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Sample records for 70-kda heat-shock protein

  1. A DOUBLE KNOCKOUT; A NOVEL APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING STRESS-INDUCIBLE 70 KDA HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS (HSP70S) ON DEVELOPMENT AND REPRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat and chemical toxicants which disrupt spermatogenesis and cause male infertility are thought to induce the expression of Hsp70-1 and 70-3, the major inducible heat shock proteins of the 70kDa family. Previous studies from several laboratories including our own have characteri...

  2. Heat Shock Proteins: Mediators of Atherosclerotic Development.

    PubMed

    Deniset, Justin F; Pierce, Grant N

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins play important housekeeping roles in a variety of cells within the body during normal control conditions. The many different functions for heat shock proteins in the cell depend upon the specific heat shock protein involved. Each protein is nominally differentiated based upon its molecular size. However, in addition to their role in normal cell function, heat shock proteins may play an even more important role as pro-survival proteins conserved through evolution to protect the cell from a variety of stresses. The ability of a cell to withstand these environmental stresses is critical to its capacity to adapt and remain viable. Loss of this ability may lead to pathological states. Abnormal localization, structure or function of the heat shock proteins has been associated with many pathologies, including those involving heart disease. Heat shock proteins like HSP60 and HSP70 in particular have been identified as playing important roles in inflammation and immune reactions. Inflammation has been identified recently as an important pathological risk factor for heart disease. It is perhaps not surprising therefore, that heat shock protein family has been increasingly identified as an important intracellular pathway associated with inflammatory-mediated heart conditions including atherosclerosis. This paper reviews the evidence in support of a role for heat shock proteins in cardiovascular disease and the potential to target these proteins to alter the progression of atherosclerotic disease.

  3. Heat Shock Proteins in the Human Eye

    PubMed Central

    Urbak, Lærke; Vorum, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are believed to primarily protect and maintain cell viability under stressful conditions such as those occurring during thermal and oxidative challenges chiefly by refolding and stabilizing proteins. Hsps are found throughout the various tissues of the eye where they are thought to confer protection from disease states such as cataract, glaucoma, and cancer. This minireview summarizes the placement, properties, and roles of Hsps in the eye and aims to provide a better comprehension of their function and involvement in ocular disease pathogenesis. PMID:22084677

  4. Small Heat Shock Proteins in Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Salinthone, Sonemany; Tyagi, Manoj; Gerthoffer, William T.

    2008-01-01

    The small heat shock proteins (HSPs) HSP20, HSP27 and αB-crystallin are chaperone proteins that are abundantly expressed in smooth muscles are important modulators of muscle contraction, cell migration and cell survival. This review focuses on factors regulating expression of small HSPs in smooth muscle, signaling pathways that regulate macromolecular structure and the biochemical and cellular functions of small HSPs. Cellular processes regulated by small HSPs include chaperoning denatured proteins, maintaining cellular redox state and modifying filamentous actin polymerization. These processes influence smooth muscle proliferation, cell migration, cell survival, muscle contraction and synthesis of signaling proteins. Understanding functions of small heat shock proteins is relevant to mechanisms of disease in which dysfunctional smooth muscle causes symptoms, or is a target of drug therapy. One example is that secreted HSP27 may be a useful marker of inflammation during atherogenesis. Another is that phosphorylated HSP20 which relaxes smooth muscle may prove to be highly relevant to treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, asthma, premature labor and overactive bladder. Because small HSPs also modulate smooth muscle proliferation and cell migration they may prove to be targets for developing effective, novel treatments of clinical problems arising from remodeling of smooth muscle in vascular, respiratory and urogenital systems. PMID:18579210

  5. Heat shock proteins in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Sreedharan, Rajasree; Van Why, Scott K

    2016-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are essential to cell survival through their function as protein chaperones. The role they play in kidney health and disease is varied. Hsp induction may be either beneficial or detrimental to the kidney, depending on the specific Hsp, type of cell, and context. This review addresses the role of Hsps in the kidney, including during development, as osmoprotectants, and in various kidney disease models. Heat shock transcription factor, activated by a stress on renal cells, induces Hsp elaboration and separately regulates immune responses that can contribute to renal injury. Induced Hsps in the intracellular compartment are mostly beneficial in the kidney by stabilizing and restoring cell architecture and function through acting as protein chaperones. Intracellular Hsps also inhibit apoptosis and facilitate cell proliferation, preserving renal tubule viability after acute injury, but enhancing progression of cystic kidney disease and malignancy. Induced Hsps in the extracellular compartment, either circulating or located on outer cell membranes, are mainly detrimental through enhancing inflammation pathways to injury. Correctly harnessing these stress proteins promises the opportunity to alter the course of acute and chronic kidney disease.

  6. Modulation of Alloimmunity by Heat Shock Proteins.

    PubMed

    Borges, Thiago J; Lang, Benjamin J; Lopes, Rafael L; Bonorino, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms that evolved for host defense against pathogens and injury are also responsible for transplant rejection. Host rejection of foreign tissue was originally thought to be mediated mainly by T cell recognition of foreign MHC alleles. Management of solid organ transplant rejection has thus focused mainly on inhibition of T cell function and matching MHC alleles between donor and host. Recently, however, it has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the initial innate immune responses upon transplantation has a decisive impact on rejection. The exact mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have yet to be characterized. Ischemic cell death and inflammation that occur upon transplantation are synonymous with extracellular release of various heat shock proteins (Hsps), many of which have been shown to have immune-modulatory properties. Here, we review the impact of Hsps upon alloimmunity and discuss the potential use of Hsps as accessory agents to improve solid organ transplant outcomes. PMID:27555846

  7. Modulation of Alloimmunity by Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Thiago J.; Lang, Benjamin J.; Lopes, Rafael L.; Bonorino, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms that evolved for host defense against pathogens and injury are also responsible for transplant rejection. Host rejection of foreign tissue was originally thought to be mediated mainly by T cell recognition of foreign MHC alleles. Management of solid organ transplant rejection has thus focused mainly on inhibition of T cell function and matching MHC alleles between donor and host. Recently, however, it has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the initial innate immune responses upon transplantation has a decisive impact on rejection. The exact mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have yet to be characterized. Ischemic cell death and inflammation that occur upon transplantation are synonymous with extracellular release of various heat shock proteins (Hsps), many of which have been shown to have immune-modulatory properties. Here, we review the impact of Hsps upon alloimmunity and discuss the potential use of Hsps as accessory agents to improve solid organ transplant outcomes. PMID:27555846

  8. Modulation of Alloimmunity by Heat Shock Proteins.

    PubMed

    Borges, Thiago J; Lang, Benjamin J; Lopes, Rafael L; Bonorino, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms that evolved for host defense against pathogens and injury are also responsible for transplant rejection. Host rejection of foreign tissue was originally thought to be mediated mainly by T cell recognition of foreign MHC alleles. Management of solid organ transplant rejection has thus focused mainly on inhibition of T cell function and matching MHC alleles between donor and host. Recently, however, it has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the initial innate immune responses upon transplantation has a decisive impact on rejection. The exact mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have yet to be characterized. Ischemic cell death and inflammation that occur upon transplantation are synonymous with extracellular release of various heat shock proteins (Hsps), many of which have been shown to have immune-modulatory properties. Here, we review the impact of Hsps upon alloimmunity and discuss the potential use of Hsps as accessory agents to improve solid organ transplant outcomes.

  9. Heat-shock protein 70: molecular supertool?

    PubMed

    Aufricht, Christoph

    2005-06-01

    The cellular stress response decreases cellular injury, either via primary induction of cytoresistance or by secondary enhancement of cellular repair mechanisms. The most frequently studied and best understood effectors of the cellular stress response are the heat shock proteins (HSP). HSP are among the oldest tools in the cellular protein machinery, demonstrating extremely high conservation of the genetic code since bacteria. Molecular chaperons, with the HSP-70 being the prototype, cooperate in transport and folding of proteins, preventing aggregation, and even resolubilizing injured proteins. Increasing evidence supports a role for HSP during the recovery from renal ischemia, in particular in cellular salvage from apoptotic cell death and cytoskeletal restoration. Recent studies also report the potential for biomolecular profiling of newborns for the risk of acute renal failure. In peritoneal dialysis novel data suggest the use of HSP expression for biocompatibility testing. More importantly, HSP are prime therapeutic candidates for clinical situations associated with predictable insults, such as organ procurement in transplant medicine and repetitive exposure to hyperosmolar and acidotic peritoneal dialysis fluids. The next challenge will be to define the regulatory pathways of the cellular stress response in these models to introduce novel therapeutic interventions, such as new pharmaceutics enhancing the HSP expression.

  10. Regulation of protein turnover by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2014-12-01

    Protein turnover reflects the balance between synthesis and degradation of proteins, and it is a crucial process for the maintenance of the cellular protein pool. The folding of proteins, refolding of misfolded proteins, and also degradation of misfolded and damaged proteins are involved in the protein quality control (PQC) system. Correct protein folding and degradation are controlled by many different factors, one of the most important of which is the heat shock protein family. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are in the class of molecular chaperones, which may prevent the inappropriate interaction of proteins and induce correct folding. On the other hand, these proteins play significant roles in the degradation pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy. This review focuses on the emerging role of HSPs in the regulation of protein turnover; the effects of HSPs on the degradation machineries ERAD, autophagy, and proteasome; as well as the role of posttranslational modifications in the PQC system.

  11. Heat shock proteins and heat shock factor 1 in carcinogenesis and tumor development: an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are a subset of the molecular chaperones, best known for their rapid and abundant induction by stress. HSP genes are activated at the transcriptional level by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1). During the progression of many types of cancer, this heat shock transcriptional regulon becomes co-opted by mechanisms that are currently unclear, although evidently triggered in the emerging tumor cell. Concerted activation of HSF1 and the accumulation of HSPs then participates in many of the traits that permit the malignant phenotype. Thus cancers of many histologies exhibit activated HSF1 and increased HSP levels that may help to deter tumor suppression and evade therapy in the clinic. We review here the extensive work that has been carried out and is still in progress aimed at: (1) understanding the oncogenic mechanisms by which HSP genes are switched on, (2) determining the roles of HSF1 / HSP in malignant transformation and, (3) discovering approaches to therapy based on disrupting the influence of the HSF1 controlled transcriptome in cancer. PMID:22885793

  12. Multiple oligomeric structures of a bacterial small heat shock protein

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Nandini; Bhandari, Spraha; Moreno, Rodolfo; Hu, Liya; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Suguna, Kaza

    2016-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that form the first line of defence against the detrimental effects of cellular stress. Under conditions of stress they undergo drastic conformational rearrangements in order to bind to misfolded substrate proteins and prevent cellular protein aggregation. Owing to the dynamic nature of small heat shock protein oligomers, elucidating the structural basis of chaperone action and oligomerization still remains a challenge. In order to understand the organization of sHSP oligomers, we have determined crystal structures of a small heat shock protein from Salmonella typhimurium in a dimeric form and two higher oligomeric forms: an 18-mer and a 24-mer. Though the core dimer structure is conserved in all the forms, structural heterogeneity arises due to variation in the terminal regions. PMID:27053150

  13. Heat shock proteins, end effectors of myocardium ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed Central

    Guisasola, María Concepcion; Desco, Maria del Mar; Gonzalez, Fernanda Silvana; Asensio, Fernando; Dulin, Elena; Suarez, Antonio; Garcia Barreno, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) whether ischemia-reperfusion increased the content of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) transcripts and (2) whether myocardial content of Hsp72 is increased by ischemic preconditioning so that they can be considered as end effectors of preconditioning. Twelve male minipigs (8 protocol, 4 sham) were used, with the following ischemic preconditioning protocol: 3 ischemia and reperfusion 5-minute alternative cycles and last reperfusion cycle of 3 hours. Initial and final transmural biopsies (both in healthy and ischemic areas) were taken in all animals. Heat shock protein 72 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression was measured by a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method using complementary DNA normalized against the housekeeping gene cyclophilin. The identification of heat shock protein 72 was performed by immunoblot. In our “classic” preconditioning model, we found no changes in mRNA hsp72 levels or heat shock protein 72 content in the myocardium after 3 hours of reperfusion. Our experimental model is valid and the experimental techniques are appropriate, but the induction of heat shock proteins 72 as end effectors of cardioprotection in ischemic preconditioning does not occur in the first hours after ischemia, but probably at least 24 hours after it, in the so-called “second protection window.” PMID:17009598

  14. Synergistic Effects of Toxic Elements on Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as “suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms” requires further investigation. PMID:25136596

  15. Effect of heat-shock on Plasmodium falciparum viability, growth and expression of the heat-shock protein 'PFHSP70-I' gene.

    PubMed

    Joshi, B; Biswas, S; Sharma, Y D

    1992-11-01

    Cultures of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum were subjected to heat-shock for varying times and temperatures and then tested for their viability, growth and expression of heat-shock protein. Results show that the majority of parasites remained viable after heat-shock but their growth was affected. However, the expression of the heat-shock protein 'PFHSP70-I' gene was enhanced after heat-shock. We conclude that malarial parasites are able to survive in vivo during fever probably due to the overexpression of the heat-shock protein gene.

  16. Expression of heat shock protein genes in insect stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are abundantly expressed in insects are important modulators of insect survival. Expression of HSP genes in insects is not only developmentally regulated, but also induced by various stressors in order to confer protection against such stressors. The expression o...

  17. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock.

    PubMed

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to " postdict " the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  18. Molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis and heat shock response of Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masahiro; Tsuboi, Yoshihiro; Taniyama, Yusuke; Uchida, Naohiro; Sato, Reeko; Nakamura, Kensuke; Ohta, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    The Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90 (BgHSP90) gene was cloned and sequenced. The length of the gene was 2,610 bp with two introns. This gene was amplified from cDNA corresponding to full length coding sequence (CDS) with an open reading frame of 2,148 bp. A phylogenetic analysis of the CDS of HSP90 gene showed that B. gibsoni was most closely related to B. bovis and Babesia sp. BQ1/Lintan and lies within a phylogenetic cluster of protozoa. Moreover, mRNA transcription profile for BgHSP90 exposed to high temperature were examined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. BgHSP90 levels were elevated when the parasites were incubated at 43°C for 1 hr. PMID:27149891

  19. Molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis and heat shock response of Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90

    PubMed Central

    YAMASAKI, Masahiro; TSUBOI, Yoshihiro; TANIYAMA, Yusuke; UCHIDA, Naohiro; SATO, Reeko; NAKAMURA, Kensuke; OHTA, Hiroshi; TAKIGUCHI, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90 (BgHSP90) gene was cloned and sequenced. The length of the gene was 2,610 bp with two introns. This gene was amplified from cDNA corresponding to full length coding sequence (CDS) with an open reading frame of 2,148 bp. A phylogenetic analysis of the CDS of HSP90 gene showed that B. gibsoni was most closely related to B. bovis and Babesia sp. BQ1/Lintan and lies within a phylogenetic cluster of protozoa. Moreover, mRNA transcription profile for BgHSP90 exposed to high temperature were examined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. BgHSP90 levels were elevated when the parasites were incubated at 43°C for 1 hr. PMID:27149891

  20. A novel 29-kDa chicken heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Einat, M F; Haberfeld, A; Shamay, A; Horev, G; Hurwitz, S; Yahav, S

    1996-12-01

    The family of small heat shock proteins is the more variable among the highly conserved superfamily of heat shock proteins (HSP). Using a metabolic labeling procedure with tissue explants, we have detected in chickens a new member of the small HSP family with an apparent molecular weight of 29-kDa. This protein was induced in broiler chickens' heart muscle and lungs following an in vivo heat stress. The 29-kDa band appears after 3 h of heat stress, much later than the induction of HSP 90, HSP 70, and HSP 27. The late onset of induction suggests that HSP 29 plays a more specific role of a "second stage defense protein". PMID:9000279

  1. Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Prevents HIV Rebound*

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pheroze; Maidji, Ekaterina; Stoddart, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    HIV evades eradication because transcriptionally dormant proviral genomes persist in long-lived reservoirs of resting CD4+ T cells and myeloid cells, which are the source of viral rebound after cessation of antiretroviral therapy. Dormant HIV genomes readily produce infectious virus upon cellular activation because host transcription factors activated specifically by cell stress and heat shock mediate full-length HIV transcription. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is overexpressed during heat shock and activates inducible cellular transcription factors. Here we show that heat shock accelerates HIV transcription through induction of Hsp90 activity, which activates essential HIV-specific cellular transcription factors (NF-κB, NFAT, and STAT5), and that inhibition of Hsp90 greatly reduces gene expression mediated by these factors. More importantly, we show that Hsp90 controls virus transcription in vivo by specific Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical development, tanespimycin (17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) and AUY922, which durably prevented viral rebound in HIV-infected humanized NOD scid IL-2Rγ−/− bone marrow-liver-thymus mice up to 11 weeks after treatment cessation. Despite the absence of rebound viremia, we were able to recover infectious HIV from PBMC with heat shock. Replication-competent virus was detected in spleen cells from these nonviremic Hsp90 inhibitor-treated mice, indicating the presence of a tissue reservoir of persistent infection. Our novel findings provide in vivo evidence that inhibition of Hsp90 activity prevents HIV gene expression in replication-competent cellular reservoirs that would typically cause rebound in plasma viremia after antiretroviral therapy cessation. Alternating or supplementing Hsp90 inhibitors with current antiretroviral therapy regimens could conceivably suppress rebound viremia from persistent HIV reservoirs. PMID:26957545

  2. Appearance of heat shock proteins during the induction of multiple flagella in Naegleria gruberi.

    PubMed

    Walsh, C

    1980-04-10

    A heat shock to amebae of the amebo-flagellate Naegleria gruberi during differentiation into swimming flagellates results in the induction of heat shock proteins as well as multiple flagella. The principal heat shock proteins migrate on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular weights of 96,000, 77,000, 70,000, and 68,000. These proteins are synthesized preferentially when cells at 25 degrees C are shifted to temperatures above 32 degrees C. The maximal incorporation of methionine into heat shock proteins occurs at 38.2 degrees C, the temperature at which maximal induction of multiple flagella has been reported. Synthesis of heat shock proteins requires new transcription as judged by the ability of actinomycin D to inhibit their synthesis during the first 15 min of heat shock but not thereafter. Although heat shock can induce multiple flagella only when applied during a restricted interval, heat shock proteins are induced at any time cells are shifted to 38.2 degrees C. The response to heat shock of the Naegleria heat shock proteins resembles that of Drosophila heat shock proteins, but the two groups of proteins differ in both size and number. Naegleria heat shock proteins are, however, strikingly similar in size to a group of heat-induced proteins found in chick embryo fibroblast, mouse L, and BHK cells. PMID:7358690

  3. Heat shock proteins: essential proteins for apoptosis regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lanneau, D; Brunet, M; Frisan, E; Solary, E; Fontenay, M; Garrido, C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Many different external and intrinsic apoptotic stimuli induce the accumulation in the cells of a set of proteins known as stress or heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs are conserved proteins present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These proteins play an essential role as molecular chaperones by assisting the correct folding of nascent and stress-accumulated misfolded proteins, and by preventing their aggregation. HSPs have a protective function, that is they allow the cells to survive to otherwise lethal conditions. Various mechanisms have been proposed to account for the cytoprotective functions of HSPs. Several of these proteins have demonstrated to directly interact with components of the cell signalling pathways, for example those of the tightly regulated caspasedependent programmed cell death machinery, upstream, downstream and at the mitochondrial level. HSPs can also affect caspase-independent apoptosis-like process by interacting with apoptogenic factors such as apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) or by acting at the lysosome level. This review will describe the different key apoptotic proteins interacting with HSPs and the consequences of these interactions in cell survival, proliferation and apoptotic processes. Our purpose will be illustrated by emerging strategies in targeting these protective proteins to treat haematological malignancies. PMID:18266962

  4. Crowding Activates Heat Shock Protein 90.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Jackson C; Huang, Bin; Sun, Ming; Street, Timothy O

    2016-03-18

    Hsp90 is a dimeric ATP-dependent chaperone involved in the folding, maturation, and activation of diverse target proteins. Extensive in vitro structural analysis has led to a working model of Hsp90's ATP-driven conformational cycle. An implicit assumption is that dilute experimental conditions do not significantly perturb Hsp90 structure and function. However, Hsp90 undergoes a dramatic open/closed conformational change, which raises the possibility that this assumption may not be valid for this chaperone. Indeed, here we show that the ATPase activity of Hsp90 is highly sensitive to molecular crowding, whereas the ATPase activities of Hsp60 and Hsp70 chaperones are insensitive to crowding conditions. Polymer crowders activate Hsp90 in a non-saturable manner, with increasing efficacy at increasing concentration. Crowders exhibit a non-linear relationship between their radius of gyration and the extent to which they activate Hsp90. This experimental relationship can be qualitatively recapitulated with simple structure-based volume calculations comparing open/closed configurations of Hsp90. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that crowding activation of Hsp90 is entropically driven, which is consistent with a model in which excluded volume provides a driving force that favors the closed active state of Hsp90. Multiple Hsp90 homologs are activated by crowders, with the endoplasmic reticulum-specific Hsp90, Grp94, exhibiting the highest sensitivity. Finally, we find that crowding activation works by a different mechanism than co-chaperone activation and that these mechanisms are independent. We hypothesize that Hsp90 has a higher intrinsic activity in the cell than in vitro. PMID:26797120

  5. Reproductive costs of heat shock protein in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Silbermann, R; Tatar, M

    2000-12-01

    Senescence may evolve when genes have antagonistic effects between early reproduction and later age-specific mortality. Although widely consistent with data of quantitative genetics, this model has yet to be validated with the identification of a specific locus presenting such trade-offs. The molecular chaperone hsp70 may be a candidate for such a gene. Heat induced expression of the Hsp70 protein in adults decreases rates of age-specific mortality during normal aging, while maternally experienced heat shock depresses the production of mature progeny. Here we show that maternal heat shock reduces the proportion of egg hatch but not the viability of successfully hatched offspring. To assess whether heat induced maternal expression of hsp70 causes reduced egg hatch, we measured the proportion of eggs that hatch from females engineered to overexpress hsp70 transgenes. We used the same transgenic strains that extend longevity upon hsp70 expression and found that Hsp70 is sufficient to suppress egg hatch. The proportion of egg hatch as a function of hsp70 expression was not reduced in the first eggs laid after maternal heat shock, but appears in later laid eggs, which were at preoogenic and early vitellogenic stages during the maternal expression of hsp70. The contervailing effects of hsp70 upon fecundity and subsequent age-specific mortality exemplify antagonistic pleiotropy, and this trade-off could contribute to the evolution of Drosophila senescence.

  6. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker’s yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to “ postdict ” the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  7. Heat shock protein 90 is required for sexual and asexual development, virulence, and heat shock response in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Bui, Duc-Cuong; Lee, Yoonji; Lim, Jae Yun; Fu, Minmin; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Choi, Gyung Ja; Son, Hokyoung; Lee, Yin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells repress global translation and selectively upregulate stress response proteins by altering multiple steps in gene expression. In this study, genome-wide transcriptome analysis of cellular adaptation to thermal stress was performed on the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. The results revealed that profound alterations in gene expression were required for heat shock responses in F. graminearum. Among these proteins, heat shock protein 90 (FgHsp90) was revealed to play a central role in heat shock stress responses in this fungus. FgHsp90 was highly expressed and exclusively localised to nuclei in response to heat stress. Moreover, our comprehensive functional characterisation of FgHsp90 provides clear genetic evidence supporting its crucial roles in the vegetative growth, reproduction, and virulence of F. graminearum. In particular, FgHsp90 performs multiple functions as a transcriptional regulator of conidiation. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying adaptation to heat shock and the roles of Hsp90 in fungal development. PMID:27306495

  8. Heat shock protein 90 is required for sexual and asexual development, virulence, and heat shock response in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Duc-Cuong; Lee, Yoonji; Lim, Jae Yun; Fu, Minmin; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Choi, Gyung Ja; Son, Hokyoung; Lee, Yin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells repress global translation and selectively upregulate stress response proteins by altering multiple steps in gene expression. In this study, genome-wide transcriptome analysis of cellular adaptation to thermal stress was performed on the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. The results revealed that profound alterations in gene expression were required for heat shock responses in F. graminearum. Among these proteins, heat shock protein 90 (FgHsp90) was revealed to play a central role in heat shock stress responses in this fungus. FgHsp90 was highly expressed and exclusively localised to nuclei in response to heat stress. Moreover, our comprehensive functional characterisation of FgHsp90 provides clear genetic evidence supporting its crucial roles in the vegetative growth, reproduction, and virulence of F. graminearum. In particular, FgHsp90 performs multiple functions as a transcriptional regulator of conidiation. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying adaptation to heat shock and the roles of Hsp90 in fungal development. PMID:27306495

  9. Small heat shock proteins from extremophiles: a review.

    PubMed

    Laksanalamai, Pongpan; Robb, Frank T

    2004-02-01

    Many microorganisms from extreme environments have been well characterized, and increasing access to genomic sequence data has recently allowed the analysis of the protein families related to stress responses. Heat shock proteins appear to be ubiquitous in extremophiles. In this review, we focus on the family of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) from extremophiles, which are alpha-crystallin homologues. Like the alpha-crystallin eye lens proteins, sHSPs act as molecular chaperones and prevent aggregation of denatured proteins under heat and desiccation stress. Many putative sHSP homologues have been identified in the genomic sequences of all classes of extremophiles. Current studies of shsp gene expression have revealed mechanisms of regulation and activity distinct from other known hsp gene regulation systems. Biochemical studies on sHSPs are limited to thermophilic and hyperthermophilic organisms, and the only two available crystal structures of sHSPs from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, a hyperthermophilic archaeon and a mesophilic eukaryote, have contributed significantly to an understanding of the mechanisms of action of sHSPs, although many aspects remain unclear.

  10. [Alterations in heat shock protein 70 kDa levels in human neutrophils under the heat shock conditions].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, A A; Vetchinin, S S; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular content of heat shock proteins of 70 kDa family (HSP70) possessing chaperone and cytoprotective functions depends on specialization and functional activity of the cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the dynamics of constitutive and inducible HSP70 levels evoked by heat shock in human neutrophils, the short-lived fraction of white blood cells providing non-specific defense against bacterial pathogens. Biphasic dynamics of the intracellular HSP70 level with an increase and following decrease in 15-30 min after the heat shock was revealed by flow cytometry. This dynamics was similar for constitutive and inducible forms of HSP70. Pre-incubation of neutrophils with cycloheximide, the inhibitor of protein synthesis, did not change the intracellular HSP70 dynamics registered by flow cytometry indicating that the increased HSP70 level detected immediately after the heat shock was not mediated by de novo protein synthesis. It was confirmed by Western blotting analysis of HSP70 intracellular content. It was suggested that the elevated HSP70 level was related to conformational HSP70 molecule changes and to increased availability of HSP70 epitopes for antibody binding. Using a panel of antibodies specific to the N-terminal ATP-binding or C-terminal substrate-binding domains of HSP70 it has been demonstrated by cell immunofluorescence and flow cytometry methods that the heat shock-associated increase of the intracellular HSP70 level was mediated by HSP70 interaction with antibodies recognizing HSP70 substrate-binding domain. It was demonstrated that the decrease of intracellular HSP70 level after heat treatment could be connected with a release of both inducible and constitutive HSP70 into extracellular space. Our data suggest that stress-induced release of HSP70 from neutrophils is regulated by ABC-transporters.

  11. Characterization of proteins and RNAs present on polysomes from normal and heat shocked Drosophila cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, M.M.; Bruederle, L.P.

    1987-05-01

    Translational regulation in heat shocked Drosophila cells is characterized by a shutdown in translation of normal cell mRNA and selective translation of mRNAs coding for heat shock polypeptides. They have characterized the sedimentation profiles and macromolecular compositions of ribosomes and polysomes in normal and heat shocked cells in order to implicate factors responsible for the changes in regulation of translation in heat shocked cells. Sucrose gradient analysis of polysome sedimentation carried out under physiological salt conditions confirms the previously reported decrease in polysomes and increase in 80s monosomes in heat shock. The size of the 40s and 60s subunit peaks and the levels of /sup 35/S-methionyl-tRNA associated with the 43s preinitiation complex do not change significantly in heat shock. Titration of specific mRNA levels across the gradients shows that normal cell mRNAs accumulate in the 40 to 80s region of heat shock profiles while heat shock mRNAs are distributed on heat shock polysomes. Analysis of proteins present on the gradients shows a 46 kD protein is present on polysomes from normal cells and polymerized into the insoluble cytoskeleton in heat shocked cells. The rearrangement of the insoluble cytoskeleton follows the same time course as changes in translation regulation in induction and recovery from heat shock and is accompanied by phosphorylation of the 46 kD polypeptide.

  12. Targeted heat shock protein 72 for pulmonary cytoprotection.

    PubMed

    Parseghian, Missag H; Hobson, Stephen T; Richieri, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) is perhaps the most important member of the HSP70 family of proteins, given that it is induced in a wide variety of tissues and cells to combat stress, particularly oxidative stress. Here, we review independent observations of the critical role this protein plays as a pulmonary cytoprotectant and discuss the merits of developing HSP72 as a therapeutic for rapid delivery to cells and tissues after a traumatic event. We also discuss the fusion of HSP72 to a cell-penetrating single-chain Fv antibody fragment derived from mAb 3E10, referred to as Fv-HSP70. This fusion construct has been validated in vivo in a cerebral infarction model and is currently in testing as a clinical therapeutic to treat ischemic events and as a fieldable medical countermeasure to treat inhalation of toxicants caused by terrorist actions or industrial accidents. PMID:27152638

  13. A heat shock protein 90 β isoform involved in immune response to bacteria challenge and heat shock from Miichthys miiuy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tao; Gao, Yunhang; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2013-08-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is highly conserved molecular chaperone that plays a critical role in cellular stress response. In this study, we reported the identification and functional analysis of a heat shock protein 90 gene from miiuy croaker (designated Mimi-HSP90). Mimi-HSP90 contained five conserved HSP90 protein family signatures and shared 89.6%-99.5% similarity with other known HSP90 β isoform. Homology analysis and structure comparison further indicated that Mimi-HSP90 should be β isoform member of the HSP90 family. The molecular evolutionary analysis showed that HSP90 was under an overall strong purifying select pressure among fish species. Mimi-HSP90 gene was constitutively expressed in ten examined tissues, and the expression level of liver was higher than in other tissues. The expression level of Mimi-HSP90 gene under bacterial infection and heat shock were analyzed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, resulted in significant changes in liver, spleen, and kidney tissues. The purified recombinant pET-HSP90 protein was used to produce the polyclonal antibody in mice. The specificity of the antibody was determined by Western blot analysis. All results suggested that Mimi-HSP90 was involved in thermal stress and immune response in miiuy croaker. PMID:23684810

  14. Heat Shock Protein 70: Roles in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, María José; Montalban, Xavier; Espejo, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) have long been considered intracellular chaperones that possess housekeeping and cytoprotective functions. Consequently, HSP overexpression was proposed as a potential therapy for neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the accumulation or aggregation of abnormal proteins. Recently, the discovery that cells release HSP with the capacity to trigger proinflammatory as well as immunoregulatory responses has focused attention on investigating the role of HSP in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, the most relevant HSP is the inducible Hsp70, which exhibits both cytoprotectant and immunoregulatory functions. Several studies have presented contradictory evidence concerning the involvement of Hsp70 in MS or experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the MS animal model. In this review, we dissect the functions of Hsp70 and discuss the controversial data concerning the role of Hsp70 in MS and EAE. PMID:22669475

  15. An ancient developmental induction: heat-shock proteins induced in sporulation and oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, S; Rossi, J; Petko, L; Lindquist, S

    1986-03-01

    Every eukaryotic and prokaryotic organism tested to date synthesizes a small number of heat-shock proteins in response to heat and other forms of stress. A particular pattern of heat-shock gene expression was observed during ascospore development in Saccharomyces: heat-shock proteins hsp26 and hsp84 were strongly induced nor inducible by heat shock. Instead, two proteins related to hsp70 were induced. A strikingly similar pattern of expression occurs during oogenesis in Drosophila, suggesting that it may be one of the earliest developmental pathways to evolve in eukaryotic cells.

  16. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu; Chen, Hongbo; Cheng, Yanfen; Nasir, Mohammad Abdel; Kemper, Nicole; Bao, Endong

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42˚C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480‑min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB.

  17. Involvement of heat shock protein 47 in Schistosoma japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jia-Quan; Tao, Ran; Li, Lan; Ma, Ke; Xu, Lei; Ai, Guo; Fan, Xiang-Xue; Jiao, Yun-Tao; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with the blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum is associated with both liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Previously, heat shock protein 47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, was shown to play a critical role in the maturation of procollagen. However, less is known about the role of heat shock protein 47 in S. japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis. We therefore investigated the expression of heat shock protein 47 in S. japonicum-induced liver fibrosis and attempted to determine whether inhibition of heat shock protein 47 could have beneficial effects on fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that the expression of heat shock protein 47 was significantly increased in patients with Schistosoma-induced fibrosis, as well as in rodent models. Immunohistochemistry revealed heat shock protein 47-positive cells were found in the periphery of egg granulomas. Administration of heat shock protein 47-targeted short hairpin (sh)RNA remarkably reduced heat shock protein 47 expression and collagen deposition in NIH3T3 cells and liver tissue of S. japonicum-infected mice. Life-table analysis revealed a dose-dependent prolongation of survival rates with the treatment of heat shock protein 47-shRNA in murine fibrosis models. Moreover, serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate transaminase activity, splenomegaly, spleen weight index and portal hypertension were also measured, which showed improvement with the anti-fibrosis treatment. The fibrosis-related parameters assessed were expressions of Col1a1, Col3a1, TGF-β1, CTGF, IL-13, IL-17, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and PAI-1 in the liver. This study demonstrated that heat shock protein 47-targeted shRNA directly reduced collagen production of mouse liver fibrosis associated with S. japonicum. We conclude that heat shock protein 47 plays an essential role in S. japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice and may be a potential target for ameliorating the hepatic fibrosis caused by this parasite. PMID:24295791

  18. Immunity to heat shock proteins and arthritic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, W

    1999-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a frequently used model of experimental arthritis. Because of its histopathology, which is reminiscent of rheumatoid arthritis in humans, AA is used as a model for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs. Recently, it has become evident that AA is a typical T-cell-mediated autoimmune condition. Therefore, novel immunotherapies targeted to T cells can be developed in this model. Analysis of responding T cells in AA have now led to the definition of various antigens with potential relevance to arthritis, including human arthritic conditions. One such antigen defined in AA is the 60kD heat shock protein. Both T-cell vaccination approaches and active antigen immunizations and antigen toleration approaches have turned out to be effective in suppressing AA. PMID:10231009

  19. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Tamas; Polyak, Angela; Papp, Krisztina; Meszar, Zoltan; Zakany, Roza; Meszar-Katona, Eva; Tünde, Palne Terdik; Ham, Chang Hwa; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes. PMID:27025262

  20. Synthesis of the low molecular weight heat shock proteins in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, M.A.; Key, J.L. )

    1987-08-01

    Heat shock of living tissue induces the synthesis of a unique group of proteins, the heat shock proteins. In plants, the major group of heat shock proteins has a molecular mass of 15 to 25 kilodaltons. Accumulation to these proteins to stainable levels has been reported in only a few species. To examine accumulation of the low molecular weight heat shock proteins in a broader range of species, two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to resolve total protein from the following species: soybean (Glycine max L. Merr., var Wayne), pea (Pisum sativum L., var Early Alaska), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), wheat (Triticum asetivum L.), rice (Oryza sativa L., cv IR-36), maize (Zea mays L.), pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum L. Leeke, line 23DB), and Panicum miliaceum L. When identified by both silver staining and incorporation of radiolabel, a diverse array of low molecular weight heat shock proteins was synthesized in each of these species. These proteins accumulated to significant levels after three hours of heat shock but exhibited considerable heterogeneity in isoelectric point, molecular weight, stainability, and radiolabel incorporation. Although most appeared to be synthesized only during heat shock, some were detectable at low levels in control tissue. Compared to the monocots, a higher proportion of low molecular weight heat shock proteins was detectable in control tissues from dicots.

  1. The Hexameric Structures of Human Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Ta-Wei; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The human 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) functions as a dimeric molecular chaperone. HSP90 identified on the cell surface has been found to play a crucial role in cancer invasion and metastasis, and has become a validated anti-cancer target for drug development. It has been shown to self-assemble into oligomers upon heat shock or divalent cations treatment, but the functional role of the oligomeric states in the chaperone cycle is not fully understood. Principal Findings Here we report the crystal structure of a truncated HSP90 that contains the middle segment and the carboxy-terminal domain, termed MC-HSP90. The structure reveals an architecture with triangular bipyramid geometry, in which the building block of the hexameric assembly is a dimer. In solution, MC-HSP90 exists in three major oligomer states, namely dimer, tetramer and hexamer, which were elucidated by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. The newly discovered HSP90 isoform HSP90N that lacks the N-terminal ATPase domain also exhibited similar oligomerization states as did MC-HSP90. Conclusions While lacking the ATPase domain, both MC-HSP90 and HSP90N can self-assemble into a hexameric structure, spontaneously. The crystal structure of MC-HSP90 reveals that, in addition to the C-terminal dimerization domain, the residue W320 in the M domain plays a critical role in its oligomerization. This study not only demonstrates how the human MC-HSP90 forms a hexamer, but also justifies the similar formation of HSP90N by using 3D modeling analysis. PMID:21647436

  2. Associations between heat shock protein 70 genetic polymorphisms and calving traits in crossbred Brahman cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stressors such as heat, cold, toxins, and oxygen deprivation are known to induce heat shock proteins. Genetic polymorphisms associated with heat shock protein genes have been associated with decreased male and female fertility. Our objectives were to 1) confirm single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) ...

  3. The expression and induction of heat shock proteins in molluscs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwu; Chen, Zhiwei

    2013-05-01

    Living cells respond to stress stimuli by triggering rapid changes in the protein profiles, and the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) plays an important part in this process. HSPs, mainly acting as molecular chaperones, are constitutively expressed in cells and involved in protein folding, assembly, degradation, and intracellular localization. The overexpression of HSPs represents a ubiquitous molecular mechanism to cope with stress. Compared to vertebrates, molluscs have a biphasic life cycle where pelagic larvae go through settlement and metamorphosis. HSPs may play an important role in the survival strategy of molluscs during the biphasic life stages. Since aquatic environments are highly dynamic, molluscs may be subject to a variety of sources of stress and HSPs might play a more important role in the adaptation of these animals. Moreover, the mechanisms of stress tolerance in molluscs can offer fundamental insights into the adaptation of organisms for a wide range of environmental challenges. The cDNA of HSPs has been cloned from some molluscs, and HSPs can be induced by heat stress, hypoxia, heavy metal contamination, and aestivation, etc. The expression of HSPs was detected in the neuroendocrine system, mollusc development, and reproductive process. Furthermore, the induction of HSPs is related with the phosphorylation of stress-activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and cJun-N-terminal kinases (JNKs) in molluscs.

  4. Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Stem Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guo-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Stress response is well appreciated to induce the expression of heat shock proteins (Hsps) in the cell. Numerous studies have demonstrated that Hsps function as molecular chaperones in the stabilization of intracellular proteins, repairing damaged proteins, and assisting in protein translocation. Various kinds of stem cells (embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells) have to maintain their stemness and, under certain circumstances, undergo stress. Therefore, Hsps should have an important influence on stem cells. Actually, numerous studies have indicated that some Hsps physically interact with a number of transcription factors as well as intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways. Importantly, alterations in Hsp expression have been demonstrated to affect stem cell behavior including self-renewal, differentiation, sensitivity to environmental stress, and aging. This chapter summarizes recent findings related to (1) the roles of Hsps in maintenance of stem cell dormancy, proliferation, and differentiation; (2) the expression signature of Hsps in embryonic/adult stem cells and differentiated stem cells; (3) the protective roles of Hsps in transplanted stem cells; and (4) the possible roles of Hsps in stem cell aging. PMID:22917237

  5. Riboflavin protects mice against liposaccharide-induced shock through expression of heat shock protein 25

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development. The study was aimed at investigating the effects of vitamin B2 on the survival rate, and expressions of tissue heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mice und...

  6. Non-Specific Protein Modifications by a Phytochemical Induce Heat Shock Response for Self-Defense

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Kohta; Ohkura, Shinya; Nakahata, Erina; Ishisaka, Akari; Kawai, Yoshichika; Terao, Junji; Mori, Taiki; Ishii, Takeshi; Nakayama, Tsutomu; Kioka, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Shinya; Ikeda, Yasutaka; Akiyama, Minoru; Irie, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Accumulated evidence shows that some phytochemicals provide beneficial effects for human health. Recently, a number of mechanistic studies have revealed that direct interactions between phytochemicals and functional proteins play significant roles in exhibiting their bioactivities. However, their binding selectivities to biological molecules are considered to be lower due to their small and simple structures. In this study, we found that zerumbone, a bioactive sesquiterpene, binds to numerous proteins with little selectivity. Similar to heat-denatured proteins, zerumbone-modified proteins were recognized by heat shock protein 90, a constitutive molecular chaperone, leading to heat shock factor 1-dependent heat shock protein induction in hepa1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells. Furthermore, oral administration of this phytochemical up-regulated heat shock protein expressions in the livers of Sprague-Dawley rats. Interestingly, pretreatment with zerumbone conferred a thermoresistant phenotype to hepa1c1c7 cells as well as to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. It is also important to note that several phytochemicals with higher hydrophobicity or electrophilicity, including phenethyl isothiocyanate and curcumin, markedly induced heat shock proteins, whereas most of the tested nutrients did not. These results suggest that non-specific protein modifications by xenobiotic phytochemicals cause mild proteostress, thereby inducing heat shock response and leading to potentiation of protein quality control systems. We considered these bioactivities to be xenohormesis, an adaptation mechanism against xenobiotic chemical stresses. Heat shock response by phytochemicals may be a fundamental mechanism underlying their various bioactivities. PMID:23536805

  7. Heat Shock Proteins in Dermatophytes: Current Advances and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rossi, Nilce M.; Jacob, Tiago R.; Sanches, Pablo R.; Peres, Nalu T.A.; Lang, Elza A.S.; Martins, Maíra P.; Rossi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are proteins whose transcription responds rapidly to temperature shifts. They constitute a family of molecular chaperones, involved in the proper folding and stabilisation of proteins under physiological and adverse conditions. HSPs also assist in the protection and recovery of cells exposed to a variety of stressful conditions, including heat. The role of HSPs extends beyond chaperoning proteins, as they also participate in diverse cellular functions, such as the assembly of macromolecular complexes, protein transport and sorting, dissociation of denatured protein aggregates, cell cycle control, and programmed cell death. They are also important antigens from a variety of pathogens, are able to stimulate innate immune cells, and are implicated in acquired immunity. In fungi, HSPs have been implicated in virulence, dimorphic transition, and drug resistance. Some HSPs are potential targets for therapeutic strategies. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of HSPs in dermatophytes, which are a group of keratinophilic fungi responsible for superficial mycoses in humans and animals. Computational analyses were performed to characterise the group of proteins in these dermatophytes, as well as to assess their conservation and to identify DNA-binding domains (5′-nGAAn-3′) in the promoter regions of the hsp genes. In addition, the quantification of the transcript levels of few genes in a pacC background helped in the development of an extended model for the regulation of the expression of the hsp genes, which supports the participation of the pH-responsive transcriptional regulator PacC in this process. PMID:27226766

  8. Multi-Level Interactions Between Heat Shock Factors, Heat Shock Proteins, and the Redox System Regulate Acclimation to Heat

    PubMed Central

    Driedonks, Nicky; Xu, Jiemeng; Peters, Janny L.; Park, Sunghun; Rieu, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    High temperature has become a global concern because it seriously affects the growth and reproduction of plants. Exposure of plant cells to high temperatures result in cellular damage and can even lead to cell death. Part of the damage can be ascribed to the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which accumulate during abiotic stresses such as heat stress. ROS are toxic and can modify other biomacromolecules including membrane lipids, DNA, and proteins. In order to protect the cells, ROS scavenging is essential. In contrast with their inherent harms, ROS also function as signaling molecules, inducing stress tolerance mechanisms. This review examines the evidence for crosstalk between the classical heat stress response, which consists of heat shock factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs), with the ROS network at multiple levels in the heat response process. Heat stimulates HSF activity directly, but also indirectly via ROS. HSFs in turn stimulate the expression of HSP chaperones and also affect ROS scavenger gene expression. In the short term, HSFs repress expression of superoxide dismutase scavenger genes via induction of miRNA398, while they also activate scavenger gene expression and stabilize scavenger protein activity via HSP induction. We propose that these contrasting effects allow for the boosting of the heat stress response at the very onset of the stress, while preventing subsequent oxidative damage. The described model on HSFs, HSPs, ROS, and ROS scavenger interactions seems applicable to responses to stresses other than heat and may explain the phenomenon of crossacclimation. PMID:26635827

  9. Multi-Level Interactions Between Heat Shock Factors, Heat Shock Proteins, and the Redox System Regulate Acclimation to Heat.

    PubMed

    Driedonks, Nicky; Xu, Jiemeng; Peters, Janny L; Park, Sunghun; Rieu, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    High temperature has become a global concern because it seriously affects the growth and reproduction of plants. Exposure of plant cells to high temperatures result in cellular damage and can even lead to cell death. Part of the damage can be ascribed to the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which accumulate during abiotic stresses such as heat stress. ROS are toxic and can modify other biomacromolecules including membrane lipids, DNA, and proteins. In order to protect the cells, ROS scavenging is essential. In contrast with their inherent harms, ROS also function as signaling molecules, inducing stress tolerance mechanisms. This review examines the evidence for crosstalk between the classical heat stress response, which consists of heat shock factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs), with the ROS network at multiple levels in the heat response process. Heat stimulates HSF activity directly, but also indirectly via ROS. HSFs in turn stimulate the expression of HSP chaperones and also affect ROS scavenger gene expression. In the short term, HSFs repress expression of superoxide dismutase scavenger genes via induction of miRNA398, while they also activate scavenger gene expression and stabilize scavenger protein activity via HSP induction. We propose that these contrasting effects allow for the boosting of the heat stress response at the very onset of the stress, while preventing subsequent oxidative damage. The described model on HSFs, HSPs, ROS, and ROS scavenger interactions seems applicable to responses to stresses other than heat and may explain the phenomenon of crossacclimation.

  10. Multi-Level Interactions Between Heat Shock Factors, Heat Shock Proteins, and the Redox System Regulate Acclimation to Heat.

    PubMed

    Driedonks, Nicky; Xu, Jiemeng; Peters, Janny L; Park, Sunghun; Rieu, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    High temperature has become a global concern because it seriously affects the growth and reproduction of plants. Exposure of plant cells to high temperatures result in cellular damage and can even lead to cell death. Part of the damage can be ascribed to the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which accumulate during abiotic stresses such as heat stress. ROS are toxic and can modify other biomacromolecules including membrane lipids, DNA, and proteins. In order to protect the cells, ROS scavenging is essential. In contrast with their inherent harms, ROS also function as signaling molecules, inducing stress tolerance mechanisms. This review examines the evidence for crosstalk between the classical heat stress response, which consists of heat shock factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs), with the ROS network at multiple levels in the heat response process. Heat stimulates HSF activity directly, but also indirectly via ROS. HSFs in turn stimulate the expression of HSP chaperones and also affect ROS scavenger gene expression. In the short term, HSFs repress expression of superoxide dismutase scavenger genes via induction of miRNA398, while they also activate scavenger gene expression and stabilize scavenger protein activity via HSP induction. We propose that these contrasting effects allow for the boosting of the heat stress response at the very onset of the stress, while preventing subsequent oxidative damage. The described model on HSFs, HSPs, ROS, and ROS scavenger interactions seems applicable to responses to stresses other than heat and may explain the phenomenon of crossacclimation. PMID:26635827

  11. High dietary protein combats the stress of Labeo rohita fingerlings exposed to heat shock.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shivendra; Sahu, N P; Pal, A K; Subramanian, Saravanan; Priyadarshi, Himanshu; Kumar, Vikas

    2011-12-01

    The amelioration effect of high dietary protein against stress was evaluated in Labeo rohita fingerlings, exposed to heat shock. Two hundred and forty fingerlings (6.57 ± 0.04 g, average weight ± SE) were randomly distributed into 4 treatment groups, each with 4 replicates was fed with either of four diets containing different levels of protein (20, 30, 40 or 45%). Water temperatures of all the treatments were within the range of 25.5-26.5°C throughout the experimental period of 30 days. After 30 days of feeding, fish were given heat shock by exposing to 38°C for 2 h. Heat shock significantly decreased (P < 0.05) liver glycogen content in treatment groups fed with 20 and 30% dietary protein, whereas unaffected in the 40 and 45% protein-fed groups. Heat shock significantly increased (P < 0.05) serum glucose and cortisol level in all the treatments. The 40 and 45% dietary protein-fed groups registered significantly higher survival (%) after the heat shock compared with their lower-protein counterparts. Heat shock increased the glycolytic, gluconeogenic, protein metabolic and antioxidative enzymes to cope up with thermal stress. Our results indicate that high-protein diet (≥40%) combats the stress due to heat shock in Labeo rohita.

  12. The role of small heat shock proteins in parasites.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Espinoza, Bertha

    2015-09-01

    The natural life cycle of many protozoan and helminth parasites involves exposure to several hostile environmental conditions. Under these circumstances, the parasites arouse a cellular stress response that involves the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Small HSPs (sHSPs) constitute one of the main families of HSPs. The sHSPs are very divergent at the sequence level, but their secondary and tertiary structures are conserved and some of its members are related to α-crystallin from vertebrates. They are involved in a variety of cellular processes. As other HSPs, the sHSPs act as molecular chaperones; however, they have shown other activities apparently not related to chaperone action. In this review, the diverse activities of sHSPs in the major genera of protozoan and helminth parasites are described. These include stress response, development, and immune response, among others. In addition, an analysis comparing the sequences of sHSPs from some parasites using a distance analysis is presented. Because many parasites face hostile conditions through its life cycles the study of HSPs, including sHSPs, is fundamental.

  13. Heat shock proteins: stimulators of innate and acquired immunity.

    PubMed

    Colaco, Camilo A; Bailey, Christopher R; Walker, K Barry; Keeble, James

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvants were reintroduced into modern immunology as the dirty little secret of immunologists by Janeway and thus began the molecular definition of innate immunity. It is now clear that the binding of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) activates the innate immune response and provides the host with a rapid mechanism for detecting infection by pathogens and initiates adaptive immunity. Ironically, in addition to advancing the basic science of immunology, Janeway's revelation on induction of the adaptive system has also spurred an era of rational vaccine design that exploits PRRs. Thus, defined PAMPs that bind to known PRRs are being specifically coupled to antigens to improve their immunogenicity. However, while PAMPs efficiently activate the innate immune response, they do not mediate the capture of antigen that is required to elicit the specific responses of the acquired immune system. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that are found complexed to client polypeptides and have been studied as potential cancer vaccines. In addition to binding PRRs and activating the innate immune response, HSPs have been shown to both induce the maturation of APCs and provide chaperoned polypeptides for specific triggering of the acquired immune response.

  14. Heat Shock Proteins: Conditional Mediators of Inflammation in Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Stuart K.; Murshid, Ayesha; Gong, Jianlin

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP)-based anticancer vaccines have undergone successful preclinical testing and are now entering clinical trial. Questions still remain, however regarding the immunological properties of HSPs. It is now accepted that many of the HSPs participate in tumor immunity, at least in part by chaperoning tumor antigenic peptides, introducing them into antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DC) that display the antigens on MHC class I molecules on the cell surface and stimulate cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL). However, in order for activated CD8+ T cells to function as effective CTL and kill tumor cells, additional signals must be induced to obtain a sturdy CTL response. These include the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on the DC surface and inflammatory events that can induce immunogenic cytokine cascades. That such events occur is indicated by the ability of Hsp70 vaccines to induce antitumor immunity and overcome tolerance to tumor antigens such as mucin1. Secondary activation of CTL can be induced by inflammatory signaling through Toll-like receptors and/or by interaction of antigen-activated T helper cells with the APC. We will discuss the role of the inflammatory properties of HSPs in tumor immunity and the potential role of HSPs in activating T helper cells and DC licensing. PMID:22566956

  15. Heat-Shock Protein 90-Targeted Nano Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rochani, Ankit K; Ravindran Girija, Aswathy; Borah, Ankita; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D

    2016-04-01

    Suboptimal chemotherapy of anticancer drugs may be attributed to a variety of cellular mechanisms, which synergize to dodge the drug responses. Nearly 2 decades of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-targeted drug discovery has shown that the mono-therapy with Hsp90 inhibitors seems to be relatively ineffective compared with combination treatment due to several cellular dodging mechanisms. In this article, we have tried to analyze and review the Hsp90 and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR)-mediated drug resistance mechanisms. By using this information we have discussed about the rationale behind use of drug combinations that includes both or any one of these inhibitors for cancer therapy. Currently, biodegradable nano vector (NV)-loaded novel drug delivery systems have shown to resolve the problems of poor bioavailability. NVs of drugs such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and others have been successfully introduced for medicinal use. Hence, looking at the success of NVs, in this article we have also discussed the progress made in the delivery of biodegradable NV-loaded Hsp90 and m-TOR-targeted inhibitors in multiple drug combinations. We have also discussed the possible ways by which the market success of biodegradable NVs can positively impact the clinical trials of anti-Hsp90 and m-TOR combination strategy. PMID:26886301

  16. The Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Antigen Cross Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Ayesha; Gong, Jianlin; Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that bind tumor antigens and mediate their uptake into antigen presenting cells. HSP–antigen complexes are then directed toward either the MHC class I pathway through antigen cross presentation or the conventional class II pathway, leading to activation of T cell subsets. Uptake of HSP-chaperoned polypeptides can involve both receptor-mediated and receptor-independent routes, and mechanisms of antigen sorting between the Class I and II pathways after uptake are currently under investigation. The processes involved in internalization of HSP–antigen complexes differ somewhat from the mechanisms previously determined for (unchaperoned) particulate and free soluble antigens. A number of studies show that HSP-facilitated antigen cross presentation requires uptake of the complexes by scavenger receptors (SR) followed by processing in the proteasome, and loading onto MHC class I molecules. In this review we have examined the roles of HSPs and SR in antigen uptake, sorting, processing, cell signaling, and activation of innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:22566944

  17. Heat-resistant variants of Chinese hamster fibroblasts altered in expression of heat shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Laszlo, A; Li, G C

    1985-01-01

    Heat-resistant variants of the Chinese hamster HA-1 line have been isolated after repeated heat treatments. The heat-resistant phenotype has been stable for over 70 passages. One of the members of the 70-kDa heat shock protein family was found to be synthesized at greater levels in the heat-resistant variants under normal growth conditions. Mild heat treatment of the variant lines induced a transient thermotolerance that was accompanied by additional increase in the synthesis of the 70-kDa heat shock proteins. Cell-free translation of total cellular RNA revealed greater amounts of 70-kDa heat shock protein mRNA in both control and heated variant cells. The greater levels of 70-kDa heat shock protein synthesized in the variant cells presumably are a reflection of altered levels of its messenger mRNA. In addition, we found that translational control plays a role in the elevated expression of heat shock proteins in heat-shocked HA-1 cells and their heat-resistant variants. The association of the heat-resistant phenotype with increased levels of a 70-kDa heat shock protein suggests strongly that this gene product plays a role in protecting cells from damage inflicted by elevated temperatures. Images PMID:3865213

  18. [Small heat shock proteins and adaptation to hypertermia in various Drosophila species].

    PubMed

    Shilova, V Iu; Garbuz, D G; Evgen'ev, M B; Zatsepina, O G

    2006-01-01

    Expression level and kinetics of accumulation of small heat shock proteins (21-27 kDa group) have been investigated in three Drosophila species differing significantly by temperature niche and thermosensitivity. It was shown that low-latitude thermotolerant species D. virilis exceeds the high-latitude thermosensitive closely-related species D. lummei as well as distant thermosensitive species D. melanogaster in terms of small heat shock proteins expression and accumulation after temperature elevation. The data obtained enable to postulate an important role of small heat shock proteins in organism basal thermotolerance and general adaptation to adverse conditions of environment. PMID:16637267

  19. The Entamoeba histolytica methylated LINE-binding protein EhMLBP provides protection against heat shock.

    PubMed

    Katz, Sophia; Kushnir, Oded; Tovy, Ayala; Siman Tov, Rama; Ankri, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to environmental stress is a key process that allows the unicellular parasite Entamoeba histolytica to survive in its human host. We previously characterized EhMLBP as an essential protein for the growth and the virulence of the parasite. EhMLBP binds to methylated repetitive DNA, and is one of the core proteins of the parasite's epigenetic machinery. Here, we show that EhMLBP and heat shock proteins have common properties. EhMLBP is induced by heat shock and its expression is regulated by a heat shock element binding site that is located in its 5' non-coding region. Following heat shock, the perinuclear localization of EhMLBP in control trophozoites is replaced by an even distribution within the nucleus alongside with an enhanced recruitment of EhMLBP to the reverse transcriptase of a long interspersed nucleotide element (LINE) DNA. Constitutive overexpression of EhMLBP protects trophozoites against heat shock and reduces protein aggregation. This protective function is lost in trophozoites that overexpress a mutated form of EhMLBP which is devoid of its heat shock domain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a methyl DNA-binding protein that plays a protective role against heat shock.

  20. KPNA3-knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak associated with the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori) by reducing heat shock factor transport into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Wei, Guoqing; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Li, Kedong; Zhang, Congfen; Dai, Lishang; Sun, Yu; Liu, Dongran; Zhu, Baojian; Liu, Chaoliang

    2016-01-10

    In this study, we investigated the role of karyopherin alpha 3 in the heat shock response in male silkworm pupae. Karyopherin alpha recognizes the classical nuclear location sequence on proteins and transports them into the nucleus by forming a trimetric complex with karyopherin beta. Three predicted karyopherin alphas (KPNA1, KPNA2 and KPNA3) have been identified from the silkworm Bombyx mori. Pull-down assay result showed that KPNA3 can pull down heat shock transcription factor (HSF) from proteins extracted from tissues using non-denature lysis buffer. After 45 °C heat shock on male B. mori pupae for 30 min, we identified two heat shock protein (HSP) mRNA expression peaks correlating with HSP19.9, HSP20.4 and HSP25.4 at 4 h (peak 1) and 24 h (peak 2). The second peak was eliminated after knockdown of KPNA3. Similar results were obtained following knockdown of HSF, which is the trans-activating factor of heat shock. However, KPNA3 knockdown was not accompanied by the decreased HSF protein levels at 24 h after heat shock which were observed following HSF knockdown. We also expressed recombinant protein GST-KPNA3 and His-HSF in Escherichia coli to perform GST pull-down assay and the result confirmed the interaction between KPNA3 and HSF. We concluded that KPNA3 knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak in the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae by reducing HSF transport into the nucleus.

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation of the trypanosome heat shock response by a zinc finger protein.

    PubMed

    Droll, Dorothea; Minia, Igor; Fadda, Abeer; Singh, Aditi; Stewart, Mhairi; Queiroz, Rafael; Clayton, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In most organisms, the heat-shock response involves increased heat-shock gene transcription. In Kinetoplastid protists, however, virtually all control of gene expression is post-transcriptional. Correspondingly, Trypanosoma brucei heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) synthesis after heat shock depends on regulation of HSP70 mRNA turnover. We here show that the T. brucei CCCH zinc finger protein ZC3H11 is a post-transcriptional regulator of trypanosome chaperone mRNAs. ZC3H11 is essential in bloodstream-form trypanosomes and for recovery of insect-form trypanosomes from heat shock. ZC3H11 binds to mRNAs encoding heat-shock protein homologues, with clear specificity for the subset of trypanosome chaperones that is required for protein refolding. In procyclic forms, ZC3H11 was required for stabilisation of target chaperone-encoding mRNAs after heat shock, and the HSP70 mRNA was also decreased upon ZC3H11 depletion in bloodstream forms. Many mRNAs bound to ZC3H11 have a consensus AUU repeat motif in the 3'-untranslated region. ZC3H11 bound preferentially to AUU repeats in vitro, and ZC3H11 regulation of HSP70 mRNA in bloodstream forms depended on its AUU repeat region. Tethering of ZC3H11 to a reporter mRNA increased reporter expression, showing that it is capable of actively stabilizing an mRNA. These results show that expression of trypanosome heat-shock genes is controlled by a specific RNA-protein interaction. They also show that heat-shock-induced chaperone expression in procyclic trypanosome enhances parasite survival at elevated temperatures.

  2. Solute composition and heat shock proteins in rat renal medulla.

    PubMed

    Ohno, A; Müller, E; Fraek, M L; Thurau, K; Beck, F

    1997-05-01

    The high content of heat shock proteins (HSPs) 25 and 72 in the hyperosmotic inner medulla of the concentrating kidney has been ascribed to the high NaCl and urea concentrations in this kidney zone. To assess the effects of variations in the composition of solutes in the renal medulla on the intrarenal distribution of HSPs, rats were fed either a high- or low-Na diet for 3 weeks. These diets result in greatly differing urine and inner medullary solute composition. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot techniques were used to analyse HSP25 and HSP72 in the cortex, outer medulla and inner medulla. In addition, the amounts of organic osmolytes (sorbitol, myo-inositol, betaine and glycerophosphorylcholine) and urea in the tissue were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Intra- and extracellular electrolyte concentrations at the papillary tip were measured by electron microprobe analysis. In the high-Na group, urine osmolality was about 1000 mosmol/kg lower than in rats fed a low-Na diet, due to lower urea concentrations. The sum of urine sodium and potassium concentrations, however, did not differ between the two groups. Neither in the outer nor in the inner medulla was the sum of the concentrations of organic osmolytes affected by the dietary treatment. The sum of sodium, potassium and chloride concentrations did not differ between the two experimental groups, neither in the interstitial nor in the intracellular compartments. However, the urea content and the amounts of HSP25 and HSP72 were significantly lower in the inner medulla of the group of rats fed a high-Na diet. Our results suggest that urea participates in the regulation of the medullary levels of the HSPs and that both HSP25 and HSP72 are components of mechanisms protecting medullary cells against the deleterious effects of high urea concentrations.

  3. Heat shock proteins: the 'Swiss Army Knife' vaccines against cancers and infectious agents.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, P K; Amato, R J

    2001-03-21

    The ability of heat shock proteins to: (a) chaperone peptides, including antigenic peptides; (b) interact with antigen presenting cells through a receptor; (c) stimulate antigen presenting cells to secrete inflammatory cytokines; and (d) mediate maturation of dendritic cells, makes them a one-stop shop for the immune system. These properties also permit the utilization of heat shock proteins for development of a new generation of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against cancers and infectious diseases.

  4. Heat shock protein induction and induced thermal tolerance are independent in adult salamanders.

    PubMed

    Easton, D P; Rutledge, P S; Spotila, J R

    1987-02-01

    Ectothermic vertebrates become thermally tolerant (heat hardened) after exposure to heat shock. Eukaryotic cells show a similar response. Cellular thermal tolerance is correlated with the induction of heat shock proteins (hsps). We have investigated the relationship between heat hardening in salamanders and the induction of hsps in the tissues of these organisms. Although the synthesis of hsps can be induced in these animals by sublethal heat shocks, conditions required for hsp induction and heat hardening often do not coincide. We conclude that induced thermal tolerance in adult salamanders is independent of hsp induction in their tissues. PMID:3559509

  5. Exploring systems affected by the heat shock response in Plasmodium falciparum via protein association networks

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, Timothy G.; Cai, Hong; Gu, Jianying; Zhou, Zhan; Wang, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock response is a general mechanism by which organisms deal with physical insults such as sudden changes in temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses, and exposure to toxic substances. Plasmodium falciparum is exposed to drastic temperature changes as a part of its life cycle and maintains an extensive repertoire of heat shock response-related proteins. As these proteins serve to maintain the parasite in the face of anti-malarial drugs as well, better understanding of the heat shock-related systems in the malaria parasite will lead to therapeutic approaches that frustrate these systems, leading to more effective use of anti-malarials. Here we use protein association networks to broaden our understanding of the systems impacted by and/or implicated in the heat shock response. PMID:25539848

  6. BH3-only protein BIM mediates heat shock-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Indra M; Chen, Miao-Der; Muro, Israel; Robertson, John D; Wright, Casey W; Bratton, Shawn B

    2014-01-01

    Acute heat shock can induce apoptosis through a canonical pathway involving the upstream activation of caspase-2, followed by BID cleavage and stimulation of the intrinsic pathway. Herein, we report that the BH3-only protein BIM, rather than BID, is essential to heat shock-induced cell death. We observed that BIM-deficient cells were highly resistant to heat shock, exhibiting short and long-term survival equivalent to Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) cells and better than either Bid(-/-) or dominant-negative caspase-9-expressing cells. Only Bim(-/-) and Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) cells exhibited resistance to mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and loss of mitochondrial inner membrane potential. Moreover, while dimerized caspase-2 failed to induce apoptosis in Bid(-/-) cells, it readily did so in Bim(-/-) cells, implying that caspase-2 kills exclusively through BID, not BIM. Finally, BIM reportedly associates with MCL-1 following heat shock, and Mcl-1(-/-) cells were indeed sensitized to heat shock-induced apoptosis. However, pharmacological inhibition of BCL-2 and BCL-X(L) with ABT-737 also sensitized cells to heat shock, most likely through liberation of BIM. Thus, BIM mediates heat shock-induced apoptosis through a BAX/BAK-dependent pathway that is antagonized by antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members.

  7. Aging results in an unusual expression of Drosophila heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.E.; Walton, J.K.; Dubitsky, R.; Bensch, K.G. )

    1988-06-01

    The authors used high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to evaluate the effect of aging on the heat shock response in Drosophila melanogaster. Although the aging process is not well understood at the molecular level, recent observations suggest that quantitative changes in gene expression occur as these fruit flies approach senescence. Such genetic alterations are in accord with our present data, which clearly show marked differences in the synthesis of heat shock proteins between young and old fruit flies. In 10-day-old flies, a heat shock of 20 min results in the expression of 14 new proteins as detectable by two-dimensional electrophoresis of ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled polypeptides, whereas identical treatment of 45-day-old flies leads to the expression of at least 50 new or highly up-regulated proteins. In addition, there is also a concomitant increase in the rate of synthesis of a number of the normal proteins in the older animals. Microdensitometric determinations of the low molecular weight heat shock polypeptides on autoradiographs of five age groups revealed that their maximum expression occurs at 47 days for a population of flies with a mean life span of 33.7 days. Moreover, a heat shock effect similar to that observed in senescent flies occurs in young flies fed canavanine, an arginine analogue, before heat shock.

  8. Heat shock protein 70 and anti–heat shock protein 70 antibodies in nasal secretions of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsybikov, Namjil N.; Egorova, Elena V.; Kuznik, Boris I.; Fefelova, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The issue of heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and anti-HSP70 antibodies in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has never been explored. Objective: To determine the nasal secretion (NS) levels of HSP70 and anti-HSP70 antibodies in patients with CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and patients with CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP), and to evaluate their associations with CRS clinical severity and correlation with NS interleukin (IL), IL-5 and interferon λ. Methods: CRS severity was determined by Lund-Mackay scores. Levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE), IL-4, IL-5, interferon λ, HSP70, and anti-HSP70 antibody levels in NS were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Forty-six patients with CRSsNP (25 women [54.3%] and 21 men [45.7%], mean [standard deviation {SD}]) age, 34.1 ± 12.3 years; 54 patients with CRSwNP (24 women [44.4%] and 30 men [55.6%], mean [SD] age, 37.9 ± 17.5 years). A group of 40 healthy subjects served as controls. Compared with the controls (with a mean [SD] NS HSP70 level of 0.05 ± 0.03 μg/mL), mean [SD] NS HSP70 levels in both the CRSsNP group (0.16 ± 0.07 μg/mL) and CRSwNP group (0.21 ± 0.10 μg/mL) were increased (p < 0.001). Similarly, the mean (SD) NS anti-HSP70 antibody levels were significantly higher in patients with CRSwNP (0.25 ± 0.09 optical density value [ODV]) compared with CRSsNP (0.13 ± 0.04 ODV) (p < 0.001) and healthy controls (0.14 ± 0.02 ODV) (p < 0.001). NS HSP70 in subjects with CRSwNP showed a significant positive correlation with the Lund-Mackay score (r = 0.31; p < 0.05). NS levels of either HSP70 or anti-HSP70 antibodies were strongly correlated with NS IL-4 in the CRSwNP group (r = 0.62, p < 0.001; and r = 0.69, p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: NS concentrations of HSP70 and secretory IgA anti HSP70 antibodies are increased in CRSwNP (but not in CRSsNP) and correlate positively with the Lund-Mackay score, NS IL-4, and NS IL-5. PMID:27103555

  9. Nuclear proteins in Drosophila melanogaster cells after heat shock and their binding to homologous DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Falkner, F G; Biessmann, H

    1980-01-01

    After 5 minutes heat shock at 37 degrees C Drosophila melanogaster Kc-cell nuclear proteins were extracted wit 0.4M NaCl and compared by SDS gel electrophoresis with extracts from cells grown at 25 degrees C. Two proteins (39 000 and 46 000) were only found in heat shock nuclei. Reconstitution with total Drosophila DNA or a DNA fragment from the heat inducible locus 87A/C covalently coupled to sepharose was performed. In the presence of calf thymus competitor DNA these proteins and also others of lower molecular weight showed preferential binding to the homologous DNA. Images PMID:6777762

  10. Small heat shock proteins in redox metabolism: implications for cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Christians, Elisabeth S; Ishiwata, Takahiro; Benjamin, Ivor J

    2012-10-01

    A timely review series on small heat shock proteins has to appropriately examine their fundamental properties and implications in the cardiovascular system since several members of this chaperone family exhibit robust expression in the myocardium and blood vessels. Due to energetic and metabolic demands, the cardiovascular system maintains a high mitochondrial activity but irreversible oxidative damage might ensue from increased production of reactive oxygen species. How equilibrium between their production and scavenging is achieved becomes paramount for physiological maintenance. For example, heat shock protein B1 (HSPB1) is implicated in maintaining this equilibrium or redox homeostasis by upholding the level of glutathione, a major redox mediator. Studies of gain or loss of function achieved by genetic manipulations have been highly informative for understanding the roles of those proteins. For example, genetic deficiency of several small heat shock proteins such as HSPB5 and HSPB2 is well-tolerated in heart cells whereas a single missense mutation causes human pathology. Such evidence highlights both the profound genetic redundancy observed among the multigene family of small heat shock proteins while underscoring the role proteotoxicity plays in driving disease pathogenesis. We will discuss the available data on small heat shock proteins in the cardiovascular system, redox metabolism and human diseases. From the medical perspective, we envision that such emerging knowledge of the multiple roles small heat shock proteins exert in the cardiovascular system will undoubtedly open new avenues for their identification and possible therapeutic targeting in humans. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Small HSPs in physiology and pathology.

  11. Baculovirus replication induces the expression of heat shock proteins in vivo and in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent handful of studies have linked baculovirus infection with the induction of heat shock proteins, a highly conserved family of cytoprotective proteins. Here, we demonstrate baculovirus-stimulated upregulation of hsp70 transcription in the natural host, Helicoverpa zea. Larvae lethally infec...

  12. The pertinence of expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) to the efficacy of cryopreservation in HELAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peitao; Shu, Zhiquan; He, Liqun; Cui, Xiangdong; Wang, Yuzhen; Gao, Dayong

    2005-01-01

    HELAs (Hela cells, passed cells of human cervical carcinoma) were heat or cold treated (named heat or cold shock) and then resumed normal culture for 2, 4 or 8 hours respectively. The expressions of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and 90 (HSP90) of the HELAs were measured by Northern and Western blotting. HELAs after 4-hour culture were exposed to or cryopreserved with different concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO, 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% respectively, V/V). Meanwhile, the HELAs after different culture time (2, 4 and 6 hours of culture) were cryopreserved with 5% Me2SO. After exposure or cryopreservation, the number of live HELAs was counted and the survival rate was calculated. The results showed that heat shock increased the expression of HSP70 and HSP90 of HELAs, while cold shock decreased the expression of the two proteins. When the concentrations of Me2SO were 10%, 15% and 20%, the survival rates of HELAs after exposure to Me2SO or cryopreservation were much lower than those when the concentrations were small. The survival rates of the heat shocked HELAs were significantly higher than those of the cold shocked and control HELAs. After cryopreservation with 5% Me2SO, the survival rate of heat shocked HELAs group with 2 hours culture time was the lowest among all the groups of HELAs with different cultural time. From the results of this study, we conclude that the expressions of HSP70 and HSP90 in HELAs increased significantly after heat shock, while cold shock decreased the expressions of these two proteins. The over-expressions of HSPs in the heat shocked HELAs could protect the cells from both injury caused by potential toxicity of high concentrations of Me2SO and cryoinjury caused by the freeze-thawing/cryopreservation procedure.

  13. Absolute protein quantification of the yeast chaperome under conditions of heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Rebecca J.; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W.; Lanthaler, Karin; Beynon, Robert J.; Grant, Chris M.; Hubbard, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones are fundamental to regulating the heat shock response, mediating protein recovery from thermal‐induced misfolding and aggregation. Using the QconCAT strategy and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) for absolute protein quantification, we have determined copy per cell values for 49 key chaperones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of normal growth and heat shock. This work extends a previous chemostat quantification study by including up to five Q‐peptides per protein to improve confidence in protein quantification. In contrast to the global proteome profile of S. cerevisiae in response to heat shock, which remains largely unchanged as determined by label‐free quantification, many of the chaperones are upregulated with an average two‐fold increase in protein abundance. Interestingly, eight of the significantly upregulated chaperones are direct gene targets of heat shock transcription factor‐1. By performing absolute quantification of chaperones under heat stress for the first time, we were able to evaluate the individual protein‐level response. Furthermore, this SRM data was used to calibrate label‐free quantification values for the proteome in absolute terms, thus improving relative quantification between the two conditions. This study significantly enhances the largely transcriptomic data available in the field and illustrates a more nuanced response at the protein level. PMID:27252046

  14. Expression levels of heat shock protein 60 and glucose-regulated protein 78 in response to trimethylamine-N-oxide treatment in murine macrophage J774A.1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Gholamhoseyniannajar, A; Yaghoobi, M M; Jahani, Y; Vahabzadeh, Z

    2015-09-26

    Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a common metabolite in animals and humans, can induce changes in the expression or conformation of heat shock proteins. It has also been introduced as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and a biomarker for kidney problems. On the other hand, increased levels of heat shock proteins 60 and 70 KDa are associated with increased atherosclerosis risk. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the possible effect(s) of TMAO on the expression of HSP60 and GRP78 at the mRNA and protein levels. Murine macrophage J774A.1 cells were treated with micromolar concentrations of TMAO and 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), a chemical chaperon, for different time intervals. Tunicamycin was also used as a control for induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Tunicamycin greatly increased both mRNA and protein levels of GRP78. Similarly but to a lesser extent compared to tunicamycin, TMAO also increased mRNA and protein levels of GRP78 in a dose and time-dependent manner. In contrast, 4-PBA failed to induce any changes. Similar to GRP78, HSP60 was also increased only at mRNA level in TMAO treated cells. 4-PBA also increased HSP60 mRNA levels, whereas, tunicamycin did not show any effect on either protein or mRNA levels of HSP60. Since both heat shock proteins are stress inducible and the elevation of GRP78 is a hallmark for endoplasmic reticulum stress induction, it can be concluded that TMAO may induce endoplasmic reticulum stress or may act through elevation of these heat shock proteins.

  15. EFFECT OF EXPOSURE PROTOCOL AND HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN EXPRESSION ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Effect of exposure protocol and heat shock protein expression on arsenite induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    The genotoxic effects of arsenic (As) are well accepted, yet its mechanism of action is not clearly defined. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) protect...

  16. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  17. A small heat shock protein is essential for thermotolerance and intracellular survival of Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Hombach, Antje; Ommen, Gabi; MacDonald, Andrea; Clos, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leishmania parasites must survive and proliferate in two vastly different environments – the guts of poikilothermic sandflies and the antigen-presenting cells of homeothermic mammals. The change of temperature during the transmission from sandflies to mammals is both a key trigger for the progression of their life cycle and for elevated synthesis of heat shock proteins, which have been implicated in their survival at higher temperatures. Although the functions of the main heat shock protein families in the Leishmania life cycle have been studied, nothing is known about the roles played by small heat shock proteins. Here, we present the first evidence for the pivotal role played by the Leishmania donovani 23-kDa heat shock protein (which we called HSP23), which is expressed preferentially during the mammalian stage where it assumes a perinuclear localisation. Loss of HSP23 causes increased sensitivity to chemical stressors and renders L. donovani non-viable at 37°C. Consequently, HSP23-null mutants are non-infectious to primary macrophages in vitro. All phenotypic effects could be abrogated by the introduction of a functional HSP23 transgene into the null mutant, confirming the specificity of the mutant phenotype. Thus, HSP23 expression is a prerequisite for L. donovani survival at mammalian host temperatures and a crucial virulence factor. PMID:25179594

  18. Complexity and Genetic Variability of Heat-Shock Protein Expression in Isolated Maize Microspores.

    PubMed Central

    Magnard, J. L.; Vergne, P.; Dumas, C.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in isolated maize (Zea mays L.) microspores has been investigated using high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled to immunodetection and fluorography of in vivo synthesized proteins. To this end, homogeneous and viable populations of microspores have been purified in sufficient amounts for molecular analysis from plants grown in controlled conditions. Appropriate conditions for thermal stress application have been defined. The analysis revealed that isolated microspores from maize display a classical heat-shock response characterized by the repression of the normal protein synthesis and the expression of a set of HSPs. A high complexity of the response was demonstrated, with numerous different HSPs being resolved in each known major HSP molecular weight class. However, the extent of this heat-shock response is limited in that some of these HSPs do not accumulate at high levels following temperature elevation. Comparative analysis of the heat-shock responses of microspores isolated from five genotypes demonstrated high levels of genetic variability. Furthermore, many HSPs were detected in microspores at control temperature, indicating a possible involvement of these proteins in pollen development at stages close to first pollen mitosis. PMID:12226349

  19. THE EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) AND EXPOSURE PROTOCOL ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Exposure Protocol on Arsenite Induced Genotoxicity

    Barnes, J.A.1,2, Collins, B.W.2, Dix, D.J.3 and Allen J.W2.
    1National Research Council, 2Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, 3Reproductive Toxicology Division, Office...

  20. Complexity and Genetic Variability of Heat-Shock Protein Expression in Isolated Maize Microspores.

    PubMed

    Magnard, J. L.; Vergne, P.; Dumas, C.

    1996-08-01

    The expression of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in isolated maize (Zea mays L.) microspores has been investigated using high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled to immunodetection and fluorography of in vivo synthesized proteins. To this end, homogeneous and viable populations of microspores have been purified in sufficient amounts for molecular analysis from plants grown in controlled conditions. Appropriate conditions for thermal stress application have been defined. The analysis revealed that isolated microspores from maize display a classical heat-shock response characterized by the repression of the normal protein synthesis and the expression of a set of HSPs. A high complexity of the response was demonstrated, with numerous different HSPs being resolved in each known major HSP molecular weight class. However, the extent of this heat-shock response is limited in that some of these HSPs do not accumulate at high levels following temperature elevation. Comparative analysis of the heat-shock responses of microspores isolated from five genotypes demonstrated high levels of genetic variability. Furthermore, many HSPs were detected in microspores at control temperature, indicating a possible involvement of these proteins in pollen development at stages close to first pollen mitosis. PMID:12226349

  1. Specific Binding of Tetratricopeptide Repeat Proteins to Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) Is Regulated by Affinity and Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Assimon, Victoria A; Southworth, Daniel R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2015-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) require the help of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain-containing cochaperones for many of their functions. Each monomer of Hsp70 or Hsp90 can interact with only a single TPR cochaperone at a time, and each member of the TPR cochaperone family brings distinct functions to the complex. Thus, competition for TPR binding sites on Hsp70 and Hsp90 appears to shape chaperone activity. Recent structural and biophysical efforts have improved our understanding of chaperone-TPR contacts, focusing on the C-terminal EEVD motif that is present in both chaperones. To better understand these important protein-protein interactions on a wider scale, we measured the affinity of five TPR cochaperones, CHIP, Hop, DnaJC7, FKBP51, and FKBP52, for the C-termini of four members of the chaperone family, Hsc70, Hsp72, Hsp90α, and Hsp90β, in vitro. These studies identified some surprising selectivity among the chaperone-TPR pairs, including the selective binding of FKBP51/52 to Hsp90α/β. These results also revealed that other TPR cochaperones are only able to weakly discriminate between the chaperones or between their paralogs. We also explored whether mimicking phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues near the EEVD motif might impact affinity and found that pseudophosphorylation had selective effects on binding to CHIP but not other cochaperones. Together, these findings suggest that both intrinsic affinity and post-translational modifications tune the interactions between the Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins and the TPR cochaperones.

  2. Nitric oxide induces heat-shock protein 70 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells via activation of heat shock factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Hu, Y; Kleindienst, R; Wick, G

    1997-01-01

    Current data suggest that nitric oxide (NO) is a double-edged sword that could result in relaxation and/or cytotoxicity of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) via cGMP- dependent or -independent signal pathways. Stress or heat shock proteins (hsps) have been shown to be augmented in arterial SMCs during acute hypertension and atherosclerosis, both conditions that are believed to correlate with disturbed NO production. In the present study, we demonstrate that NO generated from sodium nitroprusside (SNP), S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, and spermine/nitric oxide complex leads to hsp70 induction in cultured SMCs. Western blot analysis demonstrated that hsp70 protein expression peaked between 6 and 12 h after treatment with SNP, and elevated protein levels were preceded by induction of hsp70 mRNA within 3 h. Induction of hsp70 mRNA was associated with the activation of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), suggesting that the response was regulated at the transcriptional level. HSF1 activation was completely blocked by hemoglobin, dithiothreitol, and cycloheximide, suggesting that the protein damage and nascent polypeptide formation induced by NO may initiate this activation. Furthermore, SMCs pretreated with heat shock (42 degrees C) for 30 min were significantly protected from death induced by NO. Thus, we provide evidence that NO induces hsp70 expression in SMCs via HSF1 activation. Induction of hsp70 could be important in protecting SMCs from injury resulting from NO stimulation. PMID:9276725

  3. Role of Heat-Shock Proteins in Cellular Function and in the Biology of Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Shraddha; Thakur, Raman; Shankar, Jata

    2015-01-01

    Stress (biotic or abiotic) is an unfavourable condition for an organism including fungus. To overcome stress, organism expresses heat-shock proteins (Hsps) or chaperons to perform biological function. Hsps are involved in various routine biological processes such as transcription, translation and posttranslational modifications, protein folding, and aggregation and disaggregation of proteins. Thus, it is important to understand holistic role of Hsps in response to stress and other biological conditions in fungi. Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40 are found predominant in replication and Hsp90 is found in transcriptional and posttranscriptional process. Hsp90 and Hsp70 in combination or alone play a major role in morphogenesis and dimorphism. Heat stress in fungi expresses Hsp60, Hsp90, Hsp104, Hsp30, and Hsp10 proteins, whereas expression of Hsp12 protein was observed in response to cold stress. Hsp30, Hsp70, and Hsp90 proteins showed expression in response to pH stress. Osmotic stress is controlled by small heat-shock proteins and Hsp60. Expression of Hsp104 is observed under high pressure conditions. Out of these heat-shock proteins, Hsp90 has been predicted as a potential antifungal target due to its role in morphogenesis. Thus, current review focuses on role of Hsps in fungi during morphogenesis and various stress conditions (temperature, pH, and osmotic pressure) and in antifungal drug tolerance. PMID:26881084

  4. Structure and function of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins: established concepts and emerging ideas.

    PubMed

    MacRae, T H

    2000-06-01

    Small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins are defined by conserved sequence of approximately 90 amino acid residues, termed the alpha-crystallin domain, which is bounded by variable amino- and carboxy-terminal extensions. These proteins form oligomers, most of uncertain quaternary structure, and oligomerization is prerequisite to their function as molecular chaperones. Sequence modelling and physical analyses show that the secondary structure of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins is predominately beta-pleated sheet. Crystallography, site-directed spin-labelling and yeast two-hybrid selection demonstrate regions of secondary structure within the alpha-crystallin domain that interact during oligomer assembly, a process also dependent on the amino terminus. Oligomers are dynamic, exhibiting subunit exchange and organizational plasticity, perhaps leading to functional diversity. Exposure of hydrophobic residues by structural modification facilitates chaperoning where denaturing proteins in the molten globule state associate with oligomers. The flexible carboxy-terminal extension contributes to chaperone activity by enhancing the solubility of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis has yielded proteins where the effect of the change on structure and function depends upon the residue modified, the organism under study and the analytical techniques used. Most revealing, substitution of a conserved arginine residue within the alpha-crystallin domain has a major impact on quaternary structure and chaperone action probably through realignment of beta-sheets. These mutations are linked to inherited diseases. Oligomer size is regulated by a stress-responsive cascade including MAPKAP kinase 2/3 and p38. Phosphorylation of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins has important consequences within stressed cells, especially for microfilaments.

  5. Induction of heat-shock protein synthesis in chondrocytes at physiological temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Madreperla, S.A.; Louwerenburg, B.; Mann, R.W.; Towle, C.A.; Mankin, H.J.; Treadwell, B.V.

    1985-01-01

    Induction of heat-shock protein (HSP) synthesis is demonstrated in cultured calf-chondrocytes at temperatures shown to occur in normal human cartilage during experiments subjecting intact cadaverous hip joints to the parameters of level walking. A 70,000 MW heat-shock protein (HSP-70) is synthesized by chondrocytes at temperatures above 39 degrees C, while induction of synthesis of a 110,000 MW HSP only occurs at temperatures of 45 degrees C or greater. These differences in critical temperatures for induction, and data showing differences in kinetics of induction and repression of synthesis, suggest that there are differences in the mechanism of induction of the two HSPs. The duration of HSP synthesis and inhibition of synthesis of normal cellular proteins is directly proportional to the duration and magnitude of the temperature rise. Possible relationships between these new findings and the initiation and progression of degenerative joint disease are discussed.

  6. On the brotherhood of the mitochondrial chaperones mortalin and heat shock protein 60

    PubMed Central

    Deocaris, Custer C.; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2006-01-01

    The heat shock chaperones mortalin/mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mtHsp70) and Hsp60 are found in multiple subcellular sites and function in the folding and intracellular trafficking of many proteins. The chaperoning activity of these 2 proteins involves different structural and functional mechanisms. In spite of providing an excellent model for an evolutionarily conserved molecular “brotherhood,” their individual functions, although overlapping, are nonredundant. As they travel to various locations, both chaperones acquire different binding partners and exert a more divergent involvement in tumorigenesis, cellular senescence, and immunology. An understanding of their functional biology may lead to novel designing and development of therapeutic strategies for cancer and aging. PMID:16817317

  7. Hsp42 is the general small heat shock protein in the cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Haslbeck, Martin; Braun, Nathalie; Stromer, Thusnelda; Richter, Bettina; Model, Natascha; Weinkauf, Sevil; Buchner, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that prevent the unspecific aggregation of proteins. So far, Hsp26 was the only unambiguously identified member of the sHsp family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show here that the sHsp system in the cytosol of S. cerevisiae consists of two proteins, Hsp26 and Hsp42. Hsp42 forms large dynamic oligomers with a barrel-like structure. In contrast to Hsp26, which functions predominantly at heat shock temperatures, Hsp42 is active as a chaperone under all conditions tested in vivo and in vitro. Under heat shock conditions, both Hsp42 and Hsp26 suppress the aggregation of one-third of the cytosolic proteins. This subset is about 90% overlapping for Hsp42 and Hsp26. The sHsp substrates belong to different biochemical pathways. This indicates a general protective function of sHsps for proteome stability in S. cerevisiae. Consistent with this observation, sHsp knockout strains show phenotypical defects. Taken together, our results define Hsp42 as an important player for protein homeostasis at physiological and under stress conditions. PMID:14749732

  8. Heat Shock Proteins: Intestinal Gatekeepers that Are Influenced by Dietary Components and the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haoyu; Dicksved, Johan; Lundh, Torbjörn; Lindberg, Jan Erik

    2014-01-01

    Trillions of microorganisms that inhabit the intestinal tract form a diverse and intricate ecosystem with a deeply embedded symbiotic relationship with their hosts. As more detailed information on gut microbiota complexity and functional diversity accumulates, we are learning more about how diet-microbiota interactions can influence the immune system within and outside the gut and host health in general. Heat shock proteins are a set of highly conserved proteins that are present in all types of cells, from microbes to mammals. These proteins carry out crucial intracellular housekeeping functions and unexpected extracellular immuno-regulatory features in order to maintain the mucosal barrier integrity and gut homeostasis. It is becoming evident that the enteric microbiota is one of the major determinants of heat shock protein production in intestinal epithelial cells. This review will focus on the interactions between diet, gut microbiota and their role for regulating heat shock protein production and, furthermore, how these interactions influence the immune system and the integrity of the mucosal barrier. PMID:25437614

  9. Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) Expression and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagouri, Flora; Bournakis, Evangelos; Koutsoukos, Konstantinos; Papadimitriou, Christos A.

    2012-01-01

    Hsp90 is an abundant protein in mammalian cells. It forms several discrete complexes, each containing distinct groups of co-chaperones that assist protein folding and refolding during stress, protein transport and degradation. It interacts with a variety of proteins that play key roles in breast neoplasia including estrogen receptors, tumor suppressor p53 protein, angiogenesis transcription factor HIF-1alpha, antiapoptotic kinase Akt, Raf-1 MAP kinase and a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases of the erbB family. Elevated Hsp90 expression has been documented in breast ductal carcinomas contributing to the proliferative activity of breast cancer cells; whilst a significantly decreased Hsp90 expression has been shown in infiltrative lobular carcinomas and lobular neoplasia. Hsp90 overexpression has been proposed as a component of a mechanism through which breast cancer cells become resistant to various stress stimuli. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of HSPs can provide therapeutic opportunities in the field of cancer treatment. 17-allylamino,17-demethoxygeldanamycin is the first Hsp90 inhibitor that has clinically been investigated in phase II trial, yielding promising results in patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer, whilst other Hsp90 inhibitors (retaspimycin HCL, NVP-AUY922, NVP-BEP800, CNF2024/BIIB021, SNX-5422, STA-9090, etc.) are currently under evaluation. PMID:24280702

  10. Arginine methylation in yeast proteins during stationary-phase growth and heat shock.

    PubMed

    Lakowski, Ted M; Pak, Magnolia L; Szeitz, András; Thomas, Dylan; Vhuiyan, Mynol I; Clement, Bernd; Frankel, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Arginine methyltransferases (RMTs) catalyze the methylation of arginine residues on proteins. We examined the effects of log-phase growth, stationary-phase growth, and heat shock on the formation of methylarginines on yeast proteins to determine if the conditions favor a particular type of methylation. Utilizing linear ion trap mass spectrometry, we identify methylarginines in wild-type and RMT deletion yeast strains using secondary product ion scans (MS(3)), and quantify the methylarginines using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Employing MS(3) and isotopic incorporation, we demonstrate for the first time that Nη1, Nη2-dimethylarginine (sDMA) is present on yeast proteins, and make a detailed structural determination of the fragment ions from the spectra. Nη-monomethylarginine (ηMMA), Nδ-monomethylarginine (δMMA), Nη1, Nη1-dimethylarginine (aDMA), and sDMA were detected in RMT deletion yeast using MS(3) and MRM with and without isotopic incorporation, suggesting that additional RMT enzymes remain to be discovered in yeast. The concentrations of ηMMA and δMMA decreased by half during heat shock and stationary phase compared to log-phase growth of wild-type yeast, whereas sDMA increased by as much as sevenfold and aDMA decreased by 11-fold. Therefore, upon entering stressful conditions like heat shock or stationary-phase growth, there is a net increase in sDMA and decreases in aDMA, ηMMA, and δMMA on yeast proteins.

  11. Small heat shock proteins can release light dependence of tobacco seed during germination.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia; Hong, Choo Bong

    2015-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination. PMID:25604531

  12. Small heat shock proteins can release light dependence of tobacco seed during germination.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia; Hong, Choo Bong

    2015-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination.

  13. Molecular genetics of heat tolerance and heat shock proteins in cereals.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Elena; Klueva, Natalya; Perrotta, Carla; Gulli, Mariolina; Nguyen, Henry T; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2002-01-01

    Heat stress is common in most cereal-growing areas of the world. In this paper, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular and genetic basis of thermotolerance in vegetative and reproductive tissues of cereals. Significance of heat stress response and expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in thermotolerance of cereal yield and quality is discussed. Major avenues for increasing thermotolerance in cereals via conventional breeding or genetic modification are outlined. PMID:11999842

  14. Thermally induced apoptosis, necrosis, and heat shock protein expression in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Song, Alfred S; Najjar, Amer M; Diller, Kenneth R

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted to compare the heat shock responses of cells grown in 2D and 3D culture environments as indicated by the level of heat shock protein 70 expression and the incidence of apoptosis and necrosis of prostate cancer cell lines in response to graded hyperthermia. PC3 cells were stably transduced with a dual reporter system composed of two tandem expression cassettes-a conditional heat shock protein promoter driving the expression of green fluorescent protein (HSPp-GFP) and a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter controlling the constitutive expression of a "beacon" red fluorescent protein (CMVp-RFP). Two-dimensional and three-dimensional cultures of PC3 prostate cancer cells were grown in 96-well plates for evaluation of their time-dependent response to supraphysiological temperature. To induce controlled hyperthermia, culture plates were placed on a flat copper surface of a circulating water manifold that maintained the specimens within ±0.1°C of a target temperature. Hyperthermia protocols included various combinations of temperature, ranging from 37°C to 57°C, and exposure times of up to 2 h. The majority of protocols were focused on temperature and time permutations, where the response gradient was greatest. Post-treatment analysis by flow cytometry analysis was used to measure the incidences of apoptosis (annexin V-FITC stain), necrosis (propidium iodide (PI) stain), and HSP70 transcription (GFP expression). Cells grown in 3D compared with 2D culture showed reduced incidence of apoptosis and necrosis and a higher level of HSP70 expression in response to heat shock at the temperatures tested. Cells responded differently to hyperthermia when grown in 2D and 3D cultures. Three-dimensional culture appears to enhance survival plausibly by activating protective processes related to enhanced-HSP70 expression. These differences highlight the importance of selecting physiologically relevant 3D models in assessing cellular responses to hyperthermia in

  15. Small Heat Shock Proteins Can Release Light Dependence of Tobacco Seed during Germination1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination. PMID:25604531

  16. Anti-heat shock protein autoantibody profiling in breast cancer using customized protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liu; Gehin, Thomas; Chevolot, Yann; Souteyrand, Eliane; Mangé, Alain; Solassol, Jérôme; Laurenceau, Emmanuelle

    2016-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are over-expressed in a wide range of human cancers. It results in the stimulation of the immune system and consequently in elevated concentration of anti-HSP autoantibodies. Elevated anti-HSP autoantibodies were found in breast cancer patients, and they are associated with tumor metastasis. Therefore, screening these autoantibodies could be of diagnostic and prognostic values. Protein microarrays have already demonstrated their great potential as a diagnostic tool. However, protein diversity requires optimization of the microarray fabrication to achieve high sensitivity and specificity. In this study, seven HSPs were immobilized on six different surface chemistries. After evaluation and optimization with purified antibodies of the six surface chemistries, two surfaces were selected to detect anti-HSP autoantibodies in breast cancer sera. Multiplex detection of anti-HSP autoantibodies allowed discrimination of breast cancer patients (50) from healthy controls (26) with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 100%. PMID:26715250

  17. Heat shock protein 90 inhibitors repurposed against Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Shahinas, Dea; Debnath, Anjan; Benedict, Christan; McKerrow, James H.; Pillai, Dylan R.

    2015-01-01

    Hsp90 is an essential chaperone responsible for trafficking a vast array of client proteins, which are substrates that Hsp90 regulates in eukaryotic cells under stress conditions. The ATP-binding N-terminal domain of Hsp90 (also known as a GHKL type ATPase domain) can serve as a specific drug target, because sufficient structural diversity in the ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90 allows for ortholog selectivity of Hsp90 inhibitors. The primary objective of this study is to identify inhibitors specific for the ATP-binding domain of Entamoeba histolytica Hsp90 (EhHsp90). An additional aim, using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and a protein in vitro assay, is to show that the antiparasitic activity of Hsp90 inhibitors is dependent on specific residues within the ATP-binding domain. Here, we tested the activity of 43 inhibitors of Hsp90 that we previously identified using a high-throughput screen. Of the 43 compounds tested, 19 competed for binding of the EhHsp90 ATP-binding domain. Five out of the 19 EhHsp90 protein hits demonstrated activity against E. histolytica in vitro culture: rifabutin, rutilantin, cetylpyridinium chloride, pararosaniline pamoate and gentian violet. These five top E. histolytica Hsp90 inhibitors showed 30–100% inhibition of E. histolytica in culture in the micromolar range. These data suggest that E. histolytica-specific Hsp90 inhibitors are possible to identify and provide important lead compounds for the development of novel antiamebic drugs. PMID:26029171

  18. Altered phosphorylation of. tau. protein in heat-shocked rats and patients with Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Papasozomenos, S.C.; Yuan Su Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX )

    1991-05-15

    Six hours after heat shocking 2- to 3-month-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 42C for 15 min, the authors analyzed {tau} protein immunoreactivity in SDS extracts of cerebrums and peripheral nerves by using immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry with the anti-{tau} monoclonal antibody Tau-1, which recognizes a phosphate-dependent nonphosphorylated epitope, and with {sup 125}I-labeled protein A. In the cerebal extracts, the authors found altered phosphorylation of {tau} in heat-shocked females, characterized by a marked reduction in the amount of nonphosphorylated {tau}, a doubling of the ratio of total (phosphorylated plus nonphosphorylated) {tau} to nonphosphorylated {tau}, and the appearance of the slowest moving phosphorylated {tau} polypeptide (68 kDa). Similar, but milder, changes were observed in male rats. Quantitative immunoblot analysis of cortex and the underlying white matter with Tau-1 and {sup 125}I-labeled protein A showed that the amount of phosphorylated {tau} progressively increased in the Alzheimer disease-affected cerebral cortex, while concurrently a proportionally lesser amount of {tau} entered the white matter axons. The similar findings for the rat heat-shock model and Alzheimer disease suggest that life stressors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells derived heat shock protein70-peptide complex has enhanced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Jun; Liu, Yunyan; Luo, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-derived heat shock protein70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Tu) have shown great promise in tumor immunotherapy due to numerous advantages. However, large-scale phase III clinical trials showed that the limited immunogenicity remained to be enhanced. In previous research, we demonstrated that heat shock protein 70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Fc) derived from dendritic cell (DC)-tumor fusions exhibit enhanced immunogenicity compared with HSP70.PCs from tumor cells. However, the DCs used in our previous research were obtained from healthy donors and not from the patient population. In order to promote the clinical application of these complexes, HSP70.PC-Fc was prepared from patient-derived DC fused directly with patient-derived tumor cells in the current study. Our results showed that compared with HSP70.PC-Tu, HSP70.PC-Fc elicited much more powerful immune responses against the tumor from which the HSP70 was derived, including enhanced T cell activation, and CTL responses that were shown to be antigen specific and HLA restricted. Our results further indicated that the enhanced immunogenicity is related to the activation of CD4+ T cells and increased association with other heat shock proteins, such as HSP90. Therefore, the current study confirms the enhanced immunogenicity of HSP70.PC derived from DC-tumor fusions and may provide direct evidence promoting their future clinical use.

  20. Microinjection of ubiquitin: changes in protein degradation in HeLa cells subjected to heat-shock

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Ubiquitin was radiolabeled by reaction with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and introduced into HeLa cells using erythrocyte-mediated microinjection. The injected cells were then incubated at 45 degrees C for 5 min (reversible heat-shock) or for 30 min (lethal heat-shock). After either treatment, there were dramatic changes in the levels of ubiquitin conjugates. Under normal culture conditions, approximately 10% of the injected ubiquitin is linked to histones, 40% is found in conjugates with molecular weights greater than 25,000, and the rest is unconjugated. After heat-shock, the free ubiquitin pool and the level of histone-ubiquitin conjugates decreased rapidly, and high molecular weight conjugates predominated. Formation of large conjugates did not require protein synthesis; when analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the major conjugates did not co-migrate with heat- shock proteins before or after thermal stress. Concomitant with the loss of free ubiquitin, the degradation of endogenous proteins, injected hemoglobin, BSA, and ubiquitin was reduced in heat-shocked HeLa cells. After reversible heat-shock, the decrease in proteolysis was small, and both the rate of proteolysis and the size of the free ubiquitin pool returned to control levels upon incubation at 37 degrees C. In contrast, neither proteolysis nor free ubiquitin pools returned to control levels after lethal heat-shock. However, lethally heat- shocked cells degraded denatured hemoglobin more rapidly than native hemoglobin and ubiquitin-globin conjugates formed within them. Therefore, stabilization of proteins after heat-shock cannot be due to the loss of ubiquitin conjugation or inability to degrade proteins that form conjugates with ubiquitin. PMID:3029142

  1. Axonal maintenance, glia, exosomes, and heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Tytell, Michael; Lasek, Raymond J; Gainer, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Of all cellular specializations, the axon is especially distinctive because it is a narrow cylinder of specialized cytoplasm called axoplasm with a length that may be orders of magnitude greater than the diameter of the cell body from which it originates. Thus, the volume of axoplasm can be much greater than the cytoplasm in the cell body. This fact raises a logistical problem with regard to axonal maintenance. Many of the components of axoplasm, such as soluble proteins and cytoskeleton, are slowly transported, taking weeks to months to travel the length of axons longer than a few millimeters after being synthesized in the cell body. Furthermore, this slow rate of supply suggests that the axon itself might not have the capacity to respond fast enough to compensate for damage to transported macromolecules. Such damage is likely in view of the mechanical fragility of an axon, especially those innervating the limbs, as rapid limb motion with high impact, like running, subjects the axons in the limbs to considerable mechanical force. Some researchers have suggested that local, intra-axonal protein synthesis is the answer to this problem. However, the translational state of axonal RNAs remains controversial. We suggest that glial cells, which envelop all axons, whether myelinated or not, are the local sources of replacement and repair macromolecules for long axons. The plausibility of this hypothesis is reinforced by reviewing several decades of work on glia-axon macromolecular transfer, together with recent investigations of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles, as vehicles for the transmission of membrane and cytoplasmic components from one cell to another. PMID:26962444

  2. Axonal maintenance, glia, exosomes, and heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Michael; Lasek, Raymond J.; Gainer, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Of all cellular specializations, the axon is especially distinctive because it is a narrow cylinder of specialized cytoplasm called axoplasm with a length that may be orders of magnitude greater than the diameter of the cell body from which it originates. Thus, the volume of axoplasm can be much greater than the cytoplasm in the cell body. This fact raises a logistical problem with regard to axonal maintenance. Many of the components of axoplasm, such as soluble proteins and cytoskeleton, are slowly transported, taking weeks to months to travel the length of axons longer than a few millimeters after being synthesized in the cell body. Furthermore, this slow rate of supply suggests that the axon itself might not have the capacity to respond fast enough to compensate for damage to transported macromolecules. Such damage is likely in view of the mechanical fragility of an axon, especially those innervating the limbs, as rapid limb motion with high impact, like running, subjects the axons in the limbs to considerable mechanical force. Some researchers have suggested that local, intra-axonal protein synthesis is the answer to this problem. However, the translational state of axonal RNAs remains controversial. We suggest that glial cells, which envelop all axons, whether myelinated or not, are the local sources of replacement and repair macromolecules for long axons. The plausibility of this hypothesis is reinforced by reviewing several decades of work on glia-axon macromolecular transfer, together with recent investigations of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles, as vehicles for the transmission of membrane and cytoplasmic components from one cell to another. PMID:26962444

  3. Human heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) protects murine cells from injury during metabolic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R S; Thomas, J A; Fina, M; German, Z; Benjamin, I J

    1993-01-01

    Expression of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) is stimulated during ischemia, but its proposed cytoprotective function during metabolic stress has remained conjectural. We introduced a human hsp70 gene into mouse 10T1/2 cells and assessed the susceptibility of these cells to injury in response to conditions that mimic ischemia. Transiently transfected cells, in the absence of stress, expressed human hsp70 to levels equal to or greater than those induced by heat shock, as assessed by RNAse protection, immunoblot, and immunohistochemical analyses. By comparison to cells transfected with a control plasmid, cells expressing the human hsp70 transgene were resistant to injury induced by glucose deprivation and inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. These results provide direct evidence for a cytoprotective function of hsp70 during metabolic stress. Images PMID:8326014

  4. Heat Shock Factor 1 Is a Substrate for p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dayalan Naidu, Sharadha; Sutherland, Calum; Zhang, Ying; Risco, Ana; de la Vega, Laureano; Caunt, Christopher J.; Hastie, C. James; Lamont, Douglas J.; Torrente, Laura; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Keyse, Stephen M.; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) monitors the structural integrity of the proteome. Phosphorylation at S326 is a hallmark for HSF1 activation, but the identity of the kinase(s) phosphorylating this site has remained elusive. We show here that the dietary agent phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) inhibits heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), the main negative regulator of HSF1; activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); and increases S326 phosphorylation, trimerization, and nuclear translocation of HSF1, and the transcription of a luciferase reporter, as well as the endogenous prototypic HSF1 target Hsp70. In vitro, all members of the p38 MAPK family rapidly and stoichiometrically catalyze the S326 phosphorylation. The use of stable knockdown cell lines and inhibitors indicated that among the p38 MAPKs, p38γ is the principal isoform responsible for the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S326 in cells. A protease-mass spectrometry approach confirmed S326 phosphorylation and unexpectedly revealed that p38 MAPK also catalyzes the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S303/307, previously known repressive posttranslational modifications. Thus, we have identified p38 MAPKs as highly efficient catalysts for the phosphorylation of HSF1. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the magnitude and persistence of activation of p38 MAPK are important determinants of the extent and duration of the heat shock response. PMID:27354066

  5. Small Heat Shock Proteins Are Novel Common Determinants of Alcohol and Nicotine Sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; Rajamanoharan, Dayani; McCue, Hannah V.; Rankin, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Addiction to drugs is strongly determined by multiple genetic factors. Alcohol and nicotine produce distinct pharmacological effects within the nervous system through discrete molecular targets; yet, data from family and twin analyses support the existence of common genetic factors for addiction in general. The mechanisms underlying addiction, however, are poorly described and common genetic factors for alcohol and nicotine remain unidentified. We investigated the role that the heat shock transcription factor, HSF-1, and its downstream effectors played as common genetic modulators of sensitivity to addictive substances. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, an exemplary model organism with substance dose-dependent responses similar to mammals, we demonstrate that HSF-1 altered sensitivity to both alcohol and nicotine. Using a combination of a targeted RNAi screen of downstream factors and transgenic approaches we identified that these effects were contingent upon the constitutive neuronal expression of HSP-16.48, a small heat shock protein (HSP) homolog of human α-crystallin. Furthermore we demonstrated that the function of HSP-16.48 in drug sensitivity surprisingly was independent of chaperone activity during the heat shock stress response. Instead we identified a distinct domain within the N-terminal region of the HSP-16.48 protein that specified its function in comparison to related small HSPs. Our findings establish and characterize a novel genetic determinant underlying sensitivity to diverse addictive substances. PMID:26773049

  6. Heat shock protein-mediated protection against Cisplatin-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tiffany G; Roy, Soumen; Brandon, Carlene S; Kramarenko, Inga K; Francis, Shimon P; Taleb, Mona; Marshall, Keely M; Schwendener, Reto; Lee, Fu-Shing; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2015-02-01

    Cisplatin is a highly successful and widely used chemotherapy for the treatment of various solid malignancies in both adult and pediatric patients. Side effects of cisplatin treatment include nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity results from damage to and death of cells in the inner ear, including sensory hair cells. We showed previously that heat shock inhibits cisplatin-induced hair cell death in whole-organ cultures of utricles from adult mice. Since heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is the most upregulated HSP in response to heat shock, we investigated the role of HSP70 as a potential protectant against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Our data using utricles from HSP70 (-/-) mice indicate that HSP70 is necessary for the protective effect of heat shock against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. In addition, constitutive expression of inducible HSP70 offered modest protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. We also examined a second heat-inducible protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, also called HSP32). HO-1 is an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of free heme. We previously showed that induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) inhibits aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. Here, we show that HO-1 also offers significant protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. HO-1 induction occurred primarily in resident macrophages, with no detectable expression in hair cells or supporting cells. Depletion of macrophages from utricles abolished the protective effect of HO-1 induction. Together, our data indicate that HSP induction protects against cisplatin-induced hair cell death, and they suggest that resident macrophages mediate the protective effect of HO-1 induction.

  7. Heat shock protein-mediated protection against Cisplatin-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tiffany G; Roy, Soumen; Brandon, Carlene S; Kramarenko, Inga K; Francis, Shimon P; Taleb, Mona; Marshall, Keely M; Schwendener, Reto; Lee, Fu-Shing; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2015-02-01

    Cisplatin is a highly successful and widely used chemotherapy for the treatment of various solid malignancies in both adult and pediatric patients. Side effects of cisplatin treatment include nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity results from damage to and death of cells in the inner ear, including sensory hair cells. We showed previously that heat shock inhibits cisplatin-induced hair cell death in whole-organ cultures of utricles from adult mice. Since heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is the most upregulated HSP in response to heat shock, we investigated the role of HSP70 as a potential protectant against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Our data using utricles from HSP70 (-/-) mice indicate that HSP70 is necessary for the protective effect of heat shock against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. In addition, constitutive expression of inducible HSP70 offered modest protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. We also examined a second heat-inducible protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, also called HSP32). HO-1 is an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of free heme. We previously showed that induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) inhibits aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. Here, we show that HO-1 also offers significant protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. HO-1 induction occurred primarily in resident macrophages, with no detectable expression in hair cells or supporting cells. Depletion of macrophages from utricles abolished the protective effect of HO-1 induction. Together, our data indicate that HSP induction protects against cisplatin-induced hair cell death, and they suggest that resident macrophages mediate the protective effect of HO-1 induction. PMID:25261194

  8. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C M; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). As safeguards of the cellular proteome, HSPs assist in protein folding and prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins. Here, we compared the capacity of all Drosophila melanogaster small HSP family members for their ability to assist in refolding stress-denatured substrates and/or to prevent aggregation of disease-associated misfolded proteins. We identified CG14207 as a novel and potent small HSP member that exclusively assisted in HSP70-dependent refolding of stress-denatured proteins. Furthermore, we report that HSP67BC, which has no role in protein refolding, was the most effective small HSP preventing toxic protein aggregation in an HSP70-independent manner. Importantly, overexpression of both CG14207 and HSP67BC in Drosophila leads to a mild increase in lifespan, demonstrating that increased levels of functionally diverse small HSPs can promote longevity in vivo.

  9. Overexpression of heat shock protein 70 in stomach of stress-induced gastric ulcer-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Shichijo, Kazuko; Ihara, Makoto; Matsuu, Mutsumi; Ito, Masahiro; Okumura, Yutaka; Sekine, Ichiro

    2003-02-01

    Expression of heat shock protein 70, induced by an antiulcer drug, provides protection against gastric ulcers. However, the mechanisms responsible for this protection are not known. The expression in ulcer-resistant, spontaneously hypertensive rats was 2.8-fold higher than in normotensive rats. One hour after restraint and water immersion stress, strong nuclear immunoreactivity was observed in nuclei of surface epithelial cells at the crest of gastric mucosal folds, the first site of ulceration, only in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Heat shock cognate protein 70, which is expressed in mucus-secreting cells, was not overexpressed in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Heat shock protein 70 expression was attenuated by chemical sympathectomy, which also resulted in abolition of the increase of mucosal blood flow and aggravation of ulcers. Our results indicate that overexpression of heat shock protein 70 in the stomach seems to protect against gastric ulcers through its cytoprotective effects on gastric mucosa by increasing mucosal blood flow. PMID:12643613

  10. Expression, purification and some properties of fluorescent chimeras of human small heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Datskevich, Petr N; Mymrikov, Evgeny V; Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Shemetov, Anton A; Sudnitsyna, Maria V; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2012-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsp) are ubiquitously expressed in all human tissues and have an important housekeeping role in preventing the accumulation of aggregates of improperly folded or denatured proteins. They also participate in the regulation of the cytoskeleton, proliferation, apoptosis and many other vital processes. Fluorescent chimeras composed of sHsp and enhanced fluorescent proteins have been used to determine the intracellular locations of small heat shock proteins and to analyse the hetero-oligomeric complexes formed by different sHsp. However, the biochemical properties and chaperone-like activities of these chimeras have not been investigated. To determine the properties of these chimeras, we fused enhanced yellow and cyan fluorescent proteins (EYFP and ECFP) to the N-termini of four ubiquitously expressed human small heat shock proteins: HspB1, HspB5, HspB6, and HspB8. The eight fluorescent chimeras of small heat shock proteins and isolated fluorescent proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. The chimeric proteins were isolated and purified via ammonium sulphate fractionation, ion exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. This method provided 20-100 mg of fluorescent chimeras from 1L of bacterial culture. The spectral properties of the chimeras were similar to those of the isolated fluorescent proteins. The fusion of fluorescent proteins to HspB6 and HspB8, which typically form dimers, did not affect their quaternary structures. Oligomers of the fluorescent chimeras of HspB1 and HspB5 were less stable and contained fewer subunits than oligomers formed by the wild-type proteins. Fusion with EYFP decreased the chaperone-like activity of HspB5 and HspB6 whereas fusion with ECFP increased chaperone-like activity. All fluorescent chimeras of HspB1 and HspB8 had higher chaperone-like activity than the wild-type proteins. Thus, although fluorescent chimeras are useful for many purposes, the fluorescent proteins used to form these chimeras may

  11. genome-wide analysis and expression profiling of the small heat shock proteins in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    elicker, kimberly s.; hutson, lara d.

    2008-01-01

    Small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSPs) have important roles in preventing disease and promoting resistance to environmental stressors. Mutations in any one of a number of sHSPs, including HSP27 (HSPB1), HSP22 (HSPB8), αA-crystallin (HSPB4), or αB-crystallin (HSPB5) can result in neuronal degeneration, myopathy, and/or cataract in humans. Ten sHSPs are known in humans, and thirteen have been identified in teleost fish. Here we report the identification of thirteen zebrafish sHSPs. Using a combination of phylogenetic analysis and analysis of synteny, we have determined that ten are likely orthologs of human sHSPs. We have used quantitative RT-PCR to determine the relative expression levels of all thirteen sHSPs during development and in response to heat shock. Our findings indicate that most of the zebrafish sHSPs are expressed during development, and five of these genes are transcriptionally upregulated by heat shock at one or more stages of development. PMID:17888590

  12. Relationship between heat shock protein 70 expression and life span in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Schumpert, Charles; Handy, Indhira; Dudycha, Jeffry L; Patel, Rekha C

    2014-07-01

    The longevity of an organism is directly related to its ability to effectively cope with cellular stress. Heat shock response (HSR) protects the cells against accumulation of damaged proteins after exposure to elevated temperatures and also in aging cells. To understand the role of Hsp70 in regulating life span of Daphnia, we examined the expression of Hsp70 in two ecotypes that exhibit strikingly different life spans. Daphnia pulicaria, the long lived ecotype, showed a robust Hsp70 induction as compared to the shorter lived Daphnia pulex. Interestingly, the short-lived D. pulex isolates showed no induction of Hsp70 at the mid point in their life span. In contrast to this, the long-lived D. pulicaria continued to induce Hsp70 expression at an equivalent age. We further show that the Hsp70 expression was induced at transcriptional level in response to heat shock. The transcription factor responsible for Hsp70 induction, heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), although present in aged organisms did not exhibit DNA-binding capability. Thus, the decline of Hsp70 induction in old organisms could be attributed to a decline in HSF-1's DNA-binding activity. These results for the first time, present a molecular analysis of the relationship between HSR and life span in Daphnia. PMID:24814302

  13. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species regulate the accumulation of heat shock proteins in tomato leaves in response to heat shock and pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Piterková, Jana; Luhová, Lenka; Mieslerová, Barbora; Lebeda, Aleš; Petřivalský, Marek

    2013-06-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are produced in response to various stress stimuli to prevent cell damage. We evaluated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the accumulation of Hsp70 proteins in tomato leaves induced by abiotic and biotic stress stimuli. A model system of leaf discs was used with two tomato genotypes, Solanum lycopersicum cv. Amateur and Solanum chmielewskii, differing in their resistance to fungal pathogen Oidium neolycopersici. Leaf discs were exposed to stress factors as heat shock and pathogen infection alone or in a combination, and treated with substances modulating endogenous NO and ROS levels. Two proteins of Hsp70 family were detected in stressed tomato leaf discs: a heat-inducible 72 kDa protein and a constitutive 75 kDa protein. The pathogenesis and mechanical stress influenced Hsp75 accumulation, whereas heat stress induced mainly Hsp72 production. Treatment with NO donor and NO scavenger significantly modulated the level of Hsp70 in variable manner related to the genotype resistance. Hsp70 accumulation correlated with endogenous NO level in S. lycopersicum and ROS levels in S. chmielewskii. We conclude NO and ROS are involved in the regulation of Hsp70 production and accumulation under abiotic and biotic stresses in dependence on plant ability to trigger its defence mechanisms. PMID:23602099

  14. X66, a novel N-terminal heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, exerts antitumor effects without induction of heat shock response

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Haitian; Wang, Guimin; Li, Bo; Zhu, Weiliang; Xie, Chengying; Lou, Liguang

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is essential for cancer cells to assist the function of various oncoproteins, and it has been recognized as a promising target in cancer therapy. Although the HSP90 inhibitors in clinical trials have shown encouraging clinical efficacy, these agents induce heat shock response (HSR), which undermines their therapeutic effects. In this report, we detailed the pharmacologic properties of 4-(2-((1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)hydrazinyl)-N-(4-bromophenyl)-6-(3,5- dimethyl-1H -pyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazin-2-amine (X66), a novel and potent HSP90 inhibitor. X66 binds to the N-terminal domain in a different manner from the classic HSP90 inhibitors. Cellular study showed that X66 depleted HSP90 client proteins, resulted in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and inhibition of proliferation in cancer cell lines. X66 did not activate heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) or stimulate transcription of HSPs. Moreover, the combination of X66 with HSP90 and proteasome inhibitors yielded synergistic cytotoxicity which was involved in X66-mediated abrogation of HSR through inhibition of HSF-1 activity. The intraperitoneal administration of X66 alone depleted client protein and inhibited tumor growth, and led to enhanced activity when combined with celastrol as compared to either agent alone in BT-474 xenograft model. Collectively, the HSP90 inhibitory action and the potent antitumor activity, with the anti-HSR action, promise X66 a novel HSP90-targeted agent, which merits further research and development. PMID:27105490

  15. Protein carbonylation and heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle: relationships to age and sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Beltran Valls, Maria R; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Narici, Marco V; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E; Caporossi, Daniela; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into "old" and "old sarcopenic") were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r (2) = -.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r (2) = -.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se.

  16. Heat shock protein synthesis and trehalose accumulation are not required for induced thermotolerance in depressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gross, C; Watson, K

    1996-03-27

    Intrinsic and heat shock induced thermotolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated in cells grown on glucose and acetate supplemented media. Heat shocked cells (37 degrees C/30 min), in either medium, exhibited induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (hsp) and trehalose. In all cases, with the notable exception of repressed cells of a relatively thermosensitive strain, heat shock acquisition of thermotolerance also occurred in the absence of protein synthesis and coincident decrease in trehalose accumulation. Results indicted that the marked increase in thermotolerance exhibited by non-fermenting (acetate) cells compared with fermenting (glucose) cells was not closely correlated with levels of hsp or trehalose. It was concluded that mechanisms for intrinsic and induced thermotolerance appear to be different and that growth on acetate endows cells with a biochemical predisposition, other than hsp or trehalose, that confers intrinsic tolerance, a factor which may be subject to heat induced modification.

  17. Heat shock protein 70, heat shock protein 32, and vascular endothelial growth factor production and their effects on lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in porcine aortic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Chiara; Zannoni, Augusta; Turba, Maria Elena; Fantinati, Paolo; Tamanini, Carlo; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica

    2005-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a highly proactive molecule that causes in vivo a systemic inflammatory response syndrome and activates in vitro the inflammatory pathway in different cellular types, including endothelial cells (EC). Because the proinflammatory status could lead to EC injury and apoptosis, the expression of proinflammatory genes must be finely regulated through the induction of protective genes. This study aimed at determining whether an LPS exposure is effective in inducing apoptosis in primary cultures of porcine aortic endothelial cells and in stimulating heat shock protein (Hsp)70 and Hsp32 production as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion. Cells between third and eighth passage were exposed to 10 μg/mL LPS for 1, 7, 15, and 24 hours (time-course experiments) or to 1, 10, and 100 μg/mL LPS for 7 and 15 hours (dose-response experiments). Apoptosis was not affected by 1 μg/mL LPS but significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner with the highest LPS doses. Furthermore, apoptosis rate increased only till 15 hours of LPS exposure. LPS stimulated VEGF secretion in a dose-dependent manner; its effect became significant after 7 hours and reached a plateau after 15 hours. Both Hsp70 and Hsp32 expressions were induced by LPS in a dose-dependent manner after 7 hours. Subsequent studies were addressed to evaluate the protective role of Hsp32, Hsp70, and VEGF. Hemin, an Hsp32 inducer (5, 20, 50 μM), and recombinant VEGF (100 and 200 ng/mL), were added to the culture 2 hours before LPS (10 μg/mL for 24 hours); to induce Hsp70 expression, cells were heat shocked (42°C for 1 hour) 15 hours before LPS (10 μg/mL for 24 hours). Hemin exposure upregulated Hsp32 expression in a dose-dependent manner and protected cells against LPS-induced apoptosis. Heat shock (HS) stimulated Hsp70 expression but failed to reduce LPS-induced apoptosis; VEGF addition did not protect cells against LPS-induced apoptosis at any dose tested. Nevertheless

  18. Induction of mycobacterial proteins during phagocytosis and heat shock: a time interval analysis.

    PubMed

    Alavi, M R; Affronti, L F

    1994-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives macrophage bactericidal activities by mechanisms that may include induction of stress proteins. We sought to determine whether the synthesis of any mycobacterial proteins is increased during phagocytosis and whether any of these proteins are also up-regulated during heat shock. Protein synthesis by M. tuberculosis H37Ra during phagocytosis by the mouse macrophage cell line IC-21, and during heat shock at 45 and 48 degrees C, was monitored at various time intervals using 35S-labeled methionine/cysteine and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our data suggest the existence of certain common elements in the stress response of mycobacteria to the three stress stimuli. This apparent similarity was best characterized by the up-regulation of a 25-kDa protein after exposure to each of the stress conditions. Furthermore, this 25-kDa protein and a 37-kDa protein that was also synthesized during phagocytosis appeared to be extracellular because they were preferentially solubilized when infected macrophages were lysed with 0.5% NP-40. PMID:8182341

  19. Oligomers of Heat-Shock Proteins: Structures That Don’t Imply Function

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, William M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins must remain soluble in the cytosol in order to perform their biological functions. To protect against undesired protein aggregation, living cells maintain a population of molecular chaperones that ensure the solubility of the proteome. Here we report simulations of a lattice model of interacting proteins to understand how low concentrations of passive molecular chaperones, such as small heat-shock proteins, suppress thermodynamic instabilities in protein solutions. Given fixed concentrations of chaperones and client proteins, the solubility of the proteome can be increased by tuning the chaperone–client binding strength. Surprisingly, we find that the binding strength that optimizes solubility while preventing irreversible chaperone binding also promotes the formation of weakly bound chaperone oligomers, although the presence of these oligomers does not significantly affect the thermodynamic stability of the solution. Such oligomers are commonly observed in experiments on small heat-shock proteins, but their connection to the biological function of these chaperones has remained unclear. Our simulations suggest that this clustering may not have any essential biological function, but rather emerges as a natural side-effect of optimizing the thermodynamic stability of the proteome. PMID:26928170

  20. Small heat shock proteins protect against {alpha}-synuclein-induced toxicity and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Klucken, Jochen; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Liu Fang; Nguyen, Paul; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J. . E-mail: touteiro@partners.org

    2006-12-22

    Protein misfolding and inclusion formation are common events in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). {alpha}-Synuclein (aSyn) is the main protein component of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB) which are pathognomic of PD, Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other diseases collectively known as LB diseases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are one class of the cellular quality control system that mediate protein folding, remodeling, and even disaggregation. Here, we investigated the role of the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and {alpha}B-crystallin, in LB diseases. We demonstrate, via quantitative PCR, that Hsp27 messenger RNA levels are {approx}2-3-fold higher in DLB cases compared to control. We also show a corresponding increase in Hsp27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that Hsp27 reduces aSyn-induced toxicity by {approx}80% in a culture model while {alpha}B-crystallin reduces toxicity by {approx}20%. In addition, intracellular inclusions were immunopositive for endogenous Hsp27, and overexpression of this protein reduced aSyn aggregation in a cell culture model.

  1. A First Line of Stress Defense: Small Heat Shock Proteins and their function in protein homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Haslbeck, Martin; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are virtually ubiquitous molecular chaperones that can prevent the irreversible aggregation of denaturing proteins. To maintain protein homeostasis, sHsps complex with a variety of nonnative proteins in an ATP-independent manner and, in the context of the stress response, form a first line of defense against protein aggregation. In vertebrates they act to maintain the clarity of the eye lens, and in humans sHsp mutations are linked to myopathies and neuropathies. Although found in all domains of life, sHsps are quite diverse and have evolved independently in metazoans, plants and fungi. sHsp monomers range in size from approximately 12 to 42 kDa and are defined by a conserved β-sandwich α-crystallin domain, flanked by variable N- and C-terminal sequences. Most sHsps form large oligomeric ensembles with a broad distribution of different, sphere- or barrel like oligomers, with the size and structure of the oligomers dictated by features of the N- and C-termini. The activity of sHsps is regulated by mechanisms that change the equilibrium distribution in tertiary features and/or quaternary structure of the sHsp ensembles. Cooperation and/or coassembly between different sHsps in the same cellular compartment adds an underexplored level of complexity to sHsp structure and function. PMID:25681016

  2. A first line of stress defense: small heat shock proteins and their function in protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haslbeck, Martin; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2015-04-10

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are virtually ubiquitous molecular chaperones that can prevent the irreversible aggregation of denaturing proteins. sHsps complex with a variety of non-native proteins in an ATP-independent manner and, in the context of the stress response, form a first line of defense against protein aggregation in order to maintain protein homeostasis. In vertebrates, they act to maintain the clarity of the eye lens, and in humans, sHsp mutations are linked to myopathies and neuropathies. Although found in all domains of life, sHsps are quite diverse and have evolved independently in metazoans, plants and fungi. sHsp monomers range in size from approximately 12 to 42kDa and are defined by a conserved β-sandwich α-crystallin domain, flanked by variable N- and C-terminal sequences. Most sHsps form large oligomeric ensembles with a broad distribution of different, sphere- or barrel-like oligomers, with the size and structure of the oligomers dictated by features of the N- and C-termini. The activity of sHsps is regulated by mechanisms that change the equilibrium distribution in tertiary features and/or quaternary structure of the sHsp ensembles. Cooperation and/or co-assembly between different sHsps in the same cellular compartment add an underexplored level of complexity to sHsp structure and function.

  3. Small heat shock protein alphaA-crystallin regulates epithelial sodium channel expression.

    PubMed

    Kashlan, Ossama B; Mueller, Gunhild M; Qamar, Mohammad Z; Poland, Paul A; Ahner, Annette; Rubenstein, Ronald C; Hughey, Rebecca P; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Kleyman, Thomas R

    2007-09-21

    Integral membrane proteins are synthesized on the cytoplasmic face of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). After being translocated or inserted into the ER, they fold and undergo post-translational modifications. Within the ER, proteins are also subjected to quality control checkpoints, during which misfolded proteins may be degraded by proteasomes via a process known as ER-associated degradation. Molecular chaperones, including the small heat shock protein alphaA-crystallin, have recently been shown to play a role in this process. We have now found that alphaA-crystallin is expressed in cultured mouse collecting duct cells, where apical Na(+) transport is mediated by epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC). ENaC-mediated Na(+) currents in Xenopus oocytes were reduced by co-expression of alphaA-crystallin. This reduction in ENaC activity reflected a decrease in the number of channels expressed at the cell surface. Furthermore, we observed that the rate of ENaC delivery to the cell surface of Xenopus oocytes was significantly reduced by co-expression of alphaA-crystallin, whereas the rate of channel retrieval remained unchanged. We also observed that alphaA-crystallin and ENaC co-immunoprecipitate. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that small heat shock proteins recognize ENaC subunits at ER quality control checkpoints and can target ENaC subunits for ER-associated degradation. PMID:17664274

  4. Inhibition of heat shock protein 90 attenuates adenylate cyclase sensitization after chronic morphine treatment.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyoshi; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Fujiwara, Yoko; Shibata, Katsushi; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Fujimura, Akio

    2010-02-19

    Cellular adaptations to chronic opioid treatment result in enhanced responsiveness of adenylate cyclase and an increase in forskolin- or agonist-stimulated cAMP production. It is, however, not known whether chaperone molecules such as heat shock proteins contribute to this adenylate cyclase sensitization. Here, we report that treatment of cells with geldanamycin, an inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), led to effective attenuation of morphine-induced adenylate cyclase sensitization. In SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells, morphine significantly increased RNA transcript and protein levels of type I adenylate cyclase, leading to sensitization. Whole-genome tiling array analysis revealed that cAMP response element-binding protein, an important mediator for cellular adaptation to morphine, associated with the proximal promoter of Hsp90AB1 not only in SK-N-SH cells but also in rat PC12 and human embryonic kidney cells. Hsp90AB1 transcript and protein levels increased significantly during morphine treatment, and co-application of geldanamycin (0.1-10 nM) effectively suppressed the increase in forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activation by 56%. Type I adenylate cyclase, but not Hsp90AB1, underwent significant degradation during geldanamycin treatment. These results indicate that Hsp90 is a new pharmacological target for the suppression of adenylate cyclase sensitization induced by chronic morphine treatment.

  5. Ibogaine blocked methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and induction of heat shock protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Imam, S Z; Newport, G D; Slikker, W; Ali, S F

    1999-03-27

    Body temperature changes and heat shock protein (HSP-72) induction in the caudate nucleus were studied in female C57BL/6N mice pretreated with ibogaine (50 mg/kg) and sacrificed 48 h. after a single dose of methamphetamine (20 mg/kg). Methamphetamine injection resulted in hyperthermia and induced HSP-72 expression, whereas treatment with ibogaine alone produced hypothermia. The ibogaine followed by methamphetamine injection showed no hyperthermia and decreased HSP-72 expression. These data indicate that pretreatment with ibogaine can completely block methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and HSP-72 expression in the striatum.

  6. Chronic SIV and morphine treatment increases heat shock protein 5 expression at the synapse.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Callen, Shannon; Fox, Howard S; Lisco, Steven J; Buch, Shilpa J

    2015-10-01

    The abuse of opiates such as morphine in synergy with HIV infection accelerates neurocognitive impairments and neuropathology in the CNS of HIV-infected subjects, collectively referred to as HAND. To identify potential pathogenic markers associated with HIV and morphine in perturbing the synaptic architecture, we performed quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics on purified synaptosomes isolated from the caudate of two groups of rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV differing by one regimen-morphine treatment. The upregulation of heat shock 70-kDa protein 5 in the SIV + morphine group points to increased cellular stress during SIV/morphine interaction thus leading to CNS dysfunction.

  7. Exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 reduces response of human neuroblastoma cells to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yurinskaya, M M; Funikov, S Y; Evgen'ev, M B; Vinokurov, M G

    2016-07-01

    The effect of exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNFα secretion, and mRNA expression by human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. It was shown that exogenous HSP70 protects neuroblastoma cells from the action of LPS. The protection mechanism of HSP70 includes a reduction in the production of ROS and TNFα and a decrease in the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β mRNA in SK-N-SH cells induced by LPS. PMID:27599502

  8. Exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 reduces response of human neuroblastoma cells to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yurinskaya, M M; Funikov, S Y; Evgen'ev, M B; Vinokurov, M G

    2016-07-01

    The effect of exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNFα secretion, and mRNA expression by human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. It was shown that exogenous HSP70 protects neuroblastoma cells from the action of LPS. The protection mechanism of HSP70 includes a reduction in the production of ROS and TNFα and a decrease in the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β mRNA in SK-N-SH cells induced by LPS.

  9. Identification of heat shock proteins via transcriptome profiling of tree peony leaf exposed to high temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Z; Cheng, Y W; Ya, H Y; Han, J M; Zheng, L

    2015-07-28

    The tree peony leaf is an important vegetative organ that is sensitive to abiotic stress and particularly to high temperature. This sensitivity affects plant growth and restricts tree peony distribution. However, the transcriptomic information currently available on the peony leaf in public databases is limited. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptomes of peony leaves subjected to high temperature using the Illumina HiSeq TM 2000 platform. We performed de novo assembly of 93,714 unigenes (average length of 639.7 bp). By searching the public databases, 22,323 unigenes and 13,107 unigenes showed significant similarities with proteins in the NCBI non-redundant protein database and SWISS-PROT database (E-value < 1e-5), respectively. We assigned 17,340 unigenes to Gene Ontology categories, and we assigned 7618 unigenes to clusters of orthologous groups for eukaryotic complete genomes. By searching the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database, 8014 unigenes were assigned to 6 main categories, including 290 KEGG pathways. To advance research on improving thermotolerance, we identified 24 potential heat shock protein genes with complete open reading frames from the transcriptomic sequences. This is the first study to characterize the leaf transcriptome of tree peony leaf using high-throughput sequencing. The information obtained from the tree peony leaf is valuable for gene discovery, and the identified heat shock protein genes can be used to improve plant stress-tolerance.

  10. M. paratuberculosis Heat Shock Protein 65 and Human Diseases: Bridging Infection and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Coad Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the known infectious cause of Johne's disease, an enteric inflammatory disease mostly studied in ruminant animals. MAP has also been implicated in the very similar Crohn's disease of humans as well as sarcoidosis. Recently, MAP has been associated with juvenile sarcoidosis (Blau syndrome), autoimmune diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. While it is intuitive to implicate MAP in granulomatous diseases where the microbe participates in the granuloma, it is more difficult to assign a role for MAP in diseases where autoantibodies are a primary feature. MAP may trigger autoimmune antibodies via its heat shock proteins. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (HSP65) is an immunodominant protein that shares sequential and conformational elements with several human host proteins. This molecular mimicry is the proposed etiopathology by which MAP stimulates autoantibodies associated with autoimmune (type 1) diabetes, autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. This paper proposes that MAP is a source of mycobacterial HSP65 and acts as a trigger of autoimmune disease. PMID:23056923

  11. The role of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in radiation-induced immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Pockley, Alan G; Schmid, Thomas E; Schilling, Daniela

    2015-11-28

    Despite enormous progress in radiation technologies (high precision image-guided irradiation, proton irradiation, heavy ion irradiation) and radiotherapeutic concepts (hypofractionated irradiation schemes), the clinical outcome of radiotherapy in locally advanced and metastasized tumors and in hypoxic tumors which are radiation-resistant remains unsatisfactory. Given their key influence on a number of biological and immunological parameters, this article considers the influence of irradiation-induced stress proteins on radiation-induced immunomodulation. Depending on its location, the major stress-inducible Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has been found to fulfill multiple roles. On the one hand, increased intracellular Hsp70 levels have been found to play a key role in the recovery from stress such as radio(chemo)therapy, and on the other hand extracellular Hsp70 proteins are potent stimulators of the innate immune system and mediators of anti-tumor immunity. Furthermore, if loaded with tumor-derived peptides, members of the Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70) and 90 (HSP90) families can stimulate the adaptive immune system via antigen cross-presentation. An irradiation-induced enhancement of the selective expression of a membrane form of Hsp70 on the surface of tumor cells which can act as a recognition structure for activated NK cells might have significant clinical relevance, in that the outcome of irradiation therapy for advanced tumors could be improved by combining it with cell-based and other immunotherapies that target this membrane form of Hsp70.

  12. Small heat shock protein message in etiolated Pea seedlings under altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalaiev, O.

    Plants are subjected to various environmental changes during their life cycle To protect themselves against unfavorable influences plant cells synthesize several classes of small heat shock proteins sHsp ranging in size from 15 to 30 kDa This proteins are able to enhance the refolding of chemically denatured proteins in an ATP-independent manner in other words they can function as molecular chaperones The potential contribution of effects of space flight at the plant cellular and gene regulation level has not been characterized yet The object of our study is sHsp gene expression in etiolated Pisum sativum seedlings exposed to altered gravity and environmental conditions We designed primers to detect message for two inducible forms of the cytosolic small heat shock proteins sHsp 17 7 and sHsp 18 1 Applying the RT- PCR we explore sHsps mRNA in pea seedling cells subjected to two types of altered gravity achieved by centrifugation from 3 to 8g by clinorotation 2 rpm and temperature elevation 42oC Temperature elevation as the positive control significantly increased PsHspl7 7 PsHspl8 1 expression We investigate the expression of actin it was constant and comparable for unstressed controls for all variants Results are under discussion

  13. Variation in heat shock proteins within tropical and desert species of poeciliid fishes.

    PubMed

    Norris, C E; diIorio, P J; Schultz, R J; Hightower, L E

    1995-11-01

    The 70-kilodalton heat shock protein (hsp70) family of molecular chaperones, which contains both stress-inducible and normally abundant constitutive members, is highly conserved across distantly related taxa. Analysis of this protein family in individuals from an outbred population of tropical topminnows, Poeciliopsis gracilis, showed that while constitutive hsp70 family members showed no variation in protein isoforms, inducibly synthesized hsp70 was polymorphic. Several species of Poeciliopsis adapted to desert environments exhibited lower levels of inducible hsp70 polymorphism than the tropical species, but constitutive forms were identical to those in P. gracilis, as they were in the confamilial species Gambusia affinis. These differences suggest that inducible and constitutive members of this family are under different evolutionary constraints and may indicate differences in their function within the cell. Also, northern desert species of Poeciliopsis synthesize a subset of the inducible hsp70 isoforms seen in tropical species. This distribution supports the theory that ancestral tropical fish migrated northward and colonized desert streams; the subsequent decrease in variation of inducible hsp70 may have been due to genetic drift or a consequence of adaptation to the desert environment. Higher levels of variability were found when the 30-kilodalton heat shock protein (hsp30) family was analyzed within different strains of two desert species of Poeciliopsis and also in wild-caught individuals of Gambusia affinis. In both cases the distribution of hsp30 isoform diversity was similar to that seen previously with allozyme polymorphisms. PMID:8524039

  14. Silver nanoparticles induced heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Posgai, Ryan; Gorey, Timothy J.; Nielsen, Mark; Hussain, Saber M.; Rowe, John J.

    2010-02-01

    Due to the intensive commercial application of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), risk assessment of this nanoparticle is of great importance. Our previous in vitro study demonstrated that Ag NPs caused DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts. However, toxicity of Ag NPs in vivo is largely lacking. This study was undertaken to examine the toxic effects of well-characterized polysaccharide coated 10 nm Ag NPs on heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed a diet of standard cornmeal media mixed with Ag NPs at the concentrations of 50 and 100 mug/ml for 24 and 48 h. Ag NPs up-regulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 and induced oxidative stress in D. melanogaster. Malondialdehyde level, an end product of lipid peroxidation was significantly higher while antioxidant glutathione content was significantly lower in Ag NPs exposed organisms. Activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and catalase were also significantly higher in the organisms exposed to Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint p53 and cell signaling protein p38 that are involved in the DNA damage repair pathway. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, markers of apoptosis were significantly higher in Ag NPs exposed organisms. The results indicate that Ag NPs in D. melanogaster induce heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. This study suggests that the organism is stressed and thus warrants more careful assessment of Ag NPs using in vivo models to determine if chronic exposure presents developmental and reproductive toxicity.

  15. Heat shock protein expression as guidance for the therapeutic window of retinal laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Huie, Philip; Dalal, Roopa; Lee, Seungjun; Tan, Gavin; Lee, Daeyoung; Lavinksy, Daniel; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Unlike conventional photocoagulation, non-damaging retinal laser therapy (NRT) limits laser-induced heating to stay below the retinal damage threshold and therefore requires careful dosimetry. Without the adverse effects associated with photocoagulation, NRT can be applied to critical areas of the retina and repeatedly to manage chronic disorders. Although the clinical benefits of NRT have been demonstrated, the mechanism of therapeutic effect and width of the therapeutic window below damage threshold are not well understood. Here, we measure activation of heat shock response via laser-induced hyperthermia as one indication of cellular response. A 577 nm laser is used with the Endpoint Management (EpM) user interface, a titration algorithm, to set experimental pulse energies relative to a barely visible titration lesion. Live/dead staining and histology show that the retinal damage threshold in rabbits is at 40% of titration energy on EpM scale. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was detected by whole-mount immunohistochemistry after different levels of laser treatment. We show HSP70 expression in the RPE beginning at 25% of titration energy indicating that there is a window for NRT between 25% and 40% with activation of the heat shock protein expression in response to hyperthermia. HSP70 expression is also seen at the perimeter of damaging lesions, as expected based on a computational model of laser heating. Expression area for each pulse energy setting varied between laser spots due to pigmentation changes, indicating the relatively narrow window of non-damaging activation and highlighting the importance of proper titration.

  16. Macrocycles that inhibit the binding between heat shock protein 90 and TPR-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Ardi, Veronica C; Alexander, Leslie D; Johnson, Victoria A; McAlpine, Shelli R

    2011-12-16

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) accounts for 1-2% of the total proteins in normal cells and functions as a molecular chaperone that folds, assembles, and stabilizes client proteins. Hsp90 is overexpressed (3- to 6-fold increase) in stressed cells, including cancer cells, and regulates over 200 client and co-chaperone proteins. Hsp90 client proteins are involved in a plethora of cellular signaling events including numerous growth and apoptotic pathways. Since pathway-specific inhibitors can be problematic in drug-resistant cancers, shutting down multiple pathways at once is a promising approach when developing new therapeutics. Hsp90's ability to modulate many growth and signaling pathways simultaneously makes this protein an attractive target in the field of cancer therapeutics. Herein we present evidence that a small molecule modulates Hsp90 via binding between the N and middle domain and allosterically inhibiting the binding interaction between Hsp90 and four C-terminal binding client proteins: IP6K2, FKBP38, FKBP52, and HOP. These last three clients contain a tetratricopeptide-repeat (TPR) region, which is known to interact with the MEEVD sequence on the C-terminus of Hsp90. Thus, this small molecule modulates the activity between co-chaperones that contain TPR motifs and Hsp90's MEEVD region. This mechanism of action is unique from that of all Hsp90 inhibitors currently in clinical trials where these molecules have no effect on proteins that bind to the C-terminus of Hsp90. Further, our small molecule induces a Caspase-3 dependent apoptotic event. Thus, we describe the mechanism of a novel scaffold that is a useful tool for studying cell-signaling events that result when blocking the MEEVD-TPR interaction between Hsp90 and co-chaperone proteins.

  17. Pepino mosaic virus capsid protein interacts with a tomato heat shock protein cognate 70.

    PubMed

    Mathioudakis, Matthaios M; Veiga, Rita; Ghita, Melania; Tsikou, Daniela; Medina, Vicente; Canto, Tomas; Makris, Antonios M; Livieratos, Ioannis C

    2012-01-01

    Plant viral capsid proteins (CP) can be involved in virus movement, replication and symptom development as a result of their interaction with host factors. The identification of such interactions may thus provide information about viral pathogenesis. In this study, Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) CP was used as bait to screen a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cDNA library for potential interactors in yeast. Of seven independent interacting clones, six were predicted to encode the C-termini of the heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) proteins. Three full length tomato Hsc70s (named Hsc70.1, .2, .3) were used to confirm the interaction in the yeast two hybrid assay and bimolecular fluorescent complementation (BiFC) in planta. The PepMV CP-Hsc70 interaction was confirmed only in the case of Hsc70.3 for both assays. In BiFC, the interaction was visualized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of agroinfiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. During PepMV infection, Hsc70.3 mRNA levels were induced and protein accumulation increased at 48 and 72 h post inoculation. In transmission electron microscopy using immunogold labelling techniques, Hsc70 was detected to co-localize with virions in the phloem of PepMV-infected tomato leaves. These observations, together with the co-purification of Hsc70 with PepMV virions further support the notion of a PepMV CP/Hsc70 interaction during virus infection. PMID:21884738

  18. Neuroprotective effect of small heat shock protein, Hsp27, after acute and chronic alcohol administration.

    PubMed

    Toth, Melinda Erzsebet; Gonda, Szilvia; Vigh, Laszlo; Santha, Miklos

    2010-11-01

    Alcohol induces degeneration of neurons and inhibits neurogenesis in the brain. Small heat shock proteins are able to protect neurons in cerebral ischemia and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of small heat shock protein, Hsp27, after acute and chronic ethanol administrations using transgenic mice overexpressing the human Hsp27 protein. Transgenic mice and wild-type littermates were injected with 2 g/kg ethanol intraperitoneally, and then motor coordination and muscle strength were analyzed using different behavioral tests, such as footprint analysis, balance beam, and inverted screen tests. Ethanol-injected transgenic mice showed similar footprints to control saline-injected mice, did not fall of the beam, and were able to climb to the top of the inverted screen, while wild-type mice showed ataxia and incoordination after ethanol injection. The effect of Hsp27 on chronic ethanol consumption was also investigated. Drinking water of mice was replaced by a 20% ethanol solution for 5 weeks, and then brain sections were stained with Fluoro Jade C staining. We found significantly lesser amount of degenerating neurons in the brain of ethanol-drinking transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice. We conclude that Hsp27 can protect neurons against the acute and chronic toxic effects of ethanol.

  19. Escherichia coli Heat Shock Protein DnaK: Production and Consequences in Terms of Monitoring Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, Karine; Lessard, Martin; Piette, Gabriel; Lacroix, Monique; Saucier, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Through use of commercially available DnaK proteins and anti-DnaK monoclonal antibodies, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantify this heat shock protein in Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 subjected to various heating regimens. For a given process lethality (F7010 of 1, 3, and 5 min), the intracellular concentration of DnaK in E. coli varied with the heating temperature (50 or 55°C). In fact, the highest DnaK concentrations were found after treatments at the lower temperature (50°C) applied for a longer time. Residual DnaK after heating was found to be necessary for cell recovery, and additional DnaK was produced during the recovery process. Overall, higher intracellular concentrations of DnaK tended to enhance cell resistance to a subsequent lethal stress. Indeed, E. coli cells that had undergone a sublethal heat shock (105 min at 55°C, F7010 = 3 min) accompanied by a 12-h recovery (containing 76,786 ± 25,230 molecules/cell) resisted better than exponentially growing cells (38,500 ± 6,056 molecules/cell) when later heated to 60°C for 50 min (F7010 = 5 min). Results reported here suggest that using stress protein to determine cell adaptation and survival, rather than cell counts alone, may lead to more efficient heat treatment. PMID:12788720

  20. Expression of Small Heat-Shock Proteins at Low Temperatures1

    PubMed Central

    Sabehat, Adnan; Lurie, Susan; Weiss, David

    1998-01-01

    We previously reported that short exposure of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) fruits to high temperature protects them from chilling injury. To study the involvement of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in the acquisition of low-temperature tolerance, we cloned two heat-shock-induced genes that are also expressed at low temperatures. The cloned cDNAs belong to the small HSP group. Sequence analyses of the clones showed perfect homology to the tomato-ripening gene tom66 and to the tomato chloroplastic HSP21 gene tom111. The expression of both genes was induced by high temperature in fruits, flowers, leaves, and stems, but not by low or ambient temperatures or by other stresses such as drought and anaerobic conditions. When the heated fruits were transferred to low temperature, tom66 and tom111 mRNA levels first decreased but were then reinduced. Induction was not observed in nonheated fruits at low temperature. Immunodetection of tom111-encoded protein indicated that this protein is present at low temperatures in the heated fruits. The results of this study show that the expression of tom66 and tom111 is correlated with protection against some, but not all, symptoms of chilling injury. PMID:9625718

  1. Extracellular Release and Signaling by Heat Shock Protein 27: Role in Modifying Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Batulan, Zarah; Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Li, Yumei; Koumbadinga, Geremy; Alvarez-Olmedo, Daiana Gisela; Shi, Chunhua; O’Brien, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is traditionally viewed as an intracellular chaperone protein with anti-apoptotic properties. However, recent data indicate that a number of heat shock proteins, including HSP27, are also found in the extracellular space where they may signal via membrane receptors to alter gene transcription and cellular function. Therefore, there is increasing interest in better understanding how HSP27 is released from cells, its levels and composition in the extracellular space, and the cognate cell membrane receptors involved in effecting cell signaling. In this paper, the knowledge to date, as well as some emerging paradigms about the extracellular function of HSP27 is presented. Of particular interest is the role of HSP27 in attenuating atherogenesis by modifying lipid uptake and inflammation in the plaque. Moreover, the abundance of HSP27 in serum is an emerging new biomarker for ischemic events. Finally, HSP27 replacement therapy may represent a novel therapeutic opportunity for chronic inflammatory disorders, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:27507972

  2. Neuroprotective effect of small heat shock protein, Hsp27, after acute and chronic alcohol administration

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Melinda Erzsebet; Gonda, Szilvia; Vigh, Laszlo

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol induces degeneration of neurons and inhibits neurogenesis in the brain. Small heat shock proteins are able to protect neurons in cerebral ischemia and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of small heat shock protein, Hsp27, after acute and chronic ethanol administrations using transgenic mice overexpressing the human Hsp27 protein. Transgenic mice and wild-type littermates were injected with 2 g/kg ethanol intraperitoneally, and then motor coordination and muscle strength were analyzed using different behavioral tests, such as footprint analysis, balance beam, and inverted screen tests. Ethanol-injected transgenic mice showed similar footprints to control saline-injected mice, did not fall of the beam, and were able to climb to the top of the inverted screen, while wild-type mice showed ataxia and incoordination after ethanol injection. The effect of Hsp27 on chronic ethanol consumption was also investigated. Drinking water of mice was replaced by a 20% ethanol solution for 5 weeks, and then brain sections were stained with Fluoro Jade C staining. We found significantly lesser amount of degenerating neurons in the brain of ethanol-drinking transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice. We conclude that Hsp27 can protect neurons against the acute and chronic toxic effects of ethanol. PMID:20461564

  3. Heat Shock Cognate Protein 70 Is Involved in Rotavirus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Bouyssounade, Daniela; Zárate, Selene; Iša, Pavel; López, Tomás; Espinosa, Rafaela; Romero, Pedro; Méndez, Ernesto; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we have identified the heat shock cognate protein (hsc70) as a receptor candidate for rotaviruses. hsc70 was shown to be present on the surface of MA104 cells, and antibodies to this protein blocked rotavirus infectivity, while not affecting the infectivity of reovirus and poliovirus. Preincubation of the hsc70 protein with the viruses also inhibited their infectivity. Triple-layered particles (mature virions), but not double-layered particles, bound hsc70 in a solid-phase assay, and this interaction was blocked by monoclonal antibodies to the virus surface proteins VP4 and VP7. Rotaviruses were shown to interact with hsc70 at a postattachment step, since antibodies to hsc70 and the protein itself did not inhibit the virus attachment to cells. We propose that the functional rotavirus receptor is a complex of several cell surface molecules that include, among others, hsc70. PMID:11907249

  4. Heat shock protein-based therapy as a potential candidate for treating the sphingolipidoses.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Thomas; Gray, James; Priestman, David A; Wallom, Kerri-Lee; Atkins, Jennifer; Olsen, Ole Dines; Klein, Alexander; Drndarski, Svetlana; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Ingemann, Linda; Smith, David A; Morris, Lauren; Bornæs, Claus; Jørgensen, Signe Humle; Williams, Ian; Hinsby, Anders; Arenz, Christoph; Begley, David; Jäättelä, Marja; Platt, Frances M

    2016-09-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) often manifest with severe systemic and central nervous system (CNS) symptoms. The existing treatment options are limited and have no or only modest efficacy against neurological manifestations of disease. We demonstrate that recombinant human heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) improves the binding of several sphingolipid-degrading enzymes to their essential cofactor bis(monoacyl)glycerophosphate in vitro. HSP70 treatment reversed lysosomal pathology in primary fibroblasts from 14 patients with eight different LSDs. HSP70 penetrated effectively into murine tissues including the CNS and inhibited glycosphingolipid accumulation in murine models of Fabry disease (Gla(-/-)), Sandhoff disease (Hexb(-/-)), and Niemann-Pick disease type C (Npc1(-/-)) and attenuated a wide spectrum of disease-associated neurological symptoms in Hexb(-/-) and Npc1(-/-) mice. Oral administration of arimoclomol, a small-molecule coinducer of HSPs that is currently in clinical trials for Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC), recapitulated the effects of recombinant human HSP70, suggesting that heat shock protein-based therapies merit clinical evaluation for treating LSDs. PMID:27605553

  5. Size dependent classification of heat shock proteins: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Jee, Hyunseok

    2016-08-01

    Molecular chaperones are ubiquitous and abundant within cellular environments, functioning as a defense mechanism against outer environment. The range of molecular chaperones varies from 10 to over 100 kDa. Depending on the size, the specific locations and physiological roles of molecular chaperones vary within the cell. Multifunctionality of heat shock proteins (HSPs) expressed via various cyto-stress including heat shock have been spotlighted as a reliable prognostic target biomarker for therapeutic purpose in neuromuscular disease or cancer related studies. HSP also plays a critical role in the maintenance of proteins and cellular homeostasis in exercise-induced adaptation. Such various functions of HSPs give scientists insights into intracellular protective mechanisms in the living body thus HSPs can be target molecules to know the defense mechanism in cellular environment. Based on experimental results regarding small to large scaled HSPs, this review aims to provide updated important information regarding the modality of responses of intracellular HSPs towards extracellular stimulations. Further, the expressive mechanisms of HSPs data from tremendous in vivo and in vitro studies underlying the enhancement of the functionality of living body will be discussed. PMID:27656620

  6. Size dependent classification of heat shock proteins: a mini-review

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Hyunseok

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are ubiquitous and abundant within cellular environments, functioning as a defense mechanism against outer environment. The range of molecular chaperones varies from 10 to over 100 kDa. Depending on the size, the specific locations and physiological roles of molecular chaperones vary within the cell. Multifunctionality of heat shock proteins (HSPs) expressed via various cyto-stress including heat shock have been spotlighted as a reliable prognostic target biomarker for therapeutic purpose in neuromuscular disease or cancer related studies. HSP also plays a critical role in the maintenance of proteins and cellular homeostasis in exercise-induced adaptation. Such various functions of HSPs give scientists insights into intracellular protective mechanisms in the living body thus HSPs can be target molecules to know the defense mechanism in cellular environment. Based on experimental results regarding small to large scaled HSPs, this review aims to provide updated important information regarding the modality of responses of intracellular HSPs towards extracellular stimulations. Further, the expressive mechanisms of HSPs data from tremendous in vivo and in vitro studies underlying the enhancement of the functionality of living body will be discussed.

  7. Cloning, sequencing, and mapping of the human chromosome 14 heat shock protein gene (HSPA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnycastle, L.L.C.; Chang-En Yu; Schellenberg, G.D.

    1994-09-01

    A genomic clone for the human heat shock protein (HSP) 70 gene located on chromosome 14 was isolated and sequenced. The gene, designated HSPA2, has a single open reading frame of 1917 bp that encodes a 639-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 70,030 Da. Analysis of the sequence indicates that HLPA2 is the human homologue of the murine Hsp 70-2 gene with 91.7% identity in the nucleotide coding sequence and 98.2% in the corresponding amino acid sequence. HSPA2 has less amino acid homology to other members of the human HSP70 gene family, 83.3% to the heat-inducible HSP70-1 gene and 86.1% with the human heat shock cognate gene HSC70. HSPA2 is constitutively expressed in most tissues, with very high levels in testis and skeletal muscle. Significant but lower levels are also expressed in ovary, small intestine, colon, brain, placenta, and kidney. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clone containing HSPA2 (YAC741H4) that also contained the polymorphic marker D14S63 was identified. This 670-kb YAC was mapped to 14q24.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Subsequent two-color FISH and genetic mapping placed HSPA2/D14S63 proximal to the markers D14S57 and D14S77. 50 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Size dependent classification of heat shock proteins: a mini-review

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Hyunseok

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are ubiquitous and abundant within cellular environments, functioning as a defense mechanism against outer environment. The range of molecular chaperones varies from 10 to over 100 kDa. Depending on the size, the specific locations and physiological roles of molecular chaperones vary within the cell. Multifunctionality of heat shock proteins (HSPs) expressed via various cyto-stress including heat shock have been spotlighted as a reliable prognostic target biomarker for therapeutic purpose in neuromuscular disease or cancer related studies. HSP also plays a critical role in the maintenance of proteins and cellular homeostasis in exercise-induced adaptation. Such various functions of HSPs give scientists insights into intracellular protective mechanisms in the living body thus HSPs can be target molecules to know the defense mechanism in cellular environment. Based on experimental results regarding small to large scaled HSPs, this review aims to provide updated important information regarding the modality of responses of intracellular HSPs towards extracellular stimulations. Further, the expressive mechanisms of HSPs data from tremendous in vivo and in vitro studies underlying the enhancement of the functionality of living body will be discussed. PMID:27656620

  9. Heat shock protein-based therapy as a potential candidate for treating the sphingolipidoses.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Thomas; Gray, James; Priestman, David A; Wallom, Kerri-Lee; Atkins, Jennifer; Olsen, Ole Dines; Klein, Alexander; Drndarski, Svetlana; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Ingemann, Linda; Smith, David A; Morris, Lauren; Bornæs, Claus; Jørgensen, Signe Humle; Williams, Ian; Hinsby, Anders; Arenz, Christoph; Begley, David; Jäättelä, Marja; Platt, Frances M

    2016-09-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) often manifest with severe systemic and central nervous system (CNS) symptoms. The existing treatment options are limited and have no or only modest efficacy against neurological manifestations of disease. We demonstrate that recombinant human heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) improves the binding of several sphingolipid-degrading enzymes to their essential cofactor bis(monoacyl)glycerophosphate in vitro. HSP70 treatment reversed lysosomal pathology in primary fibroblasts from 14 patients with eight different LSDs. HSP70 penetrated effectively into murine tissues including the CNS and inhibited glycosphingolipid accumulation in murine models of Fabry disease (Gla(-/-)), Sandhoff disease (Hexb(-/-)), and Niemann-Pick disease type C (Npc1(-/-)) and attenuated a wide spectrum of disease-associated neurological symptoms in Hexb(-/-) and Npc1(-/-) mice. Oral administration of arimoclomol, a small-molecule coinducer of HSPs that is currently in clinical trials for Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC), recapitulated the effects of recombinant human HSP70, suggesting that heat shock protein-based therapies merit clinical evaluation for treating LSDs.

  10. Emerging Role of Nitric Oxide and Heat Shock Proteins in Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Molina, Marisa Nile; Ferder, León; Manucha, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is present in pathologies such as diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertension, inflammation, cardiac disease, and dyslipidemias. Population studies show that IR is multifactorial and has genetic components, such as defects in the insulin-signaling pathway (as serine phosphorylation on insulin substrate or decreased activation of signaling molecules) and RAS/MAPK-dependent pathways. IR is connected to mitochondrial dysfunction, overproduction of oxidants, accumulation of fat, and an over-activation of the renin-angiotensin system linked to the NADPH oxidase activity. In addition, nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (endothelial and inducible), is also associated with IR when both impaired release and reduced bioavailability of all which lead to inflammation and hypertension. However, increased NO may promote vasculoprotection. Moreover, reduced NO release induces heat shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) expression in IR and diabetes, mediating beneficial effects against oxidative stress injury, inflammation and apoptosis. HSP70 may be used as biomarker of the chronicity of diabetes. Hsp72 (inducible protein) is linked to vascular complications with a high-fat diet by blocking inflammation signaling (cytoprotective and anti-cytotoxicity intracellular role). Elucidating the IR signaling pathways and the roles of NO and HSPs is relevant to the application of new treatments, such as heat shock and thermal therapy, nitrosylated drugs, chemical chaperones or exercise training. PMID:26694820

  11. Levels of Antibodies against Human Heat Shock Protein (HSP) 60 in Patients with Glaucoma in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Grabska-Liberek, Iwona; Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Olesińska, Marzena; Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Kocięcki, Jarosandlstrokaw; Sikora, Mariusz; Jamrozy-Witkowska, Agnieszka; Tesla, Piotr; Czarnocka, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Although elevated intraocular pressure is a major risk factor for the development of glaucoma, there is increasing evidence that the immune system may be involved in the development of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). The aim of this study was to determine if NTG is associated with elevated levels of antibodies against human heat shock protein (HSP) 60. Material/Methods The study was conducted in 139 subjects (35 subjects with NTG [Group 1], 34 subjects with primary open-angle glaucoma/POAG/[Group 2], 24 subjects with autoimmune rheumatic diseases [Group 3], and 36 healthy controls [Group 4]). All subjects had complete ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, tonometry, gonioscopy; visual-field examination, and optical coherence tomography/OCT/of the optic nerve head and the macula). Blood samples were collected for the measurements of serum levels of antibodies against human HSP60. Results The subjects with rheumatic diseases had the highest median serum level of antibodies against HSP60 – 20.49 ng/mL. The values in the subjects with NTG, POAG, and in controls were 18.79 ng/mL, 18.61 ng/mL and 17.61 ng/mL, respectively (p=0.96). Conclusions This study does not confirm the hypothesis that normal-tension glaucoma is associated with elevated blood levels of antibodies against human heat shock protein (HSP) 60. PMID:25786333

  12. Differential expression of heat shock transcription factors and heat shock proteins after acute and chronic heat stress in laying chickens (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingjing; Tang, Li; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Liyang; Xi, Lin; Liu, Hsiao-Ching; Odle, Jack; Luo, Xugang

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress due to high environmental temperature negatively influences animal performances. To better understand the biological impact of heat stress, laying broiler breeder chickens were subjected either to acute (step-wisely increasing temperature from 21 to 35°C within 24 hours) or chronic (32°C for 8 weeks) high temperature exposure. High temperature challenges significantly elevated body temperature of experimental birds (P<0.05). However, oxidation status of lipid and protein and expression of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) 70 and 90 were differently affected by acute and chronic treatment. Tissue-specific responses to thermal challenge were also found among heart, liver and muscle. In the heart, acute heat challenge affected lipid oxidation (P = 0.05) and gene expression of all 4 HSF gene expression was upregulated (P<0.05). During chronic heat treatment, the HSP 70 mRNA level was increased (P<0.05) and HSP 90 mRNA (P<0.05) was decreased. In the liver, oxidation of protein was alleviated during acute heat challenge (P<0.05), however, gene expression HSF2, 3 and 4 and HSP 70 were highly induced (P<0.05). HSP90 expression was increased by chronic thermal treatment (P<0.05). In the muscle, both types of heat stress increased protein oxidation, but HSFs and HSPs gene expression remained unaltered. Only tendencies to increase were observed in HSP 70 (P = 0.052) and 90 (P = 0.054) gene expression after acute heat stress. The differential expressions of HSF and HSP genes in different tissues of laying broiler breeder chickens suggested that anti-heat stress mechanisms might be provoked more profoundly in the heart, by which the muscle was least protected during heat stress. In addition to HSP, HSFs gene expression could be used as a marker during acute heat stress.

  13. Targeting Allosteric Control Mechanisms in Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaokai; Shao, Hao; Taylor, Isabelle R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a molecular chaperone that plays critical roles in protein homeostasis. Hsp70's chaperone activity is coordinated by intra-molecular interactions between its two domains, as well as inter-molecular interactions between Hsp70 and its co-chaperones. Each of these contacts represents a potential opportunity for the development of chemical inhibitors. To illustrate this concept, we review three classes of recently identified molecules that bind distinct pockets on Hsp70. Although all three compounds share the ability to interrupt core biochemical functions of Hsp70, they stabilize different conformers. Accordingly, each compound appears to interrupt a specific subset of inter- and intra-molecular interactions. Thus, an accurate definition of an Hsp70 inhibitor may require a particularly detailed understanding of the molecule's binding site and its effects on protein-protein interactions.

  14. Targeting Allosteric Control Mechanisms in Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaokai; Shao, Hao; Taylor, Isabelle R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a molecular chaperone that plays critical roles in protein homeostasis. Hsp70's chaperone activity is coordinated by intra-molecular interactions between its two domains, as well as inter-molecular interactions between Hsp70 and its co-chaperones. Each of these contacts represents a potential opportunity for the development of chemical inhibitors. To illustrate this concept, we review three classes of recently identified molecules that bind distinct pockets on Hsp70. Although all three compounds share the ability to interrupt core biochemical functions of Hsp70, they stabilize different conformers. Accordingly, each compound appears to interrupt a specific subset of inter- and intra-molecular interactions. Thus, an accurate definition of an Hsp70 inhibitor may require a particularly detailed understanding of the molecule's binding site and its effects on protein-protein interactions. PMID:27072701

  15. Concomitant changes in high temperature tolerance and heat-shock proteins in desert succulents.

    PubMed

    Kee, S C; Nobel, P S

    1986-02-01

    Raising the day/night air temperatures from 30 degrees C/20 degrees C to 50 degrees C/40 degrees C increases the high temperature tolerated by Agave deserti, Carnegiea gigantea, and Ferocactus acanthodes by 6 degrees C to 8 degrees C; the increase is about half completed in 3 days and fully completed in 10 days. A 25 to 27 kilodalton protein concomitantly accumulates for all three desert succulents upon transfer to 50 degrees C/40 degrees C, while accumulation of other heat "heat-shock" proteins is species specific. Some of the induced proteins are more abundant at 3 days, while others (including the 25-27 kilodalton protein) remain after completion of high temperature acclimation.

  16. CHIP Knockdown Reduced Heat Shock Response and Protein Quality Control Capacity in Lens Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Liu, Z; Bao, X; Qin, Y; Taylor, A; Shang, F; Wu, M

    2015-01-01

    Protein quality control (PQC) systems, including molecular chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP), plays an important role in maintaining intracellular protein homeostasis. Carboxyl terminus of Hsc70- interacting protein (CHIP) links the chaperone and UPPs, thus contributing to the repair or removal of damaged proteins. Over-expression of CHIP had previously been used to protect cells from environmental stress. In order to gain a more physiologic mechanism of the advantage conferred by CHIP, we induced a CHIP knockdown and monitored the ability of cells to cope with environmental stress. To knockdown CHIP, the human lens epithelial cell line HLE B3 was transfected with lentiviral particles that encode a CHIP short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or negative control lentiviral particles. Stable CHIP-knock down cells (KD) and negative control cells (NC) were selected with puromycin. After exposure to heat shock stress, there was no change observed in the expression of Hsp90. In contrast, Hsp70 levels increased significantly in NC cells but less so in KD cells. Hsp27 levels also increased after heat shock, but only in NC cells. Protein ubiquitination was reduced when CHIP was knocked down. CHIP knockdown reduced the ability to clear aggregation proteins. When same levels of aggregation-prone RFP-mutant crystallin fusion protein, RFP/V76D-γD, was expressed, there was ~9- fold more aggregates in KD cells as compared to that observed in NC cells. Furthermore, KD cells were more sensitive to toxicity of amino acid analog canavanine as compared to NC cells. Together, these data indicate that CHIP is required for PQC and that CHIP knockdown diminished cellular PQC capacity in lens cells.

  17. CHIP Knockdown Reduced Heat Shock Response and Protein Quality Control Capacity in Lens Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Liu, Z; Bao, X; Qin, Y; Taylor, A; Shang, F; Wu, M

    2015-01-01

    Protein quality control (PQC) systems, including molecular chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP), plays an important role in maintaining intracellular protein homeostasis. Carboxyl terminus of Hsc70- interacting protein (CHIP) links the chaperone and UPPs, thus contributing to the repair or removal of damaged proteins. Over-expression of CHIP had previously been used to protect cells from environmental stress. In order to gain a more physiologic mechanism of the advantage conferred by CHIP, we induced a CHIP knockdown and monitored the ability of cells to cope with environmental stress. To knockdown CHIP, the human lens epithelial cell line HLE B3 was transfected with lentiviral particles that encode a CHIP short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or negative control lentiviral particles. Stable CHIP-knock down cells (KD) and negative control cells (NC) were selected with puromycin. After exposure to heat shock stress, there was no change observed in the expression of Hsp90. In contrast, Hsp70 levels increased significantly in NC cells but less so in KD cells. Hsp27 levels also increased after heat shock, but only in NC cells. Protein ubiquitination was reduced when CHIP was knocked down. CHIP knockdown reduced the ability to clear aggregation proteins. When same levels of aggregation-prone RFP-mutant crystallin fusion protein, RFP/V76D-γD, was expressed, there was ~9- fold more aggregates in KD cells as compared to that observed in NC cells. Furthermore, KD cells were more sensitive to toxicity of amino acid analog canavanine as compared to NC cells. Together, these data indicate that CHIP is required for PQC and that CHIP knockdown diminished cellular PQC capacity in lens cells. PMID:26321754

  18. The structure and expression of maize genes encoding the major heat shock protein, hsp70.

    PubMed

    Rochester, D E; Winer, J A; Shah, D M

    1986-03-01

    We have isolated and sequenced two maize genomic clones that are homologous to the Drosophila hsp70 gene. One of the maize hsp70 clones contains the entire hsp70 coding region and 81 nucleotides of the 5' nontranslated sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence for this maize protein is 68% homologous to the hsp70 of Drosophila. The second maize hsp70 clone contains only part of the coding sequence and 1.1 kb of the 5' flanking sequence. This 5' flanking sequence contains two sequences homologous to the consensus heat-shock-element sequence. Both maize genes are thermally inducible and each contains an intron in the same position as that of the heat-shock-cognate gene, hsc1, of Drosophila. The presence of an intron in the maize genes is a distinguishing feature in that no other thermally inducible hsp70 genes described to date contain an intron. We have constructed a hybrid hsp70 gene containing the entire hsp70 coding sequence with an intron, and 1.1 kb of the 5' flanking sequence. We demonstrate that this hybrid gene is thermally inducible in a transgenic petunia plant and that the gene is expressed from its own promoter.

  19. Heat shock protein 70 of Naegleria fowleri is important factor for proliferation and in vitro cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyoung-Ju; Song, Kyung-Hui; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Yang-Jin; Park, Chang-Eun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the role of heat shock 70 protein (HSP70) in free-living amoeba, a constitutive and inducible heat shock 70 gene of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri has previously been cloned, characterized, and named as Nf-cHSP70. The Nf-cHSP70 is localized in the cytoplasm, pseudopodia, and phagocytic food-cups. To investigate the role of Nf-cHSP70 in the pathogenicity of N. fowleri, the synthesis of N. fowleri HSP70 was first inhibited with benzylidene lactam compound (KNK437), and Nf-cHSP70 gene was knock-downed with antisense oligomers, which were designed with a start region-specific antisense oligonucleotides (24 oligomers) and modified with phosphorothioate. KNK437 inhibited the induction of N. fowleri HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, 300 muM KNK437 reduced the proliferation of N. fowleri to 79.4% of untreated control (100%). Nf-cHSP70 knock-downed N. fowleri with antisense oligomers showed 68.5% reduction of proliferation in comparison with untreated control (100%). The cytotoxicity of N. fowleri against CHO target cells was reduced to 42.1% by KNK437 and 68.6% by antisense oligomers. These results suggest that the cloned Nf-cHSP70 plays an important role in the proliferation and cytotoxicity of pathogenic N. fowleri.

  20. Crystal structure of the hexamer of human heat shock factor binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueqi; Xu, Lingfeng; Liu, Yiwei; Tong, Xiaohang; Zhu, Guangyu; Zhang, Xuejun C; Li, Xuemei; Rao, Zihe

    2009-04-01

    Heat shock response (HSR) is a ubiquitous cellular mechanism that copes with a variety of stresses. This response is mediated by a family of transcriptional activators, heat shock factors (HSFs), which are under tight regulation. HSF binding protein 1 (HSBP1) is a negative regulator of HSR and is reported to bind specifically with the active trimeric form of HSF1, thus inhibiting its activity. HSBP1 contains heptad-repeats in the primary sequence and was believed to stay in a trimer form in solution. We report the crystal structure of the trimerization domain of the M30I/L55P mutant of human HSBP1 at 1.8 A resolution. In this crystal form, the HSBP1 fragment of residues 6-53 forms a continuous, 11-turn long helix. The helix self-associates to form a parallel, symmetrical, triple coiled-coil helix bundle, which further assembles into a dimer of trimers in a head-to-head fashion. Solution study confirmed that the wild-type HSBP1 shares similar biophysical properties with the crystallized variant. Furthermore, we identified Ser31, which buried its polar side chain in the hydrophobic interior of the helix bundle, as a stability weak-spot. Substitution of this residue with Ile increases the melting temperature by 24 degrees C, implicating that this conserved serine residue is maintained at position 31 for functional purposes.

  1. Developmentally and stress-induced small heat shock proteins in cork oak somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Puigderrajols, Pere; Jofré, Anna; Mir, Gisela; Pla, Maria; Verdaguer, Dolors; Huguet, Gemma; Molinas, Marisa

    2002-06-01

    The timing and tissue localization of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) during cork oak somatic embryo development was investigated under normal growing culture conditions and in response to stress. Western blot analyses using polyclonal antibodies raised against cork oak recombinant HSP17 showed a transient accumulation of class I sHSPs during somatic embryo maturation and germination. Moreover, the amount of protein increased at all stages of embryo development in response to exogenous stress. The developmentally accumulated proteins localized to early differentiating, but not the highly dividing, regions of the root and shoot apical meristems. By contrast, these highly dividing regions were strongly immunostained after heat stress. Findings support the hypothesis of a distinct control for developmentally and stress-induced accumulation of class I sHSPs. The possible role of sHSPs is discussed in relation to their tissue specific localization.

  2. Heat shock protein 70 down-regulates the production of toll-like receptor-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines by a heat shock factor-1/constitutive heat shock element-binding factor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an intracellular chaperone protein with regulatory and cytoprotective functions. Hsp70 can also be found in the extracellular milieu, as a result of active secretion or passive release from damaged cells. The role of extracellular Hsp70 is not fully understood. Some studies report that it activates monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells through innate immune receptors (such as Toll-like receptors, TLRs), while others report that Hsp70 is a negative regulator of the inflammatory response. In order to address this apparent inconsistency, in this study we evaluated the response of human monocytes to a highly purified recombinant Hsp70. Methods Human peripheral blood monocytes were stimulated with Hsp70, alone or in combination with TLR agonists. Cytokines were quantified in culture supernatants, their mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR, and the binding of transcription factors was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Kruskal-Wallis test or one-way or two-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results The addition of Hsp70 to TLR-activated monocytes down-regulated TNF-α as well as IL-6 levels. This effect was independent of a physical interaction between Hsp70 and TLR agonists; instead it resulted of changes at the TNF-α gene expression level. The decrease in TNF-α expression correlated with the binding of HSF-1 (heat shock transcription factor 1, a transcription factor activated in response to Hsp70) and CHBF (constitutive HSE-binding factor) to the TNF-α gene promoter. Conclusion Extracellular Hsp70 negatively regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines of monocytes exposed to TLR agonists and contributes to dampen the inflammatory response. PMID:25053922

  3. Differential expression patterns among heat-shock protein genes and thermal responses in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Fernando; Orobio, Rony F; Chavarriaga, Paul; Toro-Perea, Nelson

    2015-08-01

    There is convincing evidence that heat-shock proteins (HSP) are upregulated by stress conditions in insects; however, the relative contribution of each HSP gene to the heat-shock response remains unclear. Here we considered the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1), a phloem feeder and invasive species whose molecular stress response is an important mechanism for overcoming heat stress. We assessed the expression of the hsp23, 40, 70 and 90 genes at the mRNA level when submitted to heat shocks of 40 and 44°C/1h (control at 25°C). For this, we evaluated a set of available and suitable reference genes in order to perform data normalization using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) technique, and then confirmed the production of HSP70 protein based on Western blot. Results were compared with the hardening capacity of B. tabaci, measured by fitness components as a response to heat shocks, using 40°C as the induction temperature. Three of the four genes (hsp23, 70 and 90) were upregulated by heat stress at mRNA, showing differential expression patterns. Hsp70 expression was confirmed at the protein level. Hardening significantly increased fitness following heat stress, suggesting that HSPs may contribute to hardening capacity in B. tabaci. Potential role of each gene in the heat-shock response for whiteflies is discussed. PMID:26267515

  4. Differential expression patterns among heat-shock protein genes and thermal responses in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Fernando; Orobio, Rony F; Chavarriaga, Paul; Toro-Perea, Nelson

    2015-08-01

    There is convincing evidence that heat-shock proteins (HSP) are upregulated by stress conditions in insects; however, the relative contribution of each HSP gene to the heat-shock response remains unclear. Here we considered the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1), a phloem feeder and invasive species whose molecular stress response is an important mechanism for overcoming heat stress. We assessed the expression of the hsp23, 40, 70 and 90 genes at the mRNA level when submitted to heat shocks of 40 and 44°C/1h (control at 25°C). For this, we evaluated a set of available and suitable reference genes in order to perform data normalization using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) technique, and then confirmed the production of HSP70 protein based on Western blot. Results were compared with the hardening capacity of B. tabaci, measured by fitness components as a response to heat shocks, using 40°C as the induction temperature. Three of the four genes (hsp23, 70 and 90) were upregulated by heat stress at mRNA, showing differential expression patterns. Hsp70 expression was confirmed at the protein level. Hardening significantly increased fitness following heat stress, suggesting that HSPs may contribute to hardening capacity in B. tabaci. Potential role of each gene in the heat-shock response for whiteflies is discussed.

  5. A novel protein quality control mechanism contributes to heat shock resistance of worldwide-distributed Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Wigren, Edvard; Trček, Janja; Peters, Verena; Kim, Jihong; Hasni, Muhammad Sharif; Nimtz, Manfred; Lindqvist, Ylva; Park, Chankyu; Curth, Ute; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Römling, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly successful nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a wide variety of infections with clone C strains most prevalent worldwide. In this study, we initially characterize a molecular mechanism of survival unique to clone C strains. We identified a P. aeruginosa clone C-specific genomic island (PACGI-1) that contains the highly expressed small heat shock protein sHsp20c, the founding member of a novel subclass of class B bacterial small heat shock proteins. sHsp20c and adjacent gene products are involved in resistance against heat shock. Heat stable sHsp20c is unconventionally expressed in stationary phase in a wide temperature range from 20 to 42°C. Purified sHsp20c has characteristic features of small heat shock protein class B as it is monodisperse, forms sphere-like 24-meric oligomers and exhibits significant chaperone activity. As the P. aeruginosa clone C population is significantly more heat shock resistant than genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa strains without sHsp20c, the horizontally acquired shsp20c operon might contribute to the survival of worldwide-distributed clone C strains.

  6. Coordinate synthesis and turnover of heat shock proteins in Borrelia burgdorferi: degradation of DnaK during recovery from heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Cluss, R G; Goel, A S; Rehm, H L; Schoenecker, J G; Boothby, J T

    1996-01-01

    The synthesis and turnover of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete, was investigated by radiolabeling of whole spirochetes and spheroplasts, comparison of one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and use of immunochemistry. The approximately 72-kDa DnaK homolog and three additional Hsps of 39, 27, and 21 kDa increased in amount by 3- to 15-fold between 2 and 6 h following temperature upshift from 28 to 39 degrees C. Temperature downshift experiments following the transfer of spirochetes from 40 to 28 degrees C showed that within 15 to 30 min, synthesis of most of the major Hsps returned to levels seen in spirochetes statically maintained at the lower temperature. Spheroplasts of B. burgdorferi produced by treatment with EDTA and lysozyme were radiolabeled, and specific Hsps were localized to either the cytoplasm or membrane fraction. Further analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis demonstrated three constitutively expressed DnaK isoforms with pIs near 5.5. A pattern suggestive of DnaK degradation was observed following recovery from heat shock but not in spirochetes maintained entirely at a low temperature. Some of these putative degradation products were recognized by monoclonal antibodies directed against the B. burgdorferi DnaK protein. These data suggest that following a period of peak synthesis, DnaK is actively degraded as the spirochete reestablishes its metabolic thermometer. These findings provide a new interpretation of previous work suggesting that 10 to 15 B. burgdorferi polypeptides, including DnaK have a common epitope. PMID:8613385

  7. [Heat shock proteins of freshwater protists and their involvement in adaptation to changes in the environmental salinity].

    PubMed

    Plekhanov, A Iu; Smurov, A O; Podlipaeva, Iu I; Ivanova, L O; Gudkov, A V

    2006-01-01

    Changes in the level of heat shock proteins (HSP) in cells of freshwater protists, amoebae Amoeba proteus and ciliates Paramecium jenningsi, in response to changes in the environmental salinity were investigated. Changes in salinity levels were considered as a stress factor. The immunoblotting method revealed a polypeptide antigen cross-reacting with antibodies against bovine HSP70 in total protein extracts of both intact cells and cells subjected to salinity stress. The same polypeptide antigen was revealed in A. proteus cells subjected to heat shock. Therefore, it may be supposed that the polypeptide revealed after salinity shock is a heat shock protein related to the vertebrate HSP70. Under the impact of stress factor, well acclimated protists mostly spend their own previously accumulated HSP70. A conclusion is made that freshwater protists, living under conditions of increased salinity, appear to be preadapted to changes in environmental factors.

  8. Chaperone heat shock protein 90 mobilization and hydralazine cytoprotection against acrolein-induced carbonyl stress.

    PubMed

    Burcham, Philip C; Raso, Albert; Kaminskas, Lisa M

    2012-11-01

    Toxic carbonyls such as acrolein participate in many degenerative diseases. Although the nucleophilic vasodilatory drug hydralazine readily traps such species under "test-tube" conditions, whether these reactions adequately explain its efficacy in animal models of carbonyl-mediated disease is uncertain. We have previously shown that hydralazine attacks carbonyl-adducted proteins in an "adduct-trapping" reaction that appears to take precedence over direct "carbonyl-sequestering" reactions, but how this reaction conferred cytoprotection was unclear. This study explored the possibility that by increasing the bulkiness of acrolein-adducted proteins, adduct-trapping might alter the redistribution of chaperones to damaged cytoskeletal proteins that are known targets for acrolein. Using A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells, the levels of chaperones heat shock protein (Hsp) 40, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp110 were measured in intermediate filament extracts prepared after a 3-h exposure to acrolein. Exposure to acrolein alone modestly increased the levels of all four chaperones. Coexposure to hydralazine (10-100 μM) strongly suppressed cell ATP loss while producing strong adduct-trapping in intermediate filaments. Most strikingly, hydralazine selectively boosted the levels of cytoskeletal-associated Hsp90, including a high-mass species that was sensitive to the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin. Biochemical fractionation of acrolein- and hydralazine-treated cells revealed that hydralazine likely promoted Hsp90 migration from cytosol into other subcellular compartments. A role for Hsp90 mobilization in cytoprotection was confirmed by the finding that brief heat shock treatment suppressed acute acrolein toxicity in A549 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that by increasing the steric bulk of carbonyl-adducted proteins, adduct-trapping drugs trigger the intracellular mobilization of the key molecular chaperone Hsp90.

  9. Effect of acquisition of improved thermotolerance on the induction of heat shock proteins in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Yahav, S; Shamay, A; Horev, G; Bar-Ilan, D; Genina, O; Friedman-Einat, M

    1997-10-01

    The role of heat shock proteins (HSP) in the protection of cells from heat stress is well established. However, very little is known about their contribution to thermotolerance in the complexity of a whole homeotherm animal. Here we report on the analysis of protein synthesis in lung and heart muscle tissues of broiler chickens following exposure to high ambient temperature. Half of the flock was treated by an early age exposure to heat (conditioning), to improve thermotolerance. In contrast to what has been expected, lower levels of HSP induction was observed in the treated chickens. We suggest that 1) the induction of HSP in the heart and lung tissues of the whole animal correlates with the body temperature and 2) HSP response does not represent a part of the long-term mechanism that is evoked by the early age conditioning. PMID:9316120

  10. The Clinical Significance of Phosphorylated Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSPB1) in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Mitsuru; Adachi, Seiji; Kozawa, Osamu; Shimizu, Masahito; Yasuda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of most aggressive forms of cancer. After clinical detection it exhibits fast metastatic growth. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27; HSPB1) has been characterized as a molecular chaperone which modifies the structures and functions of other proteins in cells when they are exposed to various stresses, such as chemotherapy. While the administration of gemcitabine, an anti-tumor drug, has been the standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, accumulating evidence shows that HSP27 plays a key role in the chemosensitivity to gemcitabine. In addition, phosphorylated HSP27 induced by gemcitabine has been associated with the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. In this review, we summarize the role of phosphorylated HSP27, as well as HSP27, in the regulation of chemosensitivity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26805817

  11. In vivo chaperone activity of heat shock protein 70 and thermotolerance.

    PubMed

    Nollen, E A; Brunsting, J F; Roelofsen, H; Weber, L A; Kampinga, H H

    1999-03-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is thought to play a critical role in the thermotolerance of mammalian cells, presumably due to its chaperone activity. We examined the chaperone activity and cellular heat resistance of a clonal cell line in which overexpression of Hsp70 was transiently induced by means of the tetracycline-regulated gene expression system. This single-cell-line approach circumvents problems associated with clonal variation and indirect effects resulting from constitutive overexpression of Hsp70. The in vivo chaperone function of Hsp70 was quantitatively investigated by using firefly luciferase as a reporter protein. Chaperone activity was found to strictly correlate to the level of Hsp70 expression. In addition, we observed an Hsp70 concentration dependent increase in the cellular heat resistance. In order to study the contribution of the Hsp70 chaperone activity, heat resistance of cells that expressed tetracycline-regulated Hsp70 was compared to thermotolerant cells expressing the same level of Hsp70 plus all of the other heat shock proteins. Overexpression of Hsp70 alone was sufficient to induce a similar recovery of cytoplasmic luciferase activity, as does expression of all Hsps in thermotolerant cells. However, when the luciferase reporter protein was directed to the nucleus, expression of Hsp70 alone was not sufficient to yield the level of recovery observed in thermotolerant cells. In addition, cells expressing the same level of Hsp70 found in heat-induced thermotolerant cells containing additional Hsps showed increased resistance to thermal killing but were more sensitive than thermotolerant cells. These results suggest that the inducible form of Hsp70 contributes to the stress-tolerant state by increasing the chaperone activity in the cytoplasm. However, its expression alone is apparently insufficient for protection of other subcellular compartments to yield clonal heat resistance to the level observed in thermotolerant cells.

  12. Sequence and regulation of a gene encoding a human 89-kilodalton heat shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, E; Brandon, S E; Smale, G; Lloyd, D; Weber, L A

    1989-01-01

    Vertebrate cells synthesize two forms of the 82- to 90-kilodalton heat shock protein that are encoded by distinct gene families. In HeLa cells, both proteins (hsp89 alpha and hsp89 beta) are abundant under normal growth conditions and are synthesized at increased rates in response to heat stress. Only the larger form, hsp89 alpha, is induced by the adenovirus E1A gene product (M. C. Simon, K. Kitchener, H. T. Kao, E. Hickey, L. Weber, R. Voellmy, N. Heintz, and J. R. Nevins, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:2884-2890, 1987). We have isolated a human hsp89 alpha gene that shows complete sequence identity with heat- and E1A-inducible cDNA used as a hybridization probe. The 5'-flanking region contained overlapping and inverted consensus heat shock control elements that can confer heat-inducible expression on a beta-globin reporter gene. The gene contained 10 intervening sequences. The first intron was located adjacent to the translation start codon, an arrangement also found in the Drosophila hsp82 gene. The spliced mRNA sequence contained a single open reading frame encoding an 84,564-dalton polypeptide showing high homology with the hsp82 to hsp90 proteins of other organisms. The deduced hsp89 alpha protein sequence differed from the human hsp89 beta sequence reported elsewhere (N. F. Rebbe, J. Ware, R. M. Bertina, P. Modrich, and D. W. Stafford (Gene 53:235-245, 1987) in at least 99 out of the 732 amino acids. Transcription of the hsp89 alpha gene was induced by serum during normal cell growth, but expression did not appear to be restricted to a particular stage of the cell cycle. hsp89 alpha mRNA was considerably more stable than the mRNA encoding hsp70, which can account for the higher constitutive rate of hsp89 synthesis in unstressed cells. Images PMID:2527334

  13. Ecotypic variation in chloroplast small heat-shock proteins and related thermotolerance in Chenopodium album.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Samina; Haq, Noor Ul; Heckathorn, Scott A; Hamilton, E William; Luthe, Dawn S

    2011-08-01

    Production of chloroplast-localized small heat-shock proteins (Cp-sHSP) is correlated with increased thermotolerance in plants. Ecotypic variation in function and expression of Cp-sHSPs was analyzed in two Chenopodium album ecotypes from cool vs. warm-temperate USA habitats [New York (NY) and Mississippi (MS) respectively]. P(et) was more heat tolerant in the MS than the NY ecotype, and MS ecotype derived proportionally greater protection of P(et) by Cp-sHSP during high temperatures. Four genes encoding Cp-sHSPs were isolated and characterized: CaHSP25.99n (NY-1) and CaHSP26.23n (NY-2) from NY ecotype, and CaHSP26.04m (MS-1) and CaHSP26.26m (MS-2) from MS ecotype. The genes were nearly identical in predicted amino-acid sequence and hydrophobicity. Gene expression analysis indicated that MS-1 and MS-2 transcripts were constitutively expressed at low levels at 25 °C, while no NY-1 and NY-2 transcripts were detected at this temperature. Maximum accumulation of NY-1 and NY-2 transcripts occurred at 33 °C and 40 °C for MS-1 and MS-2. Immunoblot analysis revealed that (1) protein expression was highest at 37 °C in both ecotypes, but was greater in MS than NY ecotype at 40 °C; and (2) import of Cp-sHSP into chloroplasts was more heat-labile in NY ecotype. The higher expression of one isoform in MS ecotype may contribute to its enhanced thermotolerance. Absence of correlation between protein and transcript levels, suggests the post-transcriptional regulation is occurring. Promoter analysis of these genes revealed significant variations in heat-shock elements (HSE), core motifs required for heat-shock-factor binding. We propose a correlation between unique promoter architecture, Cp-sHSP expression and thermotolerance in both ecotypes.

  14. Specific Genetic Immunotherapy Induced by Recombinant Vaccine Alpha-Fetoprotein-Heat Shock Protein 70 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Lin, Huanping; Wang, Qiaoxia

    Purposes: To construct a recombinant vaccine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-heat shock protein (HSP70) complex, and study its ability to induce specific CTL response and its protective effect against AFP-producing tumor. Material/Methods: A recombinant vaccine was constructed by conjugating mouse alpha-fetoprotein to heat shock protein 70. By way of intracutaneous injection, mice were primed and boosted with recombinant vaccine mAFP/HSP70, whereas single mAFP or HSP70 injection as controls. The ELISPOT and ELISA were used to measure the frequency of cells producing the cytokine IFN-γ in splenocytes and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum from immunized mice respectively. In vivo tumor challenge were carried out to assess the immune effect of the recombinant vaccine. Results: By recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine immunization, the results of ELISPOT and ELISA showed that the number of splenic cells producing IFN-γ and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum were significantly higher in mAFP/HSP70 group than those in mAFP and HSP70 groups (108.50±11.70 IFN-γ spots/106 cells vs 41.60±10.40 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, 7.32±3.14 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, P<0.01; 156.32±10.42 μg/mL vs 66.52±7.35 μg/mL, 5.73±2.89 μg/mL, P<0.01). The tumor volume in mAFP/HSP70 group was significantly smaller than that in mAFP and HSP70 groups (42.44±7.14 mm3 vs 392.23±12.46 mm3, 838.63±13.84 mm3, P<0.01). Conclusions: The study further confirmed the function of heat shock protein 70's immune adjuvant. Sequential immunization with recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine could generate effective antitumor immunity on AFP-producing tumor. The recombined mAFP/HSP70 vaccine may be suitable for serving as an immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. Suppression of Heat Shock Protein 27 Using OGX-427 Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Potentiates Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibitors to Delay Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lamoureux, François; Thomas, Christian; Yin, Min-Jean; Fazli, Ladan; Zoubeidi, Amina; Gleave, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although prostate cancer responds initially to androgen ablation therapies, progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) frequently occurs. Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 inhibition is a rational therapeutic strategy for CRPC that targets key proteins such as androgen receptor (AR) and protein kinase B (Akt); however, most Hsp90 inhibitors trigger elevation of stress proteins like Hsp27 that confer tumor cell survival and treatment resistance. Objective We hypothesized that cotargeting the cytoprotective chaperone Hsp27 and Hsp90 would amplify endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and treatment-induced cell death in cancer. Design, setting, and participants Inducible and constitutive Hsp27 and other HSPs were measured by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot assays. The combinations of OGX-427 with Hsp90 inhibitors were evaluated in vitro for LNCaP cell growth and apoptosis and in vivo in CRPC LNCaP xenograft models. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Tumor volumes were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Overall survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves, and statistical significance was assessed with the log-rank test. Results and limitations Hsp90 inhibitors induced expression of HSPs in tumor cells and tissues in a dose- and time-dependent manner; in particular, Hsp27 mRNA and protein levels increased threefold. In vitro, OGX-427 synergistically enhanced Hsp90 inhibitor-induced suppression of cell growth and induced apoptosis by 60% as measured by increased sub-G1 fraction and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. These biologic events were accompanied by decreased expression of HSPs, Akt, AR, and prostate-specific antigen, and induction of ER stress markers (cleaved activating transcription factor 6, glucose-regulated protein 78, and DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3). In vivo, OGX-427 potentiated the anticancer effects of Hsp90 inhibitor PF-04929113 (orally, 25 mg/kg) to inhibit tumor

  16. Repression of hsp70 heat shock gene transcription by the suppressor of hairy-wing protein of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, C.; Dorsett, D. )

    1991-04-01

    The suppressor of hairy-wing [su(Hw)] locus of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a zinc finger protein that binds a repeated motif in the gypsy retroposon. Mutations of su(Hw) suppress the phenotypes associated with mutations caused by gypsy insertions. To examine the mechanisms by which su(Hw) alters gene expression, a fragment of gypsy containing multiple su(Hw) protein-binding sites was inserted into various locations in the well-characterized Drosophila hsp70 heat shock gene promoter. The authors found no evidence for activation of basal hsp70 transcription by su(Hw) protein in cultured Drosophila cells but observed that it can repress heat shock-induced transcription. Repression occurred only when su(Hw) protein-binding sites were positioned between binding sites for proteins required for heat shock transcription. They propose that su(Hw) protein interferes nonspecifically with protein-protein interactions required for heat shock transcription, perhaps sterically, or by altering the ability of DNA to bend or twist.

  17. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  18. Transcript analysis and expression profiling of three heat shock protein 70 genes in the ectoparasitoid Habrobracon hebetor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are known as chaperones that help with folding of other proteins when cells are under environmental stresses. The upregulation of HSPs is essential for cold survival during insect diapause. The ectoparasitoid Habrobracon hebetor, a potential biological control agent, can e...

  19. ELEVATED LEVELS OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECT MCF-7 CELLS FROM ARSENITE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear whether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical...

  20. Chalcones from Angelica keiskei: Evaluation of Their Heat Shock Protein Inducing Activities.

    PubMed

    Kil, Yun-Seo; Choi, Seul-Ki; Lee, Yun-Sil; Jafari, Mahtab; Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-10-23

    Five new chalcones, 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E,5E)-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,5-octadienyl]chalcone (1), (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-6-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2-octenyl]chalcone (2), 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-3-methyl-5-(1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)-2-pentenyl]chalcone (3), 2',3'-furano-4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone (4), and (±)-4-hydroxy-2',3'-(2,3-dihydro-2-methoxyfurano)-4'-methoxychalcone (5), were isolated from the aerial parts of Angelica keiskei Koidzumi together with eight known chalcones, 6-13, which were identified as (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(6E)-2-hydroxy-7-methyl-3-methylene-6-octenyl]chalcone (6), xanthoangelol (7), xanthoangelol F (8), xanthoangelol G (9), 4-hydroxyderricin (10), xanthoangelol D (11), xanthoangelol E (12), and xanthoangelol H (13), respectively. Chalcones 1-13 were evaluated for their promoter activity on heat shock protein 25 (hsp25, murine form of human hsp27). Compounds 1 and 6 activated the hsp25 promoter by 21.9- and 29.2-fold of untreated control at 10 μM, respectively. Further protein expression patterns of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), HSP70, and HSP27 by 1 and 6 were examined. Compound 6 increased the expression of HSF1, HSP70, and HSP27 by 4.3-, 1.5-, and 4.6-fold of untreated control, respectively, without any significant cellular cytotoxicities, whereas 1 did not induce any expression of these proteins. As a result, 6 seems to be a prospective HSP inducer.

  1. Chalcones from Angelica keiskei: Evaluation of Their Heat Shock Protein Inducing Activities.

    PubMed

    Kil, Yun-Seo; Choi, Seul-Ki; Lee, Yun-Sil; Jafari, Mahtab; Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-10-23

    Five new chalcones, 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E,5E)-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,5-octadienyl]chalcone (1), (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-6-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2-octenyl]chalcone (2), 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-3-methyl-5-(1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)-2-pentenyl]chalcone (3), 2',3'-furano-4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone (4), and (±)-4-hydroxy-2',3'-(2,3-dihydro-2-methoxyfurano)-4'-methoxychalcone (5), were isolated from the aerial parts of Angelica keiskei Koidzumi together with eight known chalcones, 6-13, which were identified as (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(6E)-2-hydroxy-7-methyl-3-methylene-6-octenyl]chalcone (6), xanthoangelol (7), xanthoangelol F (8), xanthoangelol G (9), 4-hydroxyderricin (10), xanthoangelol D (11), xanthoangelol E (12), and xanthoangelol H (13), respectively. Chalcones 1-13 were evaluated for their promoter activity on heat shock protein 25 (hsp25, murine form of human hsp27). Compounds 1 and 6 activated the hsp25 promoter by 21.9- and 29.2-fold of untreated control at 10 μM, respectively. Further protein expression patterns of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), HSP70, and HSP27 by 1 and 6 were examined. Compound 6 increased the expression of HSF1, HSP70, and HSP27 by 4.3-, 1.5-, and 4.6-fold of untreated control, respectively, without any significant cellular cytotoxicities, whereas 1 did not induce any expression of these proteins. As a result, 6 seems to be a prospective HSP inducer. PMID:26431394

  2. The stress protein heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibits the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel

    PubMed Central

    Iftinca, Mircea; Flynn, Robyn; Basso, Lilian; Melo, Helvira; Aboushousha, Reem; Taylor, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized cellular defense mechanisms prevent damage from chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The heat shock proteins have been recognized as key chaperones that maintain cell survival against a variety of exogenous and endogenous stress signals including noxious temperature. However, the role of heat shock proteins in nociception remains poorly understood. We carried out an expression analysis of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein, a member of the stress-induced HSP70 family in lumbar dorsal root ganglia from a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain. We used immunolabeling of dorsal root ganglion neurons, behavioral analysis and patch clamp electrophysiology in both dorsal root ganglion neurons and HEK cells transfected with Hsc70 and Transient Receptor Potential Channels to examine their functional interaction in heat shock stress condition. Results We report an increase in protein levels of Hsc70 in mouse dorsal root ganglia, 3 days post Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection in the hind paw. Immunostaining of Hsc70 was observed in most of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, including the small size nociceptors immunoreactive to the TRPV1 channel. Standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 current after exposure to heat shock. We found that capsaicin-evoked currents are inhibited by heat shock in dorsal root ganglion neurons and transfected HEK cells expressing Hsc70 and TRPV1. Blocking Hsc70 with matrine or spergualin compounds prevented heat shock-induced inhibition of the channel. We also found that, in contrast to TRPV1, both the cold sensor channels TRPA1 and TRPM8 were unresponsive to heat shock stress. Finally, we show that inhibition of TRPV1 depends on the ATPase activity of Hsc70 and involves the rho-associated protein kinase. Conclusions Our work identified Hsc70 and its ATPase activity as a central

  3. Temperature dependent N-glycosylation of plasma membrane heat shock protein Hsp30p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Ken'ichi; Takabatake, Akiko; Inoue, Yoshiharu; Izawa, Shingo

    2012-03-30

    The HSP30 gene of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a seven-transmembrane heat shock protein expressed in response to various types of stress including heat shock. Although Hsp30p contains a potential N-glycosylation consensus sequence (Asn(2)-Asp(3)-Thr(4)), whether it is actually N-glycosylated has not been verified. Here we demonstrate that N-glycosylation is induced at Asn(2) of Hsp30p by severe heat shock, ethanol stress, and acetic acid stress. Mild heat shock and glucose depletion induced the expression but not N-glycosylation of Hsp30p, indicating the N-glycosylation to be dependent on temperature and environmental conditions. N-glycosylation did not affect on the intracellular localization of Hsp30p but its physiological role under severe heat shock conditions. Since limited information is available on stress-responsive or condition-induced N-glycosylation, our findings provide new insight into the regulation of cellular stress response in yeast.

  4. Binding of non-native protein to Hsp25 during heat shock creates a reservoir of folding intermediates for reactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrnsperger, M; Gräber, S; Gaestel, M; Buchner, J

    1997-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are a conserved and ubiquitous protein family. Their ability to convey thermoresistance suggests their participation in protecting the native conformation of proteins. However, the underlying functional principles of their protective properties and their role in concert with other chaperone families remain enigmatic. Here, we analysed the influence of Hsp25 on the inactivation and subsequent aggregation of a model protein, citrate synthase (CS), under heat shock conditions in vitro. We show that stable binding of several non-native CS molecules to one Hsp25 oligomer leads to an accumulation of CS unfolding intermediates, which are protected from irreversible aggregation. Furthermore, a number of different proteins which bind to Hsp25 can be isolated from heat-shocked extracts of cells. Under permissive folding conditions, CS can be released from Hsp25 and, in cooperation with Hsp70, an ATP-dependent chaperone, the native state can be restored. Taken together, our findings allow us to integrate sHsps functionally in the cellular chaperone system operating under heat shock conditions. The task of sHsps in this context is to efficiently trap a large number of unfolding proteins in a folding-competent state and thus create a reservoir of non-native proteins for an extended period of time, allowing refolding after restoration of physiological conditions in cooperation with other chaperones. PMID:9029143

  5. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  6. Sequence characterization of heat shock protein gene of Cyclospora cayetanensis isolates from Nepal, Mexico, and Peru.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Torres, Patricia; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil; Ortega, Ynes

    2013-04-01

    We have described the development of a 2-step nested PCR protocol based on the characterization of the 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) gene for rapid detection of the human-pathogenic Cyclospora cayetanensis parasite. We tested and validated these newly designed primer sets by PCR amplification followed by nucleotide sequencing of PCR-amplified HSP70 fragments belonging to 16 human C. cayetanensis isolates from 3 different endemic regions that include Nepal, Mexico, and Peru. No genetic polymorphism was observed among the isolates at the characterized regions of the HSP70 locus. This newly developed HSP70 gene-based nested PCR protocol provides another useful genetic marker for the rapid detection of C. cayetanensis in the future.

  7. Understanding the Role of Heat Shock Protein Isoforms in Male Fertility, Aging and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Purandhar, Kaveri; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Prajapati, Bhumika; Rajput, Parth

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play a role in the homeostasis, apoptosis regulation and the maintenance of the various other physiological processes. Aging is accompanied by a decrease in the resistance to environmental stress, while mitochondria are primary targets in the process of aging, their expression decreasing with age. Mitochondrion also plays a significant role in the process of spermatogenesis. HSPs have been shown to be involved in apoptosis with some of acting as apoptotic inhibitors and are involved in cytoprotection. In this review we discuss the roles of Hsp 27, 60, 70, and 90 in aging and male infertility and have concluded that these particular HSPs can be used as a molecular markers for mitochondrially- mediated apoptosis, aging and male infertility. PMID:25606560

  8. Small heat shock proteins and their role in meat tenderness: a review.

    PubMed

    Lomiwes, D; Farouk, M M; Wiklund, E; Young, O A

    2014-01-01

    The eating quality of meat is a result of complex interactions between the biological traits and biochemical processes during the conversion of muscle to meat. It was hypothesised that muscles inevitably engage towards apoptotic cell death due to the termination of oxygen and nutrient supply to the muscle following exsanguination. Thus, factors that regulate the process of apoptotic cell death of muscle cells are believed to ultimately influence meat quality. Proteomic studies have associated the regulation of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) with various meat quality attributes including tenderness, colour, juiciness and flavour. Due to the anti-apoptotic and chaperone functions of sHSPs, they are proposed to be involved with the eating quality of meat. In this review, we discuss the possible chaperone and anti-apoptotic role of sHSPs during the conversion of muscle to meat and consider the repercussions of this on the development of meat tenderness.

  9. Heat shock protein 47 expression in aged normal human fibroblasts: modulation by Salix alba extract.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Carine; Noblesse, Emmanuelle; Boisdé, Cécille; Moreau, Marielle; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Mahé, Christian

    2004-06-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 47 is a specific chaperone of procollagen. This heat shock protein is responsible for the correct three-dimensional organization of procollagen and its control-quality prior secretion. The aim of the study is to evaluate the level of HSP 47 in aged, photoaged, and senescent fibroblasts and its modulation by a plant extract (Salix alba). The level of HSP 47 and/or procollagen expression in fibroblasts was measured by real-time RT-PCR (mRNA transcripts) and by flow cytometry (immunochemistry technique for measurement of arbitrary fluorescence intensity). Immunochemistry techniques and confocal microscopy were used to visualize the cellular localization of HSP 47 and procollagen. These parameters were compared with different age donors, nonsenescent, and senescent fibroblasts. Fibroblasts were irradiated by a noncytotoxic dose of UVA (6 J/cm(2)), and HSP 47 level was evaluated. S. alba extract was tested for its capacity to modulate HSP 47 expression. Colocalization of HSP 47 and procollagen was shown by confocal microscopy, indicating that HSP 47 could play a role of procollagen molecular chaperone in the cellular model. It was also shown that the HSP 47 level is decreased in old-donor cells, senescent, and irradiated cells. This decrease can be modulated by a S. alba extract (polyphenols rich) in a dose-dependent manner. The evaluation of HSP 47 expression in the experimental conditions can lead to a new approach of aging and photoaging, pointing out the implication of this chaperone in these pathophysiologic phenomena. Modulation of HSP 47 expression by this family of molecules could be of cosmetic and/or dermatologic interest.

  10. Expression of heat shock protein 72 in atrophied rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oishi, Y.; Ishihara, A.; Talmadge, R. J.; Ohira, Y.; Taniguchi, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the expression of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in response to atrophic-inducing perturbations of muscle involving chronic mechanical unloading and denervation were determined. Adult male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to a sedentary cage control (CON), hind limb unloading (HU, via tail suspension), HU plus tenotomy (HU + TEN), HU plus denervation (HU + DEN), or HU + TEN + DEN group. Tenotomy and DEN involved cutting the Achilles tendon and removing a segment of the sciatic nerve, respectively. After 5 days, HSP72 levels in the soleus of the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 42 (P < 0.05) and 53% (P < 0.01) less than CON, respectively. Soleus weight decreased in both groups. Heat shock protein 72 levels in the plantaris of the HU + TEN, HU + DEN, and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 31, 25, and 30% lower than CON, respectively (P < 0.05). Plantaris weight decreased in the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN, but not in the HU + TEN group. Hind limb unloading alone had little effect on the HSP72 level in either muscle. Reduced levels of HSP72 were associated with a decreased soleus (r=0.62, P < 0.01) and plantaris (r=0.78, P < 0.001) weight. These results indicate that the levels of HSP72 in both a slow and a fast rat plantarflexor are responsive to a chronic decrease in the levels of loading and/or activation and suggest that the neuromuscular activity level and the presence of innervation of a muscle are important factors that induce HSP72 expression.

  11. The pattern of protein synthesis induced by heat-shock of the moderately halophilic bacterium Chromobacterium marismortui: protective effect of high salt concentration against the thermal shock.

    PubMed

    Katinakis, P

    1989-01-01

    The protein synthetic response to heat shock of the moderately halophilic bacterium Chromobacterium marismortui was examined. Upon exposure to elevated temperature there is an increased synthesis of a specific subset of proteins (heat shock proteins-hsps) in the molecular weight region of 15 to 90 kD, while normal protein synthesis is severely repressed. The synthesis of hsps reaches a maximum 5 min after heat shock at 42 degrees C. Cells recovered their normal protein synthesis patterns rapidly upon returning to their normal growth temperature following heat shock. When cells grown in 2.5M NaCl were challenged with heat shock at 42 degrees C, the synthesis of some normal proteins was permitted. Furthermore, growth in high salt concentration resulted in an extension of the upper temperature limits at which C. marismortui could synthesize hsps. Adaptation of C. marismortui to decreasing salinity stimulated the synthesis of new proteins distinct from the hsps.

  12. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang-Jin; Seo, Young-Su

    2015-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) functioning as molecular chaperones are the key components responsible for protein folding, assembly, translocation, and degradation under stress conditions and in many normal cellular processes. Plants respond to pathogen invasion using two different innate immune responses mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) or resistance (R) proteins. HSPs play an indispensable role as molecular chaperones in the quality control of plasma membrane-resident PRRs and intracellular R proteins against potential invaders. Here, we specifically discuss the functional involvement of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) HSPs/chaperones in plant immunity to obtain an integrated understanding of the immune responses in plant cells. PMID:26676169

  13. Prolonged Fasting Identifies Heat Shock Protein 10 as a Sirtuin 3 Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongping; Chen, Yong; Aponte, Angel M.; Battaglia, Valentina; Gucek, Marjan; Sack, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Although Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), a mitochondrially enriched deacetylase and activator of fat oxidation, is down-regulated in response to high fat feeding, the rate of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial protein acetylation are invariably enhanced in this dietary milieu. These paradoxical data implicate that additional acetylation modification-dependent levels of regulation may be operational under nutrient excess conditions. Because the heat shock protein (Hsp) Hsp10-Hsp60 chaperone complex mediates folding of the fatty acid oxidation enzyme medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, we tested whether acetylation-dependent mitochondrial protein folding contributes to this regulatory discrepancy. We demonstrate that Hsp10 is a functional SIRT3 substrate and that, in response to prolonged fasting, SIRT3 levels modulate mitochondrial protein folding. Acetyl mutagenesis of Hsp10 lysine 56 alters Hsp10-Hsp60 binding, conformation, and protein folding. Consistent with Hsp10-Hsp60 regulation of fatty acid oxidation enzyme integrity, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and fat oxidation are elevated by Hsp10 acetylation. These data identify acetyl modification of Hsp10 as a nutrient-sensing regulatory node controlling mitochondrial protein folding and metabolic function. PMID:25505263

  14. Heat shock protein-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, B G; Wainberg, M A

    1999-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) and cyclophilins (CypA) are intracellular chaperone molecules that facilitate protein folding and assembly. These proteins are selectively expressed in cells following exposure to a range of stress stimuli, including viral infection. Hsp species are highly immunogenic, eliciting humoral, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cell responses against viruses, tumours, and infectious diseases. This review discusses the roles of stress proteins in immunity and viral life cycles, vis-à-vis the development of Hsp-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection. Cumulative findings are cited implicating the requirement of CypA in HIV-1 replication and formation of infectious virions. Studies by our group show the upregulated expression of hsp27 and hsp70 during single-cycle HIV infections. These species redistribute to the cell surface following HIV-infection and heat stress, serving as targets for NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot studies show that hsp27, hsp70, and hsp78 complex with HIV-1 viral proteins intracellularly. Hsp70, hsp56, and CypA are assembled into HIV-1 virions. The ability of hsps to interact with HIV-1 viral proteins, combined with their inherent adjuvant and immunogenic properties, indicates that hsps may serve as vehicles for antigen delivery and the design of vaccines against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:10231014

  15. Characterization of three transcripts encoding small heat shock proteins expressed in the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Codling moth is a major pest of apples and pears worldwide. Increasing knowledge of how this insect responds to environmental stress will improve field and postharvest control measures used against it. The small heat shock proteins (sHsps) play a major role in cellular responses to environmental st...

  16. TARGETED DELETION OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 ABROGATES THE LATE INFARCT-SPARING EFFECT OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIC PRECONDITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract submitted for 82nd annual meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, May 4-8, 2002 in Washington D.C.

    Targeted Deletion of Inducible Heat Shock Protein 70 Abrogates the Late Infarct-Sparing Effect of Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning

    Craig...

  17. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  18. Heat shock partially dissociates the overlapping modules of the yeast protein-protein interaction network: a systems level model of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mihalik, Ágoston; Csermely, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Network analysis became a powerful tool giving new insights to the understanding of cellular behavior. Heat shock, the archetype of stress responses, is a well-characterized and simple model of cellular dynamics. S. cerevisiae is an appropriate model organism, since both its protein-protein interaction network (interactome) and stress response at the gene expression level have been well characterized. However, the analysis of the reorganization of the yeast interactome during stress has not been investigated yet. We calculated the changes of the interaction-weights of the yeast interactome from the changes of mRNA expression levels upon heat shock. The major finding of our study is that heat shock induced a significant decrease in both the overlaps and connections of yeast interactome modules. In agreement with this the weighted diameter of the yeast interactome had a 4.9-fold increase in heat shock. Several key proteins of the heat shock response became centers of heat shock-induced local communities, as well as bridges providing a residual connection of modules after heat shock. The observed changes resemble to a 'stratus-cumulus' type transition of the interactome structure, since the unstressed yeast interactome had a globally connected organization, similar to that of stratus clouds, whereas the heat shocked interactome had a multifocal organization, similar to that of cumulus clouds. Our results showed that heat shock induces a partial disintegration of the global organization of the yeast interactome. This change may be rather general occurring in many types of stresses. Moreover, other complex systems, such as single proteins, social networks and ecosystems may also decrease their inter-modular links, thus develop more compact modules, and display a partial disintegration of their global structure in the initial phase of crisis. Thus, our work may provide a model of a general, system-level adaptation mechanism to environmental changes. PMID:22022244

  19. Heat shock partially dissociates the overlapping modules of the yeast protein-protein interaction network: a systems level model of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mihalik, Ágoston; Csermely, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Network analysis became a powerful tool giving new insights to the understanding of cellular behavior. Heat shock, the archetype of stress responses, is a well-characterized and simple model of cellular dynamics. S. cerevisiae is an appropriate model organism, since both its protein-protein interaction network (interactome) and stress response at the gene expression level have been well characterized. However, the analysis of the reorganization of the yeast interactome during stress has not been investigated yet. We calculated the changes of the interaction-weights of the yeast interactome from the changes of mRNA expression levels upon heat shock. The major finding of our study is that heat shock induced a significant decrease in both the overlaps and connections of yeast interactome modules. In agreement with this the weighted diameter of the yeast interactome had a 4.9-fold increase in heat shock. Several key proteins of the heat shock response became centers of heat shock-induced local communities, as well as bridges providing a residual connection of modules after heat shock. The observed changes resemble to a 'stratus-cumulus' type transition of the interactome structure, since the unstressed yeast interactome had a globally connected organization, similar to that of stratus clouds, whereas the heat shocked interactome had a multifocal organization, similar to that of cumulus clouds. Our results showed that heat shock induces a partial disintegration of the global organization of the yeast interactome. This change may be rather general occurring in many types of stresses. Moreover, other complex systems, such as single proteins, social networks and ecosystems may also decrease their inter-modular links, thus develop more compact modules, and display a partial disintegration of their global structure in the initial phase of crisis. Thus, our work may provide a model of a general, system-level adaptation mechanism to environmental changes.

  20. Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Biswas, Jaydip; Roy, Madhumita

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent

  1. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  2. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Robert Y.L.; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells.

  3. Disruption of the glucocorticoid receptor assembly with heat shock protein 90 by a peptidic antiglucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Dao-Phan, H P; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-06-01

    Association of glucocorticoid (GR) and progesterone (PR) receptors with a set of molecular chaperones, including the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90), is a dynamic process required for proper folding and maintaining these nuclear receptors under a transcriptionally inactive, ligand-responsive state. Mutational studies of the chicken hsp90 complementary DNA suggested that three regions of this protein (A, B, and Z) interact with the hormone-binding domain of GR, whereas region A is dispensable for hsp90 binding to PR. We found that this 69-amino acid region can be narrowed down to a 35-mer alpha-helical, acidic peptide, which is by itself able to inhibit hsp90 association to GR translated in vitro. The hsp90-free GR did not bind ligand, but was devoid of any specific DNA-binding activity, and higher peptide concentrations specifically inhibited the binding of activated GR to DNA. When overexpressed in cultured cells, this peptide acted as an antiglucocorticoid and inhibited the antiactivating protein-1 activity and the ligand-dependent nuclear transfer of GR. None of these effects, either in vivo and in vitro, was observed for PR. The region from residue 232 to residue 265 of hsp90 is, therefore, a domain critical for its association to GR, an association that is a prerequisite for receptor transcriptional activity. More importantly, these results demonstrate that targeting specific protein/protein interaction interfaces is a powerful means to specifically modulate nuclear receptor signaling pathways in a ligand-independent manner.

  4. Drosophila melanogaster Hsp22: a mitochondrial small heat shock protein influencing the aging process

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Geneviève; Tanguay, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in many key cellular processes and therefore need to rely on good protein quality control (PQC). Three types of mechanisms are in place to insure mitochondrial protein integrity: reactive oxygen species scavenging by anti-oxidant enzymes, protein folding/degradation by molecular chaperones and proteases and clearance of defective mitochondria by mitophagy. Drosophila melanogaster Hsp22 is part of the molecular chaperone axis of the PQC and is characterized by its intra-mitochondrial localization and preferential expression during aging. As a stress biomarker, the level of its expression during aging has been shown to partially predict the remaining lifespan of flies. Since over-expression of this small heat shock protein increases lifespan and resistance to stress, Hsp22 most likely has a positive effect on mitochondrial integrity. Accordingly, Hsp22 has recently been implicated in the mitochondrial unfolding protein response of flies. This review will summarize the key findings on D. melanogaster Hsp22 and emphasis on its links with the aging process. PMID:25852752

  5. Unfolding the Role of Large Heat Shock Proteins: New Insights and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Daming; Subjeck, John; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) of eukaryotes are evolutionarily conserved molecules present in all the major intracellular organelles. They mainly function as molecular chaperones and participate in maintenance of protein homeostasis in physiological state and under stressful conditions. Despite their relative abundance, the large HSPs, i.e., Hsp110 and glucose-regulated protein 170 (Grp170), have received less attention compared to other conventional HSPs. These proteins are distantly related to the Hsp70 and belong to Hsp70 superfamily. Increased sizes of Hsp110 and Grp170, due to the presence of a loop structure, result in their exceptional capability in binding to polypeptide substrates or non-protein ligands, such as pathogen-associated molecules. These interactions that occur in the extracellular environment during tissue injury or microbial infection may lead to amplification of an immune response engaging both innate and adaptive immune components. Here, we review the current advances in understanding these large HSPs as molecular chaperones in proteostasis control and immune modulation as well as their therapeutic implications in treatment of cancer and neurodegeneration. Given their unique immunoregulatory activities, we also discuss the emerging evidence of their potential involvement in inflammatory and immune-related diseases. PMID:26973652

  6. Plasma antibodies to heat shock protein 60 and heat shock protein 70 are associated with increased risk of electrocardiograph abnormalities in automobile workers exposed to noise.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Yang, Miao; Yao, Huiling; Zheng, Jianru; Yang, Qiaoling; Chen, Sheng; Wei, Qingyi; Tanguay, Robert M; Wu, Tangchun

    2005-01-01

    In the living and working environment, stressful factors, such as noise, can cause health problems including cardiovascular diseases and noise-induced hearing loss. Some heat shock proteins (Hsps) play an important role in protecting cardiac cells against ischemic injury, and antibodies against these Hsps are associated with the development and prognosis of atherogenesis, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. Whether the presence of such antibodies is associated with abnormal electrocardiography (ECG) in stressed autoworkers exposed to chronic noise is presently unknown. Therefore, we investigated the association between the levels of plasma anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 with electrocardiograph abnormality in 396 autoworkers exposed to different noise levels by using Western blot, ECG, and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The results showed that the increase in levels of anti-Hsp70 was associated with a higher risk of ECG abnormalities characteristic of chronic myocardial ischemia (P < 0.05), conductive abnormality (P < 0.01), or heart displacement (P < 0.05); in contrast, elevated anti-Hsp60 was related to ECG abnormalities characteristic of sinus arrhythmia, chronic myocardial ischemia, and ectopic rhythm (P < 0.01 for all). Overall, high levels of both anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 were associated with significantly increased risk of ECG abnormalities (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73 and 95% confidence interval [Cl] = 1.04-2.86 for anti-Hsp70 and OR = 1.36 and 95% Cl = 1.07-1.72 for anti-Hsp60) with and without adjustment for cumulative noise exposure (OR = 1.96 and 95% Cl = 1.20-3.21 for anti-Hsp70 and OR = 3.93 and 95% Cl = 1.72-8.92 for anti-Hsp60). These findings suggest that the production of both anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 may be independent risk factors for the development and progression of abnormal ECG and therefore possibly cardiovascular diseases in autoworkers exposed to occupational noise.

  7. Two novel heat shock genes encoding proteins produced in response to heterologous protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Allen, S P; Polazzi, J O; Gierse, J K; Easton, A M

    1992-11-01

    In Escherichia coli high-level production of some heterologous proteins (specifically, human prorenin, renin, and bovine insulin-like growth factor 2) resulted in the induction of two new E. coli heat shock proteins, both of which have molecular masses of 16 kDa and are tightly associated with inclusion bodies formed during heterologous protein production. We named these inclusion body-associated proteins IbpA and IbpB. The coding sequences for IbpA and IbpB were identified and isolated from the Kohara E. coli gene bank. The genes for these proteins (ibpA and ibpB) are located at 82.5 min on the chromosome. Nucleotide sequencing of the two genes revealed that they are transcribed in the same direction and are separated by 110 bp. Putative Shine-Dalgarno sequences are located upstream from the initiation codons of both genes. A putative heat shock promoter is located upstream from ibpA, and a putative transcription terminator is located downstream from ibpB. A temperature upshift experiment in which we used a wild-type E. coli strain and an isogenic rpoH mutant strain indicated that a sigma 32-containing RNA polymerase is involved in the regulation of expression of these genes. There is 57.5% identity between the genes at the nucleotide level and 52.2% identity at the amino acid level. A search of the protein data bases showed that both of these 16-kDa proteins exhibit low levels of homology to low-molecular-weight heat shock proteins from eukaryotic species.

  8. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Huelgas-Morales, Gabriela; Silva-García, Carlos Giovanni; Salinas, Laura S.; Greenstein, David; Navarro, Rosa E.

    2016-01-01

    In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline—the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction—protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures. PMID:26865701

  9. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huelgas-Morales, Gabriela; Silva-García, Carlos Giovanni; Salinas, Laura S; Greenstein, David; Navarro, Rosa E

    2016-01-01

    In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline-the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction-protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures. PMID:26865701

  10. Heat shock protein 27 expression in the human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A; Assaf, Hanan A; Hussein, Mahmoud Rezk A

    2008-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones involved in protein folding, assembly and transport, and which play critical roles in the regulation of cell growth, survival and differentiation. We set out to test the hypothesis that HSP27 protein is expressed in the human testes and its expression varies with the state of spermatogenesis. HSP27 expression was examined in 30 human testicular biopsy specimens (normal spermatogenesis, maturation arrest and Sertoli cell only syndrome, 10 cases each) using immunofluorescent methods. The biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing investigations for infertility. The seminiferous epithelium of the human testes showing normal spermatogenesis had a cell type-specific expression of HSP27. HSP27 expression was strong in the cytoplasm of the Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and Leydig cells. Alternatively, the expression was moderate in the spermatocytes, weak in the spermatids and absent in the spermatozoa. In testes showing maturation arrest, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells, weak in the spermatogonia, and spermatocytes. It was absent in the spermatids and Leydig cells. In Sertoli cell only syndrome, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells and absent in the Leydig cells. We report for the first time the expression patterns of HSP27 in the human testes and show differential expression during normal spermatogenesis, indicating a possible role in this process. The altered expression of this protein in testes showing abnormal spermatogenesis may be related to the pathogenesis of male infertility.

  11. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Burger, Adélle; Ludewig, Michael H; Boshoff, Aileen

    2014-01-01

    The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c. PMID:24707395

  12. Heat shock protein-70 neutralizes apoptosis inducing factor in Bcr/Abl expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Dai, An-Ya; Tao, Kun; Xiao, Qing; Huang, Zheng-Lan; Gao, Miao; Li, Hui; Wang, Xin; Cao, Wei-Xi; Feng, Wen-Li

    2015-10-01

    Bcr/Abl fusion protein is a hallmark of human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The protein can activate various signaling pathways to make normal cells transform malignantly and thus to facilitate tumorigenesis. It has been reported that heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) can be served as an anti-apoptotic protein that suppresses Bax and Apo-2L/TRAIL. But it is unclear whether HSP-70 affects AIF-initiated apoptosis in Bcr/Abl expressing cells considering that HSP-70 is coincidentally over-regulated in these cells. Our findings supported that abundant HSP-70 in Bcr/Abl cells neutralizes AIF by segregating it from nucleus via direct interaction, leading to the failure of AIF initiating cell death and the silence of caspase-independent apoptotic pathway upon apoptotic induction. Moderate inhibition of HSP-70 expression by siRNA leads to Vp-16 triggered re-distribution of AIF in nucleus. In addition, AIF bears a HSP-70 binding domain allowing association with HSP-70. Therefore, disruption of the association using an AIF mutant lacking this domain can restore the potential of AIF importing into nucleus, and finally triggers cell death in a time dependent manner.

  13. Heat-shock proteins can promote as well as regulate autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rajaiah, Rajesh; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2009-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are among the most highly conserved and immunogenic proteins shared by microbial agents and mammals. Under physiological conditions, the ubiquitously distributed Hsps maintain the integrity and function of other cellular proteins when cells are exposed to stressful stimuli. However, owing to their conserved nature and stress inducibility, Hsps may become targets of immune response. The T cells and/or antibodies induced by a microbial Hsp may crossreact with the corresponding mammalian Hsp (molecular mimicry) and trigger an autoimmune response, which if unchecked can lead to immune pathology and clinical manifestations. Furthermore, enhanced expression of Hsp under stress can unveil previously hidden antigenic determinants that can initiate and perpetuate autoimmune reactivity. Also, the innate immune mechanisms activated by an Hsp can reinforce and even direct the type of adaptive immune response to that protein. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of autoimmunity in several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis and type 1 diabetes. However, Hsps possess immunoregulatory attributes as well and therefore, are being exploited for immunomodulation of various immune-mediated disorders. PMID:19121415

  14. Role of the Cytosolic Heat Shock Protein 70 Ssa5 in the Ciliate Protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Akematsu, Takahiko; Attiq, Rizwan; Tada, Chika; Nakai, Yutaka; Pearlman, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a member of a family of conserved chaperone proteins whose function is well investigated in many model organisms. Here we focus on an Hsp70 called Ssa5 in the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila, and reveal that its translation is heat inducible as for general Hsps. Moreover, the protein is abundantly expressed in the cytoplasm during sexual reproduction (conjugation) as well as in response to heat-stress. Knocking out of SSA5 (ΔSSA5) does not affect the survival of the cell under heat-stress, likely due to other Hsp70 paralogs compensating for the defect. During conjugation, ΔSSA5 leads to a fertilization defect in which the two pronuclei are in close proximity but never fuse. The unfertilized pronuclei differentiate, resulting in a heterokaryon with developed haploid germline and somatic nuclei. In addition, degeneration of the parental somatic nucleus is not affected. These results suggest a specific involvement of Ssa5 in pronuclear fusion and fertilization.

  15. Inhibiting Heat Shock Proteins Can Potentiate the Cytotoxic Effect of Cannabidiol in Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Scott, Katherine A; Dennis, Jayne L; Dalgleish, Angus G; Liu, Wai M

    2015-11-01

    Cannabinoids possess a number of characteristics that make them putative anticancer drugs, and their value as such is currently being explored in a number of clinical studies. To further understand the roles that cannabinoids may have, we performed gene expression profiling in glioma cell lines cultured with cannabidiol (CBD) and/or Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and pursued targets identified by this screening. Results showed that a large number of genes belonging to the heat shock protein (HSP) super-family were up-regulated following treatment, specifically with CBD. Increases were observed both at the gene and protein levels and arose as a consequence of increased generation of ROS by CBD, and correlated with an increase in a number of HSP client proteins. Furthermore, increases impeded the cytotoxic effect of CBD; an effect that was improved by co-culture with pharmacalogical inhibitors of HSPs. Similarly, culturing glioma cells with CBD and HSP inhibitors increased radiosensitivity when compared to CBD-alone. Taken together, these data indicate that the cytotoxic effects of CBD can be diminished by HSPs that indirectly rise as a result of CBD use, and that the inclusion of HSP inhibitors in CBD treatment regimens can enhance the overall effect.

  16. Heat shock protein synthesis and thermotolerance in Cataglyphis, an ant from the Sahara desert.

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, W J; Wehner, R

    1995-01-01

    The ant Cataglyphis lives in the Sahara desert and is one of the most thermotolerant land animals known. It forages at body temperatures above 50 degrees C, and the critical thermal maxima are at 53.6 +/- 0.8 degrees C for Cataglyphis bombycina and 55.1 +/- 1.1 degrees C for Cataglyphis bicolor. The synthesis and accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) were analyzed in Cataglyphis and compared to Formica, an ant living in more moderate climates, and to two Drosophila species. In Cataglyphis, protein synthesis continues at temperatures up to 45 degrees C as compared to 39 degrees C for Formica and Drosophila. The two Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila ambigua, differ with respect to their maximal induction of HSP synthesis and accumulation by 3-4 degrees C. In contrast, the two ant species accumulate HSPs prior to their exposure to heat, and in Cataglyphis the temperature of maximal HSP induction by de novo protein synthesis is only 2 degrees C higher than in Formica. These findings are interpreted as preadaption of the ants prior to exposure to high temperatures. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7708762

  17. Genes for Drosophila small heat shock proteins are regulated differently by ecdysterone

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, J.; Voellmy, R. ); Mestril, R. )

    1991-12-01

    Genes for small heat shock proteins (hsp27 to hsp22) are activated in late third-instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster in the absence of heat stress. This regulation has been stimulated in cultured Drosophila cells in which the genes are activated by the addition of ecdysterone. Sequence elements (HERE) involved in ecdysterone regulation of the hsp27 and hsp23 genes have been defined by transfection studies and have recently been identified as binding sites for ecdysterone receptor. The authors report here that the shp27 and hsp23 genes are regulated differently by ecdysterone. The hsp27 gene is activated rapidly by ecdysterone, even in the absence of protein synthesis. In contrast, high-level expression of the hsp23 gene begins only after a lag of about 6 h, is dependent on the continuous presence of ecdysterone, and is sensitive to low concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors. Transfection experiments with reported constructs show that this difference in regulation is at the transcriptional level. Synthetic hsp27 or hsp23 HERE sequences confer hsp27- or hsp23-type ecdysterone regulation on a basal promoter. These findings indicate that the hsp27 gene is primary, and the hsp23 gene is mainly a secondary, hormone-responsive gene. Ecdysterone receptor is implied to play a role in the regulation of both genes.

  18. Enhanced salt tolerance in tomato plants constitutively expressing heat-shock protein in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Fu, C; Liu, X X; Yang, W W; Zhao, C M; Liu, J

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway. The UPR signaling pathway is associated with plant responses to adverse environmental conditions. Thus, changes in the UPR signaling pathway might affect plant abiotic tolerance. Here, the role of ER small heat-shock protein (ER-sHSP) in improving plant resistance to salt stress was explored. Under salt stress conditions, ER-sHSP transgenic plants were found to have more vigorous roots, maintain a higher relative water content, absorb less Na(+), accumulate more osmolytes and Ca(2+), and sustain less damage to the photosystem, compared to wild-type non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the constitutive expression of ER-sHSP under salt stress depressed the expression of other ER molecular chaperones. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of ER-sHSP enhanced salinity tolerance of tomato plants significantly, and alleviated the ER stress caused by the salt stress in plant cells. PMID:27421016

  19. Characterization and Expression of Genes Encoding Three Small Heat Shock Proteins in Sesamia inferens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng; Lu, Ming-Xing; Tang, Xiao-Tian; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    The pink stem borer, Sesamia inferens (Walker), is a major pest of rice and is endemic in China and other parts of Asia. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) encompass a diverse, widespread class of stress proteins that have not been characterized in S. inferens. In the present study, we isolated and characterized three S. inferens genes that encode members of the α-crystallin/sHSP family, namely, Sihsp21.4, Sihsp20.6, and Sihsp19.6. The three cDNAs encoded proteins of 187, 183 and 174 amino acids with calculated molecular weights of 21.4, 20.6 and 19.6 kDa, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the three genes showed strong similarity to sHSPs identified in other lepidopteran insects. Sihsp21.4 contained an intron, but Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 lacked introns. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed that Sihsp21.4 was most strongly expressed in S. inferens heads; Whereas expression of Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 was highest in eggs. The three S. inferens sHSP genes were up-regulated during low temperature stress. In summary, our results show that S. inferens sHSP genes have distinct regulatory roles in the physiology of S. inferens. PMID:25514417

  20. Regulation of the murine alpha B-crystallin/small heat shock protein gene in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gopal-Srivastava, R; Haynes, J I; Piatigorsky, J

    1995-01-01

    The murine alpha B-crystallin/small heat shock protein gene is expressed at high levels in the lens and at lower levels in the heart, skeletal muscle, and numerous other tissues. Previously we have found a skeletal-muscle-preferred enhancer at positions -427 to -259 of the alpha B-crystallin gene containing at least four cis-acting regulatory elements (alpha BE-1, alpha BE-2, alpha BE-3, and MRF, which has an E box). Here we show that in transgenic mice, the alpha B-crystallin enhancer directs the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene driven by the alpha B-crystallin promoter specifically to myocardiocytes of the heart. The alpha B-crystallin enhancer was active in conjugation with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter/human growth hormone reporter gene in transfected rat myocardiocytes. DNase I footprinting and site-specific mutagenesis experiments showed that alpha BE-1, alpha BE-2, alpha BE-3, MRF, and a novel, heart-specific element called alpha BE-4 are required for alpha B-crystallin enhancer activity in transfected myocardiocytes. By contrast, alpha BE-4 is not utilized for enhancer activity in transfected lens or skeletal muscle cell lines. Alpha BE-4 contains an overlapping heat shock sequence and a reverse CArG box [5'-GG(A/T)6CC-3']. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with an antibody to serum response factor and a CArG-box-competing sequence from the c-fos promoter indicated that a cardiac-specific protein with DNA-binding and antigenic similarities to serum response factor binds to alpha BE-4 via the reverse CArG box; electrophoretic mobility shift assays and antibody experiments with anti-USF antiserum and heart nuclear extract also raised the possibility that the MRF E box utilizes USF or an antigenically related protein. We conclude that the activity of the alpha B-crystallin enhancer in the heart utilizes a reverse CArG box and an E-box-dependent pathway. PMID:8524275

  1. The Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Facilitates the Degradation of Poly-Alanine Expanded Poly (A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 via the Carboxyl Terminus of Heat Shock Protein 70-Interacting Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Huang, Xuan; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Dan; Luo, Huqiao; Lu, Quqin; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin; Luo, Shiwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the identification of poly-alanine expanded poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1) as the genetic cause of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the onset and progression of the disease remain unclear. Results In this study, we show that PABPN1 interacts with and is stabilized by heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). Treatment with the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG disrupted the interaction of mutant PABPN1 with HSP90 and reduced the formation of intranuclear inclusions (INIs). Furthermore, mutant PABPN1 was preferentially degraded in the presence of 17-AAG compared with wild-type PABPN1 in vitro and in vivo. The effect of 17-AAG was mediated through an increase in the interaction of PABPN1 with the carboxyl terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein (CHIP). The overexpression of CHIP suppressed the aggregation of mutant PABPN1 in transfected cells. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the HSP90 molecular chaperone system plays a crucial role in the selective elimination of abnormal PABPN1 proteins and also suggest a potential therapeutic application of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG for the treatment of OPMD. PMID:26414348

  2. Disruption of the three cytoskeletal networks in mammalian cells does not affect transcription, translation, or protein translocation changes induced by heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, W J; Feramisco, J R

    1985-01-01

    Mammalian cells show a complex series of transcriptional and translational switching events in response to heat shock treatment which ultimately lead to the production and accumulation of a small number of proteins, the so-called heat shock (or stress) proteins. We investigated the heat shock response in both qualitative and quantitative ways in cells that were pretreated with drugs that specifically disrupt one or more of the three major cytoskeletal networks. (These drugs alone, cytochalasin E and colcemid, do not result in induction of the heat shock response.) Our results indicated that disruption of the actin microfilaments, the vimentin-containing intermediate filaments, or the microtubules in living cells does not hinder the ability of the cell to undergo an apparently normal heat shock response. Even when all three networks were simultaneously disrupted (resulting in a loose, baglike appearance of the cells), the cells still underwent a complete heat shock response as assayed by the appearance of the heat shock proteins. In addition, the major induced 72-kilodalton heat shock protein was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm into its proper location in the nucleus and nucleolus irrespective of the condition of the three cytoskeletal elements. Images PMID:4040602

  3. Non-Lethal Heat Shock Increased Hsp70 and Immune Protein Transcripts but Not Vibrio Tolerance in the White-Leg Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Loc, Nguyen Hong; MacRae, Thomas H.; Musa, Najiah; Bin Abdullah, Muhd Danish Daniel; Abdul Wahid, Mohd. Effendy; Sung, Yeong Yik

    2013-01-01

    Non-lethal heat shock boosts bacterial and viral disease tolerance in shrimp, possibly due to increases in endogenous heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and/or immune proteins. To further understand the mechanisms protecting shrimp against infection, Hsp70 and the mRNAs encoding the immune-related proteins prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxinectin, penaeidin, crustin and hemocyanin were studied in post-larvae of the white-leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, following a non-lethal heat shock. As indicated by RT-qPCR, a 30 min abrupt heat shock increased Hsp70 mRNA in comparison to non-heated animals. Immunoprobing of western blots and quantification by ELISA revealed that Hsp70 production after heat shock was correlated with enhanced Hsp70 mRNA. proPO and hemocyanin mRNA levels were augmented, whereas peroxinectin and crustin mRNA levels were unchanged following non-lethal heat shock. Penaeidin mRNA was decreased by all heat shock treatments. Thirty min abrupt heat shock failed to improve survival of post-larvae in a standardized challenge test with Vibrio harveyi, indicating that under the conditions of this study, L. vannamei tolerance to Vibrio infection was influenced neither by Hsp70 accumulation nor the changes in the immune-related proteins, observations dissimilar to other shrimp species examined. PMID:24039886

  4. Cloning of the heat shock protein 90 and 70 genes from the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and expression characteristics in relation to thermal stress and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of heat shock protein (HSP) genes (Se-hsp90 and Se-hsp70) were cloned from the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and their expression was investigated in relation to cold shock, heat shock, and development. The open reading frames of Se-hsp90 and Sehsp70 ar...

  5. Expression of genes coding for antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins is altered in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Van Remmen, H; Williams, M D; Heydari, A R; Takahashi, R; Chung, H Y; Yu, B P; Richardson, A

    1996-02-01

    The expression of genes for heat shock proteins in the HSP70 family and genes for antioxidant enzymes was studied in rat hepatocytes cultured in either L-15 or Williams E media on a collagen matrix for up to 48 hours. The mRNA transcripts for the heat shock proteins hsp70, hsc70, and grp78 were induced dramatically when hepatocytes were cultured in L-15, and to a lesser extent when cultured in Williams E. The increase in hsp70 and hsc70 mRNA levels in the cultured hepatocytes was correlated with an increase in the nuclear transcription of these two genes and the binding activity of the heat shock transcription factor to the heat shock element. Culturing rat hepatocytes in either L-15 or Williams E resulted in a decrease in the levels of the mRNA transcripts for catalase and glutathione peroxidase and the activities of these two enzymes. However, the expression of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, i.e., the level of the mRNA transcript or the enzymatic activity, did not change appreciably when hepatocytes were cultured for up to 48 hours. The decline in catalase and glutathione peroxidase expression in the cultured hepatocytes was correlated with a decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio and an increase in lipid peroxidation. These data show that the expression of several genes involved in cellular protection change when hepatocytes are placed in primary cultures. Therefore, one must be careful in extrapolating from primary cultures to the liver in vivo, especially when studying processes that might be affected by heat shock proteins or antioxidant enzymes.

  6. Structure and Light-Induced Expression of a Small Heat-Shock Protein Gene of Pharbitis nil1

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Priti; Felsheim, Roderick F.; Larkin, John C.; Das, Anath

    1992-01-01

    To isolate genes that are regulated by a photoperiod that promotes flowering in Pharbitis nil, a cDNA library representing mRNA of induced cotyledons was screened by differential hybridization. The DNA sequence of one cDNA clone isolated by this approach, clone 12L, showed homology to plant small heat-shock protein (hsp) genes. P. nil genomic clones hybridizing to clone 12L were isolated, and the DNA sequences of two P. nil small hsp (shsp) genes, shsp-1 and shsp-2, were determined. The derived amino acid sequences of shsp-1 and shsp-2 showed maximum homology to the 17.9-kD soybean hsp, a member of the class II cytoplasmic hsps found in plants. A study of the expression of shsp-1 and shsp-2 genes by RNase protection assay indicated that shsp-1 is induced by photoperiod, by light treatment of dark-grown P. nil seedlings, and by heat shock, and that shsp-2 is induced only by heat shock. Analysis of the sequences of the nontranscribed region indicates that both genes contain multiple heat-shock elements. The shsp-1 gene, in addition, contains sequences homologous to the GT-1-binding site, which may play a role in its light-regulated expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:16653196

  7. Impact of aging on heat shock protein expression in the substantia nigra and striatum of the female rat.

    PubMed

    Gleixner, A M; Pulugulla, S H; Pant, D B; Posimo, J M; Crum, T S; Leak, R K

    2014-07-01

    Many heat shock proteins are chaperones that help refold or degrade misfolded proteins and battle apoptosis. Because of their capacity to protect against protein misfolding, they may help keep diseases of aging at bay. A few reports have examined heat shock proteins (eg. Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70, and heat shock cognate 70 or Hsc70) as a function of age in the striatum and nigra. In the present study, we examined the impact of aging on Hsp25, heme oxygenase 1 (HO1 or Hsp32), Hsp40, Hsp60, Hsc70, Hsc/Hsp70 interacting protein (Hip), 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), Hsp90, and ubiquitinated proteins in the nigra and striatum of the female rat by infrared immunoblotting. Female animals are not typically examined in aging studies, adding further to the novelty of our study. Striatal HO1 and Hsp40 were both higher in middle-aged females than in the oldest group. Hsp60 levels were also highest in middle age in the nigra, but were highest in the oldest animals in the striatum. Striatal levels of Hsc70 and the co-chaperone Hip were lower in the oldest group relative to the youngest animals. In contrast, Hsp25 rose with advancing age in both regions. Hsp25 was also colocalized with tyrosine hydroxylase in nigral neurons. Ubiquitinated proteins exhibited a trend to rise in the oldest animals in both regions, and K48 linkage-specific ubiquitin rose significantly from 4-6 to 16-19 months in the striatum. Our study reveals a complex array of age-related changes in heat shock proteins. Furthermore, the age-related rises in some proteins, such as Hsp25, may reflect endogenous adaptations to cellular stress.

  8. The Role of Heat Shock Protein 90B1 in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Mo, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yongxian; Peng, Xiuhong; Luo, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogenetic disorder in women that is characterized by arrested follicular growth and anovulatory infertility. The altered protein expression levels in the ovarian tissues reflect the molecular defects in folliculogenesis. To identify aberrant protein expression in PCOS, we analyzed protein expression profiles in the ovarian tissues of patients with PCOS. We identified a total of 18 protein spots that were differentially expressed in PCOS compared with healthy ovarian samples. A total of 13 proteins were upregulated and 5 proteins were downregulated. The expression levels of heat shock protein 90B1 (HSP90B1) and calcium signaling activator calmodulin 1 (CALM1) were increased by at least two-fold. The expression levels of HSP90B1 and CALM1 were positively associated with ovarian cell survival and negatively associated with caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. Knock-down of HSP90B1 with siRNA attenuated ovarian cell survival and increased apoptosis. In contrast, ovarian cell survival was improved and cell apoptosis was decreased in cells over-expressing HSP90B1. These results demonstrated the pivotal role of HSP90B1 in the proliferation and survival of ovarian cells, suggesting a critical role for HSP90B1 in the pathogenesis of PCOS. We also observed a downregulation of anti-inflammatory activity-related annexin A6 (ANXA6) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) compared with the normal controls, which could affect cell division and folliculogenesis in PCOS. This is the first study to identify novel altered gene expression in the ovarian tissues of patients with PCOS. These findings may have significant implications for future diagnostic and treatment strategies for PCOS using molecular interventions. PMID:27046189

  9. Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Differ between Chaparral Shrubs from Contrasting Microclimates

    DOE PAGES

    Knight, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Smore » mall heat shock protein (sHsp) responses were studied for two evergreen perennial shrubs in the northern California chaparral; one common on warm, south-facing slopes ( Ceanothus cuneatus ), and the other on cooler, north-facing slopes ( Prunus ilicifolia ).mall Hsp expression was induced experimentally for field collected leaves. Leaf collections were made where the species co-occur.mall Hsp expression was quantified using two antibodies, one specific to a chloroplast 22 kD sHsp and another that detects a broad range of sHsps. Differences between chloroplast sHsp accumulation, which protects thermally labile proteins in PSII, and the general sHsp response were examined. The species from the cooler microclimate, Prunus , had a lower induction temperature and accumulated greater levels of sHsps at low temperatures. Both Prunus and Ceanothus reached peak sHsp expression at 42 ∘ C . The species from the warmer microclimate, Ceanothus , had greater sHsp expression at higher temperatures. Chloroplast sHsp expression generally tracked sHsp expression in Ceanothus , but in Prunus general Hsps were elevated before chloroplast sHsps. Variation between species for sHsp expression (induction temperatures, accumulation levels, and the duration of expression) coupled with the costs of Hsp synthesis, may contribute to differences in the abundance and distribution of plants across environmental gradients.« less

  10. Exogenous heat shock protein 70 mediates sepsis manifestations and decreases the mortality rate in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kustanova, Gul'sara A.; Murashev, Arcady N.; Karpov, Vadim L.; Margulis, Boris A.; Guzhova, Irina V.; Prokhorenko, Izabella R.; Grachev, Sergei V.; Evgen'ev, Michael B.

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria can lead to an uncontrolled inflammatory reaction that can be deadly for the host. We checked whether heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) protein is able to protect animals from the deleterious effects of bacterial LPS by monitoring the effect of exogenous Hsp70 injections before and after LPS administration. Our research with rats demonstrates for the first time that administration of exogeneous Hsp70 before and after LPS challenges can reduce mortality rates and modify several parameters of hemostasis and hemodynamics. Hsp70 isolated from bovine muscles showed significant protective effects against the impaired coagulation and fibrinolytic systems caused by LPS, and reduced the mortality caused by Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium LPS injections significantly. Characteristically, Hsp70 preparations used in the experiments result in different effects when administered before and after an LPS challenge, and the effects of Hsp70 injections also differ significantly depending on the origin of the LPS (E coli vs S typhimurium). Based on our data, mammalian Hsp70 appears to be an attractive target in therapeutic strategies designed to stimulate endogenous protective mechanisms against many deleterious consequences of septic shock by accelerating the functional recovery of susceptible organs in humans. PMID:17009601

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies to Heat Shock Protein 60 Alter the Pathogenesis of Histoplasma capsulatum▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Allan J.; Frases, Susana; Gomez, Francisco J.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock proteins with molecular masses of ∼60 kDa (Hsp60) are widely distributed in nature and are highly conserved immunogenic molecules that can function as molecular chaperones and enhance cellular survival under physiological stress conditions. The fungus Histoplasma capsulatum displays an Hsp60 on its cell surface that is a key target of the cellular immune response during histoplasmosis, and immunization with this protein is protective. However, the role of humoral responses to Hsp60 has not been fully elucidated. We generated immunoglobulin G (IgG) isotype monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to H. capsulatum Hsp60. IgG1 and IgG2a MAbs significantly prolonged the survival of mice infected with H. capsulatum. An IgG2b MAb was not protective. The protective MAbs reduced intracellular fungal survival and increased phagolysosomal fusion of macrophages in vitro. Histological examination of infected mice showed that protective MAbs reduced the fungal burden and organ damage. Organs of infected animals treated with protective MAbs had significantly increased levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha and decreased levels of IL-4 and IL-10. Hence, IgG1 and IgG2a MAbs to Hsp60 can modify H. capsulatum pathogenesis in part by altering the intracellular fate of the fungus and inducing the production of Th1-associated cytokines. PMID:19179416

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to heat shock protein 60 alter the pathogenesis of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Allan J; Frases, Susana; Gomez, Francisco J; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2009-04-01

    Heat shock proteins with molecular masses of approximately 60 kDa (Hsp60) are widely distributed in nature and are highly conserved immunogenic molecules that can function as molecular chaperones and enhance cellular survival under physiological stress conditions. The fungus Histoplasma capsulatum displays an Hsp60 on its cell surface that is a key target of the cellular immune response during histoplasmosis, and immunization with this protein is protective. However, the role of humoral responses to Hsp60 has not been fully elucidated. We generated immunoglobulin G (IgG) isotype monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to H. capsulatum Hsp60. IgG1 and IgG2a MAbs significantly prolonged the survival of mice infected with H. capsulatum. An IgG2b MAb was not protective. The protective MAbs reduced intracellular fungal survival and increased phagolysosomal fusion of macrophages in vitro. Histological examination of infected mice showed that protective MAbs reduced the fungal burden and organ damage. Organs of infected animals treated with protective MAbs had significantly increased levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha and decreased levels of IL-4 and IL-10. Hence, IgG1 and IgG2a MAbs to Hsp60 can modify H. capsulatum pathogenesis in part by altering the intracellular fate of the fungus and inducing the production of Th1-associated cytokines.

  13. Caffeine Induces the Stress Response and Up-Regulates Heat Shock Proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Al-Amin, Mohammad; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Gong, Joomi; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine has both positive and negative effects on physiological functions in a dose-dependent manner. C. elegans has been used as an animal model to investigate the effects of caffeine on development. Caffeine treatment at a high dose (30 mM) showed detrimental effects and caused early larval arrest. We performed a comparative proteomic analysis to investigate the mode of action of high-dose caffeine treatment in C. elegans and found that the stress response proteins, heat shock protein (HSP)-4 (endoplasmic reticulum [ER] chaperone), HSP-6 (mitochondrial chaperone), and HSP-16 (cytosolic chaperone), were induced and their expression was regulated at the transcriptional level. These findings suggest that high-dose caffeine intake causes a strong stress response and activates all three stress-response pathways in the worms, including the ER-, mitochondrial-, and cytosolic pathways. RNA interference of each hsp gene or in triple combination retarded growth. In addition, caffeine treatment stimulated a food-avoidance behavior (aversion phenotype), which was enhanced by RNAi depletion of the hsp-4 gene. Therefore, up-regulation of hsp genes after caffeine treatment appeared to be the major responses to alleviate stress and protect against developmental arrest.

  14. Effect of heat shock protein 70 polymorphism on thermotolerance in Tharparkar cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sandip; Kumar, Pushpendra; Kashyap, Neeraj; Deshmukh, Bharti; Dige, Mahesh Shivanand; Bhushan, Bharat; Chauhan, Anuj; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Gyanendra

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Out of various members of heat shock protein (HSP) superfamily which act a molecular chaperon by binding to the denaturing protein thus stabilizing them and preserving their activity, HSP70 are of major importance in thermotolerance development. Thus, present investigation aimed at a screening of HSP70 gene for polymorphisms and possible differences in thermotolerance in Tharparkar breed of cattle. Materials and Methods: A 295 bp fragment of HSP70 gene was subjected to polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) followed by sequencing of different SSCP patterns in 64 Tharparkar cattle. A comparative thermotolerance of identified genotypes was analyzed using heat tolerance coefficients (HTCs) of animals for different seasons. Results: Three SSCP patterns and consequently two alleles namely A and B were documented in one fragment of HSP70 gene. On sequencing, one single-nucleotide polymorphism with G > T substitution was found at a position that led to a change of amino acid aspartate to tyrosine in allele A. It was found that in maintaining near normal average rectal temperature, genotype AA was superior (p≤0.01). Genotype AA, thus, was found to be most thermotolerant genotype with the highest HTC (p≤0.01). Conclusion: The polymorphism at HSP70 is expected to be a potent determinant for heat tolerance in cattle, which may aid in selection for thermotolerance in cattle. PMID:27051194

  15. Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Protection from and Pathogenesis of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zügel, Ulrich; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    1999-01-01

    Increased synthesis of heat shock proteins (hsp) occurs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells when they are exposed to stress. By increasing their hsp content, cells protect themselves from lethal assaults, primarily because hsp interfere with the uncontrolled protein unfolding that occurs under stress. However, hsp are not produced only by stressed cells; some hsp are synthesized constitutively and perform important housekeeping functions. Accordingly, hsp are involved in the assembly of molecules which play important roles in the immune system. It is not surprising that due to their wide distribution and their homology among different species, hsp represent target antigens of the immune response. Frequent confrontation of the immune system with conserved regions of hsp which are shared by various microbial pathogens can potentiate antimicrobial immunity. However, long-term confrontation of the immune system with hsp antigens which are similar in the host and invaders may convert the immune response against these host antigens and promote autoimmune disease. This review provides an overview of the role of hsp in immunity with a focus on infectious and autoimmune diseases. PMID:9880473

  16. Optimizing heat shock protein expression induced by prostate cancer laser therapy through predictive computational models.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Feng, Yusheng; Zhang, Yongjie; Bass, Jon; Jason Stafford, R; Volgin, Andrei; Hazle, John D; Diller, Kenneth R

    2006-01-01

    Thermal therapy efficacy can be diminished due to heat shock protein (HSP) induction in regions of a tumor where temperatures are insufficient to coagulate proteins. HSP expression enhances tumor cell viability and imparts resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatments, which are generally employed in conjunction with hyperthermia. Therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced HSP expression within the targeted tumor must be incorporated into the treatment plan to optimize the thermal dose delivery and permit prediction of the overall tissue response. A treatment planning computational model capable of predicting the temperature, HSP27 and HSP70 expression, and damage fraction distributions associated with laser heating in healthy prostate tissue and tumors is presented. Measured thermally induced HSP27 and HSP70 expression kinetics and injury data for normal and cancerous prostate cells and prostate tumors are employed to create the first HSP expression predictive model and formulate an Arrhenius damage model. The correlation coefficients between measured and model predicted temperature, HSP27, and HSP70 were 0.98, 0.99, and 0.99, respectively, confirming the accuracy of the model. Utilization of the treatment planning model in the design of prostate cancer thermal therapies can enable optimization of the treatment outcome by controlling HSP expression and injury.

  17. Pediatric Sepsis – Part V: Extracellular Heat Shock Proteins: Alarmins for the Host Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, John S; Lahni, Patrick M.; Wong, Hector R.; Wheeler, Derek S.

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that facilitate the proper folding and assembly of nascent polypeptides and assist in the refolding and stabilization of damaged polypeptides. Through these largely intracellular functions, the HSPs maintain homeostasis and assure cell survival. However, a growing body of literature suggests that HSPs have important effects in the extracellular environment as well. Extracellular HSPs are released from damaged or stressed cells and appear to act as local “danger signals” that activate stress response programs in surrounding cells. Importantly, extracellular HSPs have been shown to activate the host innate and adaptive immune response. With this in mind, extracellular HSPs are commonly included in a growing list of a family of proteins known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or alarmins, which trigger an immune response to tissue injury, such as may occur with trauma, ischemia-reperfusion injury, oxidative stress, etc. Extracellular HSPs, including Hsp72 (HSPA), Hsp27 (HSPB1), Hsp90 (HSPC), Hsp60 (HSPD), and Chaperonin/Hsp10 (HSPE) are especially attractrive candidates for DAMPs or alarmins which may be particularly relevant in the pathophysiology of the sepsis syndrome. PMID:24765217

  18. [Development of heat shock proteins with controlled distribution properties and their application to vaccine delivery].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Takemoto, Seiji; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2007-02-01

    Antigen delivery to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is a key issue in developing effective cancer vaccines. Controlling the tissue distribution of antigens, which are administered in a peptide/protein or DNA form, can increase antigen-specific immune responses, including the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), a member of a highly conserved family of molecular chaperones, forms complexes with a variety of tumor-related antigens via its polypeptide binding domain. Because Hsp70 is taken up by APCs through the recognition by Hsp receptors, such as CD91 and LOX-1, its application to antigen delivery systems has been examined both in experimental and clinical settings. A tissue distribution study revealed that Hsp70 is mainly taken up by the liver, especially by hepatocytes, after intravenous injection in mice. A significant amount of Hsp70 was also delivered to regional lymph nodes when it was injected subcutaneously, supporting the hypothesis that Hsp70 is a natural targeting system to APCs. Model antigens were complexed with or conjugated to Hsp70, by which greater antigen-specific immune responses were achieved. Cytoplasmic delivery of Hsp70-antigen further increased the efficacy of the Hsp70-based vaccines. These findings indicate that effective cancer therapy can be achieved by developing Hsp70-based anticancer vaccines when their tissue and intracellular distribution is properly controlled. PMID:17268149

  19. The expression of heat shock proteins 70 and 90 in pea seedlings under simulated microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, L.

    Microgravity is an abnormal and so stress factor for plants. Expression of known stress-related genes is appeared to implicate in the cell response to different kinds of stress. Heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP90 are present in plant cells under the normal growth conditions and their quantity increases during stress. The effect of simulated microgravity on expression of HSP70 and HSP90 was studied in etiolated Pisum sativum seedlings grown on the horizontal clinostat (2 rpm) from seed germination for 3 days. Seedlings were also subjected to two other types of stressors: vertical clinorotatoin (2 rpm) and 2 h temperature elevation (40°C). HSPs' level was measured by ELISA. The quantity of both HSPs increased more than in three times in the seedlings on the horizontal clinostat in comparison with the stationary 1 g control. Vertical clinorotation also increased HSPs' level but less at about 20% than horizontal one. These effects were comparable with the influence of temperature elevation. The data presented suggest that simulated microgravity upregulate HSP70 and HSP90 expression. The increased HSPs' level might evidence the important functional role of these proteins in plant adaptation to microgravity. We are currently investigating the contribution of constitutive or inducible forms of the HSPs in this stress response.

  20. The heat shock protein 70 cochaperone hip enhances functional maturation of glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory M; Prapapanich, Viravan; Carrigan, Patricia E; Roberts, Patricia J; Riggs, Daniel L; Smith, David F

    2004-07-01

    Multiple molecular chaperones interact with steroid receptors to promote functional maturation and stability of receptor complexes. The heat shock protein (Hsp)70 cochaperone Hip has been identified in conjunction with Hsp70, Hsp90, and the Hsp70/Hsp90 cochaperone Hop/Sti1p in receptor complexes during an intermediate stage of receptor assembly, but a functional requirement for Hip in the receptor assembly process has not been established. Because the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains orthologs for most of the receptor-associated chaperones yet lacks an orthologous Hip gene, we exploited the well-established yeast model for steroid receptor function to ask whether Hip can alter steroid receptor function in vivo. Introducing human Hip into yeast enhances hormone-dependent activation of a reporter gene by glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Because Hip does not similarly enhance signaling by mineralocorticoid, progesterone, or estrogen receptors, a general effect on transcription can be excluded. Instead, Hip promotes functional maturation of GR without increasing steady-state levels of GR protein. Unexpectedly, Hip binding to Hsp70 is not critical for boosting GR responsiveness to hormone. In conclusion, Hip functions by a previously unrecognized mechanism to promote the efficiency of GR maturation in cells.

  1. Molecular chaperone function of the Rana catesbeiana small heat shock protein, hsp30.

    PubMed

    Kaldis, Angelo; Atkinson, Burr G; Heikkila, John J

    2004-10-01

    Eukaryotic small heat shock proteins (shps) act as molecular chaperones by binding to denaturing proteins, preventing their heat-induced aggregation and maintaining their solubility until they can be refolded back to their normal state by other chaperones. In this study we report on the functional characterization of a developmentally regulated shsp, hsp30, from the American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana. An expression vector containing the open reading frame of the hsp30 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant hsp30 was recovered as multimeric complexes and was composed of a mixture of alpha-helical and beta-sheet-like structures as determined by circular dichroism analysis. Hsp30 displayed chaperone activity since it inhibited heat-induced aggregation of citrate synthase. Furthermore hsp30 maintained heat-treated luciferase in a folding competent state. For example, heat denatured luciferase when microinjected into Xenopus oocytes did not regain enzyme activity whereas luciferase heat denatured with hsp30 regained 100% enzyme activity. Finally, hsp30 protected the DNA restriction endonuclease, PstI, from heat inactivation. PstI incubated alone at 42 degrees C lost its enzymatic function after 1 h whereas PstI supplemented with hsp30 accurately digested plasmid DNA after 4 h at the elevated temperature. These results clearly indicate a molecular chaperone role for R. catesbeiana hsp30.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum heat shock protein gp96 maintains liver homeostasis and promotes hepatocellular carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rachidi, Saleh; Sun, Shaoli; Wu, Bill X; Jones, Elizabeth; Drake, Richard R.; Ogretmen, Besim; Cowart, Ashley; Clarke, Christopher J.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Chiosis, Gabriela; Liu, Bei; Li, Zihai

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims gp96, or grp94, is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) heat shock protein 90 paralog which acts as a protein chaperone and plays an important role in ER homeostasis. Previous work has demonstrated its role in ER stress, Wnt and integrin signaling, calcium homeostasis and others, which are vital processes in oncogenesis. However, the cancer-intrinsic function of gp96 remains controversial. Methods We studied the roles of gp96 in liver biology in mice via an albumin promoter-driven cre recombinase-mediated disruption of gp96 gene, hsp90b1. The impact of gp96 status on hepatic carcinogenesis in response to diethyl-nitrosoamine (DENA) was probed. The roles of gp96 on human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC) were also examined pharmacologically with a targeted gp96 inhibitor. Results We demonstrated that gp96 maintains liver development and hepatocyte function in vivo, and its loss genetically promotes adaptive accumulation of long chain ceramides, accompanied by steatotic regeneration of residual gp96+ hepatocytes. The need for compensatory expansion of gp96+ cells in the gp96− background predisposes mice to develop carcinogen-induced hepatic hyperplasia and cancer from gp96+ but not gp96− hepatocytes. We also found that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of gp96 in human HCCs perturbs multiple growth signals, and attenuates their proliferation and expansion. Conclusions gp96 is a pro-oncogenic chaperone, and is an attractive therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:25463537

  3. Heat-shock protein expression on the membrane of T cells undergoing apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Poccia, F; Piselli, P; Vendetti, S; Bach, S; Amendola, A; Placido, R; Colizzi, V

    1996-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (hsp) represent a highly conserved family of proteins, normally localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus, whose expression is induced in situations involving cell stress. This paper reports the unusual translocation of hsp to the cell membrane of T cells undergoing apoptosis. We observed that glucocorticosteroid-induced thymocyte death is associated to the surface expression of hsp 60 and hsp 70 in a discrete fraction of apoptotic cells. hsp surface expression is closely related to a thymic subset of immature CD3low/- T cells. The expression of surface hsp 60 appears early after treatment with dexamethasone (3 hr) whereas the membrane expression of hsp 70 follows different kinetics and peaks later. Morphological analysis of the hsp+ apoptotic cells suggest that this subset represents late-stage apoptotic cells at their minimal volume before fragmentation into apoptotic bodies. Membrane expression of hsp is also associated with apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from AIDS patients cultured in vitro. Altogether, we show that a discrete fraction of cells undergoing apoptosis expresses membrane hsp 60 and hsp 70, supporting the hypothesis that apoptosis causes a radical alteration in the expression of cell surface molecules. Surface hsp expressed during apoptosis may constitute a novel immune-context able to generate packages of self- and exogenous antigens, originating from degradation of altered cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8707351

  4. Spotlight on the microbes that produce heat shock protein 90-targeting antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Peter W.; Millson, Stefan H.

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a promising cancer drug target as a molecular chaperone critical for stabilization and activation of several of the oncoproteins that drive cancer progression. Its actions depend upon its essential ATPase, an activity fortuitously inhibited with a very high degree of selectivity by natural antibiotics: notably the actinomycete-derived benzoquinone ansamycins (e.g. geldanamycin) and certain fungal-derived resorcyclic acid lactones (e.g. radicicol). The molecular interactions made by these antibiotics when bound within the ADP/ATP-binding site of Hsp90 have served as templates for the development of several synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor drugs. Much attention now focuses on the clinical trials of these drugs. However, because microbes have evolved antibiotics to target Hsp90, it is probable that they often exploit Hsp90 inhibition when interacting with each other and with plants. Fungi known to produce Hsp90 inhibitors include mycoparasitic, as well as plant-pathogenic, endophytic and mycorrhizal species. The Hsp90 chaperone may, therefore, be a prominent target in establishing a number of mycoparasitic (interfungal), fungal pathogen–plant and symbiotic fungus–plant relationships. Furthermore the Hsp90 family proteins of the microbes that produce Hsp90 inhibitor antibiotics are able to reveal how drug resistance can arise by amino acid changes in the highly conserved ADP/ATP-binding site of Hsp90. PMID:23271830

  5. Serum heat shock protein after simulated deep diving in Navy divers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui-Chieh; Chen, Yin-Shin; Kang, Bor-Hwang; Wan, Fan-Jong; Chang, Lu-Peng; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2009-10-31

    Deep sea diving might cause a tremendous physical or psychological stress to the divers. The present study aims to evaluate the stress response to a simulated wet dive in Navy divers. Nineteen Navy divers took part in this study when they were undergoing annual deep dive training. Ten divers were exposed to 190 feet of sea water (fsw) breathing compressed air on day 1 and to 250 fsw breathing helium-oxygen (Heliox) gas mixture on day 3. Another 9 divers were exposed to 220 fsw on day 1 and 285 fsw on day 3 breathing Heliox gas mixture. The bottom time ranged from 5 to 8 min, and then the standard U.S. Navy air and Heliox decompression tables were followed for surfacing. Predive levels of serum heat shock protein 72 (sHsp72) were 9.95 +/- 0.56 ng/ml, which were significantly higher than those in the control group (8.01 +/- 0.77 ng/ml). After simulating Heliox dive, the sHsp72 increased to 10.43 +/- 0.56 ng/ml, but this was not statistically significant. Our results demonstrated that the serum level of Hsp72 is higher in the Navy divers who underwent regular intensive exercise. However, it remains unknown whether this increase of stress protein is associated with the diving stress or exercise preconditioning in the Navy divers.

  6. Heat shock protein 90{beta}: A novel mediator of vitamin D action

    SciTech Connect

    Angelo, Giana Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Sonna, Larry A.

    2008-03-14

    We investigated the role of Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in vitamin D action in Caco-2 cells using geldanamycin (GA) to block Hsp90 function and RNA interference to reduce Hsp90{beta} expression. When cells were exposed to GA, vitamin D-mediated gene expression and transcriptional activity were inhibited by 69% and 54%, respectively. Gel shift analysis indicated that GA reduced vitamin D-mediated DNA binding activity of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). We tested the specific role of Hsp90{beta} by knocking down its expression with stably expressed short hairpin RNA. Vitamin D-induced gene expression and transcriptional activity were reduced by 90% and 80%, respectively, in Hsp90{beta}-deficient cells. Nuclear protein for VDR and RXR{alpha}, its heterodimer partner, were not reduced in Hsp90{beta}-deficient cells. These findings indicate that Hsp90{beta} is needed for optimal vitamin D responsiveness in the enterocyte and demonstrate a specific role for Hsp90{beta} in VDR signaling.

  7. Chaperone Activity of Small Heat Shock Proteins Underlies Therapeutic Efficacy in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis*

    PubMed Central

    Kurnellas, Michael P.; Brownell, Sara E.; Su, Leon; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Dolganov, Gregory; Chopra, Sidharth; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Webster, Jonathan; Ousman, Shalina S.; Becker, Rachel A.; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the therapeutic activity of αB crystallin, small heat shock protein B5 (HspB5), was shared with other human sHsps, a set of seven human family members, a mutant of HspB5 G120 known to exhibit reduced chaperone activity, and a mycobacterial sHsp were expressed and purified from bacteria. Each of the recombinant proteins was shown to be a functional chaperone, capable of inhibiting aggregation of denatured insulin with varying efficiency. When injected into mice at the peak of disease, they were all effective in reducing the paralysis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additional structure activity correlations between chaperone activity and therapeutic function were established when linear regions within HspB5 were examined. A single region, corresponding to residues 73–92 of HspB5, forms amyloid fibrils, exhibited chaperone activity, and was an effective therapeutic for encephalomyelitis. The linkage of the three activities was further established by demonstrating individual substitutions of critical hydrophobic amino acids in the peptide resulted in the loss of all of the functions. PMID:22955287

  8. A potential role for Helicobacter pylori heat shock protein 60 in gastric tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chen-Si; He, Pei-Juin; Tsai, Nu-Man; Li, Chi-Han; Yang, Shang-Chih; Hsu, Wei-Tung; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Wu, Chang-Jer; Cheng, Tain-Lu; Liao, Kuang-Wen

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori has been found to promote the malignant process leading to gastric cancer. Heat shock protein 60 of H. pylori (HpHSP60) was previously been identified as a potent immunogene. This study investigates the role of HpHSP60 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis. The effect of HpHSP60 on cell proliferation, anti-death activity, angiogenesis and cell migration were explored. The results showed that HpHSP60 enhanced migration by gastric cancer cells and promoted tube formation by umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); however, HpHSP60 did not increase cell proliferation nor was this protein able to rescue gastric cancer cells from death. Moreover, the results also indicated HpHSP60 had different effects on AGS gastric cancer cells or THP-1 monocytic cells in terms of their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important to cancer development. We propose that HpHSP60 may trigger the initiation of carcinogenesis by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine release and by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Thus, this extracellular pathogen-derived HSP60 is potentially a vigorous virulence factor that can act as a carcinogen during gastric tumorigenesis.

  9. Optimizing heat shock protein expression induced by prostate cancer laser therapy through predictive computational models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylander, Marissa N.; Feng, Yusheng; Zhang, Yongjie; Bass, Jon; Stafford, Roger J.; Hazle, John D.; Diller, Kenneth R.

    2006-07-01

    Thermal therapy efficacy can be diminished due to heat shock protein (HSP) induction in regions of a tumor where temperatures are insufficient to coagulate proteins. HSP expression enhances tumor cell viability and imparts resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatments, which are generally employed in conjunction with hyperthermia. Therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced HSP expression within the targeted tumor must be incorporated into the treatment plan to optimize the thermal dose delivery and permit prediction of the overall tissue response. A treatment planning computational model capable of predicting the temperature, HSP27 and HSP70 expression, and damage fraction distributions associated with laser heating in healthy prostate tissue and tumors is presented. Measured thermally induced HSP27 and HSP70 expression kinetics and injury data for normal and cancerous prostate cells and prostate tumors are employed to create the first HSP expression predictive model and formulate an Arrhenius damage model. The correlation coefficients between measured and model predicted temperature, HSP27, and HSP70 were 0.98, 0.99, and 0.99, respectively, confirming the accuracy of the model. Utilization of the treatment planning model in the design of prostate cancer thermal therapies can enable optimization of the treatment outcome by controlling HSP expression and injury.

  10. Regulation and Mechanism of Action of the Small Heat Shock Protein from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus†

    PubMed Central

    Laksanalamai, Pongpan; Maeder, Dennis L.; Robb, Frank T.

    2001-01-01

    The small heat shock protein (sHSP) from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was specifically induced at the level of transcription by heat shock at 105°C. The gene encoding this protein was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant sHSP prevented the majority of E. coli proteins from aggregating in vitro for up to 40 min at 105°C. The sHSP also prevented bovine glutamate dehydrogenase from aggregating at 56°C. Survivability of E. coli overexpressing the sHSP was enhanced approximately sixfold during exposure to 50°C for 2 h compared with the control culture, which did not express the sHSP. Apparently, the sHSP confers a survival advantage on mesophilic bacteria by preventing protein aggregation at supraoptimal temperatures. PMID:11489874

  11. Insulin signaling and the heat shock response modulate protein homeostasis in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestine during infection.

    PubMed

    Mohri-Shiomi, Akiko; Garsin, Danielle A

    2008-01-01

    During infection, damage can occur to the host as an outcome of both pathogen virulence mechanisms and host defense strategies. Using aggregation of a model polyglutamine-containing protein as an indicator in Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that protein damage occurs specifically at the site of the host-pathogen interaction, the intestine, in response to various bacterial pathogens. We demonstrate that the insulin signaling pathway and the heat shock transcription factor (HSF-1) influence the amount of aggregation that occurs, in addition to heat shock proteins and oxidative stress enzymes. We also show that addition of the antioxidants epigallocatechin gallate and alpha-lipoic acid reduces polyglutamine aggregation. The influence of oxidative stress enzymes and exogenous antioxidants on protein aggregation suggests that reactive oxygen species produced by the host are a source of protein damage during infection. We propose a model in which heat shock proteins and oxidative stress enzymes regulated by insulin signaling and HSF-1 are required for tissue protection during infection, to minimize the effects of protein damage occurring as a result of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:17951251

  12. Enzyme-treated asparagus extract promotes expression of heat shock protein and exerts antistress effects.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomohiro; Maeda, Takahiro; Goto, Kazunori; Miura, Takehito; Wakame, Koji; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Sato, Atsuya

    2014-03-01

    A novel enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) has been developed as a functional material produced from asparagus stem. Studies were conducted to determine the effect of ETAS on heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression and alleviation of stress. HeLa cells were treated with ETAS, and HSP70 mRNA and protein levels were measured using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. ETAS showed significant increases in HSP70 mRNA at more than 0.125 mg/mL and the protein at more than 1.0 mg/mL. The antistress effect was evaluated in a murine sleep-deprivation model. A sleep-deprivation stress load resulted in elevation of blood corticosterone and lipid peroxide concentrations, while supplementation with ETAS at 200 and 1000 mg/kg body weight was associated with significantly reduced levels of both stress markers, which were in the normal range. The HSP70 protein expression level in mice subjected to sleep-deprivation stress and supplemented with ETAS was significantly enhanced in stomach, liver, and kidney, compared to ETAS-untreated mice. A preliminary and small-sized human study was conducted among healthy volunteers consuming up to 150 mg/d of ETAS daily for 7 d. The mRNA expression of HSP70 in peripheral leukocytes was significantly elevated at intakes of 100 or 150 mg/d, compared to their baseline levels. Since HSP70 is known to be a stress-related protein and its induction leads to cytoprotection, the present results suggest that ETAS might exert antistress effects under stressful conditions, resulting from enhancement of HSP70 expression.

  13. Circulating antibodies to heat-shock protein 60 in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, T R; Winrow, V R; Blake, D R; Rampton, D S

    1992-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved immunogenic intracellular molecules that are induced by inflammatory mediators and may induce autoimmune phenomena in vivo. We have recently demonstrated the increased expression of HSP-60 in the colonocytes of patients with ulcerative colitis. To study further the role of HSP-60 in inflammatory bowel disease, we have now measured antibodies to recombinant mycobacterial HSP-65 (a member of the HSP-60 family) in patients with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, healthy volunteers and, as disease controls, patients with confirmed bacterial diarrhoea. In comparison with healthy controls (n = 20; median level of 89 ELISA units; range 24-292), serum IgA HSP-60 antibodies were elevated in Crohn's disease (n = 21; 157; 57-364; P < 0.05) and active ulcerative colitis (n = 16; 188; 58-373; P < 0.01) but not bacterial diarrhoea (n = 10; 106; 51-285). Increased IgA HSP-60 antibody levels in patients with inflammatory bowel disease may occur as the result of HSP release from injured gut epithelium; alternatively, increased intestinal permeability could facilitate mucosal access of luminal antigens and the generation of cross-reactive anti-bacterial HSP antibodies. PMID:1424286

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of the Trypanosoma genus based on the heat-shock protein 70 gene.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Jorge; Fernández-Calienes, Aymé; Montalvo, Ana Margarita; Maes, Ilse; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Büscher, Philippe; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Van der Auwera, Gert

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosome evolution was so far essentially studied on the basis of phylogenetic analyses of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) and glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) genes. We used for the first time the 70kDa heat-shock protein gene (hsp70) to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among 11 Trypanosoma species on the basis of 1380 nucleotides from 76 sequences corresponding to 65 strains. We also constructed a phylogeny based on combined datasets of SSU-rDNA, gGAPDH and hsp70 sequences. The obtained clusters can be correlated with the sections and subgenus classifications of mammal-infecting trypanosomes except for Trypanosoma theileri and Trypanosoma rangeli. Our analysis supports the classification of Trypanosoma species into clades rather than in sections and subgenera, some of which being polyphyletic. Nine clades were recognized: Trypanosoma carassi, Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma grayi, Trypanosoma lewisi, T. rangeli, T. theileri, Trypanosoma vivax and Trypanozoon. These results are consistent with existing knowledge of the genus' phylogeny. Within the T. cruzi clade, three groups of T. cruzi discrete typing units could be clearly distinguished, corresponding to TcI, TcIII, and TcII+V+VI, while support for TcIV was lacking. Phylogenetic analyses based on hsp70 demonstrated that this molecular marker can be applied for discriminating most of the Trypanosoma species and clades. PMID:27180897

  15. Antibodies to the chlamydial 60 kilodalton heat shock protein in women with tubal factor infertility.

    PubMed Central

    Ault, K A; Statland, B D; King, M M; Dozier, D I; Joachims, M L; Gunter, J

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fallopian tube damage and subsequent infertility are common sequelae of upper genital tract infection with Chlamydia trachomatis. This fallopian tube damage is thought to be immune mediated. The 60 kilodalton chlamydial heat shock protein (hsp) may be the key antigen associated with this pathogenic response. Our objective was to study the relationship between antibody response to 60 kilodalton chlamydial hsp and tubal factor infertility (TFI). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Twenty-three women with TFI and 33 women with male factor infertility (controls) were studied. Tubal factor infertility was defined as infertility for one year with hydrosalpinx or distal tubal occlusion. Patients' sera were tested for antibodies to the chlamydial hsp using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A stepwise logistic regression was performed by each patient's age, race/ethnicity, self-reported history of chlamydia infection, gonorrhea, or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), history of ectopic pregnancy, and antibodies to the chlamydial hsp. RESULTS: Eighteen of the 23 women with TFI had a positive result on the hsp ELISA (78.6%) versus 23.4% of controls. Risk factors for TFI were a history of PID (P = 0.022), "nonwhite" race (P = 0.004), history of ectopic pregnancy (P = 0.027), and antibodies to the 60 kilodalton chlamydial hsp (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Antibodies to 60 kilodalton chlamydial hsp are strongly associated with TFI. PMID:9812248

  16. Small heat shock proteins Hspb7 and Hspb12 regulate early steps of cardiac morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Gabriel E.; Mercer, Emily J.; Mason, Christopher E.; Evans, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac morphogenesis is a complex multi-stage process, and the molecular basis for controlling distinct steps remains poorly understood. Because gata4 encodes a key transcriptional regulator of morphogenesis, we profiled transcript changes in cardiomyocytes when Gata4 protein is depleted from developing zebrafish embryos. We discovered that gata4 regulates expression of two small heat shock genes, hspb7 and hspb12, both of which are expressed in the embryonic heart. We show that depletion of Hspb7 or Hspb12 disrupts normal cardiac morphogenesis, at least in part due to defects in ventricular size and shape. We confirmed that gata4 interacts genetically with the hspb7/12 pathway, but surprisingly, we found that hspb7 also has an earlier, gata4-independent function. Depletion perturbs Kupffer’s vesicle (KV) morphology leading to a failure in establishing the left-right axis of asymmetry. Targeted depletion of Hspb7 in the yolk syncytial layer is sufficient to disrupt KV morphology and also causes an even earlier block to heart tube formation and a bifid phenotype. Recently, several genome-wide association studies found that HSPB7 SNPs are highly associated with idiopathic cardiomyopathies and heart failure. Therefore, GATA4 and HSPB7 may act alone or together to regulate morphogenesis with relevance to congenital and acquired human heart disease. PMID:23850773

  17. Small heat shock proteins, phylogeny in filamentous fungi and expression analyses in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianbing; Wang, Mingshuang; Zhou, Liting; Yu, Dongliang

    2016-01-10

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) have been characterized in organisms from all three domains of life and viruses and are involved in a wide range of biological functions. However, the evolution and function of sHSP in Aspergillus species are largely unknown. In the present work, sHSPs were identified in 31 filamentous fungi, including species from Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium and Magnaporthe, as well as Botrytis cinerea and Neurospora crassa. Phylogenetic analysis revealed high level of divergence of sHSPs among filamentous fungi that orthologs could be only found between very closely related species. Strikingly, duplication of shsp genes occurred in genera Penicillium and also Aspergillus nidulans was observed, which might be an important pathway of sHSPs evolution. Expression analysis of shsp genes revealed that sHSPs were involved in response of A. nidulans to various conditions, including cold/heat as well as oxidative and osmotic stresses, and that the recent duplicated sHSPs in A. nidulans had highly similar function. PMID:26403724

  18. Molecular characterization of the heat shock protein 70 gene in Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Han, Xiao; Yue, Hua; Tang, Cheng

    2013-10-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is a species of mycoplasma bacteria that commonly infects the respiratory tract, causing respiratory disease in sheep and goats worldwide. In the current study, the 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) gene was cloned, sequenced and analyzed in 14 clinical isolates of M. ovipneumoniae. Results showed that, compared to the reference Y98 strain, the open-reading frames (ORFs) of Hsp70 gene in all isolates were 1818 base pairs (bp). Three nucleotides of TCA were inserted at 1,776 bp, resulting in insertion of the amino acid glutamine at amino acid position 593. The neighbor-joining trees, constructed using the Hsp70 gene, exhibited that the closest genetic relationship occurred between M. ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, which was consistent with the one based on the whole genome comparisons between these two mycoplasma species. Therefore, these results suggest that the Hsp70 gene, rather than 16S ribosomal RNA, was suitable as a potential molecular marker for evaluating the genetic relationship of M. ovipneumoniae with other bacterial species.

  19. Heat shock protein 27 regulates human prostate cancer cell motility and metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Voll, Eric A; Ogden, Irene M; Pavese, Janet M; Huang, XiaoKe; Xu, Li; Jovanovic, Borko D; Bergan, Raymond C

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common form of cancer in American men. Mortality from PCa is caused by the movement of cancer cells from the primary organ to form metastatic tumors at distant sites. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is known to increase human PCa cell invasion and its overexpression is associated with metastatic disease. The role of HSP27 in driving PCa cell movement from the prostate to distant metastatic sites is unknown. Increased HSP27 expression increased metastasis as well as primary tumor mass. In vitro studies further examined the mechanism of HSP27-induced metastatic behavior. HSP27 did not affect cell detachment, adhesion, or migration, but did increase cell invasion. Cell invasion was dependent upon matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), whose expression was increased by HSP27. In vivo, HSP27 induced commensurate changes in MMP-2 expression in tumors. These findings demonstrate that HSP27 drives metastatic spread of cancer cells from the prostate to distant sites, does so across a continuum of expression levels, and identifies HSP27-driven increases in MMP-2 expression as functionally relevant. These findings add to prior studies demonstrating that HSP27 increases PCa cell motility, growth and survival. Together, they demonstrate that HSP27 plays an important role in PCa progression. PMID:24798191

  20. Expression of heat shock protein 90 at the cell surface in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Cristina; Regidor, Ignacio; Poveda, Pedro D.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the activity of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90/HSPC) as a chaperone, some recent studies have reported expression of Hsp90 at the cell surface in certain types of cancer and nervous system cells. We study the expression of Hsp90 at the cell surface in human neuroblastoma (NB69) cells. Immunofluorescence experiments labeling with anti-Hsp90 antibodies on both nonpermeabilized cells and live cells detected Hsp90 at the cell surface. Hsp90 was also identified in a membrane fraction from subcellular fractionation. Cell-surface Hsp90 was significantly more expressed in undifferentiated proliferative spherical neuroblastoma cells than in differentiated flattened cells. In addition, spherical cells were significantly more sensitive to Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin compared to flattened cells. This paper describes the first evidence of cell-surface Hsp90 expression in a cancer cell line from nervous tissue and may indicate a novel target for anti-tumoral agents. PMID:18800240

  1. Small heat shock proteins in cellular adhesion and migration: evidence from Plasmodium genetics.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Georgina N; Matuschewski, Kai; Buscaglia, Carlos A

    2012-01-01

    Cellular locomotion and adhesion critically depend on regulated turnover of filamentous actin. Biochemical data from diverse model systems support a role for the family of small heat shock proteins (HSPBs) in microfilament regulation. The small chaperones could either act directly, through competition with the motor myosin, or indirectly, through modulation of actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin activity. However, a direct link between HSPBs and actin-based cellular motility remained to be established. In a recent experimental genetics study, we provided evidence for regulation of Plasmodium motility by HSPB6/Hsp20. The infectious forms of malaria parasites, termed sporozoites, display fast and continuous substrate-dependent motility, which is largely driven by turnover of actin microfilaments. Sporozoite gliding locomotion is essential to avoid destruction by host defense mechanisms and to ultimately reach a hepatocyte, the target cell, where to transform and replicate. Genetic ablation of Plasmodium HSP20 dramatically changed sporozoite speed and substrate adhesion, resulting in impaired natural malaria transmission. In this article, we discuss the function of Hsp20 in this fast-moving unicellular protozoan and implications for the roles of HSPBs in adhesion and migration of eukaryotic cells.

  2. Detrimental Effect of Fungal 60-kDa Heat Shock Protein on Experimental Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Fabrício Freitas; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Landgraf, Taise Natali; Peron, Gabriela; Costa, Marcelo Vieira; Coelho-Castelo, Arlete A. M.; Bonato, Vânia L. D.; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson

    2016-01-01

    The genus Paracoccidioides comprises species of dimorphic fungi that cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a systemic disease prevalent in Latin America. Here, we investigated whether administration of native 60-kDa heat shock protein of P. brasiliensis (nPbHsp60) or its recombinant counterpart (rPbHsp60) affected the course of experimental PCM. Mice were subcutaneously injected with nPbHsp60 or rPbHsp60 emulsified in complete’s Freund Adjuvant (CFA) at three weeks after intravenous injection of P. brasiliensis yeasts. Infected control mice were injected with CFA or isotonic saline solution alone. Thirty days after the nPbHsp60 or rPbHsp60 administration, mice showed remarkably increased fungal load, tissue inflammation, and granulomas in the lungs, liver, and spleen compared with control mice. Further, rPbHsp60 treatment (i) decreased the known protective effect of CFA against PCM and (ii) increased the concentrations of IL-17, TNF-α, IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β in the lungs. Together, our results indicated that PbHsp60 induced a harmful immune response, exacerbated inflammation, and promoted fungal dissemination. Therefore, we propose that PbHsp60 contributes to the fungal pathogenesis. PMID:27598463

  3. Heat-shock proteins as dendritic cell-targeting vaccines – getting warmer

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Shaun; Colaco, Camilo A; Blandford, Lucy E; Bailey, Christopher R; Baschieri, Selene; Todryk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (hsp) provide a natural link between innate and adaptive immune responses by combining the ideal properties of antigen carriage (chaperoning), targeting and activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including dendritic cells (DC). Targeting is achieved through binding of hsp to distinct cell surface receptors and is followed by antigen internalization, processing and presentation. An improved understanding of the interaction of hsp with DC has driven the development of numerous hsp-containing vaccines, designed to deliver antigens directly to DC. Studies in mice have shown that for cancers, such vaccines generate impressive immune responses and protection from tumour challenge. However, translation to human use, as for many experimental immunotherapies, has been slow partly because of the need to perform trials in patients with advanced cancers, where demonstration of efficacy is challenging. Recently, the properties of hsp have been used for development of prophylactic vaccines against infectious diseases including tuberculosis and meningitis. These hsp-based vaccines, in the form of pathogen-derived hsp–antigen complexes, or recombinant hsp combined with selected antigens in vitro, offer an innovative approach against challenging diseases where broad antigen coverage is critical. PMID:23551234

  4. Heat shock protein derivatives for delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Takemoto, Seiji; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2008-04-16

    Delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a key issue for developing effective cancer vaccines. Controlling the tissue distribution of antigens can increase antigen-specific immune responses, including the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) forms complexes with a variety of tumor-related antigens via its polypeptide-binding domain. Because Hsp70 is taken up by APCs through recognition by Hsp receptors, such as CD91 and LOX-1, its application to antigen delivery systems has been examined both in experimental and clinical settings. A tissue distribution study revealed that Hsp70 is mainly taken up by the liver, especially by hepatocytes, after intravenous injection in mice. A significant amount of Hsp70 was also delivered to regional lymph nodes when it was injected subcutaneously, supporting the hypothesis that Hsp70 is a natural targeting system for APCs. Model antigens were complexed with or conjugated to Hsp70, resulting in greater antigen-specific immune responses. Cytoplasmic delivery of Hsp70-antigen further increased the efficacy of the Hsp70-based vaccines. These findings indicate that effective cancer therapy can be achieved by developing Hsp70-based anticancer vaccines when their tissue and intracellular distribution is properly controlled. PMID:17980980

  5. Heat shock protein 60 activates B cells via the TLR4-MyD88 pathway.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Sfady, Michal; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Pevsner-Fischer, Meirav; Mor, Felix; Carmi, Pnina; Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Lider, Ofer; Cohen, Irun R

    2005-09-15

    We recently reported that soluble 60-kDa heat shock protein (HSP60) can directly activate T cells via TLR2 signaling to enhance their Th2 response. In this study we investigated whether HSP60 might also activate B cells by an innate signaling pathway. We found that human HSP60 (but not the Escherichia coli GroEL or the Mycobacterial HSP65 molecules) induced naive mouse B cells to proliferate and to secrete IL-10 and IL-6. In addition, the HSP60-treated B cells up-regulated their expression of MHC class II and accessory molecules CD69, CD40, and B7-2. We tested the functional ability of HSP60-treated B cells to activate an allogeneic T cell response and found enhanced secretion of both IL-10 and IFN-gamma by the responding T cells. The effects of HSP60 were found to be largely dependent on TLR4 and MyD88 signaling; B cells from TLR4-mutant mice or from MyD88 knockout mice showed decreased responses to HSP60. Care was taken to rule out contamination of the HSP60 with LPS as a causative factor. These findings add B cells to the complex web of interactions by which HSP60 can regulate immune responses. PMID:16148103

  6. Myocardial ischaemia and the inflammatory response: release of heat shock protein 70 after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Dybdahl, B; Slørdahl, S A; Waage, A; Kierulf, P; Espevik, T; Sundan, A

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To test the hypothesis that heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 may be released into the circulation after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) by exploring the kinetics of Hsp70 release and the relations between Hsp70 and markers of inflammation and myocardial damage in AMI. Design: Blood samples from 24 patients were prospectively collected through to the first day after AMI. Hsp70, interleukin (IL) 6, IL-8, and IL-10 in serum were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Median Hsp70 concentrations in AMI patients measured at arrival, six hours thereafter, and the following morning were 686, 868, and 607 pg/ml, respectively. These concentrations were all significantly different from those of the control patients with angina with a median serum Hsp70 concentration of 306 pg/ml. Peak Hsp70 correlated with creatine kinase (CK) MB (r  =  0.62, p < 0.01) and cardiac troponin T (r  =  0.58, p < 0.01). Furthermore, serum Hsp70 correlated with IL-6 and IL-8 at six hours (r  =  0.60, p < 0.01 and r  =  0.59, p < 0.01, respectively). Conclusions: In this study, Hsp70 was rapidly released into the circulation after AMI. Circulating Hsp70 is suggested as a marker of myocardial damage. In addition, Hsp70 may have a role in the inflammatory response after AMI. PMID:15710705

  7. Detrimental Effect of Fungal 60-kDa Heat Shock Protein on Experimental Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fabrício Freitas; Oliveira, Leandro Licursi de; Landgraf, Taise Natali; Peron, Gabriela; Costa, Marcelo Vieira; Coelho-Castelo, Arlete A M; Bonato, Vânia L D; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson

    2016-01-01

    The genus Paracoccidioides comprises species of dimorphic fungi that cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a systemic disease prevalent in Latin America. Here, we investigated whether administration of native 60-kDa heat shock protein of P. brasiliensis (nPbHsp60) or its recombinant counterpart (rPbHsp60) affected the course of experimental PCM. Mice were subcutaneously injected with nPbHsp60 or rPbHsp60 emulsified in complete's Freund Adjuvant (CFA) at three weeks after intravenous injection of P. brasiliensis yeasts. Infected control mice were injected with CFA or isotonic saline solution alone. Thirty days after the nPbHsp60 or rPbHsp60 administration, mice showed remarkably increased fungal load, tissue inflammation, and granulomas in the lungs, liver, and spleen compared with control mice. Further, rPbHsp60 treatment (i) decreased the known protective effect of CFA against PCM and (ii) increased the concentrations of IL-17, TNF-α, IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β in the lungs. Together, our results indicated that PbHsp60 induced a harmful immune response, exacerbated inflammation, and promoted fungal dissemination. Therefore, we propose that PbHsp60 contributes to the fungal pathogenesis. PMID:27598463

  8. Arthritis protective regulatory potential of self–heat shock protein cross-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, Willem; Wendling, Uwe; Paul, Liesbeth; Prakken, Berent; van Kooten, Peter; van der Zee, Ruurd

    2000-01-01

    Immunization with heat shock proteins has protective effects in models of induced arthritis. Analysis has shown a reduced synovial inflammation in such protected animals. Adoptive transfer and immunization with selected T cell epitopes (synthetic peptides) have indicated the protection to be mediated by T cells directed to conserved hsp epitopes. This was shown first for mycobacterial hsp60 and later for mycobacterial hsp70. Fine specificity analysis showed that such T cells were cross-reactive with the homologous self hsp. Therefore protection by microbial hsp reactive T cells can be by cross-recognition of self hsp overexpressed in the inflamed tissue. Preimmunization with hsp leads to a relative expansion of such self hsp cross-responsive T cells. The regulatory nature of such T cells may originate from mucosal tolerance maintained by commensal flora derived hsp or from partial activation through recognition of self hsp as a partial agonist (Altered Peptide Ligand) or in the absence of proper costimulation. Recently, we reported the selective upregulation of B7.2 on microbial hsp60 specific T cells in response to self hsp60. Through a preferred interaction with CTLA-4 on proinflammatory T cells this may constitute an effector mechanism of regulation. Also, regulatory T cells produced IL10. PMID:11189451

  9. The involvement of heat-shock proteins in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min-Nung; Yu, Hua; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature on the role of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis in animal models ans patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The published literature in Medline (PubMed), including our published work on the cell-mediated as well as humoral immune response to various HSPs was reviewed. Studies in both the pre-clinical animal models of arthritis as well as RA were examined critically and the data presented. Results In experimental arthritis, disease induction by different arthritogenic stimuli, including an adjuvant, led to immune response to mycobacterial HSP65 (BHSP65). However, attempts to induce arthritis by a purified HSP have not met with success. There are several reports of a significant immune response to HSP65 in RA patients. But, the issue of cause and effect is difficult to address. Nevertheless, several studies in animal models and a couple of clinical trials in RA patients have shown the beneficial effect of HSPs against autoimmune arthritis. Conclusions There is a clear association between immune response to HSPs, particularly HSP65, and the initiation and propagation of autoimmune arthritis in experimental models. The correlation is relatively less convincing in RA patients. In both cases, the ability of HSPs to modulate arthritis offers support, albeit an indirect one, for the involvement of these antigens in the disease process. PMID:19969325

  10. Recurrence rate and progression of chondrosarcoma is correlated with heat shock protein expression

    PubMed Central

    TRIEB, KLEMENS; SULZBACHER, IRENE; KUBISTA, BERND

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in tumour immunity, and are correlated with survival and drug resistance in numerous types of cancer. The present study investigated the expression of HSPs and multiple drug resistance (MDR) in human chondrosarcoma. HSP and P-glycoprotein (the MDR1 gene product) expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded sections obtained from 37 patients with chondrosarcoma (19 male and 18 female; aged 33–85 years; mean age, 48.5 years). HSP73 and 90 were significantly overexpressed in patients with local recurrence: HSP73 was expressed in 7/7 patients (100%) with local recurrence and 9/18 patients (50%) without recurrence (P<0.02), while HSP90 was expressed in all patients with recurrence but only 8/18 (44%) without recurrence (P<0.02). A marked association was also identified between HSP expression and survival. HSP72 and 73 were significantly overexpressed in tumours from patients who succumbed to the disease (all positive for HSP72 and 73; P<0.05). No differences were observed between HSP27, 73 or 90-positive or -negative tumours according to age or gender. In addition, HSP72 expression was correlated with differentiation of the tumours (P<0.02). These results indicate that HSP72, 73 and 90 may function as novel prognostic markers for chondrosarcoma, and initiate further studies regarding the use of such markers for the identification of patients with poor prognosis. PMID:26870241

  11. Daphnia response to predation threat involves heat-shock proteins and the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Pijanowska, Joanna; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2004-02-01

    Of all the environmental pressures that all organisms across all kingdoms must face, one of the greatest is the risk of predation. The unpredictability of predation events from the perspective of a single individual is one of the major components of a changing, unstable environment (Gliwicz and Pijanowska, 1989; Lampert, 1987). The panoply of antipredator defenses among terrestrial and aquatic organisms involves a variety of morphological, behavioral, and life-history adaptations that even if they are not life-saving, may enable organisms to complete reproduction before predation occurs. Most of these phenotypic changes are directly induced by cues associated with the biotic agent, in the case of aquatic organisms, the chemical compounds (kairomones) released by a predator into the water. Herein we show that exposure of Daphnia to invertebrate and vertebrate kairomones results in changes in motion, behavior, and life history and at the molecular level involves changes in heat-shock proteins (HSPs) level and the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton. In addition, some of these effects are transgenerational, i.e., they are passed on from the mother to her offspring. PMID:14994270

  12. Epitopes of Microbial and Human Heat Shock Protein 60 and Their Recognition in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Elfaitouri, Amal; Herrmann, Björn; Bölin-Wiener, Agnes; Wang, Yilin; Gottfries, Carl-Gerhard; Zachrisson, Olof; Pipkorn, Rϋdiger; Rönnblom, Lars; Blomberg, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME, also called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), a common disease with chronic fatigability, cognitive dysfunction and myalgia of unknown etiology, often starts with an infection. The chaperonin human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) occurs in mitochondria and in bacteria, is highly conserved, antigenic and a major autoantigen. The anti-HSP60 humoral (IgG and IgM) immune response was studied in 69 ME patients and 76 blood donors (BD) (the Training set) with recombinant human and E coli HSP60, and 136 30-mer overlapping and targeted peptides from HSP60 of humans, Chlamydia, Mycoplasma and 26 other species in a multiplex suspension array. Peptides from HSP60 helix I had a chaperonin-like activity, but these and other HSP60 peptides also bound IgG and IgM with an ME preference, theoretically indicating a competition between HSP60 function and antibody binding. A HSP60-based panel of 25 antigens was selected. When evaluated with 61 other ME and 399 non-ME samples (331 BD, 20 Multiple Sclerosis and 48 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients), a peptide from Chlamydia pneumoniae HSP60 detected IgM in 15 of 61 (24%) of ME, and in 1 of 399 non-ME at a high cutoff (p<0.0001). IgM to specific cross-reactive epitopes of human and microbial HSP60 occurs in a subset of ME, compatible with infection-induced autoimmunity. PMID:24312270

  13. Heat shock protein inhibitors, 17-DMAG and KNK437, enhance arsenic trioxide-induced mitotic apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yichen; Yen Wenyen; Lee, T.-C. Yih, L.-H.

    2009-04-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic agent in leukemia because of its ability to induce apoptosis. However, there is no sufficient evidence to support its therapeutic use for other types of cancers. In this study, we investigated if, and how, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG), an antagonist of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), and KNK437, a HSP synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the cytotoxic effect of ATO. Our results showed that cotreatment with ATO and either 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced cell death and apoptosis. siRNA-mediated attenuation of the expression of the inducible isoform of HSP70 (HSP70i) or HSP90{alpha}/{beta} also enhanced ATO-induced apoptosis. In addition, cotreatment with ATO and 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced mitotic arrest and ATO-induced BUBR1 phosphorylation and PDS1 accumulation. Cotreatment also significantly increased the percentage of mitotic cells with abnormal mitotic spindles and promoted metaphase arrest as compared to ATO treatment alone. These results indicated that 17-DMAG or KNK437 may enhance ATO cytotoxicity by potentiating mitotic arrest and mitotic apoptosis possibly through increased activation of the spindle checkpoint.

  14. Targeting Heat Shock Proteins Mitigates Ventilator Induced Diaphragm Muscle Dysfunction in an Age-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Hannah; Cacciani, Nicola; Akkad, Hazem; Larsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are often overtly subjected to mechanical ventilation and immobilization, which leads to impaired limb and respiratory muscle function. The latter, termed ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD) has recently been related to compromised heat shock protein (Hsp) activation. The administration of a pharmacological drug BGP-15 acting as a Hsp chaperone co-inducer has been found to partially alleviate VIDD in young rats. Considering that the mean age in the ICU is increasing, we aimed to explore whether the beneficial functional effects are also present in old rats. For that, we exposed young (7–8 months) and old (28–32 months) rats to 5-day controlled mechanical ventilation and immobilization with or without systemic BGP-15 administration. We then dissected diaphragm muscles, membrane–permeabilized bundles and evaluated the contractile function at single fiber level. Results confirmed that administration of BGP-15 restored the force-generating capacity of isolated muscle cells from young rats in conjunction with an increased expression of Hsp72. On the other hand, our results highlighted that old rats did not positively respond to the BGP-15 treatment. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to comprehend in more depth the effect of VIDD on diaphragm function and ascertain any further age-related differences. PMID:27729867

  15. The calmodulin-binding domain of the mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Minami, Y; Kawasaki, H; Suzuki, K; Yahara, I

    1993-05-01

    The mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) and Ca(2+)-calmodulin were cross-linked at an equimolar ratio using a carbodiimide zero-length cross-linker. To identify the calmodulin-binding domain(s) of HSP90, CNBr-cleaved peptide fragments of HSP90 were mixed with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and cross-linked. Amino acid sequence determination revealed that an HSP90 alpha-derived peptide starting at the 486th amino acid residue was contained in the cross-linked products, which contains a calmodulin-binding motif (from Lys500 to Ile520). A similar motif is present also in HSP90 beta (from Lys491 to Val511). The synthetic peptides corresponding to these putative calmodulin-binding sequences were found to be cross-linked with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and to prevent the cross-linking of HSP90 and Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Both HSP90 alpha and HSP90 beta bind Ca2+. The HSP90 peptides bind HSP90 and thereby inhibit the binding of Ca2+. In addition, the HSP90 peptides augment the self-oligomerization of HSP90 induced at elevated temperatures. These results suggest that the calmodulin-binding domain of HSP90 might interact with another part of the same molecule and that Ca(2+)-calmodulin might modulate the structure and function of HSP90 through abolishing the intramolecular interaction. PMID:8486648

  16. Heat shock proteins and chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bårdsen, Kjetil; Nilsen, Mari Mæland; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Norheim, Katrine Brække; Jonsson, Grete

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue occurs frequently in patients with cancer, neurological diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases, but the biological mechanisms that lead to and regulate fatigue are largely unknown. When the innate immune system is activated, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are produced to protect cells. Some extracellular HSPs appear to recognize cellular targets in the brain, and we hypothesize that fatigue may be generated by specific HSPs signalling through neuronal or glial cells in the central nervous system. From a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome, 20 patients with high and 20 patients with low fatigue were selected. Fatigue was evaluated with a fatigue visual analogue scale. Plasma concentrations of HSP32, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90α were measured and analysed to determine if there were associations with the level of fatigue. Plasma concentrations of HSP90α were significantly higher in patients with high fatigue compared with those with low fatigue, and there was a tendency to higher concentrations of HSP72 in patients with high fatigue compared with patients with low fatigue. There were no differences in concentrations of HSP32 and HSP60 between the high- and low-fatigue groups. Thus, extracellular HSPs, particularly HSP90α, may signal fatigue in chronic inflammation. This supports the hypothesis that fatigue is generated by cellular defence mechanisms. PMID:26921255

  17. Epitopes of microbial and human heat shock protein 60 and their recognition in myalgic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Elfaitouri, Amal; Herrmann, Björn; Bölin-Wiener, Agnes; Wang, Yilin; Gottfries, Carl-Gerhard; Zachrisson, Olof; Pipkorn, Rϋdiger; Rönnblom, Lars; Blomberg, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME, also called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), a common disease with chronic fatigability, cognitive dysfunction and myalgia of unknown etiology, often starts with an infection. The chaperonin human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) occurs in mitochondria and in bacteria, is highly conserved, antigenic and a major autoantigen. The anti-HSP60 humoral (IgG and IgM) immune response was studied in 69 ME patients and 76 blood donors (BD) (the Training set) with recombinant human and E coli HSP60, and 136 30-mer overlapping and targeted peptides from HSP60 of humans, Chlamydia, Mycoplasma and 26 other species in a multiplex suspension array. Peptides from HSP60 helix I had a chaperonin-like activity, but these and other HSP60 peptides also bound IgG and IgM with an ME preference, theoretically indicating a competition between HSP60 function and antibody binding. A HSP60-based panel of 25 antigens was selected. When evaluated with 61 other ME and 399 non-ME samples (331 BD, 20 Multiple Sclerosis and 48 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients), a peptide from Chlamydia pneumoniae HSP60 detected IgM in 15 of 61 (24%) of ME, and in 1 of 399 non-ME at a high cutoff (p<0.0001). IgM to specific cross-reactive epitopes of human and microbial HSP60 occurs in a subset of ME, compatible with infection-induced autoimmunity.

  18. Gut epithelial inducible heat-shock proteins and their modulation by diet and the microbiota.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Marie-Edith; Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic of metabolic diseases has raised questions about the interplay between the human diet and the gut and its microbiota. The gut has two vital roles: nutrient absorption and intestinal barrier function. Gut barrier defects are involved in many diseases. Excess energy intake disturbs the gut microbiota and favors body entry of microbial compounds that stimulate chronic metabolic inflammation. In this context, the natural defense mechanisms of gut epithelial cells and the potential to boost them nutritionally warrant further study. One such important defense system is the activation of inducible heat-shock proteins (iHSPs) which protect the gut epithelium against oxidative stress and inflammation. Importantly, various microbial components can induce the expression of iHSPs. This review examines gut epithelial iHSPs as the main targets of microbial signals and nutrients and presents data on diseases involving disturbances of gut epithelial iHSPs. In addition, a broad literature analysis of dietary modulation of gut epithelial iHSPs is provided. Future research aims should include the identification of gut microbes that can optimize gut-protective iHSPs and the evaluation of iHSP-mediated health benefits of nutrients and food components.

  19. [Genome-wide identification and analysis of heat shock protein 90 in tomato].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunfei; Wan, Hongjian; Yang, Yuejian; Wei, Yanping; Li, Zhimiao; Ye, Qingjing; Wang, Rongqing; Ruan, Meiying; Yao, Zhuping; Zhou, Guozhi

    2014-10-01

    Heat shock proteins 90 (Hsp90) are a kind of specific proteins in plant which were produced under environmental stresses. By referring to the tomato genome database, we identified and analyzed Hsp90 gene family members using bioinformatics methods. Results indicated that the tomato genome contained at least 7 Hsp90 genes, which were distributed unevenly on 6 chromosomes. Amino acid sequence length of these proteins ranged from 267 to 794aa. Numbers of intron ranged from 2 to 19. Microsynteny analysis showed that two pairs of Hsp90 genes (Hsp90-1and Hsp90-3, Hsp90-5 and Hsp90-7) were identified by segment duplication. In addition, multiple conservation motifs were found in Hsp90 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Hsp90 genes from tomato, rice and Arabidopsis can be divided into 5 groups. Three pair of orthologous genes and four pairs of homologous genes were found. Expression analysis based on RNA-seq showed that the expression of three genes (Hsp90-5, Hsp90-6 and Hsp90-7) was high in vegetable and reproductive organs, while the expression of other four genes (Hsp90-1, Hsp90-2, Hsp90-3 and Hsp90-4) was relatively low except for its expression at the breaking stage of fruit. Analysis of promoter regions of Hsp90 genes showed that multiple cis-elements were involved in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The expression of 7 genes under heat stress was also detected by qRT-PCR. Expression of all Hsp90 genes in tomato leaf was enhanced. The results indicated that these genes could be participated in tomato leaf response to heat stresses. Together, these results will lay a foundation for analyzing Hsp90 gene function and molecular evolution in the future. PMID:25406253

  20. Keratinocyte-Secreted Heat Shock Protein-90alpha: Leading Wound Reepithelialization and Closure

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Woodley, David T.; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Delayed and nonhealing wounds pose a health, economic, and social problem worldwide. For decades, the conventional wisdom pointed to growth factors as the driving force of wound healing and granted them a center stage for therapeutic development. To date, few have obtained US FDA approvals or shown clinical effectiveness and safety. Critical Issue: Wound closure is the initial and most critical step during wound healing. Closing chronic wounds to shut down continued infection is the primary and likely the only achievable goal at the clinic in the foreseeable future. The critical question here is to identify the factor(s) in wounded tissues that drives the initial wound closure. Recent Advances: We made an unexpected discovery of the secreted form of heat shock protein-90alpha (Hsp90α) for promoting skin cell motility, reepithelialization, and wound closure. Secreted Hsp90α possesses unique properties to remain functional under the hostile wound environment that compromises conventional growth factors' effectiveness. Through the common lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 cell surface receptor and activation of the Akt signaling pathway, topical application of human recombinant Hsp90α protein greatly accelerates excision, burn, and diabetic skin wound closure in rodent and porcine models. Future Directions: In almost all cells, the 2–3% of their total proteins (∼7,000 per cell) are Hsp90 (α and β), a long unraveled puzzle. Our new finding of Hsp90 secretion in wounded tissues suggests that the stockpile of Hsp90α by all cells is to rapidly supply the need for extracellular Hsp90α to repair damaged tissues. We propose that keratinocytes at the wound edge secrete Hsp90α that leads the reepithelialization process to close the wound. PMID:27076995

  1. A 9 bp cis-element in the promoters of class I small heat shock protein genes on chromosome 3 in rice mediates L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid and heat shock responses

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jiahn-Chou; Yeh, Ching-Hui; Lin, Ya-Ping; Ke, Yi-Ting; Chen, Ming-Tse; You, Jia-Wen; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Chung-An; Wu, Shaw-Jye; Lin, Chu-Yung

    2010-01-01

    In rice, the class I small heat shock protein (sHSP-CI) genes were found to be selectively induced by L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (AZC) on chromosome 3 but not chromosome 1. Here it is shown that a novel cis-responsive element contributed to the differential regulation. By serial deletion and computational analysis, a 9 bp putative AZC-responsive element (AZRE), GTCCTGGAC, located between nucleotides –186 and –178 relative to the transcription initiation site of Oshsp17.3 was revealed. Deletion of this putative AZRE from the promoter abolished its ability to be induced by AZC. Moreover, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed that the AZRE interacted specifically with nuclear proteins from AZC-treated rice seedlings. Two AZRE–protein complexes were detected by EMSA, one of which could be competed out by a canonical heat shock element (HSE). Deletion of the AZRE also affected the HS response. Furthermore, transient co-expression of the heat shock factor OsHsfA4b with the AZRE in the promoter of Oshsp17.3 was effective. The requirement for the putative AZRE for AZC and HS responses in transgenic Arabidopsis was also shown. Thus, AZRE represents an alternative form of heat HSE, and its interaction with canonical HSEs through heat shock factors may be required to respond to HS and AZC. PMID:20643810

  2. Cold acclimation increases levels of some heat shock protein and sirtuin isoforms in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Teigen, Laura E; Orczewska, Julieanna I; McLaughlin, Jessica; O'Brien, Kristin M

    2015-10-01

    Molecular chaperones [heat shock proteins (HSPs)] increase in response to rapid changes in temperatures, but long-term acclimation to cold temperature may also warrant elevations in HSPs. In fishes, cold acclimation increases mitochondrial density and oxidative stress in some tissues, which may increase demand for HSPs. We hypothesized that levels of HSPs, as well as sirtuins (SIRTs), NAD-dependent deacetylases that mediate changes in metabolism and responses to oxidative stress (including increases in HSPs), would increase during cold acclimation of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Transcript levels of hsp70, hsc70, hsp60 and hsp90-α, sirts1-4, as well as protein levels of HSP60, HSP90 and HSC70 were quantified in liver and pectoral adductor muscle of stickleback during cold acclimation from 20 °C to 8 °C. In liver, cold acclimation stimulated a transient increase in mRNA levels of hsp60 and hsc70. Transcript levels of sirt1 and sirt2 also increased in response to cold acclimation and remained elevated. In pectoral muscle, mRNA levels of hsp60, hsp90-α, hsc70 and sirt1 all transiently increased in response to cold acclimation, while levels of sirts2-4 remained constant or declined. Similar to transcript levels, protein levels of HSC70 increased in both liver and pectoral muscle. Levels of HSP90 also increased in liver after 4 weeks at 8 °C. HSP60 remained unchanged in both tissues, as did HSP90 in pectoral muscle. Our results indicate that while both HSPs and SIRTs increase in response to cold acclimation in stickleback, the response is tissue and isoform specific, likely reflecting differences in metabolism and oxidative stress.

  3. Theoretical insights into the mechanism of redox switch in heat shock protein Hsp33.

    PubMed

    Enescu, Mironel; Kassim, Rima; Ramseyer, Christophe; Cardey, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Heat shock protein 33 (Hsp33) is activated in the presence of H2O2 by a very interesting redox switch based on a tetra-coordinated zinc-cysteine complex present in the fully reduced and inactive protein form. The oxidation of this zinc center by H2O2 induces formation of two S-S bridges and the zinc release followed by the protein unfolding. We report here a theoretical study of the step-by-step sequence of the overall process starting with the oxidation of the first cysteine residue and ending with the zinc release. Each reaction step is characterized by its Gibbs free energy barrier (∆G (‡)). It is predicted that the first reaction step consists in the oxidation of Cys263 by H2O2 which is by far the most reactive cysteine (∆G (‡) = 15.4 kcal mol(-1)). The next two reaction steps are the formation of the first S-S bridge between Cys263 and Cys266 (∆G (‡) = 13.6 kcal mol(-1)) and the oxidation of Cys231 by H2O2 (∆G (‡) = 20.4 kcal mol(-1)). It is then shown that the formation of the second S-S bridge (Cys231-Cys233) before the zinc release is most unlikely (∆G (‡) = 34.8 kcal mol(-1)). Instead, the release of zinc just after the oxidation of the third cysteine (Cys231) is shown to be thermodynamically (dissociation Gibbs free energy ∆G d = 6.0 kcal mol(-1)) and kinetically (reaction rate constant k d ≈ 10(6) s(-1)) favored. This result is in good agreement with the experimental data on the oxidation mechanism of Hsp33 zinc center available to date. PMID:25637463

  4. Human Mutation in the Anti-apoptotic Heat Shock Protein 20 Abrogates Its Cardioprotective Effects*

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaou, Persoulla; Knöll, Ralph; Haghighi, Kobra; Fan, Guo-Chang; Dorn, Gerald W.; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Kranias, Evangelia G.

    2008-01-01

    The small heat shock protein Hsp20 protects cardiomyocytes against apoptosis, and phosphorylation at its Ser16 site enhances its cardioprotection. To determine whether genetic variants exist in human Hsp20, which may modify these beneficial effects, we sequenced the coding region of the Hsp20 gene in 1347 patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy and 744 subjects with no heart disease. We identified a C59T substitution in the human Hsp20 gene in one patient and three individuals without heart disease. All subjects were heterozygous for this mutation, which changes a fully conserved proline residue into leucine at position 20 (P20L), resulting in secondary structural alterations. To examine the potential functional significance of the P20L-Hsp20 human variant, adult rat cardiomyocytes were infected with Ad.GFP (where Ad is adenovirus and GFP is green fluorescent protein), Ad.WT-Hsp20 (where WT is wild-type), and Ad.P20L-Hsp20 and subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion injury. Expression of WT-Hsp20 resulted in significant attenuation of apoptosis compared with the GFP control. However, the P20L-Hsp20 mutant showed no protection against apoptosis, assessed by Hoechst staining and DNA fragmentation. The loss of cardioprotection by the mutant Hsp20 was associated with its diminished phosphorylation at Ser16 compared with WT-Hsp20. Furthermore, maximal stimulation of cardiomyocytes with isoproterenol or protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation in vitro confirmed the impaired ability of the mutant Hsp20 to become phosphorylated at Ser16. In conclusion, we have identified a P20L substitution in human Hsp20, which is associated with diminished phosphorylation at Ser16 and complete abrogation of the Hsp20 cardioprotective effects which may adversely affect the ability of human carriers to cope with cellular stress. PMID:18790732

  5. Implication of Bemisia tabaci heat shock protein 70 in Begomovirus-whitefly interactions.

    PubMed

    Götz, Monika; Popovski, Smadar; Kollenberg, Mario; Gorovits, Rena; Brown, Judith K; Cicero, Joseph M; Czosnek, Henryk; Winter, Stephan; Ghanim, Murad

    2012-12-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is a major cosmopolitan pest capable of feeding on hundreds of plant species and transmits several major plant viruses. The most important and widespread viruses vectored by B. tabaci are in the genus Begomovirus, an unusual group of plant viruses owing to their small, single-stranded DNA genome and geminate particle morphology. B. tabaci transmits begomoviruses in a persistent circulative nonpropagative manner. Evidence suggests that the whitefly vector encounters deleterious effects following Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) ingestion and retention. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis underlying these coevolved begomovirus-whitefly interactions. To elucidate these interactions, we undertook a study using B. tabaci microarrays to specifically describe the responses of the transcriptomes of whole insects and dissected midguts following TYLCV acquisition and retention. Microarray, real-time PCR, and Western blot analyses indicated that B. tabaci heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) specifically responded to the presence of the monopartite TYLCV and the bipartite Squash leaf curl virus. Immunocapture PCR, protein coimmunoprecipitation, and virus overlay protein binding assays showed in vitro interaction between TYLCV and HSP70. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunolocalization showed colocalization of TYLCV and the bipartite Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus virions and HSP70 within midgut epithelial cells. Finally, membrane feeding of whiteflies with anti-HSP70 antibodies and TYLCV virions showed an increase in TYLCV transmission, suggesting an inhibitory role for HSP70 in virus transmission, a role that might be related to protection against begomoviruses while translocating in the whitefly. PMID:23015709

  6. Heat shock proteins in relation to heat stress tolerance of creeping bentgrass at different N levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on 'Penn-A4' creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha-1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance.

  7. Heat Shock Proteins in Relation to Heat Stress Tolerance of Creeping Bentgrass at Different N Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on ‘Penn-A4’ creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha−1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance. PMID:25050702

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel heat shock protein 20 of Babesia orientalis.

    PubMed

    He, Lan; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Qing-Li; Fan, Li-Zhe; Miao, Xiao-Yan; Khan, Muhammad Kasib; Hu, Min; Zhou, Yan-Qin; Zhao, Jun-Long

    2014-08-29

    The heat shock protein 20 (HSP20) gene of Babesia orientalis (BoHSP20) was identified from both genomic DNA and cDNA. The full-length BoHSP20 gene was 690bp with one intron from position 88-243bp. The amplicon obtained from cDNA corresponded to a full-length open reading frame (ORF) with a length of 534bp, encoding a polypeptide of 178 amino acid residues with a predicted size of 20kDa. The ORF was cloned into a pET-28a plasmid and subsequently expressed as a His-fusion protein. The recombinant HSP20 of B. orientalis (rBoHSP20) was purified and evaluated as an antigen using Western blotting. Anti-B. orientalis water buffalo serum reacted with rBoHSP20, indicating that this protein was an immunodominant antigen and could be a useful diagnostic reagent to detect antibodies against B. orientalis in water buffalo. The native BoHSP20 was recognized by polyclonal antibody from the serum of rabbit immunized with rBoHSP20. Strong immunofluorescence signals were observed from B. orientalis in blood smears by fluorescence microscopy. Bacterial survival experiments indicated that HSP20 can significantly increase the viability of bacteria when the culture is exposed to thermal stress. The results suggest that BoHSP20 might play an important role during B. orientalis transmission from tick to host animal, given the sudden shifts in temperature involved. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that B. orientalis is in the Babesia clade and most closely related to Babesia bovis. Similar topologies were obtained from trees based on 18S rRNA and the HSP70 gene. The present study suggests that BoHSP20 might be a potential diagnostic antigen and that the HSP20 genes can aid in the classification of Babesia and Theileria species.

  9. Treatment of adjuvant arthritis with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and peptide derived from heat shock protein 65.

    PubMed

    Brendolan, Andrea; Higuchi, Masanori; Sibley, Richard; Strober, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats is induced by the subcutaneous injection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mineral oil, and the predominant T cell immune reactivity is against the heat shock protein 65 derived peptide 176-190. We treated Lewis rats with human recombinant G-CSF followed by (i.v) administration of peptide 176-190 after induction of adjuvant arthritis (AA), and observed decreased disease severity, joint destruction, new bone formation and joint ankylosis. Treatment with G-CSF alone was also effective, but to a lesser extent. In addition, we found that splenocytes from rats treated with G-CSF had reduced antigen presenting capacity compared with splenocytes from vehicle treated rats. Primed lymph node cells from G-CSF plus peptide treated rats showed a marked reduction in proliferation and secretion of IFN-gamma after stimulation with the heat shock protein peptide in vitro as compared to controls.

  10. Molecular characterization of the gene encoding an 18-kilodalton small heat shock protein associated with the membrane of Leuconostoc oenos.

    PubMed Central

    Jobin, M P; Delmas, F; Garmyn, D; Diviès, C; Guzzo, J

    1997-01-01

    In Leuconostoc oenos, different stresses such as heat, ethanol, and acid shocks dramatically induce the expression of an 18-kDa small heat shock protein called Lo 18. The corresponding gene (hsp18) was cloned from a genomic library of L. oenos constructed in Escherichia coli. A 2.3-kb DNA fragment carrying the hsp18 gene was sequenced. The hsp18 gene encodes a polypeptide of 148 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 16,938 Da. The Lo18 protein has a significant identity with small heat shock proteins of the alpha-crystallin family. The transcriptional start site was determined by primer extension. This experiment allowed us to identify the promoter region exhibiting high similarity to consensus promoter sequences of gram-positive bacteria, as well as E. coli. Northern blot analysis showed that hsp18 consists of a unique transcription unit of 0.6 kb. Moreover, hsp18 expression seemed to be controlled at the transcriptional level. This small heat shock protein was found to be peripherally associated with the membrane of L. oenos. PMID:9023938

  11. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  12. Heat Shock Protein 90α Is a Potential Serological Biomarker of Acute Rejection after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Maehana, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Fukuzawa, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Hideki; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), a molecular chaperone associated with the activation of client proteins, was recently reported to play an important role in immunologic reactions. To date, the role of HSP90 in solid organ transplantations has remained unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum HSP90α levels and acute allograft rejection after organ and tissue transplantation using serum samples from kidney allograft recipients, an in vitro antibody-mediated rejection model, and a murine skin transplantation. Results Serum HSP90α levels were significantly higher in kidney recipients at the time of acute rejection (AR) than in those with no evidence of rejection. In most cases with AR, serum HSP90 decreased to baseline after the treatment. On the other hand, serum HSP90α was not elevated as much in patients with chronic rejection, calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity, or BK virus nephropathy as in AR patients. In vitro study showed that HSP90α concentration in the supernatant was significantly higher in the supernatant of human aortic endothelial cells cocultured with specific anti-HLA IgG under complement attack than in that of cells cocultured with nonspecific IgG. In mice receiving skin transplantation, serum HSP90α was elevated when the first graft was rejected and the level further increased during more severe rejection of the second graft. Conclusions The results suggest that HSP90α is released into the serum by cell damage due to AR in organ and tissue transplantation, and it is potentially a new biomarker to help detect AR in kidney recipients. PMID:27631127

  13. Heat shock protein 70 is necessary for Rice stripe virus infection in plants.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shanshan; Lu, Yuwen; Li, Kunfeng; Lin, Lin; Zheng, Hongying; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping

    2014-12-01

    Heat shock proteins 70 (HSP70s) are a highly conserved family of genes in eukaryotes, and are involved in a remarkable variety of cellular processes. In many plant positive-stranded RNA viruses, HSP70 participates in the construction of a viral replication complex and plays various roles during viral infection. Here, we found increased expression of HSP70 following infection by Rice stripe virus (RSV), a negative-stranded RNA virus, in both rice (the natural host) and Nicotiana benthamiana (an experimental host). Heat treatment of N. benthamiana (Nb) plants enhanced viral infection, whereas RSV infection was retarded and viral RNAs accumulated at a low level when HSP70 was silenced. In both bimolecular fluorescence complement and in vitro pull-down assays, the N-terminus of RSV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) interacted and co-localized with the HSP70s of both plants (OsHSP70 and NbHSP70). The localization of the N-terminus of RdRp when expressed alone was not obviously different from when it was co-expressed with OsHSP or NbHSP, and vice versa. RSV infection also had no effect on the localization of host HSP70. These results demonstrate that host HSP70 is necessary for RSV infection and probably plays a role in viral replication by interacting with viral RdRp, which provides the first evidence of an interacting host protein related to RSV replication, which has been little studied to date.

  14. Advances in the discovery and development of heat-shock protein 90 inhibitors for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hardik J; Modi, Shanu; Chiosis, Gabriela; Taldone, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Over the last 15 – 20 years, targeted anticancer strategies have focused on therapies aimed at abrogating a single malignant protein. Agents that are directed towards the inhibition of a single oncoprotein have resulted in a number of useful drugs in the treatment of cancers (i.e., Gleevec, BCR-ABL; Tarceva and Iressa, EGFR). However, such a strategy relies on the notion that a cancer cell is dependent on a single signaling pathway for its survival. The possibility that a cancer cell may mutate or switch its dependence to another signaling pathway can result in the ineffectiveness of such agents. Recent advances in the biology of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) have revealed intimate details into the complexity of the chaperoning process that Hsp90 is engaged in and, at the same time, have offered those involved in drug discovery several unique ways to interfere in this process. Areas covered This review provides the current understanding of the chaperone cycle of Hsp90 and presents the multifaceted approaches used by researchers in the discovery of potential Hsp90 drugs. It discusses the phenotypic outcomes in cancer cells on Hsp90 inhibition by these several approaches and also addresses several distinctions observed among direct Hsp90 ATP-pocket competitors providing commentary on the potential biological outcomes as well as the clinical relevance of such features. Expert opinion The significantly different phenotypic outcomes observed from Hsp90 inhibition by the many inhibitors developed suggest that the clinical development of Hsp90 inhibitors would be better served by careful consideration of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties of individual candidates rather than a generic approach directed towards the target. PMID:22400044

  15. Heat shock protein 90 is involved in IL-17-mediated skin inflammation following thermal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Kyung; Park, Minhwa; Kim, Ji-Yon; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Woo, So-Youn

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases involves interactions between immune cells and keratinocytes, including the T helper 17 (Th17)-mediated immune response. Several chemokines [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)1, CXCL5 and CXCL8] and antimicrobial peptides [β-defensin 1 (BD1), LL-37, S100A8 and S100A9] were transcriptionally upregulated in the keratinocyte cell line HaCaT upon stimulation with interleukin (IL)-17. Balneotherapy, the treatment of disease by bathing, is an alternative therapy that has frequently been used for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. Immersion in pools of thermal mineral water is often considered to have chemical, thermal, mechanical and immunomodulatory benefits. We examined the effect of thermal treatment on IL-17-mediated inflammation in a model of skin disease. As Act1 is required for IL-17 signaling and is a client protein of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), we evaluated the effect of HSP90 inhibition on IL-17-mediated cytokine and antimicrobial peptide expression in keratinocytes following heat treatment. We found that after thermal stimulation, Act1 binding to HSP90α was significantly increased in the presence of IL-17 (100 ng/ml) and 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, 1 µM). Antimicrobial peptide and chemokine expression generally increased after heat treatment; Act1 knockdown and 17‑AAG reversed this effect. These observations demonstrate the possible immunomodulatory effect of heat on keratinocytes during the progression of IL-17-mediated inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:27279135

  16. Heat shock protein Hsp90-2 expression in the Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, Liudmyla

    Heat shock proteins 90 kDa (Hsp90) are abundant under normal conditions and induced by stress. This family is distinguished from other chaperones in that most of its substrates are signal transduction proteins. Previously, we determined some time-dependent increase in the Hsp90 level in pea seedlings in response to simulated microgravity that indicated a stress-reaction. However, expression of the individual members of the Hsp90 family have specific pattern. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible alterations in the gene expression pattern of cytosolic Hsp90-2 in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under 2D-clinorotation. To obtain detailed expression pattern of the HSP90-2 genes we used seeds that provides a resource of loss-of-function mutations gene expression patterns via translational fusions with the reporter gene, GUS (a line N 166718, NASC). There were two variants of the experiment: 1) seedlings grew under clinorotation for 10, 12, 14 d; 2) seedlings grew in the stationary conditions for 10 d followed by clinorotation for 3 h -at 22o C and 16h light cycle. The seedlings grown in the stationary conditions were used as a control. GUS staining showed that HSP90-2 expression was regulated during seedling development and affected by clinorotation in the heterozygous mutant plants. In the homozygous for the mutation plants, HSP90-2 expression was stable during seedling development and not affected by clinorotation. GUS staining was observed in cotyledons, leaves and hypocotyls of the seedlings (especially intense in vascular bundles), indicating intensive cellular processes with participation of this chaperone. Possible pathways of influence of clinorotation on HSP90-2 expression are discussed.

  17. Heat shock protein 70 regulates platelet integrin activation, granule secretion and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rigg, Rachel A; Healy, Laura D; Nowak, Marie S; Mallet, Jérémy; Thierheimer, Marisa L D; Pang, Jiaqing; McCarty, Owen J T; Aslan, Joseph E

    2016-04-01

    Molecular chaperones that support protein quality control, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), participate in diverse aspects of cellular and physiological function. Recent studies have reported roles for specific chaperone activities in blood platelets in maintaining hemostasis; however, the functions of Hsp70 in platelet physiology remain uninvestigated. Here we characterize roles for Hsp70 activity in platelet activation and function. In vitro biochemical, microscopy, flow cytometry, and aggregometry assays of platelet function, as well as ex vivo analyses of platelet aggregate formation in whole blood under shear, were carried out under Hsp70-inhibited conditions. Inhibition of platelet Hsp70 blocked platelet aggregation and granule secretion in response to collagen-related peptide (CRP), which engages the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor-γ chain complex. Hsp70 inhibition also reduced platelet integrin-αIIbβ3 activation downstream of GPVI, as Hsp70-inhibited platelets showed reduced PAC-1 and fibrinogen binding. Ex vivo, pharmacological inhibition of Hsp70 in human whole blood prevented the formation of platelet aggregates on collagen under shear. Biochemical studies supported a role for Hsp70 in maintaining the assembly of the linker for activation of T cells signalosome, which couples GPVI-initiated signaling to integrin activation, secretion, and platelet function. Together, our results suggest that Hsp70 regulates platelet activation and function by supporting linker for activation of T cells-associated signaling events downstream of platelet GPVI engagement, suggesting a role for Hsp70 in the intracellular organization of signaling systems that mediate platelet secretion, "inside-out" activation of platelet integrin-αIIbβ3, platelet-platelet aggregation, and, ultimately, hemostatic plug and thrombus formation.

  18. Influence of selenium on heat shock protein 70 expression in heat stressed turkey embryos (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Rivera, Rafael E; Christensen, V L; Edens, F W; Wineland, M J

    2005-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) family of proteins, which functions as molecular chaperones, has been associated with tolerance to stressors in avian species. Selenium (Se) is an essential trace mineral incorporated into the seleno-enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx). GSHpx reduces oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) in the GSH/GSSG antioxidant system and protects cells from oxidative damage. This study was conducted to examine if the relationship between dietary supplementation of selenium to turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) hens and the embryonic expression of hsp70 and GSHpx activity in heat stressed embryos. Livers of embryos developing in eggs from turkey hens fed diets with or without supplemental Se were analyzed for hsp70 concentration and GSHpx activity before and after recovery from a heating episode. Before heat stress, hsp70 concentrations were equivalent in each treatment, but GSHpx activity was maximized in the SE treatment group. After recovery from the heating episode, hsp70 concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the non-Se-supplemented groups, but in the Se-supplemented groups the hsp70 concentrations were not different from pre-stress concentrations. In the pre-stress Se-supplemented group, liver GSHpx activity was significantly higher than GSHpx activity in the non-Se-supplemented embryo livers, and in the livers from embryos recovering from heat stress, GSHpx activity in the non-Se-supplemented group was lower than the pre-stress activity and significantly lower than the GSHpx activity in liver from Se-supplemented embryos recovering from heat distress. Se supplementation to the dams resulted in a significant increase in their embryos and that condition would facilitate a decreased incidence of oxidative damage to cells. A more reduced redox status in embryos from Se-supplemented dams decreased the need for cellular protection attributed to stress induced hsp70 and presumably allows heat distressed embryos

  19. MIPS: a calmodulin-binding protein of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Huiyue; Zang, Xiaonan; Gong, Le; Sun, Hengyi; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2014-08-01

    To study the Ca(2+)/Calmodulin (CaM) signal transduction pathway of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat stress, myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS), a calmodulin-binding protein, was isolated using the yeast two-hybrid system. cDNA and DNA sequences of mips were cloned from G. lemaneiformis by using 5'RACE and genome walking procedures. The MIPS DNA sequence was 2,067 nucleotides long, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,623 nucleotides with no intron. The mips ORF was predicted to encode 540 amino acids, which included the conserved MIPS domain and was 61-67 % similar to that of other species. After analyzing the amino acid sequence of MIPS, the CaM-Binding Domain (CaMBD) was inferred to be at a site spanning from amino acid 212 to amino acid 236. The yeast two-hybrid results proved that MIPS can interact with CaM and that MIPS is a type of calmodulin-binding protein. Next, the expression of CaM and MIPS in wild-type G. lemaneiformis and a heat-tolerant G. lemaneiformis cultivar, "981," were analyzed using real-time PCR under a heat shock of 32 °C. The expression level displayed a cyclical upward trend. Compared with wild type, the CaM expression levels of cultivar 981 were higher, which might directly relate to its resistance to high temperatures. This paper indicates that MIPS and CaM may play important roles in the high-temperature resistance of G. lemaneiformis.

  20. Heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress, and antioxidant status in periparturient crossbred cows supplemented with α-tocopherol acetate.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Anjali; Ashutosh; Chandra, Gulab; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigating the effect of α-tocopherol acetate on heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), oxidative stress, and antioxidant status during periparturient period in medium body condition score crossbred cows. Twenty crossbred Karan Fries cows with confirmed pregnancy were selected 2 months before expected date of calving. The cows were randomly distributed in to two groups: 10 cows were kept as control and 10 were supplemented with α-tocopherol acetate during dry period for 2 months. Blood samples were collected at -20, -10, -5, 0, 5, 10, and 20 days in relation to the expected date of calving. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and total immunoglobulin were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in treatment as compared to control cows. Heat shock protein 70 and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in the treatment cows than their counterpart. Treatment with α-tocopherol acetate during dry period resulted in reduced oxidative stress, heat shock protein Hsp70 levels, improved antioxidant, and improved immunity status indicating beneficial effect of α-tocopherol acetate treatment.

  1. Heat shock protein 22 (HSPB8) limits TGF-β-stimulated migration of osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohiro; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Kainuma, Shingo; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2016-11-15

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are induced in response to various physiological and environmental conditions such as chemical and heat stress, and recognized to function as molecular chaperones. HSP22 (HSPB8), a low-molecular weight HSP, is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types. However, the precise role of HSP22 in bone metabolism remains to be clarified. In the present study, we investigated whether HSP22 is implicated in the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-stimulated migration of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. Although protein levels of HSP22 were clearly detected in unstimulated MC3T3-E1 cells, TGF-β failed to induce the protein levels. The TGF-β-stimulated migration was significantly up-regulated by knockdown of HSP22 expression. The cell migration stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor-BB was also enhanced by HSP22 knockdown. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, PD98059, an inhibitor of MEK1/2, or SP600125, an inhibitor of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase had no effects on the TGF-β-induced migration. SIS3, a specific inhibitor of TGF-β-dependent Smad3 phosphorylation, significantly reduced the migration with or without TGF-β stimulation. Smad2, Smad3, Smad4 or Smad7 was not coimmunoprecipitated with HSP22. On the other hand, the TGF-β-induced Smad2 phosphorylation was enhanced by HSP22 down-regulation. The protein levels of TGF-β type II receptor (TGF-β RII) but not TGF-β type I receptor (TGF-β RI) was significantly up-regulated in HSP22 knockdown cells compared with those in the control cells. However, the levels of TGF-β RII mRNA in HSP22 knockdown cells were little different from those of the control cells. Neither TGF-β RI nor TGF-β RII was coimmunoprecipitated with HSP22. SIS3 reduced the amplification by HSP22 knockdown of the TGF-β-stimulated cell migration almost to the basal level. Our results strongly suggest that HSP22 functions as a negative regulator in the TGF

  2. Cucumber Necrosis Virus Recruits Cellular Heat Shock Protein 70 Homologs at Several Stages of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Syed Benazir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA viruses often depend on host factors for multiplication inside cells due to the constraints of their small genome size and limited coding capacity. One such factor that has been exploited by several plant and animal viruses is heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family homologs which have been shown to play roles for different viruses in viral RNA replication, viral assembly, disassembly, and cell-to-cell movement. Using next generation sequence analysis, we reveal that several isoforms of Hsp70 and Hsc70 transcripts are induced to very high levels during cucumber necrosis virus (CNV) infection of Nicotiana benthamiana and that HSP70 proteins are also induced by at least 10-fold. We show that HSP70 family protein homologs are co-opted by CNV at several stages of infection. We have found that overexpression of Hsp70 or Hsc70 leads to enhanced CNV genomic RNA, coat protein (CP), and virion accumulation, whereas downregulation leads to a corresponding decrease. Hsc70-2 was found to increase solubility of CNV CP in vitro and to increase accumulation of CNV CP independently of viral RNA replication during coagroinfiltration in N. benthamiana. In addition, virus particle assembly into virus-like particles in CP agroinfiltrated plants was increased in the presence of Hsc70-2. HSP70 was found to increase the targeting of CNV CP to chloroplasts during infection, reinforcing the role of HSP70 in chloroplast targeting of host proteins. Hence, our findings have led to the discovery of a highly induced host factor that has been co-opted to play multiple roles during several stages of the CNV infection cycle. IMPORTANCE Because of the small size of its RNA genome, CNV is dependent on interaction with host cellular components to successfully complete its multiplication cycle. We have found that CNV induces HSP70 family homologs to a high level during infection, possibly as a result of the host response to the high levels of CNV proteins that accumulate during infection

  3. Radio frequency induced hyperthermia mediated by dextran stabilized LSMO nanoparticles: in vitro evaluation of heat shock protein response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhayani, K. R.; Rajwade, J. M.; Paknikar, K. M.

    2013-01-01

    Dextran stabilized La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (Dex-LSMO) is an alternative cancer hyperthermia agent holding considerable promise. Here, we have carried out a comparative study on radio frequency (˜264 kHz) induced Dex-LSMO mediated heating and extraneous heating (mimicking generalized hyperthermia) in terms of changes in the morphology, proliferation pattern and induction of heat shock proteins in a human melanoma cell line (A375). Our results clearly show that the cellular effects seen with extraneous heating (60 min at 43 °C) could be reproduced by just six minutes of radio frequency induced Dex-LSMO mediated heating. More importantly, the observed enhanced levels of HSP 70 and 90 (molecular markers of heat shock that trigger favorable immunological reactions) seen with Dex-LSMO mediated heating were comparable to extraneous heating. These results suggest the possible utility of Dex-LSMO as a cancer hyperthermia agent.

  4. Expression of heat shock protein-coding genes associated with anhydrobiosis in an African chironomid Polypedilum vanderplanki

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Oleg; Cornette, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In order to survive in extreme environments, organisms need to develop special adaptations both on physiological and molecular levels. The sleeping chironomid Polypedilum vanderplanki, inhabiting temporary water pools in semi-arid regions of Africa, is the only insect to have evolutionarily acquired the ability to withstand prolonged complete desiccation at larval stage, entering a state called anhydrobiosis. Even after years in a dry state, larvae are able to revive within a short period of time, completely restoring metabolism. Because of the possible involvement of stress proteins in the preservation of biomolecules during the anhydrobiosis of the sleeping chironomid, we have analyzed the expression of genes encoding six heat shock proteins (Pv-hsp90, Pv-hsp70, Pv-hsc70, Pv-hsp60, Pv-hsp20, and Pv-p23) and one heat shock factor (Pv-hsf1) in dehydrating, rehydrating, and heat-shocked larvae. All examined genes were significantly up-regulated in the larvae upon dehydration and several patterns of expression were detected. Gene transcript of Pv-hsf1 was up-regulated within 8 h of desiccation, followed by large shock proteins expression reaching peak at 24–48 h of desiccation. Heat-shock-responsive Pv-hsp70 and Pv-hsp60 showed a two-peak expression: in dehydrating and rehydrating larvae. Both small alpha-crystallin heat shock proteins (sHSP) transcripts were accumulated in the desiccated larvae, but showed different expression profiles. Both sHSP-coding genes were found to be heat-inducible, and Pv-hsp20 was up-regulated in the larvae at the early stage of desiccation. In contrast, expression of the second transcript, corresponding to Pv-p23, was limited to the late stages of desiccation, suggesting possible involvement of this protein in the glass-state formation in anhydrobiotic larvae. We discuss possible roles of proteins encoded by these stress genes during the different stages of anhydrobiosis in P. vanderplanki. Electronic supplementary material The

  5. Heat Shock Protein-70 Expression in Vitiligo and its Relation to the Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Reham William; El-Rifaie, Abdel-Aziz A; Abdel-Wahab, Amr M; Gohary, Yasser M; Rashed, Laila A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitiligo is a progressive depigmenting disorder characterized by the loss of functional melanocytes from the epidermis. The etiopathogenesis of vitiligo is still unclear. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are prime candidates to connect stress to the skin. HSPs were found to be implicated in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and other skin disorders as psoriasis. Aim and Objectives: The aim of this study was to map the level of HSP-70 in vitiligo lesions to declare its role in the pathogenesis and activity of vitiligo. Materials and Methods: The study included thirty patients with vitiligo and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Vitiligo patients were divided as regards to the disease activity into highly active, moderately active, and inactive vitiligo groups. Skin biopsies were taken from the lesional and nonlesional skin of patients and from the normal skin of the controls. HSP-70 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was estimated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: Our analysis revealed a significantly higher expression of HSP-70 mRNA in lesional skin biopsies from vitiligo patients compared to nonlesional skin biopsies from vitiligo patients (P < 0.001) and compared to skin biopsies from healthy controls (P < 0.001). The level of HSP-70 was not found to be correlated with age, sex, or disease duration. The expression of HSP-70 was correlated with the disease activity and patients with active vitiligo showed higher mean HSP-70 level compared to those with inactive disease. Conclusions: HSP-70 plays a role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo and may enhance the immune response in active disease. PMID:27512186

  6. Luminal bacterial flora determines physiological expression of intestinal epithelial cytoprotective heat shock proteins 25 and 72.

    PubMed

    Arvans, Donna L; Vavricka, Stephan R; Ren, Hongyu; Musch, Mark W; Kang, Lisa; Rocha, Flavio G; Lucioni, Alvaro; Turner, Jerrold R; Alverdy, John; Chang, Eugene B

    2005-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) 25 and 72 are expressed normally by surface colonocytes but not by small intestinal enterocytes. We hypothesized that luminal commensal microflora maintain the observed colonocyte HSP expression. The ability of the small intestine to respond to bacteria and their products and modulate HSPs has not been determined. The effects of luminal bacterial flora in surgically created midjejunal self-filling (SFL) vs. self-emptying (SEL) small-bowel blind loops on epithelial HSP expression were studied. HSP25 and HSP72 expression were assessed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. SFL were chronically colonized, whereas SEL contained levels of bacteria normal for the proximal small intestine. SFL creation significantly increased HSP25 and HSP72 expression relative to corresponding sections from SEL. Metronidazole treatment, which primarily affects anaerobic bacteria as well as a diet lacking fermentable fiber, significantly decreased SFL HSP expression. Small bowel incubation with butyrate ex vivo induced a sustained and significant upregulation of HSP25 and altered HSP72 expression, confirming the role of short-chain fatty acids. To determine whether HSPs induction altered responses to an injury, effects of the oxidant, monochloramine, on epithelial resistance and short-circuit current (I(sc)) responses to carbachol and glucose were compared. Increased SFL HSP expression was associated with protection against oxidant-induced decreases in transmural resistance and I(sc) responses to glucose, but not secretory responses to carbachol. In conclusion, luminal microflora and their metabolic byproducts direct expression of HSPs in gut epithelial cells, an effect that contributes to preservation of epithelial cell viability under conditions of stress.

  7. Heat-shock protein HSPA4 is required for progression of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Held, Torsten; Barakat, Amal Z; Mohamed, Belal A; Paprotta, Ilona; Meinhardt, Andreas; Engel, Wolfgang; Adham, Ibrahim M

    2011-07-01

    Heat-shock protein 110 (HSP110) family members act as nucleotide exchange factors (NEF) of mammalian and yeast HSP70 chaperones during the ATP hydrolysis cycle. In this study, we describe the expression pattern of murine HSPA4, a member of the HSP110 family, during testis development and the consequence of HSPA4 deficiency on male fertility. HSPA4 is ubiquitously expressed in all the examined tissues. During prenatal and postnatal development of gonad, HSPA4 is expressed in both somatic and germ cells; however, expression was much higher in germ cells of prenatal gonads. Analyses of Hspa4-deficient mice revealed that all homozygous mice on the hybrid C57BL/6J×129/Sv genetic background were apparently healthy. Although HSPA4 is expressed as early as E13.5 in male gonad, a lack of histological differences between Hspa4(-/-) and control littermates suggests that Hspa4 deficiency does not impair the gonocytes or their development to spermatogonia. Remarkably, an increased number of the Hspa4-deficient males displayed impaired fertility, whereas females were fertile. The total number of spermatozoa and their motility were drastically reduced in infertile Hspa4-deficient mice compared with wild-type littermates. The majority of pachytene spermatocytes in the juvenile Hspa4(-/-) mice failed to complete the first meiotic prophase and became apoptotic. Furthermore, down-regulation of transcription levels of genes known to be expressed in spermatocytes at late stages of prophase I and post-meiotic spermatids leads to suggest that the development of most spermatogenic cells is arrested at late stages of meiotic prophase I. These results provide evidence that HSPA4 is required for normal spermatogenesis.

  8. Heat shock proteins: in vivo heat treatments reveal adipose tissue depot-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Robert S; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Wheatley, Joshua L; Wright, David C; Geiger, Paige C

    2015-01-01

    Heat treatments (HT) and the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) improve whole body and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity while decreasing white adipose tissue (WAT) mass. However, HSPs in WAT have been understudied. The purpose of the present study was to examine patterns of HSP expression in WAT depots, and to examine the effects of a single in vivo HT on WAT metabolism. Male Wistar rats received HT (41°C, 20 min) or sham treatment (37°C), and 24 h later subcutaneous, epididymal, and retroperitoneal WAT depots (SCAT, eWAT, and rpWAT, respectively) were removed for ex vivo experiments and Western blotting. SCAT, eWAT, and rpWAT from a subset of rats were also cultured separately and received a single in vitro HT or sham treatment. HSP72 and HSP25 expression was greatest in more metabolically active WAT depots (i.e., eWAT and rpWAT) compared with the SCAT. Following HT, HSP72 increased in all depots with the greatest induction occurring in the SCAT. In addition, HSP25 increased in the rpWAT and eWAT, while HSP60 increased in the rpWAT only in vivo. Free fatty acid (FFA) release from WAT explants was increased following HT in the rpWAT only, and fatty acid reesterification was decreased in the rpWAT but increased in the SCAT following HT. HT increased insulin responsiveness in eWAT, but not in SCAT or rpWAT. Differences in HSP expression and induction patterns following HT further support the growing body of literature differentiating distinct WAT depots in health and disease.

  9. Expression of heat shock protein 70 in the liver of extensively and intensively kept heavy pigs.

    PubMed

    Negrato, E; Di Martino, G; Vascellari, M; Radaelli, G; Capello, K; Pascoli, F; Bertotto, D; Bonfanti, L

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) by Western blot (WB) in swine liver. Subsequently, the study aimed to apply this method to two experimental groups of heavy pigs raised in different confinement systems: intensive/indoor (Group A) and extensive/outdoor (Group B). Thirty-six crossbred commercial heavy pigs were divided as follows: Group A (eight castrated males and eight females) was equally distributed into two single-sex indoor pens (1.02 m²/pig); Group B (11 castrated males and nine females) was kept in one single (partially grassy and partially wooded) open area of about 6000 m². Group A was slaughtered at 41 weeks of age (170 ± 9 kg) and Group B at 48 weeks of age (172 ± 13 kg). At the abattoir the livers of all the animals were collected and analyzed by WB assay in order to quantify the levels of HSP70. Moreover, a further liver sample was taken from the same animals in order to investigate the cellular localization of HSP70 by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The interaction between sex and group resulted statistically significant (P = 0.001). When stratified by sex, Group A showed significantly higher HSP70 values compared with Group B for both male and female subjects (P < 0.001). Stratifying by group, males showed significantly higher HSP70 values than females in Group A (P < 0.001), whereas no statistical differences were observed between sexes for Group B (P = 0.653). The IHC results evidenced cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in a granular pattern in both groups. The different expression pattern observed by WB could prove to be a useful tool in the assessment of pig health and welfare.

  10. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Sik Seo, Hyun Wook Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  11. Expression of Antioxidant Molecules and Heat Shock Protein 27 in Thyroid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Yang, Shucui; Vlantis, Alexander C; Liu, Shirley Y W; Ng, Enders K W; Chan, Amy B W; Wu, Juekun; Du, Jing; Wei, Wei; Liu, Xiaoling; Liu, Zhimin; Ng, Siu Kwan; van Hasselt, C Andrew; Tong, Michael C F; Chen, George G

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage is a known causing factor for many types of tumors, but information on the role of oxidants and antioxidants in thyroid tumors is limited. The aim of this study was to determine antioxidant levels in thyroid tumors. In this study, tumor and its matched non-tumor thyroid tissue samples were obtained from 53 patients with thyroid tumors. The levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), thioredoxin reductase 2 (TXNRD2), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), catalase (CAT), and 27 kd heat-shock protein (hsp27) were determined in both thyroid tissue samples and cultured thyroid cells by immunohistochemical staining and western blot. Hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) was used to generate oxidant stress in the cell culture experiments. We found that the levels of MnSOD, TXNRD2, GSH, Gpx, and Hsp27 were increased in both malignant and benign tumors, while the level of CAT was decreased. To verify the results of the tissue study, we treated cultured thyroid cells with H2 O2 and found the same pattern of antioxidant changes. Hsp27 was also increased after H2 O2 treatment. The expression of hsp27 was upregulated by 8.24-, 6.96-, and 3.09-fold in thyroid cancer, follicular adenoma, multinodular goiter, respectively. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the levels of hsp27 together with MnSOD, TXNRD2, GSH, and Gpx were significantly upregulated by H2 O2 in thyroid tumors. The increase of these antioxidants is observed in both malignant and benign tumors, particularly in the former. The upregulation of antioxidants is likely a protective mechanism of tumor cells to maintain their survival and growth. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2473-2481, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26970173

  12. Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase cleaves malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101). Implications for gametocytogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Michael; Russo, Crystal; Li, Xuerong; Chishti, Athar H.

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • PfSPP is an ER resident protease. • PfSPP is expressed both as a monomer and dimer. • The signal peptide of HSP101 is the first known substrate of PfSPP. • Reduced PfSPP activity may significantly affect ER homeostasis. - Abstract: Previously we described the identification of a Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase (PfSPP) functioning at the blood stage of malaria infection. Our studies also demonstrated that mammalian SPP inhibitors prevent malaria parasite growth at the late-ring/early trophozoite stage of intra-erythrocytic development. Consistent with its role in development, we tested the hypothesis that PfSPP functions at the endoplasmic reticulum of P.falciparum where it cleaves membrane-bound signal peptides generated following the enzyme activity of signal peptidase. The localization of PfSPP to the endoplasmic reticulum was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. Biochemical analysis indicated the existence of monomer and dimer forms of PfSPP in the parasite lysate. A comprehensive bioinformatics screen identified several candidate PfSPP substrates in the parasite genome. Using an established transfection based in vivo luminescence assay, malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101) was identified as a substrate of PfSPP, and partial inhibition of PfSPP correlated with the emergence of gametocytes. This finding unveils the first known substrate of PfSPP, and provides new perspectives for the function of intra-membrane proteolysis at the erythrocyte stage of malaria parasite life cycle.

  13. Retinal ganglion cell protection with geranylgeranylacetone, a heat shock protein inducer, in a rat glaucoma model.

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Joseph; Ishii, Yoko; Kwong, Jacky M K

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the effects of geranylgeranylacetone (GCA) on the expression of inducible (HSP72) and constitutive (HSC70) heat shock proteins (HSPs) on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rat model of glaucoma. METHODS: Adult Wistar rats were given intraperitoneal injections of GGA, 200 mg/kg daily. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining for HSP72 and HSC70 were performed after 1, 3, and 7 days of GGA administration. After 7 days of GGA pretreatment, intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated unilaterally by repeated trabecular argon laser photocoagulation 5 days after intracameral injection of india ink. After the first laser photocoagulation, CGA was given twice a week. RGC survival was evaluated after 5 weeks of IOP elevation. Immunohistochemistry and TdT-mediated biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) were performed after 1 week of IOP elevation. Quercetin, an inhibitor of HSP expression, was also administered to a separate group. RESULTS: There was increased expression of HSP72 in RGCs at 3 and 7 days after GGA administration, but HSC70 was unchanged. After 5 weeks of IOP elevation, there was 27% +/- 6% loss of RGCs. The administration of GGA significantly reduced the loss of RGCs, lessened optic nerve damage, decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the RGC layer, and increased HSP72. Quercetin administration abolished these protective effects. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that systemic administration of GGA protects RGCs from glaucomatous damage in a rat model and suggest a novel pathway for netroprotection for patients with glaucoma. PMID:14971562

  14. Influence of temperature stress on in vitro fertilization and heat shock protein synthesis in maize (Zea mays L. ) reproductive tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, I.; Dumas, C. )

    1990-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the response of maize (Zea mays) male and female mature reproductive tissues to temperature stress. We have tested the fertilization abilities of the stressed spikelets and pollen using in vitro pollination-fertilization to determine their respective tolerance to stress. The synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) was also analyzed in male and female tissues using electrophoresis of {sup 35}S-labeled proteins and fluorography, to establish a relationship between the physiological and molecular responses. Pollen, spikelets, and pollinated spikelets were exposed to selected temperatures (4, 28, 32, 36, or 40{degree}C) and tested using an in vitro fertilization system. The fertilization rate is highly reduced when pollinated spikelets are exposed to temperatures over 36{degree}C. When pollen and spikelets are exposed separately to temperature stress, the female tissues appear resistant to 4 hours of cold stress (4{degree}C) or heat stress (40{degree}C). Under heat shock conditions, the synthesis of a typical set of HSPs is induced in the female tissues. In contrast, the mature pollen is sensitive to heat stress and is responsible for the failure of fertilization at high temperatures. At the molecular level, no heat shock response is detected in the mature pollen.

  15. An essential role for heat shock transcription factor binding protein 1 (HSBP1) during early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Binnur; Min, Jin-Na; Zhang, Yan; Szurek, Edyta; Moskophidis, Demetrius; Eroglu, Ali; Mivechi, Nahid F

    2014-02-15

    Heat shock factor binding protein 1 (HSBP1) is a 76 amino acid polypeptide that contains two arrays of hydrophobic heptad repeats and was originally identified through its interaction with the oligomerization domain of heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1), suppressing Hsf1's transcriptional activity following stress. To examine the function of HSBP1 in vivo, we generated mice with targeted disruption of the hsbp1 gene and examined zebrafish embryos treated with HSBP1-specific morpholino oligonucleotides. Our results show that hsbp1 is critical for preimplantation embryonic development. Embryonic stem (ES) cells deficient in hsbp1 survive and proliferate normally into the neural lineage in vitro; however, lack of hsbp1 in embryoid bodies (EBs) leads to disorganization of the germ layers and a reduction in the endoderm-specific markers (such as α-fetoprotein). We further show that hsbp1-deficient mouse EBs and knockdown of HSBP1 in zebrafish leads to an increase in the expression of the neural crest inducers Snail2, Tfap2α and Foxd3, suggesting a potential role for HSBP1 in the Wnt pathway. The hsbp1-deficient ES cells, EBs and zebrafish embryos with reduced HSBP1 levels exhibit elevated levels of Hsf1 activity and expression of heat shock proteins (Hsps). We conclude that HSBP1 plays an essential role during early mouse and zebrafish embryonic development.

  16. Assembly of Lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli Requires the Essential LapB Heat Shock Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality. PMID:24722986

  17. Assembly of lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli requires the essential LapB heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-05-23

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality.

  18. Diversity of cytosolic HSP70 Heat Shock Protein from decapods and their phylogenetic placement within Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Baringou, Stephane; Rouault, Jacques-Deric; Koken, Marcel; Hardivillier, Yann; Hurtado, Luis; Leignel, Vincent

    2016-10-10

    The 70kDa heat shock proteins (HSP70) are considered the most conserved members of the HSP family. These proteins are primordial to the cell, because of their implications in many cellular pathways (e. g., development, immunity) and also because they minimize the effects of multiple stresses (e. g., temperature, pollutants, salinity, radiations). In the cytosol, two ubiquitous HSP70s with either a constitutive (HSC70) or an inducible (HSP70) expression pattern are found in all metazoan species, encoded by 5 or 6 genes (Drosophila melanogaster or yeast and human respectively). The cytosolic HSP70 protein family is considered a major actor in environmental adaptation, and widely used in ecology as an important biomarker of environmental stress. Nevertheless, the diversity of cytosolic HSP70 remains unclear amongst the Athropoda phylum, especially within decapods. Using 122 new and 311 available sequences, we carried out analyses of the overall cytosolic HSP70 diversity in arthropods (with a focus on decapods) and inferred molecular phylogenies. Overall structural and phylogenetic analyses showed a surprisingly high diversity in cytosolic HSP70 and revealed the existence of several unrecognised groups. All crustacean HSP70 sequences present signature motifs and molecular weights characteristic of non-organellar HSP70, with multiple specific substitutions in the protein sequence. The cytosolic HSP70 family in arthropods appears to be constituted of at least three distinct groups (annotated as A, B and C), which comprise several subdivisions, including both constitutive and inducible forms. Group A is constituted by several classes of Arthropods, while group B and C seem to be specific to Malacostraca and Hexapoda/Chelicerata, respectively. The HSP70 organization appeared much more complex than previously suggested, and far beyond a simple differentiation according to their expression pattern (HSC70 versus HSP70). This study proposes a new classification of cytosolic

  19. Identification and characterisation of a novel heat shock protein 90 inhibitor ONO4140.

    PubMed

    Eachkoti, Rafiqa; Reddy, M V Ramana; Lieu, Yen K; Cosenza, Stephen C; Reddy, E PremKumar

    2014-07-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 is a key component of the super-chaperone complex that maintains functionally active conformation of various client proteins. Many of these client proteins regulate important nodal points in multiple signalling pathways that promote cancer cell growth and survival. Inhibitors of Hsp90, therefore, have the potential of functioning as anti-cancer agents with pleiotropic effects. Identification of novel Hsp90 inhibitors with more favourable pharmacological properties is a priority in cancer therapy. To achieve this goal, we screened a compound library using a biochemical assay based on refolding of denatured firefly luciferase. The assay revealed high sensitivity, reliability and reproducibility with a Z-factor of 0.81 ± 0.17. Six Hsp90 inhibitory compounds identified by this screening with IC50 values between 1.0 and 6 μM were further characterised for anti-proliferative activity by Cell Titer-Blue Cell Viability Assay using multiple tumour cell lines. Of particular interest was ONO4140 with lowest GI50 values in three different cancer cell lines viz; DU-145, BT-474 and K562 cell lines. This study also revealed that short-term exposure of tumour cells with ONO4140 is sufficient to inhibit the catalytic activity of Hsp90, evaluated through disruption of Hsp90-p23 association by immunoprecipitation. This short term exposure appears to initiate events like degradation of Hsp90 client proteins such as ErbB2/Her-2 and Akt with concomitant inhibition of survival signalling leading to the apoptotic death of tumour cells as seen by western blotting and Caspase Glow-3,7 assay. The study also reveals that apoptosis following Hsp90 inhibition with ONO4140 occurs via Caspase9-Caspase3 intrinsic apoptotic pathway, a process that is likely triggered by inactivation of Akt. In conclusion, we have identified a novel class of synthetic compounds which show potent Hsp90 inhibitory action in preclinical studies. The discovery of this novel class of

  20. Diversity of cytosolic HSP70 Heat Shock Protein from decapods and their phylogenetic placement within Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Baringou, Stephane; Rouault, Jacques-Deric; Koken, Marcel; Hardivillier, Yann; Hurtado, Luis; Leignel, Vincent

    2016-10-10

    The 70kDa heat shock proteins (HSP70) are considered the most conserved members of the HSP family. These proteins are primordial to the cell, because of their implications in many cellular pathways (e. g., development, immunity) and also because they minimize the effects of multiple stresses (e. g., temperature, pollutants, salinity, radiations). In the cytosol, two ubiquitous HSP70s with either a constitutive (HSC70) or an inducible (HSP70) expression pattern are found in all metazoan species, encoded by 5 or 6 genes (Drosophila melanogaster or yeast and human respectively). The cytosolic HSP70 protein family is considered a major actor in environmental adaptation, and widely used in ecology as an important biomarker of environmental stress. Nevertheless, the diversity of cytosolic HSP70 remains unclear amongst the Athropoda phylum, especially within decapods. Using 122 new and 311 available sequences, we carried out analyses of the overall cytosolic HSP70 diversity in arthropods (with a focus on decapods) and inferred molecular phylogenies. Overall structural and phylogenetic analyses showed a surprisingly high diversity in cytosolic HSP70 and revealed the existence of several unrecognised groups. All crustacean HSP70 sequences present signature motifs and molecular weights characteristic of non-organellar HSP70, with multiple specific substitutions in the protein sequence. The cytosolic HSP70 family in arthropods appears to be constituted of at least three distinct groups (annotated as A, B and C), which comprise several subdivisions, including both constitutive and inducible forms. Group A is constituted by several classes of Arthropods, while group B and C seem to be specific to Malacostraca and Hexapoda/Chelicerata, respectively. The HSP70 organization appeared much more complex than previously suggested, and far beyond a simple differentiation according to their expression pattern (HSC70 versus HSP70). This study proposes a new classification of cytosolic

  1. Begomovirus coat protein interacts with a small heat-shock protein of its transmission vector (Bemisia tabaci).

    PubMed

    Ohnesorge, S; Bejarano, E R

    2009-11-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) is transmitted from plant to plant by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci in a persistent-circulative manner. The coat protein (CP) plays an important role in this transmission cycle. In this study, the CP was used to screen a Bemisia tabaci cDNA library using the yeast two-hybrid system, in a search for interacting partners. A member of the small heat-shock protein family (termed BtHSP16) was identified and its interaction with the CP was verified by an in vitro pull-down assay. The binding domain was located at the variable N-terminal part of the CP, while full-length BtHSP16 is required for the interaction. The putative role for this interaction in the transmission cycle by the whitefly is discussed. PMID:19817909

  2. Sodium hydrosulfide induces systemic thermotolerance to strawberry plants through transcriptional regulation of heat shock proteins and aquaporin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Temperature extremes represent an important limiting factor to plant growth and productivity. The present study evaluated the effect of hydroponic pretreatment of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa cv. ‘Camarosa’) roots with an H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; 100 μM for 48 h), on the response of plants to acute heat shock treatment (42°C, 8 h). Results Heat stress-induced phenotypic damage was ameliorated in NaHS-pretreated plants, which managed to preserve higher maximum photochemical PSII quantum yields than stressed plants. Apparent mitigating effects of H2S pretreatment were registered regarding oxidative and nitrosative secondary stress, since malondialdehyde (MDA), H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO) were quantified in lower amounts than in heat-stressed plants. In addition, NaHS pretreatment preserved ascorbate/glutathione homeostasis, as evidenced by lower ASC and GSH pool redox disturbances and enhanced transcription of ASC (GDH) and GSH biosynthetic enzymes (GS, GCS), 8 h after heat stress imposition. Furthermore, NaHS root pretreatment resulted in induction of gene expression levels of an array of protective molecules, such as enzymatic antioxidants (cAPX, CAT, MnSOD, GR), heat shock proteins (HSP70, HSP80, HSP90) and aquaporins (PIP). Conclusion Overall, we propose that H2S root pretreatment activates a coordinated network of heat shock defense-related pathways at a transcriptional level and systemically protects strawberry plants from heat shock-induced damage. PMID:24499299

  3. Regulation of heat shock protein message in Jurkat cells cultured under serum-starved and gravity-altered conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    Although our understanding of effects of space flight on human physiology has advanced significantly over the past four decades, the potential contribution of stress at the cellular and gene regulation level is not characterized. The objective of this ground-based study was to evaluate stress gene regulation in cells exposed to altered gravity and environmentally suboptimal conditions. We designed primers to detect message for both the constitutive and inducible forms of the heat shock protein, HSP-70. Applying the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we probed for HSP-70 message in human acute T-cell leukemia cells, Jurkat, subjected to three types of environmental stressors: (1) altered gravity achieved by centrifugation (hypergravity) and randomization of the gravity vector in rotating bioreactors, (2) serum starvation by culture in medium containing 0.05% serum, and (3) temperature elevation (42 degrees C). Temperature elevation, as the positive control, significantly increased HSP-70 message, while centrifugation and culture in rotating bioreactors did not upregulate heat shock gene expression. We found a fourfold increase in heat shock message in serum-starved cells. Message for the housekeeping genes, actin and cyclophilin, were constant and comparable to unstressed controls for all treatments. We conclude that gravitational perturbations incurred by centrifugal forces, exceeding those characteristic of a Space Shuttle launch (3g), and culture in rotating bioreactors do not upregulate HSP-70 gene expression. In addition, we found RT-PCR useful for evaluating stress in cultured cells. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Targeting heat-shock protein 90 with ganetespib for molecularly targeted therapy of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Lu, J; Hua, Y; Zhang, P; Liang, Z; Ruan, L; Lian, C; Shi, H; Chen, K; Tu, Z

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) has become an attractive therapeutic target in treating cancers, because of its abnormally high expression in cancers. Several successful cases of HSP90 inhibitors capable of inhibiting GC inspired us to try ganetespib, a clinically promising and actively investigated second-generation HSP90 inhibitor in GC treatment. In our study, we show that ganetespib markedly reduced the growth of MGC-803 and also significantly inhibited the growth of SGC-7901 and MKN-28 in a dose-dependent manner. It induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in all three cell lines, together with the related markers affected significantly. Mechanistically, ganetespib caused pronounced decrease of expression of classic HSP90 client proteins. Specifically, it greatly affected epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling cascades by markedly decreasing the levels of total EGFR and EGFR on cell membranes. EGFR knockdown also induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis accompanied with a decrease of several EGFR downstream proteins. These results strongly support that EGFR signaling greatly contributes to the ganetespib inhibitory effects. Besides, we found that the responses of GC cell lines to ganetespib correlated well with their EGFR expression levels: MGC-803, as well as AGS and BGC-803, with higher EGFR expression responded to ganetespib better, whereas SGC-7901 and MKN-28 with lower EGFR levels were much less sensitive to ganetespib. Although SGC-7901 and MKN-28 were not very sensitive to ganetespib, ganetespib worked synergistically with radiation and cisplatin in killing them. Importantly, ganetespib significantly inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors in vivo as a single agent or in combination with cisplatin. Results of hematoxylin/eosin staining, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling) assays, and immunohistochemistry staining of phosphorylated cyclin

  5. Resveratrol induces apoptosis in K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) cells by targeting a key survival protein, heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Prabir K; Mustafi, Soumyajit Banerjee; Ganguly, Sudipto; Chatterjee, Mitali; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2008-06-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease associated with a characteristic chromosomal translocation called the Philadelphia chromosome. This results in the expression of the Bcr-Abl fusion protein, a constitutively active protein tyrosine kinase. Although there are a few treatment options with Bcr-Abl kinase inhibitors, drug resistance is often encountered. One of the major obstacles in overcoming drug resistance in CML is the high endogenous levels of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). Resveratrol is a phytoalexin produced by several plants. We studied the chemotherapeutic effects and mode of action of resveratrol on K562 (CML) cells. Resveratrol induced apoptosis in K562 cells in a time-dependent manner. This was established by increased annexin V binding, corroborated with an enhanced caspase-3 activity and a rise in the sub-G(0)/G(1) population. Resveratrol treatment also caused suppression of Hsp70 both in mRNA and protein levels. The downregulation of Hsp70 by resveratrol exposure was correlated with a diminished presence of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in the nucleus, and the downregulation of transcriptional activity of HSF1. High endogenous levels of Hsp70 have been found to be a deterrent for sensitivity to chemotherapy. We show here that resveratrol could considerably enhance the apoptosis induction in K562 cells by 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, an anticancer agent that inhibits Hsp90 but augments Hsp70 levels. We conclude that resveratrol significantly downregulated Hsp70 levels through inhibition of HSF1 transcriptional activity and appreciably augmented the pro-apoptotic effects of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin.

  6. Effects of heat shock protein 90 expression on pectoralis major oxidation in broilers exposed to acute heat stress.

    PubMed

    Hao, Y; Gu, X H

    2014-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) expression on pH, lipid peroxidation, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression of pectoralis major in broilers exposed to acute heat stress. In total, 90 male broilers were randomly allocated to 3 groups: control (CON), heat stress (HS), or geldanamycin treatment (GA). On d 41, the broilers in the GA group were injected intraperitoneally with GA (5 μg/kg of BW), and the broilers in the CON and HS groups were injected intraperitoneally with saline. Twenty-four hours later, the broilers in the CON group were moved to environmental chambers controlled at 22°C for 2 h, and the broilers in the HS and GA groups were moved to environmental chambers controlled at 40°C for 2 h. The pH values of the pectoralis major after 30 min and 24 h of chilling after slaughter of HS and GA broilers were significantly lower (P < 0.01) than those of the CON broilers. Heat stress caused significant increases in sera corticosterone and lactic dehydrogenase, the activity of malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase, the expression of HSP90 and HSP70, and nuclear expression of GR protein in the pectoralis major (P < 0.05). Heat stress induced a significant decrease in GR protein expression in the cytoplasm and GR mRNA expression. Furthermore, the low expression of HSP90 significantly increased levels of lactic dehydrogenase and malondialdehyde and GR protein expression in the cytoplasm under heat stress (P < 0.01), and significantly decreased nuclear GR protein expression (P < 0.01). Heat shock protein 90 was positively correlated with corticosterone and superoxide dismutase activities (P < 0.01), and HSP90 mRNA was negatively correlated with pH after chilling for 24 h. The results demonstrated that HSP90 plays a pivotal role in protecting cells from oxidation.

  7. Investigation of the chaperone function of the small heat shock protein — AgsA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A small heat shock protein AgsA was originally isolated from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We previously demonstrated that AgsA was an effective chaperone that could reduce the amount of heat-aggregated proteins in an Escherichia coli rpoH mutant. AgsA appeared to promote survival at lethal temperatures by cooperating with other chaperones in vivo. To investigate the aggregation prevention mechanisms of AgsA, we constructed N- or C-terminal truncated mutants and compared their properties with wild type AgsA. Results AgsA showed significant overall homology to wheat sHsp16.9 allowing its three-dimensional structure to be predicted. Truncations of AgsA until the N-terminal 23rd and C-terminal 11th amino acid (AA) from both termini preserved its in vivo chaperone activity. Temperature-controlled gel filtration chromatography showed that purified AgsA could maintain large oligomeric complexes up to 50°C. Destabilization of oligomeric complexes was observed for N-terminal 11- and 17-AA truncated AgsA; C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA could not form large oligomeric complexes. AgsA prevented the aggregation of denatured lysozyme, malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and citrate synthase (CS) but did not prevent the aggregation of insulin at 25°C. N-terminal 17-AA truncated AgsA showed no chaperone activity towards MDH. C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA showed weak or no chaperone activity towards lysozyme, MDH and CS although it prevented the aggregation of insulin at 25°C. When the same amount of AgsA and C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA were mixed (half of respective amount required for efficient chaperone activities), good chaperone activity for all substrates and temperatures was observed. Detectable intermolecular exchanges between AgsA oligomers at 25°C were not observed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis; however, significant exchanges between AgsA oligomers and C-terminal truncated AgsA were observed at 25°C. Conclusions Our data

  8. Discovery of NMS-E973 as novel, selective and potent inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90).

    PubMed

    Brasca, Maria Gabriella; Mantegani, Sergio; Amboldi, Nadia; Bindi, Simona; Caronni, Dannica; Casale, Elena; Ceccarelli, Walter; Colombo, Nicoletta; De Ponti, Anna; Donati, Daniele; Ermoli, Antonella; Fachin, Gabriele; Felder, Eduard R; Ferguson, Ronald D; Fiorelli, Claudio; Guanci, Marco; Isacchi, Antonella; Pesenti, Enrico; Polucci, Paolo; Riceputi, Laura; Sola, Francesco; Visco, Carlo; Zuccotto, Fabio; Fogliatto, Gianpaolo

    2013-11-15

    Novel small molecule inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) were discovered with the help of a fragment based drug discovery approach (FBDD) and subsequent optimization with a combination of structure guided design, parallel synthesis and application of medicinal chemistry principles. These efforts led to the identification of compound 18 (NMS-E973), which displayed significant efficacy in a human ovarian A2780 xenograft tumor model, with a mechanism of action confirmed in vivo by typical modulation of known Hsp90 client proteins, and with a favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile.

  9. Discovery of NMS-E973 as novel, selective and potent inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90).

    PubMed

    Brasca, Maria Gabriella; Mantegani, Sergio; Amboldi, Nadia; Bindi, Simona; Caronni, Dannica; Casale, Elena; Ceccarelli, Walter; Colombo, Nicoletta; De Ponti, Anna; Donati, Daniele; Ermoli, Antonella; Fachin, Gabriele; Felder, Eduard R; Ferguson, Ronald D; Fiorelli, Claudio; Guanci, Marco; Isacchi, Antonella; Pesenti, Enrico; Polucci, Paolo; Riceputi, Laura; Sola, Francesco; Visco, Carlo; Zuccotto, Fabio; Fogliatto, Gianpaolo

    2013-11-15

    Novel small molecule inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) were discovered with the help of a fragment based drug discovery approach (FBDD) and subsequent optimization with a combination of structure guided design, parallel synthesis and application of medicinal chemistry principles. These efforts led to the identification of compound 18 (NMS-E973), which displayed significant efficacy in a human ovarian A2780 xenograft tumor model, with a mechanism of action confirmed in vivo by typical modulation of known Hsp90 client proteins, and with a favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile. PMID:24100158

  10. Can heat shock protein 32 be used for the early diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia?

    PubMed Central

    Berhuni, Sait; Öztürk, Ersin; Oral, Arzu Yılmaztepe; Sarkut, Pınar; Kahveci, Nevzat; Yılmazlar, Tuncay; Özlük, Kasım; Yerci, Ömer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Acute mesenteric ischemia is a challenging and fatal disease. The aim of this study was to detect the heat shock protein 32 (HSP32) response in intestinal tissue and systemic blood to intestinal ischemia and ischemia/reperfusion to define a tool for the early diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia. Material and Methods: Thirty female Wistar albino rats were equally divided into 3 groups. Group 1 rats underwent simple laparotomy and closure (control). In Group 2 rats, 1-hour intestinal ischemia followed by 5-hour reperfusion was performed, and Group 3 rats were subjected to 6-hour intestinal ischemia. The experiment was repeated with a 24-hour waiting period. At the end of the waiting period, blood was withdrawn from the tail veins of the rats and the rats were sacrificed via cardiac puncture. Re-laparotomy was subsequently performed and intestinal tissue and luminal samples were obtained for biochemical and pathological investigations. The HSP32 levels of intestinal tissues, luminal contents and blood levels were compared among the groups. Results: At the end of the 24-hour waiting period, the median tissue HSP32 levels were 0.43 (0–6.6) ng/mL for Group 1, 9.51 (2.5–49.9) ng/mL for Group 2 and 43.13 (6.3–121.3) ng/mL for Group 3 (p=0.001). The median blood HSP32 levels were 0.11 (0.1–1.4) ng/mL for Group 1, 0.42 (0.1–0.7) ng/mL for Group 2, and 0.25 (0.1–1.2) ng/mL for Group 3 (p=0.047). The HSP levels in the luminal contents were undetectable. Conclusion: Both ischemia and ischemia/reperfusion significantly raised intestinal tissue HSP32 levels in comparison with the control group. However, this change was not reflected in the circulating blood or luminal contents. PMID:26985164

  11. The effect of inhibition of heat-shock proteins on thiram-induced tibial dyschondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Genin, O; Hasdai, A; Shinder, D; Pines, M

    2012-07-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is a skeletal abnormality that can cause economic losses and animal welfare concerns. Thiram-induced TD is characterized by enlarged, unvascularized growth plates, low levels of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor Flk-1, abnormal chondrocyte differentiation, and lameness. Recently we reported the involvement of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in chondrocyte differentiation and growth-plate vascularization. Inhibition of Hsp90 activity in thiram-induced TD resulted in increased Flk-1 levels, re-instated normal growth-plate angiogenesis and morphology, and abrogated lameness. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of various concentrations of 17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), an inhibitor of Hsp90 activity, in preventing growth-plate histopathology and lameness in TD-affected chicks. Low doses of 17-DMAG (2 injections, each of 100 or 300 μg) did not prevent TD development even though Flk-1 levels were restored, which suggests that Flk-1 is not the only rate-limiting factor in growth-plate angiogenesis. High doses of 17-DMAG (2 injections, each of 600 or 900 μg) prevented BW loss, decreased the TD score, reduced lesion width, restored proper chondrocyte differentiation, increased blood vessel invasion, and eliminated lameness. To assess the specificity of Hsp90, we evaluated the efficacy of the flavonoid quercetin, an inhibitor of Hsp70 synthesis, in preventing TD development; it decreased Hsp70 levels but not those of Hsp90 in the control growth plates and prevented upregulation of Hsp70 in the TD-affected growth plates. Dietary quercetin (at 100 or 500 ppm) did not prevent the hypoxia that is characteristic of the TD-affected growth plate or development of thiram-induced TD and lameness. The present results demonstrate the specificity and the major role of Hsp90 in chondrocyte differentiation and growth-plate vascularization. In contrast to the anti-angiogenic effect of 17-DMAG observed

  12. Dinoflagellate Phylogeny as Inferred from Heat Shock Protein 90 and Ribosomal Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenrath, Mona; Leander, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Interrelationships among dinoflagellates in molecular phylogenies are largely unresolved, especially in the deepest branches. Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences provide phylogenetic signals only at the tips of the dinoflagellate tree. Two reasons for the poor resolution of deep dinoflagellate relationships using rDNA sequences are (1) most sites are relatively conserved and (2) there are different evolutionary rates among sites in different lineages. Therefore, alternative molecular markers are required to address the deeper phylogenetic relationships among dinoflagellates. Preliminary evidence indicates that the heat shock protein 90 gene (Hsp90) will provide an informative marker, mainly because this gene is relatively long and appears to have relatively uniform rates of evolution in different lineages. Methodology/Principal Findings We more than doubled the previous dataset of Hsp90 sequences from dinoflagellates by generating additional sequences from 17 different species, representing seven different orders. In order to concatenate the Hsp90 data with rDNA sequences, we supplemented the Hsp90 sequences with three new SSU rDNA sequences and five new LSU rDNA sequences. The new Hsp90 sequences were generated, in part, from four additional heterotrophic dinoflagellates and the type species for six different genera. Molecular phylogenetic analyses resulted in a paraphyletic assemblage near the base of the dinoflagellate tree consisting of only athecate species. However, Noctiluca was never part of this assemblage and branched in a position that was nested within other lineages of dinokaryotes. The phylogenetic trees inferred from Hsp90 sequences were consistent with trees inferred from rDNA sequences in that the backbone of the dinoflagellate clade was largely unresolved. Conclusions/Significance The sequence conservation in both Hsp90 and rDNA sequences and the poor resolution of the deepest nodes suggests that dinoflagellates reflect an explosive

  13. Design of heat shock-resistant surfaces to prevent protein aggregation: Enhanced chaperone activity of immobilized α-Crystallin.

    PubMed

    Ray, Namrata; Roy, Sarita; Singha, Santiswarup; Chandra, Bappaditya; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr; Sarkar, Amitabha

    2014-05-21

    α-Crystallin is a multimeric protein belonging to the family of small heat shock proteins, which function as molecular chaperones by resisting heat and oxidative stress induced aggregation of other proteins. We immobilized α-Crystallin on a self-assembled monolayer on glass surface and studied its activity in terms of the prevention of aggregation of aldolase. We discovered that playing with grafted protein density led to interesting variations in the chaperone activity of immobilized α-Crystallin. This result is in accordance with the hypothesis that dynamicity of subunits plays a vital role in the functioning of α-Crystallin and might be able to throw light on the structure-activity relationship. We showed that the chaperone activity of a certain number of immobilized α-Crystallins was superior compared to a solution containing an equivalent number of the protein and 10 times the number of the protein at temperatures >60 °C. The α-Crystallin grafted surfaces retained activity on reuse. This could also lead to the design of potent heat-shock resistant surfaces that can find wide applications in storage and shipping of protein based biopharmaceuticals.

  14. Novel isoforms of heat shock transcription factor 1, HSF1γα and HSF1γβ, regulate chaperone protein gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Neueder, Andreas; Achilli, Francesca; Moussaoui, Saliha; Bates, Gillian P

    2014-07-18

    The heat shock response, resulting in the production of heat shock proteins or molecular chaperones, is triggered by elevated temperature and a variety of other stressors. Its master regulator is heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1). Heat shock factors generally exist in multiple isoforms. The two known isoforms of HSF1 differ in the inclusion (HSF1α) or exclusion (HSF1β) of exon 11. Although there are some data concerning the differential expression patterns and transcriptional activities of HSF2 isoforms during development, little is known about the distinct properties of the HSF1 isoforms. Here we present evidence for two novel HSF1 isoforms termed HSF1γα and HSF1γβ, and we show that the HSF1 isoform ratio differentially regulates heat shock protein gene transcription. Hsf1γ isoforms are expressed in various mouse tissues and are translated into protein. Furthermore, after heat shock, HSF1γ isoforms are exported from the nucleus more rapidly or degraded more quickly than HSF1α or HSF1β. We also show that each individual HSF1 isoform is sufficient to induce the heat shock response and that expression of combinations of HSF1 isoforms, in particular HSF1α and HSF1β, results in a synergistic enhancement of the transcriptional response. In addition, HSF1γ isoforms potentially suppress the synergistic effect of HSF1α and HSF1β co-expression. Collectively, our observations suggest that the expression of HSF1 isoforms in a specific ratio provides an additional layer in the regulation of heat shock protein gene transcription.

  15. Detection and identification of heat shock protein 10 as a biomarker in colorectal cancer by protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Bogumil, Ralf; Ernst, Günther; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2006-04-01

    Although colorectal cancer is one of the best-characterized tumors with regard to the multistep progression, it remains one of the most frequent and deadly neoplasms. For a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the process of tumorigenesis and tumor progression, changes in protein expression between microdissected normal and tumorous colonic epithelium were analyzed. Cryostat sections from colorectal tumors, adenoma tissue, and adjacent normal mucosa were laser-microdissected and analyzed using ProteinChip Arrays. The derived MS profiles exhibited numerous statistical differences. One peak showing significantly high expression in the tumor was purified by reverse-phase chromatography and SDS-PAGE. The protein band of interest was passively eluted from the gel and identified as heat shock protein 10 (HSP 10) by tryptic digestion, peptide mapping, and MS/MS analysis. This tumor marker was further characterized by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of HSP 10-positive tissue by ProteinChip technology confirmed the identity of this protein. This work demonstrates that biomarker in colorectal cancer can be detected, identified, and assessed by a proteomic approach comprising tissue microdissection, protein profiling, and immunological techniques. In our experience, histological defined microdissected tissue areas should be used to identify proteins that might be responsible for tumorigenesis. PMID:16502466

  16. The Arabian camel Camelus dromedarius heat shock protein 90α: cDNA cloning, characterization and expression.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Hesham; Shalaby, Manal; Embaby, Amira; Ismael, Mohammad; Pathan, Akbar; Ataya, Farid; Alanazi, Mohammad; Bassiouny, Khalid

    2015-11-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a highly conserved ubiquitous molecular chaperone contributing to assisting folding, maintenance of structural integrity and proper regulation of a subset of cytosolic proteins. In the present study, a heat shock protein 90α full length coding cDNA was isolated and cloned from the Arabian one-humped camel by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The full length cDNA sequence was submitted to NCBI GeneBank under the accession number KF612338. The sequence analysis of the Arabian camel Hsp90α cDNA showed 2202bp encoding a protein of 733 amino acids with estimated molecular mass of 84.827kDa and theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of 5.31. Blast search analysis revealed that the C. dromedarius Hsp90α shared high similarity with other known Hsp90α. Comparative analyses of camel Hsp90α protein sequence with other mammalian Hsp90s showed high identity (85-94%). Heterologous expression of camel Hsp90α cDNA in E. coli JM109 (DE3) gave a fusion protein band of 86.0kDa after induction with IPTG for 4h.

  17. Thermal protein denaturation and protein aggregation in cells made thermotolerant by various chemicals: role of heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Kampinga, H H; Brunsting, J F; Stege, G J; Burgman, P W; Konings, A W

    1995-08-01

    Thermotolerance (TT) induced by sodium arsenite (A-TT: 100 microM, 1 h, 37 degrees C) was compared to heat-induced thermotolerance (H-TT: 15 min, 44 degrees C) using HeLa S3 cells. All four pretreatments led to comparable levels of thermotolerance and also induced resistance to arsenite-, ethanol-, and diamide-induced toxicity (clonogenic ability). Stress-induced expression of the major heat shock proteins (hsp27, hsc70(p73), hsp70(p72), and hsp90) was generally highest in H-TT cells and lowest in A-TT cells. Interestingly, the four types of TT cells showed distinct differences in certain aspects of resistance against thermal protein damage. Thermal protein denaturation and aggregation determined in isolated cellular membrane fractions was found to be attenuated when they were isolated from H-TT and A-TT cells but not when isolated from E-TT and D-TT cells. The heat resistance in the proteins of the membrane fraction corresponded with elevated levels of hsp70(p72) associated with the isolated membrane fractions. In the nuclear fraction, only marginal (not significant) attenuation of the formation of protein aggregates (as determined by TX-100 (in)solubility) was observed. However, the postheat recovery from heat-induced protein aggregation in the nucleus was faster in H-TT, E-TT, and D-TT cells, but not in A-TT cells. Despite the fact that elevated levels of hsp27, hsp70(p73), and hsp70(p72) were found in the TX-100 insoluble nuclear fraction derived from all TT cells, no correlation was found with the degree of resistance in terms of the accelerated recovery from nuclear protein aggregation. The only correlation between accelerated recovery from nuclear protein aggregates was that with total cellular levels of hsp27. The data indicate that heat-induced loss of clonogenic ability may be a multitarget rather than a single target event. A threshold of damage may exist in cells after exposure to heat; multiple sets of proteins in (different compartments of) the cell

  18. The cytomegalovirus protein UL138 induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells by binding to heat shock protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Guo, Gangqiang; Sun, Xiangwei; Chen, Jing; Ye, Lulu; Ye, Sisi; Mao, Chenchen; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Lifang; Jiang, Lubin; Shen, Xian; Xue, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) could act as a tumor promoter and play an “oncomodulatory” role in the neoplastic process of several human malignancies. However, we demonstrate for the first time that UL138, a HCMV latency-associated gene, could act as a tumor inhibitor in gastric cancer (GC). The expression of UL138 is down-regulated in HCMV positive gastric adenocarcinoma tissues, especially in poorly or none differentiated tumors. Overexpression of UL138 in several human GC cell lines inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis, in association with the reduction of an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and the induction of cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, protein array analysis reveals that UL138 interacts with a chaperone protein, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). This interaction is confirmed by immunoprecipitation and immunostaining in situ in GC cell lines. In addition, this UL138-mediated cancer cell death could efficiently lead to suppression of human tumor growth in a xenograft animal model of GC. In conclusion, these results uncover a previously unknown role of the cytomegalovirus protein UL138 in inducing GC cells apoptosis, which might imply a general mechanism that viral proteins inhibit cancer growth in interactions with both chaperones and apoptosis-related proteins. Our findings might provide a potential target for new therapeutic strategies of GC treatment. PMID:26735338

  19. PredHSP: Sequence Based Proteome-Wide Heat Shock Protein Prediction and Classification Tool to Unlock the Stress Biology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravindra; Kumari, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are chaperonic proteins, which are present in every domain of life. They play a crucial role in folding/unfolding of proteins, their sorting and assembly into multi-protein complex, cell cycle control and also protect the cell during stress. Considering the fact that no web-based predictor is available for simultaneous prediction and classification of HSPs, it is imperative to develop a method, which can predict and classify them efficiently. In this study, we have developed coupled amino acid composition and support vector machine based two-tier method, PredHSP that identifies heat shock proteins (1st tier) and classifies it to different families (at 2nd tier). At 1st tier, we achieved maximum accuracy 76.66% with MCC 0.43, while at 2nd tier we achieved maximum accuracy 96.36% with MCC 0.87 for HSP20, 91.91% with MCC 0.83 for HSP40, 95.96% with MCC 0.72 for HSP60, 91.87% with MCC 0.71 for HSP70, 98.43% with MCC 0.70 for HSP90 and 97.48% with MCC 0.71 for HSP100. We have also developed a webserver, as well as standalone package for the use of scientific community, which can be accessed at http://14.139.227.92/mkumar/predhsp/index.html. PMID:27195495

  20. Synthesis of 19-substituted geldanamycins with altered conformations and their binding to heat shock protein Hsp90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitson, Russell R. A.; Chang, Chuan-Hsin; Xiong, Rui; Williams, Huw E. L.; Davis, Adrienne L.; Lewis, William; Dehn, Donna L.; Siegel, David; Roe, S. Mark; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Ross, David; Moody, Christopher J.

    2013-04-01

    The benzoquinone ansamycin geldanamycin and its derivatives are inhibitors of heat shock protein Hsp90, an emerging target for novel therapeutic agents both in cancer and in neurodegeneration. However, the toxicity of these compounds to normal cells has been ascribed to reaction with thiol nucleophiles at the quinone 19-position. We reasoned that blocking this position would ameliorate toxicity, and that it might also enforce a favourable conformational switch of the trans-amide group into the cis-form required for protein binding. Here, we report an efficient synthesis of such 19-substituted compounds and realization of our hypotheses. Protein crystallography established that the new compounds bind to Hsp90 with, as expected, a cis-amide conformation. Studies on Hsp90 inhibition in cells demonstrated the molecular signature of Hsp90 inhibitors: decreases in client proteins with compensatory increases in other heat shock proteins in both human breast cancer and dopaminergic neural cells, demonstrating their potential for use in the therapy of cancer or neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Dynamic behavior of small heat shock protein inhibition on amyloid fibrillization of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Dong; Dong, Xiao; Deng, Wei; Lai, Luhua

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of small heat shock protein inhibition on fibril formation was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peptide SSTSAA with modified ends was used for amyloid fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRET signal was followed during the fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 inhibits fibril formation when introduced in the lag phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 slows down fibril formation when introduced after the lag phase. -- Abstract: Small heat shock proteins, a class of molecular chaperones, are reported to inhibit amyloid fibril formation in vitro, while the mechanism of inhibition remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which Mj HSP16.5 inhibits amyloid fibril formation of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A. A model peptide (dansyl-SSTSAA-W) was designed by introducing a pair of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes into the peptide, allowing for the monitoring of fibril formation by this experimental model. Mj HSP16.5 completely inhibited fibril formation of the model peptide at a molar ratio of 1:120. The dynamic process of fibril formation, revealed by FRET, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy, showed a lag phase of about 2 h followed by a fast growth period. The effect of Mj HSP16.5 on amyloid fibril formation was investigated by adding it into the incubation solution during different growth phases. Adding Mj HSP16.5 to the incubating peptide before or during the lag phase completely inhibited fibril formation. However, introducing Mj HSP16.5 after the lag phase only slowed down the fibril formation process by adhering to the already formed fibrils. These findings provide insight into the inhibitory roles of small heat shock proteins on amyloid fibril formation at the molecular level.

  2. Isolation and analysis of the expression of two genes for the 81-kilodalton heat-shock proteins from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Naito, S; Komeda, Y

    1992-06-01

    We have cloned and characterized two members of the family of genes for the 81-kilodalton heat-shock proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana, HSP81-1 and HSP81-2. Comparison of the entire genomic sequence of the HSP81-1 gene with the corresponding full-length cDNA previously reported as AtHS83 (TW Conner, PR LaFayette, RT Nagao, JL Key [1990] Plant Physiol 94: 1689-1695) reveals the presence of three introns of 315, 83, and 88 base pairs. By contrast, analysis of the HSP81-2 genomic and partial cDNA sequences suggests that the HSP81-2 gene is interrupted by only two introns of 304 and 106 base pairs. The 5'-initiation sites of the two corresponding mRNAs were mapped from results of experiments with S1 nuclease. The deduced amino acid sequences of the proteins encoded by these two genes show 88% identity, and they also show striking similarities to the hsp90 family of proteins in yeast and animal cells. From the results of northern blot analysis of transcripts, it appears that the expression of the HSP81-1 gene occurs at only very low levels in the absence of heat shock and is strongly induced by heat (35 degrees C). The HSP81-2 gene is constitutively expressed at much higher levels, and its expression is moderately enhanced by elevated temperatures. Severe heat shock appears to block the splicing of the pre-mRNA transcribed from HSP81-1. We also examined the effects of arsenite and cadmium on the expression of the HSP81 genes, as well as on other groups of hsp genes in Arabidopsis. Treatment with cadmium was marginally effective in inducing hsp genes, whereas arsenite stress strongly stimulated the accumulation of each mRNA in a coordinated fashion. PMID:16668895

  3. Phosphorylation of Heat Shock Protein 27 is Increased by Cast Immobilization and by Serum-free Starvation in Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Jang, Sung-Ho; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] Cast immobilization- and cell starvation-induced loss of muscle mass are closely associated with a dramatic reduction in the structural muscle proteins. Heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones that are constitutively expressed in several eukaryotic cells and have been shown to protect against various stressors. However, the changes in the phosphorylation of atrophy-related heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) are still poorly understood in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examine whether or not phosphorylation of HSP27 is changed in the skeletal muscles after cast immobilization and serum-free starvation with low glucose in a time-dependent manner. [Methods] We undertook a HSP27 expression and high-resolution differential proteomic analysis in skeletal muscles. Furthermore, we used western blotting to examine protein expression and phosphorylation of HSP27 in atrophied gastrocnemius muscle strips and L6 myoblasts. [Results] Cast immobilization and starvation significantly upregulated the phosphorylation of HSP27 in a time-dependent manner, respectively. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that cast immobilization- and serum-free starvation-induced atrophy may be in part related to changes in the phosphorylation of HSP27 in rat skeletal muscles.

  4. A key role for heat shock protein 70 in the localization and insertion of tombusvirus replication proteins to intracellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Yung-Liang; Stork, Jozsef; Nagy, Peter D

    2009-04-01

    Plus-stranded RNA viruses coopt host proteins to promote their robust replication in infected hosts. Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) is a model virus that can replicate a small replicon RNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in plants. The tombusvirus replicase complex contains heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), an abundant cytosolic chaperone, which is required for TBSV replication. To dissect the function of Hsp70 in TBSV replication, in this paper we use an Hsp70 mutant (ssa1 ssa2) yeast strain that supports a low level of TBSV replication. Using confocal laser microscopy and cellular fractionation experiments, we find that the localization of the viral replication proteins changes to the cytosol in the mutant cells from the peroxisomal membranes in wild-type cells. An in vitro membrane insertion assay shows that Hsp70 promotes the integration of the viral replication proteins into subcellular membranes. This step seems to be critical for the assembly of the viral replicase complex. Using a gene-silencing approach and quercetin as a chemical inhibitor to downregulate Hsp70 levels, we also confirm the significance of cytosolic Hsp70 in the replication of TBSV and other plant viruses in a plant host. Taken together, our results suggest that cytosolic Hsp70 plays multiple roles in TBSV replication, such as affecting the subcellular localization and membrane insertion of the viral replication proteins as well as the assembly of the viral replicase. PMID:19153242

  5. A 75 kd merozoite surface protein of Plasmodium falciparum which is related to the 70 kd heat-shock proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshir, F; Flint, J E; Richman, S J; Reese, R T

    1987-01-01

    Proteins on the merozoite surface of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum are targets of the host's immune response. The merozoite surface location of p75, a 75 kd P. falciparum protein, was established by immunoelectron microscopy using antisera raised to the expressed product of a cDNA clone. Immunoprecipitation from protein extracts biosynthetically labeled during different periods of the asexual cycle showed that p75 is made continuously, although ring-stage parasites appear to synthesize larger quantities. p75 is conserved and invariant in size in eight isolates of P. falciparum. The 880 bp cDNA sequence encoding part of p75 reveals one open reading frame containing a repetitive sequence unit of four amino acids. The predicted reading frame is correct since antisera to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the repetitive region recognize p75 in immunoblots. The sequence of p75 is homologous with the sequences of proteins from the ubiquitous, highly conserved family of 70 kd heat-shock proteins, suggesting an important physiological function for p75. The cDNA fragment encoding part of p75 hybridizes with multiple genomic fragments, whose sizes are identical in DNA from nine P. falciparum strains, suggesting that the gene for p75 is well conserved and may be part of a gene family. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3556166

  6. Gene expression analysis of heat shock proteins in the nucleus accumbens of rats with different morphine seeking behaviours.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elisabet; Bocos, Carlos; Del Castillo, Carmen; Pérez-García, Carmen; Morales, Lidia; Alguacil, Luis F

    2011-11-20

    Heat-shock proteins play functional roles on brain regulatory processes which are deeply involved in drug addiction, such as synaptic plasticity. However, few studies have been focused on gene expression of heat-shock proteins (Hsp) as potential diagnostic tools for addiction risk. This work tries to provide new knowledge on this field by using two rat models of differential vulnerability to morphine addiction in order to study differential gene expression of a selected group of Hsp genes in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Hsp70-1A, 84, 86 and 105 genes were similarly regulated by an acute injection of morphine in two subpopulations of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats showing different rates of extinction of morphine conditioned preference. However, Lewis and Fischer rats, two strains that differ in many aspects of drug seeking behaviours, exhibited marked differences in their expression patterns of Hsp84, 86 and 105. These results suggest that differential Hsp gene expression could be related to addiction vulnerability and recommend further work to validate these proteins as potential markers for drug addiction risk.

  7. Evaluation of heat shock protein 70 as a biomarker of environmental stress in Fucus serratus and Lemna minor.

    PubMed

    Elyse Ireland, H; Harding, Steve J; Bonwick, Graham A; Jones, Michael; Smith, Christopher J; Williams, John H H

    2004-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are known to be induced in response to short-term stress. The present study aimed to evaluate the potential of Hsp70 as a biomarker of stress produced by increased temperature, osmotic pressure, and exposure to cadmium and sodium chloride in marine macroalgae and fresh water plant species. An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IC-ELISA) was developed with a working range of 0.025-10 microg ml(-1) using a monoclonal antibody raised against purified Hsp70 of Phaseolus aureus (mung bean). Fucus serratus (toothed wrack), Chondrus crispus (Stackhouse or Carrageen moss), Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) and Lemna minor (common duckweed) sample extracts were stressed for up to 24 h and then tested in the IC-ELISA. The presence of Hsp70 and cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by Western blot. The heat shock response was confirmed in each species using a 2-h 42 degrees C treatment. Following heat shock, Hsp70 concentrations increased to a peak at 2 h (F. serratus) or 4 h (L. minor), after which concentrations decreased. Osmotic and cadmium stresses also resulted in elevated Hsp70 concentrations in samples of F. serratus and L. minor when compared with unstressed controls. In both, osmotic and metal stress, the production of Hsp70 increased to a maximum and subsequently decreased as the stressor levels increased. Results suggest that Hsp70 IC-ELISA could potentially be applied to the detection of stress in these aquatic species, although it would probably be most effective when used in conjunction with other measurements to provide a stressor-specific biomarker profile or fingerprint.

  8. Metal ions induced heat shock protein response by elevating superoxide anion level in HeLa cells transformed by HSE-SEAP reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhanjiang; Yang, Xiaoda; Wang, Kui

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this work is to define the relationship between heat shock protein (HSP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells exposed to different concentrations of metal ions, and to evaluate a new method for tracing the dynamic levels of cellular reactive oxygen species using a HSE-SEAP reporter gene. The expression of heat shock protein was measured using a secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene transformed into HeLa cell strain, the levels of superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were determined by NBT reduction assay and DCFH staining flow cytometry (FCM), respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that the expression of heat shock protein induced by metal ions was linearly related to the cellular superoxide anion level before cytotoxic effects were observed, but not related to the cellular hydrogen peroxide level. The experimental results suggested that metal ions might induce heat shock protein by elevating cellular superoxide anion level, and thus the expression of heat shock protein indicated by the HSE-SEAP reporter gene can be an effective model for monitoring the dynamic level of superoxide anion and early metal-induced oxidative stress/cytotoxicity.

  9. Assessment of Heat Shock Protein 70 Induction by Heat in Alfalfa Varieties and Constitutive Overexpression in Transgenic Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ferradini, Nicoletta; Iannacone, Rina; Capomaccio, Stefano; Metelli, Alessandra; Armentano, Nadia; Semeraro, Lucia; Cellini, Francesco; Veronesi, Fabio; Rosellini, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones involved in many cellular functions. It has been shown that mammalian cytosolic HSP70 binds antigenic peptides mediating the activation of the immune system, and that it plays a determining role in tumour immunogenicity. This suggests that HSP70 may be used for the production of conjugated vaccines. Human and plant HSPs share high sequence similarity and some important biological functions in vitro. In addition, plant HSPs have no endotoxic side effects. Extraction of HSP70 from plants for use as vaccine adjuvant requires enhancing its concentration in plant tissues. In this work, we explored the possibility to produce HSP70 in both transgenic and non-transgenic plants, using alfalfa as a model species. First, a transcriptional analysis of a constitutive and an inducible HSP70 genes was conducted in Arabidopsis thaliana. Then the coding sequence of the inducible form was cloned and introduced into alfalfa by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and the accumulation of the protein in leaf tissue of transgenic plants was demonstrated. We also tested diverse alfalfa varieties for heat-inducible expression of endogenous HSP70, revealing variety-specific responses to heat shock. PMID:25951604

  10. [The role of heat shock proteins HSP90 in the response of immune cells to centimeter microwaves].

    PubMed

    Glushkova, O V; Novoselova, E G; Khrenov, M O; Novoselova, T V; Cherenkov, D A; Lunin, S M; Fesenko, E E

    2008-01-01

    The effects of low-level electromagnetic waves (8.15-18 GHz, 1 microW/cm2, 1 h) on the production of heat shock proteins, several cytokines, and nitric oxide in isolated mouse macrophages and lymphocytes were examined both under normal conditions and after the treatment of the cells with geldanamycin (GA), a depressor of activity of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). The irradiation of cells without GA induced the production of Hsp70, nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and the tumor necrosis factor -alpha (TNF-alpha). No changes in the production of Hsp90 in irradiated cells were observed, but intracellular locations of Hsp25 and Hsp70 altered. The preliminary treatment of cells with GA did not remove the effects of microwaves: in these conditions, the synthesis of all cytokines tested, nitric oxide, as well as total and membrane amount of Hsp70, and the amount of Hsp25 in the cytoplasm and cytoskeleton increased. Moreover, the exposure of cells incubated with GA resulted in the reduction of Hsp90-alpha production. PMID:18488507

  11. Dynamics of heat shock protein 70 concentrations in peripheral blood lymphocyte lysates during pregnancy in lactating Holstein-Friesian cows.

    PubMed

    Yániz, J L; López-Gatius, F; Almería, S; Carretero, T; García-Ispierto, I; Serrano, B; Smith, R F; Dobson, H; Santolaria, P

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the dynamics of the concentrations of heat shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) in peripheral blood lymphocytes of lactating Holstein-Friesian dairy cows (Bos taurus) during pregnancy. The detection of pregnancy was carried out and blood samples collected on Days 40, 90, 120, 150, 180, and 210 of gestation from 46 cows (11 primiparous and 35 pluriparous, 34 seropositive and 12 seronegative to Neospora caninum). Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated by density gradient centrifugation. Serologic analysis of Neospora infection and determinations of HSP70 concentrations in lymphocyte lysates were carried out using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Climate variables were monitored using on-farm data loggers. Heat shock protein 70 concentrations increased in lymphocytes as gestation progressed, particularly in primiparous cows, with no effect from Neospora infection, climate variables, milk production, semen-providing bull, or outcome of gestation (singletons or twins). Our results show that HSP70 concentrations increased in lymphocytes as gestation progressed and were not affected by stressful factors, such as milk production, heat stress, chronic infection (neosporosis), or twin pregnancies.

  12. Enhanced antitumor immunity of nanoliposome-encapsulated heat shock protein 70 peptide complex derived from dendritic tumor fusion cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Luo, Wen; Wang, Yucai; Chen, Jun; Liu, Yunyan; Zhang, Yong

    2015-06-01

    Tumor-derived heat shock proteins peptide complex (HSP.PC-Tu) has been regarded as a promising antitumor agent. However, inadequate immunogenicity and low bioavailability limit the clinical uses of this agent. In a previous study, we first produced an improved HSP70.PC-based vaccine purified from dendritic cell (DC)-tumor fusion cells (HSP70.PC-Fc) which had increased immunogenicity due to enhanced antigenic tumor peptides compared to HSP70.PC-Tu. In order to increase the bioavailability of HSP70.PC-Fc, the peptide complex was encapsulated with nanoliposomes (NL-HSP70.PC-Fc) in this study. After encapsulation, the tumor immunogenicity was observed using various assays. It was demonstrated that the NL-HSP70.PC-Fc has acceptable stability. The in vivo antitumor immune response was increased with regard to T-cell activation, CTL response and tumor therapy efficiency compared to that of HSP70.PC-Fc. In addition, it was shown that DC maturation was improved by NL-HSP70.PC-Fc, which added to the antitumor immunity. The results obtained for NL-HSP70.PC-Fc, which improved immunogenicity and increases the bioavailability of HSP70.PC, may represent superior heat shock proteins (HSPs)-based tumor vaccines. Such vaccines deserve further investigation and may provide a preclinical rationale to translate findings into early phase trials for patients with breast tumors.

  13. Assessment of heat shock protein 70 induction by heat in alfalfa varieties and constitutive overexpression in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Ferradini, Nicoletta; Iannacone, Rina; Capomaccio, Stefano; Metelli, Alessandra; Armentano, Nadia; Semeraro, Lucia; Cellini, Francesco; Veronesi, Fabio; Rosellini, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones involved in many cellular functions. It has been shown that mammalian cytosolic HSP70 binds antigenic peptides mediating the activation of the immune system, and that it plays a determining role in tumour immunogenicity. This suggests that HSP70 may be used for the production of conjugated vaccines. Human and plant HSPs share high sequence similarity and some important biological functions in vitro. In addition, plant HSPs have no endotoxic side effects. Extraction of HSP70 from plants for use as vaccine adjuvant requires enhancing its concentration in plant tissues. In this work, we explored the possibility to produce HSP70 in both transgenic and non-transgenic plants, using alfalfa as a model species. First, a transcriptional analysis of a constitutive and an inducible HSP70 genes was conducted in Arabidopsis thaliana. Then the coding sequence of the inducible form was cloned and introduced into alfalfa by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and the accumulation of the protein in leaf tissue of transgenic plants was demonstrated. We also tested diverse alfalfa varieties for heat-inducible expression of endogenous HSP70, revealing variety-specific responses to heat shock. PMID:25951604

  14. Assessment of heat shock protein 70 induction by heat in alfalfa varieties and constitutive overexpression in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Ferradini, Nicoletta; Iannacone, Rina; Capomaccio, Stefano; Metelli, Alessandra; Armentano, Nadia; Semeraro, Lucia; Cellini, Francesco; Veronesi, Fabio; Rosellini, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones involved in many cellular functions. It has been shown that mammalian cytosolic HSP70 binds antigenic peptides mediating the activation of the immune system, and that it plays a determining role in tumour immunogenicity. This suggests that HSP70 may be used for the production of conjugated vaccines. Human and plant HSPs share high sequence similarity and some important biological functions in vitro. In addition, plant HSPs have no endotoxic side effects. Extraction of HSP70 from plants for use as vaccine adjuvant requires enhancing its concentration in plant tissues. In this work, we explored the possibility to produce HSP70 in both transgenic and non-transgenic plants, using alfalfa as a model species. First, a transcriptional analysis of a constitutive and an inducible HSP70 genes was conducted in Arabidopsis thaliana. Then the coding sequence of the inducible form was cloned and introduced into alfalfa by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and the accumulation of the protein in leaf tissue of transgenic plants was demonstrated. We also tested diverse alfalfa varieties for heat-inducible expression of endogenous HSP70, revealing variety-specific responses to heat shock.

  15. Hsp20, a small heat shock protein of Deinococcus radiodurans, confers tolerance to hydrogen peroxide in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harinder; Appukuttan, Deepti; Lim, Sangyong

    2014-08-01

    The present study shows that DR1114 (Hsp20), a small heat shock protein of the radiationresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, enhances tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stress when expressed in Escherichia coli. A protein profile comparison showed that E. coli cells overexpressing D. radiodurans Hsp20 (EC-pHsp20) activated the redox state proteins, thus maintaining redox homeostasis. The cells also showed increased expression of pseudouridine (psi) synthases, which are important to the stability and proper functioning of structural RNA molecules. We found that the D. radiodurans mutant strain, which lacks a psi synthase (DR0896), was more sensitive to H2O2 stress than wild type. These suggest that an increased expression of proteins involved in the control of redox state homeostasis along with more stable ribosomal function may explain the improved tolerance of EC-pHsp20 to H2O2 stress.

  16. Concomitant changes in high temperature tolerance and heat-shock proteins in desert succulents. [Agave deserti, Carnegiea gigantea, Ferocactus acanthodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, S.C.; Nobel, P.S.

    1986-02-01

    Raising the day/night air temperatures from 30/sup 0/C/20/sup 0/C to 50/sup 0/C/40/sup 0/C increases the high temperature tolerated by Agave deserti, Carnegiea gigantea, and Ferocactus acanthodes by 6/sup 0/C to 8/sup 0/C; the increase is about half completed in 3 days and fully completed in 10 days. A 25 to 27 kilodalton protein concomitantly accumulates for all three desert succulents upon transfer to 50/sup 0/C/40/sup 0/C, while accumulation of other heat heat-shock proteins is species specific. Some of the induced proteins are more abundant at 3 days, while others (including the 25-27 kilodalton protein) remain after completion of high temperature acclimation.

  17. Heat Shock Protein Augmentation of Angelica gigas Nakai Root Hot Water Extract on Adipogenic Differentiation in Murine 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lumbera, Wenchie Marie L.; dela Cruz, Joseph; Yang, Seung-Hak; Hwang, Seong Gu

    2016-01-01

    There is a high association of heat shock on the alteration of energy and lipid metabolism. The alterations associated with thermal stress are composed of gene expression changes and adaptation through biochemical responses. Previous study showed that Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root extract promoted adipogenic differentiation in murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes under the normal temperature condition. However, its effect in heat shocked 3T3-L1 cells has not been established. In this study, we investigated the effect of AGN root hot water extract in the adipogenic differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes following heat shock and its possible mechanism of action. Thermal stress procedure was executed within the same stage of preadipocyte confluence (G0) through incubation at 42°C for one hour and then allowed to recover at normal incubation temperature of 37°C for another hour before AGN treatment for both cell viability assay and Oil Red O. Cell viability assay showed that AGN was able to dose dependently (0 to 400 μg/mL) increase cell proliferation under normal incubation temperature and also was able to prevent cytotoxicity due to heat shock accompanied by cell proliferation. Confluent preadipocytes were subjected into heat shock procedure, recovery and then AGN treatment prior to stimulation with the differentiation solution. Heat shocked preadipocytes exhibited reduced differentiation as supported by decreased amount of lipid accumulation in Oil Red O staining and triglyceride measurement. However, those heat shocked preadipocytes that then were given AGN extract showed a dose dependent increase in lipid accumulation as shown by both evaluation procedures. In line with these results, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis showed that AGN increased adipogenic differentiation by upregulating heat shock protection related genes and proteins together with the adipogenic markers. These findings imply the potential of AGN in heat

  18. Heat Shock Protein Augmentation of Angelica gigas Nakai Root Hot Water Extract on Adipogenic Differentiation in Murine 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lumbera, Wenchie Marie L; Dela Cruz, Joseph; Yang, Seung-Hak; Hwang, Seong Gu

    2016-03-01

    There is a high association of heat shock on the alteration of energy and lipid metabolism. The alterations associated with thermal stress are composed of gene expression changes and adaptation through biochemical responses. Previous study showed that Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root extract promoted adipogenic differentiation in murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes under the normal temperature condition. However, its effect in heat shocked 3T3-L1 cells has not been established. In this study, we investigated the effect of AGN root hot water extract in the adipogenic differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes following heat shock and its possible mechanism of action. Thermal stress procedure was executed within the same stage of preadipocyte confluence (G0) through incubation at 42°C for one hour and then allowed to recover at normal incubation temperature of 37°C for another hour before AGN treatment for both cell viability assay and Oil Red O. Cell viability assay showed that AGN was able to dose dependently (0 to 400 μg/mL) increase cell proliferation under normal incubation temperature and also was able to prevent cytotoxicity due to heat shock accompanied by cell proliferation. Confluent preadipocytes were subjected into heat shock procedure, recovery and then AGN treatment prior to stimulation with the differentiation solution. Heat shocked preadipocytes exhibited reduced differentiation as supported by decreased amount of lipid accumulation in Oil Red O staining and triglyceride measurement. However, those heat shocked preadipocytes that then were given AGN extract showed a dose dependent increase in lipid accumulation as shown by both evaluation procedures. In line with these results, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis showed that AGN increased adipogenic differentiation by upregulating heat shock protection related genes and proteins together with the adipogenic markers. These findings imply the potential of AGN in heat

  19. Heat Shock Protein Augmentation of Angelica gigas Nakai Root Hot Water Extract on Adipogenic Differentiation in Murine 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lumbera, Wenchie Marie L; Dela Cruz, Joseph; Yang, Seung-Hak; Hwang, Seong Gu

    2016-03-01

    There is a high association of heat shock on the alteration of energy and lipid metabolism. The alterations associated with thermal stress are composed of gene expression changes and adaptation through biochemical responses. Previous study showed that Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root extract promoted adipogenic differentiation in murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes under the normal temperature condition. However, its effect in heat shocked 3T3-L1 cells has not been established. In this study, we investigated the effect of AGN root hot water extract in the adipogenic differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes following heat shock and its possible mechanism of action. Thermal stress procedure was executed within the same stage of preadipocyte confluence (G0) through incubation at 42°C for one hour and then allowed to recover at normal incubation temperature of 37°C for another hour before AGN treatment for both cell viability assay and Oil Red O. Cell viability assay showed that AGN was able to dose dependently (0 to 400 μg/mL) increase cell proliferation under normal incubation temperature and also was able to prevent cytotoxicity due to heat shock accompanied by cell proliferation. Confluent preadipocytes were subjected into heat shock procedure, recovery and then AGN treatment prior to stimulation with the differentiation solution. Heat shocked preadipocytes exhibited reduced differentiation as supported by decreased amount of lipid accumulation in Oil Red O staining and triglyceride measurement. However, those heat shocked preadipocytes that then were given AGN extract showed a dose dependent increase in lipid accumulation as shown by both evaluation procedures. In line with these results, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis showed that AGN increased adipogenic differentiation by upregulating heat shock protection related genes and proteins together with the adipogenic markers. These findings imply the potential of AGN in heat

  20. The effect of electrical stimulation on post mortem myofibrillar protein degradation and small heat shock protein kinetics in bull beef.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Castillo, C J; Lomiwes, D; Wu, G; Frost, D; Farouk, M M

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of electrical stimulation and ultimate pH (pHu) on shear force, myofibrillar protein degradation and small heat shock protein (sHSP) concentrations in M. longissimus lumborum (LL). The LL from both sides of carcasses (n=15) was excised with low voltage electrical stimulation (ES) applied to an LL muscle from one side, while the opposing LL muscle was not stimulated (NS). Muscles were categorised into low (pHu<5.8), intermediate (5.8≤pHu<6.2) and high pHu (pHu≥6.2) and aged for up to 28days post mortem at -1.5°C. High pHu meat tenderised faster which corresponded with the faster degradation of titin and desmin in this group compared with low and intermediate pHu meat. Electrical stimulation significantly affected the variable levels of αβ-crystallin and HSP20 with higher concentrations of these sHSP in ES muscles at later ageing timepoints compared with NS muscles.

  1. A plastid-targeted heat shock cognate 70 kDa protein interacts with the Abutilon mosaic virus movement protein

    SciTech Connect

    Krenz, Bjoern; Windeisen, Volker; Wege, Christina; Jeske, Holger; Kleinow, Tatjana

    2010-05-25

    The movement protein (MP) of bipartite geminiviruses facilitates cell-to-cell as well as long-distance transport within plants and influences viral pathogenicity. Yeast two-hybrid assays identified a chaperone, the nuclear-encoded and plastid-targeted heat shock cognate 70 kDa protein (cpHSC70-1) of Arabidopsis thaliana, as a potential binding partner for the Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) MP. In planta, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis showed cpHSC70-1/MP complexes and MP homooligomers at the cell periphery and co-localized with chloroplasts. BiFC revealed cpHSC70-1 oligomers associated with chloroplasts, but also distributed at the cellular margin and in filaments arising from plastids reminiscent of stromules. Silencing the cpHSC70 gene of Nicotiana benthamiana using an AbMV DNA A-derived gene silencing vector induced minute white leaf areas, which indicate an effect on chloroplast stability. Although AbMV DNA accumulated within chlorotic spots, a spatial restriction of these occurred, suggesting a functional relevance of the MP-chaperone interaction for viral transport and symptom induction.

  2. Phosphorylation of human small heat shock protein HspB8 (Hsp22) by ERK1 protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Shemetov, Anton A; Seit-Nebi, Alim S; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2011-09-01

    A number of phosphomimicking mutants (replacement of Ser/Thr residues by Asp) of human small heat shock protein HspB8 were obtained and phosphorylation of the wild type HspB8 and its mutants by ERK1 kinase was analyzed in vitro. Mutation S159D does not affect phosphorylation, whereas mutations S24D and S27D equally moderately inhibited and mutation T87D strongly inhibited phosphorylation of HspB8. The double mutations S24D/T87D and S27D/T87D induced very strong inhibitory effect and the triple mutations S24D/S27D/T87D completely prevented phosphorylation catalyzed by ERK1. Thus, Ser24 and Thr87, found to be phosphorylated in vivo, are among the sites phosphorylated by ERK1 in HspB8 in vitro. Mutations S24D and T87D affect intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and susceptibility to chymotrypsinolysis of HspB8. Phosphomimicking mutations and phosphorylation promote concentration-dependent association of HspB8 subunits. Mutations S24D and S27D decrease, whereas mutation T87D increases the chaperone-like activity of HspB8. It is concluded that phosphorylation catalyzed by ERK1 might affect the structure and chaperone-like activity of HspB8 and therefore can be important for regulation of interaction of HspB8 with different target proteins.

  3. Effect of thermal manipulation during embryogenesis on liver heat shock protein expression in chronic heat stressed colored broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Vinoth, A; Thirunalasundari, T; Tharian, Jenny Anne; Shanmugam, M; Rajkumar, U

    2015-10-01

    Thermal manipulation during embryogenesis has been shown to improve thermo tolerance in broilers. Heat shock proteins are a family of proteins produced in response to variety of stress and protect cells from damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermal manipulation (TM) during embryogenesis on HSP gene and protein expression in the embryos and in chronic heat stressed 42nd day old chicks. On 15th day of incubation, fertile eggs from two breeds-Naked neck (NN) and Punjab Broiler-2 (PB-2) were randomly divided in to two groups, namely Control (C) eggs were incubated under standard incubation conditions and Thermal Conditioning (TC) eggs were exposed to higher incubation temperature (40.5°C) for 3h on 15th, 16th and 17th day of incubation. The chicks so obtained from each group were further subdivided and reared from 15th-42nd day as normal (N; 25±1°C, 70% RH) and heat exposed (HE; 35±1°C, 50% RH) resulting in four treatment groups (CN, CHE, TCN and TCHE). Embryos of two groups (C and TC) on 17th day and birds from four treatment groups on 42nd day were sacrificed. Liver was collected for analysis of gene expression by real-time PCR and protein expression by Western blot of Heat Shock Proteins (HSP 90 alpha, HSP 90 beta, HSP 70, HSP 60, HSP 27 and ubiquitin). The plasma collected on 42nd day was analyzed for biochemical parameters. Thermal challenging of embryos of both the breeds caused significant (P≤0.05) increase in all the HSPs gene and protein expression. The TCHE chicks had significantly (P≤0.05) lower HSPs gene and protein expressions and oxidative stress compared to CHE groups in both NN and PB-2. Based on these findings it can be concluded that TM during incubation provides adaptation to broiler chicks during chronic heat stress. PMID:26590469

  4. Cloning and sequence of the gene for heat shock protein 60 from Chlamydia trachomatis and immunological reactivity of the protein.

    PubMed Central

    Cerrone, M C; Ma, J J; Stephens, R S

    1991-01-01

    We isolated and sequenced the gene for the chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (HSP-60) from a Chlamydia trachomatis genomic library by molecular genetic methods. The DNA sequence derived revealed an operon-like gene structure with two open reading frames encoding an 11,122- and a 57,956-Da protein. The translated amino acid sequence of the larger open reading frame showed a high degree of homology with known sequences for HSP-60 from several bacterial species as well as with plant and human sequences. By using the determined nucleotide sequence, fragments of the gene were cloned into the plasmid vector pGEX for expression as fusion proteins consisting of glutathione S-transferase and peptide portions of the chlamydial HSP-60. HSP-60 antigenic identity was confirmed by an immunoblot with anti-HSP-60 rabbit serum. Sera from patients that exhibited both high antichlamydial titers and reactivity to chlamydial HSP-60 showed reactivity on immunoblots to two fusion proteins that represented portions of the carboxyl-terminal half of the molecule, whereas fusion proteins defining the amino-terminal half were nonreactive. No reactivity with the fusion proteins was seen with sera from patients that had been previously screened as nonreactive to native chlamydial HSP-60 but which had high antichlamydial titers. Sera from noninfected control subjects also exhibited no reactivity. Definition of recognized HSP-60 epitopes may provide a predictive screen for those patients with C. trachomatis infections who may develop damaging sequelae, as well as providing tools for the study of immunopathogenic mechanisms of Chlamydia-induced disease. Images PMID:1987066

  5. Evidence of prognostic relevant expression profiles of heat-shock proteins and glucose-regulated proteins in oesophageal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Berg, Daniela; Bauer, Karina; Wolff, Claudia; Malinowsky, Katharina; Bauer, Lukas; Drecoll, Enken; Bettstetter, Marcus; Feith, Marcus; Walch, Axel; Höfler, Heinz; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Langer, Rupert

    2012-01-01

    A high percentage of oesophageal adenocarcinomas show an aggressive clinical behaviour with a significant resistance to chemotherapy. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and glucose-regulated proteins (GRPs) are molecular chaperones that play an important role in tumour biology. Recently, novel therapeutic approaches targeting HSP90/GRP94 have been introduced for treating cancer. We performed a comprehensive investigation of HSP and GRP expression including HSP27, phosphorylated (p)-HSP27((Ser15)), p-HSP27((Ser78)), p-HSP27((Ser82)), HSP60, HSP70, HSP90, GRP78 and GRP94 in 92 primary resected oesophageal adenocarcinomas by using reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR). Results were correlated with pathologic features and survival. HSP/GRP protein and mRNA expression was detected in all tumours at various levels. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed two distinct groups of tumours with specific protein expression patterns: The hallmark of the first group was a high expression of p-HSP27((Ser15, Ser78, Ser82)) and low expression of GRP78, GRP94 and HSP60. The second group showed the inverse pattern with low p-HSP27 and high GRP78, GRP94 and HSP60 expression. The clinical outcome for patients from the first group was significantly improved compared to patients from the second group, both in univariate analysis (p = 0.015) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.029). Interestingly, these two groups could not be distinguished by immunohistochemistry or qPCR analysis. In summary, two distinct and prognostic relevant HSP/GRP protein expression patterns in adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus were detected by RPPA. Our approach may be helpful for identifying candidates for specific HSP/GRP-targeted therapies.

  6. Evidence of Prognostic Relevant Expression Profiles of Heat-Shock Proteins and Glucose-Regulated Proteins in Oesophageal Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Karina; Wolff, Claudia; Malinowsky, Katharina; Bauer, Lukas; Drecoll, Enken; Bettstetter, Marcus; Feith, Marcus; Walch, Axel; Höfler, Heinz; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Langer, Rupert

    2012-01-01

    A high percentage of oesophageal adenocarcinomas show an aggressive clinical behaviour with a significant resistance to chemotherapy. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and glucose-regulated proteins (GRPs) are molecular chaperones that play an important role in tumour biology. Recently, novel therapeutic approaches targeting HSP90/GRP94 have been introduced for treating cancer. We performed a comprehensive investigation of HSP and GRP expression including HSP27, phosphorylated (p)-HSP27(Ser15), p-HSP27(Ser78), p-HSP27(Ser82), HSP60, HSP70, HSP90, GRP78 and GRP94 in 92 primary resected oesophageal adenocarcinomas by using reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR). Results were correlated with pathologic features and survival. HSP/GRP protein and mRNA expression was detected in all tumours at various levels. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed two distinct groups of tumours with specific protein expression patterns: The hallmark of the first group was a high expression of p-HSP27(Ser15, Ser78, Ser82) and low expression of GRP78, GRP94 and HSP60. The second group showed the inverse pattern with low p-HSP27 and high GRP78, GRP94 and HSP60 expression. The clinical outcome for patients from the first group was significantly improved compared to patients from the second group, both in univariate analysis (p = 0.015) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.029). Interestingly, these two groups could not be distinguished by immunohistochemistry or qPCR analysis. In summary, two distinct and prognostic relevant HSP/GRP protein expression patterns in adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus were detected by RPPA. Our approach may be helpful for identifying candidates for specific HSP/GRP-targeted therapies. PMID:22911792

  7. Heat-induced mortality and expression of heat shock proteins in Colorado potato beetles treated with imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Kitazumi, Ai; Alpuerto, Jasper; Alyokhin, Andrei; de Los Reyes, Benildo

    2016-08-01

    The Colorado potato beetle is an important pest of solanaceous plants in the Northern Hemisphere. Better understanding of its physiological responses to temperature stress and their interactions with still-prevalent chemical control has important implications for the management of this insect. We measured mortality and expression of the Hsp70 heat shock proteins in the Colorado potato beetle larvae exposed to sublethal concentration of the commonly used insecticide imidacloprid, and to supraoptimal temperatures. Both turned out to be significant stress factors, although induction of Hsp70 by imidacloprid observed in the present study was low compared to its induction by the heat. The two factors also interacted with each other. At an extreme temperature of 43 °C, exposure to a sublethal dose of imidacloprid resulted in a significant rise in larval mortality, which was not observed at an optimal temperature of 25 °C. Heat-stressed larvae also failed to respond to imidacloprid by producing more Hsp70. These findings suggest that when field rates of insecticides become insufficient for killing the exposed beetles under optimal temperature conditions due to the evolution of resistance in beetle populations, they may still reduce the probability of resistant beetles surviving the heat shock created by using propane flamers as a rescue treatment. PMID:25504556

  8. Heat-induced mortality and expression of heat shock proteins in Colorado potato beetles treated with imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Kitazumi, Ai; Alpuerto, Jasper; Alyokhin, Andrei; de Los Reyes, Benildo

    2016-08-01

    The Colorado potato beetle is an important pest of solanaceous plants in the Northern Hemisphere. Better understanding of its physiological responses to temperature stress and their interactions with still-prevalent chemical control has important implications for the management of this insect. We measured mortality and expression of the Hsp70 heat shock proteins in the Colorado potato beetle larvae exposed to sublethal concentration of the commonly used insecticide imidacloprid, and to supraoptimal temperatures. Both turned out to be significant stress factors, although induction of Hsp70 by imidacloprid observed in the present study was low compared to its induction by the heat. The two factors also interacted with each other. At an extreme temperature of 43 °C, exposure to a sublethal dose of imidacloprid resulted in a significant rise in larval mortality, which was not observed at an optimal temperature of 25 °C. Heat-stressed larvae also failed to respond to imidacloprid by producing more Hsp70. These findings suggest that when field rates of insecticides become insufficient for killing the exposed beetles under optimal temperature conditions due to the evolution of resistance in beetle populations, they may still reduce the probability of resistant beetles surviving the heat shock created by using propane flamers as a rescue treatment.

  9. Involvement of small heat shock proteins, trehalose, and lipids in the thermal stress management in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Attila; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Németh, Gergely L; Vince-Kontár, Katalin; Jósvay, Katalin; Hunya, Ákos; Udvardy, Andor; Gombos, Imre; Péter, Mária; Balogh, Gábor; Horváth, Ibolya; Vígh, László; Török, Zsolt

    2016-03-01

    Changes in the levels of three structurally and functionally different important thermoprotectant molecules, namely small heat shock proteins (sHsps), trehalose, and lipids, have been investigated upon heat shock in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Both α-crystallin-type sHsps (Hsp15.8 and Hsp16) were induced after prolonged high-temperature treatment but with different kinetic profiles. The shsp null mutants display a weak, but significant, heat sensitivity indicating their importance in the thermal stress management. The heat induction of sHsps is different in wild type and in highly heat-sensitive trehalose-deficient (tps1Δ) cells; however, trehalose level did not show significant alteration in shsp mutants. The altered timing of trehalose accumulation and induction of sHsps suggest that the disaccharide might provide protection at the early stage of the heat stress while elevated amount of sHsps are required at the later phase. The cellular lipid compositions of two different temperature-adapted wild-type S. pombe cells are also altered according to the rule of homeoviscous adaptation, indicating their crucial role in adapting to the environmental temperature changes. Both Hsp15.8 and Hsp16 are able to bind to different lipids isolated from S. pombe, whose interaction might provide a powerful protection against heat-induced damages of the membranes. Our data suggest that all the three investigated thermoprotectant macromolecules play a pivotal role during the thermal stress management in the fission yeast.

  10. Expression of Heat Shock Protein Genes in Different Developmental Stages and After Temperature Stress in the Maize Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Tungjitwitayakul, Jatuporn; Tatun, Nujira; Vajarasathira, Boongeua; Sakurai, Sho

    2015-06-01

    The maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, is a major pest of rice and other postharvest grain stocks in tropical countries. Heating and cooling treatments have been adopted to control this pest. Because heat shock protein (hsp) genes respond to temperature stress, we examined the association of hsp genes with development and thermal stress in S. zeamais. The temperature response of the insect to heat and cold treatments was assessed at four developmental stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. LT50 values at high temperatures were similar among the four developmental stages, while adults were the most tolerant to low temperatures, and eggs, larvae, and pupae exhibited similar LT50 values. Expression levels of three hsps--Szhsp70, Szhsc70, and Szhsp90--fluctuated substantially throughout the four stages at a rearing temperature of 28°C. Heat shock and cold shock increased the expression of all three hsps, and the highest upregulation was observed at 40°C, although the intensity of upregulation varied among the three genes: strongly in Szhsp70, moderately in Szhsp90, and slightly in Szhsc70. Basal expression of the three hsps at 28°C and gene responses to heat and cold shock also varied significantly at the tissue level.

  11. Purification and characterization of chaperonin 60 and heat-shock protein 70 from chromoplasts of Narcissus pseudonarcissus.

    PubMed Central

    Bonk, M; Tadros, M; Vandekerckhove, J; Al-Babili, S; Beyer, P

    1996-01-01

    In chromoplast differentiation during flower formation in Narcissus pseudonarcissus, the molecular chaperones chaperonin 60 (Cpn60; alpha and beta) and heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) greatly increase in abundance. Both were purified and shown to be present in a functional form in chromoplasts, indicating their requirement in the extensive structural rearrangements during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition. The purified proteins, sequenced N terminally and from internal peptides, showed strong homology to plastid Cpn60 and Hsp 70 representatives from other plant species. During chromoplast differentiation, the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is strongly induced. The corresponding enzymes are all nuclear encoded and form a large, soluble, hetero-oligomeric protein complex after import but prior to their membrane attachment. By immunoprecipitations we have shown that the plastid Hsp70 is a structural constituent of a soluble entity also containing phytoene desaturase. PMID:8754688

  12. Alterations in protein synthesis and levels of heat shock 70 proteins in response to salt stress of the halotolerant yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa.

    PubMed

    Lahav, Ron; Nejidat, Ali; Abeliovich, Aharon

    2004-05-01

    Responses of the halotolerant yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa YRH2 to salt stress was studied. Strain YRH2 was isolated from chemical industry park wastewater evaporation ponds that are characterized by large fluctuations in salinity and pH. Upon shift to high salt medium there is a shutdown of protein synthesis. Radiolabeling and separation of proteins from salt stressed and non-stressed cells identified down-regulated heat shock 70 proteins Ssb1/2p, by N-terminal sequencing and Western blotting. Ssb's role in salt stress in both R. mucilaginosa and S. cerevisiae was examined and we show that its response to salt stress and amino acid limitation is similar. Other proteins such as the heat shock 70 protein Kar2p/BiP and Protein Disulfide Isomerase were strongly induced in response to a shift to high salt in R. mucilaginosa and reacted in a manner similar to the effect of tunicamycin, a known unfolded protein response inducer. Also, assaying carboxypeptidase Y, we showed that high salt medium reduces the specific activity of the enzyme in R. mucilaginosa. It is suggested that the changes in the expression of the heat shock 70 proteins is a part of a mechanism which alleviates the damaging effects of high salt on protein folding in the yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa.

  13. Overexpression of small heat shock protein 21 protects the Chinese oak silkworm Antheraea pernyi against thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Dai, Li-Shang; Fu, Wei-Wei; Lin, Kun-Zhang; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2013-08-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) usually act as molecular chaperones to prevent proteins from being denatured in extreme conditions. We first report the sHSP21 gene, named as Ap-sHSP21, in the Chinese oak silkworm Antheraea pernyi (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae). The full-length cDNA of Ap-sHSP21 is 976 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 99 bp, a 3'-UTR of 316 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 561 bp encoding a polypeptide of 186 amino acids. The deduced A. pernyi sHSP21 protein sequence reveals the percent identity is 82-93% in comparison to other sHSPs from insects. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis shows that Ap-sHSP21 expression is higher in testis than that in other examined tissues and significantly up-regulated after heat shock. In addition, prokaryotic expression and purification of the Ap-sHSP21 protein were performed. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis demonstrated that a 25 kDa recombinant protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli cells and the purified recombinant protein was also confirmed to protect restriction enzymes from thermal inactivation. The expression of Ap-sHSP21 was significantly down-regulated after RNA interference, which was confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. All together, these results suggest that Ap-sHSP21 play a key role in thermal tolerance.

  14. AMNIOTIC FLUID HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 CONCENTRATION IN HISTOLOGIC CHORIOAMNIONITIS, TERM AND PRETERM PARTURITION

    PubMed Central

    Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Erez, Offer; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Vaisbuch, Edi; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Gotsch, Francesca; Than, Nandor Gabor; Mittal, Pooja; Kim, Yeon Mee; Camacho, Natalia; Edwin, Samuel; Gomez, Ricardo; Hassan, Sonia S.; Romero, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Objective Heat shock protein (HSP) 70, a conserved member of the stress protein family, is produced in almost all cell types in response to a wide range of stressful stimuli and their production has a survival value. Evidence suggests that extra-cellular HSP70 is involved in the activation of the innate and adaptive immune response. Furthermore, increased mRNA expression of HSP 70 was observed in human fetal membranes following endotoxin stimulation. This study was conducted to determine the changes in amniotic fluid HSP70 concentrations during pregnancy, term and preterm parturition, intra-amniotic infection (IAI), and histologic chorioamnionitis. Study design A cross-sectional study was conducted in 376 pregnant women in the following groups: 1) women with a normal pregnancy that were classified in the following categories: a) women in the mid-trimester (14–18 weeks) who underwent amniocentesis for genetic indications and delivered normal infants at term (n=72); b) women at term not in labor (n=23); and c) those at term in labor (n=48); 2) women with spontaneous preterm labor and intact membranes that were subdivided into the following categories: a) preterm labor who delivered at term without IAI (n=42), b) preterm labor who delivered preterm without IAI (n=57), and c) preterm labor and delivery with IAI (n=30); and 3) women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PROM) with (n=50) and without (n=54) IAI. Among patients with preterm labor with intact membranes and preterm PROM who delivered within 72 hours of amniocentesis, placenta, umbilical cord and chorioamniotic membranes were collected and assessed for the presence or absence of acute inflammatory lesions in the extra-placental membranes (histologic chorioamnionitis) and/or umbilical cords (funisitis). HSP70 concentrations in amniotic fluid were determined using a sensitive and specific immunoassay. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. A p value <0.05 was considered statistically

  15. [Changes in heat shock protein synthesis and thermotolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings as a result of inhibition of Hsp90 by geldanamycin].

    PubMed

    Kozeko, L G

    2014-01-01

    The influence of geldanamycin (GA), which is a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein Hsp90 activities, on synthesis of Hsp70 and Hsp90 and thermotolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings has been studied. Incubation of seedlings with GA was shown to induce synthesis of these stress proteins under normal conditions. Treatment of seeds with the Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in the elevated constitutive levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90 in seedlings as well as increased induction of their synthesis under heat shock, at that the effect of GA increased with its concentration. These up-regulation of Hsp promoted thermotolerance of seedlings. The obtained results are considered as evidence for autoregulation of heat shock protein synthesis and regulation of plant tolerance by Hsp90.

  16. Interactions between Small Heat Shock Protein α-Crystallin and Galectin-Related Interfiber Protein (GRIFIN) in the Ocular Lens†

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Kelly A.; Hsu, Cheng-Da; Petrash, J. Mark

    2013-01-01

    As a member of the small heat shock protein superfamily, α-crystallin has a chaperone-like ability to recognize and bind denatured or unfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation. Recent studies suggest that α-crystallin may also interact with a variety of proteins under native conditions in vitro. To identify potential binding partners for α-crystallin in the intact ocular lens, we conducted cross-linking studies in transgenic mouse lenses designed for overexpression of His-tagged human αA-crystallin. Interacting proteins were copurified with the epitope-tagged crystallin complexes and were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. This approach identified GRIFIN (galectin-related interfiber protein) as a novel binding partner. Consistent with results from cross-linking, GRIFIN subunits copurified with α-crystallin complexes during size exclusion chromatography of nontransgenic mouse lens extracts prepared without chemical cross-linking. Equilibrium binding to GRIFIN was studied using native α-crystallin isolated from calf lenses as well as oligomeric complexes reconstituted from recombinant αA- and αB-crystallin subunits. Calf lens α-crystallin binds GRIFIN with relatively high affinity (Kd=6.5 ± 0.8 μM) at a stoichiometry of 0.25 ± 0.01 GRIFIN monomer/α-crystallin subunit. The binding interaction between α-crystallin and GRIFIN is enhanced up to 5-fold in the presence of 3 mM ATP. These binding data support the hypothesis that GRIFIN is a novel binding partner of α-crystallin in the lens. PMID:19296714

  17. Heat shock protein induction by certain chemical stressors is correlated with their cytotoxicity, lipophilicity and protein-denaturing capacity.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus-Steinmetz, U; Rensing, L

    1997-12-01

    Seven agents were analyzed with respect to their ability to induce heat shock protein (HSP) synthesis in C6 rat glioma cells. Induction of HSP synthesis was correlated with cytotoxicity and lipophilicity of the substances. In addition to the first four n-alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol) and phenol, whose capacity to induce HSP was analyzed earlier (Neuhaus-Steinmetz et al., 1994. Mol. Pharmacol. 45, 36-41), isopropanol, 1,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), diethylstilbestrol (DES), carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), rotenone, paracetamol and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) induced HSP synthesis after a 1-h incubation at a substance-specific concentration. The maximal induction of HSPs was closely correlated with the cytotoxicity of all substances and occurred when cell viability was reduced to 75 +/- 11% of the controls. Cytotoxicity and the ability to induce HSP were correlated with the lipophilicity of the alcohols, phenol, rotenone and paracetamol. Calculation of the hypothetical membrane concentrations of these compounds yielded a nearly equal value (0.54 +/- 0.13 M), indicating that interaction of substances with lipophilic cellular compounds, such as membranes or lipophilic core regions of proteins, is a critical step leading to HSP induction. This assumption is supported by a correlation between HSP induction and protein denaturation by the different alcohols (Herskovits et al., 1970. J. Biol. Chem. 245, 2588-2598). We assume that the amount of misfolded proteins induced by these lipophilic agents is responsible for the induction of HSP synthesis. ASA, DNP and CCCP induced HSP at lower concentrations than substances with a similar lipophilicity, which may be due to effects which add to the misfolding of proteins or to other signal pathways.

  18. Heat shock protein 70-hom gene polymorphism and protein expression in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Boiocchi, C; Monti, M C; Osera, C; Mallucci, G; Pistono, C; Ferraro, O E; Nosari, G; Romani, A; Cuccia, M; Govoni, S; Pascale, A; Montomoli, C; Bergamaschi, R

    2016-09-15

    Immune-mediated and neurodegenerative mechanisms are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS). Growing evidences highlight the role of HSP70 genes in the susceptibility of some neurological diseases. In this explorative study we analyzed a polymorphism (i.e. HSP70-hom rs2227956) of the gene HSPA1L, which encodes for the protein hsp70-hom. We sequenced the polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in 191 MS patients and 365 healthy controls. The hsp70-hom protein expression was quantified by western blotting. We reported a strong association between rs2227956 polymorphism and MS risk, which is independent from the association with HSP70-2 rs1061581, and a significant link between hsp70-hom protein expression and MS severity. PMID:27609295

  19. The major low-molecular-weight heat shock protein in chloroplasts shows antigenic conservation among diverse higher plant species.

    PubMed

    Vierling, E; Harris, L M; Chen, Q

    1989-02-01

    Several plant species are known to synthesize low-molecular-weight nucleus-encoded heat shock proteins (HSPs) which localize to chloroplasts. DNA sequence analysis of chloroplast HSP cDNAs from pea (Pisum sativum) and soybean (Glycine max) has shown that the carboxyl-terminal halves of these proteins are homologous to low-molecular-weight HSPs from a wide range of eucaryotes (E. Vierling, R. T. Nagao, A. E. DeRocher, and L. M. Harris, EMBO J. 7:575-581, 1988). We used a pea cDNA to construct fusion proteins containing either the carboxyl-terminal heat shock domain or the amino-terminal domain of the chloroplast HSP. The fusion proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and used to produce choloroplast HSP-specific polyclonal antibodies. The carboxyl-terminal antibodies recognized chloroplast HSP precursor proteins from pea and from three divergent plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, petunia (Petunia hybrida), and maize (Zea mays). The amino-terminal antibodies recognized effectively only the pea precursor. When intact plants of each species were subjected to a heat stress regime mimicking field growth conditions, significant levels of the mature forms of the chloroplast HSPs accumulated in pea, A. thaliana, and maize. The levels of accumulated HSPs remained unchanged for 12 h following the stress treatment. We conclude that the synthesis of chloroplast-localized HSPs is an important component of the stree response in all higher plants and that chloroplast HSPs from dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants have a conserved carboxyl-terminal domain.

  20. Co-expression of a heat shock transcription factor to improve conformational quality of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shao-Yen; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Li, Shu-Jyuan; Lee, Wen-Chien

    2014-09-01

    A co-expression system was established in Escherichia coli for enhancing the cellular expression of heat shock transcription factor, sigma 32 (σ(32)). A Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the rpoH gene of E. coli, which encodes σ(32), were cloned into a bacterial plasmid containing a gene fusion encoding a doubly tagged N-acetyl-d-neuraminic acid aldolase (GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R). After the IPTG induction, a substantially higher level of sigma 32 was observed up to 3 h in the co-expression cells, but an enhancement in the solubility of target protein was manifest only in the first hour. Nevertheless, the co-expression of sigma 32 led to higher level of Neu5Ac aldolase enzymatic activity in both the soluble and insoluble (inclusion body) fractions. The Neu5Ac aldolase activity of the supernatant from the lysate of cells co-expressing GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R and recombinant σ(32) was 3.4-fold higher at 3 h postinduction than that in cells overexpressing GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R in the absence of recombinantly expressed σ(32). The results of acrylamide quenching indicated that the conformational quality of the fusion protein was improved by the co-expression of recombinant σ(32). Thus, the increased level of intracellular σ(32) might have created favorable conditions for the proper folding of recombinant proteins through the cooperative effects of chaperones/heat shock proteins expressed by the E. coli host, which resulted in smaller inclusion bodies, improved conformational quality and a higher specific activity of the overexpressed GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R protein.

  1. Susceptibility of Snails to Infection with Schistosomes is influenced by Temperature and Expression of Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Matty; Elhelu, O; Smith, M; Haugen, B; Miller, A; Raghavan, N; Wellman, C; Cousin, C; Dixon, F; Mann, V; Rinaldi, G; Ittiprasert, W; Brindley, PJ

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater snail, Biomphalaria glabrata is the obligate intermediate host for the transmission of the parasitic trematode, Schistosoma mansoni the causative agent of the chronic debilitating neglected tropical disease, schistosomiasis. We showed previously that in juvenile snails, early and significant induction of stress manifested by the expression of stress proteins, Hsp 70, Hsp 90 and reverse transcriptase (RT) of the non- LTR retrotransposon, nimbus, is a characteristic feature of juvenile susceptible NMRI but not resistant BS-90 snails. These latter, however, could be rendered susceptible after mild heat shock at 32°C, revealing that resistance in the BS-90 resistant snail to schistosomes is a temperature dependent trait. Here we tested the hypothesis that maintenance of BS-90 resistant snails at the permissive temperature for several generations affects the resistance phenotype displayed at the non-permissive temperature of 25°C. The progeny of BS-90 snails bred and maintained through several generations (F1 to F4) at 32°C were susceptible to the schistosome infection when returned to room temperature, shedding cercariae at four weeks post-infection. Moreover, the study of expression levels of the heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 protein by ELISA and western blot analysis, showed that this protein is also differentially expressed between susceptible and resistant snails, with susceptible snails expressing more protein than their resistant counterparts after early exposure to wild-type but not to radiation-attenuated miracidia. These data suggested that in the face of global warming, the ability to sustain a reduction in schistosomiasis by using refractory snails as a strategy to block transmission of the disease might prove challenging since non-lethal elevation in temperature, affects snail susceptibility to S. mansoni. PMID:26504668

  2. Prostaglandin E synthase interacts with inducible heat shock protein 70 after heat stress in bovine primary dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Richter, Constanze; Viergutz, Torsten; Schwerin, Manfred; Weitzel, Joachim M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to heat stress in dairy cows leads to undesired side effects that are reflected by complex alterations in endocrine parameters, such as reduced progesterone, estradiol, and thyroid hormone concentrations. These endocrine maladaptation leads to failure to resume cyclicity, a poor uterine environment and inappropriate immune responses in postpartum dairy cows. Prostaglandins (PG's) are lipid mediators, which serve as signal molecules in response to various external stimuli as well as to cell-specific internal signal molecules. A central role in PG synthesis plays prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) that catalyzes the isomerization of PGH2 to PGE2 .The present study was conducted to investigate heat stress associated PGES expression. Expression of PGES and inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), as a putative chaperonic protein, was studied in bovine primary fibroblasts under different heat shock conditions. Bovine primary fibroblasts produce PGE2 at homoiothermical norm temperature (38.5°C in bovine), but reduce PGE2 production rates under extreme heat stress (at 45°C for 6 h). By contrast, PGE2 production rates are maintained after a milder heat stress (at 41.5°C for 6 h). PGE2 synthesis is abolished by application of cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, indicating de novo synthesis. Heat stress increases HSP70 but not PGES protein concentrations. HSP70 physically interacts with PGES and the PGES-HSP70 complex did not dissociate upon heat stress at 45°C even after returning the cells to 37°C. The PGE2 production negatively correlates with the portion of PGES-HSP70 complex. These results suggest a protein interaction between HSP70 and PGES in dermal fibroblast cells. Blockage of PGES protein by HSP70 seems to interfere with the regulatory processes essential for cellular adaptive protection. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  3. Protein complex formation with heat shock protein 90 in chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Sandra L.; Slaughter, James C.; Kaplowitz, Mark R.; Zhang, Yongmei; Zeng, Heng; Frye, Naila Rashida; Aschner, Judy L.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant interactions between heat shock protein (Hsp)90 and its client proteins could contribute to pulmonary hypertension. We tested the hypotheses that 1) the interaction between Hsp90 and its known client protein, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), is impaired in pulmonary resistance arteries (PRAs) from piglets with pulmonary hypertension caused by exposure to 3 or 10 days of hypoxia and 2) Hsp90 interacts with the prostanoid pathway proteins prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) and/or thromboxane synthase (TXAS). We also determined whether Hsp90 antagonism with geldanamycin alters the agonist-induced synthesis of prostacyclin and thromboxane or alters PRA responses to these prostaglandin metabolites. Compared with normoxic piglets, less eNOS coimmunoprecipitated with Hsp90 in PRAs from hypoxic piglets. Despite reduced Hsp90-eNOS interactions, dilation to ACh was enhanced in geldanamycin-treated PRAs from hypoxic, but not normoxic, piglets. In PRAs from all groups of piglets, PGIS and TXAS coimmunoprecipitated with Hsp90. Geldanamycin reduced the ACh-induced synthesis of prostacyclin and thromboxane and altered responses to the thromboxane mimetic U-46619 in PRAs from all groups. Although geldanamycin enhanced responses to prostacyclin in PRAs from both groups of hypoxic piglets, geldanamycin had no effect on prostacyclin responses in PRAs from either group of normoxic piglets. Our findings indicate that Hsp90 influences both prostanoid and eNOS signaling in the pulmonary circulation of newborn piglets and that the impact of pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 on these signaling pathways is altered during exposure to chronic hypoxia. PMID:20693398

  4. In vitro assembly of the Tomato bushy stunt virus replicase requires the host Heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Pogany, Judit; Stork, Jozsef; Li, Zhenghe; Nagy, Peter D

    2008-12-16

    To gain insights into the functions of a viral RNA replicase, we have assembled in vitro and entirely from nonplant sources, a fully functional replicase complex of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). The formation of the TBSV replicase required two purified recombinant TBSV replication proteins, which were obtained from E. coli, the viral RNA replicon, rATP, rGTP, and a yeast cell-free extract. The in vitro assembly of the replicase took place in the membraneous fraction of the yeast extract, in which the viral replicase-RNA complex became RNase- and proteinase-resistant. The assembly of the replicase complex required the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 = yeast Ssa1/2p) present in the soluble fraction of the yeast cell-free extract. The assembled TBSV replicase performed a complete replication cycle, synthesizing RNA complementary to the provided RNA replicon and using the complementary RNA as template to synthesize new TBSV replicon RNA. PMID:19060219

  5. The plastid metalloprotease FtsH6 and small heat shock protein HSP21 jointly regulate thermomemory in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sedaghatmehr, Mastoureh; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Balazadeh, Salma

    2016-01-01

    Acquired tolerance to heat stress is an increased resistance to elevated temperature following a prior exposure to heat. The maintenance of acquired thermotolerance in the absence of intervening stress is called ‘thermomemory' but the mechanistic basis for this memory is not well defined. Here we show that Arabidopsis HSP21, a plastidial small heat shock protein that rapidly accumulates after heat stress and remains abundant during the thermomemory phase, is a crucial component of thermomemory. Sustained memory requires that HSP21 levels remain high. Through pharmacological interrogation and transcriptome profiling, we show that the plastid-localized metalloprotease FtsH6 regulates HSP21 abundance. Lack of a functional FtsH6 protein promotes HSP21 accumulation during the later stages of thermomemory and increases thermomemory capacity. Our results thus reveal the presence of a plastidial FtsH6–HSP21 control module for thermomemory in plants. PMID:27561243

  6. The Small Heat Shock Protein Hsp27 Affects Assembly Dynamics and Structure of Keratin Intermediate Filament Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Jona; Haslbeck, Martin; Dempfle, Lisa; Krause, Maike; Grashoff, Carsten; Buchner, Johannes; Herrmann, Harald; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of living cells are essential for many processes. They are defined by the cytoskeleton, a composite network of protein fibers. Thus, the precise control of its architecture is of paramount importance. Our knowledge about the molecular and physical mechanisms defining the network structure remains scarce, especially for the intermediate filament cytoskeleton. Here, we investigate the effect of small heat shock proteins on the keratin 8/18 intermediate filament cytoskeleton using a well-controlled model system of reconstituted keratin networks. We demonstrate that Hsp27 severely alters the structure of such networks by changing their assembly dynamics. Furthermore, the C-terminal tail domain of keratin 8 is shown to be essential for this effect. Combining results from fluorescence and electron microscopy with data from analytical ultracentrifugation reveals the crucial role of kinetic trapping in keratin network formation. PMID:24138853

  7. Expression of heat shock proteins (hsp) 27 and 70 in various organ systems in cases of death due to fire.

    PubMed

    Doberentz, E; Genneper, L; Böker, D; Lignitz, E; Madea, B

    2014-11-01

    The expression of heat shock proteins (hsp) increases in case of variable types of endogenous and exogenous cellular stress, as for example thermal stress. Immunohistochemical staining with hsp antibodies can visualize these stress proteins. Fifty-three cases of death due to heat and a control group of 100 deaths without any antemortem thermic stress were examined regarding hsp27 and hsp70 expression in myocardial, pulmonary, and renal tissues. The results revealed a correlation between hsp expression, survival time, and cause of death. In cases of death due to fire, the expression of hsp is more extensive than in the control group, especially in pulmonary and renal tissues. The immunohistochemical investigation of an hsp expression can support the proof of vitality in cases of death related to fire. PMID:24740765

  8. The plastid metalloprotease FtsH6 and small heat shock protein HSP21 jointly regulate thermomemory in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sedaghatmehr, Mastoureh; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Balazadeh, Salma

    2016-01-01

    Acquired tolerance to heat stress is an increased resistance to elevated temperature following a prior exposure to heat. The maintenance of acquired thermotolerance in the absence of intervening stress is called 'thermomemory' but the mechanistic basis for this memory is not well defined. Here we show that Arabidopsis HSP21, a plastidial small heat shock protein that rapidly accumulates after heat stress and remains abundant during the thermomemory phase, is a crucial component of thermomemory. Sustained memory requires that HSP21 levels remain high. Through pharmacological interrogation and transcriptome profiling, we show that the plastid-localized metalloprotease FtsH6 regulates HSP21 abundance. Lack of a functional FtsH6 protein promotes HSP21 accumulation during the later stages of thermomemory and increases thermomemory capacity. Our results thus reveal the presence of a plastidial FtsH6-HSP21 control module for thermomemory in plants. PMID:27561243

  9. Gibberellic Acid-Induced Aleurone Layers Responding to Heat Shock or Tunicamycin Provide Insight into the N-Glycoproteome, Protein Secretion, and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress1[W

    PubMed Central

    Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol; Hägglund, Per; Svensson, Birte; Finnie, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The growing relevance of plants for the production of recombinant proteins makes understanding the secretory machinery, including the identification of glycosylation sites in secreted proteins, an important goal of plant proteomics. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone layers maintained in vitro respond to gibberellic acid by secreting an array of proteins and provide a unique system for the analysis of plant protein secretion. Perturbation of protein secretion in gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers by two independent mechanisms, heat shock and tunicamycin treatment, demonstrated overlapping effects on both the intracellular and secreted proteomes. Proteins in a total of 22 and 178 two-dimensional gel spots changing in intensity in extracellular and intracellular fractions, respectively, were identified by mass spectrometry. Among these are proteins with key roles in protein processing and secretion, such as calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase, proteasome subunits, and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase. Sixteen heat shock proteins in 29 spots showed diverse responses to the treatments, with only a minority increasing in response to heat shock. The majority, all of which were small heat shock proteins, decreased in heat-shocked aleurone layers. Additionally, glycopeptide enrichment and N-glycosylation analysis identified 73 glycosylation sites in 65 aleurone layer proteins, with 53 of the glycoproteins found in extracellular fractions and 36 found in intracellular fractions. This represents major progress in characterization of the barley N-glycoproteome, since only four of these sites were previously described. Overall, these findings considerably advance knowledge of the plant protein secretion system in general and emphasize the versatility of the aleurone layer as a model system for studying plant protein secretion. PMID:24344171

  10. Gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers responding to heat shock or tunicamycin provide insight into the N-glycoproteome, protein secretion, and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol; Hägglund, Per; Svensson, Birte; Finnie, Christine

    2014-02-01

    The growing relevance of plants for the production of recombinant proteins makes understanding the secretory machinery, including the identification of glycosylation sites in secreted proteins, an important goal of plant proteomics. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone layers maintained in vitro respond to gibberellic acid by secreting an array of proteins and provide a unique system for the analysis of plant protein secretion. Perturbation of protein secretion in gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers by two independent mechanisms, heat shock and tunicamycin treatment, demonstrated overlapping effects on both the intracellular and secreted proteomes. Proteins in a total of 22 and 178 two-dimensional gel spots changing in intensity in extracellular and intracellular fractions, respectively, were identified by mass spectrometry. Among these are proteins with key roles in protein processing and secretion, such as calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase, proteasome subunits, and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase. Sixteen heat shock proteins in 29 spots showed diverse responses to the treatments, with only a minority increasing in response to heat shock. The majority, all of which were small heat shock proteins, decreased in heat-shocked aleurone layers. Additionally, glycopeptide enrichment and N-glycosylation analysis identified 73 glycosylation sites in 65 aleurone layer proteins, with 53 of the glycoproteins found in extracellular fractions and 36 found in intracellular fractions. This represents major progress in characterization of the barley N-glycoproteome, since only four of these sites were previously described. Overall, these findings considerably advance knowledge of the plant protein secretion system in general and emphasize the versatility of the aleurone layer as a model system for studying plant protein secretion.

  11. Heat shock protein 70 and AMP-activated protein kinase contribute to 17-DMAG-dependent protection against heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yung-Chieh; Lam, Kwok-Keung; Peng, Yi-Jen; Lee, Yen-Mei; Yang, Chung-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Yen, Mao-Hsiung; Cheng, Pao-Yun

    2016-10-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) preconditioning induces thermotolerance, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a role in the process of autophagy. Here, we investigated whether 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG) protected against heat stroke (HS) in rats by up-regulation of Hsp70 and phosphorylated AMPK (pAMPK). To produce HS, male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed in a chamber with an ambient temperature of 42°C. Physiological function (mean arterial pressure, heart rate and core temperature), hepatic and intestinal injury, inflammatory mediators and levels of Hsp70, pAMPK and light chain 3 (LC3B) in hepatic tissue were measured in HS rats or/and rats pre-treated with 17-DMAG. 17-DMAG pre-treatment significantly attenuated hypotension and organ dysfunction induced by HS in rats. The survival time during HS was also prolonged by 17-DMAG treatment. Hsp70 expression was increased, whereas pAMPK levels in the liver were significantly decreased in HS rats. Following pre-treatment with 17-DMAG, Hsp70 protein levels increased further, and pAMPK levels were enhanced. Treatment with an AMPK activator significantly increased the LC3BII/LC3BI ratio as a marker of autophagy in HS rats. Treatment with quercetin significantly suppressed Hsp70 and pAMPK levels and reduced the protective effects of 17-DMAG in HS rats. Both of Hsp70 and AMPK are involved in the 17-DMAG-mediated protection against HS. 17-DMAG may be a promising candidate drug in the clinical setting.

  12. Heat shock protein 70 and AMP-activated protein kinase contribute to 17-DMAG-dependent protection against heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yung-Chieh; Lam, Kwok-Keung; Peng, Yi-Jen; Lee, Yen-Mei; Yang, Chung-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Yen, Mao-Hsiung; Cheng, Pao-Yun

    2016-10-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) preconditioning induces thermotolerance, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a role in the process of autophagy. Here, we investigated whether 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG) protected against heat stroke (HS) in rats by up-regulation of Hsp70 and phosphorylated AMPK (pAMPK). To produce HS, male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed in a chamber with an ambient temperature of 42°C. Physiological function (mean arterial pressure, heart rate and core temperature), hepatic and intestinal injury, inflammatory mediators and levels of Hsp70, pAMPK and light chain 3 (LC3B) in hepatic tissue were measured in HS rats or/and rats pre-treated with 17-DMAG. 17-DMAG pre-treatment significantly attenuated hypotension and organ dysfunction induced by HS in rats. The survival time during HS was also prolonged by 17-DMAG treatment. Hsp70 expression was increased, whereas pAMPK levels in the liver were significantly decreased in HS rats. Following pre-treatment with 17-DMAG, Hsp70 protein levels increased further, and pAMPK levels were enhanced. Treatment with an AMPK activator significantly increased the LC3BII/LC3BI ratio as a marker of autophagy in HS rats. Treatment with quercetin significantly suppressed Hsp70 and pAMPK levels and reduced the protective effects of 17-DMAG in HS rats. Both of Hsp70 and AMPK are involved in the 17-DMAG-mediated protection against HS. 17-DMAG may be a promising candidate drug in the clinical setting. PMID:27241357

  13. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2) in regulating human sperm-egg recognition.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Brett; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Dun, Matthew D; Redgrove, Kate A; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Aitken, R John

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2), as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  14. HBP21, a chaperone of heat shock protein 70, functions as a tumor suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lingxi; Kwong, Dora Lai-Wan; Li, Yan; Liu, Ming; Yuan, Yun-Fei; Li, Yan; Fu, Li; Guan, Xin-Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, caused by genetic and epigenetic alterations, is one of the key issues in the development and progression of cancer. To identify and characterize cancer related genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) pathogenesis, transcriptome sequencing has been applied to compare expression profiles between tumor and non-tumor tissues. Among the down-regulated genes, heat shock binding protein 21 (HBP21) was selected for further study. In this study, down-regulation of HBP21 was frequently detected in primary HCCs (87/120, 72.5%), which was significantly associated with advanced clinical stage (P = 0.049), poor differentiation (P = 0.018) and poor prognosis (P = 0.026). Further study found that down-regulation of HBP21 in HCC was mainly caused by allele loss and promoter methylation. Functional study found that HBP21 could inhibit tumor cell growth rate, foci formation and colony formation in soft agar, and tumor formation in nude mice when it was transfected into HCC cells. Molecular study found that HBP21 could promote cell apoptosis, especially under adverse conditions such as heat and chemotherapeutic agent treatment. As a chaperone of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), HBP21 could inhibit interaction between HSP70 and Bax, increased Bax protein translocation from cytoplasm to mitochondria, and subsequently increased the release of cytochrome c into cytoplasm, and finally induced apoptosis. Clinically, HBP21 could be used as a prognostic biomarker for HCC outcome prediction and might be also as a novel therapeutic agent in HCC treatment.

  15. Application of the cis-regulatory region of a heat-shock protein 70 gene to heat-inducible gene expression in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Akane; Utsumi, Nanami; Morita, Maki; Ohya, Aya; Wada, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Temporally controlled induction of gene expression is a useful technique for analyzing gene function. To make such a technique possible in Ciona intestinalis embryos, we employed the cis-regulatory region of the heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like for heat-inducible gene expression in C. intestinalis embryos. We showed that Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like becomes heat shock-inducible by the 32-cell stage during embryogenesis. The 5'-upstream region of Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like, which contains heat-shock elements indispensable for heat-inducible gene expression, induces the heat shock-dependent expression of a reporter gene in the whole embryo from the 32-cell to the middle gastrula stages and in progressively restricted areas of embryos in subsequent stages. We assessed the effects of heat-shock treatments in different conditions on the normality of embryos and induction of transgene expression. We evaluated the usefulness of this technique through overexpression experiments on the well-characterized, developmentally relevant gene, Ci-Bra, and showed that this technique is applicable for inferring the gene function in C. intestinalis.

  16. A chemical-biological study reveals C9-type iridoids as novel heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Vassallo, Antonio; Temraz, Abeer; Cotugno, Roberta; Belisario, Maria A; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Chini, Maria G; Pisano, Claudio; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Braca, Alessandra

    2013-02-28

    The potential of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) as a therapeutic target for numerous diseases has made the identification and optimization of novel Hsp90 inhibitors an emerging therapeutic strategy. A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) approach was adopted to screen some iridoids for their Hsp90 α binding capability. Twenty-four iridoid derivatives, including 13 new natural compounds, were isolated from the leaves of Tabebuia argentea and petioles of Catalpa bignonioides. Their structures were elucidated by NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. By means of a panel of chemical and biological approaches, four iridoids were demonstrated to bind Hsp90 α. In particular, the dimeric iridoid argenteoside A was shown to efficiently inhibit the chaperone in biochemical and cellular assays. Our results disclose C9-type iridoids as a novel class of Hsp90 inhibitors.

  17. A virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori: role of heat shock protein in mucosal inflammation after H. pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, S; Yamaguchi, H; Osaki, T; Taguchi, H

    1998-01-01

    Among the various virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori the role of its heat shock protein 60 (HSP60, HspB) in mucosal inflammation after H. pylori infection was examined. In flow cytometric analysis, the expression of HSP60 on the cell surface was different, depending on the H. pylori strain used. The HSP60 epitope was also detected on the surface of both human gastric cancer cells (MKN45, KATOIII, and MKN28) and human gastric biopsy specimens. The intensity of the expression of HSP60 on the cell surface correlated significantly with the adhesion of H. pylori to MKN45 cells, but not with urease activity and production of vacuolating cytotoxin. A monoclonal antibody to H. pylori HSP60 inhibited the adhesion of H. pylori to MKN45 cells. These results suggest that HSP60 of H. pylori might act as an important virulence factor after H. pylori infection. PMID:9872496

  18. The taming of small heat-shock proteins: crystallization of the α-crystallin domain from human Hsp27

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, E. V.; Beelen, S.; Gusev, N. B.; Strelkov, S. V.

    2009-01-01

    Small heat-shock proteins (sHsps) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones. sHsps function as homooligomers or heterooligomers that are prone to subunit exchange and structural plasticity. Here, a procedure for obtaining diffraction-quality crystals of the α-crystallin domain of human Hsp27 is presented. Initially, limited proteolysis was used to delineate the corresponding stable fragment (residues 90–171). This fragment could be crystallized, but examination of the crystals using X-rays indicated partial disorder. The surface-entropy reduction approach was applied to ameliorate the crystal quality. Consequently, a double mutant E125A/E126A of the 90–171 fragment yielded well ordered crystals that diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution. PMID:20054128

  19. Purification and in vitro chaperone activity of a class I small heat-shock protein abundant in recalcitrant chestnut seeds.

    PubMed

    Collada, C; Gomez, L; Casado, R; Aragoncillo, C

    1997-09-01

    A 20-kD protein has been purified from cotyledons of recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) chestnut (Castanea sativa) seeds, where it accumulates at levels comparable to those of major seed storage proteins. This protein, termed Cs smHSP 1, forms homododecameric complexes under nondenaturing conditions and appears to be homologous to cytosolic class I small heat-shock proteins (smHSPs) from plant sources. In vitro evidence has been obtained that the isolated protein can function as a molecular chaperone; it increases, at stoichiometric levels, the renaturation yields of chemically denatured citrate synthase and also prevents the irreversible thermal inactivation of this enzyme. Although a role in desiccation tolerance has been hypothesized for seed smHSPs, this does not seem to be the case for Cs smHSP 1. We have investigated the presence of immunologically related proteins in orthodox and recalcitrant seeds of 13 woody species. Our results indicate that the presence of Cs smHSP 1-like proteins, even at high levels, is not enough to confer desiccation tolerance, and that the amount of these proteins does not furnish a reliable criterion to identify desiccation-sensitive seeds. Additional proteins or mechanisms appear necessary to keep the viability of orthodox seeds upon shedding.

  20. A 21-kDa chloroplast heat shock protein assembles into high molecular weight complexes in vivo and in Organelle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Osteryoung, K; Vierling, E

    1994-05-01

    The conservation of the carboxyl-terminal "heat shock" domain among small (sm) cytoplasmic and chloroplast heat shock proteins (HSPs) suggests that these smHSPs perform similar functions. Previous studies have established that cytoplasmic smHSPs are found in higher order structures in vivo (approximately 500 kDa). To determine if the chloroplast smHSP is found in similar complexes, we examined the size of the 21-kDa chloroplast smHSP from Pisum sativum, PsHSP21, under non-denaturing conditions. Following sedimentation of chloroplast stromal extracts on sucrose gradients PsHSP21 is detected in fractions corresponding to 10-11 S. Upon non-denaturing gel electrophoresis, PsHSP21 was detected in two high molecular mass complexes of approximately 230 and 200 kDa, in good agreement with the sucrose gradient data. These PsHSP21-containing particles were stable under different salt and Mg2+ conditions, and their integrity was not affected by 1.0% Triton X-100 or 10 mM ATP. To study assembly of the high molecular weight complexes containing PsHSP21, in vitro translated PsHSP21 was imported into chloroplasts and its size was examined. Following import into chloroplasts isolated from heat-stressed plants, greater than 50% of PsHSP21 was recovered in the higher molecular weight forms. In contrast, following import into chloroplasts isolated from control plants the protein was recovered exclusively in a 5 S (approximately 42-kDa) form. These data suggest that preexisting PsHSP21 or other heat-induced factors may be required for assembly of the higher molecular weight particles. We propose that the 10-11 S particles are the functional form of PsHSP21.

  1. Identification, genomic organization and expression profiles of four heat shock protein genes in the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Xing; Li, Hong-Bo; Zheng, Yu-Tao; Shi, Liang; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-04-01

    The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, is an important invasive pest with a strong tolerance for extreme temperatures; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate thermotolerance in this insect remain unclear. In this study, four heat shock protein genes were cloned from F. occidentalis and named Fohsp90, Fohsc701, Fohsc702 and Fohsp60. These four Hsps exhibited typical characteristics of heat shock proteins. Subcellular localization signals and phylogenetic analysis indicated that FoHsp90 and FoHsc701 localize to the cytosol, whereas FoHsc702 and FoHsp60 were located in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, respectively. Analysis of genomic sequences revealed the presence of introns in the four genes (three, four, seven, and five introns for Fohsp90, Fohsc701, Fohsc702 and Fohsp60, respectively). Both the number and position of introns in these four genes were quite different from analogous genes in other species. qRT-PCR indicated that the four Fohsps were detected in second-stage larvae, one-day-old pupae, and one-day-old adults, and mRNA expression levels were lowest in larvae and highest in pupae. Fohsc701 and Fohsc702 possessed similar expression patterns and were not induced by cold or heat stress. Expression of Fohsp60 was significantly elevated by heat, and Fohsp90 was rapidly up-regulated after exposure to both cold and heat stress. Exposure to -8°C had no effect on expression of the four Fohsps; however, expression of Fohsp90 and Fohsp60 was highest after a 2-h incubation at 39°C. Furthermore, cold and heat hardening led to significant up-regulation of the four Fohsps compared to their respective controls. Collectively, our results indicate that the four FoHsps contribute to insect development and also function in rapid cold or heat hardening; furthermore, FoHsp90 and FoHsp60 contribute to thermotolerance in F. occidentalis.

  2. Rapid acclimation of juvenile corals to CO2 -mediated acidification by upregulation of heat shock protein and Bcl-2 genes.

    PubMed

    Moya, A; Huisman, L; Forêt, S; Gattuso, J-P; Hayward, D C; Ball, E E; Miller, D J

    2015-01-01

    Corals play a key role in ocean ecosystems and carbonate balance, but their molecular response to ocean acidification remains unclear. The only previous whole-transcriptome study (Moya et al. Molecular Ecology, 2012; 21, 2440) documented extensive disruption of gene expression, particularly of genes encoding skeletal organic matrix proteins, in juvenile corals (Acropora millepora) after short-term (3 d) exposure to elevated pCO2 . In this study, whole-transcriptome analysis was used to compare the effects of such 'acute' (3 d) exposure to elevated pCO2 with a longer ('prolonged'; 9 d) period of exposure beginning immediately post-fertilization. Far fewer genes were differentially expressed under the 9-d treatment, and although the transcriptome data implied wholesale disruption of metabolism and calcification genes in the acute treatment experiment, expression of most genes was at control levels after prolonged treatment. There was little overlap between the genes responding to the acute and prolonged treatments, but heat shock proteins (HSPs) and heat shock factors (HSFs) were over-represented amongst the genes responding to both treatments. Amongst these was an HSP70 gene previously shown to be involved in acclimation to thermal stress in a field population of another acroporid coral. The most obvious feature of the molecular response in the 9-d treatment experiment was the upregulation of five distinct Bcl-2 family members, the majority predicted to be anti-apoptotic. This suggests that an important component of the longer term response to elevated CO2 is suppression of apoptosis. It therefore appears that juvenile A. millepora have the capacity to rapidly acclimate to elevated pCO2 , a process mediated by upregulation of specific HSPs and a suite of Bcl-2 family members.

  3. Structure and properties of chimeric small heat shock proteins containing yellow fluorescent protein attached to their C-terminal ends.

    PubMed

    Datskevich, Petr N; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2014-07-01

    Recombinant chimeras of small heat shock proteins (sHsp) HspB1, HspB5, and HspB6 containing enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) attached to their C-terminal ends were constructed and purified. Some properties of these chimeras were compared with the corresponding properties of the same chimeras containing EYFP attached to the N-terminal end of sHsp. The C-terminal fluorescent chimeras of HspB1 and HspB5 tend to aggregate and form a heterogeneous mixture of oligomers. The apparent molecular weight of the largest C-terminal chimeric oligomers was higher than that of the corresponding N-terminal chimeras or of the wild-type proteins; however, both homooligomers of N-terminal chimeras and homooligomers of C-terminal chimeras contained fewer subunits than the wild-type HspB1 or HspB5. Both N-terminal and C-terminal chimeras of HspB6 form small oligomers with an apparent molecular weight of 73-84 kDa. The C-terminal chimeras exchange their subunits with homologous wild-type proteins. Heterooligomers formed by the wild-type HspB1 (or HspB5) and the C-terminal chimeras of HspB6 differ in size and composition from heterooligomers formed by the corresponding wild-type proteins. As a rule, the N-terminal chimeras possess similar or slightly higher chaperone-like activity than the corresponding wild-type proteins, whereas the C-terminal chimeras always have a lower chaperone-like activity than the wild-type proteins. It is concluded that attachment of EYFP to either N-terminal or C-terminal ends of sHsp affects their oligomeric structure, their ability to form heterooligomers, and their chaperone-like activity. Therefore, the data obtained with fluorescent chimeras of sHsp expressed in the cell should be interpreted with caution.

  4. Ezrin, maspin, peroxiredoxin 2, and heat shock protein 27: potential targets of a streptococcal-induced autoimmune response in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Besgen, Petra; Trommler, Paul; Vollmer, Sigrid; Prinz, Joerg Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Psoriasis is an HLA-Cw6-associated T cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the skin that is often triggered by streptococcal angina. To identify keratinocyte proteins, which may become psoriatic autoantigens as the result of an immune response against streptococci, rabbits were immunized with heat-killed Streptococcus pyogenes. Streptococcal immunization induced Ab formation against various human keratinocyte proteins. Sera from psoriasis patients reacted against several of these proteins as well. Common serologic reactivities of rabbits and patients included the proteins ezrin, maspin, peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), heat shock protein (hsp)27, and keratin 6. When used for stimulation of blood lymphocytes, ezrin, maspin, PRDX2, and hsp27 induced increased T cell activation in psoriasis patients, which was particularly evident for HLA-Cw6(+) individuals. Ag-specific T cell lines generated with these proteins consisted predominantly of CD8(+) T cells and used TCR beta-chain rearrangements, which were highly homologous to those expanded within the corresponding skin lesion. Several immunodominant epitopes on the different proteins could be defined according to sequence alignments with the whole genome of S. pyogenes. Our data indicate that maspin, ezrin, PRDX2, hsp27, and potentially keratin 6 could act as autoantigens of a streptococcal-induced autoimmune response and represent targets of the exaggerated T cell response in psoriasis. Additionally, ezrin and hsp27 might constitute antigenic links between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease, uveitis, or arteriosclerosis, which are clinically associated.

  5. Heat-shock response transcriptional program enables high-yield and high-quality recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yu; Genereux, Joseph C; Nolan, Chandler; Singh, Meha; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2014-09-19

    The biosynthesis of soluble, properly folded recombinant proteins in large quantities from Escherichia coli is desirable for academic research and industrial protein production. The basal E. coli protein homeostasis (proteostasis) network capacity is often insufficient to efficiently fold overexpressed proteins. Herein we demonstrate that a transcriptionally reprogrammed E. coli proteostasis network is generally superior for producing soluble, folded, and functional recombinant proteins. Reprogramming is accomplished by overexpressing a negative feedback deficient heat-shock response transcription factor before and during overexpression of the protein-of-interest. The advantage of transcriptional reprogramming versus simply overexpressing select proteostasis network components (e.g., chaperones and co-chaperones, which has been explored previously) is that a large number of proteostasis network components are upregulated at their evolved stoichiometry, thus maintaining the system capabilities of the proteostasis network that are currently incompletely understood. Transcriptional proteostasis network reprogramming mediated by stress-responsive signaling in the absence of stress should also be useful for protein production in other cells.

  6. Effect of heat shock on the fatty acid and protein profiles of Cronobacter sakazakii BCRC 13988 as well as its growth and survival in the presence of various carbon, nitrogen sources and disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Li, Po-Ting; Hsiao, Wan-Ling; Yu, Roch-Chui; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, Cronobacter sakazakii, a foodborne pathogen, was first subjected to heat shock at 47 °C for 15 min. Effect of heat shock on the fatty acid and protein profiles, carbon and nitrogen source requirements as well as the susceptibilities of C. sakazakii to Clidox-S, a chlorine-containing disinfectant and Quatricide, a quaternary ammonium compound were investigated. Results revealed that heat shock increased the proportion of myristic acid (14:0), palmitic acid (16:0) and the ratio of saturated fatty acid to unsaturated fatty acid, while reducing the proportion of palmitoleic acid (16:1) and cis-vacceric acid (18:1). In addition, eleven proteins showed enhanced expression, while one protein showed decreased expression in the heat-shocked compared to the non-heat-shocked cells. Non-heat-shocked cells in the medium supplemented with beef extract exhibited the highest maximum population. On the contrary, the highest maximum population of heat-shocked C. sakazakii was noted in the medium having either tryptone or yeast extract as the nitrogen source. Among the various carbon sources examined, the growth of the test organism, regardless of heat shock, was greatest in the medium having glucose as the carbon source. Furthermore, heat shock enhanced the resistance of C. sakazakii to Clidox-S or Quatricide.

  7. Tandem Duplication Events in the Expansion of the Small Heat Shock Protein Gene Family in Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706)

    PubMed Central

    Krsticevic, Flavia J.; Arce, Débora P.; Ezpeleta, Joaquín; Tapia, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In plants, fruit maturation and oxidative stress can induce small heat shock protein (sHSP) synthesis to maintain cellular homeostasis. Although the tomato reference genome was published in 2012, the actual number and functionality of sHSP genes remain unknown. Using a transcriptomic (RNA-seq) and evolutionary genomic approach, putative sHSP genes in the Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706) genome were investigated. A sHSP gene family of 33 members was established. Remarkably, roughly half of the members of this family can be explained by nine independent tandem duplication events that determined, evolutionarily, their functional fates. Within a mitochondrial class subfamily, only one duplicated member, Solyc08g078700, retained its ancestral chaperone function, while the others, Solyc08g078710 and Solyc08g078720, likely degenerated under neutrality and lack ancestral chaperone function. Functional conservation occurred within a cytosolic class I subfamily, whose four members, Solyc06g076570, Solyc06g076560, Solyc06g076540, and Solyc06g076520, support ∼57% of the total sHSP RNAm in the red ripe fruit. Subfunctionalization occurred within a new subfamily, whose two members, Solyc04g082720 and Solyc04g082740, show heterogeneous differential expression profiles during fruit ripening. These findings, involving the birth/death of some genes or the preferential/plastic expression of some others during fruit ripening, highlight the importance of tandem duplication events in the expansion of the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome. Despite its evolutionary diversity, the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome seems to be endowed with a core set of four homeostasis genes: Solyc05g014280, Solyc03g082420, Solyc11g020330, and Solyc06g076560, which appear to provide a baseline protection during both fruit ripening and heat shock stress in different tomato tissues. PMID:27565886

  8. Molecular characterization of heat shock protein 70 gene transcripts during Vibrio harveyi infection of humphead snapper, Lutjanus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinzhong; Pang, Huanying; Wu, Zaohe; Jian, Jichang

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) and inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene of humphead snapper, Lutjanus sanguineus, were cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique with the primers designed from the known expressed sequence tags (ESTs) identified from the subtracted cDNA library of the head kidney of humphead snapper. BLAST program analysis indicated that both HSC70 and HSP70 shared high homology with their counterparts in other species. However, the homology between HSC70 and HSP70 is only 82.5% identity. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by the neighbor-joining method, and the results suggested that both HSC70 and HSP70 could be used for phylogenetic analysis at order levels. The expression profiles of HSC70 and HSP70 were measured by fluorescent real-time RT-PCR after Vibrio harveyi infection. Our results suggested that both HSC70 and HSP70 could be induced by V. harveyi challenge. However, the expression pattern of HSP70 showed some differences compared with that of HSC70. Original level of HSP70 in head kidney was lower than that of HSC70. The expression of HSP70 could increase faster and last longer than that of HSC70 and maintain a high level from the time point of 6-15 h. Our results suggested that the rapid transcriptional upregulation of HSC70 and HSP70 in response to V. harveyi infection might be important for the survival of humphead snapper.

  9. The Small Heat Shock Protein p26 Aids Development of Encysting Artemia Embryos, Prevents Spontaneous Diapause Termination and Protects against Stress

    PubMed Central

    King, Allison M.; MacRae, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Artemia franciscana embryos enter diapause as encysted gastrulae, a physiological state of metabolic dormancy and enhanced stress resistance. The objective of this study was to use RNAi to investigate the function of p26, an abundant, diapause-specific small heat shock protein, in the development and behavior of encysted Artemia embryos (cysts). RNAi methodology was developed where injection of Artemia females with dsRNA specifically eliminated p26 from cysts. p26 mRNA and protein knock down were, respectively, confirmed by RT-PCR and immuno-probing of western blots. ArHsp21 and ArHsp22, diapause-related small heat shock proteins in Artemia cysts sharing a conserved α-crystallin domain with p26, were unaffected by injection of females with dsRNA for p26, demonstrating the specificity of protein knock down. Elimination of p26 delayed cyst release from females demonstrating that this molecular chaperone influences the development of diapause-destined embryos. Although development was slowed the metabolic activities of cysts either containing or lacking p26 were similar. p26 inhibited diapause termination after prolonged incubation of cysts in sea water perhaps by a direct effect on termination or indirectly because p26 is necessary for the preservation of diapause maintenance. Cyst diapause was however, terminated by desiccation and freezing, a procedure leading to high mortality within cyst populations lacking p26 and indicating the protein is required for stress tolerance. Cysts lacking p26 were also less resistant to heat shock. This is the first in vivo study to show that knock down of a small heat shock protein slows the development of diapause-destined embryos, suggesting a role for p26 in the developmental process. The same small heat shock protein prevents spontaneous termination of diapause and provides stress protection to encysted embryos. PMID:22952748

  10. Bacterial Heat Shock Protein GroEL (Hsp64) Exerts Immunoregulatory Effects on T Cells by Utilizing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nalbant, Ayten; Kant, Melis

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) expresses a 64-kDa GroEL protein belonging to the heat shock family of proteins. This protein has been shown to influence human host cells, but the apoptotic capacity of the GroEL protein regarding T cells is not yet known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans GroEL (AaGroEL) protein to induce human peripheral blood T-cell apoptosis. Endogenous, purified AaGroEL protein was used as an antigen. In AaGroEL-treated T cells, the data indicated that phosphatidylserine exposure, an early apoptotic event, was dose- and time-dependent. The AaGroEL-treated T cells were also positive for active caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The rate of AaGroEL-induced apoptosis was suppressed by the addition of the general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Furthermore, cleaved caspase-8 bands (40/36 kDa and 23 kDa) were identified in cells responding to AaGroEL. DNA fragmentation was also detected in the AaGroEL-treated T cells. Overall, we demonstrated that the endogenous GroEL from A. actinomycetemcomitans has the capacity to induce T-cell apoptosis. PMID:27736933

  11. Microsporidia, amitochondrial protists, possess a 70-kDa heat shock protein gene of mitochondrial evolutionary origin.

    PubMed

    Peyretaillade, E; Broussolle, V; Peyret, P; Méténier, G; Gouy, M; Vivarès, C P

    1998-06-01

    An intronless gene encoding a protein of 592 amino acid residues with similarity to 70-kDa heat shock proteins (HSP70s) has been cloned and sequenced from the amitochondrial protist Encephalitozoon cuniculi (phylum Microsporidia). Southern blot analyses show the presence of a single gene copy located on chromosome XI. The encoded protein exhibits an N-terminal hydrophobic leader sequence and two motifs shared by proteobacterial and mitochondrially expressed HSP70 homologs. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum likelihood and evolutionary distances place the E. cuniculi sequence in the cluster of mitochondrially expressed HSP70s, with a higher evolutionary rate than those of homologous sequences. Similar results were obtained after cloning a fragment of the homologous gene in the closely related species E. hellem. The presence of a nuclear targeting signal-like sequence supports a role of the Encephalitozoon HSP70 as a molecular chaperone of nuclear proteins. No evidence for cytosolic or endoplasmic reticulum forms of HSP70 was obtained through PCR amplification. These data suggest that Encephalitozoon species have evolved from an ancestor bearing mitochondria, which is in disagreement with the postulated presymbiotic origin of Microsporidia. The specific role and intracellular localization of the mitochondrial HSP70-like protein remain to be elucidated. PMID:9615449

  12. Microsporidia, amitochondrial protists, possess a 70-kDa heat shock protein gene of mitochondrial evolutionary origin.

    PubMed

    Peyretaillade, E; Broussolle, V; Peyret, P; Méténier, G; Gouy, M; Vivarès, C P

    1998-06-01

    An intronless gene encoding a protein of 592 amino acid residues with similarity to 70-kDa heat shock proteins (HSP70s) has been cloned and sequenced from the amitochondrial protist Encephalitozoon cuniculi (phylum Microsporidia). Southern blot analyses show the presence of a single gene copy located on chromosome XI. The encoded protein exhibits an N-terminal hydrophobic leader sequence and two motifs shared by proteobacterial and mitochondrially expressed HSP70 homologs. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum likelihood and evolutionary distances place the E. cuniculi sequence in the cluster of mitochondrially expressed HSP70s, with a higher evolutionary rate than those of homologous sequences. Similar results were obtained after cloning a fragment of the homologous gene in the closely related species E. hellem. The presence of a nuclear targeting signal-like sequence supports a role of the Encephalitozoon HSP70 as a molecular chaperone of nuclear proteins. No evidence for cytosolic or endoplasmic reticulum forms of HSP70 was obtained through PCR amplification. These data suggest that Encephalitozoon species have evolved from an ancestor bearing mitochondria, which is in disagreement with the postulated presymbiotic origin of Microsporidia. The specific role and intracellular localization of the mitochondrial HSP70-like protein remain to be elucidated.

  13. Acquisition of thermotolerance in soybean seedlings: synthesis and accumulation of heat shock proteins and their cellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.Y.; Roberts, J.K.; Key, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    When soybean Glycine max var Wayne seedlings are shifted from a normal growth temperature of 28/sup 0/C up to 40/sup 0/C (heat shock or HS), there is a dramatic change in protein synthesis. A new set of proteins known as shock proteins (HSPs) is produced and normal protein synthesis is greatly reduced. However, a pretreatmemt at 40/sup 0/C or a brief (10 minute) pulse treatment at 45/sup 0/C followed by a 28/sup 0/C incubation provide protection (thermal tolerance) to a subsequent exposure at 45/sup 0/C. During 40/sup 0/C HS, some HSPs become localized and stably associated with purified organelle fractions while others do not. A chase at 28/sup 0/C results in the gradual loss over a 4-hour period of the HSPs from the organelle fractions, but the HSPs remain selectively localized during a 40/sup 0/C chase period. The relative amount of HSPs which relocalize during a second HS increases with higher temperatures from 40/sup 0/C to 45/sup 0/C. Proteins induced by arsenite treatment are not selectively localized with organelle fractions at 28/sup 0/C but become organelle-associated during a subsequent HS at 40/sup 0/C.

  14. Heat Shock Protein 70 Inhibitors. 2. 2,5′-Thiodipyrimidines, 5-(Phenylthio)pyrimidines, 2-(Pyridin-3-ylthio)pyrimidines, and 3-(Phenylthio)pyridines as Reversible Binders to an Allosteric Site on Heat Shock Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and development of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) inhibitors is currently a hot topic in cancer. In the preceding paper in this issue (10.1021/jm401551n), we have described structure–activity relationship studies in the first Hsp70 inhibitor class rationally designed to bind to a novel allosteric pocket located in the N-terminal domain of the protein. These ligands contained an acrylamide to take advantage of an active cysteine embedded in the allosteric pocket and acted as covalent protein modifiers upon binding. Here, we perform chemical modifications around the irreversible inhibitor scaffold to demonstrate that covalent modification is not a requirement for activity within this class of compounds. The study identifies derivative 27c, which mimics the biological effects of the irreversible inhibitors at comparable concentrations. Collectively, the back-to-back manuscripts describe the first pharmacophores that favorably and selectively interact with a never explored pocket in Hsp70 and provide a novel blueprint for a cancer-oriented development of Hsp70-directed ligands. PMID:24548239

  15. Heat Shock Protein 70 Inhibitors. 1. 2,5′-Thiodipyrimidine and 5-(Phenylthio)pyrimidine Acrylamides as Irreversible Binders to an Allosteric Site on Heat Shock Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an important emerging cancer target whose inhibition may affect multiple cancer-associated signaling pathways and, moreover, result in significant cancer cell apoptosis. Despite considerable interest from both academia and pharmaceutical companies in the discovery and development of druglike Hsp70 inhibitors, little success has been reported so far. Here we describe structure–activity relationship studies in the first rationally designed Hsp70 inhibitor class that binds to a novel allosteric pocket located in the N-terminal domain of the protein. These 2,5′-thiodipyrimidine and 5-(phenylthio)pyrimidine acrylamides take advantage of an active cysteine embedded in the allosteric pocket to act as covalent protein modifiers upon binding. The study identifies derivatives 17a and 20a, which selectively bind to Hsp70 in cancer cells. Addition of high nanomolar to low micromolar concentrations of these inhibitors to cancer cells leads to a reduction in the steady-state levels of Hsp70-sheltered oncoproteins, an effect associated with inhibition of cancer cell growth and apoptosis. In summary, the described scaffolds represent a viable starting point for the development of druglike Hsp70 inhibitors as novel anticancer therapeutics. PMID:24548207

  16. Small heat shock protein IbpB acts as a robust chaperone in living cells by hierarchically activating its multi-type substrate-binding residues.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinmiao; Shi, Xiaodong; Yin, Linxiang; Liu, Jiafeng; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung; Chang, Zengyi

    2013-04-26

    As ubiquitous molecular chaperones, small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are crucial for protein homeostasis. It is not clear why sHSPs are able to bind a wide spectrum of non-native substrate proteins and how such binding is enhanced by heat shock. Here, by utilizing a genetically incorporated photo-cross-linker (p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine), we systematically characterized the substrate-binding residues in IbpB (a sHSP from Escherichia coli) in living cells over a wide spectrum of temperatures (from 20 to 50 °C). A total of 20 and 48 residues were identified at normal and heat shock temperatures, respectively. They are not necessarily hydrophobic and can be classified into three types: types I and II were activated at low and normal temperatures, respectively, and type III mediated oligomerization at low temperature but switched to substrate binding at heat shock temperature. In addition, substrate binding of IbpB in living cells began at temperatures as low as 25 °C and was further enhanced upon temperature elevation. Together, these in vivo data provide novel structural insights into the wide substrate spectrum of sHSPs and suggest that sHSP is able to hierarchically activate its multi-type substrate-binding residues and thus act as a robust chaperone in cells under fluctuating growth conditions.

  17. Unraveling regulation of the small heat shock proteins by the heat shock factor HvHsfB2c in barley: its implications in drought stress response and seed development.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Kavi Kishor, Polavarapu B; Seiler, Christiane; Kuhlmann, Markus; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Lee, Justin; Reddy, Malireddy K; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2014-01-01

    The rapid increase in heat shock proteins upon exposure to damaging stresses and during plant development related to desiccation events reveal their dual importance in plant development and stress tolerance. Genome-wide sequence survey identified 20 non-redundant small heat shock proteins (sHsp) and 22 heat shock factor (Hsf) genes in barley. While all three major classes (A, B, C) of Hsfs are localized in nucleus, the 20 sHsp gene family members are localized in different cell organelles like cytoplasm, mitochondria, plastid and peroxisomes. Hsf and sHsp members are differentially regulated during drought and at different seed developmental stages suggesting the importance of chaperone role under drought as well as seed development. In silico cis-regulatory motif analysis of Hsf promoters showed an enrichment with abscisic acid responsive cis-elements (ABRE), implying regulatory role of ABA in mediating transcriptional response of HvsHsf genes. Gene regulatory network analysis identified HvHsfB2c as potential central regulator of the seed-specific expression of several HvsHsps including 17.5CI sHsp. These results indicate that HvHsfB2c is co-expressed in the central hub of small Hsps and therefore it may be regulating the expression of several HvsHsp subclasses HvHsp16.88-CI, HvHsp17.5-CI and HvHsp17.7-CI. The in vivo relevance of binding specificity of HvHsfB2C transcription factor to HSE-element present in the promoter of HvSHP17.5-CI under heat stress exposure is confirmed by gel shift and LUC-reporter assays. Further, we isolated 477 bp cDNA from barley encoding a 17.5 sHsp polypeptide, which was predominantly upregulated under drought stress treatments and also preferentially expressed in developing seeds. Recombinant HvsHsp17.5-CI protein was expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity, which displayed in vitro chaperone activity. The predicted structural model of HvsHsp-17.5-CI protein suggests that the α-crystallin domain is evolutionarily highly

  18. Unraveling regulation of the small heat shock proteins by the heat shock factor HvHsfB2c in barley: its implications in drought stress response and seed development.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Kavi Kishor, Polavarapu B; Seiler, Christiane; Kuhlmann, Markus; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Lee, Justin; Reddy, Malireddy K; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2014-01-01

    The rapid increase in heat shock proteins upon exposure to damaging stresses and during plant development related to desiccation events reveal their dual importance in plant development and stress tolerance. Genome-wide sequence survey identified 20 non-redundant small heat shock proteins (sHsp) and 22 heat shock factor (Hsf) genes in barley. While all three major classes (A, B, C) of Hsfs are localized in nucleus, the 20 sHsp gene family members are localized in different cell organelles like cytoplasm, mitochondria, plastid and peroxisomes. Hsf and sHsp members are differentially regulated during drought and at different seed developmental stages suggesting the importance of chaperone role under drought as well as seed development. In silico cis-regulatory motif analysis of Hsf promoters showed an enrichment with abscisic acid responsive cis-elements (ABRE), implying regulatory role of ABA in mediating transcriptional response of HvsHsf genes. Gene regulatory network analysis identified HvHsfB2c as potential central regulator of the seed-specific expression of several HvsHsps including 17.5CI sHsp. These results indicate that HvHsfB2c is co-expressed in the central hub of small Hsps and therefore it may be regulating the expression of several HvsHsp subclasses HvHsp16.88-CI, HvHsp17.5-CI and HvHsp17.7-CI. The in vivo relevance of binding specificity of HvHsfB2C transcription factor to HSE-element present in the promoter of HvSHP17.5-CI under heat stress exposure is confirmed by gel shift and LUC-reporter assays. Further, we isolated 477 bp cDNA from barley encoding a 17.5 sHsp polypeptide, which was predominantly upregulated under drought stress treatments and also preferentially expressed in developing seeds. Recombinant HvsHsp17.5-CI protein was expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity, which displayed in vitro chaperone activity. The predicted structural model of HvsHsp-17.5-CI protein suggests that the α-crystallin domain is evolutionarily highly

  19. The Bacillus subtilis heat shock stimulon

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    All organisms respond to a sudden increase in temperature by the so-called heat shock response. This response results in the induction of a subset of genes, designated heat shock genes coding for heat shock proteins, which allow the cell to cope with the stress regimen. Research carried out during the last 10 years with eubacteria has revealed that the heat shock genes of a given species fall into different classes (regulons), where each class is regulated by a different transcriptional regulator, which could be an alternative sigma factor, a transcriptional activator, or a transcriptional repressor. All regulons of a single species constitute the heat shock stimulon. In Bacillus subtilis, more than 200 genes representing over 7% of the transcriptionally active genes are induced at least 3-fold in response to a heat shock. This response becomes apparent within the first minute after exposure to heat stress, is transient, and is coordinated by at least 5 transcriptional regulator proteins, including 2 repressors, an alternate sigma-factor, and a 2-component signal transduction system. A detailed analysis of the regulation of all known heat shock genes has shown that they belong to at least 6 regulons that together comprise the B subtilis heat shock stimulon. Potential thermosensors are discussed in this article. PMID:14984053

  20. Phenotype of Cardiomyopathy in Cardiac-specific Heat Shock Protein B8 K141N Transgenic Mouse*

    PubMed Central

    Sanbe, Atsushi; Marunouchi, Tetsuro; Abe, Tsutomu; Tezuka, Yu; Okada, Mizuki; Aoki, Sayuri; Tsumura, Hideki; Yamauchi, Junji; Tanonaka, Kouichi; Nishigori, Hideo; Tanoue, Akito

    2013-01-01

    A K141N missense mutation in heat shock protein (HSP) B8, which belongs to the small HSP family, causes distal hereditary motor neuropathy, which is characterized by the formation of inclusion bodies in cells. Although the HSPB8 gene causes hereditary motor neuropathy, obvious expression of HSPB8 is also observed in other tissues, such as the heart. The effects of a single mutation in HSPB8 upon the heart were analyzed using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Expression of HSPB8 K141N by adenoviral infection resulted in increased HSPB8-positive aggregates around nuclei, whereas no aggregates were observed in myocytes expressing wild-type HSPB8. HSPB8-positive aggresomes contained amyloid oligomer intermediates that were detected by a specific anti-oligomer antibody (A11). Expression of HSPB8 K141N induced slight cellular toxicity. Recombinant HSPB8 K141N protein showed reactivity against the anti-oligomer antibody, and reactivity of the mutant HSPB8 protein was much higher than that of wild-type HSPB8 protein. To extend our in vitro study, cardiac-specific HSPB8 K141N transgenic (TG) mice were generated. Echocardiography revealed that the HSPB8 K141N TG mice exhibited mild hypertrophy and apical fibrosis as well as slightly reduced cardiac function, although no phenotype was detected in wild-type HSPB8 TG mice. A single point mutation of HSPB8, such as K141N, can cause cardiac disease. PMID:23389032

  1. Reaction of small heat-shock proteins to different kinds of cellular stress in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bartelt-Kirbach, Britta; Golenhofen, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Upregulation of small heat-shock proteins (sHsps) in response to cellular stress is one mechanism to increase cell viability.We previously described that cultured rat hippocampal neurons express five of the 11 family members but only upregulate two of them (HspB1 and HspB5) at the protein level after heat stress. Since neurons have to cope with many other pathological conditions, we investigated in this study the expression of all five expressed sHsps on mRNA and protein level after sublethal sodium arsenite and oxidative and hyperosmotic stress. Under all three conditions, HspB1, HspB5, HspB6, and HspB8 but not HspB11 were consistently upregulated but showed differences in the time course of upregulation. The increase of sHsps always occurred earlier on mRNA level compared with protein levels. We conclude from our data that these four upregulated sHsps (HspB1, HspB5, HspB6, HspB8) act together in different proportions in the protection of neurons from various stress conditions.

  2. Genetic variation in heat shock protein 70 is associated with septic shock: narrowing the association to a specific haplotype.

    PubMed

    Kee, C; Cheong, K Y; Pham, K; Waterer, G W; Temple, S E L

    2008-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) plays a major role in immune responses. Polymorphisms within the gene have been associated with development of septic shock. This study refines the region of the HSP70 gene associated with development of septic shock and confirms its functionality. Subjects (n = 31) were grouped into one of three haplotypes based on their HSPA1B-179C>T and HSPA1B1267A>G genotypes. Mononuclear cells from these subjects were stimulated with heat-killed bacteria (10(7 )colony-forming units/mL Escherichia coli or Streptococcus pneumoniae) for 8 and 21 h. HSP70 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA and protein levels were measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and ELISA, respectively. The HSPA1B-179*C:1267*A haplotype was associated with significantly lower levels of HSPA1B mRNA and protein and higher production of TNF mRNA and protein compared to the other haplotypes. Induction of HSP70 was TNF independent. These results suggest that the HSPA1B-179C>T:1267A>G haplotype is functional and may explain the association of the HSP70 gene with development of septic shock.

  3. Induction of Antioxidant and Heat Shock Protein Responses During Torpor in the Gray Mouse Lemur, Microcebus murinus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Wei; Biggar, Kyle K; Zhang, Jing; Tessier, Shannon N; Pifferi, Fabien; Perret, Martine; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-04-01

    A natural tolerance of various environmental stresses is typically supported by various cytoprotective mechanisms that protect macromolecules and promote extended viability. Among these are antioxidant defenses that help to limit damage from reactive oxygen species and chaperones that help to minimize protein misfolding or unfolding under stress conditions. To understand the molecular mechanisms that act to protect cells during primate torpor, the present study characterizes antioxidant and heat shock protein (HSP) responses in various organs of control (aroused) and torpid gray mouse lemurs, Microcebus murinus. Protein expression of HSP70 and HSP90α was elevated to 1.26 and 1.49 fold, respectively, in brown adipose tissue during torpor as compared with control animals, whereas HSP60 in liver of torpid animals was 1.15 fold of that in control (P<0.05). Among antioxidant enzymes, protein levels of thioredoxin 1 were elevated to 2.19 fold in white adipose tissue during torpor, whereas Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase 1 levels rose to 1.1 fold in skeletal muscle (P<0.05). Additionally, total antioxidant capacity was increased to 1.6 fold in liver during torpor (P<0.05), while remaining unchanged in the five other tissues. Overall, our data suggest that antioxidant and HSP responses are modified in a tissue-specific manner during daily torpor in gray mouse lemurs. Furthermore, our data also show that cytoprotective strategies employed during primate torpor are distinct from the strategies in rodent hibernation as reported in previous studies.

  4. Heat shock protein 70 kDa chaperone/DnaJ cochaperone complex employs an unusual dynamic interface.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Atta; Bhattacharya, Akash; McDonald, Ramsay A; Cordes, Melissa; Ellington, Benjamin; Bertelsen, Eric B; Zuiderweg, Erik R P

    2011-11-22

    The heat shock protein 70 kDa (Hsp70)/DnaJ/nucleotide exchange factor system assists in intracellular protein (re)folding. Using solution NMR, we obtained a three-dimensional structure for a 75-kDa Hsp70-DnaJ complex in the ADP state, loaded with substrate peptide. We establish that the J domain (residues 1-70) binds with its positively charged helix II to a negatively charged loop in the Hsp70 nucleotide-binding domain. The complex shows an unusual "tethered" binding mode which is stoichiometric and saturable, but which has a dynamic interface. The complex represents part of a triple complex of Hsp70 and DnaJ both bound to substrate protein. Mutagenesis data indicate that the interface is also of relevance for the interaction of Hsp70 and DnaJ in the ATP state. The solution complex is completely different from a crystal structure of a disulfide-linked complex of homologous proteins [Jiang, et al. (2007) Mol Cell 28:422-433].

  5. Structural and functional diversity in the family of small heat shock proteins from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Natalia; Braun, Nathalie; Bepperling, Alexander; Kriehuber, Thomas; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Buchner, Johannes; Angel, Sergio O; Haslbeck, Martin

    2009-11-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones which prevent the nonspecific aggregation of non-native proteins. Five potential sHsps exist in the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. They are located in different intracellular compartments including mitochondria and are differentially expressed during the parasite's life cycle. Here, we analyzed the structural and functional properties of all five proteins. Interestingly, this first in vitro characterization of sHsps from protists showed that all T. gondii sHsps exhibit the characteristic properties of sHsps such as oligomeric structure and chaperone activity. However, differences in their quaternary structure and in their specific chaperone properties exist. On the structural level, the T. gondii sHsps can be divided in small (12-18 subunits) and large (24-32 subunits) oligomers. Furthermore, they differ in their interaction with non-native proteins. While some bind substrates tightly, others interact more transiently. The chaperone activity of the three more mono-disperse T. gondii sHsps is regulated by temperature with a decrease in temperature leading to the activation of chaperone activity, suggesting an adaption to specific steps of the parasite's life cycle.

  6. A two-domain protein triggers heat shock pathway and necrosis pathway both in model plant and nematode.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Lifang; Wang, Huihui; Cai, Ge; Peng, Donghai; Zhou, Hua; Zheng, Jinshui; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Xixi; Yu, Haoquan; Li, Seng; Geng, Ce; Sun, Ming

    2015-11-01

    The entomopathogen Bacillus thuringiensis is equipped with multiple virulent factors. The genome sequence of B. thuringiensis YBT1520 revealed the presence of a two-domain protein named Nel which is composed of a necrosis-inducing phytophthora protein 1-like domain found in phytopathogens and a ricin B-like lectin domain. The merging of two distantly related domains is relatively rare. Nel induced necrosis and pathogen-triggered immunity (PTI) on model plants. The Nel also exhibited inhibition activity to nematode. Microscopic observation showed that the toxicity of Nel to nematodes targets the intestine. Quantitative proteomics revealed that Nel stimulated the host defence. The Nel thus possesses dual roles, as both toxin and elicitor. Remarkably, the Nel protein triggered a similar response, induction of the heat shock pathway and the necrosis pathway, in both model plants and nematodes. The unusual ability of Nel to function across kingdom suggests a highly conserved mechanism in eukaryotes that predates the divergence of plants and animal. It is also speculated that the two-domain protein is the result of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between phytopathogens and entomopathogens. Our results provide an example that HGT occurs between members of different species or even genera with lower frequency are particularly important for evolution of new bacterial pathogen lineages with new virulence. Bacillus thuringiensis occupies the same ecological niches, plant and soil, as phytopathogens, providing the opportunity for gene exchange. PMID:26147248

  7. Heat shock protein 70 protects PC12 cells against ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation by maintaining intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xue-chun; Hu, Dan; Huang, Shu-ran; Li, Qing-shu; Li, Zhi; Qu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) maintains Ca2+ homeostasis in PC12 cells, which may protect against apoptosis; however, the mechanisms of neuroprotection are unclear. Therefore, in this study, we examined Ca2+ levels in PC12 cells transfected with an exogenous lentiviral HSP70 gene expression construct, and we subsequently subjected the cells to ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. HSP70 overexpression increased neuronal viability and ATPase activity, and it decreased cellular reactive oxygen species levels and intracellular Ca2+ concentration after hypoxia/reoxygenation. HSP70 overexpression enhanced the protein and mRNA expression levels of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA), but it decreased the protein and mRNA levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), thereby leading to decreased intracellular Ca2+ concentration after ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation. These results suggest that exogenous HSP70 protects against ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation injury, at least in part, by maintaining cellular Ca2+ homeostasis, by upregulating SERCA expression and by downregulating IP3R expression.

  8. Heat shock protein 70 protects PC12 cells against ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation by maintaining intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xue-Chun; Hu, Dan; Huang, Shu-Ran; Li, Qing-Shu; Li, Zhi; Qu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) maintains Ca(2+) homeostasis in PC12 cells, which may protect against apoptosis; however, the mechanisms of neuroprotection are unclear. Therefore, in this study, we examined Ca(2+) levels in PC12 cells transfected with an exogenous lentiviral HSP70 gene expression construct, and we subsequently subjected the cells to ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. HSP70 overexpression increased neuronal viability and ATPase activity, and it decreased cellular reactive oxygen species levels and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration after hypoxia/reoxygenation. HSP70 overexpression enhanced the protein and mRNA expression levels of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), but it decreased the protein and mRNA levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), thereby leading to decreased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration after ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation. These results suggest that exogenous HSP70 protects against ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation injury, at least in part, by maintaining cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, by upregulating SERCA expression and by downregulating IP3R expression. PMID:27630698

  9. Heat shock protein 70 protects PC12 cells against ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation by maintaining intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xue-chun; Hu, Dan; Huang, Shu-ran; Li, Qing-shu; Li, Zhi; Qu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) maintains Ca2+ homeostasis in PC12 cells, which may protect against apoptosis; however, the mechanisms of neuroprotection are unclear. Therefore, in this study, we examined Ca2+ levels in PC12 cells transfected with an exogenous lentiviral HSP70 gene expression construct, and we subsequently subjected the cells to ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. HSP70 overexpression increased neuronal viability and ATPase activity, and it decreased cellular reactive oxygen species levels and intracellular Ca2+ concentration after hypoxia/reoxygenation. HSP70 overexpression enhanced the protein and mRNA expression levels of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA), but it decreased the protein and mRNA levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), thereby leading to decreased intracellular Ca2+ concentration after ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation. These results suggest that exogenous HSP70 protects against ischemia-hypoxia/reoxygenation injury, at least in part, by maintaining cellular Ca2+ homeostasis, by upregulating SERCA expression and by downregulating IP3R expression. PMID:27630698

  10. Immune responses to Mycobacterial heat shock protein 70 accompany self-reactivity to human BiP in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Hirofumi; Hanata, Norio; Sumitomo, Shuji; Okamura, Tomohisa; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, and a member of human heat shock protein (HSP) 70 protein family, Binding Immunoglobulin Protein (BiP), has been identified as an important autoantigen for T and B cells. We herein focused on Mycobacterial (Myc) HSPs and immune responses to MycHSPs in RA patients. Serum titers of antibodies against MycHSP70 were significantly elevated in RA patients and correlated with serum anti-BiP antibody titers. A MycHSP70-derived HLA-DR4 major epitope was identified using the proliferative capacity of RA PBMCs as an indicator. The major epitope, MycHSP70287–306, was located at the corresponding position in the major epitope for human BiP336–355, and a strong correlation was found between the proliferation of PBMCs in response to MycHSP70287–306 and BiP336–355. The immunization of HLA-DR4 transgenic mice with MycHSP70 induced the proliferation of T cells and development of anti-BiP antibodies. In contrast, the oral administration of MycHSP70287–306 resulted in the amelioration of collagen-induced arthritis, serum antibody responses, and T cell proliferation. In conclusion, immune responses to MycHSP70 were associated with adaptive immunity against BiP in RA, and could be an important mechanism underlying the development of autoimmunity. PMID:26927756

  11. Heterologous expression of a plant small heat-shock protein enhances Escherichia coli viability under heat and cold stress.

    PubMed

    Soto, A; Allona, I; Collada, C; Guevara, M A; Casado, R; Rodriguez-Cerezo, E; Aragoncillo, C; Gomez, L

    1999-06-01

    A small heat-shock protein (sHSP) that shows molecular chaperone activity in vitro was recently purified from mature chestnut (Castanea sativa) cotyledons. This protein, renamed here as CsHSP17. 5, belongs to cytosolic class I, as revealed by cDNA sequencing and immunoelectron microscopy. Recombinant CsHSP17.5 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli to study its possible function under stress conditions. Upon transfer from 37 degrees C to 50 degrees C, a temperature known to cause cell autolysis, those cells that accumulated CsHSP17.5 showed improved viability compared with control cultures. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of cell lysates suggested that such a protective effect in vivo is due to the ability of recombinant sHSP to maintain soluble cytosolic proteins in their native conformation, with little substrate specificity. To test the recent hypothesis that sHSPs may be involved in protection against cold stress, we also studied the viability of recombinant cells at 4 degrees C. Unlike the major heat-induced chaperone, GroEL/ES, the chestnut sHSP significantly enhanced cell survivability at this temperature. CsHSP17.5 thus represents an example of a HSP capable of protecting cells against both thermal extremes. Consistent with these findings, high-level induction of homologous transcripts was observed in vegetative tissues of chestnut plantlets exposed to either type of thermal stress but not salt stress.

  12. Human heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 interferes with Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA)-mediated adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Paolo; Bozza, Giuseppe; Capecchi, Barbara; Caproni, Elena; Barrile, Riccardo; Norais, Nathalie; Capitani, Mirco; Sallese, Michele; Cecchini, Paola; Ciucchi, Laura; Gao, Zhenai; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Merola, Marcello

    2012-03-01

    NadA (N eisseria meningitidisadhesin A), a meningococcal surface protein, mediates adhesion to and invasion of human cells, an activity in which host membrane proteins have been implicated. While investigating these host factors in human epithelial cells by affinity chromatography, we discovered an unanticipated interaction of NadA with heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, a molecular chaperone. The specific in vitro interaction of recombinant soluble NadA and Hsp90 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations, dot and far-Western blot. Intriguingly, ADP, but not ATP, was required for this association, and the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG promoted complex formation. Hsp90 binding to an Escherichia coli strain used as carrier to express surface exposed NadA confirmed these results in live bacteria. We also examined RNA interference, plasmid-driven overexpression, addition of exogenous rHsp90 and 17-AAG inhibition in human epithelial cells to further elucidate the involvement of Hsp90 in NadA-mediated adhesion and invasion. Together, these data suggest an inverse correlation between the amount of host Hsp90 and the NadA adhesive/invasive phenotype. Confocal microscopy also demonstrated that meningococci interact with cellular Hsp90, a completely novel finding. Altogether our results show that variation of host Hsp90 expression or activity interferes with adhesive and invasive events driven by NadA.

  13. Chemical methodology as a source of small-molecule checkpoint inhibitors and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) modulators

    PubMed Central

    Huryn, Donna M.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Brummond, Kay M.; Chambers, Peter G.; Eyer, Benjamin; Ireland, Alex W.; Kawasumi, Masaoki; LaPorte, Matthew G.; Lloyd, Kayla; Manteau, Baptiste; Nghiem, Paul; Quade, Bettina; Seguin, Sandlin P.; Wipf, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Unique chemical methodology enables the synthesis of innovative and diverse scaffolds and chemotypes and allows access to previously unexplored “chemical space.” Compound collections based on such new synthetic methods can provide small-molecule probes of proteins and/or pathways whose functions are not fully understood. We describe the identification, characterization, and evolution of two such probes. In one example, a pathway-based screen for DNA damage checkpoint inhibitors identified a compound, MARPIN (ATM and ATR pathway inhibitor) that sensitizes p53-deficient cells to DNA-damaging agents. Modification of the small molecule and generation of an immobilized probe were used to selectively bind putative protein target(s) responsible for the observed activity. The second example describes a focused library approach that relied on tandem multicomponent reaction methodologies to afford a series of modulators of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) molecular chaperone. The synthesis of libraries based on the structure of MAL3-101 generated a collection of chemotypes, each modulating Hsp70 function, but exhibiting divergent pharmacological activities. For example, probes that compromise the replication of a disease-associated polyomavirus were identified. These projects highlight the importance of chemical methodology development as a source of small-molecule probes and as a drug discovery starting point. PMID:21502524

  14. Expression of small heat shock protein (sHSP) genes in the garden pea (Pisum sativum) under slow horizontal clinorotation

    PubMed Central

    Talalaiev, Oleksandr; Korduym, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells respond to stress conditions, such as high temperatures, by synthesizing small heat shock proteins (sHSPs). sHSPs are molecular chaperones that assist in protein folding and prevent irreversible protein aggregation. Although many sHSP genes are temperature-inducible, other variables, such as altered gravity, can induce significant changes in plant cell gene expression. Furthermore, not all subfamilies of sHSP genes share the same expression pattern. The objective of our research was to determine the effect of simulated microgravity (clinorotation) on the expression of sHSP gene subfamilies with different subcellular locations in etiolated pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings. sHSP gene expression levels were examined using quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR). qPCR results demonstrated that sHSP genes were constitutively expressed in seedlings. High temperatures increased the expression of sHSP genes by several thousand-fold. However, simulated microgravity did not have any significant effects on sHSP gene expression. PMID:24786104

  15. Tylophorine Analog DCB-3503 Inhibited Cyclin D1 Translation through Allosteric Regulation of Heat Shock Cognate Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Lam, Wing; Chen, Shao-Ru; Guan, Fu-Lan; Dutchman, Ginger E.; Francis, Samson; Baker, David C.; Cheng, Yung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Tylophorine analog DCB-3503 is a potential anticancer and immunosuppressive agent that suppresses the translation of cellular regulatory proteins, including cyclin D1, at the elongation step. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unknown. This study demonstrates that DCB-3503 preferentially binds to heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), which is a determinant for cyclin D1 translation by binding to the 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR) of its mRNA. DCB-3503 allosterically regulates the ATPase and chaperone activities of HSC70 by promoting ATP hydrolysis in the presence of specific RNA binding motifs (AUUUA) of cyclin D1 mRNA. The suppression of cyclin D1 translation by DCB-3503 is not solely caused by perturbation of the homeostasis of microRNAs, although the microRNA processing complex is dissociated with DCB-3503 treatment. This study highlights a novel regulatory mechanism of protein translation with AUUUA motifs in the 3′ UTR of mRNA by HSC70, and its activity can be allosterically modulated by DCB-3503. DCB-3503 may be used to treat malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma or breast cancer with elevated expression of cyclin D1. PMID:27596272

  16. Regulation by heat shock protein 22 (HSPB8) of transforming growth factor-α-induced ovary cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mariko; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Suzuki, Noriko; Takamatsu, Reika; Furui, Tatsuro; Yoshimi, Naoki; Kozawa, Osamu; Morishige, Ken-ichirou

    2015-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that heat shock proteins (HSPs) are implicated in progression of cancer. HSP22 (HSPB8), a small HSP, is recognized to be ubiquitously expressed in various tissues. However, the expression and the role of HSP22 in ovarian cancer remain to be clarified. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of HSP22 in transforming growth factor (TGF)-α-induced migration of ovarian cancer cells. The expression of HSP22 was detected in a serous ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3.ip1. The migration was reduced by down-regulation of HSP22 expression. The TGF-α-induced migration was reduced by SB203580 (a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor), SP600125 (a SAPK/JNK inhibitor) and Y27632 (a Rho-kinase inhibitor). However, down-regulation of HSP22 had little effect on the TGF-α-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, SAPK/JNK and MYPT, a target protein of Rho-kinase. The HSP22 expression was further analyzed in 20 resected specimens of human ovarian serous carcinoma. The expression of HSP22 was detected in all the twenty tissues (8.24-109.22 pg/mg protein), and the cases with highly expression of HSP22 showed a tendency to acquire the progressive ability. Our results strongly suggest that HSP22 acts as a positive regulator in TGF-α-induced migration of ovarian cancer cells, subsequently directing ovarian cancer toward progression. PMID:25731856

  17. Role of heat shock protein Hsp25 in the response of the orofacial nuclei motor system to physiological stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Talebian, S.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Although expression of the small heat shock protein family member Hsp25 has been previously observed in the central nervous system (CNS), both constitutively and upon induction, its function in the CNS remains far from clear. In the present study we have characterized the spatial pattern of expression of Hsp25 in the normal adult mouse brain as well as the changes in expression patterns induced by subjecting mice to experimental hyperthermia or hypoxia. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a surprisingly restricted pattern of constitutive expression of Hsp25 in the brain, limited to the facial, trigeminal, ambiguus, hypoglossal and vagal motor nuclei of the brainstem. After hyperthermia or hypoxia treatment, significant increases in the levels of Hsp25 were observed in these same areas and also in fibers of the facial and trigeminal nerve tracts. Immunoblot analysis of protein lysates from brainstem also showed the same pattern of induction of Hsp25. Surprisingly, no other area in the brain showed expression of Hsp25, in either control or stressed animals. The highly restricted expression of Hsp25 implies that this protein may have a specific physiological role in the orofacial motor nuclei, which govern precise coordination between muscles of mastication and the pharynx, larynx, and face. Its rapid induction after stress further suggests that Hsp25 may serve as a specific molecular chaperone in the lower cholinergic motor neurons and along their fibers under conditions of stress or injury. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Tylophorine Analog DCB-3503 Inhibited Cyclin D1 Translation through Allosteric Regulation of Heat Shock Cognate Protein 70.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lam, Wing; Chen, Shao-Ru; Guan, Fu-Lan; Dutchman, Ginger E; Francis, Samson; Baker, David C; Cheng, Yung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Tylophorine analog DCB-3503 is a potential anticancer and immunosuppressive agent that suppresses the translation of cellular regulatory proteins, including cyclin D1, at the elongation step. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unknown. This study demonstrates that DCB-3503 preferentially binds to heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), which is a determinant for cyclin D1 translation by binding to the 3'-untranslated region (3' UTR) of its mRNA. DCB-3503 allosterically regulates the ATPase and chaperone activities of HSC70 by promoting ATP hydrolysis in the presence of specific RNA binding motifs (AUUUA) of cyclin D1 mRNA. The suppression of cyclin D1 translation by DCB-3503 is not solely caused by perturbation of the homeostasis of microRNAs, although the microRNA processing complex is dissociated with DCB-3503 treatment. This study highlights a novel regulatory mechanism of protein translation with AUUUA motifs in the 3' UTR of mRNA by HSC70, and its activity can be allosterically modulated by DCB-3503. DCB-3503 may be used to treat malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma or breast cancer with elevated expression of cyclin D1. PMID:27596272

  19. Knocking down of heat-shock protein 27 directs differentiation of functional glutamatergic neurons from placenta-derived multipotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Che; Huang, Chi-Jung; Lee, Yih-Jing; Tien, Lu-Tai; Ku, Wei-Chi; Chien, Raymond; Lee, Fa-Kung; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This study presents human placenta-derived multipotent cells (PDMCs) as a source from which functional glutamatergic neurons can be derived. We found that the small heat-shock protein 27 (HSP27) was downregulated during the neuronal differentiation process. The in vivo temporal and spatial profiles of HSP27 expression were determined and showed inverted distributions with neuronal proteins during mouse embryonic development. Overexpression of HSP27 in stem cells led to the arrest of neuronal differentiation; however, the knockdown of HSP27 yielded a substantially enhanced ability of PDMCs to differentiate into neurons. These neurons formed synaptic networks and showed positive staining for multiple neuronal markers. Additionally, cellular phenomena including the absence of apoptosis and rare proliferation in HSP27-silenced PDMCs, combined with molecular events such as cleaved caspase-3 and the loss of stemness with cleaved Nanog, indicated that HSP27 is located upstream of neuronal differentiation and constrains that process. Furthermore, the induced neurons showed increasing intracellular calcium concentrations upon glutamate treatment. These differentiated cells co-expressed the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, vesicular glutamate transporter, and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 but did not show expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, choline acetyltransferase or glutamate decarboxylase 67. Therefore, we concluded that HSP27-silenced PDMCs differentiated into neurons possessing the characteristics of functional glutamatergic neurons. PMID:27444754

  20. Molecular cloning and expression of two heat-shock protein genes (HSC70/HSP70) from Prenant's schizothoracin (Schizothorax prenanti).

    PubMed

    Li, Jiuxuan; Zhang, Haibin; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yang, Shiyong; Yan, Taiming; Song, Zhaobin

    2015-04-01

    Through the RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends, two complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) clones encoding heat-shock cognate 70 (HSC70, designated Sp-HSC70) and inducible heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70, designated Sp-HSP70) were isolated from the liver of Prenant's schizothoracin (Schizothorax prenanti). The cDNAs were 2344- and 2292-bp in length and contained 1950- and 1932-bp open reading frames, encoded proteins of 649 and 643 amino acids, respectively. Amino acid sequence analysis indicated that both Sp-HSC70 and Sp-HSP70 contained three signature sequences of HSP70 family, two partial overlapping bipartite nuclear localization signal sequences (an ATP-binding site motif, a bipartite nuclear targeting signal), and a cytoplasmic characteristic motif EEVD. Homology analysis revealed that Sp-HSC70 and Sp-HSP70 shared 77.5% identity and Sp-HSC70 shared more than 81.1% identity with the known HSC70s of other vertebrates, while Sp-HSP70 shared more than 77.5 % identity with the known HSP70s of other vertebrates. Fluorescent real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed that Sp-HSC70 and Sp-HSP70 mRNAs were found in all tested tissues, including blood, brain, heart, liver, spleen, head kidney, white muscle, skin, gonad, hypophysis, red muscle, and gill. The Sp-HSC70 and Sp-HSP70 mRNA expression level in blood and head kidney displayed a significant increase in vibrio-challenged group with the bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila at 24 h post-infection compared to a control group. Temporally, there was a clear time-dependent expression pattern of Sp-HSC70 or Sp-HSP70 gene after bacterial challenge, and the expression of Sp-HSC70 and Sp-HSP70 mRNAs reached a maximum level at 12 and 6 h post-challenge, respectively. Both returned to control level after 7 × 24 h. The results suggest that Sp-HSC70 and Sp-HSP70 genes may play important roles in mediating the immune responses of A. hydrophila-related diseases in the Prenant's schizothoracin. PMID:25690871

  1. Comparative studies on temperature threshold for heat shock protein 70 induction in young and adult Murrah buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Haque, N; Ludri, A; Hossain, S A; Ashutosh, M

    2012-10-01

    To know the temperature threshold for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction in lymphocytes and to assess physiological changes, if any, in relation to HSP70 induction in young and adult Murrah buffaloes, this study was divided into two parts: I. In vivo study: where assay of HSP70 was performed in blood samples collected from acutely exposed young and adult Murrah buffaloes (n = 6) inside a climatic chamber at 40, 42 and 45 °C for 4 h and thermoneutral temperature (22 °C). Physiological parameters viz., rectal temperature, respiratory rate, pulse rate and skin temperature of different body parts were monitored to assess magnitude of stress in the animals owing to thermal exposure II. For in vitro study, equal numbers of lymphocyte cells were separated from blood collected from young and adult buffaloes and were subjected to four temperature treatments (38, 40, 42 and 45 °C) for 4 h. A significant increase (p < 0.05) in all the physiological parameters in both young and adult buffaloes was observed after exposure to 40, 42 and 45 °C for 4 h as compared to 38 °C. The average plasma HSP70 concentrations (ng/ml) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) at 40, 42 and 45 °C as compared to 38 °C in both young and adult and were higher in young than adult buffaloes at 38 and 45 °C. Heat shock protein 70 level in lymphocyte lysate showed highest concentration after 3-h exposure to all temperatures (40, 42 and 45 °C) in both young and adult buffaloes. The intensity of changes of all physiological parameters was more in young animals than in the adults indicating the greater susceptibility of younger animals to heat stress and was found to be changed at around 40 °C when animals were exposed to different temperatures, indicating the possibility that HSP70 production may be initiated at this temperature which is 2 or 3 °C higher than core body temperature.

  2. Heat shock protein 90 is essential for replication of porcine circovirus type 2 in PK-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xuliang; Ma, Chang; You, Jinwei; Dong, Min; Yun, Shifeng; Jiang, Ping

    2016-09-15

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is recognized as the causative agent of porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD). However, the mechanism of PCV2 replication has not been understood completely. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) plays an important role in viral genome replication, viral genes expression, and viral particle packaging. In this study, we firstly found that inhibition of Hsp90 by pretreatment of host cells with 17-AAG, a specific inhibitor of Hsp90, or blocking Hsp90α/Hsp90β with siRNA, resulted in significantly reduced viral replication in PK-15 cells. But inhibition of Hsp90 by 17-AAG did not affect PCV2 entry into the host cells. Meanwhile, over-expression of Hsp90α/Hsp90β enhanced PCV2 genome replication and virion production. In addition, Hsp90β was enriched in the nuclear zone in the cells infected with PCV2. But it did not interact with the viral Cap/Rep proteins. It suggested that Hsp90 is required for PCV2 production in PK-15 cells culture. It should be helpful for further evaluating the mechanism of replication and pathogenesis of PCV2 and developing novel antiviral therapies. PMID:27553861

  3. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli heat shock protein YedU reveals three potential catalytic active sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yonghong; Liu, Deqian; Kaluarachchi, Warna D.; Bellamy, Henry D.; White, Mark A.; Fox, Robert O.

    2003-01-01

    The mRNA of Escherichia coli yedU gene is induced 31-fold upon heat shock. The 31-kD YedU protein, also calls Hsp31, is highly conserved in several human pathogens and has chaperone activity. We solved the crystal structure of YedU at 2.2 Å resolution. YedU monomer has an α/β/α sandwich domain and a small α/β domain. YedU is a dimer in solution, and its crystal structure indicates that a significant amount of surface area is buried upon dimerization. There is an extended hydrophobic patch that crosses the dimer interface on the surface of the protein. This hydrophobic patch is likely the substrate-binding site responsible for the chaperone activity. The structure also reveals a potential protease-like catalytic triad composed of Cys184, His185, and Asp213, although no enzymatic activity could be identified. YedU coordinates a metal ion using His85, His122, and Glu90. This 2-His-1-carboxylate motif is present in carboxypeptidase A (a zinc enzyme), and a number of dioxygenases and hydroxylases that utilize iron as a cofactor, suggesting another potential function for YedU. PMID:14500888

  4. Membrane-bound heat shock proteins facilitate the uptake of dying cells and cross-presentation of cellular antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyan; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Dongmei; Wu, Weicheng; Shao, Miaomiao; Wang, Lan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were originally identified as stress-responsive proteins and serve as molecular chaperones in different intracellular compartments. Translocation of HSPs to the cell surface and release of HSPs into the extracellular space have been observed during the apoptotic process and in response to a variety of cellular stress. Here, we report that UV irradiation and cisplatin treatment rapidly induce the expression of membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 upstream the phosphatidylserine exposure. Membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the release of IL-6 and IL-1β as well as DC maturation by the evaluation of CD80 and CD86 expression. On the other hand, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 on cells could facilitate the uptake of dying cells by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), as a common receptor for Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90, is response for their recognition and mediates the uptake of dying cells. Furthermore, membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the cross-presentation of OVA antigen from E.G7 cells and inhibition of the uptake of dying cells by LOX-1 decreases the cross-presentation of cellular antigen. Therefore, the rapid exposure of HSPs on dying cells at the early stage allows for the recognition by and confers an activation signal to the immune system. PMID:26481477

  5. Effect of surfactants on Ra-sHSPI - A small heat shock protein from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus annulatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Shahein, Yasser E.; Hussein, Nahla; Khan, Rizwan H.

    2016-09-01

    Electrostatic interaction plays an important role in protein aggregation phenomenon. In this study, we have checked the effect of anionic - Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and cationic-Cetyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB) surfactant on aggregation behavior of Ra-sHSPI, a small heat shock protein purified from Rhipicephalus annulatus tick. To monitor the effect of these surfactants, we have employed several spectroscopic methods such as Rayleigh light scattering measurements, ANS (8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) fluorescence measurements, ThT (Thioflavin T) binding assays, Far-UV CD (Circular Dichroism) and dynamic light scattering measurements. In the presence of anionic surfactant-SDS, Ra-sHSPI forms amyloid fibrils, in contrast, no amyloid formation was observed in presence of cationic surfactant at low pH. Enhancement of ANS fluorescence intensity confirms the exposition of more hydrophobic patches during aggregation. ThT binding assay confirms the amyloid fibrillar nature of the SDS induced Ra-sHSPI aggregates and supported by PASTA 2.0 (prediction of amyloid structural aggregation) software. This study demonstrates the crucial role of charge during amyloid fibril formation at low pH in Ra-sHSPI.

  6. A comparative study on biologically and chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles induced Heat Shock Proteins on fresh water fish Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Girilal, M; Krishnakumar, V; Poornima, Paramasivan; Mohammed Fayaz, A; Kalaichelvan, P T

    2015-11-01

    The wide applicability of silver nanoparticles in medicine and pharmaceutical industries leads to its over exploitation and thus contaminating our environment. Majority of these nanoscale dimension particles finally accumulates in fresh water and marine ecosystem. As the nanoparticles behave entirely different from its corresponding bulk material, a better understanding of their environmental impacts in aquatic ecosystems is inevitable. The study was focused on a comparative stress physiology analysis of chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles and