photoevaporation by ultraviolet radiation. We focus on 3) and 4) and describe the quasi-steady state appearance and the overall evolution of disks under the influence of winds and radiation from the central star and of radiation from external OB stars. Viscous accretion likely dominates disk dispersal in the inner disk (r approx. or less than 10 AU), while photoevaporation is the principal process of disk dispersal outside of r approx. or greater than 10 AU for low mass stars. Disk dispersal timescales are compared and discussed in relation to theoretical estimates for planet formation timescales. Photoevaporation may explain the large differences in the hydrogen content of the giant planets in the solar system. The commonly held belief that our early sun's stellar wind dispersed he solar nebula is called into question. Finally, we model the small bright objects ('proplyds') observed in the Orion Nebula as disks around young, low mass stars which are externally illuminated by the UV (ultraviolet) photons from the nearby massive star Theta(1)C.

  8. Dispersal of Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2001-01-01

    We review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source, 2) close stellar encounters, 3) stellar winds, and 4) photoevaporation by ultraviolet radiation. We focus on 3) and 4) and describe the quasi-steady state appearance and the overall evolution of disks under the influence of winds and radiation from the central star and of radiation from external OB stars. Viscous accretion likely dominates disk dispersal in the inner disk (r < or approx. equals 10 AU), while photoevaporation is the principal process of disk dispersal outside of r > or approx. equals 10 AU for low mass stars. Disk dispersal timescales are compared and discussed in relation to theoretical estimates for planet formation timescales. Photoevaporation may explain the large differences in the hydrogen content of the giant planets in the solar system. The commonly held belief that our early sun's stellar wind dispersed the solar nebula is called into question. Finally, we model the small bright objects ("proplyds") observed in the Orion Nebula as disks around young, low mass stars which are externally illuminated by the UV photons from the nearby massive star Theta(sup 1)C.

  9. Protein Formulations for Emulsions and Solid-in-Oil Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Martins, Madalena; Loureiro, Ana; Azoia, Nuno G; Silva, Carla; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-06-01

    Needs from medical and cosmetic areas have led to the design of novel nanosized emulsions and solid-in-oil dispersions of proteins. Here, we describe the production of those emulsions and dispersions using high-energy methodologies such as high-pressure homogenization or ultrasound. Recent work has resulted in new mechanistic insights related to the formation of protein emulsions and dispersions. The production method and composition of these formulations can determine major parameters such as size, stability, and functionality, and therefore their final application. Aqueous nanoemulsions of proteins can be used for drug delivery, while solid-in-oil dispersions are often used in transdermal applications. PMID:26996614

  10. On the LO-polaron dispersion in D dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, B.; Kalina, F.; Smondyrev, M.

    2003-05-01

    We discuss the (LO)polaron dispersion for arbitrary spatial dimension D. Firstly, we review the existing literature; recent numerical work is critically analyzed. Secondly, we derive novel upper bounds for the dispersion, which incorporate the correct behaviour of the dispersion up to third order of the coupling constant . A totally analytical evaluation is performed in the case D = 1. We compare the upper bounds with previously published lower bounds. Apart from a surrounding of zero dispersion, the relative deviation is on a few-percent scale.

  11. Stretched cavity soliton in dispersion-managed Kerr resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Chengying; Yang, Changxi

    2015-08-01

    Stretched cavity soliton (SCS) in dispersion-managed nonlinear resonators is numerically investigated. SCS is found to stretch and compress twice during a round-trip propagation inside the dispersion-managed resonator, exhibiting a pulse dynamics similar to dispersion-managed mode-locked femtosecond lasers. Even though the breathing ratio is relatively small, the characteristics of SCS are significantly modified by the pulse stretching dynamics in the resonator. The output pulse will have a flatter spectrum around the center frequency. However, the power for the comb lines at the wing of the spectrum decays faster than the conventional sech-shaped CS, making dispersion wave emission harder to be excited in dispersion-managed resonators. Furthermore, stretching of the pulse lowers the nonlinear phase shift and makes it more resistant towards breather soliton instability. When shortening the cavity length to the microresonator scale, we find that ultrashort pulses can be generated through dispersion management, even in a low Q -factor cavity.

  12. STUDY ON DISPERSION OF LONGITUDINAL ELASTIC WAVES IN ROCK SPECIMENS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Satoshi; Ohnishi, Yuzo; Yano, Takao; Takahashi, Manabu; Yoshimura, Kimitaka; Ando, Ken-Ichi

    In order to estimate the permeable properties and pore fluid properties in the ground, survey methods using dispersion and attenuation of elastic waves have been developed. The Biot theory have been applied to the frequency-dependent dispersion data, but the influence of geological properties on velocity dispersion and the relation between the permeable properties and velocity dispersion in rock specimens have not become clear. Sedimentary rock and granite specimens were tested using longitudinal waves for the difference of velocity dispersion phenomena observed in each specimen, and we examine whether the Biot theory can be applied to observed experimental data. Moreover, we tried to estimate the permeability of the rock specimen based on the theory and show that the Biot-squirt theory can be applied to estimating rock permeability using the seismic wave dispersion characteristics.

  13. Dispersive transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Adler, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Experiments demonstrating asymmetrical dispersive transport of a conservative tracer across interfaces between different porous materials have recently been performed. Here, this phenomenon is studied numerically on the pore scale. The flow field is derived by solving the Stokes equation. The dispersive transport is simulated by a large number of particles undergoing random walks under the simultaneous action of convection and diffusion. Two main two-dimensional configurations are studied; each consists of two segments (called coarse and fine) with the same structure, porosity, and length along the main flow, but different characteristic solid/pore sizes. One structure consists of two channels containing cavities of different sizes, and the second of square "grains" of different sizes. At time t=0, a large number of particles is injected (as a pulse) around a given cross-section. The corresponding breakthrough curves (BTCs) are registered as functions of time at six different cross sections. Calculations are made twice; in the first case (CtoF), particles are injected in the coarse side and are transported towards the fine one; in the second one (FtoC), the opposite case is studied. These calculations are performed for various Péclet numbers (Pe). Comparison of the resulting BTCs shows features that are similar to experimental observations, but with qualitative and quantitative differences. The influences of the medium, of the injection and observation planes, and of Pe are detailed and discussed. A BTC for pulse injection can be characterized by its maximum M(t_M) and the time tM at which it occurs. The observed differences for channels bounded by cavities are very small. However for the granular structures, M(t_M) is always larger for FtoC than for CtoF ; tM depends on all the parameters, namely Pe, the size ratio between the large and small grains, the injection and the observation planes. The numerical results are systematically compared with solutions of one

  14. SMED - Sulphur MEditerranean Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Sellitto, Pasquale; Corradini, Stefano; Di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio; Merucci, Luca; Caltabiano, Tommaso; La Spina, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of volcanic gases and particles can have profound impacts on terrestrial environment, atmospheric composition, climate forcing, and then on human health at various temporal and spatial scales. Volcanic emissions have been identified as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in our understanding of recent climate change trends. In particular, a primary role is acted by sulphur dioxide emission due to its conversion to volcanic sulphate aerosol via atmospheric oxidation. Aerosols may play a key role in the radiative budget and then in photochemistry and tropospheric composition. Mt. Etna is one of the most prodigious and persistent emitters of gasses and particles on Earth, accounting for about 10% of global average volcanic emission of CO2 and SO2. Its sulphur emissions stand for 0.7 × 106 t S/yr9 and then about 10 times bigger than anthropogenic sulphur emissions in the Mediterranean area. Centrepiece of the SMED project is to advance the understanding of volcanogenic sulphur dioxide and sulphate aerosol particles dispersion and radiative impact on the downwind Mediterranean region by an integrated approach between ground- and space-based observations and modelling. Research is addressed by exploring the potential relationship between proximal SO2 flux and aerosol measured remotely in the volcanic plume of Mt. Etna between 2000 and 2014 and distal aerosol ground-based measurements in Lampedusa, Greece, and Malta from AERONET network. Ground data are combined with satellite multispectral polar and geostationary imagers able to detect and retrieve volcanic ash and SO2. The high repetition time of SEVIRI (15 minutes) will ensure the potential opportunity to follow the entire evolution of the volcanic cloud, while, the higher spatial resolution of MODIS (1x1 km2), are exploited for investigating the probability to retrieve volcanic SO2 abundances from passive degassing. Ground and space observations are complemented with atmospheric Lagrangian model

  15. Natural dispersion revisited.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Øistein; Reed, Mark; Bodsberg, Nils Rune

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a new semi-empirical model for oil droplet size distributions generated by single breaking wave events. Empirical data was obtained from laboratory experiments with different crude oils at different stages of weathering. The paper starts with a review of the most commonly used model for natural dispersion, which is followed by a presentation of the laboratory study on oil droplet size distributions formed by breaking waves conducted by SINTEF on behalf of the NOAA/UNH Coastal Response Research Center. The next section presents the theoretical and empirical foundation for the new model. The model is based on dimensional analysis and contains two non-dimensional groups; the Weber and Reynolds number. The model was validated with data from a full scale experimental oil spill conducted in the Haltenbanken area offshore Norway in July 1982, as described in the last section of the paper. PMID:25752537

  16. Fine scale relationships between sex, life history, and dispersal of masu salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kitanishi, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Toshiaki; Koizumi, Itsuro; Dunham, Jason B.; Higashi, Seigo

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the patterns and processes driving dispersal is critical for understanding population structure and dynamics. In many organisms, sex-biased dispersal is related to the type of mating system. Considerably less is known about the influence of life history variability on dispersal. Here we investigated patterns of dispersal in masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou) to evaluate influences of sex and life history on dispersal. As expected, assignment tests and isolation by distance analysis revealed that dispersal of marine-migratory masu salmon was male-biased. However, dispersal of resident and migratory males did not follow our expectation and marine-migratory individuals dispersed more than residents. This may be because direct competition between marine-migratory and resident males is weak or that the cost of dispersal is smaller for marine-migratory individuals. This study revealed that both sex and migratory life history influence patterns of dispersal at a local scale in masu salmon.

  17. ACOUSTIC RECTIFICATION IN DISPERSIVE MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-03

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  18. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  19. Differences in Time until Dispersal between Cryptic Species of a Marine Nematode Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    De Meester, Nele; Derycke, Sofie; Moens, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Co-occurrence of closely related species may be achieved in environments with fluctuating dynamics, where competitively inferior species can avoid competition through dispersal. Here we present an experiment in which we compared active dispersal abilities (time until first dispersal, number and gender of dispersive adults, and nematode densities at time of dispersal) in Litoditis marina, a common bacterivorous nematode species complex comprising four often co-occurring cryptic species, Pm I, II, III, and IV, as a function of salinity and food distribution. The experiment was conducted in microcosms consisting of an inoculation plate, connection tube, and dispersal plate. Results show species-specific dispersal abilities with Pm I dispersing almost one week later than Pm III. The number of dispersive adults at time of first dispersal was species-specific, with one dispersive female in Pm I and Pm III and a higher, gender-balanced, number in Pm II and Pm IV. Food distribution affected dispersal: in absence of food in the inoculation plate, all species dispersed after ca four days. When food was available Pm I dispersed later, and at the same time and densities irrespective of food conditions in the dispersal plate (food vs no food), suggesting density-dependent dispersal. Pm III dispersed faster and at a lower population density. Salinity affected dispersal, with slower dispersal at higher salinity. These results suggest that active dispersal in Litoditis marina is common, density-dependent, and with species, gender- and environment-specific dispersal abilities. These differences can lead to differential responses under suboptimal conditions and may help to explain temporary coexistence at local scales. PMID:22876328

  20. Determinants of female dispersal in Thomas langurs.

    PubMed

    Sterck, E H

    1997-01-01

    Female dispersal occurs in a number of primate species. It may be related to: avoidance of inbreeding, reduction in food competition, reduction of predation risk, or avoidance of infanticide in combination with mate choice. Female dispersal was studied for a 5-year period in a wild population of Thomas langurs (Presbytis thomasi) that lived in one-male multi-female groups. Juvenile and adult individuals of both sexes were seen to disperse. Females appeared to transfer unhindered between groups, mostly from a larger group to a recently formed smaller one. They transferred without their infants and when not pregnant, and seemed to transfer preferentially during periods when extra-group males were harassing their group. During these inter-group encounters extra-group males seemed to try to commit infanticide. Thus, the timing of female transfer was probably closely linked to infanticide avoidance. Moreover, females seemed to transfer when the resident male of their group was no longer a good protector. The observations in the present study suggest that females transferred to reduce the risk of infanticide. Female dispersal may have another ultimate advantage as well, namely inbreeding avoidance. Due to the dispersal of both females and males the social organization of Thomas langurs was rather fluid. New groups were formed when females joined a male; male takeovers were not observed. Bisexual groups had only a limited life span, because all adult females of a bisexual group could emigrate. This pattern of unhindered female dispersal affects male reproductive strategies, and in particular it might lead to infanticidal behavior during inter-group encounters. PMID:9209584

  1. Pollen Forecast and Dispersion Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Monica; Di Giuseppe, Fabio; Medaglia, Carlo Maria; Travaglini, Alessandro; Tocci, Raffaella; Brighetti, M. Antonia; Petitta, Marcello

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is monitoring, mapping and forecast of pollen distribution for the city of Rome using in-situ measurements of 10 species of common allergenic pollens and measurements of PM10. The production of daily concentration maps, associated to a mobile phone app, are innovative compared to existing dedicated services to people who suffer from respiratory allergies. The dispersal pollen is one of the most well-known causes of allergic disease that is manifested by disorders of the respiratory functions. Allergies are the third leading cause of chronic disease and it is estimated that tens millions of people in Italy suffer from it. Recent works reveal that during the last few years there was a progressive increase of affected subjects, especially in urban areas. This situation may depend: on the ability to transport of pollutants, on the ability to react between pollutants and pollen and from a combination of other irritants, existing in densely populated and polluted urban areas. The methodology used to produce maps is based on in-situ measurements time series relative to 2012, obtained from networks of air quality and pollen stations in the metropolitan area of Rome. The monitoring station aerobiological of University of Rome "Tor Vergata" is located at the Department of Biology. The instrument used to pollen monitoring is a volumetric sampler type Hirst (Hirst 1952), Model 2000 VPPS Lanzoni; the data acquisition is carried out as reported in Standard UNI 11008:2004 - "Qualità dell'aria - Metodo di campionamento e conteggio dei granuli pollinici e delle spore fungine aerodisperse" - the protocol that describes the procedure for measuring of the concentration of pollen grains and fungal spores dispersed into the atmosphere, and reported in the "Manuale di gestione e qualità della R.I.M.A" (Travaglini et. al. 2009). All 10 allergenic pollen are monitored since 1996. At Tor Vergata university is also operating a meteorological station (SP2000, CAE

  2. Response to “Comment on ‘Generalized dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized anisotropic plasma’” [Phys. Plasmas 22, 024701 (2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Deeba, F.; Ahmad, Zahoor; Murtaza, G.

    2015-02-15

    Sharifi and Parvazian have presented comments on our paper by questioning the validity of the results. The plots of different curves of kappa and (r, q) distributions produced by them are incorrect. They pretended as if we have made claim that our results are valid for large arguments of product of Bessel Function, whereas Neumann's series expansion is valid only for small arguments. In our paper, no claim is made that the results are valid for all values of b. Our results are valid only for b ≪ 1. The results plotted by the commenters are incorrect and in this response we are presenting correct plots of dispersion curves.

  3. Faraday dispersion functions of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Tashiro, Yuichi; Takahashi, Keitaro; Akahori, Takuya; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: 136d8008@st.kumamoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: akahori@physics.usyd.edu.au

    2014-09-01

    The Faraday dispersion function (FDF), which can be derived from an observed polarization spectrum by Faraday rotation measure synthesis, is a profile of polarized emissions as a function of Faraday depth. We study intrinsic FDFs along sight lines through face-on Milky Way like galaxies by means of a sophisticated galactic model incorporating three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and investigate how much information the FDF intrinsically contains. Since the FDF reflects distributions of thermal and cosmic-ray electrons as well as magnetic fields, it has been expected that the FDF could be a new probe to examine internal structures of galaxies. We, however, find that an intrinsic FDF along a sight line through a galaxy is very complicated, depending significantly on actual configurations of turbulence. We perform 800 realizations of turbulence and find no universal shape of the FDF even if we fix the global parameters of the model. We calculate the probability distribution functions of the standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis of FDFs and compare them for models with different global parameters. Our models predict that the presence of vertical magnetic fields and the large-scale height of cosmic-ray electrons tend to make the standard deviation relatively large. In contrast, the differences in skewness and kurtosis are relatively less significant.

  4. Hybrid Dispersion Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Goda, K.; Mahjoubfar, A.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2012-01-01

    Laser scanning technology is one of the most integral parts of today's scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and biomedicine. In many applications, high-speed scanning capability is essential for scanning a large area in a short time and multi-dimensional sensing of moving objects and dynamical processes with fine temporal resolution. Unfortunately, conventional laser scanners are often too slow, resulting in limited precision and utility. Here we present a new type of laser scanner that offers ∼1,000 times higher scan rates than conventional state-of-the-art scanners. This method employs spatial dispersion of temporally stretched broadband optical pulses onto the target, enabling inertia-free laser scans at unprecedented scan rates of nearly 100 MHz at 800 nm. To show our scanner's broad utility, we use it to demonstrate unique and previously difficult-to-achieve capabilities in imaging, surface vibrometry, and flow cytometry at a record 2D raster scan rate of more than 100 kHz with 27,000 resolvable points. PMID:22685627

  5. Photon dispersion in a supernova core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, Alexander; Raffelt, Georg

    1998-03-01

    While the photon forward-scattering amplitude on free magnetic dipoles (e.g. free neutrons) vanishes, the nucleon magnetic moments still contribute significantly to the photon dispersion relation in a supernova (SN) core where the nucleon spins are not free due to their interaction. We study the frequency dependence of the relevant spin susceptibility in a toy model with only neutrons which interact by one-pion exchange. Our approach amounts to calculating the photon absorption rate from the inverse bremsstrahlung process γnn-->nn, and then deriving the refractive index nrefr with the help of the Kramers-Kronig relation. In the static limit (ω-->0) the dispersion relation is governed by the Pauli susceptibility χPauli so that n2refr-1~χPauli>0. For ω somewhat above the neutron spin-relaxation rate Γσ we find n2refr-1<0, and for ω>>Γσ the photon dispersion relation acquires the form ω2-k2=m2γ. An exact expression for the ``transverse photon mass'' mγ is given in terms of the f-sum of the neutron spin autocorrelation function; an estimate is m2γ~χPauliTΓσ. The dominant contribution to nrefr in a SN core remains the electron plasma frequency so that the Cherenkov processes γν<-->ν remain forbidden for all photon frequencies.

  6. Dispersion in Unconsolidated Aquatic Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychoudhury, A. N.

    2001-11-01

    Inert tracer breakthrough experiments were used to parameterize hydrodynamic dispersion in undisturbed cores of surface sediment from lacustrine, estuarine, and marine depositional environments. The sediments studied cover wide ranges of composition, porosity (46 to 83%), mean grain size (10 -5to 10 -2 cm), and sorting (0·48-1·26). As expected, hydrodynamic dispersion depends on the average longitudinal fluid flow velocity through the sediment plug. At linear flow velocities exceeding 10 -4 cm s -1, mechanical dispersion exceeds diffusion in all sediment cores studied. Compared to the classical studies on dispersion in sand columns, however, Peclet numbers based on particle size measurements do not provide a reliable guide for predicting the transition from molecular diffusion-dominated to mechanical dispersion-dominated flow regimes in the sediments. It is believed that the influence of pore structure on dispersion is much larger than that of particle size and that the characteristic pore lengths in the finest, highly porous sediments are orders of magnitude larger than the mean grain size. Aggregation, microlaminations, and a heterogeneous pore size distribution may all contribute to non-ideal flow conditions in the sediments. Tailing of the breakthrough curve occurred occasionally in fine grain sediment, signifying micro and macro scale dispersion and non-ideal flow behavior. Experiments showing significant non-ideal flow through the sediment plug were not used for calculation of hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient.

  7. Preparation of alkali metal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for producing alkali metal dispersions of high purity. The dispersions are prepared by varying the equilibrium solubility of the alkali metal in a suitable organic solvent in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The equilibrium variation is produced by temperature change. The size of the particles is controlled by controlling the rate of temperature change.

  8. QT dispersion in adult hypertensives.

    PubMed Central

    Sani, Isa Muhammad; Solomon, Danbauchi Sulei; Imhogene, Oyati Albert; Ahmad, Alhassan Muhammad; Bala, Garko Sani

    2006-01-01

    Increased QT dispersion is associated with sudden cardiac death in congestive cardiac failure, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and following myocardial infarction. Patients with hypertension--in particular, those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH)--are also at greater risk of sudden cardiac death. We examined whether QT dispersion, which is easily obtained from a routine ECG, correlates with LVH. One-hundred untreated patients with systemic hypertension and 78 normotensives had QT dispersion measured manually from a surface 12-lead electrocardiogram and two-dimensional echocardiography performed to measure interventricular septal thickness, posterior wall thickness and left ventricular internal diameter. Office blood pressure was also recorded. Multivariate analysis demonstrated significant relationships between QT dispersion and office systolic blood pressure, and left ventricular mass index. Manual measurement of QT dispersion might be a simple, noninvasive screening procedure to identify those hypertensives at greatest risk of sudden cardiac death in a third-world country. PMID:16623077

  9. Multiple proximate and ultimate causes of natal dispersal in white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, E.S.; Diefenbach, D.R.; Rosenberry, C.S.; Wallingford, B.D.

    2008-01-01

    Proximate and ultimate causes of dispersal in vertebrates vary, and relative importance of these causes is poorly understood. Among populations, inter- and intrasexual social cues for dispersal are thought to reduce inbreeding and local mate competition, respectively, and specific emigration cue may affect dispersal distance, such that inbreeding avoidance dispersal tends to be farther than dispersal to reduce local competition. To investigate potential occurrence of multiple proximate and ultimate causes of dispersal within populations, we radio-marked 363 juvenile male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in 2 study areas in Pennsylvania. Natal dispersal probability and distance were monitored over a 3-year period when large-scale management changes reduced density of adult females and increased density of adult males. Most dispersal (95-97%) occurred during two 12-week periods: spring, when yearling males still closely associate with related females, and prior to fall breeding season, when yearling males closely associate with other breeding-age males. Following changes to sex and age structure that reduced potential for inbreeding and increased potential for mate competition, annual dispersal probability did not change; however, probability of spring dispersal decreased, whereas probability of fall dispersal increased. Spring dispersal distances were greater than fall dispersal distances, suggesting that adaptive inbreeding avoidance dispersal requires greater distance than mate competition dispersal where opposite-sex relatives are philopatric and populations are not patchily distributed. Both inbreeding avoidance and mate competition are important ultimate causes of dispersal of white-tailed deer, but ultimate motivations for dispersal are proximately cued by different social mechanisms and elicit different responses in dispersers.

  10. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.

    2011-04-12

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  11. Understanding cavity resonances with intracavity dispersion properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Jiteng; Wu Haibin; Mumba, M.; Gea-Banacloche, J.; Xiao Min

    2011-02-15

    We experimentally study the strongly coupled three-level atom-cavity system at both cavity and coupling frequency detuning cases. Side peak splitting and anti-crossing-like phenomena are observed under different experimental conditions. Intracavity dispersion properties are used to explain qualitatively the complicated cavity resonance structures in the composite system of inhomogeneously broadened three-level atoms inside an optical ring cavity with relatively strong driving intensities.

  12. Dispersion Analysis of the Pulseline Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Briggs, R J; Poole, B R; Nelson, S D

    2005-05-10

    The authors analyze the sheath helix model of the pulseline accelerator. They find the dispersion relation for a shielded helix with a dielectric material between the shield and the helix and compare it against the results from 3-D electromagnetic simulations. Expressions for the fields near the beam axis are obtained. A scheme to taper the properties of the helix to maintain synchronism with the accelerated ions is described. An approximate circuit model of the system that includes beam loading is derived.

  13. Multiphase Instabilities in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S. ``Bala''

    2015-11-01

    Explosive dispersal of particles is a complex multiphase phenomenon that can be observed in volcanic eruptions or in engineering applications such as multiphase explosives. As the layer of particles moves outward at high speed, it undergoes complex interactions with the blast-wave structure following the reaction of the energetic material. Particularly in this work, we are interested in the multiphase flow instabilities related to Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RM) instabilities (in the gas phase and particulate phase), which take place as the particle layer disperses. These types of instabilities are known to depend on initial conditions for a relatively long time of their evolution. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, we study the growth of these instabilities and their dependence on initial conditions related to the particulate phase - namely, (i) particle size, (ii) initial distribution, and (iii) mass ratio (particles to explosive). Additional complexities associated with compaction of the layer of particles are avoided here by limiting the simulations to modest initial volume fraction of particles. A detailed analysis of the initial conditions and its effects on multiphase RM/RT-like instabilities in the context of an explosive dispersal of particles is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  14. Chandra Observations of Low Velocity Dispersion Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helsdon, Stephen F.; Ponman, Trevor J.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    Deviations of galaxy groups from cluster scaling relations can be understood in terms of an excess of entropy in groups. The main effect of this excess is to reduce the density and thus the luminosity of the intragroup gas. Given this, groups should also show a steep relationship between X-ray luminosity and velocity dispersion. However, previous work suggests that this is not the case, with many measuring slopes flatter than the cluster relation. Examining the group LX-σ relation shows that much of the flattening is caused by a small subset of groups that show very high X-ray luminosities for their velocity dispersions (or vice versa). Detailed Chandra study of two such groups shows that earlier ROSAT results were subject to significant (~30%-40%) point-source contamination but confirm that a significant hot intergalactic medium is present in these groups, although these are two of the coolest systems in which intergalactic X-ray emission has been detected. Their X-ray properties are shown to be broadly consistent with those of other galaxy groups, although the gas entropy in NGC 1587 is unusually low, and its X-ray luminosity is correspondingly high for its temperature when compared with most groups. This leads us to suggest that the velocity dispersion in these systems has been reduced in some way, and we consider how this might have come about.

  15. Wave-vector dispersion versus angular-momentum dispersion of collective modes in small metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekardt, W.

    1987-09-01

    The wave-vector dispersion of collective modes in small particles is investigated within the time-dependent local-density approximation as applied to a self-consistent jellium particle. It is shown that the dispersion of the volume plasmons can be understood from that in an infinite electron gas. For a given multipole an optimum wave vector exists for the quasiresonant excitation of the volume mode but not for the surface mode. It is pointed out that-for the volume modes-the hydrodynamic approximation gives a reasonable first guess for the relation between frequencies and size-quantized wave vectors.

  16. Migration of dispersive GPR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, M.H.; Oden, C.P.

    2004-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and dielectric and magnetic relaxation phenomena cause electromagnetic propagation to be dispersive in earth materials. Both velocity and attenuation may vary with frequency, depending on the frequency content of the propagating energy and the nature of the relaxation phenomena. A minor amount of velocity dispersion is associated with high attenuation. For this reason, measuring effects of velocity dispersion in ground penetrating radar (GPR) data is difficult. With a dispersive forward model, GPR responses to propagation through materials with known frequency-dependent properties have been created. These responses are used as test data for migration algorithms that have been modified to handle specific aspects of dispersive media. When either Stolt or Gazdag migration methods are modified to correct for just velocity dispersion, the results are little changed from standard migration. For nondispersive propagating wavefield data, like deep seismic, ensuring correct phase summation in a migration algorithm is more important than correctly handling amplitude. However, the results of migrating model responses to dispersive media with modified algorithms indicate that, in this case, correcting for frequency-dependent amplitude loss has a much greater effect on the result than correcting for proper phase summation. A modified migration is only effective when it includes attenuation recovery, performing deconvolution and migration simultaneously.

  17. Hydrodynamics of CNT dispersion in high shear dispersion mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Min; Lee, Dong Hyun; Hwang, Wook Ryol; Lee, Sang Bok; Jung, Seung-Il

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the carbon nanotube (CNT) fragmentation mechanism and dispersion in high shear homogenizers as a plausible dispersion technique, correlating with device geometries and processing conditions, for mass production of CNT-aluminum composites for automobile industries. A CNT dispersion model has been established in a turbulent flow regime and an experimental method in characterizing the critical yield stress of CNT flocs are presented. Considering CNT dispersion in ethanol as a model system, we tested two different geometries of high shear mixers — blade-stirrer type and rotor-stator type homogenizers — and reported the particle size distributions in time and the comparison has been made with the modeling approach and partly with the computational results.

  18. Statistical effects related to low numbers of reacting molecules analyzed for a reversible association reaction A + B = C in ideally dispersed systems: An apparent violation of the law of mass action.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, R; Sosnowski, S; Maślanka, Ł

    2016-03-28

    Theoretical analysis and computer simulations (Monte Carlo and numerical integration of differential equations) show that the statistical effect of a small number of reacting molecules depends on a way the molecules are distributed among the small volume nano-reactors (droplets in this study). A simple reversible association A + B = C was chosen as a model reaction, enabling to observe both thermodynamic (apparent equilibrium constant) and kinetic effects of a small number of reactant molecules. When substrates are distributed uniformly among droplets, all containing the same equal number of substrate molecules, the apparent equilibrium constant of the association is higher than the chemical one (observed in a macroscopic-large volume system). The average rate of the association, being initially independent of the numbers of molecules, becomes (at higher conversions) higher than that in a macroscopic system: the lower the number of substrate molecules in a droplet, the higher is the rate. This results in the correspondingly higher apparent equilibrium constant. A quite opposite behavior is observed when reactant molecules are distributed randomly among droplets: the apparent association rate and equilibrium constants are lower than those observed in large volume systems, being the lower, the lower is the average number of reacting molecules in a droplet. The random distribution of reactant molecules corresponds to ideal (equal sizes of droplets) dispersing of a reaction mixture. Our simulations have shown that when the equilibrated large volume system is dispersed, the resulting droplet system is already at equilibrium and no changes of proportions of droplets differing in reactant compositions can be observed upon prolongation of the reaction time. PMID:27036432

  19. Statistical effects related to low numbers of reacting molecules analyzed for a reversible association reaction A + B = C in ideally dispersed systems: An apparent violation of the law of mass action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanski, R.; Sosnowski, S.; Maślanka, Ł.

    2016-03-01

    Theoretical analysis and computer simulations (Monte Carlo and numerical integration of differential equations) show that the statistical effect of a small number of reacting molecules depends on a way the molecules are distributed among the small volume nano-reactors (droplets in this study). A simple reversible association A + B = C was chosen as a model reaction, enabling to observe both thermodynamic (apparent equilibrium constant) and kinetic effects of a small number of reactant molecules. When substrates are distributed uniformly among droplets, all containing the same equal number of substrate molecules, the apparent equilibrium constant of the association is higher than the chemical one (observed in a macroscopic—large volume system). The average rate of the association, being initially independent of the numbers of molecules, becomes (at higher conversions) higher than that in a macroscopic system: the lower the number of substrate molecules in a droplet, the higher is the rate. This results in the correspondingly higher apparent equilibrium constant. A quite opposite behavior is observed when reactant molecules are distributed randomly among droplets: the apparent association rate and equilibrium constants are lower than those observed in large volume systems, being the lower, the lower is the average number of reacting molecules in a droplet. The random distribution of reactant molecules corresponds to ideal (equal sizes of droplets) dispersing of a reaction mixture. Our simulations have shown that when the equilibrated large volume system is dispersed, the resulting droplet system is already at equilibrium and no changes of proportions of droplets differing in reactant compositions can be observed upon prolongation of the reaction time.

  20. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  1. Responses of dispersal agents to tree and fruit traits in Virola calophylla (Myristicaceae): implications for selection.

    PubMed

    Russo, Sabrina E

    2003-06-01

    Variation in traits affecting seed dispersal in plants has been attributed to selection exerted by dispersal agents. The potential for such selection was investigated in Virola calophylla (Myristicaceae) in Manú National Park, Peru, through identification of seed dispersal agents and of tree and fruit traits significantly affecting the quantity of seeds dispersed. Seventeen bird and one primate species (the spider monkey, Ateles paniscus) dispersed its seeds. Spider monkeys dispersed the majority of seeds (a minimum of 83% of all dispersed seeds). Visitation by dispersal agents depended only on the quantity of ripe fruit available during a tree observation. In contrast, seed removal increased with both greater quantity of ripe fruit and aril: seed ratio. When analyzed separately, seed removal by birds increased only with greater aril: seed ratio, whereas seed removal by spider monkeys was affected by the quantity of ripe fruit and phenological stage. The finding that dispersal agents responded differently to some tree and fruit traits indicates not only that dispersal agents can exert selection on traits affecting seed dispersal, but also that the resulting selection pressures are likely to be inconsistent. This conclusion is supported by the result that the proportion of the seed crop that was dispersed from individual trees, which accounted for cumulative dispersal by all agents, was not influenced by any tree or fruit trait evaluated. Comparing these results with those from studies of V. sebifera and V. nobilis in Panama revealed that the disperser assemblages of these three Virola species were congruent in their similar taxonomic representation. In Panama the proportion of V. nobilis seed crop dispersed was related positively to aril: seed ratio and negatively to seed mass, a result not found for V. calophylla in Peru. The greater importance of dispersal by primates versus birds in V. calophylla, relative to V. nobilis, may explain this difference. Thus

  2. Preparation and dispersive mechanism of highly dispersive ultrafine silver powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guiquan; Gan, Weiping; Luo, Jian; Xiang, Feng; Zhang, Jinling; Zhou, Hua; Liu, Huan

    2010-09-01

    Using ascorbic acid as the reducing agent, AgNO 3 as the source of Ag, the ultrafine silver powder was prepared by liquid-phase reduction method. The optimal conditions to prepare the ultrafine silver powder were obtained by studying the effects of following factors, such as the selection of dispersant, the doses of dispersant and pH, on the dispersibility of silver powder under other constant conditions. The pure ultrafine silver powder with quasi-spherical shape and mean size of 1.15 μm was synthesized under the optimal conditions of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as disperser, PVA/AgNO 3 mass ratio of 4:100 and pH 7 while maintaining other conditions exactly in the same circumstances, such as AgNO 3 concentration of 0.20 mol L -1, ascorbic acid concentration of 0.15 mol L -1 and reaction temperature of 40 °C. The ultrafine silver powder was characterized by SEM and XRD. And a PVA dispersive mechanism for preparing highly dispersive ultrafine silver powder, proved by the ultraviolet spectra, is that PVA absorbed on the surface of silver particles by coordination bond preventing the silver particles from diffusion and aggregation. In addition, the steric effect may help to reduce aggregation.

  3. Trade-offs between seed dispersal and dormancy in an amphi-basicarpic cold desert annual

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Juan J.; Tan, Dun Y.; Baskin, Jerry M.; Baskin, Carol C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Several studies have demonstrated trade-offs between depth of seed dormancy and dispersal ability for diaspore-dimorphic species. However, relatively little is known about trade-offs between these two life history traits for a species that produces more than two diaspore morphs. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between seed dormancy and dispersal in Ceratocarpus arenarius, an amphi-basicarpic cold desert annual that produces a continuum of dispersal unit morphs. Methods A comparison was made of dispersal and dormancy breaking/germination responses of dispersal units from ground level (a), the middle of the plant canopy (c) and the top of the plant canopy (f). Various features of the morphology and mass of dispersal units and fruits (utricles) were measured. The role of bracteoles in diaspore dispersal by wind, settlement onto the soil surface and dormancy/germination was determined by comparing responses of intact dispersal units and fruits. Movement of dispersal units by wind and animals, seed after-ripening, germination phenology and the presence of water-soluble germination inhibitors in bracteoles were tested using standard procedures. Key Results Dispersal units a, c and f differed in morphology and mass; in the majority of cases, extremes were exhibited by a and f, with c being intermediate. Overall, relative dispersal ability was f > c > a, whereas relative intensity of dormancy was a > c > f. Bracteoles increased dispersal distance by wind, enhanced settlement of diaspores onto the soil surface and mechanically inhibited germination. Conclusions The results provide evidence for a model in which there is a continuous inverse-linear relationship between diaspore dispersal ability and depth of dormancy. Thus, dispersal unit heteromorphism of C. arenarius results in a continuum, from no dispersal ability/high dormancy (dispersal unit a) to high dispersal ability/low dormancy (unit f), which may be a bet

  4. Low-frequency dielectric dispersion of bacterial cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Asami, Koji

    2014-07-01

    Dielectric spectra of Escherichia coli cells suspended in 0.1-10 mM NaCl were measured over a frequency range of 10 Hz to 10 MHz. Low-frequency dielectric dispersion, so-called the α-dispersion, was found below 10 kHz in addition to the β-dispersion, due to interfacial polarization, appearing above 100 kHz. When the cells were killed by heating at 60°C for 30 min, the β-dispersion disappeared completely, whereas the α-dispersion was little influenced. This suggests that the plasma (or inner) membranes of the dead cells are no longer the permeability barrier to small ions, and that the α-dispersion is not related to the membrane potential due to selective membrane permeability of ions. The intensity of the α-dispersion depended on both of the pH and ionic strength of the external medium, supporting the model that the α-dispersion results from the deformation of the ion clouds formed outside and inside the cell wall containing charged residues. PMID:24835050

  5. Asphaltene dispersants as demulsification aids

    SciTech Connect

    Manek, M.B.

    1995-11-01

    Destabilization of petroleum asphaltenes may cause a multitude of problems in crude oil recovery and production. One major problem is their agglomeration at the water-oil interface of crude oil emulsions. Once agglomeration occurs, destabilized asphaltenes can form a thick pad in the dehydration equipment, which significantly reduces the demulsification rate. Certain polymeric dispersants increase asphaltene solubilization in hydrocarbon media, and when used in conjunction with emulsion breakers, facilitate the demulsification process. Two case studies are presented that demonstrate how asphaltene dispersants can efficiently inhibit pad formation and help reduce demulsifier dosage. Criteria for dispersant application and selection are discussed, which include the application of a novel laboratory technique to assess asphaltene stabilization in the crude oil. The technique monitors asphaltene agglomeration while undergoing titration with an incompatible solvent (precipitant). The method was used to evaluate stabilization of asphaltenes in the crude oil and to screen asphaltene dispersants.

  6. Dispersion coefficients for coastal regions

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, B.L.; Kaleel, R.J.; Shearer, D.L.

    1983-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken an extensive atmospheric dispersion research and measurement program from which it is intended will emerge improved predictive techniques for employment in licensing decisions and for emergency planning and response. Through this program the NRC has conducted field measurement programs over a wide range of geographic and topographic locations, and are using the acquired tracer and meteorological measurements to evaluate existing dispersion models and prediction techniques, and to develop new techniques when necessary.

  7. Does Random Dispersion Help Survival?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinazi, Rinaldo B.

    2015-04-01

    Many species live in colonies that prosper for a while and then collapse. After the collapse the colony survivors disperse randomly and found new colonies that may or may not make it depending on the new environment they find. We use birth and death chains in random environments to model such a population and to argue that random dispersion is a superior strategy for survival.

  8. Alfven wave filamentation and dispersive phase mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sulem, P. L.; Passot, T.; Laveder, D.; Borgogno, D.

    2009-11-10

    The formation of three-dimensional magnetic structures from quasi-monochromatic left-hand polarized dispersive Alfven waves, under the effect of transverse collapse and/or the lensing effect of density channels aligned with the ambient magnetic field is discussed, both in the context of the usual Hall-MHD and using a fluid model retaining linear Landau damping and finite Larmor radius corrections. It is in particular shown that in a small-{beta} plasma (that is stable relatively to the filamentation instability in the absence of inhomogeneities), a moderate density enhancement leads the wave energy to concentrate into a filament whose transverse size is prescribed by the dimension of the channel, while for a strong density perturbation, this structure later on evolves to thin helical ribbons where the strong gradients permit dissipation processes to become efficient and heat the plasma. The outcome of this 'dispersive phase mixing' that leads to small-scale formation on relatively extended regions contrasts with the more localized oblique shocks formed in the absence of dispersion. Preliminary results on the effect of weak collisions that lead to an increase of the transverse ion temperature are also briefly mentioned.

  9. Nanotube Dispersions Made With Charged Surfactant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuper, Cynthia; Kuzma, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Dispersions (including monodispersions) of nanotubes in water at relatively high concentrations have been formulated as prototypes of reagents for use in making fibers, films, and membranes based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Other than water, the ingredients of a dispersion of this type include one or more charged surfactant(s) and carbon nanotubes derived from the HiPco(TradeMark) (or equivalent) process. Among reagents known to be made from HiPco(TradeMark)(or equivalent) SWNTs, these are the most concentrated and are expected to be usable in processing of bulk structures and materials. Test data indicate that small bundles of SWNTs and single SWNTs at concentrations up to 1.1 weight percent have been present in water plus surfactant. This development is expected to contribute to the growth of an industry based on applied carbon nanotechnology. There are expected to be commercial applications in aerospace, avionics, sporting goods, automotive products, biotechnology, and medicine.

  10. Apochromatic telescope without anomalous dispersion glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duplov, Roman

    2006-07-01

    In order to correct secondary longitudinal chromatic aberration in conventional refracting optical systems, it is necessary to use at least one optical material having anomalous partial dispersion. A novel lens system with correction of the secondary spectrum by using only normal glasses is presented. The lens system comprises three widely separated lens components; both second and third components are subaperture. The presented example of an apochromatic telescope demonstrates secondary spectrum correction with the use of only crown BK7 and flint F2, which are among the most inexpensive optical glasses available at the market. Two more similar designs are presented, both with the use of low-cost slightly anomalous dispersion glasses. These telescopes have a higher relative aperture and a smaller tertiary spectrum.

  11. Morphomechanical Innovation Drives Explosive Seed Dispersal.

    PubMed

    Hofhuis, Hugo; Moulton, Derek; Lessinnes, Thomas; Routier-Kierzkowska, Anne-Lise; Bomphrey, Richard J; Mosca, Gabriella; Reinhardt, Hagen; Sarchet, Penny; Gan, Xiangchao; Tsiantis, Miltos; Ventikos, Yiannis; Walker, Simon; Goriely, Alain; Smith, Richard; Hay, Angela

    2016-06-30

    How mechanical and biological processes are coordinated across cells, tissues, and organs to produce complex traits is a key question in biology. Cardamine hirsuta, a relative of Arabidopsis thaliana, uses an explosive mechanism to disperse its seeds. We show that this trait evolved through morphomechanical innovations at different spatial scales. At the organ scale, tension within the fruit wall generates the elastic energy required for explosion. This tension is produced by differential contraction of fruit wall tissues through an active mechanism involving turgor pressure, cell geometry, and wall properties of the epidermis. Explosive release of this tension is controlled at the cellular scale by asymmetric lignin deposition within endocarp b cells-a striking pattern that is strictly associated with explosive pod shatter across the Brassicaceae plant family. By bridging these different scales, we present an integrated mechanism for explosive seed dispersal that links evolutionary novelty with complex trait innovation. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27264605

  12. Apochromatic telescope without anomalous dispersion glasses.

    PubMed

    Duplov, Roman

    2006-07-20

    In order to correct secondary longitudinal chromatic aberration in conventional refracting optical systems, it is necessary to use at least one optical material having anomalous partial dispersion. A novel lens system with correction of the secondary spectrum by using only normal glasses is presented. The lens system comprises three widely separated lens components; both second and third components are subaperture. The presented example of an apochromatic telescope demonstrates secondary spectrum correction with the use of only crown BK7 and flint F2, which are among the most inexpensive optical glasses available at the market. Two more similar designs are presented, both with the use of low-cost slightly anomalous dispersion glasses. These telescopes have a higher relative aperture and a smaller tertiary spectrum. PMID:16826255

  13. Dispersion of Sound in Dilute Suspensions with Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    The theory accounting for nonlinear particle relaxation (viscous and thermal) has been applied to the prediction of dispersion of sound in dilute suspensions. The results suggest that significant deviations exist for sound dispersion between the linear and nonlinear theories at large values of Omega(Tau)(sub d), where Omega is the circular frequency, and Tau(sub d) is the Stokesian particle relaxation time. It is revealed that the nonlinear effect on the dispersion coefficient due to viscous contribution is larger relative to that of thermal conduction

  14. Final report on the safety assessment of disperse Blue 7.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Disperse Blue 7 in cosmetic products: (1) methods of manufacture, including clarification of the relationship between Disperse Blue 7 and Disperse Turquoise ALF and Disperse Turquoise LF2G mixed with Reax 83A, Tamol SW, and Twitchell Oil; (2) analytical methods by which Disperse Blue 7 is measured; (3) impurities; (4) concentration of use as a function of product type; (5) confirmation that this is a direct hair dye; and (6) clarification of genotoxicity study results (e.g., Disperse Turquoise ALF and Disperse Turquoise LF2G were genotoxic in bacteria - what is the specific relation to Disperse Blue 7? Disperse Blue 7 at 60% purity was genotoxic in bacteria - is the other 40% the inert Reax 83A, Tamol SW, and Twitchell Oil?). Until such data are provided, the available data are insufficient to support the safety of Disperse Blue 7 as a hair dye ingredient in cosmetic formulations. PMID:17613132

  15. Elucidation of Photoisomerization-Related Structural Changes in an Acrylamide-Bridged Binaphthalene-Diazene Macrocyclic Chiroptical Switch by Experimental Electronic Circular Dichroism Spectra Simulation: Role of Dispersion Corrections.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Lukáš; Kicková, Anna; Filo, Juraj; Kedžuch, Stanislav; Putala, Martin

    2015-08-13

    Nondestructive readout of light-driven molecular memory devices can be achieved by monitoring the alterations in the chiroptical properties of 1,1'-binaphthalene as a conformationally responsive chiral group. In our system, this signaling unit is connected via acrylamide linkers to the receiving diphenyldiazene fragment, which undergoes significant geometrical changes upon (E)/(Z)-photoisomerization. The compound functions as a stable photochromic switch by alternating irradiation at 365/465 nm, with fully reversible modulation of circular dichroism (CD) signal intensity (up to 1:3) and extended thermal stability of the (Z)-isomer. According to molecular modeling, the acrylamide spacers are due to the imposed cyclic strain upon photoisomerization forced to switch amide conformations, which is markedly reflected in the CD spectra, whereas binaphthalene conformational changes are mostly neglected both by theory and by experiment. In CD simulation by TD-DFT, CAM-B3LYP outperforms B3LYP and M06 by means of similarity analysis, whereas the last mentioned functional also delivers satisfactory performance qualitatively. The inclusion of dispersion corrections during geometry optimization was crucial to retain consistency with the measured spectra. By carefully considering all relevant conformations of this 20-membered macrocycle, reasonable agreement with the experiment is reached not only for the CD simulation of the individual conformers but also of the photoisomerization process of their admixture. PMID:26172026

  16. Vertebrate seed dispersers maintain the composition of tropical forest seedbanks

    PubMed Central

    Wandrag, E. M.; Dunham, A. E.; Miller, R. H.; Rogers, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of seeds in the soil (the seedbank) can set the template for the early regeneration of habitats following disturbance. Seed dispersal is an important factor determining the pattern of seed rain, which affects the interactions those seeds experience. For this reason, seed dispersal should play an important role in structuring forest seedbanks, yet we know little about how that happens. Using the functional extirpation of frugivorous vertebrates from the island of Guam, together with two nearby islands (Saipan and Rota) that each support relatively intact disperser assemblages, we aimed to identify the role of vertebrate dispersers in structuring forest seedbanks. We sampled the seedbank on Guam where dispersers are absent, and compared this with the seedbank on Saipan and Rota where they are present. Almost twice as many species found in the seedbank on Guam, when compared with Saipan and Rota, had a conspecific adult within 2 m. This indicates a strong role of vertebrate dispersal in determining the identity of seeds in the seedbank. In addition, on Guam, a greater proportion of samples contained no seeds and overall species richness was lower than on Saipan. Differences in seed abundance and richness between Guam and Rota were less clear, as seedbanks on Rota also contained fewer species than Saipan, possibly due to increased post-dispersal seed predation. Our findings suggest that vertebrate seed dispersers can have a strong influence on the species composition of seedbanks. Regardless of post-dispersal processes, without dispersal, seedbanks no longer serve to increase the species pool of recruits during regeneration. PMID:26578741

  17. Vertebrate seed dispersers maintain the composition of tropical forest seedbanks.

    PubMed

    Wandrag, E M; Dunham, A E; Miller, R H; Rogers, H S

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of seeds in the soil (the seedbank) can set the template for the early regeneration of habitats following disturbance. Seed dispersal is an important factor determining the pattern of seed rain, which affects the interactions those seeds experience. For this reason, seed dispersal should play an important role in structuring forest seedbanks, yet we know little about how that happens. Using the functional extirpation of frugivorous vertebrates from the island of Guam, together with two nearby islands (Saipan and Rota) that each support relatively intact disperser assemblages, we aimed to identify the role of vertebrate dispersers in structuring forest seedbanks. We sampled the seedbank on Guam where dispersers are absent, and compared this with the seedbank on Saipan and Rota where they are present. Almost twice as many species found in the seedbank on Guam, when compared with Saipan and Rota, had a conspecific adult within 2 m. This indicates a strong role of vertebrate dispersal in determining the identity of seeds in the seedbank. In addition, on Guam, a greater proportion of samples contained no seeds and overall species richness was lower than on Saipan. Differences in seed abundance and richness between Guam and Rota were less clear, as seedbanks on Rota also contained fewer species than Saipan, possibly due to increased post-dispersal seed predation. Our findings suggest that vertebrate seed dispersers can have a strong influence on the species composition of seedbanks. Regardless of post-dispersal processes, without dispersal, seedbanks no longer serve to increase the species pool of recruits during regeneration. PMID:26578741

  18. Tracer Dispersion Within an Urban Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D.; Shallcross, D.; Price, C.; Nickless, G.; Simmonds, P.

    2003-12-01

    The transport and dispersion of pollutants has extremely important implications for the environment on urban, regional and global scales. At the urban level localised emissions of both biogenic and anthropogenic pollutants can directly impact the health of the inhabitants. The DAPPLE (Dispersion of Air Pollutants and their Penetration into the Local Environment) project is a consortium of six universities, which involves a multidisciplinary approach to characterise relatively small-scale urban atmospheric dispersion including wind tunnel modelling, computer simulations, fieldwork and analysis. This work describes the tracer technology used to characterise atmospheric dispersion as well as preliminary results from the first tracer release experiment in Central London. A steady state finite duration release of both perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH) and Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6 ) was performed as part of the first DAPPLE campaign. These compounds were released over a fifteen-minute integrated time period with the SF6 release staggered one and a half minutes behind the PMCH. The low background concentrations of PMCH (~ 5 x 10-3 pptv) and SF6 (~5pptv) along with non-depositing and non-reactive characteristics allow for the implementation of near ideal fluid dynamic experiments. Sampling consists of a multiport ladder fitting with solenoid valves onto which a succession of sampling bags is attached. These are electrically actuated in sequential order with an integrated sampling time of three minutes. The samplers are placed at various receptor positions in the DAPPLE zone in predefined positions designed to best validate these model simulated meteorological dispersion processes. Analysis of PMCH is carried out using sample enrichment on carbon based adsorbents, separation by capillary Gas Chromatography and Negative Ion Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry detection (GC-MS-NICI). SF6 concentrations are determined using fixed volume loop injections with Gas

  19. The QT dispersion and QTc dispersion in patients presenting with acute neurological events and its impact on early prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Rahar, Kailash Kumar; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Barupal, Kishan Gopal; Mathur, C. P.; Lakhotia, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To find out and investigate whether the QT dispersion and QTc dispersion is related to type and prognosis of the acute stroke in patients presenting within 24 h of the onset of stroke. Settings and Design: This was a observational study conducted at Mahatma Gandhi Hospital, Dr. SN. Medical College, Jodhpur, during January 2014 to January 2015. Subjects and Methods: The patients presented within 24 h of onset of acute stroke (hemorrhagic, infarction, or transient ischemic event) were included in the study. The stroke was confirmed by computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with (i) altered sensorium because of metabolic, infective, seizures, trauma, or tumor; (ii) prior history of cardiovascular disease, electrocardiographic abnormalities’ because of dyselectrolytemia; and (iii) and patients who were on drugs (antiarrhythmic drugs, antipsychotic drugs, erythromycin, theophylline, etc.,) which known to cause electrocardiogram changes, were excluded from the study. National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) was calculated at the time of admission and Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) at the time of discharge. Fifty age- and sex-matched healthy controls included. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test, ANOVA, and area under curve for sensitivity and specificity for the test. Results: We included 52 patients (male/female: 27/25) and 50 controls (26/24). The mean age of patients was 63.17 ± 08.90 years. Of total patients, infarct was found in 32 (61.53%), hemorrhage in 18 (34.61%), transient ischemic attack (TIA) in 1 (1.9%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage in 1 (1.9%) patient. The QT dispersion and QTc dispersion were significantly higher in cases as compare to controls. (87.30 ± 24.42 vs. 49.60 ± 08.79 ms; P < 0.001) and (97.53 ± 27.36 vs. 56.28 ± 09.86 ms; P < 0.001). Among various types of stroke, the mean QT dispersion and QTc dispersion were maximum and significantly higher in hemorrhagic stroke as compared to infarct and

  20. Dispersal of wolves (Canis lupus) in northeastern Minnesota, 1969-1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gese, E.M.; Mech, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the dispersal patterns of radio-collared wolves (Canis lupus) from 21 packs in the Superior National Forest, Minnesota, from 1969 to 1989. A total of 316 wolves (542 wolf-years) were captured, radio-collared, and followed during 21 years of radio-tracking; 75 were identified as dispersers. Both sexes dispersed equally. Of the adults, yearlings, and pups, 8, 75, and 16%, respectively, dispersed. Most dispersers left when they were 11-12 months old, only a few wolves dispersing as adults. Dispersal occurred mainly in February-April and October-November. Adults dispersed short distances into nearby territories, but yearlings and pups dispersed both short and long distances. Yearling and pup dispersal rates were highest when the wolf population was increasing or decreasing and low when the population was stable. Adults had the highest pairing and denning success, yearlings had moderate pairing and low denning success, and pups had low pairing and denning success. Yearlings and pups that dispersed a short distance had a higher success of settling in a new territory, likely reflecting available vacancies in nearby territories. Thirty-five percent of the known-age wolves remained in their natal territory for >2 years; two wolves were known to have remained for >7 years. The relative weight of pups at capture apparently did not affect their age or success of dispersal or the tendency to disperse.

  1. Dark matter dispersion tensor in perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles, Alejandro

    2016-03-01

    We compute the dark matter velocity dispersion tensor up to third order in perturbation theory using the Lagrangian formalism, revealing growing solutions at the third and higher orders. Our results are general and can be used for any other perturbative formalism. As an application, corrections to the matter power spectrum are calculated, and we find that some of them have the same structure as those in the effective field theory of large-scale structure, with "EFT-like" coefficients that grow quadratically with the linear growth function and are further suppressed by powers of the logarithmic linear growth factor f ; other corrections present additional k dependence. Due to the velocity dispersions, there exists a free-streaming scale that suppresses the whole 1-loop power spectrum. Furthermore, we find that as a consequence of the nonlinear evolution, the free-streaming length is shifted towards larger scales, wiping out more structure than that expected in linear theory. Therefore, we argue that the formalism developed here is better suited for a perturbation treatment of warm dark matter or neutrino clustering, where the velocity dispersion effects are well known to be important. We discuss implications related to the nature of dark matter.

  2. Dynamics of hard sphere colloidal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    Our objective is to perform on homogeneous, fully equilibrated dispersions the full set of experiments characterizing the transition from fluid to solid and the properties of the crystalline and glassy solid. These include measurements quantifying the nucleation and growth of crystallites, the structure of the initial fluid and the fully crystalline solid, and Brownian motion of particles within the crystal, and the elasticity of the crystal and the glass. Experiments are being built and tested for ideal microgravity environment. Here we describe the ground based effort, which exploits a fluidized bed to create a homogeneous, steady dispersion for the studies. The differences between the microgravity environment and the fluidized bed is gauged by the Peclet number Pe, which measures the rate of convection/sedimentation relative to Brownian motion. We have designed our experiment to accomplish three types of measurements on hard sphere suspensions in a fluidized bed: the static scattering intensity as a function of angle to determine the structure factor, the temporal autocorrelation function at all scattering angles to probe the dynamics, and the amplitude of the response to an oscillatory forcing to deduce the low frequency viscoelasticity. Thus the scattering instrument and the colloidal dispersion were chosen such as that the important features of each physical property lie within the detectable range for each measurement.

  3. Shade Effects on the Dispersal of Airborne Hemileia vastatrix Uredospores.

    PubMed

    Boudrot, Audrey; Pico, Jimmy; Merle, Isabelle; Granados, Eduardo; Vílchez, Sergio; Tixier, Philippe; Filho, Elías de Melo Virginio; Casanoves, Fernando; Tapia, Ana; Allinne, Clémentine; Rice, Robert A; Avelino, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Hemileia vastatrix caused a severe epidemic in Central America in 2012-13. The gradual development of that epidemic on nearly a continental scale suggests that dispersal at different scales played a significant role. Shade has been proposed as a way of reducing uredospore dispersal. The effect of shade (two strata: Erythrina poeppigiana below and Chloroleucon eurycyclum above) and full sun on H. vastatrix dispersal was studied with Burkard traps in relation to meteorological records. Annual and daily patterns of dispersal were observed, with peaks of uredospore capture obtained during wet seasons and in the early afternoon. A maximum of 464 uredospores in 1 day (in 14.4 m(3) of air) was recorded in October 2014. Interactions between shade/full sun and meteorological conditions were found. Rainfall, possibly intercepted by tree cover and redistributed by raindrops of higher kinetic energy, was the main driver of uredospore dispersal under shade. Wind gusts reversed this effect, probably by inhibiting water accumulation on leaves. Wind gusts also promoted dispersal under dry conditions in full sun, whereas they had no effect under shaded conditions, probably because the canopy blocked the wind. Our results indicate the importance of managing shade cover differentially in rainy versus dry periods to control the dispersal of airborne H. vastatrix uredospores. PMID:26828230

  4. Measuring turbulent fluid dispersion using laser induced phosphorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, Dennis; Dam, Nico; van de Water, Willem; Kunnen, Rudie; Clercx, Herman; van Heijst, Gertjan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid dispersion due to turbulence is an important subject in both natural and engineering processes, from cloud formation to turbulent mixing and liquid spray combustion. The combination of small scales and often high velocities results in few experimental techniques that can follow the course of events. We introduce a novel technique, which measures the dispersion of ``tagged'' fluid particles by means of laser-induced phosphorescence, using a solution containing a europium-based molecular complex with a relatively long phosphorescence half-life. This technique is used to measure transport processes in both the dispersion of droplets in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the dispersion of fluid of near-nozzle spray breakup processes. By tagging a small amount of droplets/fluid via laser excitation, the tagged droplets can be tracked in a Lagrangian way. The absolute dispersion of the droplets can be measured in a variety of turbulent flows. Using this technique it is shows that droplets around St =τp /τη ~ 1 (Stokes number) disperse faster than true fluid tracers in homogeneous isotropic turbulence, as well as differences between longitudinal and radial dispersion in turbulent sprays. This work is part of the research programme of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  5. Introduced birds incompletely replace seed dispersal by a native frugivore.

    PubMed

    Pejchar, Liba

    2015-01-01

    The widespread loss of native species and the introduction of non-native species has important consequences for island ecosystems. Non-native species may or may not functionally replace the role of native species in ecological processes such as seed dispersal. Although the majority of Hawaii's native plants require bird-mediated seed dispersal, only one native frugivore, Omao (Myadestes obscurus), persists in sufficient numbers to fill this functional role. Omao are restricted to less than half their original range, but two introduced frugivores are abundant throughout Hawaii. Given large-scale extinctions on islands, it is important to understand whether introduced birds serve as functional replacements or whether the absence of native frugivores alters plant communities. To assess seed dispersal by native and introduced birds, seed rain, vegetation characteristics, bird diet, density and habitat use were measured at three sites with Omao and three sites without Omao on Hawaii Island. The diet of native and introduced birds overlapped substantially, but Omao dispersed a variety of native species (n = 6) relatively evenly. In contrast, introduced birds dispersed an invasive species and fewer native species (n = 4), and >90 % of seeds dispersed by introduced birds were from two ubiquitous small-seeded species. Seed rain was significantly greater and more species rich at sites with Omao. These findings suggest that patterns of seed dispersal are altered following the local extinction of a native island frugivore. To more directly evaluate the relative roles of native and introduced frugivores in ecological processes, future studies could include reintroducing Omao to a suitable habitat within its historic range, or novel introductions to nearby islands where closely related species are now extinct. In an era of widespread extinction and invasion of island ecosystems, understanding the consequences of novel animal assemblages for processes like seed dispersal will be

  6. Introduced birds incompletely replace seed dispersal by a native frugivore

    PubMed Central

    Pejchar, Liba

    2015-01-01

    The widespread loss of native species and the introduction of non-native species has important consequences for island ecosystems. Non-native species may or may not functionally replace the role of native species in ecological processes such as seed dispersal. Although the majority of Hawaii's native plants require bird-mediated seed dispersal, only one native frugivore, Omao (Myadestes obscurus), persists in sufficient numbers to fill this functional role. Omao are restricted to less than half their original range, but two introduced frugivores are abundant throughout Hawaii. Given large-scale extinctions on islands, it is important to understand whether introduced birds serve as functional replacements or whether the absence of native frugivores alters plant communities. To assess seed dispersal by native and introduced birds, seed rain, vegetation characteristics, bird diet, density and habitat use were measured at three sites with Omao and three sites without Omao on Hawaii Island. The diet of native and introduced birds overlapped substantially, but Omao dispersed a variety of native species (n = 6) relatively evenly. In contrast, introduced birds dispersed an invasive species and fewer native species (n = 4), and >90 % of seeds dispersed by introduced birds were from two ubiquitous small-seeded species. Seed rain was significantly greater and more species rich at sites with Omao. These findings suggest that patterns of seed dispersal are altered following the local extinction of a native island frugivore. To more directly evaluate the relative roles of native and introduced frugivores in ecological processes, future studies could include reintroducing Omao to a suitable habitat within its historic range, or novel introductions to nearby islands where closely related species are now extinct. In an era of widespread extinction and invasion of island ecosystems, understanding the consequences of novel animal assemblages for processes like seed dispersal will be

  7. DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS AT VARIOUS SEA STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2002, a dispersant effectiveness protocol, which tested the effectiveness of dispersants to disperse crude oil into the water column, was developed. A new and highly reproducible protocol that uses a baffled flask as the primary vehicle for getting the oil dispersed has emerge...

  8. Dispersion-compensated fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    1992-01-01

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4.multidot.10.sup.-5 inch and a profile width of at least 10.sup.-3 inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight.

  9. DISPERSION HARDENING OF URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Arbiter, W.

    1963-01-15

    A method of hardening U metal involves the forming of a fine dispersion of UO/sub 2/. This method consists of first hydriding the U to form a finely divided powder and then exposing the powder to a very dilute O gas in an inert atmosphere under such pressure and temperature conditions as to cause a thin oxide film to coat each particle of the U hydride, The oxide skin prevents agglomeration of the particles as the remaining H is removed, thus preserving the small particle size. The oxide skin coatings remain as an oxide dispersion. The resulting product may be workhardened to improve its physical characteristics. (AEC)

  10. Dispersion-compensated Fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, K.C.

    1992-11-03

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4[times]10[sup [minus]5] inch and a profile width of at least 10[sup [minus]3] inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight. 10 figs.

  11. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; DeGrassie, J.S.

    1991-08-27

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other. 5 figures.

  12. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Ikezi, Hiroyuki; Lin-Liu, Yuh-Ren; DeGrassie, John S.

    1991-01-01

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other.

  13. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    1992-01-27

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX.« less

  14. Fog dispersion. [charged particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, L. S.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of using the charged particle technique to disperse warm fog at airports is investigated and compared with other techniques. The charged particle technique shows potential for warm fog dispersal, but experimental verification of several significant parameters, such as particle mobility and charge density, is needed. Seeding and helicopter downwash techniques are also effective for warm fog disperals, but presently are not believed to be viable techniques for routine airport operations. Thermal systems are currently used at a few overseas airports; however, they are expensive and pose potential environmental problems.

  15. Phase tracking with differential dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubois, Xavier; Lacour, Sylvestre; Perrin, Guy S.; Dembet, Roderick; Fedou, Pierre; Eisenhauer, Frank; Rousselet-Perraut, Karine; Straubmeier, Christian; Amorim, Antonio; Brandner, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Differential chromatic dispersion in single-mode optical fibres leads to a loss of contrast of the white light fringe. For the GRAVITY instrument, this aspect is critical since it limits the fringe tracking performance. We present a real-time algorithm that compensates for differential dispersion due to varying fibre lengths using prior calibration of the optical fibres. This correction is limited by the accuracy to which the fibres stretch is known. We show how this affects the SNR on the white light fringe for different scenarios and we estimate how this phenomenon might eventually impact the astrometric accuracy of GRAVITY observations.

  16. The presence of root-feeding nematodes - Not AMF - Affects an herbivore dispersal strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roissart, Annelies; Peña, Eduardo de la; Van Oyen, Lien; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Ballhorn, Daniel J.; Bonte, Dries

    2013-10-01

    Plant quality and aboveground herbivore performance are influenced either directly or indirectly by the soil community. As herbivore dispersal is a conditional strategy relative to plant quality, we examined whether belowground biotic interactions (the presence of root-feeding nematodes or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) affect aerial dispersal of a phytophagous mite (Tetranychus urticae) through changes in performance of their host plant (Phaseolus vulgaris). Aerial dispersal strategies of mites were analyzed in wind-tunnel experiments, in which a unique mite pre-dispersal behavior (rearing) was assessed in relation to the presence of belowground biota on the host plant on which mites developed. Spider mite pre-dispersal behavior significantly increased with the experienced mite density on the host during development. Additionally, plants infected with root-feeding nematodes induced an increase of spider mite aerial dispersal behavior. The results highlight that belowground herbivores can affect population dynamics of aboveground herbivores by altering dispersal strategies.

  17. Mechanical dispersion of clay from soil into water: readily-dispersed and spontaneously-dispersed clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czyż, Ewa A.; Dexter, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the experimental determination of the amount of clay dispersed from soil into water is described. The method was evaluated using soil samples from agricultural fields in 18 locations in Poland. Soil particle size distributions, contents of organic matter and exchangeable cations were measured by standard methods. Sub-samples were placed in distilled water and were subjected to four different energy inputs obtained by different numbers of inversions (end-over-end movements). The amounts of clay that dispersed into suspension were measured by light scattering (turbidimetry). An empirical equation was developed that provided an approximate fit to the experimental data for turbidity as a function of number of inversions. It is suggested that extrapolation of the fitted equation to zero inversions enables the amount of spontaneously-dispersed clay to be estimated. This method introduces the possibility of replacing the existing subjective, qualitative method of determining spontaneously-dispersed clay with a quantitative, objective method. Even though the dispersed clay is measured under saturated conditions, soil samples retain a `memory' of the water contents at which they have been stored.

  18. MAPPING DISSEMINATION OF CHEMICAL AFTER DISPERSIVE EVENTS USING AN AMBIENT-AIR, SURFACE SAMPLING TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemicals are dispersed by numerous accidental, deliberate, or weather-related events. Often, rapid analyses are desired to identify dispersed chemicals and to delineate areas of contamination. Hundreds of wipe samples might be collected from outdoor surfaces or building interi...

  19. Enhanced spectral resolution via externally dispersed interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, Jerry; Erskine, David; Sirk, Martin; Vanderburg, Andrew; Wishnow, Edward H.

    2012-09-01

    Externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) uses a hybrid spectrometer that combines a Michelson interferometer in series with a grating spectrometer. EDI provides a means of deriving spectral information at a resolution substantially higher than that provided by the grating spectrograph alone. Near IR observations have been conducted using the Triplespec spectrometer mounted on the 5m Hale telescope. Spectra have been reconstructed at a resolution of ~27000 where the resolution of Triplespec is ~2700. Progress in the development of the EDI technique is reported herein emphasizing studies related to the accuracy of the reconstructed spectra.

  20. Dispersed storage and generation case studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, K.; Stallkamp, J. A.; Walton, A.

    1980-01-01

    Three installations utilizing separate dispersed storage and generation (DSG) technologies were investigated. Each of the systems is described in costs and control. Selected institutional and environmental issues are discussed, including life cycle costs. No unresolved technical, environmental, or institutional problems were encountered in the installations. The wind and solar photovoltaic DSG were installed for test purposes, and appear to be presently uneconomical. However, a number of factors are decreasing the cost of DSG relative to conventional alternatives, and an increased DSG penetration level may be expected in the future.

  1. Hydrodynamical Dispersion in Taylor-Couette Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piva, M.; Calvo, A.; Aguirre, A.; Callegari, G.; Gabbanelli, S.; Rosen, M.; Wesfreid, J. E.

    1997-04-01

    In this article we study the mass tracer dispersion in organized flows. For this purpose we performed experiments in the flow arising from the Taylor-Couette hydrodynamic instability combined with axial flow. The tracer evolution is followed by means of optical measurements of the concentration. In this way transmission curves are obtained. We compare these curves with the solutions of the Gaussian models of mass diffusion and with phenomenological models including tracer trapping in the cells. This comparison gives us physical parameters related to the typical time and distances involved in the diffusive behaviour of tracers in the regions with recirculations and trapping.

  2. Estimation of Eeg Signal Dispersion During Seizure Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Chang, Bernard S.; Madsen, Joseph R.

    2010-01-01

    Localization of the seizure focus in the brain is a challenging problem in the field of epilepsy. The complexity of the seizure-related EEG waveform, its non-stationarity and degradation with distance due to the dispersive nature of the brain as a propagation medium, make localization difficult. Yet, precise estimation of the focus is critical, particularly when surgical resection is the only therapeutic option. The first step to solving this inverse problem is to estimate and account for frequency- or mode-specific signal dispersion, which is present in both scalp and intracranial EEG recordings during seizures. We estimated dispersion curves in both types of signals using a spatial correlation method and mode-based semblance analysis. We showed that, despite the assumption of spatial stationarity and a simplified array geometry, there is measurable inter-modal and intra-modal dispersion during seizures in both types of EEG recordings, affecting the estimated arrival times and consequently focus localization. PMID:20436687

  3. Limited dispersal, deleterious mutations and the evolution of sex

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    This study presents a mathematical model that allows for some offspring to be dispersed at random, while others stay close to their mothers. A single genetic locus is assumed to control fertility, and this locus is subject to the occurrence of deletions mutations. It is shown that, at equilibrium, the frequency of deleterious mutations in the population is inversely related to the rate of dispersal. The results also show that sexual reproduction can lead to a decrease in the equilibrium frequency of deleterious mutations. The reason for this relationship is that sex involves the dispersal of genetic material, and thus, like the dispersal of offspring, sex enhances competition among adults. The model is described using the example of a hermaphroditic plant population. However, the results should apply to animal populations as well. 36 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Optical dispersion of composite particles consisting of millicharged constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvam, Audrey K.; Latimer, David C.

    2016-08-01

    Composite dark matter (DM) comprised of electrically charged constituents can interact with the electromagnetic field via the particle's dipole moment. This interaction results in a dispersive optical index of refraction for the DM medium. We compute this refractive index for atomic DM and more strongly bound systems, modeled via a harmonic oscillator potential. The dispersive nature of the index will result in a time lag between high and low energy photons simultaneously emitted from a distant astrophysical observable. This time lag, due to matter dispersion, could confound potential claims of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) which can also result in such time lags. We compare the relative size of the two effects and determine that the dispersion due to DM is dwarfed by potential LIV effects for energies below the Planck scale.

  5. Qualitative change of character of dispersive interaction with intermolecular distance.

    PubMed

    Haslmayr, Johannes; Renger, Thomas

    2013-07-28

    The dispersive interaction between molecules results from Coulomb-correlated fluctuations of electrons and for large intermolecular distances it can be related to the molecular polarizabilities as in London's theory (F. London, Trans. Faraday Soc. 33, 8-26 (1937)). Here, we investigate the interaction between molecules with anisotropic polarizabilities at arbitrary distances using symmetry adapted perturbation theory, which allows us to analyze the different parts of the intermolecular potential separately. Whereas at large distances, in accordance with London's theory, there is no way to describe the dispersive interaction by a sum over pairwise isotropic atom-centered energy terms, at short distances such a description becomes possible. This surprising result has consequences for the development of molecular mechanics force fields, supports the dispersion energy terms applied in dispersion corrected density functional theory, and indicates that there is a qualitative change in electron correlation with distance. Apparently, at short distances intermolecular electron correlation is less influenced by intramolecular electron delocalization. PMID:23901956

  6. Doping dependent plasmon dispersion in 2 H -transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Eric; Büchner, Bernd; Habenicht, Carsten; König, Andreas; Knupfer, Martin; Berger, Helmuth; Huotari, Simo

    2016-07-01

    We report the behavior of the charge carrier plasmon of 2 H -transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) as a function of intercalation with alkali metals. Intercalation and concurrent doping of the TMD layers have a substantial impact on plasmon energy and dispersion. While the plasmon energy shifts are related to the intercalation level as expected within a simple homogeneous electron gas picture, the plasmon dispersion changes in a peculiar manner independent of the intercalant and the TMD materials. Starting from a negative dispersion, the slope of the plasmon dispersion changes sign and grows monotonously upon doping. Quantitatively, the increase of this slope depends on the orbital character (4 d or 5 d ) of the conduction bands, which indicates a decisive role of band structure effects on the plasmon behavior.

  7. Polarizability of the pion: No conflict between dispersion theory and chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquini, B.; Drechsel, D.; Scherer, S.

    2008-06-15

    Recent attempts to determine the pion polarizability by dispersion relations yield values that disagree with the predictions of chiral perturbation theory. These dispersion relations are based on specific forms for the absorptive part of the Compton amplitudes. The analytic properties of these forms are examined, and the strong enhancement of intermediate-meson contributions is shown to be connected with spurious singularities. If the basic requirements of dispersion relations are taken into account, the results of dispersion theory and effective field theory are not inconsistent.

  8. An Introduction to Dispersive Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taddei, M. M.; Mendes, T. N. C.; Farina, C.

    2010-01-01

    Dispersive forces are a kind of van der Waals intermolecular force which could only be fully understood with the establishment of quantum mechanics and, in particular, of quantum electrodynamics. In this pedagogical paper, we introduce the subject in a more elementary approach, aiming at students with basic knowledge of quantum mechanics. We…

  9. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms.

    PubMed

    Davit, Y; Byrne, H; Osborne, J; Pitt-Francis, J; Gavaghan, D; Quintard, M

    2013-01-01

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher's equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels' network; (2) the solute's diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. PMID:23410370

  10. Multiple overseas dispersal in amphibians.

    PubMed Central

    Vences, Miguel; Vieites, David R; Glaw, Frank; Brinkmann, Henner; Kosuch, Joachim; Veith, Michael; Meyer, Axel

    2003-01-01

    Amphibians are thought to be unable to disperse over ocean barriers because they do not tolerate the osmotic stress of salt water. Their distribution patterns have therefore generally been explained by vicariance biogeography. Here, we present compelling evidence for overseas dispersal of frogs in the Indian Ocean region based on the discovery of two endemic species on Mayotte. This island belongs to the Comoro archipelago, which is entirely volcanic and surrounded by sea depths of more than 3500 m. This constitutes the first observation of endemic amphibians on oceanic islands that did not have any past physical contact to other land masses. The two species of frogs had previously been thought to be nonendemic and introduced from Madagascar, but clearly represent new species based on their morphological and genetic differentiation. They belong to the genera Mantidactylus and Boophis in the family Mantellidae that is otherwise restricted to Madagascar, and are distinguished by morphology and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences from mantellid species occurring in Madagascar. This discovery permits us to update and test molecular clocks for frogs distributed in this region. The new calibrations are in agreement with previous rate estimates and indicate two further Cenozoic transmarine dispersal events that had previously been interpreted as vicariance: hyperoliid frogs from Africa to Madagascar (Heterixalus) and from Madagascar to the Seychelles islands (Tachycnemis). Our results provide the strongest evidence so far that overseas dispersal of amphibians exists and is no rare exception, although vicariance certainly retains much of its importance in explaining amphibian biogeography. PMID:14667332

  11. FORMATION OF INTERMETALLIC COMPOUND DISPERSIONS

    DOEpatents

    Bryner, J.S.

    1959-12-01

    BS>A method is presented for preparing dispersions containing thorium bismuthide in equiaxed form and having an average particle size of about 30 microns. Thorium particles having one dimension not greater than 0.015 in. are immersed in liquid bismuth at a temperature between 500 and 600 deg C, the quantity of thorium being in excess of its solubility in the bismuth.

  12. Dispersion-Enhanced Laser Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Arissian, L.; Diels, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the output modulation to determine the conditions for enhanced gyroscopic sensitivities. The element is treated as both a phase and amplitude filter, and the time-dependence of the cavity field is considered. Both atomic gases (two-level and multi-level) and optical resonators (single and coupled) are considered and compared as dispersive elements. We find that it is possible to simultaneously enhance the gyro scale factor sensitivity and suppress the dead band by using an element with anomalous dispersion that has greater loss at the carrier frequency than at the side-band frequencies, i.e., an element that simultaneously pushes and intensifies the perturbed cavity modes, e.g. a two-level absorber or an under-coupled optical resonator. The sensitivity enhancement is inversely proportional to the effective group index, becoming infinite at a group index of zero. However, the number of round trips required to reach a steady-state also becomes infinite when the group index is zero (or two). For even larger dispersions a steady-state cannot be achieved, and nonlinear dynamic effects such as bistability and periodic oscillations are predicted in the gyro response.

  13. Anomalous dispersions of `hedgehog' particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Joong Hwan; Yeom, Bongjun; Wang, Yichun; Tung, Siu On; Hoff, J. Damon; Kotov, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic particles in water and hydrophilic particles in oil aggregate, but can form colloidal dispersions if their surfaces are chemically camouflaged with surfactants, organic tethers, adsorbed polymers or other particles that impart affinity for the solvent and increase interparticle repulsion. A different strategy for modulating the interaction between a solid and a liquid uses surface corrugation, which gives rise to unique wetting behaviour. Here we show that this topographical effect can also be used to disperse particles in a wide range of solvents without recourse to chemicals to camouflage the particles' surfaces: we produce micrometre-sized particles that are coated with stiff, nanoscale spikes and exhibit long-term colloidal stability in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic media. We find that these `hedgehog' particles do not interpenetrate each other with their spikes, which markedly decreases the contact area between the particles and, therefore, the attractive forces between them. The trapping of air in aqueous dispersions, solvent autoionization at highly developed interfaces, and long-range electrostatic repulsion in organic media also contribute to the colloidal stability of our particles. The unusual dispersion behaviour of our hedgehog particles, overturning the notion that like dissolves like, might help to mitigate adverse environmental effects of the use of surfactants and volatile organic solvents, and deepens our understanding of interparticle interactions and nanoscale colloidal chemistry.

  14. REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE GALAXY VELOCITY DISPERSION FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Franx, Marijn; Brinchmann, Jarle; Labbe, Ivo; Van de Sande, Jesse; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Kriek, Mariska; Quadri, Ryan F.; Williams, Rik J.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2011-08-20

    We present a study of the evolution of the galaxy velocity dispersion function (VDF) from z = 0 to z = 1.5 using photometric data from the Ultra-Deep and the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey in the COSMOS field. The VDF has been measured locally using direct kinematic measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), but direct studies of the VDF at high redshift are difficult as they require velocity dispersion measurements of many thousands of galaxies. Taylor et al. demonstrated that dynamical and stellar masses are linearly related when the structure of the galaxy is accounted for. We show that the stellar mass, size, and Sersic index can reliably predict the velocity dispersions of SDSS galaxies. We apply this relation to galaxies at high redshift and determine the evolution of the inferred VDF. We find that the VDF at z {approx} 0.5 is very similar to the VDF at z = 0. At higher redshifts, we find that the number density of galaxies with dispersions {approx}< 200 km s{sup -1} is lower, but the number of high-dispersion galaxies is constant or even higher. At fixed cumulative number density, the velocity dispersions of galaxies with log N[Mpc{sup -3}] < -3.5 increase with time by a factor of {approx}1.4 from z {approx} 1.5-0, whereas the dispersions of galaxies with lower number density are approximately constant or decrease with time. The VDF appears to show less evolution than the stellar mass function, particularly at the lowest number densities. We note that these results are still somewhat uncertain and we suggest several avenues for further calibrating the inferred velocity dispersions.

  15. Exact averaging of laminar dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnakar, Ram R.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri

    2011-02-01

    We use the Liapunov-Schmidt (LS) technique of bifurcation theory to derive a low-dimensional model for laminar dispersion of a nonreactive solute in a tube. The LS formalism leads to an exact averaged model, consisting of the governing equation for the cross-section averaged concentration, along with the initial and inlet conditions, to all orders in the transverse diffusion time. We use the averaged model to analyze the temporal evolution of the spatial moments of the solute and show that they do not have the centroid displacement or variance deficit predicted by the coarse-grained models derived by other methods. We also present a detailed analysis of the first three spatial moments for short and long times as a function of the radial Peclet number and identify three clearly defined time intervals for the evolution of the solute concentration profile. By examining the skewness in some detail, we show that the skewness increases initially, attains a maximum for time scales of the order of transverse diffusion time, and the solute concentration profile never attains the Gaussian shape at any finite time. Finally, we reason that there is a fundamental physical inconsistency in representing laminar (Taylor) dispersion phenomena using truncated averaged models in terms of a single cross-section averaged concentration and its large scale gradient. Our approach evaluates the dispersion flux using a local gradient between the dominant diffusive and convective modes. We present and analyze a truncated regularized hyperbolic model in terms of the cup-mixing concentration for the classical Taylor-Aris dispersion that has a larger domain of validity compared to the traditional parabolic model. By analyzing the temporal moments, we show that the hyperbolic model has no physical inconsistencies that are associated with the parabolic model and can describe the dispersion process to first order accuracy in the transverse diffusion time.

  16. Modeling of Building Scale Flow and Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R L; Calhoun, R J; Chan, S T; Leone, J; Stevens, D E

    2001-07-10

    Predictions of airflows around buildings and the associated thermal and dispersion phenomena continue to be challenging because of the presence of extremely heterogeneous surface structures within urban areas. Atmospheric conditions can induce local winds to flow around structures rather than over them. Thus pollutants that are released at or near the ground tend to persist at relatively low levels with only minimal ventilation of the airborne material away from the ground surface. While flow and dispersion phenomena can be studied within wind tunnel settings, recent advances in numerical modeling have enabled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to evolve into an important tool in the simulation of building scale flows. They are developing numerical models to simulate the flow and dispersion of releases around multi-building complexes. These models will be used to assess the transport and fate of releases of hazardous agents within urban areas and to support emergency response activities. There are already a number of models that have been developed to simulate flow and dispersion around urban settings. A recent collection of these papers can be found in the Proceedings of the International Workshop on CFD for Wind Climate in Cities. Most of the simulation studies presented in the literature are based on single buildings with a few of these results compared with wind tunnel experiments. As the applications become more advanced, the influence of multiple buildings, vegetation, surface heating and atmospheric stability on flow and dispersion has begun to be incorporated into recent CFD models. The focus of this paper is to describe LLNL's effort in the development of a high-performance CFD model for simulating transport and diffusion of hazardous releases around buildings and building complexes. A number of new physics features have been implemented in order to customize the CFD model for the urban application. These include surface heating, vegetation canopy, heat

  17. Sex biases in kin shoaling and dispersal in a cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Wouter F D; Wagner, Richard H; Moodley, Yoshan; Schaedelin, Franziska C

    2014-12-01

    Animal dispersal is associated with diverse costs and benefits that vary among individuals based on phenotype and ecological conditions. For example, females may disperse when males benefit more from defending territories in familiar environments. Similarly, size differences in dispersal propensity may occur when dispersal costs are size-dependent. When individuals do disperse, they may adopt behavioral strategies that minimize dispersal costs. Dispersing fish, for example, may travel within shoals to reduce predation risks. Further, kin shoaling may augment inclusive fitness by reducing predation of relatives. However, studies are lacking on the role of kin shoaling in dispersal. We explored how sex and size influence dispersal and kin shoaling in the cichlid Neolamprologus caudopunctatus. We microsatellite genotyped over 900 individuals from two populations separated by a potential dispersal barrier, and documented patterns of population structure, migration and within-shoal relatedness. Genetic differentiation across the barrier was greater for smaller than larger fish, suggesting larger fish had dispersed longer distances. Females exhibited weaker genetic differentiation and 11 times higher migration rates than males, indicating longer-distance female-biased dispersal. Small females frequently shoaled with siblings, possibly offsetting dispersal costs associated with higher predation risks. In contrast, small males appeared to avoid kin shoaling, possibly to avoid local resource competition. In summary, long-distance dispersal in N. caudopunctatus appears to be female-biased, and kin-based shoaling by small females may represent a behavioral adaptation that reduces dispersal costs. Our study appears to be the first to provide evidence that sex differences in dispersal influence sex differences in kin shoaling. PMID:25231372

  18. Realistic dispersion kernels applied to cohabitation reaction dispersion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern, Neus; Fort, Joaquim; Pérez-Losada, Joaquim

    2008-10-01

    We develop front spreading models for several jump distance probability distributions (dispersion kernels). We derive expressions for a cohabitation model (cohabitation of parents and children) and a non-cohabitation model, and apply them to the Neolithic using data from real human populations. The speeds that we obtain are consistent with observations of the Neolithic transition. The correction due to the cohabitation effect is up to 38%.

  19. Adsorption and removal of graphene dispersants.

    PubMed

    Irin, Fahmida; Hansen, Matthew J; Bari, Rozana; Parviz, Dorsa; Metzler, Shane D; Bhattacharia, Sanjoy K; Green, Micah J

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrate three different techniques (dialysis, vacuum filtration, and spray drying) for removal of dispersants from liquid-exfoliated graphene. We evaluate these techniques for elimination of dispersants from both the bulk liquid phase and from the graphene surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms dispersant removal by these treatments. Vacuum filtration (driving by convective mass transfer) is the most effective method of dispersant removal, regardless of the type of dispersant, removing up to ∼95 wt.% of the polymeric dispersant with only ∼7.4 wt.% decrease in graphene content. Dialysis also removes a significant fraction (∼70 wt.% for polymeric dispersants) of un-adsorbed dispersants without disturbing the dispersion quality. Spray drying produces re-dispersible, crumpled powder samples and eliminates much of the unabsorbed dispersants. We also show that there is no rapid desorption of dispersants from the graphene surface. In addition, electrical conductivity measurements demonstrate conductivities one order of magnitude lower for graphene drop-cast films (where excess dispersants are present) than for vacuum filtered films, confirming poor inter-sheet connectivity when excess dispersants are present. PMID:25681785

  20. On the spectral theory of turbulence and atmospheric dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Shoaib

    A new theoretical model has been developed to predict the transport of atmospheric pollutants as they disperse in the environment. The proposed model is the first successful effort to theoretically predict the dispersion coefficient under all six Pasquill stability classes. This new approach is based on the spectral theory of turbulence and Higbie's penetration theory. It is assumed that the fundamental mechanism of mass transfer under the influence of turbulence is similar to the process of molecular diffusion: i.e., the turbulent dispersion coefficient is dependent on the molecular properties. It is also assumed that the rate of diffusion is related to the rate of energy dissipation in the flow field. During this investigation it was realized that there are at least two independent time scales that require consideration in turbulent diffusion modeling. The smaller of the two, the dissipative time scale, is related to the rate of energy dissipation and hence the state of turbulence. On the other hand, a much larger dispersive time scale determined by the size of the largest eddy also plays a critical role in the phenomenon of dispersion. The Penetration Theory is used to obtain an expression for the mass transfer coefficient that is used in conjunction with a dispersive time scale to obtain a final expression for the dispersion coefficient. The dispersive time scale used in this development is based on Gifford's time-dependent velocity autocorrelation function. Therefore, the final expression for the dispersion coefficient contains the two time scales and the molecular diffusivity. In support of Gifford's conclusion, this research has also found that the dispersive time scale is of the same order of magnitude as the Coriolis parameter. The dissipative time scale is the only parameter in the model that requires adjustment to account for the change in atmospheric stability. The new model demonstrates the variability in the diffusion characteristics of various gases

  1. Simplified dispersion curves for circular cylindrical shells using shallow shell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Sonti, Venkata R.

    2009-04-01

    An alternative derivation of the dispersion relation for the transverse vibration of a circular cylindrical shell is presented. The use of the shallow shell theory model leads to a simpler derivation of the same result. Further, the applicability of the dispersion relation is extended to the axisymmetric mode and the high frequency beam mode.

  2. Sex-biased dispersal in a salmonid fish.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Gerber, Leah

    2002-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dispersal is sex biased in an unexploited population of brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, on Cape Race, Newfoundland, Canada. Based on the assumptions that trout are promiscuous and that reproductive success is limited primarily by either number of mates (males) or fecundity (females), we predicted that males would disperse greater distances than females. We also tested the hypothesis that trout populations comprise stationary and mobile individuals, predicting that males have greater mobility than females. Based on a mark-recapture study of 943 individually tagged fishes, 191 of which were recaptured over 5 years, we find strong support for our hypothesis of male-biased dispersal in brook trout. Averaged among all 11 resampling periods, males dispersed 2.5 times as far as females; during the spawning period only, male dispersal exceeded that by females almost fourfold. Both sexes were heterogeneous with respect to movement, with a lower incidence of mobility among females (29.6%) than males (41.1%); mobile males dispersed six times further than mobile females. We conclude that this sex bias reduces mate competition among male kin and decreases the probability that males will reproduce with related females. PMID:12495493

  3. Dispersive processes in models of regional radionuclide migration. Technical memorandum

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, D.E.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-05-01

    Three broad areas of concern in the development of aquifer scale transport models will be local scale diffusion and dispersion processes, regional scale dispersion processes, and numerical problems associated with the advection-dispersion equation. Local scale dispersion processes are fairly well understood and accessible to observation. These processes will generally be dominated in large scale systems by regional processes, or macro-dispersion. Macro-dispersion is primarily the result of large scale heterogeneities in aquifer properties. In addition, the effects of many modeling approximations are often included in the process. Because difficulties arise in parameterization of this large scale phenomenon, parameterization should be based on field measurements made at the same scale as the transport process of interest or else partially circumvented through the application of a probabilistic advection model. Other problems associated with numerical transport models include difficulties with conservation of mass, stability, numerical dissipation, overshoot, flexibility, and efficiency. We recommend the random-walk model formulation for Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's purposes as the most flexible, accurate and relatively efficient modeling approach that overcomes these difficulties.

  4. Mother-offspring interactions affect natal dispersal in a lizard.

    PubMed Central

    Le Galliard, Jean-François; Ferrière, Régis; Clobert, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Interactions between relatives operate strong selective pressures on dispersal. Recently, a correlative study in the common lizard (Lacerta vivipara) suggested that natal dispersal might respond plastically to mother-offspring interactions. Here, we describe a factorial experiment supporting this observation. Two crossed treatments were applied to experimental patches of the common lizard: (i) presence versus absence of the mother, inducing a difference of kinship in offspring neighbourhoods; and (ii) high versus low patch density, resulting in two levels of conspecific abundance and modulating the effect of mother presence on the average kinship within a patch. Dispersal of the same cohort of offspring was observed at the juvenile and yearling stages. We found a sex-dependent response of offspring dispersal to the removal of the mother at the two stages. During the juvenile stage, higher dispersal was found in females in the presence of the mother, with males unaffected. During the yearling stage, the responses of both sexes to the presence of the mother opposed each other. In addition, we found a negative relationship between dispersal and patch density at the juvenile stage. No interaction between density and the presence of the mother was detected, which suggests that behavioural responses to kinship and density are disconnected and that kinship is assessed at a small social scale. We discuss the role of competition and inbreeding avoidance to explain the observed pattern. PMID:12816655

  5. Statistical description of turbulent dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, J. J. H.

    2012-12-01

    We derive a comprehensive statistical model for dispersion of passive or almost passive admixture particles such as fine particulate matter, aerosols, smoke, and fumes in turbulent flow. The model rests on the Markov limit for particle velocity. It is in accordance with the asymptotic structure of turbulence at large Reynolds number as described by Kolmogorov. The model consists of Langevin and diffusion equations in which the damping and diffusivity are expressed by expansions in powers of the reciprocal Kolmogorov constant C0. We derive solutions of O(C00) and O(C0-1). We truncate at O(C0-2) which is shown to result in an error of a few percentages in predicted dispersion statistics for representative cases of turbulent flow. We reveal analogies and remarkable differences between the solutions of classical statistical mechanics and those of statistical turbulence.

  6. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    1992-02-03

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX. The DEC VAX11 version contains an auxiliary program, POLYREAD, which reads the polyplot file created by FEM3.« less

  7. Dispersed Fringe Sensing Analysis - DFSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Redding, David C.; Basinger, Scott A.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.; Spechler, Joshua A.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersed Fringe Sensing (DFS) is a technique for measuring and phasing segmented telescope mirrors using a dispersed broadband light image. DFS is capable of breaking the monochromatic light ambiguity, measuring absolute piston errors between segments of large segmented primary mirrors to tens of nanometers accuracy over a range of 100 micrometers or more. The DFSA software tool analyzes DFS images to extract DFS encoded segment piston errors, which can be used to measure piston distances between primary mirror segments of ground and space telescopes. This information is necessary to control mirror segments to establish a smooth, continuous primary figure needed to achieve high optical quality. The DFSA tool is versatile, allowing precise piston measurements from a variety of different optical configurations. DFSA technology may be used for measuring wavefront pistons from sub-apertures defined by adjacent segments (such as Keck Telescope), or from separated sub-apertures used for testing large optical systems (such as sub-aperture wavefront testing for large primary mirrors using auto-collimating flats). An experimental demonstration of the coarse-phasing technology with verification of DFSA was performed at the Keck Telescope. DFSA includes image processing, wavelength and source spectral calibration, fringe extraction line determination, dispersed fringe analysis, and wavefront piston sign determination. The code is robust against internal optical system aberrations and against spectral variations of the source. In addition to the DFSA tool, the software package contains a simple but sophisticated MATLAB model to generate dispersed fringe images of optical system configurations in order to quickly estimate the coarse phasing performance given the optical and operational design requirements. Combining MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks), MACOS (JPL s software package for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical

  8. Dispersion as a Survival Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, Valdivino Vargas; Machado, Fábio Prates; Roldán-Correa, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We consider stochastic growth models to represent population subject to catastrophes. We analyze the subject from different set ups considering or not spatial restrictions, whether dispersion is a good strategy to increase the population viability. We find out it strongly depends on the effect of a catastrophic event, the spatial constraints of the environment and the probability that each exposed individual survives when a disaster strikes.

  9. Turbulent Dispersion of Traffic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, R. M.; Gordon, M.; Liggio, J.; Makar, P.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J.; Wentzell, J. J.; Gong, S.; Lu, G.; Lee, P.

    2010-12-01

    Emissions from the transportation sector are a significant source of air pollution. Ongoing efforts to reduce the impacts require tools to provide guidance on policies regarding fuels, vehicle types and traffic control. The air quality models currently used to predict the effectiveness of policies typically treat traffic emissions as a source uniformly distributed across the surface of a model grid. In reality, emissions occur along lines above the surface, in an initially highly concentrated form, and are immediately mixed by traffic-enhanced turbulence. Differences between model and reality in terms of both chemistry and dispersion are to be expected. The ALMITEE (Advancing Local-scale Modeling through Inclusion of Transportation Emission Experiments) subproject FEVER (Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions from Roadways), conducted on multi-lane highways in the Toronto area in the summer of 2010, included measurements to quantify the evolution and dispersion of traffic emissions. Continuous micro-meteorological data (heat and momentum fluxes, temperature, humidity and incoming solar radiation) were collected 10m from the road, next to a traffic camera used to determine traffic density, composition and speed. Sonic anemometers and an aircraft turbulence probe mounted on a mobile lab provided measurements of turbulent dispersion both directly in traffic on the highway as well as on perpendicular side roads, as a function of distance from the highway. The mobile lab was equipped with instruments to characterize the aerosol size and mass distributions, aerosol composition including black carbon content, NO, NO2, CO2, CO, SO2 and VOCs at high time resolution. Preliminary results on the consequences of turbulent dispersion of traffic emissions levels under a variety of conditions will be disseminated.

  10. Dispersion as a Survival Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, Valdivino Vargas; Machado, Fábio Prates; Roldán-Correa, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    We consider stochastic growth models to represent population subject to catastrophes. We analyze the subject from different set ups considering or not spatial restrictions, whether dispersion is a good strategy to increase the population viability. We find out it strongly depends on the effect of a catastrophic event, the spatial constraints of the environment and the probability that each exposed individual survives when a disaster strikes.

  11. Acoustic nonlinearity in dispersive solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation to consider the effects of dispersion on the generation of the static acoustic wave component is presented. It is considered that an acoustic toneburst may be modeled as a modulated continuous waveform and that the generated initial static displacement pulse may be viewed as a modulation-confined disturbance. A theoretical model for the generation of the acoustic modulation solitons evolved is developed and experimental evidence in samples of vitreous silica demonstrating the essential validity of the model is provided.

  12. Steady State Dense Gas Dispersion

    1995-03-01

    SLAB-LLNL is a steady-state one-dimensional program which calculates the atmospheric dispersion of a heavier than air gas that is continuously released at ground level. The model is based on the steady-state crosswind-averaged conservation equations of species, mass, energy, and momentum. It uses the air entrainment concept to account for the turbulent mixing of the gas cloud with the surrounding atmosphere and similarity profiles to determine the crosswind dependence.

  13. Dispersive tristability in microring resonators.

    PubMed

    Dumeige, Yannick; Féron, Patrice

    2005-12-01

    Combining a transfer matrix analysis and slowly varying envelope approximation, we propose a simple method to describe steady states associated with dispersive multistability in coupled microring resonators. This approach allows us to consider nonlinear interactions between independent forward and backward propagative fields. We applied this simple formalism first to decrease the tristability intensity threshold in linearly coupled resonators and second to optically control the tristable behavior in a single microring resonator. PMID:16486080

  14. Integrated Urban Dispersion Modeling Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Chan, S T

    2003-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for developing a detailed understanding of three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). The accurate and timely prediction of the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous materials in densely populated urban areas is a critical homeland and national security need for emergency preparedness, risk assessment, and vulnerability studies. The main challenges in high-fidelity numerical modeling of urban dispersion are the accurate prediction of peak concentrations, spatial extent and temporal evolution of harmful levels of hazardous materials, and the incorporation of detailed structural geometries. Current computational tools do not include all the necessary elements to accurately represent hazardous release events in complex urban settings embedded in high-resolution terrain. Nor do they possess the computational efficiency required for many emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We are developing a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability, able to efficiently predict dispersion in diverse urban environments for a wide range of atmospheric conditions, temporal and spatial scales, and release event scenarios. This new computational fluid dynamics capability includes adaptive mesh refinement and it can simultaneously resolve individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features), treat complex building and structural geometries (e.g., stadiums, arenas, subways, airplane interiors), and cope with the full range of atmospheric conditions (e.g. stability). We are developing approaches for seamless coupling with mesoscale numerical weather prediction models to provide realistic forcing of the urban-scale model, which is critical to its performance in real-world conditions.

  15. Hawking Radiation in Dispersive Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott James

    2011-06-01

    Hawking radiation, despite its presence in theoretical physics for over thirty years, remains elusive and undetected. It also suffers, in its original context of gravitational black holes, from conceptual difficulties. Of particular note is the trans-Planckian problem, which is concerned with the apparent origin of the radiation in absurdly high frequencies. In order to gain better theoretical understanding and, it is hoped, experimental verification of Hawking radiation, much study is being devoted to systems which model the spacetime geometry of black holes, and which, by analogy, are also thought to emit Hawking radiation. These analogue systems typically exhibit dispersion, which regularizes the wave behaviour at the horizon but does not lend itself well to analytic treatment, thus rendering Hawking's prediction less secure. A general analytic method for dealing with Hawking radiation in dispersive systems has proved difficult to find. This thesis presents new numerical and analytic results for Hawking emission spectra in dispersive systems. It examines two black-hole analogue systems: it begins by introducing the well-known acoustic model, presenting some original results in that context; then, through analogy with the acoustic model, goes on to develop the lesser-known fibre-optical model.

  16. Combining distances of ballistic and myrmecochorous seed dispersal in Adriana quadripartita (Euphorbiaceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Kieren P.; Mackay, Duncan A.; Whalen, Molly A.

    2009-05-01

    The separate contributions of different vectors to net seed dispersal curves of diplochorous systems have rarely been characterised. In Australia, myrmecochory is a common seed dispersal syndrome and in the majority of such systems, seeds are initially dispersed ballistically. We measured ballistic and myrmecochorous seed dispersal distances in relation to canopies of Adriana quadripartita (Euphorbiaceae) and used a simulation model to estimate the net dispersal curve. We also compared seed removal rates and ant abundances under, and outside, plant canopies to examine how foraging patterns by ants may affect net dispersal. Overall ant abundance did not show a significant numerical response to seedfall; however, the abundance of the main seed dispersing ant, Rhytidoponera 'metallica' did. Despite this, seed removal rates did not differ significantly between canopy and open locations. Rhytidoponera 'metallica' account for 93% of observed seed dispersal events. On average, the ants dispersed seeds 1.54 m and in doing so, moved seed a mean radial distance of 0.76 m away from canopy edges. This contribution to net dispersal distance by ants is considerable since ballistic dispersal moved seeds a median distance of 7.5 cm. Our simulation model indicated that the combination of ballistic and ant seed dispersal is expected to result in seeds being transported a median net radial dispersal distance of 1.05 m from the canopy edge. Thus in this system, an important function of diplochory may simply be to move a higher proportion of seeds from under the canopy of parent plants than is possible by ballistic dispersal alone. This 'dispersal-for-distance' may result in reduced parent-offspring competition or may increase the probability that seeds reach rare safe sites for germination and recruitment.

  17. Short-range atmospheric dispersion of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Cortis, A.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-11-01

    We present a numerical study aimed at quantifying the effects of concentration-dependent density on the spread of a seeping plume of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere such as could arise from a leaking geologic carbon sequestration site. Results of numerical models can be used to supplement field monitoring estimates of CO{sub 2} seepage flux by modelling transport and dispersion between the source emission and concentration-measurement points. We focus on modelling CO{sub 2} seepage dispersion over relatively short distances where density effects are likely to be important. We model dense gas dispersion using the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with density dependence in the gravity term. Results for a two-dimensional system show that a density dependence emerges at higher fluxes than prior estimates. A universal scaling relation is derived that allows estimation of the flux from concentrations measured downwind and vice versa.

  18. Magnetic field dispersion in the neighbourhood of Bok Globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, C. V.; Magalhães, V. de S.; Vilas-Boas, J. W.; Racca, G.; Pereyra, A.

    2014-08-01

    We performed an observational study of the relation between the interstellar magnetic field alignment and star formation in twenty (20) sky regions containing Bok Globules. The presence of young stellar objects in the globules is verified by a search of infrared sources with spectral energy distribution compatible with a pre main-sequence star. The interstellar magnetic field direction is mapped using optical polarimetry. These maps are used to estimate the dispersion of the interstellar magnetic field direction in each region from a Gaussian fit, σ B . In addition to the Gaussian dispersion, we propose a new parameter, η, to measure the magnetic field alignment that does not rely on any function fitting. Statistical tests show that the dispersion of the magnetic field direction is different in star forming globules relative to quiescent globules. Specifically, the less organised magnetic fields occur in regions having young stellar objects.

  19. Surface Plasmon's Dispersion Properties of Porous Gold Films.

    PubMed

    Stetsenko, M O; Maksimenko, L S; Rudenko, S P; Krishchenko, I M; Korchovyi, A A; Kryvyi, S B; Kaganovich, E B; Serdega, B K

    2016-12-01

    Nanostructure porous films with arrays of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have been produced by pulsed laser deposition. Dispersion properties of surface plasmons have been studied by the modulation-polarization spectroscopy technique. The dispersion relations for radiative modes and two types of non-radiative modes of localized and propagating surface plasmons were obtained. The branches of propagating modes were characterized by negative group velocity caused by spatial dispersion of dielectric function. The propagating modes are caused by dipole-dipole interactions between adjacent Au NPs. The frequencies and relaxation parameters of surface plasmon resonances and the plasma frequencies for Αu NPs were obtained. The relation between the surface plasmon's properties and formation conditions of films with arrays of Αu NPs is discussed. PMID:26925864

  20. Statistical Physics of Colloidal Dispersions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canessa, E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis is concerned with the equilibrium statistical mechanics of colloidal dispersions which represent useful model systems for the study of condensed matter physics; namely, charge stabilized colloidal dispersions and polymer stabilized colloidal dispersions. A one-component macroparticle approach is adopted in order to treat the macroscopic and microscopic properties of these systems in a simple and comprehensive manner. The thesis opens with the description of the nature of the colloidal state before reviewing some basic definitions and theory in Chapter II. In Chapter III a variational theory of phase equilibria based on the Gibbs-Bogolyobov inequality is applied to sterically stabilized colloidal dispersions. Hard spheres are chosen as the reference system for the disordered phases while an Einstein model is used for the ordered phases. The new choice of pair potential, taken for mathematical convenience, is a superposition of two Yukawa functions. By matching a double Yukawa potential to the van der Waals attractive potential at different temperatures and introducing a purely temperature dependent coefficient to the repulsive part, a rich variety of observed phase separation phenomena is qualitatively described. The behaviour of the potential is found to be consistent with a small decrease of the polymer layer thickness with increasing temperature. Using the same concept of a collapse transition the non-monotonic second virial coefficient is also explained and quantified. It is shown that a reduction of the effective macroparticle diameter with increasing temperature can only be partially examined from the point of view of a (binary-) polymer solution theory. This chapter concludes with the description of the observed, reversible, depletion flocculation behaviour. This is accomplished by using the variational formalism and by invoking the double Yukawa potential to allow

  1. Seed dispersal networks in the Galápagos and the consequences of alien plant invasions

    PubMed Central

    Heleno, Ruben H.; Olesen, Jens M.; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Alien plants are a growing threat to the Galápagos unique biota. We evaluated the impact of alien plants on eight seed dispersal networks from two islands of the archipelago. Nearly 10 000 intact seeds from 58 species were recovered from the droppings of 18 bird and reptile dispersers. The most dispersed invaders were Lantana camara, Rubus niveus and Psidium guajava, the latter two likely benefiting from an asynchronous fruit production with most native plants, which facilitate their consumption and spread. Lava lizards dispersed the seeds of 27 species, being the most important dispersers, followed by small ground finch, two mockingbirds, the giant tortoise and two insectivorous birds. Most animals dispersed alien seeds, but these formed a relatively small proportion of the interactions. Nevertheless, the integration of aliens was higher in the island that has been invaded for longest, suggesting a time-lag between alien plant introductions and their impacts on seed dispersal networks. Alien plants become more specialized with advancing invasion, favouring more simplified plant and disperser communities. However, only habitat type significantly affected the overall network structure. Alien plants were dispersed via two pathways: dry-fruited plants were preferentially dispersed by finches, while fleshy fruited species were mostly dispersed by other birds and reptiles. PMID:23173203

  2. Seed dispersal networks in the Galápagos and the consequences of alien plant invasions.

    PubMed

    Heleno, Ruben H; Olesen, Jens M; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Alien plants are a growing threat to the Galápagos unique biota. We evaluated the impact of alien plants on eight seed dispersal networks from two islands of the archipelago. Nearly 10 000 intact seeds from 58 species were recovered from the droppings of 18 bird and reptile dispersers. The most dispersed invaders were Lantana camara, Rubus niveus and Psidium guajava, the latter two likely benefiting from an asynchronous fruit production with most native plants, which facilitate their consumption and spread. Lava lizards dispersed the seeds of 27 species, being the most important dispersers, followed by small ground finch, two mockingbirds, the giant tortoise and two insectivorous birds. Most animals dispersed alien seeds, but these formed a relatively small proportion of the interactions. Nevertheless, the integration of aliens was higher in the island that has been invaded for longest, suggesting a time-lag between alien plant introductions and their impacts on seed dispersal networks. Alien plants become more specialized with advancing invasion, favouring more simplified plant and disperser communities. However, only habitat type significantly affected the overall network structure. Alien plants were dispersed via two pathways: dry-fruited plants were preferentially dispersed by finches, while fleshy fruited species were mostly dispersed by other birds and reptiles. PMID:23173203

  3. Stochastic differential equations and turbulent dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Aspects of the theory of continuous stochastic processes that seem to contribute to an understanding of turbulent dispersion are introduced and the theory and philosophy of modelling turbulent transport is emphasized. Examples of eddy diffusion examined include shear dispersion, the surface layer, and channel flow. Modeling dispersion with finite-time scale is considered including the Langevin model for homogeneous turbulence, dispersion in nonhomogeneous turbulence, and the asymptotic behavior of the Langevin model for nonhomogeneous turbulence.

  4. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  5. Water dispersal of vegetative bulbils of the invasive exotic Dioscorea oppositifolia L. in southern Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.R.; Gibson, D.J.; Middleton, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Riparian corridors promote dispersal of several species of exotic invasives worldwide. Dispersal plays a role in the colonization of exotic invasive species into new areas and this study was conducted to determine if the invasiveness of Dioscorea oppositifolia L. (Chinese yam) is facilitated by secondary dispersal of vegetative diaspores (bulbils) by water. Since seed production of this plant has not been observed in the United States, bulbils represent the only means of dispersal to new habitats. Dispersal was monitored by placing aquatic traps, tethered bulbils, and painted bulbil caches in a tributary of Drury Creek, Giant City State Park, Illinois. Results indicate that high-energy flow in the creek accelerated secondary dispersal of bulbils downstream and onto the floodplain. The longest recorded dispersal distance was 206.2 m downstream. Dispersal distance of tethered bulbils was not related to rainfall or flow velocity in the creek; however the total number of bulbils trapped was positively related to flow velocity. We conclude that secondary dispersal by water in streams can facilitate dispersal of vegetative bulbils of this exotic species.

  6. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent...

  7. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Tzou, Ming-Shin; Jiang, Hui-Jong

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  8. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  9. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent...

  10. DISPERSIBILITY OF CRUDE OIL IN FRESH WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of surfactant composition on the ability of chemical dispersants to disperse crude oil in fresh water were investigated. The objective of this research was to determine whether effective fresh water dispersants can be designed in case this technology is ever consider...

  11. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent...

  12. Dispersion-tailored active-fiber solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tartwijk, Guido H. M.; Essiambre, René-Jean; Agrawal, Govind P.

    1996-12-01

    We show analytically that tailoring the fiber dispersion appropriately can cause optical solitons to propagate unperturbed, without emission of dispersive waves, in a distributed-gain fiber amplifier with a nonuniform gain profile. We apply our scheme to a bidirectionally pumped fiber amplifier and discuss the importance of higher-order nonlinear and dispersive effects for short solitons.

  13. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  14. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  15. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  16. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact materials....

  17. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  18. Dispersion and shape engineered plasmonic nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ho; Mark, Andrew G; Alarcón-Correa, Mariana; Kim, Insook; Oswald, Peter; Lee, Tung-Chun; Fischer, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of individual metallic nanoparticles promise to deliver modular, low-cost sensing with high-detection thresholds. However, they continue to suffer from relatively low sensitivity and figures of merit (FOMs). Herein we introduce the idea of sensitivity enhancement of LSPR sensors through engineering of the material dispersion function. Employing dispersion and shape engineering of chiral nanoparticles leads to remarkable refractive index sensitivities (1,091 nm RIU(-1) at λ=921 nm) and FOMs (>2,800 RIU(-1)). A key feature is that the polarization-dependent extinction of the nanoparticles is now characterized by rich spectral features, including bipolar peaks and nulls, suitable for tracking refractive index changes. This sensing modality offers strong optical contrast even in the presence of highly absorbing media, an important consideration for use in complex biological media with limited transmission. The technique is sensitive to surface-specific binding events which we demonstrate through biotin-avidin surface coupling. PMID:27090866

  19. Saturated Dispersive Extinction Theory of Red Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling Jun

    2012-03-01

    The Dispersive Extinction Theory (DET) proposed by WangfootnotetextWang, Ling Jun, Physics Essays, 18, No. 2, (2005). offers an alternative to the Big Bang. According to DET, the cosmic red shift is caused by the dispersive extinction of the star light during the propagation from the stars to the earth, instead of being caused by the Doppler shift due to the expansion of the universe.footnotetextHubble, E., Astrophys. J. 64, 321 (1926).^,footnotetextHubble, E., The Realm of the Nebulae, (Yale University Press, New Haven, 1936). DET allows an infinite, stable, non expanding universe, and is immune of the fundamental problems inherent to the Big Bang such as the horizon problem, the extreme violation of the conservation of mass, energy and charge, and the geocentric nature which violates the principle of relativity.footnotetextWang, Ling Jun, Physics Essays, 20, No. 2, (2007). The scenario dealt with in Reference (1) is a one in which the extinction by the space medium is not saturated. This work deals with a different scenario when the extinction is saturated. The saturated extinction causes limited energy loss, and the star light can travel a much greater distance than in the unsaturated scenario.

  20. Dispersion and shape engineered plasmonic nanosensors

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ho; Mark, Andrew G.; Alarcón-Correa, Mariana; Kim, Insook; Oswald, Peter; Lee, Tung-Chun; Fischer, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of individual metallic nanoparticles promise to deliver modular, low-cost sensing with high-detection thresholds. However, they continue to suffer from relatively low sensitivity and figures of merit (FOMs). Herein we introduce the idea of sensitivity enhancement of LSPR sensors through engineering of the material dispersion function. Employing dispersion and shape engineering of chiral nanoparticles leads to remarkable refractive index sensitivities (1,091 nm RIU−1 at λ=921 nm) and FOMs (>2,800 RIU−1). A key feature is that the polarization-dependent extinction of the nanoparticles is now characterized by rich spectral features, including bipolar peaks and nulls, suitable for tracking refractive index changes. This sensing modality offers strong optical contrast even in the presence of highly absorbing media, an important consideration for use in complex biological media with limited transmission. The technique is sensitive to surface-specific binding events which we demonstrate through biotin–avidin surface coupling. PMID:27090866

  1. Sample dispersion in isotachophoresis with Poiseuille counterflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Gopmandal, Partha P.; Baier, Tobias; Hardt, Steffen

    2013-02-01

    A particular mode of isotachophoresis (ITP) employs a pressure-driven flow opposite to the sample electromigration direction in order to anchor a sample zone at a specific position along a channel or capillary. We investigate this situation using a two-dimensional finite-volume model based on the Nernst-Planck equation. The imposed Poiseuille flow profile leads to a significant dispersion of the sample zone. This effect is detrimental for the resolution in analytical applications of ITP. We investigate the impact of convective dispersion, characterized by the area-averaged width of a sample zone, for various values of the sample Péclet-number, as well as the relative mobilities of the sample and the adjacent electrolytes. A one-dimensional model for the area-averaged concentrations based on a Taylor-Aris-type effective axial diffusivity is shown to yield good agreement with the finite-volume calculations. This justifies the use of such simple models and opens the door for the rapid simulation of ITP protocols with Poiseuille counterflow.

  2. Dispersion and shape engineered plasmonic nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ho; Mark, Andrew G.; Alarcón-Correa, Mariana; Kim, Insook; Oswald, Peter; Lee, Tung-Chun; Fischer, Peer

    2016-04-01

    Biosensors based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of individual metallic nanoparticles promise to deliver modular, low-cost sensing with high-detection thresholds. However, they continue to suffer from relatively low sensitivity and figures of merit (FOMs). Herein we introduce the idea of sensitivity enhancement of LSPR sensors through engineering of the material dispersion function. Employing dispersion and shape engineering of chiral nanoparticles leads to remarkable refractive index sensitivities (1,091 nm RIU-1 at λ=921 nm) and FOMs (>2,800 RIU-1). A key feature is that the polarization-dependent extinction of the nanoparticles is now characterized by rich spectral features, including bipolar peaks and nulls, suitable for tracking refractive index changes. This sensing modality offers strong optical contrast even in the presence of highly absorbing media, an important consideration for use in complex biological media with limited transmission. The technique is sensitive to surface-specific binding events which we demonstrate through biotin-avidin surface coupling.

  3. Flow Intermittency, Dispersion, and Correlated Continuous Time Random Walks in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    de Anna, Pietro; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Bolster, Diogo; Davy, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We study the intermittency of fluid velocities in porous media and its relation to anomalous dispersion. Lagrangian velocities measured at equidistant points along streamlines are shown to form a spatial Markov process. As a consequence of this remarkable property, the dispersion of fluid particles can be described by a continuous time random walk with correlated temporal increments. This new dynamical picture of intermittency provides a direct link between the microscale flow, its intermittent properties, and non-Fickian dispersion.

  4. High Resilience of Seed Dispersal Webs Highlighted by the Experimental Removal of the Dominant Disperser.

    PubMed

    Timóteo, Sérgio; Ramos, Jaime Albino; Vaughan, Ian Phillip; Memmott, Jane

    2016-04-01

    The pressing need to conserve and restore habitats in the face of ongoing species loss [1, 2] requires a better understanding of what happens to communities when species are lost or reinstated [3, 4]. Theoretical models show that communities are relatively insensitive to species loss [5, 6]; however, they disagree with field manipulations showing a cascade of extinctions [7, 8] and have seldom been tested under field conditions (e.g., [9]). We experimentally removed the most abundant seed-dispersing ant species from seed dispersal networks in a Mediterranean landscape, replicating the experiment in three types of habitat, and then compared these communities to un-manipulated control communities. Removal did not result in large-scale changes in network structure. It revealed extensive structural plasticity of the remaining community, which rearranged itself through rewiring, while maintaining its functionality. The remaining ant species widened their diet breadth in a way that maintained seed dispersal, despite the identity of many interactions changing. The species interaction strength decreased; thus, the importance of each ant species for seed dispersal became more homogeneous, thereby reducing the dependence of seed species on one dominant ant species. Compared to the experimental results, a simulation model that included rewiring considerably overestimated the effect of species loss on network robustness. If community-level species loss models are to be of practical use in ecology or conservation, they need to include behavioral and population responses, and they need to be routinely tested under field conditions; doing this would be to the advantage of both empiricists and theoreticians. PMID:26996503

  5. Seed consumption and dispersal of ant-dispersed plants by slugs.

    PubMed

    Türke, Manfred; Heinze, Eric; Andreas, Kerstin; Svendsen, Sarah M; Gossner, Martin M; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2010-07-01

    In beech-dominated forests in Central Europe, many spring geophytes show adaptations to seed dispersal by ants (myrmecochory). Ants, however, can be rare in such moist forests. Motivated by observations of slug feeding on seeds we investigated the seed consumption of two plant species, Anemone nemorosa and Asarum europaeum, by slugs, in a series of experiments. In a seed predation experiment in a beech forest, we found that seed removal was strongly reduced when gastropods were excluded from the seed depots. The contribution of insects, including ants, and rodents to seed removal was relatively less but differed between May and July. In the laboratory, slug species, in particular Arion sp., consumed seeds of both plant species. Slugs either consumed the elaiosomes of seeds or swallowed seeds intact. Swallowed seeds were defecated undamaged and germinated as well as control seeds when buried overwinter, indicating the potential for seed dispersal by slugs. We also recovered seeds of myrmecochores in the faeces of several slugs caught in forests. In a slug release experiment in the forest, slugs moved up to 14.6 m (mean 4.4 m) in 15 h, which is the median gut passage time of seeds based on measurements made in the laboratory. We also found that when slug-defecated seeds were offered to rodents, these were less attractive than control seeds, suggesting that passage through the slug gut reduces seed predation risk. Our results demonstrate that slugs are significant consumers of elaiosomes or entire seeds of ant-dispersed plants and that they can function as seed dispersers of these plants. PMID:20364390

  6. Samara Dispersal in Boxelder: An Exercise in Hypothesis Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minorsky, Peter V.; Willing, R. Paul

    1999-01-01

    Presents a fun, inexpensive, and pedagogically useful laboratory exercise that involves indoor studies of the dispersal properties of the winged fruits (samaras) of boxelder trees. Engages students in the process of hypothesis testing, experimental design, and data analysis as well as introducing students to important concepts related to…

  7. A Multi-Clade Test Supports the Intermediate Dispersal Model of Biogeography

    PubMed Central

    Agnarsson, Ingi; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Background Biogeography models typically focus on explaining patterns through island properties, such as size, complexity, age, and isolation. Such models explain variation in the richness of island biotas. Properties of the organisms themselves, such as their size, age, and dispersal abilities, in turn may explain which organisms come to occupy, and diversify across island archipelagos. Here, we restate and test the intermediate dispersal model (IDM) predicting peak diversity in clades of relatively intermediate dispersers. Methodology We test the model through a review of terrestrial and freshwater organisms in the western Indian Ocean examining the correlation among species richness and three potential explanatory variables: dispersal ability quantified as the number of estimated dispersal events, average body size for animals, and clade age. Conclusions Our study supports the IDM with dispersal ability being the best predictor of regional diversity among the explored variables. We find a weaker relationship between diversity and clade age, but not body size. Principally, we find that richness strongly and positively correlates with dispersal ability in poor to good dispersers while a prior study found a strong decrease in richness with increased dispersal ability among excellent dispersers. Both studies therefore support the intermediate dispersal model, especially when considered together. We note that many additional variables not here considered are at play. For example, some taxa may lose dispersal ability subsequent to island colonization and some poor dispersers have reached high diversity through within island radiations. Nevertheless, our findings highlight the fundamental importance of dispersal ability in explaining patterns of biodiversity generation across islands. PMID:24466238

  8. Optical fiber dispersion characterization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geeslin, A.; Arriad, A.; Riad, S. M.; Padgett, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The theory, design, and results of optical fiber pulse dispersion measurements are considered. Both the hardware and software required to perform this type of measurement are described. Hardware includes a thermoelectrically cooled injection laser diode source, an 800 GHz gain bandwidth produce avalanche photodiode and an input mode scrambler. Software for a HP 9825 computer includes fast Fourier transform, inverse Fourier transform, and optimal compensation deconvolution. Test set construction details are also included. Test results include data collected on a 1 Km fiber, a 4 Km fiber, a fused spliced, eight 600 meter length fibers concatenated to form 4.8 Km, and up to nine optical connectors.

  9. Dispersion analysis for baseline reference mission 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. S.

    1975-01-01

    A dispersion analysis considering uncertainties (or perturbations) in platform, vehicle, and environmental parameters was performed for baseline reference mission (BRM) 2. The dispersion analysis is based on the nominal trajectory for BRM 2. The analysis was performed to determine state vector and performance dispersions (or variations) which result from the indicated uncertainties. The dispersions are determined at major mission events and fixed times from liftoff (time slices). The dispersion results will be used to evaluate the capability of the vehicle to perform the mission within a specified level of confidence and to determine flight performance reserves.

  10. Normal-dispersion microresonator Kerr frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiaoxiao; Qi, Minghao; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2016-06-01

    Optical microresonator-based Kerr frequency comb generation has developed into a hot research area in the past decade. Microresonator combs are promising for portable applications due to their potential for chip-level integration and low power consumption. According to the group velocity dispersion of the microresonator employed, research in this field may be classified into two categories: the anomalous dispersion regime and the normal dispersion regime. In this paper, we discuss the physics of Kerr comb generation in the normal dispersion regime and review recent experimental advances. The potential advantages and future directions of normal dispersion combs are also discussed.

  11. Analysis of Dispersive Landslide Tsunami Waves in the Lagrangian Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, L. A.; Mei, C.; Alam, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis' inundation heights must be accurately and efficiently predicted for a timely evacuation of coastal populations exposed to such hazardous incidents. To achieve this, approximate models have been developed for an efficient estimation of the wave propagation and runup on the world shorelines. The accuracy of these approximate models is yet a matter of dispute in regard to how much dispersion and nonlinearity should be included, and to how well the runup phenomenon is resolved. The linear shallow-water model-equation is widely used for runup predictions because it is computationally efficient. However, its lack of dispersive properties is known to adversely affect the correct prediction of wave height and arrival time. The Boussinesq set of equations considers weak dispersive and nonlinear effects and, despite being computationally more expensive, has a much better accuracy. The balance between dispersive and nonlinear effects is of significant importance for the problem of landslide generated tsunamis because such nonlinear waves have a relatively small horizontal length scale (wave length) compared to the domain of propagation. This renders dispersive effects a lot more pronounced than in the case of earthquake tsunamis. Here we compare the runup predictions of a linear shallow-water, Boussinesq (weak dispersion and weak nonlinearity) and fully nonlinear Boussinesq model (weak dispersion, no assumption on nonlinearity) for various landslide tsunami scenarios. The equations are derived in the Lagrangian framework to allow for an accurate calculation of the runup. Contrary to Eulerian models, long-wave models in Lagrangian framework can be arranged to yield a system of partial-differential equations for the vertical and horizontal displacements of the free-surface. These evolutionary equations are then solved using a finite-difference scheme for time integration and spatial differentiation. The effect of a ridge on a long-wave train climbing up a beach is

  12. Improved Measurement of Dispersion in an Optical Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Shouhua; Le, Thanh; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of measuring chromatic dispersion in an optical fiber or other device affords a lower (relative to prior such methods) limit of measurable dispersion. This method is a modified version of the amplitude-modulation (AM) method, which is one of the prior methods. In comparison with the other prior methods, the AM method is less complex. However, the AM method is limited to dispersion levels . 160 ps/nm and cannot be used to measure the symbol of the dispersion. In contrast, the present modified version of the AM method can be used to measure the symbol of the symbol of the dispersion and affords a measurement range from about 2 ps/nm to several thousand ps/nm with a resolution of 0.27 ps/nm or finer. The figure schematically depicts the measurement apparatus. The source of light for the measurement is a laser, the wavelength of which is monitored by an optical spectrum analyzer. A light-component analyzer amplitude-modulates the light with a scanning radio-frequency signal. The modulated light is passed through a buffer (described below) and through the device under test (e.g., an optical fiber, the dispersion of which one seeks to measure), then back to the light-component analyzer for spectrum analysis. Dispersion in the device under test gives rise to phase shifts among the carrier and the upper and lower sideband components of the modulated signal. These phase shifts affect the modulation-frequency component of the output of a photodetector exposed to the signal that emerges from the device under test. One of the effects is that this component goes to zero periodically as the modulation frequency is varied.

  13. Efficiency of a statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-05-01

    In developing its theory for turbulent dispersion transport, the Litchford and Jeng (1991) statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion took a generalized approach in which the perturbing influence of each turbulent eddy on consequent interactions was transported through all subsequent eddies. Nevertheless, examinations of this transport relation shows it to be able to decay rapidly: this implies that additional computational efficiency may be obtained via truncation of unneccessary transport terms. Attention is here given to the criterion for truncation, as well as to expected efficiency gains.

  14. Efficiency of a statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Litchford, R.J.; Jeng, San-Mou )

    1992-05-01

    In developing its theory for turbulent dispersion transport, the Litchford and Jeng (1991) statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion took a generalized approach in which the perturbing influence of each turbulent eddy on consequent interactions was transported through all subsequent eddies. Nevertheless, examinations of this transport relation shows it to be able to decay rapidly: this implies that additional computational efficiency may be obtained via truncation of unneccessary transport terms. Attention is here given to the criterion for truncation, as well as to expected efficiency gains. 2 refs.

  15. Efficiency of a statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    In developing its theory for turbulent dispersion transport, the Litchford and Jeng (1991) statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion took a generalized approach in which the perturbing influence of each turbulent eddy on consequent interactions was transported through all subsequent eddies. Nevertheless, examinations of this transport relation shows it to be able to decay rapidly: this implies that additional computational efficiency may be obtained via truncation of unneccessary transport terms. Attention is here given to the criterion for truncation, as well as to expected efficiency gains.

  16. Tunable delay control of entangled photons based on dispersion cancellation.

    PubMed

    Odele, Ogaga D; Lukens, Joseph M; Jaramillo-Villegas, Jose A; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2015-08-24

    We propose and demonstrate a novel approach for controlling the temporal position of the biphoton correlation function using pump frequency tuning and dispersion cancellation; precise waveguide engineering enables biphoton generation at different pump frequencies while the idea of nonlocal dispersion cancellation is used to create the relative signal-idler delay and simultaneously prevents broadening of their correlation. Experimental results for delay shifts up to ±15 times the correlation width are shown along with discussions of the performance metrics of this approach. PMID:26368161

  17. Low Energy Lorentz Violation from Modified Dispersion at High Energies.

    PubMed

    Husain, Viqar; Louko, Jorma

    2016-02-12

    Many quantum theories of gravity propose Lorentz-violating dispersion relations of the form ω=|k|f(|k|/M⋆), with recovery of approximate Lorentz invariance at energy scales much below M⋆. We show that a quantum field with this dispersion predicts drastic low energy Lorentz violation in atoms modeled as Unruh-DeWitt detectors, for any f that dips below unity somewhere. As an example, we show that polymer quantization motivated by loop quantum gravity predicts such Lorentz violation below current ion collider rapidities. PMID:26918976

  18. Surface roughness effects with solid lubricants dispersed in mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusano, C.; Goglia, P. R.; Sliney, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The lubricating effectiveness of solid-lubricant dispersions are investigated in both point and line contacts using surfaces with both random and directional roughness characteristics. Friction and wear data obtained at relatively low speeds and at room temperature, indicate that the existence of solid lubricants such as graphite, MoS2, and PTFE in a plain mineral oil generally will not improve the effectiveness of the oil as a lubricant for such surfaces. Under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction force, as a function of time, initially depends upon the directional roughness properties of the contacting surfaces irrespective of whether the base oil or dispersions are used as lubricants.

  19. Dispersal strength influences zooplankton co-occurrence patterns in experimental mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Schamp, Brandon S; Arnott, Shelley E; Joslin, Katelyn L

    2015-04-01

    Negative co-occurrence patterns are intriguing because they may reflect the outcome of interspecific interactions and therefore signal how competition shapes communities. However, other factors also contribute to these patterns. For example, theoretical studies as well as two survey-based studies have all suggested that dispersal may also impact these patterns. While natural communities commonly have nonrandom patterns of negative co-occurrence, understanding how different processes drive these patterns requires further research. We tested the influence of dispersal on co-occurrence patterns using a zooplankton mesocosm experiment with four different dispersal treatments varying in the number of dispersers delivered into mesocosms on regular intervals. Our dispersal treatments were intended to adjust the relative importance of dispersal and competition experienced within mesocosms (i.e., high dispersal results in a relatively low influence of competition on species composition and vice versa). Higher dispersal translated into increased zooplankton species richness and inter-mesocosm compositional similarity, and also changed species occupancy patterns such that species occurrences were more even across mesocosms in higher-dispersal treatments. Dispersal treatments also differed markedly in species co-occurrence patterns. Negative co-occurrence patterns were significant for all but the lowest-dispersal treatment, peaked in the intermediate-dispersal treatments, and declined in the highest-dispersal treatment. Stability analyses illustrate that co-occurrence differences are robust to the exclusion of any single mesocosm in null model analyses. Dispersal treatments did not significantly differ with respect to abiotic variation, which has been recognized as a potential driver of negative co-occurrence patterns. These results suggest that not only can dispersal influence patterns of negative co-occurrence via changes to species richness and distribution (occupancy

  20. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. For continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the, clinical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects. of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration.