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Sample records for 70-mer oligonucleotide microarray

  1. Highly parallel microbial diagnostics using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Loy, Alexander; Bodrossy, Levente

    2006-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are highly parallel hybridization platforms, allowing rapid and simultaneous identification of many different microorganisms and viruses in a single assay. In the past few years, researchers have been confronted with a dramatic increase in the number of studies reporting development and/or improvement of oligonucleotide microarrays for microbial diagnostics, but use of the technology in routine diagnostics is still constrained by a variety of factors. Careful development of microarray essentials (such as oligonucleotide probes, protocols for target preparation and hybridization, etc.) combined with extensive performance testing are thus mandatory requirements for the maturation of diagnostic microarrays from fancy technological gimmicks to robust and routinely applicable tools.

  2. Oligonucleotide microarrays in constitutional genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Keren, Boris; Le Caignec, Cedric

    2011-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays such as comparative genomic hybridization arrays and SNP microarrays enable the identification of genomic imbalances - also termed copy-number variants - with increasing resolution. This article will focus on the most significant applications of high-throughput oligonucleotide microarrays, both in genetic diagnosis and research. In genetic diagnosis, the method is becoming a standard tool for investigating patients with unexplained developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and/or with multiple congenital anomalies. Oligonucleotide microarray have also been recently applied to the detection of genomic imbalances in prenatal diagnosis either to characterize a chromosomal rearrangement that has previously been identified by standard prenatal karyotyping or to detect a cryptic genomic imbalance in a fetus with ultrasound abnormalities and a normal standard prenatal karyotype. In research, oligonucleotide microarrays have been used for a wide range of applications, such as the identification of new genes responsible for monogenic disorders and the association of a copy-number variant as a predisposing factor to a common disease. Despite its widespread use, the interpretation of results is not always straightforward. We will discuss several unexpected results and ethical issues raised by these new methods.

  3. An imputation approach for oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Lu, Qing; Fu, Wenjiang J

    2013-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are commonly adopted for detecting and qualifying the abundance of molecules in biological samples. Analysis of microarray data starts with recording and interpreting hybridization signals from CEL images. However, many CEL images may be blemished by noises from various sources, observed as "bright spots", "dark clouds", and "shadowy circles", etc. It is crucial that these image defects are correctly identified and properly processed. Existing approaches mainly focus on detecting defect areas and removing affected intensities. In this article, we propose to use a mixed effect model for imputing the affected intensities. The proposed imputation procedure is a single-array-based approach which does not require any biological replicate or between-array normalization. We further examine its performance by using Affymetrix high-density SNP arrays. The results show that this imputation procedure significantly reduces genotyping error rates. We also discuss the necessary adjustments for its potential extension to other oligonucleotide microarrays, such as gene expression profiling. The R source code for the implementation of approach is freely available upon request.

  4. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  5. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S.; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander N.; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Shipma, Matthew; White, Amanda M.; Willse, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic, genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using DNA oligonucleotide microarrays was used for high-resolution differentiation between closely related Bacillus strains, including two strains of Bacillus anthracis that are monomorphic (indistinguishable) via amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting techniques. Replicated hybridizations on 391-probe nonamer arrays were used to construct a prototype fingerprint library for quantitative comparisons. Descriptive analysis of the fingerprints, including phylogenetic reconstruction, is consistent with previous taxonomic organization of the genus. Newly developed statistical analysis methods were used to quantitatively compare and objectively confirm apparent differences in microarray fingerprints with the statistical rigor required for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics. These data suggest that a relatively simple fingerprinting microarray and statistical analysis method can differentiate between species in the Bacillus cereus complex, and between strains of B. anthracis. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand underlying microarray and process-level variability, leading to specific recommendations for the development of a standard operating procedure and/or continued technology enhancements for microbial forensics and diagnostics.

  6. Improvement of the specificity of a pan-viral microarray by using genus-specific oligonucleotides and reduction of interference by host genomes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaoping; Qin, Chengfeng; Li, Yongqiang; Liu, Hong; Lin, Fang; Li, Yuchang; Li, Jing; Zhu, Qingyu; Yang, Yinhui

    2011-09-01

    Rapid detection of viral pathogens is crucial for antiviral therapy. High-density 60-70-mer oligonucleotide microarrays have been explored for broad detection of many viruses. However, relatively low specificity and the complex analytical processes are the major limitations when pan-viral oligonucleotide microarrays are used to detect viral pathogens. In this study, genus-specific oligonucleotides were used as probes and modified sample preparations were carried out to improve the specificity and accuracy of the pan-viral oligonucleotide microarray. Genus-specific 63-mer oligonucleotide probes were used for screening human pathogenic RNA viruses. A total of 628 oligonucleotide probes covering 32 RNA viral genera from 14 viral families were used. The number of oligonucleotide probes was decreased to simplify the analytical process of hybridization and to minimize cross-hybridization. Host genomes were removed by DNase I/RNase T1 digestion before viral nucleic acid extraction, and non-ribosomal hexanucleotides were used for reverse transcription to minimize interference of host genomes. Cultured viruses were used for microarray validation. The microarray was validated by cultured isolates that belonged to five viral genera. By using DNase I/RNase T1 digestion before viral nucleic acid extraction and non-ribosomal hexanucleotides for reverse transcription, the specificity of the microarray was improved. Furthermore, the analytical process of hybridization results was simplified. The specificity of pan-viral microarray could be improved by using genus-specific oligonucleotides as probes and by using non-ribosomal hexanucleotides for reverse transcription. Combined with subsequent degenerate reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing processes, this improved genus-specific oligonucleotides microarray provides a relatively flexible strategy for diagnosis of RNA virus diseases.

  7. Construction and Evaluation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Whole-Genome Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Z. He; Q. He; L. Wu; M.E. Clark; J.D. Wall; Jizhong Zhou; Matthew W. Fields

    2004-03-17

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has been the focus of biochemical and physiological studies in the laboratory, and the metabolic versatility of this organism has been largely recognized, particularly the reduction of sulfate, fumarate, iron, uranium and chromium. In addition, a Desulfovibrio sp. has been shown to utilize uranium as the sole electron acceptor. D. vulgaris is a d-Proteobacterium with a genome size of 3.6 Mb and 3584 ORFs. The whole-genome microarrays of D. vulgaris have been constructed using 70mer oligonucleotides. All ORFs in the genome were represented with 3471 (97.1%) unique probes and 103 (2.9%) non-specific probes that may have cross-hybridization with other ORFs. In preparation for use of the experimental microarrays, artificial probes and targets were designed to assess specificity and sensitivity and identify optimal hybridization conditions for oligonucleotide microarrays. The results indicated that for 50mer and 70mer oligonucleotide arrays, hybridization at 45 C to 50 C, washing at 37 C and a wash time of 2.5 to 5 minutes obtained specific and strong hybridization signals. In order to evaluate the performance of the experimental microarrays, growth conditions were selected that were expected to give significant hybridization differences for different sets of genes. The initial evaluations were performed using D. vulgaris cells grown at logarithmic and stationary phases. Transcriptional analysis of D. vulgaris cells sampled during logarithmic phase growth indicated that 25% of annotated ORFs were up-regulated and 3% of annotated ORFs were downregulated compared to stationary phase cells. The up-regulated genes included ORFs predicted to be involved with acyl chain biosynthesis, amino acid ABC transporter, translational initiation factors, and ribosomal proteins. In the stationary phase growth cells, the two most up-regulated ORFs (70-fold) were annotated as a carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase and a 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2

  8. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  9. Microarray oligonucleotide probe designer (MOPeD): A web service

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Viren C; Mondal, Kajari; Shetty, Amol Carl; Horner, Vanessa L; Bedoyan, Jirair K; Martin, Donna; Caspary, Tamara; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Methods of genomic selection that combine high-density oligonucleotide microarrays with next-generation DNA sequencing allow investigators to characterize genomic variation in selected portions of complex eukaryotic genomes. Yet choosing which specific oligonucleotides to be use can pose a major technical challenge. To address this issue, we have developed a software package called MOPeD (Microarray Oligonucleotide Probe Designer), which automates the process of designing genomic selection microarrays. This web-based software allows individual investigators to design custom genomic selection microarrays optimized for synthesis with Roche NimbleGen’s maskless photolithography. Design parameters include uniqueness of the probe sequences, melting temperature, hairpin formation, and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms. We generated probe databases for the human, mouse, and rhesus macaque genomes and conducted experimental validation of MOPeD-designed microarrays in human samples by sequencing the human X chromosome exome, where relevant sequence metrics indicated superior performance relative to a microarray designed by the Roche NimbleGen proprietary algorithm. We also performed validation in the mouse to identify known mutations contained within a 487-kb region from mouse chromosome 16, the mouse chromosome 16 exome (1.7 Mb), and the mouse chromosome 12 exome (3.3 Mb). Our results suggest that the open source MOPeD software package and website (http://moped.genetics.emory.edu/) will make a valuable resource for investigators in their sequence-based studies of complex eukaryotic genomes. PMID:21379402

  10. Gene expression profiling in peanut using oligonucleotide microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently have a moderately significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for the oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate l...

  11. Avian oncogenic virus differential diagnosis in chickens using oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lih-Chiann; Huang, Dean; Pu, Chang-En; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2014-12-15

    Avian oncogenic viruses include the avian leukosis virus (ALV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) and Marek's disease virus (MDV). Multiple oncogenic viral infections are frequently seen, with even Marek's disease vaccines reported to be contaminated with ALV and REV. The gross lesions caused by avian oncogenic viruses often overlap, making differentiation diagnosis based on histopathology difficult. The objective of this study is to develop a rapid approach to simultaneously differentiate, subgroup and pathotype the avian oncogenic viruses. The oligonucleotide microarray was employed in this study. Particular DNA sequences were recognized using specific hybridization between the DNA target and probe on the microarray, followed with colorimetric development through enzyme reaction. With 10 designed probes, ALV-A, ALV-E, ALV-J, REV, MDV pathogenic and vaccine strains were clearly discriminated on the microarray with the naked eyes. The detection limit was 27 copy numbers, which was 10-100 times lower than multiplex PCR. Of 102 field samples screened using the oligonucleotide microarray, 32 samples were positive for ALV-E, 17 samples were positive for ALV-J, 6 samples were positive for REV, 4 samples were positive for MDV, 7 samples were positive for both ALV-A and ALV-E, 5 samples were positive for ALV-A, ALV-E and ALV-J, one sample was positive for both ALV-J and MDV, and 3 samples were positive for both REV and MDV. The oligonucleotide microarray, an easy-to-use, high-specificity, high-sensitivity and extendable assay, presents a potent technique for rapid differential diagnosis of avian oncogenic viruses and the detection of multiple avian oncogenic viral infections under field conditions.

  12. [Research progress of probe design software of oligonucleotide microarrays].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Zaoquan; Liu, Zhengchun

    2014-02-01

    DNA microarray has become an essential medical genetic diagnostic tool for its high-throughput, miniaturization and automation. The design and selection of oligonucleotide probes are critical for preparing gene chips with high quality. Several sets of probe design software have been developed and are available to perform this work now. Every set of the software aims to different target sequences and shows different advantages and limitations. In this article, the research and development of these sets of software are reviewed in line with three main criteria, including specificity, sensitivity and melting temperature (Tm). In addition, based on the experimental results from literatures, these sets of software are classified according to their applications. This review will be helpful for users to choose an appropriate probe-design software. It will also reduce the costs of microarrays, improve the application efficiency of microarrays, and promote both the research and development (R&D) and commercialization of high-performance probe design software.

  13. Gene expression profiling in peanut using high density oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Payton, Paxton; Kottapalli, Kameswara Rao; Rowland, Diane; Faircloth, Wilson; Guo, Baozhu; Burow, Mark; Puppala, Naveen; Gallo, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Background Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently has a significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate large-scale transcript responses to a variety of developmental and environmental signals, ultimately improving our understanding of plant biology. Results We have developed a high-density oligonucleotide microarray for peanut using 49,205 publicly available ESTs and tested the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues. To identify putatively tissue-specific genes and demonstrate the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues, we compared transcript levels in pod, peg, leaf, stem, and root tissues. Results from this experiment showed 108 putatively pod-specific/abundant genes, as well as transcripts whose expression was low or undetected in pod compared to peg, leaf, stem, or root. The transcripts significantly over-represented in pod include genes responsible for seed storage proteins and desiccation (e.g., late-embryogenesis abundant proteins, aquaporins, legumin B), oil production, and cellular defense. Additionally, almost half of the pod-abundant genes represent unknown genes allowing for the possibility of associating putative function to these previously uncharacterized genes. Conclusion The peanut oligonucleotide array represents the majority of publicly available peanut ESTs and can be used as a tool for expression profiling studies in diverse tissues. PMID:19523230

  14. Oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of influenza A viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotchenko, S. A.; Vasin, A. V.; Sandybaev, N. T.; Plotnikova, M. A.; Chervyakova, O. V.; Smirnova, E. A.; Kushnareva, E. V.; Strochkov, V. M.; Taylakova, E. T.; Egorov, V. V.; Koshemetov, J. K.; Kiselev, O. I.; Sansyzbay, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Influenza is one of the most widespread respiratory viral diseases, infecting humans, horses, pigs, poultry and some other animal populations. Influenza A viruses (IAV) are classified into subtypes on the basis of the surface hemagglutinin (H1 to H16) and neuraminidase (N1 to N9) glycoproteins. The correct determination of IAV subtype is necessary for clinical and epidemiological studies. In this article we propose an oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of IAV using universal one-step multisegment RT-PCR fluorescent labeling of viral gene segments. It showed to be an advanced approach for fast detection and identification of IAV.

  15. Particle-Based Microarrays of Oligonucleotides and Oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Maerkle, Frieder; Hahn, Lothar; Foertsch, Tobias; Schillo, Sebastian; Bykovskaya, Valentina; Sedlmayr, Martyna; Weber, Laura K.; Ridder, Barbara; Soehindrijo, Miriam; Muenster, Bastian; Striffler, Jakob; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Breitling, Frank; Loeffler, Felix F.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we describe different methods of microarray fabrication based on the use of micro-particles/-beads and point out future tendencies in the development of particle-based arrays. First, we consider oligonucleotide bead arrays, where each bead is a carrier of one specific sequence of oligonucleotides. This bead-based array approach, appearing in the late 1990s, enabled high-throughput oligonucleotide analysis and had a large impact on genome research. Furthermore, we consider particle-based peptide array fabrication using combinatorial chemistry. In this approach, particles can directly participate in both the synthesis and the transfer of synthesized combinatorial molecules to a substrate. Subsequently, we describe in more detail the synthesis of peptide arrays with amino acid polymer particles, which imbed the amino acids inside their polymer matrix. By heating these particles, the polymer matrix is transformed into a highly viscous gel, and thereby, imbedded monomers are allowed to participate in the coupling reaction. Finally, we focus on combinatorial laser fusing of particles for the synthesis of high-density peptide arrays. This method combines the advantages of particles and combinatorial lithographic approaches. PMID:27600347

  16. A review of statistical methods for preprocessing oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijin

    2009-12-01

    Microarrays have become an indispensable tool in biomedical research. This powerful technology not only makes it possible to quantify a large number of nucleic acid molecules simultaneously, but also produces data with many sources of noise. A number of preprocessing steps are therefore necessary to convert the raw data, usually in the form of hybridisation images, to measures of biological meaning that can be used in further statistical analysis. Preprocessing of oligonucleotide arrays includes image processing, background adjustment, data normalisation/transformation and sometimes summarisation when multiple probes are used to target one genomic unit. In this article, we review the issues encountered in each preprocessing step and introduce the statistical models and methods in preprocessing.

  17. A novel multifunctional oligonucleotide microarray for Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microarrays are invaluable tools for genome interrogation, SNP detection, and expression analysis, among other applications. Such broad capabilities would be of value to many pathogen research communities, although the development and use of genome-scale microarrays is often a costly undertaking. Therefore, effective methods for reducing unnecessary probes while maintaining or expanding functionality would be relevant to many investigators. Results Taking advantage of available genome sequences and annotation for Toxoplasma gondii (a pathogenic parasite responsible for illness in immunocompromised individuals) and Plasmodium falciparum (a related parasite responsible for severe human malaria), we designed a single oligonucleotide microarray capable of supporting a wide range of applications at relatively low cost, including genome-wide expression profiling for Toxoplasma, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genotyping of both T. gondii and P. falciparum. Expression profiling of the three clonotypic lineages dominating T. gondii populations in North America and Europe provides a first comprehensive view of the parasite transcriptome, revealing that ~49% of all annotated genes are expressed in parasite tachyzoites (the acutely lytic stage responsible for pathogenesis) and 26% of genes are differentially expressed among strains. A novel design utilizing few probes provided high confidence genotyping, used here to resolve recombination points in the clonal progeny of sexual crosses. Recent sequencing of additional T. gondii isolates identifies >620 K new SNPs, including ~11 K that intersect with expression profiling probes, yielding additional markers for genotyping studies, and further validating the utility of a combined expression profiling/genotyping array design. Additional applications facilitating SNP and transcript discovery, alternative statistical methods for quantifying gene expression, etc. are also pursued at pilot scale to inform

  18. Human papilloma virus strain detection utilising custom-designed oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Duncan; Platt, Mark; Javad, Farzad; Day, Philip J R

    2011-01-01

    Within the past 15 years, the utilisation of microarray technology for the detection of specific pathogen strains has increased rapidly. Presently, it is possible to simply purchase a pre-manufactured "off the shelf " oligonucleotide microarray bearing a wide variety of known signature DNA sequences previously identified in the organism being studied. Consequently, a hybridisation analysis may be used to pinpoint which strain/s is present in any given clinical sample. However, there exists a problem if the study necessitates the identification of novel sequences which are not represented in commercially available microarray chips. Ideally, such investigations require an in situ oligonucleotide microarray platform with the capacity to synthesise microarrays bearing probe sequences designed solely by the researcher. This chapter will focus on the employment of the Combimatrix® B3 CustomArray™ for the synthesis of reusable, bespoke microarrays for the purpose of discerning multiple Human Papilloma Virus strains. PMID:20938834

  19. New protocol for oligonucleotide microarray fabrication using SU-8-coated glass microslides.

    PubMed

    Sethi, D; Kumar, A; Gandhi, R P; Kumar, P; Gupta, K C

    2010-09-15

    Microarray technology has become an important tool for detection and analysis of nucleic acid targets. Immobilization of modified and unmodified oligonucleotides on epoxy-functionalized glass surfaces is often used in microarray fabrication. Here, we demonstrate a protocol that employs coating of SU-8 (glycidyl ether of bisphenol A) onto glass microslides to obtain high density of epoxy functions for efficient immobilization of aminoalkyl-, thiophosphoryl-, and phosphorylated oligonucleotides with uniform spot morphology. The resulting microarrays exhibited high immobilization (∼65%) and hybridization efficiency (30-36%) and were sufficiently stable over a range of temperature and pH conditions. The prominent feature of the protocol is that spots can be visualized distinctly at 0.05 μM probe (a 20-mer oligonucleotide) concentration. The constructed microarrays were subsequently used for detection of base mismatches and bacterial diseases (meningitis and typhoid).

  20. Detection of genomic deletions in rice using oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Myron; Hess, Ann; Bai, Jianfa; Mauleon, Ramil; Diaz, M Genaleen; Sugiyama, Nobuko; Bordeos, Alicia; Wang, Guo-Liang; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E

    2009-01-01

    Background The induction of genomic deletions by physical- or chemical- agents is an easy and inexpensive means to generate a genome-saturating collection of mutations. Different mutagens can be selected to ensure a mutant collection with a range of deletion sizes. This would allow identification of mutations in single genes or, alternatively, a deleted group of genes that might collectively govern a trait (e.g., quantitative trait loci, QTL). However, deletion mutants have not been widely used in functional genomics, because the mutated genes are not tagged and therefore, difficult to identify. Here, we present a microarray-based approach to identify deleted genomic regions in rice mutants selected from a large collection generated by gamma ray or fast neutron treatment. Our study focuses not only on the utility of this method for forward genetics, but also its potential as a reverse genetics tool through accumulation of hybridization data for a collection of deletion mutants harboring multiple genetic lesions. Results We demonstrate that hybridization of labeled genomic DNA directly onto the Affymetrix Rice GeneChip® allows rapid localization of deleted regions in rice mutants. Deletions ranged in size from one gene model to ~500 kb and were predicted on all 12 rice chromosomes. The utility of the technique as a tool in forward genetics was demonstrated in combination with an allelic series of mutants to rapidly narrow the genomic region, and eventually identify a candidate gene responsible for a lesion mimic phenotype. Finally, the positions of mutations in 14 mutants were aligned onto the rice pseudomolecules in a user-friendly genome browser to allow for rapid identification of untagged mutations . Conclusion We demonstrate the utility of oligonucleotide arrays to discover deleted genes in rice. The density and distribution of deletions suggests the feasibility of a database saturated with deletions across the rice genome. This community resource can continue

  1. High-quality gene assembly directly from unpurified mixtures of microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Borovkov, Alex Y.; Loskutov, Andrey V.; Robida, Mark D.; Day, Kristen M.; Cano, Jose A.; Le Olson, Tien; Patel, Hetal; Brown, Kevin; Hunter, Preston D.; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    To meet the growing demand for synthetic genes more robust, scalable and inexpensive gene assembly technologies must be developed. Here, we present a protocol for high-quality gene assembly directly from low-cost marginal-quality microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides. Significantly, we eliminated the time- and money-consuming oligonucleotide purification steps through the use of hybridization-based selection embedded in the assembly process. The protocol was tested on mixtures of up to 2000 oligonucleotides eluted directly from microarrays obtained from three different chip manufacturers. These mixtures containing <5% perfect oligos, and were used directly for assembly of 27 test genes of different sizes. Gene quality was assessed by sequencing, and their activity was tested in coupled in vitro transcription/translation reactions. Genes assembled from the microarray-eluted material using the new protocol matched the quality of the genes assembled from >95% pure column-synthesized oligonucleotides by the standard protocol. Both averaged only 2.7 errors/kb, and genes assembled from microarray-eluted material without clonal selection produced only 30% less protein than sequence-confirmed clones. This report represents the first demonstration of cost-efficient gene assembly from microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides. The overall cost of assembly by this method approaches 5¢ per base, making gene synthesis more affordable than traditional cloning. PMID:20693531

  2. Development, Characterization and Experimental Validation of a Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Gene Expression Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement. PMID:23110046

  3. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement. PMID:23110046

  4. [A prototype of oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogens relating to arena- and Filoviridae families].

    PubMed

    Zhirnov, I V; Ryabinin, V A; Sinyakov, A N; Ternovoy, V A; Shikov, A N

    2015-01-01

    A prototype of oligonucleotide microarray for detection of Lassa, Junin, Machupo, Guanarito viruses (Arenaviridae family), Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae family) was presented. An original approach founded on virus proteins (nucleocapsid protein for Junin, Guanarito, Machupo viruses and RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase for Lassa, Ebola and Marburg viruses) amino acid sequences analysis with subsequent transform of revealed unique peptides into due sets of oligonucleotides was used to design probes for hybridization and primers.

  5. POSaM: a fast, flexible, open-source, inkjet oligonucleotide synthesizer and microarrayer

    PubMed Central

    Lausted, Christopher; Dahl, Timothy; Warren, Charles; King, Kimberly; Smith, Kimberly; Johnson, Michael; Saleem, Ramsey; Aitchison, John; Hood, Lee; Lasky, Stephen R

    2004-01-01

    DNA arrays are valuable tools in molecular biology laboratories. Their rapid acceptance was aided by the release of plans for a pin-spotting microarrayer by researchers at Stanford. Inkjet microarraying is a flexible, complementary technique that allows the synthesis of arrays of any oligonucleotide sequences de novo. We describe here an open-source inkjet arrayer capable of rapidly producing sets of unique 9,800-feature arrays. PMID:15287980

  6. Development of a 37K high-density oligo-nucleotide microarray for rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have constructed a rainbow trout high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using all the available tentative consensus (TC) sequences from the Rainbow Trout Gene Index database (The Computational Biology and Functional Genomics Lab., Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Heal...

  7. PCR amplification on microarrays of gel immobilized oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhkov, Boris; Tillib, Sergei; Mikhailovich, Vladimir; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2003-11-04

    The invention relates two general methods for performing PCR amplification, combined with the detection and analysis of the PCR products on a microchip. In the first method, the amplification occurs both outside and within a plurality of gel pads on a microchip, with at least one oligonucleotide primer immobilized in a gel pad. In the second method, PCR amplification also takes place within gel pads on a microchip, but the pads are surrounded by a hydrophobic liquid such as that which separates the individual gel pads into environments which resemble micro-miniaturized test tubes.

  8. Empirical establishment of oligonucleotide probe design criteriausing perfect match and mismatch probes and artificial targets

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Wu, L.; Li, X.; Fields, M.; Zhou, J.-Z.

    2004-09-16

    Criteria for the design of gene-specific and group-specific oligonucleotide probes were established experimentally via anoligonucleotide array that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch probes (50-mers and 70-mers) based upon four genes. The effects of probe-target identity, continuous stretch, mismatch position, and hybridization free energy on specificity were tested. Little hybridization was observed at a probe-target identity of 85 percent for both 50-mer and 70-mer probes. PM signal intensities (33 to 48 percent) were detected at a probe-target identity of 94 percent for 50-meroligonucleotides and 43 to 55 percent for 70-mer probes at a probe-target identity of 96 percent. When the effects of sequence identity and continuous stretch were considered independently, a stretch probe (>15bases) contributed an additional 9 percent of the PM signal intensity compared to a nonstretch probe (15 bases) at the same identity level. Cross-hybridization increased as the length of continuous stretch increased. A 35-base stretch for 50-mer probes or a 50-base stretch for 70-mer probes had approximately 55 percent of the PM signal. Little cross-hybridization was observed for probes with a minimal binding free energy greater than 30 kcal/mol for 50-mer probes or 40 kcal/mol for 70-mer probes. Based on the experimental results, a set of criteria are suggested for the design of gene-specific and group-specific oligonucleotide probes, and the experimentally established criteria should provide valuable information for new software and algorithms for microarray-based studies.

  9. Quantitative Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Salmonella enterica isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Straub, Tim M.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Small, Jack A.; Call, Douglas R.; Daly, Don S.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2004-03-22

    We report on a genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using nucleic acid microarrays for microbial forensics and epidemiology applications. We demonstrate that the microarray method provides high-resolution differentiation between closely related microorganisms using Salmonella enterica strains. In replicate trials we used a simple 192-probe nonamer array to construct a fingerprint library of 25 closely related Salmonella isolates. Controlling false discovery rate for multiple testing at alpha =.05, at least 295 of 300 pairs of S. enterica isolate fingerprints were found to be statistically distinct using a modified Hotelling Tsquared test. Although we find most pairs of Salmonella fingerprints to be distinct, forensic applications will also require a protocol for library construction and reliable microbial classification against a fingerprint library. We outline additional steps required to produce a protocol for library construction and reliable classification of unknown organisms.

  10. Innovative instrumentation for microarray scanning and analysis: application for characterization of oligonucleotide duplexes behavior.

    PubMed

    Khomyakova, E B; Dreval, E V; Tran-Dang, M; Potier, M C; Soussaline, F P

    2004-05-01

    Accuracy in microarray technology requires new approaches to microarray reader development. A microarray reader system (optical scanning array or OSA reader) based on automated microscopy with large field of view, high speed 3 axis scanning at multiple narrow-band spectra of excitation light has been developed. It allows fast capture of high-resolution, multi-fluorescence images and is characterized by a linear dynamic range and sensitivity comparable to commonly used photo-multiplier tube (PMT)-based laser scanner. Controlled by high performance software, the instrument can be used for scanning and quantitative analysis of any type of dry microarray. Studies implying temperature-controlled hybridization chamber containing a microarray can also be performed. This enables the registration of kinetics and melting curves. This feature is required in a wide range of on-chip chemical and enzymatic reactions including on-chip PCR amplification. We used the OSA reader for the characterization of hybridization and melting behaviour of oligonucleotide:oligonucleotide duplexes on three-dimensional Code Link slides. PMID:15209342

  11. Construction and evaluation of a Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven David; Raman, Babu; McKeown, Catherine K; Kale, Shubhangi P; He, Zhili; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2007-04-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium that can directly convert cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Microarray technology is a powerful tool to gain insights into cellular processes by examining gene expression under various physiological states. Oligonucleotide microarray probes were designed for 96.7% of the 3163 C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 candidate protein-encoding genes and then a partial-genome microarray containing 70 C. thermocellum specific probes was constructed and evaluated. We detected a signal-to-noise ratio of three with as little as 1.0 ng of genomic DNA and only low signals from negative control probes (nonclostridial DNA), indicating the probes were sensitive and specific. In order to further test the specificity of the array we amplified and hybridized 10 C. thermocellum polymerase chain reaction products that represented different genes and found gene specific hybridization in each case. We also constructed a whole-genome microarray and prepared total cellular RNA from the same point in early-logarithmic growth phase from two technical replicates during cellobiose fermentation. The reliability of the microarray data was assessed by cohybridization of labeled complementary DNA from the cellobiose fermentation samples and the pattern of hybridization revealed a linear correlation. These results taken together suggest that our oligonucleotide probe set can be used for sensitive and specific C. thermocellum transcriptomic studies in the future.

  12. Drop drying on surfaces determines chemical reactivity - the specific case of immobilization of oligonucleotides on microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drop drying is a key factor in a wide range of technical applications, including spotted microarrays. The applied nL liquid volume provides specific reaction conditions for the immobilization of probe molecules to a chemically modified surface. Results We investigated the influence of nL and μL liquid drop volumes on the process of probe immobilization and compare the results obtained to the situation in liquid solution. In our data, we observe a strong relationship between drop drying effects on immobilization and surface chemistry. In this work, we present results on the immobilization of dye labeled 20mer oligonucleotides with and without an activating 5′-aminoheptyl linker onto a 2D epoxysilane and a 3D NHS activated hydrogel surface. Conclusions Our experiments identified two basic processes determining immobilization. First, the rate of drop drying that depends on the drop volume and the ambient relative humidity. Oligonucleotides in a dried spot react unspecifically with the surface and long reaction times are needed. 3D hydrogel surfaces allow for immobilization in a liquid environment under diffusive conditions. Here, oligonucleotide immobilization is much faster and a specific reaction with the reactive linker group is observed. Second, the effect of increasing probe concentration as a result of drop drying. On a 3D hydrogel, the increasing concentration of probe molecules in nL spotting volumes accelerates immobilization dramatically. In case of μL volumes, immobilization depends on whether the drop is allowed to dry completely. At non-drying conditions, very limited immobilization is observed due to the low oligonucleotide concentration used in microarray spotting solutions. The results of our study provide a general guideline for microarray assay development. They allow for the initial definition and further optimization of reaction conditions for the immobilization of oligonucleotides and other probe molecule classes to different

  13. Base-cleavable microarrays for the characterization of DNA and RNA oligonucleotides synthesized in situ by photolithography.

    PubMed

    Lietard, Jory; Kretschy, Nicole; Sack, Matej; Wahba, Alexander S; Somoza, Mark M; Damha, Masad J

    2014-11-01

    Assessing synthesis efficiency, errors, failed deprotections, and chemical and enzymatic degradation of oligonucleotides on microarrays is essential for improving existing in situ synthesis methods, and for the development of new chemistries. We describe the use of LC-MS to analyse DNA and RNA oligonucleotides deprotected and cleaved under basic conditions from microarrays fabricated using light-directed in situ chemistry. The data yield essential information on array quality and sequence identity.

  14. Development and Validation of an Oligonucleotide Microarray for Detection of Multiple Virulence and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli†

    PubMed Central

    Bruant, Guillaume; Maynard, Christine; Bekal, Sadjia; Gaucher, Isabelle; Masson, Luke; Brousseau, Roland; Harel, Josée

    2006-01-01

    An oligonucleotide microarray detecting 189 Escherichia coli virulence genes or markers and 30 antimicrobial resistance genes was designed and validated using DNA from known reference strains. This microarray was confirmed to be a powerful diagnostic tool for monitoring emerging E. coli pathotypes and antimicrobial resistance, as well as for environmental, epidemiological, and phylogenetic studies including the evaluation of genome plasticity. PMID:16672535

  15. Identification of chromosomal errors in human preimplantation embryos with oligonucleotide DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lifeng; Wang, Cassie T; Sun, Xiaofang; Liu, Lian; Li, Man; Witz, Craig; Williams, Daniel; Griffith, Jason; Skorupski, Josh; Haddad, Ghassan; Gill, Jimmy; Wang, Wei-Hua

    2013-01-01

    A previous study comparing the performance of different platforms for DNA microarray found that the oligonucleotide (oligo) microarray platform containing 385K isothermal probes had the best performance when evaluating dosage sensitivity, precision, specificity, sensitivity and copy number variations border definition. Although oligo microarray platform has been used in some research fields and clinics, it has not been used for aneuploidy screening in human embryos. The present study was designed to use this new microarray platform for preimplantation genetic screening in the human. A total of 383 blastocysts from 72 infertility patients with either advanced maternal age or with previous miscarriage were analyzed after biopsy and microarray. Euploid blastocysts were transferred to patients and clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were measured. Chromosomes in some aneuploid blastocysts were further analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to evaluate accuracy of the results. We found that most (58.1%) of the blastocysts had chromosomal abnormalities that included single or multiple gains and/or losses of chromosome(s), partial chromosome deletions and/or duplications in both euploid and aneuploid embryos. Transfer of normal euploid blastocysts in 34 cycles resulted in 58.8% clinical pregnancy and 54.4% implantation rates. Examination of abnormal blastocysts by FISH showed that all embryos had matching results comparing microarray and FISH analysis. The present study indicates that oligo microarray conducted with a higher resolution and a greater number of probes is able to detect not only aneuploidy, but also minor chromosomal abnormalities, such as partial chromosome deletion and/or duplication in human embryos. Preimplantation genetic screening of the aneuploidy by DNA microarray is an advanced technology used to select embryos for transfer and improved embryo implantation can be obtained after transfer of the screened normal embryos.

  16. Development of a gold nanoparticle-based oligonucleotide microarray for simultaneous detection of seven swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Dang, Erle; Gao, Jinzhuai; Guo, Sen; Li, Zheng

    2013-07-01

    A gold nanoparticle (GNP) based oligonucleotide microarray assay (GNMA) that combined GNP-based multiplex asymmetric PCR with silver enhancement detection, was developed for simultaneous detection of seven important swine viruses in intensive swine production. Multiplex PCR was first performed to enable the target fragments of seven viruses containing a universal sequence, which were labeled simultaneously with GNPs by multiplex asymmetric PCR in the presence of excess GNP-conjugated primer. Target labeled products were captured by virus-specific oligonucleotide probes immobilized on microarrays, followed by silver staining for signal enhancement. Black image of microarray spots was easily detected by the naked eye or a simple flatbed scanner and quantified. The results for purified plasmid constructs indicated that the assay was highly specific for detecting the seven viruses in single or multiple infections, and as few as 6-80 copies/μl of specific viral target fragments were detected successfully. Fifty-seven archived samples were tested by this assay, and the results were 100% consistent with previous results based on real-time PCR and those obtained by conventional PCR/RT-PCR and sequencing. The assay is appropriate for the routine diagnosis of viral infections in pigs due to its simplicity, low-cost, high specificity and sensitivity.

  17. A fully scalable online pre-processing algorithm for short oligonucleotide microarray atlases

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Leo; Torrente, Aurora; Elo, Laura L.; Brazma, Alvis; Rung, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Rapid accumulation of large and standardized microarray data collections is opening up novel opportunities for holistic characterization of genome function. The limited scalability of current preprocessing techniques has, however, formed a bottleneck for full utilization of these data resources. Although short oligonucleotide arrays constitute a major source of genome-wide profiling data, scalable probe-level techniques have been available only for few platforms based on pre-calculated probe effects from restricted reference training sets. To overcome these key limitations, we introduce a fully scalable online-learning algorithm for probe-level analysis and pre-processing of large microarray atlases involving tens of thousands of arrays. In contrast to the alternatives, our algorithm scales up linearly with respect to sample size and is applicable to all short oligonucleotide platforms. The model can use the most comprehensive data collections available to date to pinpoint individual probes affected by noise and biases, providing tools to guide array design and quality control. This is the only available algorithm that can learn probe-level parameters based on sequential hyperparameter updates at small consecutive batches of data, thus circumventing the extensive memory requirements of the standard approaches and opening up novel opportunities to take full advantage of contemporary microarray collections. PMID:23563154

  18. High-throughput detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria using oligonucleotide microarray with quantum dots as fluorescent labels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aihua; Qiu, Zhigang; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhaoli; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Jun-Wen

    2014-08-18

    Bacterial pathogens are mostly responsible for food-borne diseases, and there is still substantial room for improvement in the effective detection of these organisms. In the present study, we explored a new method to detect target pathogens easily and rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity. This method uses an oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots as fluorescent labels. Oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16SrRNA gene were synthesized to create an oligonucleotide microarray. The PCR products labeled with biotin were subsequently hybridized using an oligonucleotide microarray. Following incubation with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots coated with streptavidin, fluorescent signals were detected with a PerkinElmer Gx Microarray Scanner. The results clearly showed specific hybridization profiles corresponding to the bacterial species assessed. Two hundred and sixteen strains of food-borne bacterial pathogens, including standard strains and isolated strains from food samples, were used to test the specificity, stability, and sensitivity of the microarray system. We found that the oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots used as fluorescent labels can successfully discriminate the bacterial organisms at the genera or species level, with high specificity and stability as well as a sensitivity of 10 colony forming units (CFU)/mL of pure culture. We further tested 105 mock-contaminated food samples and achieved consistent results as those obtained from traditional biochemical methods. Together, these results indicate that the quantum dot-based oligonucleotide microarray has the potential to be a powerful tool in the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria in foods.

  19. MIMAS: an innovative tool for network-based high density oligonucleotide microarray data management and annotation

    PubMed Central

    Hermida, Leandro; Schaad, Olivier; Demougin, Philippe; Descombes, Patrick; Primig, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background The high-density oligonucleotide microarray (GeneChip) is an important tool for molecular biological research aiming at large-scale detection of small nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA and genome-wide analysis of mRNA concentrations. Local array data management solutions are instrumental for efficient processing of the results and for subsequent uploading of data and annotations to a global certified data repository at the EBI (ArrayExpress) or the NCBI (GeneOmnibus). Description To facilitate and accelerate annotation of high-throughput expression profiling experiments, the Microarray Information Management and Annotation System (MIMAS) was developed. The system is fully compliant with the Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment (MIAME) convention. MIMAS provides life scientists with a highly flexible and focused GeneChip data storage and annotation platform essential for subsequent analysis and interpretation of experimental results with clustering and mining tools. The system software can be downloaded for academic use upon request. Conclusion MIMAS implements a novel concept for nation-wide GeneChip data management whereby a network of facilities is centered on one data node directly connected to the European certified public microarray data repository located at the EBI. The solution proposed may serve as a prototype approach to array data management between research institutes organized in a consortium. PMID:16597336

  20. Multi-Gene Detection and Identification of Mosquito-Borne RNA Viruses Using an Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Grubaugh, Nathan D.; McMenamy, Scott S.; Turell, Michael J.; Lee, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthropod-borne viruses are important emerging pathogens world-wide. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes, such as dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, infect hundreds of millions of people and animals each year. Global surveillance of these viruses in mosquito vectors using molecular based assays is critical for prevention and control of the associated diseases. Here, we report an oligonucleotide DNA microarray design, termed ArboChip5.1, for multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses from the genera Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae), Alphavirus (Togaviridae), Orthobunyavirus (Bunyaviridae), and Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae). Methodology/Principal Findings The assay utilizes targeted PCR amplification of three genes from each virus genus for electrochemical detection on a portable, field-tested microarray platform. Fifty-two viruses propagated in cell-culture were used to evaluate the specificity of the PCR primer sets and the ArboChip5.1 microarray capture probes. The microarray detected all of the tested viruses and differentiated between many closely related viruses such as members of the dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and Semliki Forest virus clades. Laboratory infected mosquitoes were used to simulate field samples and to determine the limits of detection. Additionally, we identified dengue virus type 3, Japanese encephalitis virus, Tembusu virus, Culex flavivirus, and a Quang Binh-like virus from mosquitoes collected in Thailand in 2011 and 2012. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated that the described assay can be utilized in a comprehensive field surveillance program by the broad-range amplification and specific identification of arboviruses from infected mosquitoes. Furthermore, the microarray platform can be deployed in the field and viral RNA extraction to data analysis can occur in as little as 12 h. The information derived from the ArboChip5.1 microarray can help to establish public health

  1. Selection of optimal oligonucleotide probes for microarrays usingmultiple criteria, global alignment and parameter estimation.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xingyuan; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-10-30

    The oligonucleotide specificity for microarray hybridizationcan be predicted by its sequence identity to non-targets, continuousstretch to non-targets, and/or binding free energy to non-targets. Mostcurrently available programs only use one or two of these criteria, whichmay choose 'false' specific oligonucleotides or miss 'true' optimalprobes in a considerable proportion. We have developed a software tool,called CommOligo using new algorithms and all three criteria forselection of optimal oligonucleotide probes. A series of filters,including sequence identity, free energy, continuous stretch, GC content,self-annealing, distance to the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) andmelting temperature (Tm), are used to check each possibleoligonucleotide. A sequence identity is calculated based on gapped globalalignments. A traversal algorithm is used to generate alignments for freeenergy calculation. The optimal Tm interval is determined based on probecandidates that have passed all other filters. Final probes are pickedusing a combination of user-configurable piece-wise linear functions andan iterative process. The thresholds for identity, stretch and freeenergy filters are automatically determined from experimental data by anaccessory software tool, CommOligo_PE (CommOligo Parameter Estimator).The program was used to design probes for both whole-genome and highlyhomologous sequence data. CommOligo and CommOligo_PE are freely availableto academic users upon request.

  2. Sequencing by hybridization with the generic 6-mer oligonucleotide microarray : an advanced scheme for data processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Chechetkin, V. R.; Turygin, A. Y.; Proudnikov, D. Y.; Prokopenko, D. V.; Kirillov, E. V.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Russian Academy of Sciences

    2000-08-01

    DNA sequencing by hybridization was carried out with a microarray of all 4{sup 6} = 4,096 hexadeoxyribonucleotides (the generic microchip). The oligonucleotides immobilized in 100 x 100 x 20-{mu}m polyacrylamide gel pads of the generic microchip were hybridized with fluorescently labeled ssDNA, providing perfect and mismatched duplexes. Melting curves were measured in parallel for all microchip duplexes with a fluorescence microscope equipped with CCD camera. This allowed us to discriminate the perfect duplexes formed by the oligonucleotides, which are complementary to the target DNA. The DNA sequence was reconstructed by overlapping the complementary oligonucleotide probes. We developed a data processing scheme to heighten the discrimination of perfect duplexes from mismatched ones. The procedure was united with a reconstruction of the DNA sequence. The scheme includes the proper definition of a discriminant signal, preprocessing, and the variational principle for the sequence indicator function. The effectiveness of the procedure was confirmed by sequencing, proofreading, and nucleotide polymorphism (mutation) analysis of 13 DNA fragments from 31 to 70 nucleotides long.

  3. A New Oligonucleotide Microarray for Detection of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Legionella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp. PMID:25469776

  4. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp.

  5. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp. PMID:25469776

  6. Development and assessment of oligonucleotide microarrays for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Aleksei; Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Afanasyev, Sergey; Jørgensen, Sven Martin

    2011-03-01

    The cDNA microarrays have played a major role in functional genomics of fish and contributed substantially to different areas of aquaculture research. However at present these platforms are gradually substituted with oligonucleotide microarrays (ONM), which represent the most cost-efficient, flexible, powerful and accurate tool for multiple gene expression profiling, especially in species with rich genomic resources. This paper describes the development and assessment of ONM platforms for Atlantic salmon. The process started with the establishment of a bioinformatic system, selection of a low redundancy set of nucleotide sequences providing coverage of transcriptomes of several fish species, their identification by protein products and annotations. Pilot experiments were performed to address issues that are essential for development of ONM: gene composition, quality assessment, hybridization success of homologous and heterologous probes, optimum numbers of spot replicates and processing, management and mining of gene expression data. Performance of microarrays was evaluated in two experiments with Atlantic salmon. Comparison of peripheral blood leukocytes with a mixture of other tissues was conducted for characterization of the leukocyte transcriptome. Analyses of salmon infected with different viral diseases identified virus-responsive genes that can be used as markers for diagnostics of infected status of fish. Data mining with functional annotations confirmed the relevance of these findings.

  7. ASSESSMENT OF THE SWINE PROTEIN-ANNOTATED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY AND UTILITY OF THE ARRAYS FOR EQTL AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILING STUDIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have evaluated the new Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray (http://www.pigoligoarray.org) by analyzing transcriptional profiles for longissimus dorsi muscle (LD), Bronchial lymph node (BLN) and Lung. Four LD samples were used to assess the stringency of hybridization conditions com...

  8. Direct detection of 16S rRNA in soil extracts by using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Small, J; Call, D R; Brockman, F J; Straub, T M; Chandler, D P

    2001-10-01

    We report on the development and validation of a simple microarray method for the direct detection of intact 16S rRNA from unpurified soil extracts. Total RNAs from Geobacter chapellei and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were hybridized to an oligonucleotide array consisting of universal and species-specific 16S rRNA probes. PCR-amplified products from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio were easily and specifically detected under a range of hybridization times, temperatures, and buffers. However, reproducible, specific hybridization and detection of intact rRNA could be accomplished only by using a chaperone-detector probe strategy. With this knowledge, assay conditions were developed for rRNA detection using a 2-h hybridization time at room temperature. Hybridization specificity and signal intensity were enhanced using fragmented RNA. Formamide was required in the hybridization buffer in order to achieve species-specific detection of intact rRNA. With the chaperone detection strategy, we were able to specifically hybridize and detect G. chapellei 16S rRNA directly from a total-RNA soil extract, without further purification or removal of soluble soil constituents. The detection sensitivity for G. chapellei 16S rRNA in soil extracts was at least 0.5 microg of total RNA, representing approximately 7.5 x 10(6) Geobacter cell equivalents of RNA. These results suggest that it is now possible to apply microarray technology to the direct detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, without using PCR. PMID:11571176

  9. Optimization of single-base-pair mismatch discrimination in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El Fantroussi, Said; Smidt, Hauke; Smoot, James C.; Tribou, Erik H.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The discrimination between perfect-match and single-base-pair-mismatched nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by using oligonucleotide DNA microarrays and nonequilibrium dissociation rates (melting profiles). DNA and RNA versions of two synthetic targets corresponding to the 16S rRNA sequences of Staphylococcus epidermidis (38 nucleotides) and Nitrosomonas eutropha (39 nucleotides) were hybridized to perfect-match probes (18-mer and 19-mer) and to a set of probes having all possible single-base-pair mismatches. The melting profiles of all probe-target duplexes were determined in parallel by using an imposed temperature step gradient. We derived an optimum wash temperature for each probe and target by using a simple formula to calculate a discrimination index for each temperature of the step gradient. This optimum corresponded to the output of an independent analysis using a customized neural network program. These results together provide an experimental and analytical framework for optimizing mismatch discrimination among all probes on a DNA microarray.

  10. Development of Polymer-Coated Glass Slides as Optical Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Pourjahed, Atefeh; Rabiee, Mohammad; Tahriri, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Background The microarray technology is in needed of cost-effective, low background noise and stable substrates for successful hybridization and analysis. Methods In this research, we developed a three-dimentional stable and mechanically reliable microarray substrates by coating of two polymeric layers on standard microscope glass slides. For fabrication of these substrates, a thin film of oxidized agarose was prepared on the Poly-L-Lysine (PLL) coated glass slides. Unmodified oligonucleotide probes were spotted and immobilized on these double layered thin films by adsorption on the porous structure of the agarose film. Some of the aldehyde groups of the activated agarose linked covalently to PLL amine groups; on the other side, they bound to amino groups of adsorbed tail of biomolecules. These linkages were fixed by UV irradiation at 254 nm using a CL-1000 UV. These prepared substrates were compared to only agarose-coated and PLL-coated slides Results Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) results demonstrated that agarose provided three-dimensional surface which had higher loading and bindig capacity for biomolecules than PLL-coated surface which had two-dimensional surface. The nano-indentation tests demonstrated the prepared double coating was more reliable and flexible for mechanical robotic spotting. In addition, the repeated indentation on different substrates showed uniformity of coatings. The stability of novel coating was sufficient for hybridization process. The signal-to-noise ratio in hybridization reactions performed on the agarose-PLL coated substrates increased two fold and four fold compared to agarose and PLL coated substrates, respectively. Conclusion Finally, the agarose-PLL microarrays had the highest signal (2920) and lowest background signal (205) in hybridization, suggesting that the prepared slides are suitable in analyzing wide concentration range of analytes. PMID:24285999

  11. Development of an oligonucleotide microarray for the detection and monitoring of marine dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Luca; Cegna, Alessandra; Casabianca, Silvia; Penna, Antonella; Saunders, Nick; Magnani, Mauro

    2011-02-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs), mainly caused by dinoflagellates and diatoms, have great economic and sanitary implications. An important contribution for the comprehension of HAB phenomena and for the identification of risks related to toxic algal species is given by the monitoring programs. In the microscopy-based monitoring methods, harmful species are distinguished through their morphological characteristics. This can be time consuming and requires great taxonomic expertise due to the existence of morphologically close-related species. The high throughput, automation possibility and specificity of microarray-based detection assay, makes this technology very promising for qualitative detection of HAB species. In this study, an oligonucleotide microarray targeted to the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA region of nine toxic dinoflagellate species/clades was designed and evaluated. Two probes (45-47 nucleotides in length) were designed for each species/clade to reduce the potential for false positives. The specificity and sensitivity of the probes were evaluated with ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 PCR amplicons obtained from 20 dinoflagellates cultured strains. Cross hybridization experiments confirmed the probe specificity; moreover, the assay showed a good sensitivity, allowing the detection of up to 2 ng of labeled PCR product. The applicability of the assay with field samples was demonstrated using net concentrated seawater samples, un-spiked or spiked with known amounts of cultured cells. Despite the general application of microarray technology for harmful algae detection is not new, a peculiar group of target species/clades has been included in this new-format assay. Moreover, novelties regarding mainly the probes and the target rDNA region have allowed sensitivity improvements in comparison to previously published studies. PMID:21138747

  12. Final Report Construction of Whole Genome Microarrays, and Expression Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells in Metal-Reducing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    M.W. Fields; J.D. Wall; J. Keasling; J. Zhou

    2008-05-15

    We continue to utilize the oligonucleotide microarrays that were constructed through funding with this project to characterize growth responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris relevant to metal-reducing conditions. To effectively immobilize heavy metals and radionuclides via sulfate-reduction, it is important to understand the cellular responses to adverse factors observed at contaminated subsurface environments (e.g., nutrients, pH, contaminants, growth requirements and products). One of the major goals of the project is to construct whole-genome microarrays for Desulfovibrio vulgaris. First, in order to experimentally establish the criteria for designing gene-specific oligonucleotide probes, an oligonucleotide array was constructed that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes (50mers and 70mers) based upon 4 genes. The effects of probe-target identity, continuous stretch, mismatch position, and hybridization free energy on specificity were examined. Little hybridization was observed at a probe-target identity of <85% for both 50mer and 70mer probes. 33 to 48% of the PM signal intensities were detected at a probe-target identity of 94% for 50mer oligonucleotides, and 43 to 55% for 70mer probes at a probe-target identity of 96%. When the effects of sequence identity and continuous stretch were considered independently, a stretch probe (>15 bases) contributed an additional 9% of the PM signal intensity compared to a non-stretch probe (< 15 bases) at the same identity level. Cross-hybridization increased as the length of continuous stretch increased. A 35-base stretch for 50mer probes or a 50-base stretch for 70mer probes had approximately 55% of the PM signal. Mismatches should be as close to the middle position of an oligonucleotide probe as possible to minimize cross-hybridization. Little cross-hybridization was observed for probes with a minimal binding free energy greater than -30 kcal/mol for 50mer probes or -40 kcal/mol for 70mer probes. Based on the

  13. Effect of oligonucleotide probes substituted by deoxyinosines on the specificity of SNP detection on the DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoting; Pu, Dan; Liu, Bicheng; Xiao, Pengfeng

    2015-01-01

    One of the main factors that can affect the quality of microarray results is the microarray hybridization specificity. The key factor that affects hybridization specificity is the design of the probes. In this paper, we described a novel oligonucleotide probe containing deoxyinosines aimed at improving DNA hybridization specificity. We compared different probes to determine the distance between deoxyinosine base and SNPs site and the number of deoxyinosine bases. The new probe sequences contained two set of deoxyinosines (each set had two deoxyinosines), in which the interval between SNP site and each set of deoxyinosines was two bases. The new probes could obtain the highest hybridization specificity. The experimental results showed that probes containing deoxyinosines hybridized effectively to the perfectly matched target and improved the hybridization specificity of DNA microarray. By including a simple washing step after hybridization, these probes could distinguish matched targets from single-base-mismatched sequences perfectly. For the probes containing deoxyinosines, the fluorescence intensity of a match sequence was more than eight times stronger than that of a mismatch. However, the intensity ratio was only 1.3 times or less for the probes without deoxyinosines. Finally, using hybridization of the PCR product microarrays, we successfully genotyped SNP of 140 samples using these new labeled probes. Our results show that this is a useful new strategy for modifying oligonucleotide probes for use in DNA microarray analysis.

  14. Traceback identification of plant components in commercial compound feed through an oligonucleotide microarray based on tubulin intron polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Elena; Morello, Laura; Gianì, Silvia; Breviario, Diego

    2014-11-01

    According to EU Regulations, all components of commercial compound feed need to be declared on the label. Effective protection against fraud requires severe controls based on accurate analytical methods to ascertain what is declared by the producers. The aim of this work was to develop an oligonucleotide microarray for the molecular recognition of multiple plant components in commercial feeds. We tested the potential of the highly polymorphic first intron sequences from members of the plant β-tubulin gene family as a target for plant DNA identification. 23 oligonucleotide capture probes, targeting species-specific intron sequences, were assembled within a low density microarray for the identification of 10 plant species, selected from among those most commonly used in cattle feed formulation. The ability of the array to detect specific components in complex flour blends and in compound feed was evaluated.

  15. Direct profiling of environmental microbial populations by thermal dissociation analysis of native rRNAs hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El Fantroussi, Said; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Bernhard, Anne E.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Smidt, H.; Yershov, G. M.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile directly extracted rRNA from environmental microbial populations without PCR amplification. In our initial inspection of two distinct estuarine study sites, the hybridization patterns were reproducible and varied between estuarine sediments of differing salinities. The determination of a thermal dissociation curve (i.e., melting profile) for each probe-target duplex provided information on hybridization specificity, which is essential for confirming adequate discrimination between target and nontarget sequences.

  16. Transcription profiling of the early gravitropic response in Arabidopsis using high-density oligonucleotide probe microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Zhu, Tong; Chang, Hur-Song; Wang, Xun; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of plant tropisms, the directed growth toward or away from external stimuli such as light and gravity, began more than a century ago. Yet biochemical, physiological, and especially molecular mechanisms of plant tropic responses remain for the most part unclear. We examined expression of 8,300 genes during early stages of the gravitropic response using high-density oligonucleotide probe microarrays. Approximately 1.7% of the genes represented on the array exhibited significant expression changes within the first 30 min of gravity stimulation. Among gravity-induced genes were a number of genes previously implicated to be involved in gravitropism. However, a much larger number of the identified genes have not been previously associated with gravitropism. Because reorientation of plants may also expose plants to mechanical perturbations, we also compared the effects of a gentle mechanical perturbation on mRNA levels during the gravity response. It was found that approximately 39% of apparently gravity-regulated genes were also regulated by the mechanical perturbation caused by plant reorientation. Our study revealed the induction of complex gene expression patterns as a consequence of gravitropic reorientation and points to an interplay between the gravitropic and mechanical responses and to the extreme sensitivity of plants to even very gentle mechanical perturbations.

  17. Early changes in gene expression profiles of hepatic GVHD uncovered by oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ichiba, Tamotsu; Teshima, Takanori; Kuick, Rork; Misek, David E; Liu, Chen; Takada, Yuichiro; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Reddy, Pavan; Williams, Debra L; Hanash, Samir M; Ferrara, James L M

    2003-07-15

    The liver, skin, and gastrointestinal tract are major target organs of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the major complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In order to gain a better understanding of acute GVHD in the liver, we compared the gene expression profiles of livers after experimental allogeneic and syngeneic BMT using oligonucleotide microarray. At 35 days after allogeneic BMT when hepatic GVHD was histologically evident, genes related to cellular effectors and acute-phase proteins were up-regulated, whereas genes largely related to metabolism and endocrine function were down-regulated. At day 7 after BMT before the development of histologic changes in the liver, interferon gamma (IFN-gamma)-inducible genes, major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecules, and genes related to leukocyte trafficking had been up-regulated. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that expression of IFN-gamma protein itself was increased in the spleen but not in hepatic tissue. These results suggest that the increased expression of genes associated with the attraction and activation of donor T cells induced by IFN-gamma early after BMT is important in the initiation of hepatic GVHD in this model and provide new potential molecular targets for early detection and intervention of acute GVHD.

  18. Design and evaluation of oligonucleotide-microarray method for the detection of human intestinal bacteria in fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-Fu; Beggs, Marjorie L; Robertson, Latriana H; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2002-08-01

    An oligonucleotide-microarray method was developed for the detection of intestinal bacteria in fecal samples collected from human subjects. The 16S rDNA sequences of 20 predominant human intestinal bacterial species were used to design oligonucleotide probes. Three 40-mer oligonucleotides specific for each bacterial species (total 60 probes) were synthesized and applied to glass slides. Cyanine5 (CY5)-labeled 16S rDNAs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from human fecal samples or bacterial DNA using two universal primers and were hybridized to the oligo-microarray. The 20 intestinal bacterial species tested were Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides distasonis, Clostridium clostridiiforme, Clostridium leptum, Fusobacterium prausnitzii, Peptostreptococcus productus, Ruminococcus obeum, Ruminococcus bromii, Ruminococcus callidus, Ruminococcus albus, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium infantis, Eubacterium biforme, Eubacterium aerofaciens, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus faecium. The two universal primers were able to amplify full size 16S rDNA from all of the 20 bacterial species tested. The hybridization results indicated that the oligo-microarray method developed in this study is a reliable method for the detection of predominant human intestinal bacteria in the fecal samples.

  19. Microarray-based long oligonucleotides probe designed for Brucella Spp. detection and identification of antibiotic susceptibility pattern.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Zahra; Najafi, Ali; Piranfar, Vahhab; Mirnejad, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Brucella spp. is a common zoonotic infection referred to as Brucellosis, and it is a serious public health problem around the world. There are currently six classical species (pathogenic species in both animals and humans) within the genus Brucella. The ability and practicality facilitated by a microarray experiment help us to recognize Brucella spp. and its antibiotic resistant gene. Rapid phenotypic determination of antibiotic resistance is not possible by disk diffusion methods. Thus, evaluating antibiotics pattern and Brucella detection appear necessary technique by molecular methods in brucellosis. So, the aim of this study was to design a microarray long oligonucleotides probe and primer for the complete diagnosis of Brucella spp. and obtaining genetic profiles for antibiotic resistance in bacteria at the same time. In this study, we designed 16 antibiotic-resistant gene solid-phase primers with similar melting temperatures of 60 °C and 16 long oligonucleotide probes. These primers and probes can identify tetracycline-, chloramphenicol-, and aminoglycoside-resistant genes, respectively. The design of microarray probes is a versatile process that be done in a wide range of selections. Since the long oligo microarray probes are the best choices for specific diagnosis and definite treatment, this group of probes was designed in the present survey. PMID:27280008

  20. Microarray-based long oligonucleotides probe designed for Brucella Spp. detection and identification of antibiotic susceptibility pattern

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, Zahra; Najafi, Ali; Piranfar, Vahhab; Mirnejad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Brucella spp. is a common zoonotic infection referred to as Brucellosis, and it is a serious public health problem around the world. There are currently six classical species (pathogenic species in both animals and humans) within the genus Brucella. The ability and practicality facilitated by a microarray experiment help us to recognize Brucella spp. and its antibiotic resistant gene. Rapid phenotypic determination of antibiotic resistance is not possible by disk diffusion methods. Thus, evaluating antibiotics pattern and Brucella detection appear necessary technique by molecular methods in brucellosis. So, the aim of this study was to design a microarray long oligonucleotides probe and primer for the complete diagnosis of Brucella spp. and obtaining genetic profiles for antibiotic resistance in bacteria at the same time. In this study, we designed 16 antibiotic-resistant gene solid-phase primers with similar melting temperatures of 60 °C and 16 long oligonucleotide probes. These primers and probes can identify tetracycline-, chloramphenicol-, and aminoglycoside-resistant genes, respectively. The design of microarray probes is a versatile process that be done in a wide range of selections. Since the long oligo microarray probes are the best choices for specific diagnosis and definite treatment, this group of probes was designed in the present survey. PMID:27280008

  1. Microarray-based long oligonucleotides probe designed for Brucella Spp. detection and identification of antibiotic susceptibility pattern.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Zahra; Najafi, Ali; Piranfar, Vahhab; Mirnejad, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Brucella spp. is a common zoonotic infection referred to as Brucellosis, and it is a serious public health problem around the world. There are currently six classical species (pathogenic species in both animals and humans) within the genus Brucella. The ability and practicality facilitated by a microarray experiment help us to recognize Brucella spp. and its antibiotic resistant gene. Rapid phenotypic determination of antibiotic resistance is not possible by disk diffusion methods. Thus, evaluating antibiotics pattern and Brucella detection appear necessary technique by molecular methods in brucellosis. So, the aim of this study was to design a microarray long oligonucleotides probe and primer for the complete diagnosis of Brucella spp. and obtaining genetic profiles for antibiotic resistance in bacteria at the same time. In this study, we designed 16 antibiotic-resistant gene solid-phase primers with similar melting temperatures of 60 °C and 16 long oligonucleotide probes. These primers and probes can identify tetracycline-, chloramphenicol-, and aminoglycoside-resistant genes, respectively. The design of microarray probes is a versatile process that be done in a wide range of selections. Since the long oligo microarray probes are the best choices for specific diagnosis and definite treatment, this group of probes was designed in the present survey.

  2. Specific discrimination of three pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes by carB-based oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-01-01

    It is important to rapidly and selectively detect and analyze pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica in contaminated food to reduce the morbidity and mortality of Salmonella infection and to guarantee food safety. In the present work, we developed an oligonucleotide microarray containing duplicate specific capture probes based on the carB gene, which encodes the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase large subunit, as a competent biomarker evaluated by genetic analysis to selectively and efficiently detect and discriminate three S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes: Choleraesuis, Enteritidis, and Typhimurium. Using the developed microarray system, three serotype targets were successfully analyzed in a range as low as 1.6 to 3.1 nM and were specifically discriminated from each other without nonspecific signals. In addition, the constructed microarray did not have cross-reactivity with other common pathogenic bacteria and even enabled the clear discrimination of the target Salmonella serotype from a bacterial mixture. Therefore, these results demonstrated that our novel carB-based oligonucleotide microarray can be used as an effective and specific detection system for S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes. PMID:24185846

  3. Sample phenotype clusters in high-density oligonucleotide microarray data sets are revealed using Isomap, a nonlinear algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Kevin; Rodriguez, Raymond L; Malyj, Wasyl

    2005-01-01

    Background Life processes are determined by the organism's genetic profile and multiple environmental variables. However the interaction between these factors is inherently non-linear [1]. Microarray data is one representation of the nonlinear interactions among genes and genes and environmental factors. Still most microarray studies use linear methods for the interpretation of nonlinear data. In this study, we apply Isomap, a nonlinear method of dimensionality reduction, to analyze three independent large Affymetrix high-density oligonucleotide microarray data sets. Results Isomap discovered low-dimensional structures embedded in the Affymetrix microarray data sets. These structures correspond to and help to interpret biological phenomena present in the data. This analysis provides examples of temporal, spatial, and functional processes revealed by the Isomap algorithm. In a spinal cord injury data set, Isomap discovers the three main modalities of the experiment – location and severity of the injury and the time elapsed after the injury. In a multiple tissue data set, Isomap discovers a low-dimensional structure that corresponds to anatomical locations of the source tissues. This model is capable of describing low- and high-resolution differences in the same model, such as kidney-vs.-brain and differences between the nuclei of the amygdala, respectively. In a high-throughput drug screening data set, Isomap discovers the monocytic and granulocytic differentiation of myeloid cells and maps several chemical compounds on the two-dimensional model. Conclusion Visualization of Isomap models provides useful tools for exploratory analysis of microarray data sets. In most instances, Isomap models explain more of the variance present in the microarray data than PCA or MDS. Finally, Isomap is a promising new algorithm for class discovery and class prediction in high-density oligonucleotide data sets. PMID:16076401

  4. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Human Conjunctival and Corneal Epithelial Gene Expression with Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Helen C.; Budak, Murat T.; Murat Akinci, M. A.; Wolosin, J. Mario

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine global mRNA expression levels in corneal and conjunctival epithelia and identify transcripts that exhibit preferential tissue expression. Methods cDNA samples derived from human conjunctival and corneal epithelia were hybridized in three independent experiments to a commercial oligonucleotide array representing more than 22,000 transcripts. The resultant signal intensities and microarray software transcript present/absent calls were used in conjunction with the local pooled error (LPE) statistical method to identify transcripts that are preferentially or exclusively expressed in one of the two tissues at significant levels (expression >1% of the β-actin level). EASE (Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer software) was used to identify biological systems comparatively overrepresented in either epithelium. Immuno-, and cytohistochemistry was performed to validate or expand on selected results of interest. Results The analysis identified 332 preferential and 93 exclusive significant corneal epithelial transcripts. The corresponding numbers of conjunctival epithelium transcripts were 592 and 211, respectively. The overrepresented biological processes in the cornea were related to cell adhesion and oxiredox equilibria and cytoprotection activities. In the conjunctiva, the biological processes that were most prominent were related to innate immunity and melanogenesis. Immunohistochemistry for antigen-presenting cells and melanocytes was consistent with these gene signatures. The transcript comparison identified a substantial number of genes that have either not been identified previously or are not known to be highly expressed in these two epithelia, including testican-1, ECM1, formin, CRTAC1, and NQO1 in the cornea and, in the conjunctiva, sPLA2-IIA, lipocalin 2, IGFBP3, multiple MCH class II proteins, and the Na-Pi cotransporter type IIb. Conclusions Comparative gene expression profiling leads to the identification of many biological processes

  6. Event-specific detection of seven genetically modified soybean and maizes using multiplex-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhu, Shuifang; Miao, Haizhen; Huang, Wensheng; Qiu, Minyan; Huang, Yan; Fu, Xuping; Li, Yao

    2007-07-11

    With the increasing development of genetically modified organism (GMO) detection techniques, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been the mainstay for GMO detection. An oligonucleotide microarray is a glass chip to the surface of which an array of oligonucleotides was fixed as spots, each containing numerous copies of a sequence-specific probe that is complementary to a gene of interest. So it is used to detect ten or more targets synchronously. In this research, an event-specific detection strategy based on the unique and specific integration junction sequences between the host plant genome DNA and the integrated gene is being developed for its high specificity using multiplex-PCR together with oligonucleotide microarray. A commercial GM soybean (GTS 40-3-2) and six GM maize events (MON810, MON863, Bt176, Bt11, GA21, and T25) were detected by this method. The results indicate that it is a suitable method for the identification of these GM soybean and maizes. PMID:17559227

  7. Event-specific detection of seven genetically modified soybean and maizes using multiplex-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhu, Shuifang; Miao, Haizhen; Huang, Wensheng; Qiu, Minyan; Huang, Yan; Fu, Xuping; Li, Yao

    2007-07-11

    With the increasing development of genetically modified organism (GMO) detection techniques, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been the mainstay for GMO detection. An oligonucleotide microarray is a glass chip to the surface of which an array of oligonucleotides was fixed as spots, each containing numerous copies of a sequence-specific probe that is complementary to a gene of interest. So it is used to detect ten or more targets synchronously. In this research, an event-specific detection strategy based on the unique and specific integration junction sequences between the host plant genome DNA and the integrated gene is being developed for its high specificity using multiplex-PCR together with oligonucleotide microarray. A commercial GM soybean (GTS 40-3-2) and six GM maize events (MON810, MON863, Bt176, Bt11, GA21, and T25) were detected by this method. The results indicate that it is a suitable method for the identification of these GM soybean and maizes.

  8. Structured oligonucleotides for target indexing to allow single-vessel PCR amplification and solid support microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    Girard, Laurie D; Boissinot, Karel; Peytavi, Régis; Boissinot, Maurice; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-02-01

    The combination of molecular diagnostic technologies is increasingly used to overcome limitations on sensitivity, specificity or multiplexing capabilities, and provide efficient lab-on-chip devices. Two such techniques, PCR amplification and microarray hybridization are used serially to take advantage of the high sensitivity and specificity of the former combined with high multiplexing capacities of the latter. These methods are usually performed in different buffers and reaction chambers. However, these elaborate methods have high complexity and cost related to reagent requirements, liquid storage and the number of reaction chambers to integrate into automated devices. Furthermore, microarray hybridizations have a sequence dependent efficiency not always predictable. In this work, we have developed the concept of a structured oligonucleotide probe which is activated by cleavage from polymerase exonuclease activity. This technology is called SCISSOHR for Structured Cleavage Induced Single-Stranded Oligonucleotide Hybridization Reaction. The SCISSOHR probes enable indexing the target sequence to a tag sequence. The SCISSOHR technology also allows the combination of nucleic acid amplification and microarray hybridization in a single vessel in presence of the PCR buffer only. The SCISSOHR technology uses an amplification probe that is irreversibly modified in presence of the target, releasing a single-stranded DNA tag for microarray hybridization. Each tag is composed of a 3-nucleotide sequence-dependent segment and a unique "target sequence-independent" 14-nucleotide segment allowing for optimal hybridization with minimal cross-hybridization. We evaluated the performance of five (5) PCR buffers to support microarray hybridization, compared to a conventional hybridization buffer. Finally, as a proof of concept, we developed a multiplexed assay for the amplification, detection, and identification of three (3) DNA targets. This new technology will facilitate the design

  9. Cassava (Manihot esculenta) transcriptome analysis in response to infection by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides using an oligonucleotide-DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Maho; Kurotani, Atsushi; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Mochida, Keiichi; Matsui, Akihiro; Ishitani, Manabu; Sraphet, Supajit; Whankaew, Sukhuman; Asvarak, Thipa; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-07-01

    Cassava anthracnose disease (CAD), caused by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. Manihotis, is a serious disease of cassava (Manihot esculenta) worldwide. In this study, we established a cassava oligonucleotide-DNA microarray representing 59,079 probes corresponding to approximately 30,000 genes based on original expressed sequence tags and RNA-seq information from cassava, and applied it to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resistance to fungal infection using two cassava cultivars, Huay Bong 60 (HB60, resistant to CAD) and Hanatee (HN, sensitive to CAD). Based on quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and expression profiling by the microarray, we showed that the expressions of various plant defense-related genes, such as pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, cell wall-related genes, detoxification enzyme, genes related to the response to bacterium, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), genes related to salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene pathways were higher in HB60 compared with HN. Our results indicated that the induction of PR genes in HB60 by fungal infection and the higher expressions of defense response-related genes in HB60 compared with HN are likely responsible for the fungal resistance in HB60. We also showed that the use of our cassava oligo microarray could improve our understanding of cassava molecular mechanisms related to environmental responses and development, and advance the molecular breeding of useful cassava plants. PMID:27138000

  10. Cassava (Manihot esculenta) transcriptome analysis in response to infection by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides using an oligonucleotide-DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Maho; Kurotani, Atsushi; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Mochida, Keiichi; Matsui, Akihiro; Ishitani, Manabu; Sraphet, Supajit; Whankaew, Sukhuman; Asvarak, Thipa; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-07-01

    Cassava anthracnose disease (CAD), caused by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. Manihotis, is a serious disease of cassava (Manihot esculenta) worldwide. In this study, we established a cassava oligonucleotide-DNA microarray representing 59,079 probes corresponding to approximately 30,000 genes based on original expressed sequence tags and RNA-seq information from cassava, and applied it to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resistance to fungal infection using two cassava cultivars, Huay Bong 60 (HB60, resistant to CAD) and Hanatee (HN, sensitive to CAD). Based on quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and expression profiling by the microarray, we showed that the expressions of various plant defense-related genes, such as pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, cell wall-related genes, detoxification enzyme, genes related to the response to bacterium, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), genes related to salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene pathways were higher in HB60 compared with HN. Our results indicated that the induction of PR genes in HB60 by fungal infection and the higher expressions of defense response-related genes in HB60 compared with HN are likely responsible for the fungal resistance in HB60. We also showed that the use of our cassava oligo microarray could improve our understanding of cassava molecular mechanisms related to environmental responses and development, and advance the molecular breeding of useful cassava plants.

  11. Issues in the analysis of oligonucleotide tiling microarrays for transcript mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royce, Thomas E.; Rozowsky, Joel S.; Bertone, Paul; Samanta, Manoj; Stolc, Viktor; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Traditional microarrays use probes complementary to known genes to quantitate the differential gene expression between two or more conditions. Genomic tiling microarray experiments differ in that probes that span a genomic region at regular intervals are used to detect the presence or absence of transcription. This difference means the same sets of biases and the methods for addressing them are unlikely to be relevant to both types of experiment. We introduce the informatics challenges arising in the analysis of tiling microarray experiments as open problems to the scientific community and present initial approaches for the analysis of this nascent technology.

  12. ASSESSING THE USE OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAYS FOR FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) TO EXAMINE EXPOSURE VARIABLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology has proven to be a useful tool for analyzing the transcriptome of various organisms representing conditions such as disease states, developmental stages, and responses to chemical exposure. Although most commercially available arrays are limited to organism...

  13. In situ oligonucleotide synthesis on carbon materials: stable substrates for microarray fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Margaret F.; Lockett, Matthew R.; Rodesch, Matthew J.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Cerrina, Franco; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    Glass has become the standard substrate for the preparation of DNA arrays. Typically, glass is modified using silane chemistries to provide an appropriate functional group for nucleic acid synthesis or oligonucleotide immobilization. We have found substantial issues with the stability of these surfaces as manifested in the unwanted release of oligomers from the surface when incubated in aqueous buffers at moderate temperatures. To address this issue, we have explored the use of carbon-based substrates. Here, we demonstrate in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on carbon-based substrates using light-directed photolithographic phosphoramidite chemistry and evaluate the stabilities of the resultant DNA arrays compared to those fabricated on silanized glass slides. DNA arrays on carbon-based substrates are substantially more stable than arrays prepared on glass. This superior stability enables the use of high-density DNA arrays for applications involving high temperatures, basic conditions, or where serial hybridization and dehybridization is desired. PMID:18084027

  14. Pigeons: A Novel GUI Software for Analysing and Parsing High Density Heterologous Oligonucleotide Microarray Probe Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hung-Ming; May, Sean T.; Mayes, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Genomic DNA-based probe selection by using high density oligonucleotide arrays has recently been applied to heterologous species (Xspecies). With the advent of this new approach, researchers are able to study the genome and transcriptome of a non-model or an underutilised crop species through current state-of-the-art microarray platforms. However, a software package with a graphical user interface (GUI) to analyse and parse the oligonucleotide probe pair level data is still lacking when an experiment is designed on the basis of this cross species approach. A novel computer program called Pigeons has been developed for customised array data analysis to allow the user to import and analyse Affymetrix GeneChip® probe level data through XSpecies. One can determine empirical boundaries for removing poor probes based on genomic hybridisation of the test species to the Xspecies array, followed by making a species-specific Chip Description File (CDF) file for transcriptomics in the heterologous species, or Pigeons can be used to examine an experimental design to identify potential Single-Feature Polymorphisms (SFPs) at the DNA or RNA level. Pigeons is also focused around visualization and interactive analysis of the datasets. The software with its manual (the current release number version 1.2.1) is freely available at the website of the Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre (NASC).

  15. Rapid and reliable detection and identification of GM events using multiplex PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaodan; Li, Yingcong; Zhao, Heng; Wen, Si-yuan; Wang, Sheng-qi; Huang, Jian; Huang, Kun-lun; Luo, Yun-bo

    2005-05-18

    To devise a rapid and reliable method for the detection and identification of genetically modified (GM) events, we developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with a DNA microarray system simultaneously aiming at many targets in a single reaction. The system included probes for screening gene, species reference gene, specific gene, construct-specific gene, event-specific gene, and internal and negative control genes. 18S rRNA was combined with species reference genes as internal controls to assess the efficiency of all reactions and to eliminate false negatives. Two sets of the multiplex PCR system were used to amplify four and five targets, respectively. Eight different structure genes could be detected and identified simultaneously for Roundup Ready soybean in a single microarray. The microarray specificity was validated by its ability to discriminate two GM maizes Bt176 and Bt11. The advantages of this method are its high specificity and greatly reduced false-positives and -negatives. The multiplex PCR coupled with microarray technology presented here is a rapid and reliable tool for the simultaneous detection of GM organism ingredients.

  16. Identification of SNPs and INDELS in swine transcribed sequences using short oligonucleotide microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide detection of single feature polymorphisms (SFP) in swine using transcriptome profiling of day 25 placental RNA by contrasting probe intensities from either Meishan or an occidental composite breed with Affymetrix porcine microarrays is presented. A linear mixed model analysis was used to...

  17. The Hydrogenase Chip: a tiling oligonucleotide DNA microarray technique for characterizing hydrogen-producing and -consuming microbes in microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Ian PG; Berggren, Dusty RV; Azizian, Mohammad F; Burow, Luke C; Semprini, Lewis; Spormann, Alfred M

    2012-01-01

    We developed a broad-ranging method for identifying key hydrogen-producing and consuming microorganisms through analysis of hydrogenase gene content and expression in complex anaerobic microbial communities. The method is based on a tiling hydrogenase gene oligonucleotide DNA microarray (Hydrogenase Chip), which implements a high number of probes per gene by tiling probe sequences across genes of interest at 1.67 × –2 × coverage. This design favors the avoidance of false positive gene identification in samples of DNA or RNA extracted from complex microbial communities. We applied this technique to interrogate interspecies hydrogen transfer in complex communities in (i) lab-scale reductive dehalogenating microcosms enabling us to delineate key H2-consuming microorganisms, and (ii) hydrogen-generating microbial mats where we found evidence for significant H2 production by cyanobacteria. Independent quantitative PCR analysis on selected hydrogenase genes showed that this Hydrogenase Chip technique is semiquantitative. We also determined that as microbial community complexity increases, specificity must be traded for sensitivity in analyzing data from tiling DNA microarrays. PMID:21993396

  18. Screening genetically modified organisms using multiplex-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Miao, Haizhen; Wu, Houfei; Huang, Wensheng; Tang, Rong; Qiu, Minyan; Wen, Jianguo; Zhu, Shuifang; Li, Yao

    2006-07-15

    In this research, we developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (multiplex-PCR) coupled with a DNA microarray system simultaneously aiming at many targets in a consecutive reaction to detect a genetically modified organism (GMO). There are a total of 20 probes for detecting a GMO in a DNA microarray which can be classified into three categories according to their purpose: the first for screening GMO from un-transgenic plants based on the common elements such as promoter, reporter and terminator genes; the second for specific gene confirmation based on the target gene sequences such as herbicide-resistance or insect-resistance genes; the third for species-specific genes which the sequences are unique for different plant species. To ensure the reliability of this method, different kinds of positive and negative controls were used in DNA microarray. Commercial GM soybean, maize, rapeseed and cotton were identified by means of this method and further confirmed by PCR analysis and sequencing. The results indicate that this method discriminates between the GMOs very quickly and in a cost-saving and more time efficient way. It can detect more than 95% of currently commercial GMO plants and the limits of detection are 0.5% for soybean and 1% for maize. This method is proved to be a new method for routine analysis of GMOs.

  19. Evaluation of Gel-Pad Oligonucleotide Microarray Technology by Using Artificial Neural Networks†

    PubMed Central

    Pozhitkov, Alex; Chernov, Boris; Yershov, Gennadiy; Noble, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    Past studies have suggested that thermal dissociation analysis of nucleic acids hybridized to DNA microarrays would improve discrimination among duplex types by scanning through a broad range of stringency conditions. To more fully constrain the utility of this approach using a previously described gel-pad microarray format, artificial neural networks (NNs) were trained to recognize noisy or low-quality data, as might derive from nonspecific fluorescence, poor hybridization, or compromised data collection. The NNs were trained to classify dissociation profiles (melts) into groups based on selected characteristics (e.g., initial signal intensity, area under the curve) using a data set of 21,044 profiles derived from 186 probes hybridized to a study set of RNA extracted from 32 microbes common to the human oral cavity. Three melt profile groups were identified: one group consisted mostly of ideal melt profiles; another group consisted mostly of poor melt profiles; and, the remainder were difficult to classify. Screening of melting profiles of perfect-match hybrids revealed inconsistencies in the form of melting profiles even for identical probes on the same microarray hybridized to same target rRNA. Approximately 18% of perfect-match duplex types were correctly classified as poor. Experimental variability and deviation from ideal melt behavior were shown to be attributable primarily to a method of local background subtraction that was very sensitive to displacement of the grid frames used for image capture (both determined by the image analysis system) and duplexes with low binding constants. Additional results showed that long RNA fragments limit the discriminating power among duplex types. PMID:16332861

  20. Minimizing DNA microarrays to a single molecule per spot: using zero-mode waveguide technology to obtain kinetic data for a large number of short oligonucleotide hybridization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, Jens; Rehrauer, Hubert; Kuhn, Gerrit; Schlapbach, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    We have shown recently that the hybridization of short oligonucleotides can be studied in a zero-mode waveguide nanostructure (ZMW) chip using a modified DNA sequencer.[1] Here we present an extension of this method enabling the parallel measurement of kinetic constants of a large number of hybridization reactions on a single chip. This can be achieved by immobilization of a mixture of oligonucleotides, which leads to a statistical and random distribution of single molecules in the 150'000 ZMWs of a SMRT™ cell. This setup is comparable to a classical microarray with ZMWs in place of spots but unknown allocation of probes. The probe surface density is reduced by a factor of ~1010 allowing the study of hybridization in the absence of interactions with neighboring probes. Hybridization with a dye labelled oligonucleotide results in trains of fluorescence pulses from which interpulse durations (IPDs) and pulse widths (PWs) can be extracted. Since the identity of a probe in a ZMW is unknown, the immobilized oligonucleotide is sequenced in a subsequent step. After mapping the fluorescence traces to the sequence, the association and dissociation rate constant for each oligonucleotide can be calculated. By selecting suitable probes, the method can be used to determine rate constants of hybridization for a large number of mismatch oligonucleotides in a single measurement and at single-molecule level.

  1. An Efficient Covalent Coating on Glass Slides for Preparation of Optical Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Pourjahed, Atefeh; Rabiee, Mohammad; Tahriri, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Microarrays are potential analyzing tools for genomics and proteomics researches, which is in needed of suitable substrate for coating and also hybridization of biomolecules. Materials and Methods: In this research, a thin film of oxidized agarose was prepared on the glass slides which previously coated with poly-L-lysine (PLL). Some of the aldehyde groups of the activated agarose linked covalently to PLL amine groups; also bound to the amino groups of biomolecules. These linkages were fixed by UV irradiation. The prepared substrates were compared to only agarose-coated and PLL-coated slides. Results: Results on atomic force microscope (AFM) demonstrated that agarose provided three-dimensional surface which had higher loading and bindig capacity for biomolecules than PLL-coated surface which had two-dimensional surface. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio in hybridization reactions performed on the agarose-PLL coated substrates increased two fold and four fold compared to agarose and PLL coated substrates, respectively. Conclusion: The agarose-PLL microarrays had the highest signal (2546) and lowest background signal (205) in hybridization, suggesting that the prepared slides are suitable in analyzing wide concentration range of analytes. PMID:24570832

  2. Comparative study of Trichoderma gene expression in interactions with tomato plants using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rubio, M Belén; Domínguez, Sara; Monte, Enrique; Hermosa, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are widely used as biopesticides and biofertilizers to control diseases and to promote positive physiological responses in plants. In vitro and in vivo assays with Trichoderma harzianum CECT 2413 (T34), Trichoderma virens Gv29-8 (T87) and Trichoderma hamatum IMI 224801 (T7) revealed that these strains affected the growth and development of lateral roots in tomato plants in different ways. The early expression profiles of these Trichoderma strains were studied after 20 h of incubation in the presence of tomato plants, using a high-density oligonucleotide (HDO) microarray, and compared to the profiles in the absence of plants. Out of the total 34 138 Trichoderma probe sets deposited on the microarray, 1077 (3.15 %) showed a significant change of at least 2-fold in expression in the presence of tomato plants. The numbers of probe sets identified in the individual Trichoderma strains were 593 in T. harzianum T34, 336 in T. virens T87 and 94 in T. hamatum T7. Carbohydrate metabolism - the chitin degradation enzymes N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate deacetylase, glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase and chitinase - was the most significantly overrepresented process commonly observed in the three Trichoderma strains in early interactions with tomato plants. Strains T7 and T34, which had similar positive effects on plant development in biological assays, showed a significantly overrepresented hexokinase activity in interaction with tomato. In addition, genes encoding a 40S ribosomal protein and a P23 tumour protein were altered in both these strains.

  3. Spatial-temporal variability in diazotroph assemblages in Chesapeake Bay using an oligonucleotide nifH microarray.

    PubMed

    Moisander, Pia H; Morrison, Amanda E; Ward, Bess B; Jenkins, Bethany D; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2007-07-01

    The distribution of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms in the Chesapeake Bay was investigated using fingerprints from a nifH microarray comprised of 706 60-mer oligonucleotide nifH probes representing cultivated organisms and environmental clones from different nifH clusters. Diverse nifH targets, amplified from samples using degenerate nifH primers, were detected in water column and sediment samples collected in April and October, 2001-2002. Total nifH richness and diversity (Simpson's and Shannon indices) were highest at the most riverine, oligohaline North Bay station. In most samples, the highest diversity was in nifH Cluster 3, which includes many anaerobes, while Cluster 1 (alpha-, beta- gamma- Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria) targets had the greatest microarray signal intensities. In a multidimensional scaling analysis, deep water communities from April and October were similar within each of the sampling sites, while the surface communities had more variability. Diazotroph communities in the water column in the North Bay were distinct from the Mid- and South Bay communities, and there was a gradual change in sediment diazotroph assemblages from the North to the South Bay. Diazotrophic assemblages from the majority of the water column samples from the Mid- and South Bay clustered with the sediment assemblage in Mid-Bay. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen, salinity, dissolved organic carbon and dissolved organic phosphorus had a significant relationship with the diazotrophic bacterioplankton community. Higher diversity in the freshwater end of the system may reflect variability in disturbance rates and environmental conditions such as forms and concentrations of organic matter, nutrients and oxygen.

  4. Use of a Multiplexed CMOS Microarray to Optimize and Compare Oligonucleotide Binding to DNA Probes Synthesized or Immobilized on Individual Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Karl; Yazvenko, Nina; Wilmoth, Jodi; Cooper, John; Lyon, Wanda; Danley, David

    2010-01-01

    The CombiMatrix microarray with 12,544 electrodes supports in situ electrochemical synthesis of user-defined DNA probes. As an alternative, we immobilized commercially synthesized DNA probes on individual electrodes coated with electropolymerized polypyrrole (Ppy). Hybridization was measured using a biotinylated target oligonucleotide and either Cy5-streptavidin and fluorescence detection or horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin and enzyme-enhanced electrochemical detection. Detection efficiencies were optimized by varying the deposition of the Ppy, the terminal groups on the DNA probes, and other factors that impacted fluorescence quenching and electrical conductivity. Optimized results were compared against those obtained using a microarray with the same DNA sequences synthesized in situ. Immobilized probes produced higher fluorescence signals, possibly by providing a greater stand off between the Cy5 on the target oligonucleotide and the quenching effects of the Ppy and the platinum electrode. PMID:22163607

  5. Development of a Method for Profiling Protein Interactions with LNA-Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides Using Protein Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Whiteley, Lawrence O; Ryan, Anne M; Mathialagan, Nagappan

    2016-04-01

    Development of locked nucleic acid (LNA) gapmers, antisense oligonucleotides used for efficient inhibition of target RNA expression, is limited by nontarget-mediated hepatotoxicity. Increased binding of hepatocellular proteins to toxic LNA gapmers may be one of the mechanisms contributing to LNA gapmer-induced hepatotoxicity in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the protein binding propensity of nontoxic sequence-1 (NTS-1), toxic sequence-2 (TS-2), and severely highly toxic sequence-3 (HTS-3) LNA gapmers using human protein microarrays. We previously demonstrated by the transcription profiling analysis of liver RNA isolated from mice that TS-2 and HTS-3 gapmers modulate different transcriptional pathways in mice leading to hepatotoxicity. Our protein array profiling demonstrated that a greater number of proteins, including ones associated with hepatotoxicity, hepatic system disorder, and cell functions, were bound by TS-2 and HTS-3 compared with NTS-1. However, the profiles of proteins bound by TS-2 and HTS-3 were similar and did not distinguish proteins contributing to severe in vivo toxicity. These results, together with the previous transcription profiling analysis, indicate that the combination of sequence-dependent transcription modulation and increased protein binding of toxic LNA gapmers contributes to hepatotoxicity. PMID:26643897

  6. Development and Assessment of Whole-Genome Oligonucleotide Microarrays to Analyze an Anaerobic Microbial Community and its Responses to Oxidative Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Scholten, Johannes C.; Culley, David E.; Nie, Lei; Munn, Kyle J.; Chow, Lely; Brockman, Fred J.; Zhang, Weiwen

    2007-06-29

    The application of DNA microarray technology to investigate multiple-species microbial community presents great challenges. In this study, we reported the design and quality assessment of four whole genome oligonucleotide microarrays for two syntroph bacteria, Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans, and two archaeal methanogens, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanospirillum hungatei, and their application to analyze global gene expression of this four-species microbial community in response to oxidative stress. In order to minimize the possible cross-hybridization, cross-genome comparison was performed to assure all probes unique to each genome so that the microarrays could provide species-level resolution. Microarray quality was validated by the good reproducibility of experimental measurements of multiple biological and analytical replicates. Microarray analysis showed that S. fumaroxidans and M. hungatei responded to the stress with up-regulation of several genes known to be involved in ROS detoxification, such as catalase and rubrerythrin in S. fumaroxidans and thioredoxin and heat shock protein Hsp20 in M. hungatei. Consistent with previous study in pure culture, the microarray analysis showed that genes involved in methane production and energy metabolism were down-regulated by oxidative stress in M. barkeri. However, D. vulgaris seemed less sensitive to the oxidative stress when grown in a community, with almost no gene up-regulated. The study demonstrated the successful application of microarray technology to multiple-species microbial community, and our preliminary results indicated that the approach can provide novel insights on the metabolic and regulatory networks within microbial communities.

  7. Assessment of algorithms for high throughput detection of genomic copy number variation in oligonucleotide microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Baross, Ágnes; Delaney, Allen D; Li, H Irene; Nayar, Tarun; Flibotte, Stephane; Qian, Hong; Chan, Susanna Y; Asano, Jennifer; Ally, Adrian; Cao, Manqiu; Birch, Patricia; Brown-John, Mabel; Fernandes, Nicole; Go, Anne; Kennedy, Giulia; Langlois, Sylvie; Eydoux, Patrice; Friedman, JM; Marra, Marco A

    2007-01-01

    Background Genomic deletions and duplications are important in the pathogenesis of diseases, such as cancer and mental retardation, and have recently been shown to occur frequently in unaffected individuals as polymorphisms. Affymetrix GeneChip whole genome sampling analysis (WGSA) combined with 100 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays is one of several microarray-based approaches that are now being used to detect such structural genomic changes. The popularity of this technology and its associated open source data format have resulted in the development of an increasing number of software packages for the analysis of copy number changes using these SNP arrays. Results We evaluated four publicly available software packages for high throughput copy number analysis using synthetic and empirical 100 K SNP array data sets, the latter obtained from 107 mental retardation (MR) patients and their unaffected parents and siblings. We evaluated the software with regards to overall suitability for high-throughput 100 K SNP array data analysis, as well as effectiveness of normalization, scaling with various reference sets and feature extraction, as well as true and false positive rates of genomic copy number variant (CNV) detection. Conclusion We observed considerable variation among the numbers and types of candidate CNVs detected by different analysis approaches, and found that multiple programs were needed to find all real aberrations in our test set. The frequency of false positive deletions was substantial, but could be greatly reduced by using the SNP genotype information to confirm loss of heterozygosity. PMID:17910767

  8. Rapid identification of carbapenemase genes in gram-negative bacteria with an oligonucleotide microarray-based assay.

    PubMed

    Braun, Sascha D; Monecke, Stefan; Thürmer, Alexander; Ruppelt, Antje; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Pletz, Mathias; Reiβig, Annett; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Rapid molecular identification of carbapenemase genes in Gram-negative bacteria is crucial for infection control and prevention, surveillance and for epidemiological purposes. Furthermore, it may have a significant impact upon determining the appropriate initial treatment and greatly benefit for critically ill patients. A novel oligonucleotide microarray-based assay was developed to simultaneously detect genes encoding clinically important carbapenemases as well as selected extended (ESBL) and narrow spectrum (NSBL) beta-lactamases directly from clonal culture material within few hours. Additionally, a panel of species specific markers was included to identify Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii/braakii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. The assay was tested using a panel of 117 isolates collected from urinary, blood and stool samples. For these isolates, phenotypic identifications and susceptibility tests were available. An independent detection of carbapenemase, ESBL and NSBL genes was carried out by various external reference laboratories using PCR methods. In direct comparison, the microarray correctly identified 98.2% of the covered carbapenemase genes. This included blaVIM (13 out of 13), blaGIM (2/2), blaKPC (27/27), blaNDM (5/5), blaIMP-2/4/7/8/13/14/15/16/31 (10/10), blaOXA-23 (12/13), blaOXA-40-group (7/7), blaOXA-48-group (32/33), blaOXA-51 (1/1) and blaOXA-58 (1/1). Furthermore, the test correctly identified additional beta-lactamases [blaOXA-1 (16/16), blaOXA-2 (4/4), blaOXA-9 (33/33), OXA-10 (3/3), blaOXA-51 (25/25), blaOXA-58 (2/2), CTX-M1/M15 (17/17) and blaVIM (1/1)]. In direct comparison to phenotypical identification obtained by VITEK or MALDI-TOF systems, 114 of 117 (97.4%) isolates, including Acinetobacter baumannii (28/28), Enterobacter spec. (5/5), Escherichia coli (4/4), Klebsiella pneumoniae (62/63), Klebsiella oxytoca (0/2), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12/12), Citrobacter freundii (1/1) and

  9. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  10. Development of a consensus microarray method for identification of some highly pathogenic viruses.

    PubMed

    Xiao-Ping, Kang; Yong-Qiang, Li; Qing-Ge, Sun; Hong, Liu; Qing-Yu, Zhu; Yin-Hui, Yang

    2009-11-01

    Some highly pathogenic viruses, such as Chikungunya virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Yellow fever virus, Dengue virus, Hanta virus, SARS-CoV, and H5N1 avian influenza virus can cause severe infectious diseases. However, the consensus method for detecting these viruses has not been well established. A rapid and sensitive microarray approach for detection of these viruses and a panel of specific probes covering nine genera and 16 virus species were designed. 70-mer oligonucleotides were used at the genus level and 50-mer oligonucleotides were at the species level, respectively. To decrease the interference of the host genome in hybridization, the consensus genus primers were designed and used to reverse transcribe only virus genome. The synthesis of the second strand was carried out with a random primer sequence (5'-GTTTCCCAGTAGGTCTCNNNNNNNN-3'). The amplified products were labeled and processed for microarray analyses. This microarray-based method used the highly conserved consensus primers to synthesize specifically the virus cDNA and could identify effectively Chikungunya virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Yellow fever virus, Dengue virus, Tick borne encephalitis virus, and H5N1 avian influenza virus. Using this method, one unknown virus isolated from pig brain in Shanxi Province, China was identified. This method may have an important potential application for the diagnosis of virus infection.

  11. Evolution of the MIDTAL microarray: the adaption and testing of oligonucleotide 18S and 28S rDNA probes and evaluation of subsequent microarray generations with Prymnesium spp. cultures and field samples.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Gary R; Touzet, Nicolas; Fleming, Gerard T A; Raine, Robin

    2015-07-01

    The toxic microalgal species Prymnesium parvum and Prymnesium polylepis are responsible for numerous fish kills causing economic stress on the aquaculture industry and, through the consumption of contaminated shellfish, can potentially impact on human health. Monitoring of toxic phytoplankton is traditionally carried out by light microscopy. However, molecular methods of identification and quantification are becoming more common place. This study documents the optimisation of the novel Microarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae (MIDTAL) microarray from its initial stages to the final commercial version now available from Microbia Environnement (France). Existing oligonucleotide probes used in whole-cell fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) for Prymnesium species from higher group probes to species-level probes were adapted and tested on the first-generation microarray. The combination and interaction of numerous other probes specific for a whole range of phytoplankton taxa also spotted on the chip surface caused high cross reactivity, resulting in false-positive results on the microarray. The probe sequences were extended for the subsequent second-generation microarray, and further adaptations of the hybridisation protocol and incubation temperatures significantly reduced false-positive readings from the first to the second-generation chip, thereby increasing the specificity of the MIDTAL microarray. Additional refinement of the subsequent third-generation microarray protocols with the addition of a poly-T amino linker to the 5' end of each probe further enhanced the microarray performance but also highlighted the importance of optimising RNA labelling efficiency when testing with natural seawater samples from Killary Harbour, Ireland.

  12. Development of the first oligonucleotide microarray for global gene expression profiling in guinea pigs: defining the transcription signature of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) is one of the most extensively used animal models to study infectious diseases. However, despite its tremendous contribution towards understanding the establishment, progression and control of a number of diseases in general and tuberculosis in particular, the lack of fully annotated guinea pig genome sequence as well as appropriate molecular reagents has severely hampered detailed genetic and immunological analysis in this animal model. Results By employing the cross-species hybridization technique, we have developed an oligonucleotide microarray with 44,000 features assembled from different mammalian species, which to the best of our knowledge is the first attempt to employ microarray to study the global gene expression profile in guinea pigs. To validate and demonstrate the merit of this microarray, we have studied, as an example, the expression profile of guinea pig lungs during the advanced phase of M. tuberculosis infection. A significant upregulation of 1344 genes and a marked down regulation of 1856 genes in the lungs identified a disease signature of pulmonary tuberculosis infection. Conclusion We report the development of first comprehensive microarray for studying the global gene expression profile in guinea pigs and validation of its usefulness with tuberculosis as a case study. An important gap in the area of infectious diseases has been addressed and a valuable molecular tool is provided to optimally harness the potential of guinea pig model to develop better vaccines and therapies against human diseases. PMID:23031549

  13. Replicate high-density rat genome oligonucleotide microarrays reveal hundreds of regulated genes in the dorsal root ganglion after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, Michael; Befort, Katia; Karchewski, Laurie; Griffin, Robert S; D'Urso, Donatella; Allchorne, Andrew; Sitarski, Joanne; Mannion, James W; Pratt, Richard E; Woolf, Clifford J

    2002-01-01

    Background Rat oligonucleotide microarrays were used to detect changes in gene expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) 3 days following sciatic nerve transection (axotomy). Two comparisons were made using two sets of triplicate microarrays, naïve versus naïve and naïve versus axotomy. Results Microarray variability was assessed using the naïve versus naïve comparison. These results support use of a P < 0.05 significance threshold for detecting regulated genes, despite the large number of hypothesis tests required. For the naïve versus axotomy comparison, a 2-fold cut off alone led to an estimated error rate of 16%; combining a >1.5-fold expression change and P < 0.05 significance reduced the estimated error to 5%. The 2-fold cut off identified 178 genes while the combined >1.5-fold and P < 0.05 criteria generated 240 putatively regulated genes, which we have listed. Many of these have not been described as regulated in the DRG by axotomy. Northern blot, quantitative slot blots and in situ hybridization verified the expression of 24 transcripts. These data showed an 83% concordance rate with the arrays; most mismatches represent genes with low expression levels reflecting limits of array sensitivity. A significant correlation was found between actual mRNA differences and relative changes between microarrays (r2 = 0.8567). Temporal patterns of individual genes regulation varied. Conclusions We identify parameters for microarray analysis which reduce error while identifying many putatively regulated genes. Functional classification of these genes suggest reorganization of cell structural components, activation of genes expressed by immune and inflammatory cells and down-regulation of genes involved in neurotransmission. PMID:12401135

  14. Comparative genotyping of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains S288C and CEN.PK113-7D using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Daran-Lapujade, Pascale; Daran, Jean Marc; Kötter, Peter; Petit, Thomas; Piper, Matthew D W; Pronk, Jack T

    2003-12-01

    To analyse the reliability and accuracy of genotype analysis with high-density oligonucleotide microarrays, this method and other experimental approaches were used to analyse genomic DNA of two popular Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains. S288C was used for systematic sequencing of 'the' S. cerevisiae genome; CEN.PK113-7D is a popular strain for physiological studies and functional genomics. Random amplified polymorphic DNA, electrophoretic karyotyping and microarray analysis all indicated a high level of sequence similarity between the two strains. In the microarray analysis, as few as 288 (4.5%) of the ca. 6300 represented yeast genes were identified that yielded significantly different hybridisation intensities between the two strains. These could be classified as amplified, absent, or with sequence polymorphism in CEN.PK113-7D compared to S288C. A detailed analysis focused on the subset of 25 genes called absent in CEN.PK113-7D. Among these absent genes, 17 were clustered together on five chromosomes, mainly in subtelomeric regions. Thorough analysis of these regions by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism confirmed the absence of these genes in CEN.PK113-7D. Surprisingly, three of these regions were not smaller in CEN.PK113-7D chromosomes, indicating that they may harbour unidentified and potentially new sequences. In addition, eight genes called absent by the microarrays were scattered over the chromosomes. Using diagnostic PCR most of these genes were actually found to be present in CEN.PK113-7D, but after sequencing were found to differ significantly at the DNA level from S288C, explaining the poor hybridisation to the arrays. Our results indicate that DNA microarrays are a powerful tool for determining genotypic similarity between different yeast strains. However, to obtain meaningful information at the individual gene level, this method should be backed up by additional techniques.

  15. Investigation of genetic diversity of the bla(SHV) gene and development of an oligonucleotide microarray to detect mutations in the bla(SHV) gene.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanyuan; Sheng, Haihui; Zeng, Xainting; Yan, Jufen; Li, Haiyan; Xiao, Huasheng; Li, Xiaokun; Yang, Shulin

    2012-12-01

    SHV β-lactamases, including SHV extended-spectrum β-lactamases, are widespread throughout the world, and confer a broad spectrum of resistance to antibiotic drugs. Mutations ranging from single base-pair substitutions to small deletions within bla(SHV) often result in diminished activity and an increased susceptibility to β-lactamase inhibitors. Here, we collected 1,320 clinical isolates from three hospitals in Shanghai. We developed a novel oligonucleotide microarray to detect mutations in the bla(SHV) gene, and validated the array data by direct sequencing. Sixty-two of the 1,320 isolates carried the bla(SHV) gene. The genotypes of these 62 isolates were successfully called by the microarray and were consistent with the genotypes identified by bidirectional sequencing. Sixteen different bla(SHV) alleles were identified. The SHV-1 variant was the most frequent (32.26%), followed by SHV-11 (27.42%) and SHV-12 (25.81%). Of the 62 isolates, 12 contained two different bla(SHV) alleles. Our microarray significantly facilitated the identification of bla(SHV) variants, which makes it an attractive option for the detection of SHV variants in clinical laboratories. PMID:22897109

  16. Application of a High-Density Oligonucleotide Microarray Approach To Study Bacterial Population Dynamics during Uranium Reduction and Reoxidation†

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, Eoin L.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Joyner, Dominique C.; Baek, Seung M.; Larsen, Joern T.; Andersen, Gary L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Richardson, Paul M.; Herman, Donald J.; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin M.; Firestone, Mary K.

    2006-01-01

    Reduction of soluble uranium U(VI) to less-soluble uranium U(IV) is a promising approach to minimize migration from contaminated aquifers. It is generally assumed that, under constant reducing conditions, U(IV) is stable and immobile; however, in a previous study, we documented reoxidation of U(IV) under continuous reducing conditions (Wan et al., Environ. Sci. Technol. 2005, 39:6162-6169). To determine if changes in microbial community composition were a factor in U(IV) reoxidation, we employed a high-density phylogenetic DNA microarray (16S microarray) containing 500,000 probes to monitor changes in bacterial populations during this remediation process. Comparison of the 16S microarray with clone libraries demonstrated successful detection and classification of most clone groups. Analysis of the most dynamic groups of 16S rRNA gene amplicons detected by the 16S microarray identified five clusters of bacterial subfamilies responding in a similar manner. This approach demonstrated that amplicons of known metal-reducing bacteria such as Geothrix fermentans (confirmed by quantitative PCR) and those within the Geobacteraceae were abundant during U(VI) reduction and did not decline during the U(IV) reoxidation phase. Significantly, it appears that the observed reoxidation of uranium under reducing conditions occurred despite elevated microbial activity and the consistent presence of metal-reducing bacteria. High-density phylogenetic microarrays constitute a powerful tool, enabling the detection and monitoring of a substantial portion of the microbial population in a routine, accurate, and reproducible manner. PMID:16957256

  17. Gene expression analysis of the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma harzianum in the presence of tomato plants, chitin, or glucose using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background It has recently been shown that the Trichoderma fungal species used for biocontrol of plant diseases are capable of interacting with plant roots directly, behaving as symbiotic microorganisms. With a view to providing further information at transcriptomic level about the early response of Trichoderma to a host plant, we developed a high-density oligonucleotide (HDO) microarray encompassing 14,081 Expressed Sequence Tag (EST)-based transcripts from eight Trichoderma spp. and 9,121 genome-derived transcripts of T. reesei, and we have used this microarray to examine the gene expression of T. harzianum either alone or in the presence of tomato plants, chitin, or glucose. Results Global microarray analysis revealed 1,617 probe sets showing differential expression in T. harzianum mycelia under at least one of the culture conditions tested as compared with one another. Hierarchical clustering and heat map representation showed that the expression patterns obtained in glucose medium clustered separately from the expression patterns observed in the presence of tomato plants and chitin. Annotations using the Blast2GO suite identified 85 of the 257 transcripts whose probe sets afforded up-regulated expression in response to tomato plants. Some of these transcripts were predicted to encode proteins related to Trichoderma-host (fungus or plant) associations, such as Sm1/Elp1 protein, proteases P6281 and PRA1, enchochitinase CHIT42, or QID74 protein, although previously uncharacterized genes were also identified, including those responsible for the possible biosynthesis of nitric oxide, xenobiotic detoxification, mycelium development, or those related to the formation of infection structures in plant tissues. Conclusion The effectiveness of the Trichoderma HDO microarray to detect different gene responses under different growth conditions in the fungus T. harzianum strongly indicates that this tool should be useful for further assays that include different stages of

  18. Analysis of genetic variations in CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A5 genes using oligonucleotide microarray

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Huasheng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Chunxiu; Liu, Xiuming; Yao, Na; Sheng, Haihui; Li, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 enzymes play a critical role in the metabolism of many commonly prescribed drugs. Among them, the most important enzymes are highly polymorphic CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A5, which are responsible for about 40% of the metabolism of clinical used drugs. Here we developed a novel CYP450 oligonucleotide microarray that allow for detection of 32 known variations of CYP genes from a single multiplex reaction, including 19 polymorphisms of CYP2D6 gene, 8 polymorphisms of CYP2C9 gene, 4 polymorphisms of CYP2C19 gene and 1 polymorphism of CYP3A5 gene. 229 genomic DNA samples from unrelated Han subjects were analyzed. The microarray results showed to have high call rate and accuracy according to concordance with genotypes identified by independent bidirectional sequencing. Furthermore, we found that the major CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A5 alleles in Chinese Han population were CYP2C9*3 (allelic frequency of 10.7%), CYP2C9*2 (20.31%), CYP2C19*2 (5.68%), CYP2D6*10 (58.52%), CYP2D6*2 (13.76) and CYP3A5*3 (70.69%). With flexible DNA preparation, the microarray can significantly facilitates the process of detecting genetics variations in CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A5 gene and provide safe and effective therapy for individual patients. PMID:26770516

  19. Fast DNA Serotyping and Antimicrobial Resistance Gene Determination of Salmonella enterica with an Oligonucleotide Microarray-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Sascha D.; Ziegler, Albrecht; Methner, Ulrich; Slickers, Peter; Keiling, Silke; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Salmonellosis caused by Salmonella (S.) belongs to the most prevalent food-borne zoonotic diseases throughout the world. Therefore, serotype identification for all culture-confirmed cases of Salmonella infection is important for epidemiological purposes. As a standard, the traditional culture method (ISO 6579:2002) is used to identify Salmonella. Classical serotyping takes 4–5 days to be completed, it is labor-intensive, expensive and more than 250 non-standardized sera are necessary to characterize more than 2,500 Salmonella serovars currently known. These technical difficulties could be overcome with modern molecular methods. We developed a microarray based serogenotyping assay for the most prevalent Salmonella serovars in Europe and North America. The current assay version could theoretically discriminate 28 O-antigens and 86 H-antigens. Additionally, we included 77 targets analyzing antimicrobial resistance genes. The Salmonella assay was evaluated with a set of 168 reference strains representing 132 serovars previously serotyped by conventional agglutination through various reference centers. 117 of 132 (81%) tested serovars showed an unique microarray pattern. 15 of 132 serovars generated a pattern which was shared by multiple serovars (e.g., S. ser. Enteritidis and S. ser. Nitra). These shared patterns mainly resulted from the high similarity of the genotypes of serogroup A and D1. Using patterns of the known reference strains, a database was build which represents the basis of a new PatternMatch software that can serotype unknown Salmonella isolates automatically. After assay verification, the Salmonella serogenotyping assay was used to identify a field panel of 105 Salmonella isolates. All were identified as Salmonella and 93 of 105 isolates (88.6%) were typed in full concordance with conventional serotyping. This microarray based assay is a powerful tool for serogenotyping. PMID:23056321

  20. Fast DNA serotyping and antimicrobial resistance gene determination of salmonella enterica with an oligonucleotide microarray-based assay.

    PubMed

    Braun, Sascha D; Ziegler, Albrecht; Methner, Ulrich; Slickers, Peter; Keiling, Silke; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Salmonellosis caused by Salmonella (S.) belongs to the most prevalent food-borne zoonotic diseases throughout the world. Therefore, serotype identification for all culture-confirmed cases of Salmonella infection is important for epidemiological purposes. As a standard, the traditional culture method (ISO 6579:2002) is used to identify Salmonella. Classical serotyping takes 4-5 days to be completed, it is labor-intensive, expensive and more than 250 non-standardized sera are necessary to characterize more than 2,500 Salmonella serovars currently known. These technical difficulties could be overcome with modern molecular methods. We developed a microarray based serogenotyping assay for the most prevalent Salmonella serovars in Europe and North America. The current assay version could theoretically discriminate 28 O-antigens and 86 H-antigens. Additionally, we included 77 targets analyzing antimicrobial resistance genes. The Salmonella assay was evaluated with a set of 168 reference strains representing 132 serovars previously serotyped by conventional agglutination through various reference centers. 117 of 132 (81%) tested serovars showed an unique microarray pattern. 15 of 132 serovars generated a pattern which was shared by multiple serovars (e.g., S. ser. Enteritidis and S. ser. Nitra). These shared patterns mainly resulted from the high similarity of the genotypes of serogroup A and D1. Using patterns of the known reference strains, a database was build which represents the basis of a new PatternMatch software that can serotype unknown Salmonella isolates automatically. After assay verification, the Salmonella serogenotyping assay was used to identify a field panel of 105 Salmonella isolates. All were identified as Salmonella and 93 of 105 isolates (88.6%) were typed in full concordance with conventional serotyping. This microarray based assay is a powerful tool for serogenotyping. PMID:23056321

  1. Discrimination of bacillus anthracis and closely related microorganisms by analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA with oligonucleotide microarray.

    SciTech Connect

    Bavykin, S. G.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Zakharyev, V. M.; Lysov, Y. P.; Kelly, J. J.; Alferov, O. S.; Jackman, J.; Stahl, D. A.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Gavin, I. M.; Kukhtin, A. V.; Chandler, D.

    2008-01-30

    Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences is a commonly used method for the identification and discrimination of microorganisms. However, the high similarity of 16S and 23S rRNA sequences of Bacillus cereus group organisms (up to 99-100%) and repeatedly failed attempts to develop molecular typing systems that would use DNA sequences to discriminate between species within this group have resulted in several suggestions to consider B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, or these two species together with B. anthracis, as one species. Recently, we divided the B. cereus group into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, based on 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences and identified subgroup-specific makers in each of these three genes. Here we for the first time demonstrated discrimination of these seven subgroups, including subgroup Anthracis, with a 3D gel element microarray of oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S and 23S rRNA markers. This is the first microarray enabled identification of B. anthracis and discrimination of these seven subgroups in pure cell cultures and in environmental samples using rRNA sequences. The microarray bearing perfect match/mismatch (p/mm) probe pairs was specific enough to discriminate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and was able to identify targeted organisms in 5 min. We also demonstrated the ability of the microarray to determine subgroup affiliations for B. cereus group isolates without rRNA sequencing. Correlation of these seven subgroups with groupings based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST), fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis (AFLP) and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MME) analysis of a wide spectrum of different genes, and the demonstration of subgroup-specific differences in toxin profiles, psychrotolerance, and the ability to harbor some plasmids, suggest that these seven subgroups are not based solely on neutral genomic polymorphisms, but instead reflect

  2. Discrimination of Bacillus anthracis and Closely Related Microorganisms by Analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA with Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Bavykin, Sergei G.; Mikhailovich, Vladimir M.; Zakharyev, Vladimir M.; Lysov, Yuri p.; Kelly, John J.; Alferov, Oleg S.; Gavin, Igor M.; Kukhtin, Alexander V.; Jackman, Joany; Stahl, David A.; Chandler, Darrell; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences is a commonly used method for the identification and discrimination of microorganisms. However, the high similarity of 16S and 23S rRNA sequences of Bacillus cereus group organisms (up to 99-100%) and repeatedly failed attempts to develop molecular typing systems that would use DNA sequences to discriminate between species within this group have resulted in several suggestions to consider B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, or these two species together with B. anthracis, as one species. Recently, we divided the B. cereus group into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, based on 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences and identified subgroup-specific makers in each of these three genes. Here we for the first time demonstrated discrimination of these seven subgroups, including subgroup Anthracis, with a 3D gel element microarray of oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S and 23S rRNA markers. This is the first microarray enabled identification of B. anthracis and discrimination of these seven subgroups in pure cell cultures and in environmental samples using rRNA sequences. The microarray bearing perfect match/mismatch (p/mm) probe pairs was specific enough to discriminate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and was able to identify targeted organisms in 5 minutes. We also demonstrated the ability of the microarray to determine subgroup affiliations for B. cereus group isolates without rRNA sequencing. Correlation of these seven subgroups with groupings based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST), fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis (AFLP) and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MME) analysis of a wide spectrum of different genes, and the demonstration of subgroup-specific differences in toxin profiles, psychrotolerance, and the ability to harbor some plasmids, suggest that these seven subgroups are not based solely on neutral genomic polymorphisms, but instead

  3. Heterologous oligonucleotide microarrays for transcriptomics in a non-model species; a proof-of-concept study of drought stress in Musa

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Mark W; Graham, Neil S; Vanholme, Bartel; Swennen, Rony; May, Sean T; Keulemans, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Background 'Systems-wide' approaches such as microarray RNA-profiling are ideally suited to the study of the complex overlapping responses of plants to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, commercial microarrays are only available for a limited number of plant species and development costs are so substantial as to be prohibitive for most research groups. Here we evaluate the use of cross-hybridisation to Affymetrix oligonucleotide GeneChip® microarrays to profile the response of the banana (Musa spp.) leaf transcriptome to drought stress using a genomic DNA (gDNA)-based probe-selection strategy to improve the efficiency of detection of differentially expressed Musa transcripts. Results Following cross-hybridisation of Musa gDNA to the Rice GeneChip® Genome Array, ~33,700 gene-specific probe-sets had a sufficiently high degree of homology to be retained for transcriptomic analyses. In a proof-of-concept approach, pooled RNA representing a single biological replicate of control and drought stressed leaves of the Musa cultivar 'Cachaco' were hybridised to the Affymetrix Rice Genome Array. A total of 2,910 Musa gene homologues with a >2-fold difference in expression levels were subsequently identified. These drought-responsive transcripts included many functional classes associated with plant biotic and abiotic stress responses, as well as a range of regulatory genes known to be involved in coordinating abiotic stress responses. This latter group included members of the ERF, DREB, MYB, bZIP and bHLH transcription factor families. Fifty-two of these drought-sensitive Musa transcripts were homologous to genes underlying QTLs for drought and cold tolerance in rice, including in 2 instances QTLs associated with a single underlying gene. The list of drought-responsive transcripts also included genes identified in publicly-available comparative transcriptomics experiments. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that despite the general paucity of nucleotide sequence data in

  4. Microbial distributions detected by an oligonucleotide microarray across geochemical zones associated with methane in marine sediments from the Ulleung Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Brandon R; Graw, Michael; Brodie, Eoin L; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Kim, Sung-Han; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Torres, Marta; Colwell, Frederick S

    2013-11-01

    The biogeochemical processes that occur in marine sediments on continental margins are complex; however, from one perspective they can be considered with respect to three geochemical zones based on the presence and form of methane: sulfate–methane transition (SMTZ), gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and free gas zone (FGZ). These geochemical zones may harbor distinct microbial communities that are important in biogeochemical carbon cycles. The objective of this study was to describe the microbial communities in sediments from the SMTZ, GHSZ, and FGZ using molecular ecology methods (i.e. PhyloChip microarray analysis and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP)) and examining the results in the context of non-biological parameters in the sediments. Non-metric multidimensional scaling and multi-response permutation procedures were used to determine whether microbial community compositions were significantly different in the three geochemical zones and to correlate samples with abiotic characteristics of the sediments. This analysis indicated that microbial communities from all three zones were distinct from one another and that variables such as sulfate concentration, hydrate saturation of the nearest gas hydrate layer, and depth (or unmeasured variables associated with depth e.g. temperature, pressure) were correlated to differences between the three zones. The archaeal anaerobic methanotrophs typically attributed to performing anaerobic oxidation of methane were not detected in the SMTZ; however, the marine benthic group-B, which is often found in SMTZ, was detected. Within the GHSZ, samples that were typically closer to layers that contained higher hydrate saturation had indicator sequences related to Vibrio-type taxa. These results suggest that the biogeographic patterns of microbial communities in marine sediments are distinct based on geochemical zones defined by methane.

  5. A functional genomics tool for the Pacific bluefin tuna: Development of a 44K oligonucleotide microarray from whole-genome sequencing data for global transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Yasuike, Motoshige; Fujiwara, Atushi; Nakamura, Yoji; Iwasaki, Yuki; Nishiki, Issei; Sugaya, Takuma; Shimizu, Akio; Sano, Motohiko; Kobayashi, Takanori; Ototake, Mitsuru

    2016-02-01

    Bluefin tunas are one of the most important fishery resources worldwide. Because of high market values, bluefin tuna farming has been rapidly growing during recent years. At present, the most common form of the tuna farming is based on the stocking of wild-caught fish. Therefore, concerns have been raised about the negative impact of the tuna farming on wild stocks. Recently, the Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT), Thunnus orientalis, has succeeded in completing the reproduction cycle under aquaculture conditions, but production bottlenecks remain to be solved because of very little biological information on bluefin tunas. Functional genomics approaches promise to rapidly increase our knowledge on biological processes in the bluefin tuna. Here, we describe the development of the first 44K PBT oligonucleotide microarray (oligo-array), based on whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing and large-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs) data. In addition, we also introduce an initial 44K PBT oligo-array experiment using in vitro grown peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) stimulated with immunostimulants such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS: a cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria) or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C: a synthetic mimic of viral infection). This pilot 44K PBT oligo-array analysis successfully addressed distinct immune processes between LPS- and poly I:C- stimulated PBLs. Thus, we expect that this oligo-array will provide an excellent opportunity to analyze global gene expression profiles for a better understanding of diseases and stress, as well as for reproduction, development and influence of nutrition on tuna aquaculture production.

  6. PCR amplfication on a microarray of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides : detection of bacterial toxin- and drug-resistent genes and their mutations.

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhkov, B. N.; Drobyshev, A. L.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2000-10-01

    PCR amplification on a microarray of gel-immobilized primers (microchip) has been developed. One of a pair of PCR primers was immobilized inside a separate microchip polyacrylamide porous gel pad of 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.02 (or 0.04) micron in size and 0.2 (or 0.4) nL in volume. The amplification was carried out simultaneously both in solution covering the microchip array and inside gel pads. Each gel pad contained the immobilized forward primers, while the fluorescently labeled reverse primers, as well as all components of the amplification reaction, diffused into the gel pads from the solution. To increase the amplification efficiency, the forward primers were also added into the solution. The kinetics of amplification was measured in real time in parallel for all gel pads with a fluorescent microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The accuracy of the amplification was assessed by using the melting curves obtained for the duplexes formed by the labeled amplification product and the gel-immobilized primers during the amplification process; alternatively, the duplexes were produced by hybridization of the extended immobilized primers with labeled oligonucleotide probes. The on-chip amplification was applied to detect the anthrax toxin genes and the plasmid-borne beta-lactamase gene responsible for bacterial ampicillin resistance. The allele-specific type of PCR amplification was used to identify the Shiga toxin gene and discriminate it from the Shiga-like one. The genomic mutations responsible for rifampicin resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were detected by the same type of PCR amplification of the rpoB gene fragment isolated from sputum of tuberculosis patients. The on-chip PCR amplification has been shown to be a rapid, inexpensive and powerful tool to test genes responsible for bacterial toxin production and drug resistance, as well as to reveal point nucleotide mutations.

  7. Use of a rainbow trout oligonucleotide microarray to determine transcriptional patterns in aflatoxin B1-induced hepatocellular carcinoma compared to adjacent liver.

    PubMed

    Tilton, Susan C; Gerwick, Lena G; Hendricks, Jerry D; Rosato, Caprice S; Corley-Smith, Graham; Givan, Scott A; Bailey, George S; Bayne, Christopher J; Williams, David E

    2005-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide, and its occurrence is associated with a number of environmental factors including ingestion of the dietary contaminant aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)). Research over the last 40 years has revealed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to be an excellent research model for study of AFB(1)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis; however, little is known about changes at the molecular level in trout tumors. We have developed a rainbow trout oligonucleotide array containing 1672 elements representing over 1400 genes of known or probable relevance to toxicology, comparative immunology, carcinogenesis, endocrinology, and stress physiology. In this study, we applied microarray technology to examine gene expression of AFB(1)-induced HCC in the rainbow trout tumor model. Carcinogenesis was initiated in trout embryos with 50 ppb AFB(1), and after 13 months control livers, tumors, and tumor-adjacent liver tissues were isolated from juvenile fish. Global gene expression was determined in histologically confirmed HCCs compared to noncancerous adjacent tissue and sham-initiated control liver. We observed distinct gene regulation patterns in HCC compared to noncancerous tissue including upregulation of genes important for cell cycle control, transcription, cytoskeletal formation, and the acute phase response and downregulation of genes involved in drug metabolism, lipid metabolism, and retinol metabolism. Interestingly, the expression profiles observed in trout HCC are similar to the transcriptional signatures found in human and rodent HCC, further supporting the validity of the model. Overall, these findings contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of AFB(1)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in trout and identify conserved genes important for carcinogenesis in species separated evolutionarily by more than 400 million years.

  8. A Universal Oligonucleotide Microarray with a Minimal Number of Probes for the Detection and Identification of Viroids at the Genus Level

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dongmei; Xin, Yanyan; Ding, Fang; Deng, Ziniu; Wang, Guoping; Ma, Xianfeng; Li, Fang; Li, Guifen; Li, Mingfu; Li, Shifang; Zhu, Shuifang

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in the agricultural industry is the development of techniques that can screen plant samples for viroid infection. Microarrays are promising in this regard, as their high throughput nature can potentially allow for the detection of a range of viroids in a single test. In this paper we present a microarray that can detect a wide spectrum of all 8 reported viroid genera including 37 known plant viroid species. The array was constructed using an automated probe design protocol which generated a minimal number of probes to detect viroids at the genus level. The designed microarray showed a high specificity and sensitivity when tested with a set of standard virus samples. Finally, the microarray was applied to screen infected field samples, with Hop stunt viroid infection identified as the major disease causing pathogen for an infected citrus sample. PMID:23734201

  9. Microarray Analysis of Human Liver Cells irradiated by 80MeV/u Carbon Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Tian, Xiaoling; Kong, Fuquan; Li, Qiang; Jin, Xiaodong; Dai, Zhongying; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Mingjian; Zhao, Kui

    Objective Biological effect of heavy ion beam has the important significance for cancer therapy and space exploring owing its high LET and RBE, low OER, especially forming Bragg spike at the end of the tracks of charged particles. More serious damage for cells are induced by heavy ions and difficult repair than other irradiation such as X-ray and ν-ray . To explore the molecular mechanism of biological effect caused by heavy ionizing radiation (HIR) and to construct the gene expression profile database of HIR-induced human liver cells L02 by microarray analysis. Methods In this study, L02 cells were irradiated by 80MeV/u carbon ions at 5 Gy delivered by HIRFL (Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou) at room temperature. Total RNAs of cells incubated 6 hours and 24hours after irradiation were extracted with Trizol. Unirradiated cells were used as a control. RNAs were transcripted into cDNA by reverse transcription and labelled with cy5-dCTP and cy3-dCTP respectively. A human genome oligonucleotide set consisting of 5 amino acid-modified 70-mer probes and representing 21,329 well-characterized Homo sapiens genes was selected for microarray analysis and printed on amino-silaned glass slides. Arrays were fabricated using an OmniGrid microarrayer. Only genes whose alteration tendency was consistent in both microarrays were selected as differentially expressed genes. The Affymetrix's short oligonucleotide (25-mer) HG U133A 2.0 array analyses were performed per the manufacturer's instructions. Results Of the 21,329 genes tested, 37 genes showed changes in expression level with ratio higher than 2.0 and lower than 0.5 at 6hrs after irradiation. There were 19 genes showing up-regulation in radiated L02 cells, whereas 18 genes showing down-regulation; At 24hrs after irradiation, 269 genes showed changes in expression level with ratio higher than 2.0 and lower than 0.5. There were 67 genes showing up-regulation in radiated L02 cells, whereas 202 genes showing down

  10. Dynamic of active microorganisms inhabiting a bioleaching industrial heap of low‐grade copper sulfide ore monitored by real‐time PCR and oligonucleotide prokaryotic acidophile microarray

    PubMed Central

    Remonsellez, Francisco; Galleguillos, Felipe; Moreno‐Paz, Mercedes; Parro, Víctor; Acosta, Mauricio; Demergasso, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Summary The bioleaching of metal sulfide has developed into a very important industrial process and understanding the microbial dynamic is key to advancing commercial bioleaching operations. Here we report the first quantitative description of the dynamic of active communities in an industrial bioleaching heap. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the most abundant during the first part of the leaching cycle, while the abundance of Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Ferroplasma acidiphilum increased with age of the heap. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans kept constant throughout the leaching cycle, and Firmicutes group showed a low and a patchy distribution in the heap. The Acidiphilium‐like bacteria reached their highest abundance corresponding to the amount of autotrophs. The active microorganisms in the leaching system were determined using two RNA‐based sensitive techniques. In most cases, the 16S rRNA copy numbers of At. ferrooxidans, L. ferriphilum, At. thiooxidans and F. acidiphilum, was concomitant with the DNA copy numbers, whereas Acidiphilium‐like bacteria and some Firmicutes members did not show a clear correlation between 16S rRNA accumulation and DNA copy numbers. However, the prokaryotic acidophile microarray (PAM) analysis showed active members of Alphaproteobacteria in all samples and of Sulfobacillus genus in older ones. Also, new active groups such as Actinobacteria and Acidobacterium genus were detected by PAM. The results suggest that changes during the leaching cycle in chemical and physical conditions, such as pH and Fe3+/Fe2+ ion rate, are primary factors shaping the microbial dynamic in the heap. PMID:21255296

  11. Cytokines and therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G; Bidlingmaier, M; Eigler, A; Hacker, U; Endres, S

    1997-12-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides - short strands of synthetic nucleic acids - encompass antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides. Antisense oligonucleotides are designed to bind to target RNA by complementary base pairing and to inhibit translation of the target protein. Antisense oligonucleotides enable specific inhibition of cytokine synthesis. In contrast, aptamer oligonucleotides are able to bind directly to specific proteins. This binding depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide. Aptamer oligonucleotides with CpG motifs can exert strong immunostimulatory effects. Both kinds of therapeutic oligonucleotides - antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides - provide promising tools to modulate immunological functions. Recently, therapeutic oligonucleotides have moved towards clinical application. An antisense oligonucleotide directed against the proinflammatory intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is currently being tested in clinical trials for therapy of inflammatory disease. Immunostimulatory aptamer oligonucleotides are in preclinical development for immunotherapy. In the present review we summarize the application of therapeutic oligonucleotides to modulate immunological functions. We include technological aspects as well as current therapeutic concepts and clinical studies.

  12. Development of a human mitochondrial oligonucleotide microarray (h-MitoArray) and gene expression analysis of fibroblast cell lines from 13 patients with isolated F1Fo ATP synthase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Čížková, Alena; Stránecký, Viktor; Ivánek, Robert; Hartmannová, Hana; Nosková, Lenka; Piherová, Lenka; Tesařová, Markéta; Hansíková, Hana; Honzík, Tomáš; Zeman, Jiří; Divina, Petr; Potocká, Andrea; Paul, Jan; Sperl, Wolfgang; Mayr, Johannes A; Seneca, Sara; Houštĕk, Josef; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2008-01-01

    Background To strengthen research and differential diagnostics of mitochondrial disorders, we constructed and validated an oligonucleotide microarray (h-MitoArray) allowing expression analysis of 1632 human genes involved in mitochondrial biology, cell cycle regulation, signal transduction and apoptosis. Using h-MitoArray we analyzed gene expression profiles in 9 control and 13 fibroblast cell lines from patients with F1Fo ATP synthase deficiency consisting of 2 patients with mt9205ΔTA microdeletion and a genetically heterogeneous group of 11 patients with not yet characterized nuclear defects. Analysing gene expression profiles, we attempted to classify patients into expected defect specific subgroups, and subsequently reveal group specific compensatory changes, identify potential phenotype causing pathways and define candidate disease causing genes. Results Molecular studies, in combination with unsupervised clustering methods, defined three subgroups of patient cell lines – M group with mtDNA mutation and N1 and N2 groups with nuclear defect. Comparison of expression profiles and functional annotation, gene enrichment and pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes revealed in the M group a transcription profile suggestive of synchronized suppression of mitochondrial biogenesis and G1/S arrest. The N1 group showed elevated expression of complex I and reduced expression of complexes III, V, and V-type ATP synthase subunit genes, reduced expression of genes involved in phosphorylation dependent signaling along MAPK, Jak-STAT, JNK, and p38 MAP kinase pathways, signs of activated apoptosis and oxidative stress resembling phenotype of premature senescent fibroblasts. No specific functionally meaningful changes, except of signs of activated apoptosis, were detected in the N2 group. Evaluation of individual gene expression profiles confirmed already known ATP6/ATP8 defect in patients from the M group and indicated several candidate disease causing genes for

  13. DNA Microarray-based Ecotoxicological Biomarker Discovery in a Small Fish Model Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses several issues critical to use of zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays for computational toxicology research on endocrine disrupting chemicals using small fish models, and more generally, the use of microarrays in aquatic toxicology.

  14. Microarrays for identifying binding sites and probing structure of RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kierzek, Ryszard; Turner, Douglas H.; Kierzek, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are widely used in various biological studies. In this review, application of oligonucleotide microarrays for identifying binding sites and probing structure of RNAs is described. Deep sequencing allows fast determination of DNA and RNA sequence. High-throughput methods for determination of secondary structures of RNAs have also been developed. Those methods, however, do not reveal binding sites for oligonucleotides. In contrast, microarrays directly determine binding sites while also providing structural insights. Microarray mapping can be used over a wide range of experimental conditions, including temperature, pH, various cations at different concentrations and the presence of other molecules. Moreover, it is possible to make universal microarrays suitable for investigations of many different RNAs, and readout of results is rapid. Thus, microarrays are used to provide insight into oligonucleotide sequences potentially able to interfere with biological function. Better understanding of structure–function relationships of RNA can be facilitated by using microarrays to find RNA regions capable to bind oligonucleotides. That information is extremely important to design optimal sequences for antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA because both bind to single-stranded regions of target RNAs. PMID:25505162

  15. Synthesis of 3'-, or 5'-, or internal methacrylamido-modified oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Golova, Julia B.; Chernov, Boris K.

    2010-04-27

    New modifiers were synthesized for incorporation of a methacrylic function in 3'-, 5'- and internal positions of oligonucleotides during solid phase synthesis. A modifier was used for synthesis of 5'-methacrylated oligonucleotides for preparation of microarrays by a co-polymerization method.

  16. Formation and characterization of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride substrates.

    PubMed

    Manning, Mary; Redmond, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    A versatile method for direct, covalent attachment of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride layers, previously deposited by chemical vapor deposition at silicon wafer substrates, is reported. Each microarray fabrication process step, from silicon nitride substrate deposition, surface cleaning, amino-silanation, and attachment of a homobifunctional cross-linking molecule to covalent immobilization of probe oligonucleotides, is defined, characterized, and optimized to yield consistent probe microarray quality, homogeneity, and probe-target hybridization performance. The developed microarray fabrication methodology provides excellent (high signal-to-background ratio) and reproducible responsivity to target oligonucleotide hybridization with a rugged chemical stability that permits exposure of arrays to stringent pre- and posthybridization wash conditions through many sustained cycles of reuse. Overall, the achieved performance features compare very favorably with those of more mature glass based microarrays. It is proposed that this DNA microarray fabrication strategy has the potential to provide a viable route toward the successful realization of future integrated DNA biochips.

  17. [Preliminary study on HLA-B genotyping by oligonucleotide chips].

    PubMed

    Lan, Ke; Hu, Shou-Wang; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Hui; Guan, Wei; Ding, Yu; Sun, Ou-Jun; Wang, Sheng-Qi

    2003-04-01

    HLA genes constitute a highly polymorphic multigene system. In the present study, HLA-B oligonucleotide chips were manufactured by using a set of sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes derived from polymorphic regions in exon 2 and exon 3 of HLA-B gene spotted by microarrayer onto the aldehyde modified glass slides. In addition, the sequenced HLA-B gene clones used as standard samples were amplified from exon 2 and exon 3 by PCR. Together with the correct hybridization and wash conditions, the PCR products were bound with the array probes on the chip, and the hybridization patterns were transformed to HLA-B genotypes. The results showed that the genotypes of standard samples by the HLA-B oligonucleotide chips were completely identical with the sequenced clones. In conclusion, the oligonucleotide chip method presented here for HLA-B genotyping is a rapid, accurate, sensitive and attractive high throughput biochemical way.

  18. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  19. Comparing Bacterial DNA Microarray Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Chandler, Darrell P.; White, Amanda M.; Protic, Miroslava; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.

    2005-08-15

    Detecting subtle genetic differences between microorganisms is an important problem in molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics. In a typical investigation, gel electrophoresis is used to compare randomly amplified DNA fragments between microbial strains, where the patterns of DNA fragment sizes are proxies for a microbe's genotype. The limited genomic sample captured on a gel is often insufficient to discriminate nearly identical strains. This paper examines the application of microarray technology to DNA fingerprinting as a high-resolution alternative to gel-based methods. The so-called universal microarray, which uses short oligonucleotide probes that do not target specific genes or species, is intended to be applicable to all microorganisms because it does not require prior knowledge of genomic sequence. In principle, closely related strains can be distinguished if the number of probes on the microarray is sufficiently large, i.e., if the genome is sufficiently sampled. In practice, we confront noisy data, imperfectly matched hybridizations, and a high-dimensional inference problem. We describe the statistical problems of microarray fingerprinting, outline similarities with and differences from more conventional microarray applications, and illustrate the statistical fingerprinting problem for 10 closely related strains from three Bacillus species, and 3 strains from non-Bacillus species.

  20. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  1. Patterns of gene expression in pig adipose tissue: insulin-like growth factor system proteins, neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptors, neurotrophic factors and other secreted factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total RNA was collected at slaughter from outer subcutaneous adipose tissue (OSQ) and middle subcutaneous adipose tissue (MSQ) samples from gilts at 90, 150, and 210 d ( n =5 / age). Dye labeled cDNA probes were hybridized to custom microarrays (70 mer oligonucleotides) representing over 600 pig gen...

  2. Patterns of gene expression in pig adipose tissue: transforming growth factors, interferons, interleukins and apolipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total RNA was collected at slaughter from outer s.c. adipose tissue (OSQ), middle s.c. adipose tissue (MSQ), ovary, uterus, hypothalamus, and pituitary tissues samples from gilts at 90, 150, and 210 d ( n =5 / age). Dye labeled cDNA probes were hybridized to custom microarrays (70 mer oligonucleotid...

  3. Pentopyranosyl Oligonucleotide Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, Folkert; Kudick, Rene; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Eschenmoser, Albert; Wippo, Harald

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether the remarkable chemical properties of the pyranosyl isomer of RNA as an informational Watson-Crick base-pairing system are unique to the pentopyranosyl-(4 + 2)-oligonucleotide isomer derived from the RNA-building block D-ribose, studies on the entire family of diastereoisomeric pyranosyL(4 - Z)-oligonucleotide systems deriving from D-ribose. L-lyxose. D-xylose, and L-arabinose were carried out. The result of these extended studies is unambiguous: not only pyranosyl-RNA, but all members of the pentopyranosyl(4 + 2)-oligonucleotide family are highly efficient Watson-Crick base-pairing systems. Their synthesis and pairing properties will be described in a series of publications in this journal.

  4. Sensing immune responses with customized peptide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Schirwitz, Christopher; Loeffler, Felix F; Felgenhauer, Thomas; Stadler, Volker; Breitling, Frank; Bischoff, F Ralf

    2012-12-01

    The intent to solve biological and biomedical questions in high-throughput led to an immense interest in microarray technologies. Nowadays, DNA microarrays are routinely used to screen for oligonucleotide interactions within a large variety of potential interaction partners. To study interactions on the protein level with the same efficiency, protein and peptide microarrays offer similar advantages, but their production is more demanding. A new technology to produce peptide microarrays with a laser printer provides access to affordable and highly complex peptide microarrays. Such a peptide microarray can contain up to 775 peptide spots per cm², whereby the position of each peptide spot and, thus, the amino acid sequence of the corresponding peptide, is exactly known. Compared to other techniques, such as the SPOT synthesis, more features per cm² at lower costs can be synthesized which paves the way for laser printed peptide microarrays to take on roles as efficient and affordable biomedical sensors. Here, we describe the laser printer-based synthesis of peptide microarrays and focus on an application involving the blood sera of tetanus immunized individuals, indicating the potential of peptide arrays to sense immune responses.

  5. Tissue Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dancau, Ana-Maria; Simon, Ronald; Mirlacher, Martina; Sauter, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Modern next-generation sequencing and microarray technologies allow for the simultaneous analysis of all human genes on the DNA, RNA, miRNA, and methylation RNA level. Studies using such techniques have lead to the identification of hundreds of genes with a potential role in cancer or other diseases. The validation of all of these candidate genes requires in situ analysis of high numbers of clinical tissues samples. The tissue microarray technology greatly facilitates such analysis. In this method minute tissue samples (typically 0.6 mm in diameter) from up to 1000 different tissues can be analyzed on one microscope glass slide. All in situ methods suitable for histological studies can be applied to TMAs without major changes of protocols, including immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, or RNA in situ hybridization. Because all tissues are analyzed simultaneously with the same batch of reagents, TMA studies provide an unprecedented degree of standardization, speed, and cost efficiency.

  6. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  7. Fingerprinting Closely Related Xanthomonas Pathovars with Random Nonamer Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, Mark T.; Straub, Tim M.; Call, Douglas R.; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2002-12-01

    Current bacterial DNA typing methods are typically based upon gel-based fingerprinting methods. As such, they access a limited complement of genetic information and many independent restriction enzymes or probes is required to achieve statistical rigor and confidence in the resulting pattern of DNA fragments.

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A 2,000 GENE MICROARRAY FOR THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of the gene microarray has provided the field of ecotoxicology a new tool to identify modes of action (MOA) of chemicals and chemical mixtures. Herein we describe the development and application of a 2,000 gene oligonucleotide microarray for the fathead minnow (P...

  9. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  10. Microarrays, antiobesity and the liver

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chávez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    In this review, the microarray technology and especially oligonucleotide arrays are exemplified with a practical example taken from the perilipin−/− mice and using the dChip software, available for non-lucrative purposes. It was found that the liver of perilipin−/− mice was healthy and normal, even under high-fat diet when compared with the results published for the scd1−/− mice, which under high-fat diets had a darker liver, suggestive of hepatic steatosis. Scd1 is required for the biosynthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids and plays a key role in the hepatic synthesis of triglycerides and of very-low-density lipoproteins. Both models of obesity resistance share many similar phenotypic antiobesity features, however, the perilipin−/− mice had a significant downregulation of stearoyl CoA desaturases scd1 and scd2 in its white adipose tissue, but a normal level of both genes inside the liver, even under high-fat diet. Here, different microarray methodologies are discussed, and also some of the most recent discoveries and perspectives regarding the use of microarrays, with an emphasis on obesity gene expression, and a personal remark on my findings of increased expression for hemoglobin transcripts and other hemo related genes (hemo-like), and for leukocyte like (leuko-like) genes inside the white adipose tissue of the perilipin−/− mice. In conclusion, microarrays have much to offer in comparative studies such as those in antiobesity, and also they are methodologies adequate for new astounding molecular discoveries [free full text of this article PMID:15657555

  11. Aptamer Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Angel-Syrett, Heather; Collett, Jim; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2009-01-02

    In vitro selection can yield specific, high-affinity aptamers. We and others have devised methods for the automated selection of aptamers, and have begun to use these reagents for the construction of arrays. Arrayed aptamers have proven to be almost as sensitive as their solution phase counterparts, and when ganged together can provide both specific and general diagnostic signals for proteins and other analytes. We describe here technical details regarding the production and processing of aptamer microarrays, including blocking, washing, drying, and scanning. We will also discuss the challenges involved in developing standardized and reproducible methods for binding and quantitating protein targets. While signals from fluorescent analytes or sandwiches are typically captured, it has proven possible for immobilized aptamers to be uniquely coupled to amplification methods not available to protein reagents, thus allowing for protein-binding signals to be greatly amplified. Into the future, many of the biosensor methods described in this book can potentially be adapted to array formats, thus further expanding the utility of and applications for aptamer arrays.

  12. DNA Microarrays for Identifying Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Nölte, M.; Weber, H.; Silkenbeumer, N.; Hjörleifsdottir, S.; Hreggvidsson, G. O.; Marteinsson, V.; Kappel, K.; Planes, S.; Tinti, F.; Magoulas, A.; Garcia Vazquez, E.; Turan, C.; Hervet, C.; Campo Falgueras, D.; Antoniou, A.; Landi, M.; Blohm, D.

    2008-01-01

    In many cases marine organisms and especially their diverse developmental stages are difficult to identify by morphological characters. DNA-based identification methods offer an analytically powerful addition or even an alternative. In this study, a DNA microarray has been developed to be able to investigate its potential as a tool for the identification of fish species from European seas based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences. Eleven commercially important fish species were selected for a first prototype. Oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rDNA sequences obtained from 230 individuals of 27 fish species. In addition, more than 1200 sequences of 380 species served as sequence background against which the specificity of the probes was tested in silico. Single target hybridisations with Cy5-labelled, PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments from each of the 11 species on microarrays containing the complete set of probes confirmed their suitability. True-positive, fluorescence signals obtained were at least one order of magnitude stronger than false-positive cross-hybridisations. Single nontarget hybridisations resulted in cross-hybridisation signals at approximately 27% of the cases tested, but all of them were at least one order of magnitude lower than true-positive signals. This study demonstrates that the 16S rDNA gene is suitable for designing oligonucleotide probes, which can be used to differentiate 11 fish species. These data are a solid basis for the second step to create a “Fish Chip” for approximately 50 fish species relevant in marine environmental and fisheries research, as well as control of fisheries products. PMID:18270778

  13. DNA and protein microarray printing on silicon nitride waveguide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Hogrebe, Paul; Grainger, David W

    2006-01-15

    Sputtered silicon nitride optical waveguide surfaces were silanized and modified with a hetero-bifunctional crosslinker to facilitate thiol-reactive immobilization of contact-printed DNA probe oligonucleotides, streptavidin and murine anti-human interleukin-1 beta capture agents in microarray formats. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize each reaction sequence on the native silicon oxynitride surface. Thiol-terminated DNA probe oligonucleotides exhibited substantially higher surface printing immobilization and target hybridization efficiencies than non-thiolated DNA probe oligonucleotides: strong fluorescence signals from target DNA hybridization supported successful DNA oligonucleotide probe microarray fabrication and specific capture bioactivity. Analogously printed arrays of thiolated streptavidin and non-thiolated streptavidin did not exhibit noticeable differences in either surface immobilization or analyte capture assay signals. Non-thiolated anti-human interleukin-1 beta printed on modified silicon nitride surfaces reactive to thiol chemistry exhibited comparable performance for capturing human interleukin-1 beta analyte to commercial amine-reactive microarraying polymer surfaces in sandwich immunoassays, indicating substantial non-specific antibody-surface capture responsible for analyte capture signal.

  14. Typing of enteroviruses by use of microwell oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Susi, P; Hattara, L; Waris, M; Luoma-Aho, T; Siitari, H; Hyypiä, T; Saviranta, P

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a straightforward assay for the rapid typing of enteroviruses using oligonucleotide arrays in microtiter wells. The viral nucleic acids are concomitantly amplified and labeled during reverse transcription-PCR, and unpurified PCR products are used for hybridization. DNA strands are separated by alkaline denaturation, and hybridization is started by neutralization. The microarray hybridization reactions and the subsequent washes are performed in standard 96-well microtiter plates, which makes the method easily adaptable to high-throughput analysis. We describe here the assay principle and its potential in clinical laboratory use by correctly identifying 10 different enterovirus reference strains. Furthermore, we explore the detection of unknown sequence variants using serotype consensus oligonucleotide probes. With just two consensus probes for the coxsackievirus A9 (CVA9) serotype, we detected 23 out of 25 highly diverse CVA9 isolates. Overall, the assay involves several features aiming at ease of performance, robustness, and applicability to large-scale studies.

  15. The use of microarrays in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G.L.; He, Z.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Zhou, J.

    2009-09-15

    Microarrays have proven to be a useful and high-throughput method to provide targeted DNA sequence information for up to many thousands of specific genetic regions in a single test. A microarray consists of multiple DNA oligonucleotide probes that, under high stringency conditions, hybridize only to specific complementary nucleic acid sequences (targets). A fluorescent signal indicates the presence and, in many cases, the abundance of genetic regions of interest. In this chapter we will look at how microarrays are used in microbial ecology, especially with the recent increase in microbial community DNA sequence data. Of particular interest to microbial ecologists, phylogenetic microarrays are used for the analysis of phylotypes in a community and functional gene arrays are used for the analysis of functional genes, and, by inference, phylotypes in environmental samples. A phylogenetic microarray that has been developed by the Andersen laboratory, the PhyloChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that targets the known diversity within the 16S rRNA gene to determine microbial community composition. Using multiple, confirmatory probes to increase the confidence of detection and a mismatch probe for every perfect match probe to minimize the effect of cross-hybridization by non-target regions, the PhyloChip is able to simultaneously identify any of thousands of taxa present in an environmental sample. The PhyloChip is shown to reveal greater diversity within a community than rRNA gene sequencing due to the placement of the entire gene product on the microarray compared with the analysis of up to thousands of individual molecules by traditional sequencing methods. A functional gene array that has been developed by the Zhou laboratory, the GeoChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that dynamically identifies functional activities of multiple members within a community. The recent version of GeoChip contains more than 24,000 50mer

  16. An Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise to Study the Effect of Darkness on Plant Gene Expression Using DNA Microarray

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ming-Mei; Briggs, George M.

    2007-01-01

    DNA microarrays are microscopic arrays on a solid surface, typically a glass slide, on which DNA oligonucleotides are deposited or synthesized in a high-density matrix with a predetermined spatial order. Several types of DNA microarrays have been developed and used for various biological studies. Here, we developed an undergraduate laboratory…

  17. Application of DNA Microarray to Clinical Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2016-01-01

    Microarray-based technology to conduct array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has made a significant impact on the diagnosis of human genetic diseases. Such diagnoses, previously undetectable by traditional G-banding chromosome analysis, are now achieved by identifying genomic copy number variants (CNVs) using the microarray. Not only can hundreds of well-characterized genetic syndromes be detected in a single assay, but new genomic disorders and disease-causing genes can also be discovered through the utilization of aCGH technology. Although other platforms such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays can be used for detecting CNVs, in this chapter we focus on describing the methods for performing aCGH using Agilent oligonucleotide arrays for both prenatal (e.g., amniotic fluid and chorionic villus sample) and postnatal samples (e.g., blood).

  18. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries.

    PubMed

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-Ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection-based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization.

  19. Microarrays, Integrated Analytical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combinatorial chemistry is used to find materials that form sensor microarrays. This book discusses the fundamentals, and then proceeds to the many applications of microarrays, from measuring gene expression (DNA microarrays) to protein-protein interactions, peptide chemistry, carbodhydrate chemistry, electrochemical detection, and microfluidics.

  20. Rapid microarray-based DNA genoserotyping of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Geue, Lutz; Monecke, Stefan; Engelmann, Ines; Braun, Sascha; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    In this study, an improvement in the oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray for the genoserotyping of Escherichia coli is presented. Primer and probes for additional 70 O antigen groups were developed. The microarray was transferred to a new platform, the ArrayStrip format, which allows high through-put tests in 96-well formats and fully automated microarray analysis. Thus, starting from a single colony, it is possible to determine within a few hours and a single experiment, 94 of the over 180 known O antigen groups as well as 47 of the 53 different H antigens. The microarray was initially validated with a set of defined reference strains that had previously been serotyped by conventional agglutination in various reference centers. For further validation of the microarray, 180 clinical E. coli isolates of human origin (from urine samples, blood cultures, bronchial secretions, and wound swabs) and 53 E. coli isolates from cattle, pigs, and poultry were used. A high degree of concordance between the results of classical antibody-based serotyping and DNA-based genoserotyping was demonstrated during validation of the new 70 O antigen groups as well as for the field strains of human and animal origin. Therefore, this oligonucleotide array is a diagnostic tool that is user-friendly and more efficient than classical serotyping by agglutination. Furthermore, the tests can be performed in almost every routine lab and are easily expanded and standardized.

  1. Evaluation of 50-mer oligonucleotide arrays for detectingmicrobial populations in environmental samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Tiquia, S.M.; Wu, L.; Chong, S.C.; Passovets, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.; Zhou, J.

    2004-03-30

    Microarrays fabricated with oligonucleotides longer than 40bp have been introduced for monitoring whole genome expression but havenot been evaluated with environmental samples. To determine the potentialof this type of microarray for environmental studies, a 50-meroligonucleotide microarray was constructed using 763 genes involved innitrogen cycling: nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK), ammoniamonooxygenase (amoA), nitrogenase (nifH), methane monooxygenase (pmoA),and sulfite reductase (dsrAB) from public databases and our own sequencecollections. The comparison of the sequences from pure cultures indicatedthat the developed microarrays could provide species-level resolution foranalyzing microorganisms involved in nitrification, denitrification,nitrogen fixation, methane oxidation, and sulfite reduction. Sensitivitytests suggested that the 50-mer oligonucleotide arrays could detectdominant populations in the environments, although sensitivity stillneeds to be improved. A significant quantitative relationship was alsoobtained with a mixture of DNAs from eight different bacteria. Theseresults suggest that the 50-mer oligonucleotide array can be used as aspecific and quantitative parallel tool for the detection of microbialpopulations in environmental samples.

  2. Construction of Whole Genome Microarrays, and Expression Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells in Metal-Reducing Conditions (Uranium and Chromium)

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Matthew W.

    2005-06-01

    One of the major goals of the project is to construct whole-genome microarrays for Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Previous whole-genome microarrays constructed at ORNL have been PCR-amplimer based, and we wanted to re-evaluate the type of microarrays being built because oligonucleotide probes have several advantages. Microarrays have been generally constructed with two types of probes, PCR-generated probes that typically range in size between 200 and 2000 bp, and oligonucleotide probes with typical size of 20-70 nt. Producing PCR product-based DNA arrays can be a time-consuming procedure that includes PCR primer design, amplification, size verification, product purification, and product quantification. Also, some ORFs are difficult to amplify and thus the construction of comprehensive arrays can be a challenge. Recently, to alleviate some of the problems associated with PCR product-based microarrays, oligonucleotide microarrays that contain probes longer than 40 nt have been evaluated and used for whole genome expression studies. These microarrays should have higher specificity and are easy to construct, and can thus provide an important alternative approach to monitor gene expression. However, due to the smaller probe size, it is expected that the detection sensitivity of oligonucleotide arrays will be lower than PCR product-based probes.

  3. Stem-loop oligonucleotides: a robust tool for molecular biology and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Broude, Natalia E

    2002-06-01

    The specific structural features of stem-loop (hairpin) DNA constructs provide increased specificity of target recognition. Recently, several robust assays have been developed that exploit the potential of structurally constrained oligonucleotides to hybridize with their cognate targets. Here, I review new diagnostic approaches based on the formation of stem-loop DNA oligonucleotides: molecular beacon methodology, suppression PCR approaches and the use of hairpin probes in DNA microarrays. The advantages of these techniques over existing ones for sequence-specific DNA detection, amplification and manipulation are discussed.

  4. Manufacturing of microarrays.

    PubMed

    Petersen, David W; Kawasaki, Ernest S

    2007-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has become a powerful tool in the arsenal of the molecular biologist. Capitalizing on high precision robotics and the wealth of DNA sequences annotated from the genomes of a large number of organisms, the manufacture of microarrays is now possible for the average academic laboratory with the funds and motivation. Microarray production requires attention to both biological and physical resources, including DNA libraries, robotics, and qualified personnel. While the fabrication of microarrays is a very labor-intensive process, production of quality microarrays individually tailored on a project-by-project basis will help researchers shed light on future scientific questions.

  5. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-05-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply rigorous thermodynamic analysis to an important biochemical problem. Because the stacking of base pairs on top of one another is a significant factor in the energetics of oligonucleotide melting, several investigators have applied van't Hoff analysis to melting temperature data using a nearest-neighbor model and have obtained entropies and enthalpies for the stacking of bases. The present article explains how the equilibrium constant for the dissociation of strands from double-stranded oligonucleotides can be expressed in terms of the total strand concentration and thus how the total strand concentration influences the melting temperature. It also presents a simplified analysis based on the entropies and enthalpies of stacking that is manually tractable so that students can work examples to help them understand the thermodynamics of oligonucleotide melting.

  6. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  7. Production of complex nucleic acid libraries using highly parallel in situ oligonucleotide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michele A; Kilian, Kristopher; Wang, Yanqun; Bradshaw, Jeff; Cavet, Guy; Ge, Wei; Kulkarni, Amit; Paddison, Patrick J; Chang, Kenneth; Sheth, Nihar; Leproust, Eric; Coffey, Ernest M; Burchard, Julja; McCombie, W Richard; Linsley, Peter; Hannon, Gregory J

    2004-12-01

    Generation of complex libraries of defined nucleic acid sequences can greatly aid the functional analysis of protein and gene function. Previously, such studies relied either on individually synthesized oligonucleotides or on cellular nucleic acids as the starting material. As each method has disadvantages, we have developed a rapid and cost-effective alternative for construction of small-fragment DNA libraries of defined sequences. This approach uses in situ microarray DNA synthesis for generation of complex oligonucleotide populations. These populations can be recovered and either used directly or immortalized by cloning. From a single microarray, a library containing thousands of unique sequences can be generated. As an example of the potential applications of this technology, we have tested the approach for the production of plasmids encoding short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting numerous human and mouse genes. We achieved high-fidelity clone retrieval with a uniform representation of intended library sequences. PMID:15782200

  8. Identifying Fishes through DNA Barcodes and Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kochzius, Marc; Seidel, Christian; Antoniou, Aglaia; Botla, Sandeep Kumar; Campo, Daniel; Cariani, Alessia; Vazquez, Eva Garcia; Hauschild, Janet; Hervet, Caroline; Hjörleifsdottir, Sigridur; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur; Kappel, Kristina; Landi, Monica; Magoulas, Antonios; Marteinsson, Viggo; Nölte, Manfred; Planes, Serge; Tinti, Fausto; Turan, Cemal; Venugopal, Moleyur N.; Weber, Hannes; Blohm, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Background International fish trade reached an import value of 62.8 billion Euro in 2006, of which 44.6% are covered by the European Union. Species identification is a key problem throughout the life cycle of fishes: from eggs and larvae to adults in fisheries research and control, as well as processed fish products in consumer protection. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to evaluate the applicability of the three mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA (16S), cytochrome b (cyt b), and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) for the identification of 50 European marine fish species by combining techniques of “DNA barcoding” and microarrays. In a DNA barcoding approach, neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees of 369 16S, 212 cyt b, and 447 COI sequences indicated that cyt b and COI are suitable for unambiguous identification, whereas 16S failed to discriminate closely related flatfish and gurnard species. In course of probe design for DNA microarray development, each of the markers yielded a high number of potentially species-specific probes in silico, although many of them were rejected based on microarray hybridisation experiments. None of the markers provided probes to discriminate the sibling flatfish and gurnard species. However, since 16S-probes were less negatively influenced by the “position of label” effect and showed the lowest rejection rate and the highest mean signal intensity, 16S is more suitable for DNA microarray probe design than cty b and COI. The large portion of rejected COI-probes after hybridisation experiments (>90%) renders the DNA barcoding marker as rather unsuitable for this high-throughput technology. Conclusions/Significance Based on these data, a DNA microarray containing 64 functional oligonucleotide probes for the identification of 30 out of the 50 fish species investigated was developed. It represents the next step towards an automated and easy-to-handle method to identify fish, ichthyoplankton, and fish products. PMID

  9. Microarrays in hematology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josef; Flower, Darren; Rigley, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Microarrays are fast becoming routine tools for the high-throughput analysis of gene expression in a wide range of biologic systems, including hematology. Although a number of approaches can be taken when implementing microarray-based studies, all are capable of providing important insights into biologic function. Although some technical issues have not been resolved, microarrays will continue to make a significant impact on hematologically important research. PMID:11753074

  10. Immobilization of DNA in polyacrylamide gel for the manufacture of DNA and DNA-oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Timofeev, E.; Mirzabekov, A.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    1998-05-15

    Activated DNA was immobilized in aldehyde-containing polyacrylamide gel for use in manufacturing the MAGIChip (microarrays of gel-immobilized compounds on a chip). First, abasic sites were generated in DNA by partial acidic depurination. Amino groups were then introduced into the abasic sites by reaction with ethylenediamine and reduction of the aldimine bonds formed. It was found that DNA could be fragmented at the site of amino group incorporation or preserved mostly unfragmented. In similar reactions, both amino-DNA and amino-oligonucleotides were attached through their amines to polyacrylamide gel derivatized with aldehyde groups. Single- and double-stranded DNA of 40 to 972 nucleotides or base pairs were immobilized on the gel pads to manufacture a DNA microchip. The microchip was hybridized with fluorescently labeled DNA-specific oligonucleotide probes. This procedure for immobilization of amino compounds was used to manufacture MAGIChips containing both DNA and oligonucleotides.

  11. Oligonucleotide primers, probes and molecular methods for the environmental monitoring of methanogenic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Narihiro, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Summary For the identification and quantification of methanogenic archaea (methanogens) in environmental samples, various oligonucleotide probes/primers targeting phylogenetic markers of methanogens, such as 16S rRNA, 16S rRNA gene and the gene for the α‐subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), have been extensively developed and characterized experimentally. These oligonucleotides were designed to resolve different groups of methanogens at different taxonomic levels, and have been widely used as hybridization probes or polymerase chain reaction primers for membrane hybridization, fluorescence in situ hybridization, rRNA cleavage method, gene cloning, DNA microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for studies in environmental and determinative microbiology. In this review, we present a comprehensive list of such oligonucleotide probes/primers, which enable us to determine methanogen populations in an environment quantitatively and hierarchically, with examples of the practical applications of the probes and primers. PMID:21375721

  12. [Study toward practical use of oligonucleotide therapeutics].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takao; Yoshida, Tokuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, oligonucleotide-based therapeutics such as antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been developed extensively. For example, mipomersen (Kynamro; ISIS Pharmaceuticals), which is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide administered by subcutaneous injection, has recently been approved by the FDA for the treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. On the other hands, methods for the evaluation of quality, efficacy and safety of oligonucleotide therapeutics have not been fully discussed. Furthermore, the regulatory guidance specific for oligonucleotide therapeutics has not been established yet. Under these circumstances, we started to collaborate with Osaka University and PMDA to discuss regulatory science focused on oligonucleotide therapeutics. Through the collaboration, we would like to propose the possible design of quality evaluation and preclinical safety-evaluation of oligonucleotide therapeutics. PMID:25707197

  13. Application of Equilibrium Models of Solution Hybridization to Microarray Design and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Newton, Joshua M.; Weller, Jennifer W.; Gibas, Cynthia J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The probe percent bound value, calculated using multi-state equilibrium models of solution hybridization, is shown to be useful in understanding the hybridization behavior of microarray probes having 50 nucleotides, with and without mismatches. These longer oligonucleotides are in widespread use on microarrays, but there are few controlled studies of their interactions with mismatched targets compared to 25-mer based platforms. Principal Findings 50-mer oligonucleotides with centrally placed single, double and triple mismatches were spotted on an array. Over a range of target concentrations it was possible to discriminate binding to perfect matches and mismatches, and the type of mismatch could be predicted accurately in the concentration midrange (100 pM to 200 pM) using solution hybridization modeling methods. These results have implications for microarray design, optimization and analysis methods. Conclusions Our results highlight the importance of incorporating biophysical factors in both the design and the analysis of microarrays. Use of the probe “percent bound” value predicted by equilibrium models of hybridization is confirmed to be important for predicting and interpreting the behavior of long oligonucleotide arrays, as has been shown for short oligonucleotide arrays. PMID:20548788

  14. Basic Concepts of Microarrays and Potential Applications in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa B.; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The introduction of in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques, led by real-time PCR, into the clinical microbiology laboratory has transformed the laboratory detection of viruses and select bacterial pathogens. However, the progression of the molecular diagnostic revolution currently relies on the ability to efficiently and accurately offer multiplex detection and characterization for a variety of infectious disease pathogens. Microarray analysis has the capability to offer robust multiplex detection but has just started to enter the diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Multiple microarray platforms exist, including printed double-stranded DNA and oligonucleotide arrays, in situ-synthesized arrays, high-density bead arrays, electronic microarrays, and suspension bead arrays. One aim of this paper is to review microarray technology, highlighting technical differences between them and each platform's advantages and disadvantages. Although the use of microarrays to generate gene expression data has become routine, applications pertinent to clinical microbiology continue to rapidly expand. This review highlights uses of microarray technology that impact diagnostic microbiology, including the detection and identification of pathogens, determination of antimicrobial resistance, epidemiological strain typing, and analysis of microbial infections using host genomic expression and polymorphism profiles. PMID:19822891

  15. Microarray Analysis in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Bhawe, Kaumudi M.; Aghi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis in glioblastomas is done using either cell lines or patient samples as starting material. A survey of the current literature points to transcript-based microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based tissue microarrays as being the preferred methods of choice in cancers of neurological origin. Microarray analysis may be carried out for various purposes including the following: To correlate gene expression signatures of glioblastoma cell lines or tumors with response to chemotherapy (DeLay et al., Clin Cancer Res 18(10):2930–2942, 2012)To correlate gene expression patterns with biological features like proliferation or invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells (Jiang et al., PLoS One 8(6):e66008, 2013)To discover new tumor classificatory systems based on gene expression signature, and to correlate therapeutic response and prognosis with these signatures (Huse et al., Annu Rev Med 64(1):59–70, 2013; Verhaak et al., Cancer Cell 17(1):98–110, 2010) While investigators can sometimes use archived tumor gene expression data available from repositories such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus to answer their questions, new arrays must often be run to adequately answer specific questions. Here, we provide a detailed description of microarray methodologies, how to select the appropriate methodology for a given question, and analytical strategies that can be used. Experimental methodology for protein microarrays is outside the scope of this chapter, but basic sample preparation techniques for transcript-based microarrays are included here. PMID:26113463

  16. Microarray Analysis in Glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Bhawe, Kaumudi M; Aghi, Manish K

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis in glioblastomas is done using either cell lines or patient samples as starting material. A survey of the current literature points to transcript-based microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based tissue microarrays as being the preferred methods of choice in cancers of neurological origin. Microarray analysis may be carried out for various purposes including the following: i. To correlate gene expression signatures of glioblastoma cell lines or tumors with response to chemotherapy (DeLay et al., Clin Cancer Res 18(10):2930-2942, 2012). ii. To correlate gene expression patterns with biological features like proliferation or invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells (Jiang et al., PLoS One 8(6):e66008, 2013). iii. To discover new tumor classificatory systems based on gene expression signature, and to correlate therapeutic response and prognosis with these signatures (Huse et al., Annu Rev Med 64(1):59-70, 2013; Verhaak et al., Cancer Cell 17(1):98-110, 2010). While investigators can sometimes use archived tumor gene expression data available from repositories such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus to answer their questions, new arrays must often be run to adequately answer specific questions. Here, we provide a detailed description of microarray methodologies, how to select the appropriate methodology for a given question, and analytical strategies that can be used. Experimental methodology for protein microarrays is outside the scope of this chapter, but basic sample preparation techniques for transcript-based microarrays are included here. PMID:26113463

  17. Biopolymer synthesis on polypropylene supports. I. Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Matson, R S; Rampal, J B; Coassin, P J

    1994-03-01

    We have modified polypropylene to serve as a new solid-phase support for oligonucleotide synthesis. The plastic is first surface aminated by exposure to an ammonia plasma generated by radiofrequency plasma discharge. The aminated polypropylene has been found to be useful as a support for the in situ synthesis of oligonucleotides from monomers. Furthermore, oligonucleotides synthesized on the surface of the plastic remain attached following deprotection and can be used directly for hybridization. PMID:8203760

  18. Emerging Use of Gene Expression Microarrays in Plant Physiology

    DOE PAGES

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    Microarrays have become an important technology for the global analysis of gene expression in humans, animals, plants, and microbes. Implemented in the context of a well-designed experiment, cDNA and oligonucleotide arrays can provide highthroughput, simultaneous analysis of transcript abundance for hundreds, if not thousands, of genes. However, despite widespread acceptance, the use of microarrays as a tool to better understand processes of interest to the plant physiologist is still being explored. To help illustrate current uses of microarrays in the plant sciences, several case studies that we believe demonstrate the emerging application of gene expression arrays in plant physiology weremore » selected from among the many posters and presentations at the 2003 Plant and Animal Genome XI Conference. Based on this survey, microarrays are being used to assess gene expression in plants exposed to the experimental manipulation of air temperature, soil water content and aluminium concentration in the root zone. Analysis often includes characterizing transcript profiles for multiple post-treatment sampling periods and categorizing genes with common patterns of response using hierarchical clustering techniques. In addition, microarrays are also providing insights into developmental changes in gene expression associated with fibre and root elongation in cotton and maize, respectively. Technical and analytical limitations of microarrays are discussed and projects attempting to advance areas of microarray design and data analysis are highlighted. Finally, although much work remains, we conclude that microarrays are a valuable tool for the plant physiologist interested in the characterization and identification of individual genes and gene families with potential application in the fields of agriculture, horticulture and forestry.« less

  19. Emerging Use of Gene Expression Microarrays in Plant Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Difazio, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    Microarrays have become an important technology for the global analysis of gene expression in humans, animals, plants, and microbes. Implemented in the context of a well-designed experiment, cDNA and oligonucleotide arrays can provide highthroughput, simultaneous analysis of transcript abundance for hundreds, if not thousands, of genes. However, despite widespread acceptance, the use of microarrays as a tool to better understand processes of interest to the plant physiologist is still being explored. To help illustrate current uses of microarrays in the plant sciences, several case studies that we believe demonstrate the emerging application of gene expression arrays in plant physiology were selected from among the many posters and presentations at the 2003 Plant and Animal Genome XI Conference. Based on this survey, microarrays are being used to assess gene expression in plants exposed to the experimental manipulation of air temperature, soil water content and aluminium concentration in the root zone. Analysis often includes characterizing transcript profiles for multiple post-treatment sampling periods and categorizing genes with common patterns of response using hierarchical clustering techniques. In addition, microarrays are also providing insights into developmental changes in gene expression associated with fibre and root elongation in cotton and maize, respectively. Technical and analytical limitations of microarrays are discussed and projects attempting to advance areas of microarray design and data analysis are highlighted. Finally, although much work remains, we conclude that microarrays are a valuable tool for the plant physiologist interested in the characterization and identification of individual genes and gene families with potential application in the fields of agriculture, horticulture and forestry. PMID:18629133

  20. Microarrays in Glycoproteomics Research

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Tingting; Haab, Brian B.

    2009-01-01

    Microarrays have been extremely useful for investigating binding interactions among diverse types of molecular species, with the main advantage being the ability to examine many interactions using small amount of samples and reagents. Microarrays are increasingly being used to advance research in the field of glycobiology, which is the study of the nature and function and carbohydrates in health and disease. Several types of microarrays are being used in the study of glycans and proteins in glycobiology, including glycan arrays to study the recognition of carbohydrates, lectin arrays to determine carbohydrate expression on purified proteins or on cells, and antibody arrays to examine the variation in particular glycan structures on specific proteins. This review will cover the technology and applications of these types of microarrays, as well as their use for obtaining complementary information on various aspects of glycobiology. PMID:19389548

  1. Functional Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohui; Xie, Zhi; Qian, Jiang; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng

    2010-01-01

    Functional protein microarrays are emerging as a promising new tool for large-scale and high-throughput studies. In this article, we will review their applications in basic proteomics research, where various types of assays have been developed to probe binding activities to other biomolecules, such as proteins, DNA, RNA, small molecules, and glycans. We will also report recent progress of using functional protein microarrays in profiling protein posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, acetylation, and nitrosylation. Finally, we will discuss potential of functional protein microarrays in biomarker identification and clinical diagnostics. We strongly believe that functional protein microarrays will soon become an indispensible and invaluable tool in proteomics research and systems biology. PMID:20872749

  2. DNA Microarray Technology

    SciTech Connect

    WERNER-WASHBURNE, MARGARET; DAVIDSON, GEORGE S.

    2002-01-01

    Collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico Biology Department resulted in the capability to train students in microarray techniques and the interpretation of data from microarray experiments. These studies provide for a better understanding of the role of stationary phase and the gene regulation involved in exit from stationary phase, which may eventually have important clinical implications. Importantly, this research trained numerous students and is the basis for three new Ph.D. projects.

  3. The prebiotic synthesis of oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Stephen-Sherwood, E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper is primarily a review of recent developments in the abiotic synthesis of nucleotides, short chain oligonucleotides, and their mode of replication in solution. It also presents preliminary results from this laboratory on the prebiotic synthesis of thymidine oligodeoxynucleotides. A discussion, based on the physicochemical properties of RNA and DNA oligomers, relevant to the molecular evolution of these compounds leads to the tentative hypothesis that oligodeoxyribonucleotides of about 12 units may have been of sufficient length to initiate a self replicating coding system. Two models are suggested to account for the synthesis of high molecular weight oligomers using short chain templates and primers.

  4. DNA microarrays in neuropsychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, E R; Srivastava, L K; Quirion, R

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in experimental genomics, coupled with the wealth of sequence information available for a variety of organisms, have the potential to transform the way pharmacological research is performed. At present, high-density DNA microarrays allow researchers to quickly and accurately quantify gene-expression changes in a massively parallel manner. Although now well established in other biomedical fields, such as cancer and genetics research, DNA microarrays have only recently begun to make significant inroads into pharmacology. To date, the major focus in this field has been on the general application of DNA microarrays to toxicology and drug discovery and design. This review summarizes the major microarray findings of relevance to neuropsychopharmacology, as a prelude to the design and analysis of future basic and clinical microarray experiments. The ability of DNA microarrays to monitor gene expression simultaneously in a large-scale format is helping to usher in a post-genomic age, where simple constructs about the role of nature versus nurture are being replaced by a functional understanding of gene expression in living organisms. PMID:11479006

  5. A dynamic bead-based microarray for parallel DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochol, R. D.; Casavant, B. P.; Dueck, M. E.; Lee, L. P.; Lin, L.

    2011-05-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed and constructed by means of micromachining processes to integrate both microfluidic mixing of mobile microbeads and hydrodynamic microbead arraying capabilities on a single chip to simultaneously detect multiple bio-molecules. The prototype system has four parallel reaction chambers, which include microchannels of 18 × 50 µm2 cross-sectional area and a microfluidic mixing section of 22 cm length. Parallel detection of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences was achieved via molecular beacon probes immobilized on polystyrene microbeads of 16 µm diameter. Experimental results show quantitative detection of three distinct DNA oligonucleotide sequences from the Hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome with single base-pair mismatch specificity. Our dynamic bead-based microarray offers an effective microfluidic platform to increase parallelization of reactions and improve microbead handling for various biological applications, including bio-molecule detection, medical diagnostics and drug screening.

  6. Cellular Uptake and Intracellular Trafficking of Oligonucleotides: Implications for Oligonucleotide Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Laing, Brian

    2014-01-01

    One of the major constraints on the therapeutic use of oligonucleotides is inefficient delivery to their sites of action in the cytosol or nucleus. Recently it has become evident that the pathways of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides can strongly influence their pharmacological actions. Here we provide background information on the basic processes of endocytosis and trafficking and then review recent literature on targeted delivery and subcellular trafficking of oligonucleotides in that context. A variety of approaches including molecular scale ligand-oligonucleotide conjugates, ligand-targeted nanocarriers, and the use of small molecules to enhance oligonucleotide effects are discussed. PMID:24383421

  7. Microarrays for Genotyping Human Group A Rotavirus by Multiplex Capture and Type-Specific Primer Extension

    PubMed Central

    Lovmar, Lovisa; Fock, Caroline; Espinoza, Felix; Bucardo, Filemon; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bondeson, Kåre

    2003-01-01

    Human group A rotavirus (HRV) is the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants worldwide. HRV shares the feature of a high degree of genetic diversity with many other RNA viruses, and therefore, genotyping of this organism is more complicated than genotyping of more stable DNA viruses. We describe a novel microarray-based method that allows high-throughput genotyping of RNA viruses with a high degree of polymorphism by multiplex capture and type-specific extension on microarrays. Denatured reverse transcription (RT)-PCR products derived from two outer capsid genes of clinical isolates of HRV were hybridized to immobilized capture oligonucleotides representing the most commonly occurring P and G genotypes on a microarray. Specific primer extension of the type-specific capture oligonucleotides was applied to incorporate the fluorescent nucleotide analogue cyanine 5-labeled dUTP as a detectable label. Laser scanning and fluorescence detection of the microarrays was followed by visual or computer-assisted interpretation of the fluorescence patterns generated on the microarrays. Initially, the method detected HRV in all 40 samples and correctly determined both the G and the P genotypes of 35 of the 40 strains analyzed. After modification by inclusion of additional capture oligonucleotides specific for the initially unassigned genotypes, all genotypes could be correctly defined. The results of genotyping with the microarray fully agreed with the results obtained by nucleotide sequence analysis and sequence-specific multiplex RT-PCR. Owing to its robustness, simplicity, and general utility, the microarray-based method may gain wide applicability for the genotyping of microorganisms, including highly variable RNA and DNA viruses. PMID:14605152

  8. Microarrays for genotyping human group a rotavirus by multiplex capture and type-specific primer extension.

    PubMed

    Lovmar, Lovisa; Fock, Caroline; Espinoza, Felix; Bucardo, Filemon; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bondeson, Kåre

    2003-11-01

    Human group A rotavirus (HRV) is the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants worldwide. HRV shares the feature of a high degree of genetic diversity with many other RNA viruses, and therefore, genotyping of this organism is more complicated than genotyping of more stable DNA viruses. We describe a novel microarray-based method that allows high-throughput genotyping of RNA viruses with a high degree of polymorphism by multiplex capture and type-specific extension on microarrays. Denatured reverse transcription (RT)-PCR products derived from two outer capsid genes of clinical isolates of HRV were hybridized to immobilized capture oligonucleotides representing the most commonly occurring P and G genotypes on a microarray. Specific primer extension of the type-specific capture oligonucleotides was applied to incorporate the fluorescent nucleotide analogue cyanine 5-labeled dUTP as a detectable label. Laser scanning and fluorescence detection of the microarrays was followed by visual or computer-assisted interpretation of the fluorescence patterns generated on the microarrays. Initially, the method detected HRV in all 40 samples and correctly determined both the G and the P genotypes of 35 of the 40 strains analyzed. After modification by inclusion of additional capture oligonucleotides specific for the initially unassigned genotypes, all genotypes could be correctly defined. The results of genotyping with the microarray fully agreed with the results obtained by nucleotide sequence analysis and sequence-specific multiplex RT-PCR. Owing to its robustness, simplicity, and general utility, the microarray-based method may gain wide applicability for the genotyping of microorganisms, including highly variable RNA and DNA viruses.

  9. Microarray analysis of the developing cortex.

    PubMed

    Semeralul, Mawahib O; Boutros, Paul C; Likhodi, Olga; Okey, Allan B; Van Tol, Hubert H M; Wong, Albert H C

    2006-12-01

    Abnormal development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders that have an onset in childhood or adolescence. Although the basic laminar structure of the PFC is established in utero, extensive remodeling continues into adolescence. To map the overall pattern of changes in cortical gene transcripts during postnatal development, we made serial measurements of mRNA levels in mouse PFC using oligonucleotide microarrays. We observed changes in mRNA transcripts consistent with known postnatal morphological and biochemical events. Overall, most transcripts that changed significantly showed a progressive decrease in abundance after birth, with the majority of change between postnatal weeks 2 and 4. Genes with cell proliferative, cytoskeletal, extracellular matrix, plasma membrane lipid/transport, protein folding, and regulatory functions had decreases in mRNA levels. Quantitative PCR verified the microarray results for six selected genes: DNA methyltransferase 3A (Dnmt3a), procollagen, type III, alpha 1 (Col3a1), solute carrier family 16 (monocarboxylic acid transporters), member 1 (Slc16a1), MARCKS-like 1 (Marcksl1), nidogen 1 (Nid1) and 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (heart, mitochondrial) (Bdh).

  10. Oligonucleotide therapeutics: chemistry, delivery and clinical progress.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek K; Watts, Jonathan K

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide therapeutics have the potential to become a third pillar of drug development after small molecules and protein therapeutics. However, the three approved oligonucleotide drugs over the past 17 years have not proven to be highly successful in a commercial sense. These trailblazer drugs have nonetheless laid the foundations for entire classes of drug candidates to follow. This review will examine further advances in chemistry that are earlier in the pipeline of oligonucleotide drug candidates. Finally, we consider the possible effect of delivery systems that may provide extra footholds to improve the potency and specificity of oligonucleotide drugs. Our overview focuses on strategies to imbue antisense oligonucleotides with more drug-like properties and their applicability to other nucleic acid therapeutics.

  11. Electron Transfer Dissociation of Oligonucleotide Cations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Suncerae I; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-06-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of multi-protonated 6 - 20-mer oligonucleotides and 12- and 14-mer duplexes is compared to collision activated dissociation (CAD). ETD causes efficient charge reduction of the multi-protonated oligonucleotides in addition to limited backbone cleavages to yield sequence ions of low abundance. Subsequent CAD of the charge-reduced oligonucleotides formed upon electron transfer, in a net process termed electron transfer collision activated dissociation (ETcaD), results in rich fragmentation in terms of w, a, z, and d products, with a marked decrease in the abundance of base loss ions and internal fragments. Complete sequencing was possible for nearly all oligonucleotides studied. ETcaD of an oligonucleotide duplex resulted in specific backbone cleavages, with conservation of weaker non-covalent bonds. PMID:20161288

  12. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  13. Synthesis of 5'-Aldehyde Oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Lartia, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of oligonucleotide ending with an aldehyde functional group at their 5'-end (5'-AON) is possible for both DNA (5'-AODN) and RNA (5'-AORN) series irrespectively of the nature of the last nucleobase. The 5'-alcohol of on-support ODN is mildly oxidized under Moffat conditions. Transient protection of the resulting aldehyde by N,N'-diphenylethylenediamine derivatives allows cleavage, deprotection, and RP-HPLC purification of the protected 5'-AON. Finally, 5'-AON is deprotected by usual acetic acid treatment. In the aggregates, 5'-AON can be now synthesized and purified as routinely as non-modified ODNs, following procedures similar to the well-known "DMT-On" strategy. PMID:26967469

  14. Tandem oligonucleotide synthesis using linker phosphoramidites

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Richard T.; Yu, Shuyuan

    2005-01-01

    Multiple oligonucleotides of the same or different sequence, linked end-to-end in tandem can be synthesized in a single automated synthesis. A linker phosphoramidite [R. T. Pon and S. Yu (2004) Nucleic Acids Res., 32, 623–631] is added to the 5′-terminal OH end of a support-bound oligonucleotide to introduce a cleavable linkage (succinic acid plus sulfonyldiethanol) and the 3′-terminal base of the new sequence. Conventional phosphoramidites are then used for the rest of the sequence. After synthesis, treatment with ammonium hydroxide releases the oligonucleotides from the support and cleaves the linkages between each sequence. Mixtures of one oligonucleotide with both 5′- and 3′-terminal OH ends and other oligonucleotides with 5′-phosphorylated and 3′-OH ends are produced, which are deprotected and worked up as a single product. Tandem synthesis can be used to make pairs of PCR primers, sets of cooperative oligonucleotides or multiple copies of the same sequence. When tandem synthesis is used to make two self-complementary sequences, double-stranded structures spontaneously form after deprotection. Tandem synthesis of oligonucleotide chains containing up to six consecutive 20mer (120 bases total), various trinucleotide codons and primer pairs for PCR, or self-complementary strands for in situ formation of double-stranded DNA fragments has been demonstrated. PMID:15814811

  15. Quantitation of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Leeds, J M; Graham, M J; Truong, L; Cummins, L L

    1996-03-01

    Methods are presented for the extraction of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides from human plasma to permit quantitation by capillary gel electrophoresis. Extraction of the phosphorothioate oligonucleotides from plasma was accomplished using two solid-phase extraction columns, a strong anion-exchange column to remove plasma proteins and lipids, followed by a reverse-phase column to remove salts. A second desalting step, achieved by dialysis utilizing a membrane with a molecular weight cutoff of 2500 Da floating on distilled water, was required to remove residual ionic material from the extracted sample. This method should be generally applicable to the analysis and quantitation of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. PMID:8850544

  16. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  17. A New Generation Microarray for the Simultaneous Detection and Identification of Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis in Food

    PubMed Central

    Goji, Noriko; MacMillan, Trevor; Amoako, Kingsley Kwaku

    2012-01-01

    The use of microarrays as a multiple analytic system has generated increased interest and provided a powerful analytical tool for the simultaneous detection of pathogens in a single experiment. A wide array of applications for this technology has been reported. A low density oligonucleotide microarray was generated from the genetic sequences of Y. pestis and B. anthracis and used to fabricate a microarray chip. The new generation chip, consisting of 2,240 spots in 4 quadrants with the capability of stripping/rehybridization, was designated as “Y-PESTIS/B-ANTHRACIS 4x2K Array.” The chip was tested for specificity using DNA from a panel of bacteria that may be potentially present in food. In all, 37 unique Y. pestis-specific and 83 B. anthracis-specific probes were identified. The microarray assay distinguished Y. pestis and B. anthracis from the other bacterial species tested and correctly identified the Y. pestis-specific oligonucleotide probes using DNA extracted from experimentally inoculated milk samples. Using a whole genome amplification method, the assay was able to detect as low as 1 ng genomic DNA as the start sample. The results suggest that oligonucleotide microarray can specifically detect and identify Y. pestis and B. anthracis and may be a potentially useful diagnostic tool for detecting and confirming the organisms in food during a bioterrorism event. PMID:23125935

  18. Disc-based microarrays: principles and analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sergi; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-07-01

    The idea of using disk drives to monitor molecular biorecognition events on regular optical discs has received considerable attention during the last decade. CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray discs and other new optical discs are universal and versatile supports with the potential for development of protein and DNA microarrays. Besides, standard disk drives incorporated in personal computers can be used as compact and affordable optical reading devices. Consequently, a CD technology, resulting from the audio-video industry, has been used to develop analytical applications in health care, environmental monitoring, food safety and quality assurance. The review presents and critically evaluates the current state of the art of disc-based microarrays with illustrative examples, including past, current and future developments. Special mention is made of the analytical developments that use either chemically activated or raw standard CDs where proteins, oligonucleotides, peptides, haptens or other biological probes are immobilized. The discs are also used to perform the assays and must maintain their readability with standard optical drives. The concept and principle of evolving disc-based microarrays and the evolution of disk drives as optical detectors are also described. The review concludes with the most relevant uses ordered chronologically to provide an overview of the progress of CD technology applications in the life sciences. Also, it provides a selection of important references to the current literature. Graphical Abstract High density disc-based microarrays. PMID:26922341

  19. A tiling microarray for global analysis of chloroplast genome expression in cucumber and other plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Plastids are small organelles equipped with their own genomes (plastomes). Although these organelles are involved in numerous plant metabolic pathways, current knowledge about the transcriptional activity of plastomes is limited. To solve this problem, we constructed a plastid tiling microarray (PlasTi-microarray) consisting of 1629 oligonucleotide probes. The oligonucleotides were designed based on the cucumber chloroplast genomic sequence and targeted both strands of the plastome in a non-contiguous arrangement. Up to 4 specific probes were designed for each gene/exon, and the intergenic regions were covered regularly, with 70-nt intervals. We also developed a protocol for direct chemical labeling and hybridization of as little as 2 micrograms of chloroplast RNA. We used this protocol for profiling the expression of the cucumber chloroplast plastome on the PlasTi-microarray. Owing to the high sequence similarity of plant plastomes, the newly constructed microarray can be used to study plants other than cucumber. Comparative hybridization of chloroplast transcriptomes from cucumber, Arabidopsis, tomato and spinach showed that the PlasTi-microarray is highly versatile. PMID:21952044

  20. Gene Assembly from Chip-Synthesized Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Eroshenko, Nikolai; Kosuri, Sriram; Marblestone, Adam H; Conway, Nicholas; Church, George M.

    2012-01-01

    De novo synthesis of long double-stranded DNA constructs has a myriad of applications in biology and biological engineering. However, its widespread adoption has been hindered by high costs. Cost can be significantly reduced by using oligonucleotides synthesized on high-density DNA chips. However, most methods for using off-chip DNA for gene synthesis have failed to scale due to the high error rates, low yields, and high chemical complexity of the chip-synthesized oligonucleotides. We have recently demonstrated that some commercial DNA chip manufacturers have improved error rates, and that the issues of chemical complexity and low yields can be solved by using barcoded primers to accurately and efficiently amplify subpools of oligonucleotides. This article includes protocols for computationally designing the DNA chip, amplifying the oligonucleotide subpools, and assembling 500-800 basepair (bp) constructs. PMID:25077042

  1. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  2. Multi-Platform, Multi-Site, Microarray-Based Human Tumor Classification

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Greg; Yang, Ivana V.; Boulware, David; Kwong, Ka Yin; Coppola, Domenico; Eschrich, Steven; Quackenbush, John; Yeatman, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of gene expression profiling has resulted in the production of rich human data sets with potential for deciphering tumor diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. Here we demonstrate how artificial neural networks (ANNs) can be applied to two completely different microarray platforms (cDNA and oligonucleotide), or a combination of both, to build tumor classifiers capable of deciphering the identity of most human cancers. First, 78 tumors representing eight different types of histologically similar adenocarcinoma, were evaluated with a 32k cDNA microarray and correctly classified by a cDNA-based ANN, using independent training and test sets, with a mean accuracy of 83%. To expand our approach, oligonucleotide data derived from six independent performance sites, representing 463 tumors and 21 tumor types, were assembled, normalized, and scaled. An oligonucleotide-based ANN, trained on a random fraction of the tumors (n = 343), was 88% accurate in predicting known pathological origin of the remaining fraction of tumors (n = 120) not exposed to the training algorithm. Finally, a mixed-platform classifier using a combination of both cDNA and oligonucleotide microarray data from seven performance sites, normalized and scaled from a large and diverse tumor set (n = 539), produced similar results (85% accuracy) on independent test sets. Further validation of our classifiers was achieved by accurately (84%) predicting the known primary site of origin for an independent set of metastatic lesions (n = 50), resected from brain, lung, and liver, potentially addressing the vexing classification problems imposed by unknown primary cancers. These cDNA- and oligonucleotide-based classifiers provide a first proof of principle that data derived from multiple platforms and performance sites can be exploited to build multi-tissue tumor classifiers. PMID:14695313

  3. Structural analysis of hepatitis C RNA genome using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Martell, María; Briones, Carlos; de Vicente, Aránzazu; Piron, María; Esteban, Juan I.; Esteban, Rafael; Guardia, Jaime; Gómez, Jordi

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have tried to identify specific nucleotide sequences in the quasispecies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) that determine resistance or sensitivity to interferon (IFN) therapy, unfortunately without conclusive results. Although viral proteins represent the most evident phenotype of the virus, genomic RNA sequences determine secondary and tertiary structures which are also part of the viral phenotype and can be involved in important biological roles. In this work, a method of RNA structure analysis has been developed based on the hybridization of labelled HCV transcripts to microarrays of complementary DNA oligonucleotides. Hybridizations were carried out at non-denaturing conditions, using appropriate temperature and buffer composition to allow binding to the immobilized probes of the RNA transcript without disturbing its secondary/tertiary structural motifs. Oligonucleotides printed onto the microarray covered the entire 5′ non-coding region (5′NCR), the first three-quarters of the core region, the E2–NS2 junction and the first 400 nt of the NS3 region. We document the use of this methodology to analyse the structural degree of a large region of HCV genomic RNA in two genotypes associated with different responses to IFN treatment. The results reported here show different structural degree along the genome regions analysed, and differential hybridization patterns for distinct genotypes in NS2 and NS3 HCV regions. PMID:15247323

  4. Oxygen plasma treated interactive polycarbonate DNA microarraying platform.

    PubMed

    Tamarit-López, Jesús; Morais, Sergi; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Angel

    2011-12-21

    A novel DNA microarrying platform based on oxygen plasma activation of polycarbonate surface of compact disks (DVD) is presented. Carboxylic acid groups are generated in few seconds on polycarbonate in an efficient, fast, and clean way. Following this surface activation strategy, amino-modified oligonucleotide probes were covalently attached, reaching an immobilization density of 2 pmol cm(-2). Atomic force microscopy imaging revealed the nondestructive character of this treatment when applied for short times, allowing for disk scanning in standard DVD drives. DNA assays performed on oxygen plasma treated disks resulted very efficient with maximum hybridization yield of 93% and reaching a low limit of detection (200 pM) for perfect match synthetic oligonucleotide targets when reading the disk with a standard drive as detector. The approach was also evaluated by scoring single nucleotide polymorphisms with a discrimination ratio of 12.8. As proof of concept, the oxygen plasma treated interactive polycarbonate DNA microarraying platform was applied to the detection of PCR products of Salmonella spp., reaching a detection limit of 2 nM that corresponds to a DNA concentration of only 1 c.f.u./mL. The results confirm the suitability of the microarray platform for analysis of biological samples with high sensitivity. PMID:22044406

  5. Microarrays under the microscope

    PubMed Central

    Wildsmith, S E; Elcock, F J

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology is a rapidly advancing area, which is gaining popularity in many biological disciplines from drug target identification to predictive toxicology. Over the past few years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of methods and techniques available for carrying out this form of gene expression analysis. The techniques and associated peripherals, such as slide types, deposition methods, robotics, and scanning equipment, are undergoing constant improvement, helping to drive the technology forward in terms of robustness and ease of use. These rapid developments, combined with the number of options available and the associated hyperbole, can prove daunting for the new user. This review aims to guide the researcher through the various steps of conducting microarray experiments, from initial strategy to analysing the data, with critical examination of the benefits and disadvantages along the way. PMID:11212888

  6. Navigating public microarray databases.

    PubMed

    Penkett, Christopher J; Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources.

  7. Spotting and validation of a genome wide oligonucleotide chip with duplicate measurement of each gene

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, Mads . E-mail: mads.thomassen@ouh.fyns-amt.dk; Skov, Vibe; Eiriksdottir, Freyja; Tan, Qihua; Jochumsen, Kirsten; Fritzner, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus; Dahlgaard, Jesper; Kruse, Torben A.

    2006-06-16

    The quality of DNA microarray based gene expression data relies on the reproducibility of several steps in a microarray experiment. We have developed a spotted genome wide microarray chip with oligonucleotides printed in duplicate in order to minimise undesirable biases, thereby optimising detection of true differential expression. The validation study design consisted of an assessment of the microarray chip performance using the MessageAmp and FairPlay labelling kits. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to demonstrate that MessageAmp was significantly more reproducible than FairPlay. Further examinations with MessageAmp revealed the applicability of the system. The linear range of the chips was three orders of magnitude, the precision was high, as 95% of measurements deviated less than 1.24-fold from the expected value, and the coefficient of variation for relative expression was 13.6%. Relative quantitation was more reproducible than absolute quantitation and substantial reduction of variance was attained with duplicate spotting. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated no significant day-to-day variation.

  8. Analysis of mutations in oral poliovirus vaccine by hybridization with generic oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Kirillov, E.; Chumakov, K.; Donion, J.; Rezapkin, G.; Mirzabekov, A.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes use of a new technology of hybridization with a micro-array of immobilized oligonucleotides for detection and quantification of neurovirulent mutants in Oral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV). We used a micro-array consisting of three-dimensional gel-elements containing all possible hexamers (total of 4096 probes). Hybridization of fluorescently labelled viral cDNA samples with such microchips resulted in a pattern of spots that was registered and quantified by a computer-linked CCD camera, so that the sequence of the original cDNA could be deduced. The method could reliably identify single point mutations, since each of them affected fluorescence intensity of 12 micro-array elements. Micro-array hybridization of DNA mixtures with varying contents of point mutants demonstrated that the method can detect as little as 10% of revertants in a population of vaccine virus. This new technology should be useful for quality control of live viral vaccines, as well as for other applications requiring identification and quantification of point mutations.

  9. Caged oligonucleotides for studying biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Ruble, Brittani K.; Yeldell, Sean B.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.

    2015-01-01

    Light-activated (“caged”) compounds have been widely employed for studying biological processes with high spatial and temporal control. In the past decade, several new approaches for caging the structure and function of DNA and RNA oligonucleotides have been developed. This review focuses on caged oligonucleotides that incorporate site-specifically one or two photocleavable linkers, whose photolysis yields oligonucleotides with dramatic structural and functional changes. This technique has been employed by our laboratory and others to photoregulate gene expression in cells and living organisms, typically using near UV-activated organic chromophores. To improve capabilities for in vivo studies, we harnessed the rich inorganic photochemistry of ruthenium bipyridyl complexes to synthesize Ru-caged morpholino antisense oligonucleotides that remain inactive in zebrafish embryos until uncaged with visible light. Expanding into new caged oligonucleotide applications, our lab has developed Transcriptome In Vivo Analysis (TIVA) technology, which provides the first noninvasive, unbiased method for isolating mRNA from single neurons in brain tissues. TIVA-isolated mRNA can be amplified and then analyzed using next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq). PMID:25865001

  10. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  11. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Davis Austin

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons), 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)

  12. Design and applications of modified oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gallo, M; Montserrat, J M; Iribarren, A M

    2003-02-01

    Oligonucleotides have a wide range of applications in fields such as biotechnology, molecular biology, diagnosis and therapy. However, the spectrum of uses can be broadened by introducing chemical modifications into their structures. The most prolific field in the search for new oligonucleotide analogs is the antisense strategy, where chemical modifications confer appropriate characteristics such as hybridization, resistance to nucleases, cellular uptake, selectivity and, basically, good pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Combinatorial technology is another research area where oligonucleotides and their analogs are extensively employed. Aptamers, new catalytic ribozymes and deoxyribozymes are RNA or DNA molecules individualized from a randomly synthesized library on the basis of a particular property. They are identified by repeated cycles of selection and amplification, using PCR technologies. Modified nucleotides can be introduced either during the amplification procedure or after selection.

  13. Ecotoxicogenomics: Microarray interlaboratory comparability.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dorsch, Doris E; Bay, Steven M; Moore, Shelly; Layton, Blythe; Mehinto, Alvine C; Vulpe, Chris D; Brown-Augustine, Marianna; Loguinov, Alex; Poynton, Helen; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Perkins, Edward J; Escalon, Lynn; Denslow, Nancy D; Cristina, Colli-Dula R; Doan, Tri; Shukradas, Shweta; Bruno, Joy; Brown, Lorraine; Van Agglen, Graham; Jackman, Paula; Bauer, Megan

    2016-02-01

    Transcriptomic analysis can complement traditional ecotoxicology data by providing mechanistic insight, and by identifying sub-lethal organismal responses and contaminant classes underlying observed toxicity. Before transcriptomic information can be used in monitoring and risk assessment, it is necessary to determine its reproducibility and detect key steps impacting the reliable identification of differentially expressed genes. A custom 15K-probe microarray was used to conduct transcriptomics analyses across six laboratories with estuarine amphipods exposed to cyfluthrin-spiked or control sediments (10 days). Two sample types were generated, one consisted of total RNA extracts (Ex) from exposed and control samples (extracted by one laboratory) and the other consisted of exposed and control whole body amphipods (WB) from which each laboratory extracted RNA. Our findings indicate that gene expression microarray results are repeatable. Differentially expressed data had a higher degree of repeatability across all laboratories in samples with similar RNA quality (Ex) when compared to WB samples with more variable RNA quality. Despite such variability a subset of genes were consistently identified as differentially expressed across all laboratories and sample types. We found that the differences among the individual laboratory results can be attributed to several factors including RNA quality and technical expertise, but the overall results can be improved by following consistent protocols and with appropriate training.

  14. EvoOligo: oligonucleotide probe design with multiobjective evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Lee, In-Hee; Cho, Young-Min; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2009-12-01

    Probe design is one of the most important tasks in successful deoxyribonucleic acid microarray experiments. We propose a multiobjective evolutionary optimization method for oligonucleotide probe design based on the multiobjective nature of the probe design problem. The proposed multiobjective evolutionary approach has several distinguished features, compared with previous methods. First, the evolutionary approach can find better probe sets than existing simple filtering methods with fixed threshold values. Second, the multiobjective approach can easily incorporate the user's custom criteria or change the existing criteria. Third, our approach tries to optimize the combination of probes for the given set of genes, in contrast to other tools that independently search each gene for qualifying probes. Lastly, the multiobjective optimization method provides various sets of probe combinations, among which the user can choose, depending on the target application. The proposed method is implemented as a platform called EvoOligo and is available for service on the web. We test the performance of EvoOligo by designing probe sets for 19 types of Human Papillomavirus and 52 genes in the Arabidopsis Calmodulin multigene family. The design results from EvoOligo are proven to be superior to those from well-known existing probe design tools, such as OligoArray and OligoWiz.

  15. Oligonucleotide-based therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Magen, Iddo; Hornstein, Eran

    2014-10-10

    Molecular genetics insight into the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer׳s disease, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, encourages direct interference with the activity of neurotoxic genes or the molecular activation of neuroprotective pathways. Oligonucleotide-based therapies are recently emerging as an efficient strategy for drug development and these can be employed as new treatments of neurodegenerative states. Here we review advances in this field in recent years which suggest an encouraging assessment that oligonucleotide technologies for targeting of RNAs will enable the development of new therapies and will contribute to preservation of brain integrity.

  16. Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides inhibit the intrinsic tenase complex.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, J P; Lan, H C

    1998-09-01

    Systemic administration of ISIS 2302, a 20-mer antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide targeting human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 mRNA, causes prolongation of plasma clotting times in both monkey and human studies. The anticoagulant effects of ISIS 2302 were investigated with both in vitro coagulation assays in human plasma and purified enzyme systems. At high oligonucleotide plasma concentrations (>100 microgram/mL), prolongation of the prothrombin and thrombin times was observed. In a thrombin time assay using purified components, high concentrations of ISIS 2302 inhibited thrombin clotting activity both by stimulating inhibition by heparin cofactor II and directly competing with fibrinogen for binding to anion binding exosite I. In contrast, low concentrations of ISIS 2302 (<100 microgram/mL) showed a selective, linear prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time (PTT). The rate limiting effect of 50 microgram/mL ISIS 2302, which prolonged the PTT to 1.5 times control, was identified by sequential modification of the clotting assay. Delaying addition of oligonucleotide until after contact activation failed to correct prolongation of the PTT. The calcium-dependent steps of the intrinsic pathway were individually assessed by adding sufficient activated coagulation factor to correct the PTT in plasma deficient in that specific factor. Addition of factor XIa, IXa, VIIIa, or Va failed to correct the PTT in the presence of ISIS 2302. In contrast, 0.2 nmol/L factor Xa corrected prolongation of the PTT in factor X-deficient plasma with or without oligonucleotide present. ISIS 2302 (50 microgram/mL) did not prolong a modified Russel viper venom time, suggesting no significant inhibition of prothrombinase. Thus, 50 microgram/mL ISIS 2302 prolonged the PTT by selectively inhibiting intrinsic tenase activity. ISIS 2302 showed partial inhibition of intrinsic tenase activity (to approximately 35% of control) at clinically relevant oligonucleotide

  17. CD studies on ribonuclease A - oligonucleotides interactions.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Keren-Zur, M; Lapidot, Y

    1977-04-01

    The interaction of ApU, Aps4U, Aps4Up, ApAps4Up and Gps4U with RNase A was studied by CD difference spectroscopy. The use of 4-thiouridine (s4U) containing oligonucleotides enables to distinguish between the interaction of the different components of the ligand with the enzyme. The mode of binding of the oligonucleotides to the enzyme is described. From this mode of binding it is explained why Aps4U, for example, inhibits RNase A, while s4UpA serves as a substrate.

  18. A multivariate prediction model for microarray cross-hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yian A; Chou, Cheng-Chung; Lu, Xinghua; Slate, Elizabeth H; Peck, Konan; Xu, Wenying; Voit, Eberhard O; Almeida, Jonas S

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression microarray analysis is one of the most popular molecular diagnostic techniques in the post-genomic era. However, this technique faces the fundamental problem of potential cross-hybridization. This is a pervasive problem for both oligonucleotide and cDNA microarrays; it is considered particularly problematic for the latter. No comprehensive multivariate predictive modeling has been performed to understand how multiple variables contribute to (cross-) hybridization. Results We propose a systematic search strategy using multiple multivariate models [multiple linear regressions, regression trees, and artificial neural network analyses (ANNs)] to select an effective set of predictors for hybridization. We validate this approach on a set of DNA microarrays with cytochrome p450 family genes. The performance of our multiple multivariate models is compared with that of a recently proposed third-order polynomial regression method that uses percent identity as the sole predictor. All multivariate models agree that the 'most contiguous base pairs between probe and target sequences,' rather than percent identity, is the best univariate predictor. The predictive power is improved by inclusion of additional nonlinear effects, in particular target GC content, when regression trees or ANNs are used. Conclusion A systematic multivariate approach is provided to assess the importance of multiple sequence features for hybridization and of relationships among these features. This approach can easily be applied to larger datasets. This will allow future developments of generalized hybridization models that will be able to correct for false-positive cross-hybridization signals in expression experiments. PMID:16509965

  19. Fecal source tracking in water using a mitochondrial DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Nguyet-Minh; Villemur, Richard; Payment, Pierre; Brousseau, Roland; Topp, Edward; Masson, Luke

    2013-01-01

    A mitochondrial-based microarray (mitoArray) was developed for rapid identification of the presence of 28 animals and one family (cervidae) potentially implicated in fecal pollution in mixed activity watersheds. Oligonucleotide probes for genus or subfamily-level identification were targeted within the 12S rRNA - Val tRNA - 16S rRNA region in the mitochondrial genome. This region, called MI-50, was selected based on three criteria: 1) the ability to be amplified by universal primers 2) these universal primer sequences are present in most commercial and domestic animals of interest in source tracking, and 3) that sufficient sequence variation exists within this region to meet the minimal requirements for microarray probe discrimination. To quantify the overall level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in samples, a quantitative-PCR (Q-PCR) universal primer pair was also developed. Probe validation was performed using DNA extracted from animal tissues and, for many cases, animal-specific fecal samples. To reduce the amplification of potentially interfering fish mtDNA sequences during the MI-50 enrichment step, a clamping PCR method was designed using a fish-specific peptide nucleic acid. DNA extracted from 19 water samples were subjected to both array and independent PCR analyses. Our results confirm that the mitochondrial microarray approach method could accurately detect the dominant animals present in water samples emphasizing the potential for this methodology in the parallel scanning of a large variety of animals normally monitored in fecal source tracking.

  20. Microarray-Based Mapping for the Detection of Molecular Markers in Response to Aspergillus flavus Infection in Susceptible and Resistant Maize Lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate differential gene expression levels for resistance to A. flavus kernel infection in susceptible (Va35) and resistant (Mp313E) maize lines using Oligonucleotide and cDNA microarray analysis, (2) to evaluate differences in A. flavus accumulation betwee...

  1. Enzymatic Production of Monoclonal Stoichiometric Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Ducani, Cosimo; Kaul, Corinna; Moche, Martin; Shih, William M.; Högberg, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides are important as research tools as probes for diagnostics and gene therapy. Today, production of oligonucleotides is done via solid-phase synthesis. However, the capabilities of current polymer chemistry are limited in comparison to what can be produced in biological systems. The errors in synthetic DNA increases with oligonucleotide length, and sequence diversity can often be a problem. Here, we present the Monoclonal Stoichiometric (MOSIC) method for enzymatic DNA oligonucleotide production. Using this method, we amplify oligonucleotides from clonal templates followed by digestion of a cutter-hairpin, resulting in pools of monoclonal oligonucleotides with precisely controlled relative stoichiometric ratios. We present data where MOSIC oligonucleotides, 14–378 nt long, were prepared either by in vitro rolling-circle amplification, or by amplification in Escherichia coli in the form of phagemid DNA. The formation of a DNA crystal and folding of DNA nanostructures confirmed the scalability, purity and stoichiometry of the produced oligonucleotides. PMID:23727986

  2. Improved statistical analysis of budding yeast TAG microarrays revealed by defined spike-in pools.

    PubMed

    Peyser, Brian D; Irizarry, Rafael A; Tiffany, Carol W; Chen, Ou; Yuan, Daniel S; Boeke, Jef D; Spencer, Forrest A

    2005-09-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae knockout collection TAG microarrays are an emergent platform for rapid, genome-wide functional characterization of yeast genes. TAG arrays report abundance of unique oligonucleotide 'TAG' sequences incorporated into each deletion mutation of the yeast knockout collection, allowing measurement of relative strain representation across experimental conditions for all knockout mutants simultaneously. One application of TAG arrays is to perform genome-wide synthetic lethality screens, known as synthetic lethality analyzed by microarray (SLAM). We designed a fully defined spike-in pool to resemble typical SLAM experiments and performed TAG microarray hybridizations. We describe a method for analyzing two-color array data to efficiently measure the differential knockout strain representation across two experimental conditions, and use the spike-in pool to show that the sensitivity and specificity of this method exceed typical current approaches.

  3. The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy for 3D Analysis of Nucleic Acid Hybridization on Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovin, E. V.; Presnova, G. V.; Rubtsova, M. Yu.; Egorov, A. M.; Grigorenko, V. G.; Yaminsky, I. V.

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are considered today to be one of the most efficient methods of gene diagnostics. The capability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize the three-dimensional morphology of single molecules on a surface allows one to use it as an effective tool for the 3D analysis of a microarray for the detection of nucleic acids. The high resolution of AFM offers ways to decrease the detection threshold of target DNA and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, we suggest an approach to the evaluation of the results of hybridization of gold nanoparticle-labeled nucleic acids on silicon microarrays based on an AFM analysis of the surface both in air and in liquid which takes into account of their three-dimensional structure. We suggest a quantitative measure of the hybridization results which is based on the fraction of the surface area occupied by the nanoparticles. PMID:26085952

  4. DNA sequence analysis by hybridization with oligonucleotide microchips : MALDI mass spectrometry identification of 5mers contiguously stacked to microchip oligonucleotides.

    SciTech Connect

    Stomakhin, A. A.; Vasiliskov, V. A.; Timofeev, E.; Schulga, D.; Cotter, R. J.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology; Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry Lab.; Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine

    2000-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) has been applied to increase the informational output from DNA sequence analysis. It has been used to analyze DNA by hybridization with microarrays of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides extended with stacked 5mers. In model experiments, a 28 nt long DNA fragment was hybridized with 10 immobilized, overlapping 8mers. Then, in a second round of hybridization DNA-8mer duplexes were hybridized with a mixture of 10 5mers. The stability of the 5mer complex with DNA was increased to raise the melting temperature of the duplex by 10-15{sup o}C as a result of stacking interaction with 8mers. Contiguous 13 bp duplexes containing an internal break were formed. MALDI MS identified one or, in some cases, two 5mers contiguously stacked to each DNA-8mer duplex formed on the microchip. Incorporating a mass label into 5mers optimized MALDI MS monitoring. This procedure enabled us to reconstitute the sequence of a model DNA fragment and identify polymorphic nucleotides. The application of MALDI MS identification of contiguously stacked 5mers to increase the length of DNA for sequence analysis is discussed.

  5. One-step immobilization of poly(dT)-modified DNA onto non-modified plastic substrates by UV irradiation for microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Naoki . E-mail: n-kimu@nisshinbo.co.jp

    2006-08-25

    Previously, 'DNattach', an alternative DNA immobilization system for attaching modified oligonucleotide probes onto a gold surface by UV irradiation that can be used in various DNA microarray applications including gene expression analysis, was developed. Attached to the gold surface, the modified probes have been shown to successfully detect synaptogenesis in the developing mouse cerebellum. In this study, this technology to immobilize modified oligonucleotide probes onto three different non-modified plastic surfaces in a microarray format has been further expanded. Using this system, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of both oligonucleotide and PCR product targets has been successfully performed and it has also been shown that the probes immobilized on the slides can be used efficiently in hybridization experiments. Furthermore, it has been shown that probe concentrations of only 1-5 {mu}M are sufficient for hybridization and that this immobilization method provides hybridization signals greater than those of conventional immobilization techniques.

  6. The Genopolis Microarray Database

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Andrea; Brandizi, Marco; Even, Gael; Beretta, Ottavio; Pavelka, Norman; Pelizzola, Mattia; Mayhaus, Manuel; Foti, Maria; Mauri, Giancarlo; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression databases are key resources for microarray data management and analysis and the importance of a proper annotation of their content is well understood. Public repositories as well as microarray database systems that can be implemented by single laboratories exist. However, there is not yet a tool that can easily support a collaborative environment where different users with different rights of access to data can interact to define a common highly coherent content. The scope of the Genopolis database is to provide a resource that allows different groups performing microarray experiments related to a common subject to create a common coherent knowledge base and to analyse it. The Genopolis database has been implemented as a dedicated system for the scientific community studying dendritic and macrophage cells functions and host-parasite interactions. Results The Genopolis Database system allows the community to build an object based MIAME compliant annotation of their experiments and to store images, raw and processed data from the Affymetrix GeneChip® platform. It supports dynamical definition of controlled vocabularies and provides automated and supervised steps to control the coherence of data and annotations. It allows a precise control of the visibility of the database content to different sub groups in the community and facilitates exports of its content to public repositories. It provides an interactive users interface for data analysis: this allows users to visualize data matrices based on functional lists and sample characterization, and to navigate to other data matrices defined by similarity of expression values as well as functional characterizations of genes involved. A collaborative environment is also provided for the definition and sharing of functional annotation by users. Conclusion The Genopolis Database supports a community in building a common coherent knowledge base and analyse it. This fills a gap between a local

  7. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  8. Microarray analysis reveals the actual specificity of enrichment media used for food safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Tanja; Stessl, Beatrix; Wagner, Martin; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-06-01

    Microbial diagnostic microarrays are tools for simultaneous detection and identification of microorganisms in food, clinical, and environmental samples. In comparison to classic methods, microarray-based systems have the potential for high throughput, parallelism, and miniaturization. High specificity and high sensitivity of detection have been demonstrated. A microbial diagnostic microarray for the detection of the most relevant bacterial food- and waterborne pathogens and indicator organisms was developed and thoroughly validated. The microarray platform based on sequence-specific end labeling of oligonucleotides and the phylogenetically robust gyrB marker gene allowed a highly specific (resolution on genus and/or species level) and sensitive (0.1% relative and 10(4) CFU absolute sensitivity) detection of the target pathogens. In initial challenge studies of the applicability of microarray-based food analysis, we obtained results demonstrating the questionable specificity of standardized culture-dependent microbiological detection methods. Taking into consideration the importance of reliable food safety assessment methods, comprehensive performance assessment is essential. Results demonstrate the potential of this new pathogen diagnostic microarray to evaluate culture-based standard methods in microbiological food analysis.

  9. Systematic review of accuracy of prenatal diagnosis for abnormal chromosome diseases by microarray technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, H B; Yang, H; Liu, G; Chen, H

    2014-10-31

    The accuracy of prenatal diagnosis for abnormal chromosome diseases by chromosome microarray technology and karyotyping were compared. A literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE database with the keywords "chromosome" and "karyotype" and "genetic testing" and "prenatal diagnosis" and "oligonucleotide array sequence". The studies obtained were filtered by using the QUADAS tool, and studies conforming to the quality standard were fully analyzed. There was one paper conforming to the QUADAS standards including 4406 gravidas with adaptability syndromes of prenatal diagnosis including elderly parturient women, abnormal structure by type-B ultrasound, and other abnormalities. Microarray technology yielded successful diagnoses in 4340 cases (98.8%), and there was no need for tissue culture in 87.9% of the samples. All aneuploids and non-parallel translocations in 4282 cases of non-chimera identified by karyotyping could be detected using microarray analysis technology, whereas parallel translocations and fetal triploids could not be detected by microarray analysis technology. In the samples with normal karyotyping results, type-B ultrasound showed that 6% of chromosomal deficiencies or chromosome duplications could be detected by microarray technology, and the same abnormal chromosomes were detected in 1.7% of elderly parturient women and samples with positive serology screening results. In the prenatal diagnosis test, compared with karyotyping, microarray technology could identify the extra cell genetic information with clinical significance, aneuploids, and non-parallel translocations; however, its disadvantage is that it could not identify parallel translocations and triploids.

  10. Development and validation of a 2,000-gene microarray for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, Patrick; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Knoebl, Iris; Miracle, Ann L.; Carter, Barbara J.; Liu, Li; Denslow, Nancy D.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-07-01

    Gene microarrays provide the field of ecotoxicology new tools to identify mechanisms of action of chemicals and chemical mixtures. Herein we describe the development and application of a 2,000-gene oligonucleotide microarray for the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, a species commonly used in ecological risk assessments in North America. The microarrays were developed from various cDNA and subtraction libraries that we constructed. Consistency and reproducibility of the microarrays were documented by examining multiple technical replicates. To test application of the fathead minnow microarrays, gene expression profiles of fish exposed to 17-estradiol, a well-characterized estrogen receptor (ER) agonist, were examined. For these experiments, adult male fathead minnows were exposed for 24 h to waterborne 17-estradiol (40 or 100 ng/L) in a flow-through system, and gene expression in liver samples was characterized. Seventy-one genes were identified as differentially regulated by estradiol exposure. Examination of the gene ontology designations of these genes revealed patterns consistent with estradiol’s expected mechanisms of action and also provided novel insights as to molecular effects of the estrogen. Our studies indicate the feasibility and utility of microarrays as a basis for understanding biological responses to chemical exposure in a model ecotoxicology test species.

  11. Efficiency, error and yield in light-directed maskless synthesis of DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Light-directed in situ synthesis of DNA microarrays using computer-controlled projection from a digital micromirror device--maskless array synthesis (MAS)--has proved to be successful at both commercial and laboratory scales. The chemical synthetic cycle in MAS is quite similar to that of conventional solid-phase synthesis of oligonucleotides, but the complexity of microarrays and unique synthesis kinetics on the glass substrate require a careful tuning of parameters and unique modifications to the synthesis cycle to obtain optimal deprotection and phosphoramidite coupling. In addition, unintended deprotection due to scattering and diffraction introduce insertion errors that contribute significantly to the overall error rate. Results Stepwise phosphoramidite coupling yields have been greatly improved and are now comparable to those obtained in solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides. Extended chemical exposure in the synthesis of complex, long oligonucleotide arrays result in lower--but still high--final average yields which approach 99%. The new synthesis chemistry includes elimination of the standard oxidation until the final step, and improved coupling and light deprotection. Coupling Insertions due to stray light are the limiting factor in sequence quality for oligonucleotide synthesis for gene assembly. Diffraction and local flare are by far the largest contributors to loss of optical contrast. Conclusions Maskless array synthesis is an efficient and versatile method for synthesizing high density arrays of long oligonucleotides for hybridization- and other molecular binding-based experiments. For applications requiring high sequence purity, such as gene assembly, diffraction and flare remain significant obstacles, but can be significantly reduced with straightforward experimental strategies. PMID:22152062

  12. Oligonucleotides direct synthesis on porous silicon chip.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Luca; De Tommasi, Edoardo; Rea, Ilaria; Rotiroti, Lucia; Giangrande, Luca; Oliviero, Giorgia; Borbone, Nicola; Galeone, Aldo; Piccialli, Gennaro

    2008-01-01

    A solid phase oligonucleotide (ON) synthesis on porous silicon (PSi) chip is presented. The prepared Si-OH surface were analyzed by FT-IR and the OH functions were quantified by reaction with 3'-phosphoramidite nucleotide building block. Short ONs were synthesized on the chip surface and the coupling yields evaluated. PMID:18776583

  13. Living-Cell Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yarmush, Martin L.; King, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Living cells are remarkably complex. To unravel this complexity, living-cell assays have been developed that allow delivery of experimental stimuli and measurement of the resulting cellular responses. High-throughput adaptations of these assays, known as living-cell microarrays, which are based on microtiter plates, high-density spotting, microfabrication, and microfluidics technologies, are being developed for two general applications: (a) to screen large-scale chemical and genomic libraries and (b) to systematically investigate the local cellular microenvironment. These emerging experimental platforms offer exciting opportunities to rapidly identify genetic determinants of disease, to discover modulators of cellular function, and to probe the complex and dynamic relationships between cells and their local environment. PMID:19413510

  14. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons),more » 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)« less

  15. Liver as a target for oligonucleotide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Alfica; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Fitzgerald, Kevin

    2013-12-01

    Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are an emerging class of drugs that hold the promise for silencing "un-druggable" targets,thus creating unique opportunities for innovative medicines. As opposed to gene therapy, oligonucleotides are considered to be more akin to small molecule therapeutics because they are small,completely synthetic in origin, do not integrate into the host genome,and have a defined duration of therapeutic activity after which effects recover to baseline. They offer a high degree of specificity at the genetic level, thereby reducing off-target effects.At the same time, they provide a strategy for targeting any gene in the genome, including transcripts that produce mutated proteins.Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics include short interfering RNA (siRNA), that degrade target mRNA through RISC mediated RNAi; anti-miRs, that target miRNAs; miRNA mimics, that regulate target mRNA; antisense oligonucleotides, that may be working through RNAseH mediated mRNA decay; mRNA upregulation,by targeting long non-coding RNAs; and oligonucleotides induced alternative splicing [1]. All these approaches require some minimal degree of homology at the nucleic acid sequence level for them to be functional. The different mechanisms of action and their relevant activity are outlined in Fig. 1. Besides homology,RNA secondary structure has also been exploited in the case of ribozymes and aptamers, which act by binding to nucleic acids or proteins, respectively. While there have been many reports of gene knockdown and gene modulation in cell lines and mice with all these methods, very few have advanced to clinical stages.The main obstacle to date has been the safe and effective intracellular delivery of these compounds in higher species, including humans. Indeed, their action requires direct interaction with DNA/RNA within the target cell so even when one solves the issues of tissue and cellular access, intracellular/intranuclear location represents yet another barrier to

  16. Chemosensitization by antisense oligonucleotides targeting MDM2.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2005-02-01

    The MDM2 oncogene is overexpressed in many human cancers, including sarcomas, certain hematologic malignancies, and breast, colon and prostate cancers. The p53-MDM2 interaction pathway has been suggested as a novel target for cancer therapy. To that end, several strategies have been explored, including the use of small polypeptides targeted to the MDM2-p53 binding domain, anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides, and natural agents. Different generations of anti-human-MDM2 oligonucleotides have been tested in in vitro and in vivo human cancer models, revealing specific inhibition of MDM2 expression and significant antitumor activity. Use of antisense oligos potentiated the effects of growth inhibition, p53 activation and p21 induction by several chemotherapeutic agents. Increased therapeutic effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drugs in human cancer cell lines carrying p53 mutations or deletions have shown the ability of MDM2 inhibitors to act as chemosensitizers in various types of tumors through both p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Inhibiting MDM2 appears to also have a role in radiation therapy for human cancer, regardless of p53 status, providing a rationale for the development of a new class of radiosensitizers. Moreover, MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides potentiate the effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors by affecting in vitro and in vivo proliferation, apoptosis and protein expression in hormone-refractory and hormone-dependent human prostate cancer cells. These data support the development, among other MDM2 inhibitors, of anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides as a novel class of anticancer agents, and suggest a potentially relevant role for the oligonucleotides when integrated with conventional treatments and/or other signaling inhibitors in novel therapeutic strategies.

  17. Microarray platform for omics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecklenburg, Michael; Xie, Bin

    2001-09-01

    Microarray technology has revolutionized genetic analysis. However, limitations in genome analysis has lead to renewed interest in establishing 'omic' strategies. As we enter the post-genomic era, new microarray technologies are needed to address these new classes of 'omic' targets, such as proteins, as well as lipids and carbohydrates. We have developed a microarray platform that combines self- assembling monolayers with the biotin-streptavidin system to provide a robust, versatile immobilization scheme. A hydrophobic film is patterned on the surface creating an array of tension wells that eliminates evaporation effects thereby reducing the shear stress to which biomolecules are exposed to during immobilization. The streptavidin linker layer makes it possible to adapt and/or develop microarray based assays using virtually any class of biomolecules including: carbohydrates, peptides, antibodies, receptors, as well as them ore traditional DNA based arrays. Our microarray technology is designed to furnish seamless compatibility across the various 'omic' platforms by providing a common blueprint for fabricating and analyzing arrays. The prototype microarray uses a microscope slide footprint patterned with 2 by 96 flat wells. Data on the microarray platform will be presented.

  18. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  19. A novel universal DNA labeling and amplification system for rapid microarray-based detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Christian; Endimiani, Andrea; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and simple DNA labeling system has been developed for disposable microarrays and has been validated for the detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes abundant in Gram-positive bacteria. The DNA was fragmented and amplified using phi-29 polymerase and random primers with linkers. Labeling and further amplification were then performed by classic PCR amplification using biotinylated primers specific for the linkers. The microarray developed by Perreten et al. (Perreten, V., Vorlet-Fawer, L., Slickers, P., Ehricht, R., Kuhnert, P., Frey, J., 2005. Microarray-based detection of 90 antibiotic resistance genes of gram-positive bacteria. J.Clin.Microbiol. 43, 2291-2302.) was improved by additional oligonucleotides. A total of 244 oligonucleotides (26 to 37 nucleotide length and with similar melting temperatures) were spotted on the microarray, including genes conferring resistance to clinically important antibiotic classes like β-lactams, macrolides, aminoglycosides, glycopeptides and tetracyclines. Each antibiotic resistance gene is represented by at least 2 oligonucleotides designed from consensus sequences of gene families. The specificity of the oligonucleotides and the quality of the amplification and labeling were verified by analysis of a collection of 65 strains belonging to 24 species. Association between genotype and phenotype was verified for 6 antibiotics using 77 Staphylococcus strains belonging to different species and revealed 95% test specificity and a 93% predictive value of a positive test. The DNA labeling and amplification is independent of the species and of the target genes and could be used for different types of microarrays. This system has also the advantage to detect several genes within one bacterium at once, like in Staphylococcus aureus strain BM3318, in which up to 15 genes were detected. This new microarray-based detection system offers a large potential for applications in clinical diagnostic, basic research, food safety and

  20. DNA nanostructure-based universal microarray platform for high-efficiency multiplex bioanalysis in biofluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Dongfang; Wen, Yanli; Liu, Gang; Dong, Haoqing; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-10-22

    Microarrays of biomolecules have greatly promoted the development of the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical assays because of their remarkably parallel and high-throughput assay capability. Immobilization strategies for biomolecules on a solid support surface play a crucial role in the fabrication of high-performance biological microarrays. In this study, rationally designed DNA tetrahedra carrying three amino groups and one single-stranded DNA extension were synthesized by the self-assembly of four oligonucleotides, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography purification. We fabricated DNA tetrahedron-based microarrays by covalently coupling the DNA tetrahedron onto glass substrates. After their biorecognition capability was evaluated, DNA tetrahedron microarrays were utilized for the analysis of different types of bioactive molecules. The gap hybridization strategy, the sandwich configuration, and the engineering aptamer strategy were employed for the assay of miRNA biomarkers, protein cancer biomarkers, and small molecules, respectively. The arrays showed good capability to anchor capture biomolecules for improving biorecognition. Addressable and high-throughput analysis with improved sensitivity and specificity had been achieved. The limit of detection for let-7a miRNA, prostate specific antigen, and cocaine were 10 fM, 40 pg/mL, and 100 nM, respectively. More importantly, we demonstrated that the microarray platform worked well with clinical serum samples and showed good relativity with conventional chemical luminescent immunoassay. We have developed a novel approach for the fabrication of DNA tetrahedron-based microarrays and a universal DNA tetrahedron-based microarray platform for the detection of different types of bioactive molecules. The microarray platform shows great potential for clinical diagnosis.

  1. DNA nanostructure-based universal microarray platform for high-efficiency multiplex bioanalysis in biofluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Dongfang; Wen, Yanli; Liu, Gang; Dong, Haoqing; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-10-22

    Microarrays of biomolecules have greatly promoted the development of the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical assays because of their remarkably parallel and high-throughput assay capability. Immobilization strategies for biomolecules on a solid support surface play a crucial role in the fabrication of high-performance biological microarrays. In this study, rationally designed DNA tetrahedra carrying three amino groups and one single-stranded DNA extension were synthesized by the self-assembly of four oligonucleotides, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography purification. We fabricated DNA tetrahedron-based microarrays by covalently coupling the DNA tetrahedron onto glass substrates. After their biorecognition capability was evaluated, DNA tetrahedron microarrays were utilized for the analysis of different types of bioactive molecules. The gap hybridization strategy, the sandwich configuration, and the engineering aptamer strategy were employed for the assay of miRNA biomarkers, protein cancer biomarkers, and small molecules, respectively. The arrays showed good capability to anchor capture biomolecules for improving biorecognition. Addressable and high-throughput analysis with improved sensitivity and specificity had been achieved. The limit of detection for let-7a miRNA, prostate specific antigen, and cocaine were 10 fM, 40 pg/mL, and 100 nM, respectively. More importantly, we demonstrated that the microarray platform worked well with clinical serum samples and showed good relativity with conventional chemical luminescent immunoassay. We have developed a novel approach for the fabrication of DNA tetrahedron-based microarrays and a universal DNA tetrahedron-based microarray platform for the detection of different types of bioactive molecules. The microarray platform shows great potential for clinical diagnosis. PMID:25299733

  2. Optimised laser microdissection of the human ocular surface epithelial regions for microarray studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The most important challenge of performing insitu transcriptional profiling of the human ocular surface epithelial regions is obtaining samples in sufficient amounts, without contamination from adjacent tissue, as the region of interest is microscopic and closely apposed to other tissues regions. We have effectively collected ocular surface (OS) epithelial tissue samples from the Limbal Epithelial Crypt (LEC), limbus, cornea and conjunctiva of post-mortem cadaver eyes with laser microdissection (LMD) technique for gene expression studies with spotted oligonucleotide microarrays and Gene 1.0 ST arrays. Methods Human donor eyes (4 pairs for spotted oligonucleotide microarrays, 3 pairs for Gene 1.0 ST arrays) consented for research were included in this study with due ethical approval of the Nottingham Research Ethics Committee. Eye retrieval was performed within 36 hours of post-mortem period. The dissected corneoscleral buttons were immersed in OCT media and frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at −80°C till further use. Microscopic tissue sections of interest were taken on PALM slides and stained with Toluidine Blue for laser microdissection with PALM microbeam systems. Optimisation of the laser microdissection technique was crucial for efficient and cost effective sample collection. Results The starting concentration of RNA as stipulated by the protocol of microarray platforms was taken as the cut-off concentration of RNA samples in our studies. The area of LMD tissue processed for spotted oligonucleotide microarray study ranged from 86,253 μm2 in LEC to 392,887 μm2 in LEC stroma. The RNA concentration of the LMD samples ranged from 22 to 92 pg/μl. The recommended starting concentration of the RNA samples used for Gene 1.0 ST arrays was 6 ng/5 μl. To achieve the desired RNA concentration the area of ocular surface epithelial tissue sample processed for the Gene 1.0 ST array experiments was approximately 100,0000 μm2 to 130,0000 μm2. RNA

  3. Microarray Analysis of Microbial Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson-Francis, K.; van Houdt, R.; Leys, N.; Mergeay, M.; Cockell, C. S.

    2010-04-01

    Microarray analysis of the heavy metal resistant bacterium, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 was used to investigate the genes involved in the weathering. The results demonstrated that large porin and membrane transporter genes were unregulated.

  4. Antisense oligonucleotides, microRNAs, and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, Alberto; Chroni, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    The specificity of Watson-Crick base pairing and the development of several chemical modifications to oligonucleotides have enabled the development of novel drug classes for the treatment of different human diseases. This review focuses on promising results of recent preclinical or clinical studies on targeting HDL metabolism and function by antisense oligonucleotides and miRNA-based therapies. Although many hurdles regarding basic mechanism of action, delivery, specificity, and toxicity need to be overcome, promising results from recent clinical trials and recent approval of these types of therapy to treat dyslipidemia suggest that the treatment of HDL dysfunction will benefit from these unique clinical opportunities. Moreover, an overview of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) developed for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease and currently being tested in clinical studies is provided. Initial studies have shown that these compounds are generally safe and well tolerated, but ongoing large clinical studies will assess their long-term safety and efficacy.

  5. The prebiotic synthesis of deoxythymidine oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen-Sherwood, E.; Odom, D. G.; Oro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Deoxythymidine 5 prime-triphosphate in the presence of deoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate, cyanamide and 4-amino-5-imidazole carboxamide polymerizes under drying conditions at moderate temperatures (60 to 90 C) to yield oligonucleotides of up to four units in length. Enzymatic analysis indicated that the majority of these oligomers contained natural 3 prime-5 prime phosphodiester bonds. This reaction offers a possible method for the formation of deoxyoligonucleotides under primitive earth conditions.

  6. One-step insertion of oligonucleotide linkers or adapters to DNA using unphosphorylated oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kang, C; Inouye, M

    1993-10-01

    A simple and efficient method was developed for insertion of oligonucleotide sequences into plasmids. In this method, an unphosphorylated oligonucleotide was ligated to the restriction-digested phagemid DNA. Only the single strand of the oligonucleotide was ligated at the 5' end of the phagemid, and this resulted in the creation of a long self-complementary single-strand overhang. These single-strand overhang-possessing phagemids were used to transform XL-1 cells. This simple ligation and transformation reaction rendered approximately 7.5 x 10(4) to 5 x 10(5) of white colonies per microgram DNA from the isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galacto-pyranoside plate. This number is almost the same or even higher than the number of blue colonies from the control reaction in which ligase was used without the oligonucleotide. By this method we could mutate one enzyme site to another or create ribozyme and substrate phagemid very easily. Fidelity of this method was checked by restriction digestion, DNA sequencing and ribozyme reaction. By DNA sequencing, we observed that 100% of the white colonies contained a single oligonucleotide sequence.

  7. [Protein microarrays and personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiabo; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Joos, Thomas O

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, DNA microarrays have achieved a robust analytical performance, enabling their use for analyzing the whole transcriptome or for screening thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a single experiment. DNA microarrays allow scientists to correlate gene expression signatures with disease progression, to screen for disease-specific mutations, and to treat patients according to their individual genetic profiles; however, the real key is proteins and their manifold functions. It is necessary to achieve a greater understanding of not only protein function and abundance but also their role in the development of diseases. Protein concentrations have been shown to reflect the physiological and pathologic state of an organ, tissue, or cells far more directly than DNA, and proteins can be profiled effectively with protein microarrays, which require only a small amount of sample material. Protein microarrays have become wellestablished tools in basic and applied research, and the first products have already entered the in vitro diagnostics market. This review focuses on protein microarray applications for biomarker discovery and validation, disease diagnosis, and use within the area of personalized medicine. Protein microarrays have proved to be reliable research tools in screening for a multitude of parameters with only a minimal quantity of sample and have enormous potential in applications for diagnostic and personalized medicine.

  8. Estimating Gene Signals From Noisy Microarray Images

    PubMed Central

    Sarder, Pinaki; Davis, Paul H.; Stanley, Samuel L.

    2016-01-01

    In oligonucleotide microarray experiments, noise is a challenging problem, as biologists now are studying their organisms not in isolation but in the context of a natural environment. In low photomultiplier tube (PMT) voltage images, weak gene signals and their interactions with the background fluorescence noise are most problematic. In addition, nonspecific sequences bind to array spots intermittently causing inaccurate measurements. Conventional techniques cannot precisely separate the foreground and the background signals. In this paper, we propose analytically based estimation technique. We assume a priori spot-shape information using a circular outer periphery with an elliptical center hole. We assume Gaussian statistics for modeling both the foreground and background signals. The mean of the foreground signal quantifies the weak gene signal corresponding to the spot, and the variance gives the measure of the undesired binding that causes fluctuation in the measurement. We propose a foreground-signal and shape-estimation algorithm using the Gibbs sampling method. We compare our developed algorithm with the existing Mann–Whitney (MW)- and expectation maximization (EM)/iterated conditional modes (ICM)-based methods. Our method outperforms the existing methods with considerably smaller mean-square error (MSE) for all signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in computer-generated images and gives better qualitative results in low-SNR real-data images. Our method is computationally relatively slow because of its inherent sampling operation and hence only applicable to very noisy-spot images. In a realistic example using our method, we show that the gene-signal fluctuations on the estimated foreground are better observed for the input noisy images with relatively higher undesired bindings. PMID:18556262

  9. An event-specific DNA microarray to identify genetically modified organisms in processed foods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Su-Youn; Lee, Hyungjae; Kim, Young-Rok; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2010-05-26

    We developed an event-specific DNA microarray system to identify 19 genetically modified organisms (GMOs), including two GM soybeans (GTS-40-3-2 and A2704-12), thirteen GM maizes (Bt176, Bt11, MON810, MON863, NK603, GA21, T25, TC1507, Bt10, DAS59122-7, TC6275, MIR604, and LY038), three GM canolas (GT73, MS8xRF3, and T45), and one GM cotton (LLcotton25). The microarray included 27 oligonucleotide probes optimized to identify endogenous reference targets, event-specific targets, screening targets (35S promoter and nos terminator), and an internal target (18S rRNA gene). Thirty-seven maize-containing food products purchased from South Korean and US markets were tested for the presence of GM maize using this microarray system. Thirteen GM maize events were simultaneously detected using multiplex PCR coupled with microarray on a single chip, at a limit of detection of approximately 0.5%. Using the system described here, we detected GM maize in 11 of the 37 food samples tested. These results suggest that an event-specific DNA microarray system can reliably detect GMOs in processed foods.

  10. Fabrication of DNA Microarrays on Polydopamine-Modified Gold Thin Films for SPR Imaging Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jennifer B.; Szyndler, Megan W.; Halpern, Aaron R.; Cho, Kyunghee

    2013-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA) films were fabricated on thin film gold substrates in a single-step polymerization-deposition process from dopamine solutions and then employed in the construction of robust DNA microarrays for the ultra-sensitive detection of biomolecules with nanoparticle-enhanced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging. PDA multilayers with thicknesses varying from 1 to 5 nm were characterized with a combination of scanning angle SPR and AFM experiments, and 1.3 ± 0.2 nm PDA multilayers were chosen as an optimal thickness for the SPR imaging measurements. DNA microarrays were then fabricated by the reaction of amine-functionalized single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotides with PDA-modified gold thin film microarray elements, and were subsequently employed in SPR imaging measurements of DNA hybridization adsorption and protein-DNA binding. Concurrent control experiments with noncomplementary ssDNA sequences demonstrated that the adhesive PDA multilayer was also able to provide good resistance to the nonspecific binding of biomolecules. Finally, a series of SPR imaging measurements of the hybridization adsorption of DNA-modified gold nanoparticles onto mixed sequence DNA microarrays were used to confirm that the use of PDA multilayer films is a simple, rapid and versatile method for fabricating DNA microarrays for ultrasensitive nanoparticle-enhanced SPR imaging biosensing. PMID:23902428

  11. Penetration of oligonucleotides into mouse organism through mucosa and skin.

    PubMed

    Vlassov, V V; Karamyshev, V N; Yakubov, L A

    1993-08-01

    Benzylamide 5'-32P-oligonucleotide derivatives were shown to penetrate into mice organism when administered by various routes; intranasally, per os, intravaginally and per rectum. In all cases, the compounds are rapidly accumulated in blood and guts. Analysis of the radioactive material from blood and pancreas revealed intact oligonucleotides. Although concentrations of oligonucleotides in tissues differ considerably by the various methods of administration, the efficiency of delivery is sufficient to consider all the routes as being of therapeutic value. Dose effect on the efficiency of oligonucleotide penetration into mice suggests the transport to be a saturable process. Application of an oligonucleotide lotion on mice ear helices results in reproducible accumulation of radioactivity in the animal tissues. Effectiveness of oligonucleotide delivery into mouse through skin can be improved by using electrophoretic procedure.

  12. Template-Directed Ligation of Peptides to Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruick, Richard K.; Dawson, Philip E.; Kent, Stephen BH; Usman, Nassim; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides and peptides have enjoyed a wide range of applications in both biology and chemistry. As a consequence, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have received considerable attention, most notably in the development of antisense constructs with improved pharmacological properties. In addition, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have been used as molecular tags, in the assembly of supramolecular arrays and in the construction of encoded combinatorial libraries. To make these chimeric molecules more accessible for a broad range of investigations, we sought to develop a facile method for joining fully deprotected oligonucleotides and peptides through a stable amide bond linkage. Furthermore, we wished to make this ligation reaction addressable, enabling one to direct the ligation of specific oligonucleotide and peptide components.To confer specificity and accelerate the rate of the reaction, the ligation process was designed to be dependent on the presence of a complementary oligonucleotide template.

  13. A microarray for assessing transcription from pelagic marine microbial taxa

    PubMed Central

    Shilova, Irina N; Robidart, Julie C; James Tripp, H; Turk-Kubo, Kendra; Wawrik, Boris; Post, Anton F; Thompson, Anne W; Ward, Bess; Hollibaugh, James T; Millard, Andy; Ostrowski, Martin; J Scanlan, David; Paerl, Ryan W; Stuart, Rhona; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches have revealed unprecedented genetic diversity within microbial communities across vast expanses of the world's oceans. Linking this genetic diversity with key metabolic and cellular activities of microbial assemblages is a fundamental challenge. Here we report on a collaborative effort to design MicroTOOLs (Microbiological Targets for Ocean Observing Laboratories), a high-density oligonucleotide microarray that targets functional genes of diverse taxa in pelagic and coastal marine microbial communities. MicroTOOLs integrates nucleotide sequence information from disparate data types: genomes, PCR-amplicons, metagenomes, and metatranscriptomes. It targets 19 400 unique sequences over 145 different genes that are relevant to stress responses and microbial metabolism across the three domains of life and viruses. MicroTOOLs was used in a proof-of-concept experiment that compared the functional responses of microbial communities following Fe and P enrichments of surface water samples from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. We detected transcription of 68% of the gene targets across major taxonomic groups, and the pattern of transcription indicated relief from Fe limitation and transition to N limitation in some taxa. Prochlorococcus (eHLI), Synechococcus (sub-cluster 5.3) and Alphaproteobacteria SAR11 clade (HIMB59) showed the strongest responses to the Fe enrichment. In addition, members of uncharacterized lineages also responded. The MicroTOOLs microarray provides a robust tool for comprehensive characterization of major functional groups of microbes in the open ocean, and the design can be easily amended for specific environments and research questions. PMID:24477198

  14. A microarray for assessing transcription from pelagic marine microbial taxa.

    PubMed

    Shilova, Irina N; Robidart, Julie C; James Tripp, H; Turk-Kubo, Kendra; Wawrik, Boris; Post, Anton F; Thompson, Anne W; Ward, Bess; Hollibaugh, James T; Millard, Andy; Ostrowski, Martin; Scanlan, David J; Paerl, Ryan W; Stuart, Rhona; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2014-07-01

    Metagenomic approaches have revealed unprecedented genetic diversity within microbial communities across vast expanses of the world's oceans. Linking this genetic diversity with key metabolic and cellular activities of microbial assemblages is a fundamental challenge. Here we report on a collaborative effort to design MicroTOOLs (Microbiological Targets for Ocean Observing Laboratories), a high-density oligonucleotide microarray that targets functional genes of diverse taxa in pelagic and coastal marine microbial communities. MicroTOOLs integrates nucleotide sequence information from disparate data types: genomes, PCR-amplicons, metagenomes, and metatranscriptomes. It targets 19 400 unique sequences over 145 different genes that are relevant to stress responses and microbial metabolism across the three domains of life and viruses. MicroTOOLs was used in a proof-of-concept experiment that compared the functional responses of microbial communities following Fe and P enrichments of surface water samples from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. We detected transcription of 68% of the gene targets across major taxonomic groups, and the pattern of transcription indicated relief from Fe limitation and transition to N limitation in some taxa. Prochlorococcus (eHLI), Synechococcus (sub-cluster 5.3) and Alphaproteobacteria SAR11 clade (HIMB59) showed the strongest responses to the Fe enrichment. In addition, members of uncharacterized lineages also responded. The MicroTOOLs microarray provides a robust tool for comprehensive characterization of major functional groups of microbes in the open ocean, and the design can be easily amended for specific environments and research questions. PMID:24477198

  15. Rank-based algorithms for anlaysis of microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-min; Mei, Rui; Bartell, Daniel M.; Di, Xiaojun; Webster, Teresa A.; Ryder, Tom

    2001-06-01

    Analysis of microarray data often involves extracting information from raw intensities of spots of cells and making certain calls. Rank-based algorithms are powerful tools to provide probability values of hypothesis tests, especially when the distribution of the intensities is unknown. For our current gene expression arrays, a gene is detected by a set of probe pairs consisting of perfect match and mismatch cells. The one-sided upper-tail Wilcoxon's signed rank test is used in our algorithms for absolute calls (whether a gene is detected or not), as well as comparative calls (whether a gene is increasing or decreasing or no significant change in a sample compared with another sample). We also test the possibility to use only perfect match cells to make calls. This paper focuses on absolute calls. We have developed error analysis methods and software tools that allow us to compare the accuracy of the calls in the presence or absence of mismatch cells at different target concentrations. The usage of nonparametric rank-based tests is not limited to absolute and comparative calls of gene expression chips. They can also be applied to other oligonucleotide microarrays for genotyping and mutation detection, as well as spotted arrays.

  16. A microarray for assessing transcription from pelagic marine microbial taxa.

    PubMed

    Shilova, Irina N; Robidart, Julie C; James Tripp, H; Turk-Kubo, Kendra; Wawrik, Boris; Post, Anton F; Thompson, Anne W; Ward, Bess; Hollibaugh, James T; Millard, Andy; Ostrowski, Martin; Scanlan, David J; Paerl, Ryan W; Stuart, Rhona; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2014-07-01

    Metagenomic approaches have revealed unprecedented genetic diversity within microbial communities across vast expanses of the world's oceans. Linking this genetic diversity with key metabolic and cellular activities of microbial assemblages is a fundamental challenge. Here we report on a collaborative effort to design MicroTOOLs (Microbiological Targets for Ocean Observing Laboratories), a high-density oligonucleotide microarray that targets functional genes of diverse taxa in pelagic and coastal marine microbial communities. MicroTOOLs integrates nucleotide sequence information from disparate data types: genomes, PCR-amplicons, metagenomes, and metatranscriptomes. It targets 19 400 unique sequences over 145 different genes that are relevant to stress responses and microbial metabolism across the three domains of life and viruses. MicroTOOLs was used in a proof-of-concept experiment that compared the functional responses of microbial communities following Fe and P enrichments of surface water samples from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. We detected transcription of 68% of the gene targets across major taxonomic groups, and the pattern of transcription indicated relief from Fe limitation and transition to N limitation in some taxa. Prochlorococcus (eHLI), Synechococcus (sub-cluster 5.3) and Alphaproteobacteria SAR11 clade (HIMB59) showed the strongest responses to the Fe enrichment. In addition, members of uncharacterized lineages also responded. The MicroTOOLs microarray provides a robust tool for comprehensive characterization of major functional groups of microbes in the open ocean, and the design can be easily amended for specific environments and research questions.

  17. Oligonucleotide frequencies in DNA follow a Yule distribution.

    PubMed

    Martindale, C; Konopka, A K

    1996-03-01

    We show that ranked oligonucleotide frequencies in both protein-coding and non-coding regions from several genomes fit poorly to the Zipf distribution, but that the same frequency data give excellent fit to the Yule distribution. The parameters of the Yule distribution for oligonucleotide frequencies in exons are the same (within error limits) as the parameters for introns. This precludes application of Yule or Zipf distribution of ranked oligonucleotide frequencies to annotating new genomic sequences.

  18. Using a microfluidic device for 1 μl DNA microarray hybridization in 500 s

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cheng-Wey; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Huang, Chih-Ting; Yen, Meng-Hua; Young, Tai-Horng

    2005-01-01

    This work describes a novel and simple modification of the current microarray format. It reduces the sample/reagent volume to 1 μl and the hybridization time to 500 s. Both 20mer and 80mer oligonucleotide probes and singly labeled 20mer and 80mer targets, representative of the T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (TAL1) gene, have been used to elucidate the performance of this hybridization approach. In this format, called shuttle hybridization, a conventional flat glass DNA microarray is integrated with a PMMA microfluidic chip to reduce the sample and reagent consumption to 1/100 of that associated with the conventional format. A serpentine microtrench is designed and fabricated on a PMMA chip using a widely available CO2 laser scriber. The trench spacing is compatible with the inter-spot distance in standard microarrays. The microtrench chip and microarray chip are easily aligned and assembled manually so that the microarray is integrated with a microfluidic channel. Discrete sample plugs are employed in the microchannel for hybridization. Flowing through the microchannel with alternating depths and widths scrambles continuous sample plug into discrete short plugs. These plugs are shuttled back and forth along the channel, sweeping over microarray probes while re-circulation mixing occurs inside the plugs. Integrating the microarrays into the microfluidic channel reduces the DNA–DNA hybridization time from 18 h to 500 s. Additionally, the enhancement of DNA hybridization reaction by the microfluidic device is investigated by determining the coefficient of variation (CV), the growth rate of the hybridization signal and the ability to discriminate single-base mismatch. Detection limit of 19 amol was obtained for shuttle hybridization. A 1 μl target was used to hybridize with an array that can hold 5000 probes. PMID:15891111

  19. Comparative oligonucleotide fingerprints of three plant viroids.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, H J; Domdey, H; Sänger, H L

    1977-01-01

    5' Phosphorylation in vitro with gamma-32P-ATP and T4 phage induced polynucleotide kinase was used to obtain RNAase A and RNAase T1 fingerprints of three plant viroids: Potato spindle tuber viroid from tomato (PSTV-tom), chrysanthemum stunt viroid from cineraria (ChSV-cin) and citrus exocortis viroid from Gynura aurantiaca (CEV-gyn). These three viroids differ significantly from each other as judged from their oligonucleotide patterns. This supports the concept of individual viroid species. Images PMID:896482

  20. Optimization of an oligonucleotide microchip for microbial identification studies: a non-equilibrium dissociation approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Stahl, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    The utility of a high-density oligonucleotide microarray (microchip) for identifying strains of five closely related bacilli (Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus medusa and Bacillus subtilis) was demonstrated using an approach that compares the non-equilibrium dissociation rates ('melting curves') of all probe-target duplexes simultaneously. For this study, a hierarchical set of 30 oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA of these bacilli at multiple levels of specificity (approximate taxonomic ranks of domain, kingdom, order, genus and species) was designed and immobilized in a high-density matrix of gel pads on a glass slide. Reproducible melting curves for probes with different levels of specificity were obtained using an optimized salt concentration. Clear discrimination between perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) duplexes was achieved. By normalizing the signals to an internal standard (a universal probe), a more than twofold discrimination (> 2.4x) was achieved between PM and 1-MM duplexes at the dissociation temperature at which 50% of the probe-target duplexes remained intact. This provided excellent differentiation among representatives of different Bacillus species, both individually and in mixtures of two or three. The overall pattern of hybridization derived from this hierarchical probe set also provided a clear 'chip fingerprint' for each of these closely related Bacillus species.

  1. Protein microarrays: prospects and problems.

    PubMed

    Kodadek, T

    2001-02-01

    Protein microarrays are potentially powerful tools in biochemistry and molecular biology. Two types of protein microarrays are defined. One, termed a protein function array, will consist of thousands of native proteins immobilized in a defined pattern. Such arrays can be utilized for massively parallel testing of protein function, hence the name. The other type is termed a protein-detecting array. This will consist of large numbers of arrayed protein-binding agents. These arrays will allow for expression profiling to be done at the protein level. In this article, some of the major technological challenges to the development of protein arrays are discussed, along with potential solutions.

  2. Assessment of a direct hybridization microarray strategy for comprehensive monitoring of genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    PubMed

    Turkec, Aydin; Lucas, Stuart J; Karacanli, Burçin; Baykut, Aykut; Yuksel, Hakki

    2016-03-01

    Detection of GMO material in crop and food samples is the primary step in GMO monitoring and regulation, with the increasing number of GM events in the world market requiring detection solutions with high multiplexing capacity. In this study, we test the suitability of a high-density oligonucleotide microarray platform for direct, quantitative detection of GMOs found in the Turkish feed market. We tested 1830 different 60nt probes designed to cover the GM cassettes from 12 different GM cultivars (3 soya, 9 maize), as well as plant species-specific and contamination controls, and developed a data analysis method aiming to provide maximum throughput and sensitivity. The system was able specifically to identify each cultivar, and in 10/12 cases was sensitive enough to detect GMO DNA at concentrations of ⩽1%. These GMOs could also be quantified using the microarray, as their fluorescence signals increased linearly with GMO concentration. PMID:26471572

  3. Assessment of a direct hybridization microarray strategy for comprehensive monitoring of genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    PubMed

    Turkec, Aydin; Lucas, Stuart J; Karacanli, Burçin; Baykut, Aykut; Yuksel, Hakki

    2016-03-01

    Detection of GMO material in crop and food samples is the primary step in GMO monitoring and regulation, with the increasing number of GM events in the world market requiring detection solutions with high multiplexing capacity. In this study, we test the suitability of a high-density oligonucleotide microarray platform for direct, quantitative detection of GMOs found in the Turkish feed market. We tested 1830 different 60nt probes designed to cover the GM cassettes from 12 different GM cultivars (3 soya, 9 maize), as well as plant species-specific and contamination controls, and developed a data analysis method aiming to provide maximum throughput and sensitivity. The system was able specifically to identify each cultivar, and in 10/12 cases was sensitive enough to detect GMO DNA at concentrations of ⩽1%. These GMOs could also be quantified using the microarray, as their fluorescence signals increased linearly with GMO concentration.

  4. Time-resolved Förster-resonance-energy-transfer DNA assay on an active CMOS microarray

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David Eric; Gong, Ping; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    We present an active oligonucleotide microarray platform for time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays. In these assays, immobilized probe is labeled with a donor fluorophore and analyte target is labeled with a fluorescence quencher. Changes in the fluorescence decay lifetime of the donor are measured to determine the extent of hybridization. In this work, we demonstrate that TR-FRET assays have reduced sensitivity to variances in probe surface density compared with standard fluorescence-based microarray assays. Use of an active array substrate, fabricated in a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process, provides the additional benefits of reduced system complexity and cost. The array consists of 4096 independent single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) pixel sites and features on-chip time-to-digital conversion. We demonstrate the functionality of our system by measuring a DNA target concentration series using TR-FRET with semiconductor quantum dot donors. PMID:18515059

  5. Rapid microarray-based genotyping of Chlamydia spp. strains from clinical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Konrad; Ruettger, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic Chlamydia (C.) psittaci and C. trachomatis strains can be genotyped based on variations in the ompA genomic locus. In the present chapter, we describe rapid genotyping assays for both chlamydial agents using the ArrayStrip™ (AS) microarray platform. The test is targeting multiple discriminatory sites in the variable domains of the ompA gene by using 35 (C. psittaci) and 61 (C. trachomatis) oligonucleotide probes representing genotype-specific polymorphisms. In addition to discrimination among the established genotypes, this approach allows identification of atypical strains that were not accessible to typing using previously established techniques, such as PCR-RFLP or serotyping. The present DNA microarray assay can be conducted directly on clinical tissue samples and is suitable for tracing epidemiological chains and exploring the dissemination of particular genotypes. The procedure is easy to handle and economically affordable, and it allows genotyping of up to 32 clinical samples per day, thus lending itself for routine diagnosis as well.

  6. Template switching between PNA and RNA oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohler, C.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The origin of the RNA world is not easily understood, as effective prebiotic syntheses of the components of RNA, the beta-ribofuranoside-5'-phosphates, are hard to envisage. Recognition of this difficulty has led to the proposal that other genetic systems, the components of which are more easily formed, may have preceded RNA. This raises the question of how transitions between one genetic system and another could occur. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) resembles RNA in its ability to form double-helical complexes stabilized by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between adenine and thymine and between cytosine and guanine, but has a backbone that is held together by amide rather than by phosphodiester bonds. Oligonucleotides bases on RNA are known to act as templates that catalyse the non-enzymatic synthesis of their complements from activated mononucleotides, we now show that RNA oligonucleotides facilitate the synthesis of complementary PNA strands and vice versa. This suggests that a transition between different genetic systems can occur without loss of information.

  7. BIOCONJUGATION OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDES FOR TREATING LIVER FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhaoyang; Hajj Houssein, Houssam S.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2009-01-01

    Liver fibrosis results from chronic liver injury due to hepatitis B and C, excessive alcohol ingestion, and metal ion overload. Fibrosis culminates in cirrhosis and results in liver failure. Therefore, a potent antifibrotic therapy is in urgent need to reverse scarring and eliminate progression to cirrhosis. Although activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) remains the principle cell type responsible for liver fibrosis, perivascular fibroblasts of portal and central veins as well as periductular fibroblasts are other sources of fibrogenic cells. This review will critically discuss various treatment strategies for liver fibrosis, including prevention of liver injury, reduction of inflammation, inhibition of HSC activation, degradation of scar matrix, and inhibition of aberrant collagen synthesis. Oligonucleotides (ODNs) are short, single-stranded nucleic acids, which disrupt expression of target protein by binding to complementary mRNA or forming triplex with genomic DNA. Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide an attractive strategy for treating liver fibrosis. A series of TFOs have been developed for inhibiting the transcription of α1(I) collagen gene, which opens a new area for antifibrotic drugs. There will be in depth discussion on the use of TFOs and how different bioconjugation strategies can be utilized for their site-specific delivery to HSCs or hepatocytes for enhanced antifibrotic activities. Various insights developed in individual strategy and the need for multipronged approaches will also be discussed. PMID:18154454

  8. Microarray multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection and discrimination of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency type-1 viruses in human blood samples

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, Chu Chieh . E-mail: chuchieh.hsia@fda.hhs.gov; Chizhikov, Vladimir E.; Yang, Amy X.; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Hewlett, Indira; Duncan, Robert; Puri, Raj K.; Nakhasi, Hira L.; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2007-05-18

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) are transfusion-transmitted human pathogens that have a major impact on blood safety and public health worldwide. We developed a microarray multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection and discrimination of these three viruses. The microarray consists of 16 oligonucleotide probes, immobilized on a silylated glass slide. Amplicons from multiplex PCR were labeled with Cy-5 and hybridized to the microarray. The assay detected 1 International Unit (IU), 10 IU, 20 IU of HBV, HCV, and HIV-1, respectively, in a single multiplex reaction. The assay also detected and discriminated the presence of two or three of these viruses in a single sample. Our data represent a proof-of-concept for the possible use of highly sensitive multiplex microarray assay to screen and confirm the presence of these viruses in blood donors and patients.

  9. Microarray Developed on Plastic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Bañuls, María-José; Morais, Sergi B; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    There is a huge potential interest to use synthetic polymers as versatile solid supports for analytical microarraying. Chemical modification of polycarbonate (PC) for covalent immobilization of probes, micro-printing of protein or nucleic acid probes, development of indirect immunoassay, and development of hybridization protocols are described and discussed. PMID:26614067

  10. Microfluidic microarray systems and methods thereof

    SciTech Connect

    West, Jay A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.

    2009-04-28

    Disclosed are systems that include a manifold in fluid communication with a microfluidic chip having a microarray, an illuminator, and a detector in optical communication with the microarray. Methods for using these systems for biological detection are also disclosed.

  11. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  12. Disulfide-linked oligonucleotide phosphorothioates - Novel analogues of nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Taifeng; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis of phosphorothioate analogs of oligonucleotides by the oxidation of deoxyadenosine 3',5'-bisphosphorothioate (3) was attempted. Cyclization of 3 is much more efficient than oligomerization under all the conditions investigated. However, a preformed oligonucleotide carrying a 5'-terminal phosphorotioate group undergoes efficient chain-extension when oxidized in the presence of 3.

  13. Enzymatic Synthesis of Single-Stranded Clonal Pure Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Ducani, Cosimo; Högberg, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides, or oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs), are very important in several fields of science such as molecular biology, diagnostics, nanotechnology, and gene therapy. They are usually chemically synthesized. Here we describe an enzymatic method which enables us to synthesize pure oligonucleotides which can be up to several hundred long bases. PMID:27671934

  14. Antisense oligonucleotides: is the glass half full or half empty?

    PubMed

    Bennett, C F

    1998-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are widely used as tools to explore the pharmacological effects of inhibiting expression of a selected gene product. In addition, they are being investigated as therapeutic agents for the treatment of viral infections, cancers, and inflammatory disorders. Proof that the pharmacological effects produced by the oligonucleotides are attributable to an antisense mechanism of action requires careful experimentation. Central to this problem is the finding that oligonucleotides are capable of interacting with and modulating function of specific proteins in both a sequence-independent and -dependent manner. Despite these undesired interactions, it has been possible to demonstrate that oligonucleotides are capable of binding to a specific RNA in cultured cells, or within tissues, resulting in selective reduction of the targeted gene product and pharmacological activity. In general, these oligonucleotides were identified after a selection process in which multiple oligonucleotides targeting different regions on the RNA were evaluated for direct inhibition of targeted gene product, resulting in the identification of a potent and selective oligonucleotide. Similar to other drug-receptor interactions, selection of the most potent inhibitor results in an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio, yielding increased confidence that activity observed is the result of a desired effect of the inhibitor. With careful selection, proper controls, and careful dose-response curves it is possible to utilize antisense oligonucleotides as effective research tools and potentially as therapeutic agents. PMID:9413924

  15. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Wassman, Christopher D; Tam, Phillip Y; Lathrop, Richard H; Weiss, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed 'cross-hybridization', as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries.

  16. Noncoding oligonucleotides: the belle of the ball in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Shum, Ka-To; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy carries the promise of cures for many diseases based on manipulating the expression of a person's genes toward the therapeutic goal. The relevance of noncoding oligonucleotides to human disease is attracting widespread attention. Noncoding oligonucleotides are not only involved in gene regulation, but can also be modified into therapeutic tools. There are many strategies that leverage noncoding oligonucleotides for gene therapy, including small interfering RNAs, antisense oligonucleotides, aptamers, ribozymes, decoys, and bacteriophage phi 29 RNAs. In this chapter, we will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of gene therapies that use noncoding oligonucleotides for disease treatment. The mechanism and development of each therapeutic will be described, with a particular focus on its clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the challenges associated with developing nucleic acid therapeutics and the prospects for future success.

  17. 2'-modified nucleosides for site-specific labeling of oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, Elizabeth S.; Miller, Jeremiah E.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    We report the synthesis of 2'-modified nucleosides designed specifically for incorporating labels into oligonucleotides. Conversion of these nucleosides to phosphoramidite and solid support-bound derivatives proceeds in good yield. Large-scale synthesis of 11-mer oligonucleotides possessing the 2'-modified nucleosides is achieved using these derivatives. Thermal denaturation studies indicate that the presence of 2'-modified nucleosides in 11-mer duplexes has minimal destabilizing effects on the duplex structure when the nucleosides are placed at the duplex termini. The powerful combination of phosphoramidite and support-bound derivatives of 2'-modified nucleosides affords the large-scale preparation of an entirely new class of oligonucleotides. The ability to synthesize oligonucleotides containing label attachment sites at 3', intervening, and 5' locations of a duplex is a significant advance in the development of oligonucleotide conjugates.

  18. Addressable microfluidic polymer chip for DNA-directed immobilization of oligonucleotide-tagged compounds.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Hendrik; Hoffmann, Linda; Müller, Joachim; Alhorn, Petra; Fleger, Markus; Neyer, Andreas; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2009-07-01

    A microfluidic polymer chip for the self-assembly of DNA conjugates through DNA-directed immobilization is developed. The chip is fabricated from two parts, one of which contains a microfluidic channel produced from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) by replica-casting technique using a mold prepared by photolithographic techniques. The microfluidic part is sealed by covalent bonding with a chemically activated glass slide containing a DNA oligonucleotide microarray. The dimension of the PDMS-glass microfluidic chip is equivalent to standard microscope slides (76 x 26 mm(2)). The DNA microarray surface inside the microfluidic channels is configured through conventional spotting, and the resulting DNA patches can be conveniently addressed with compounds containing complementary DNA tags. To demonstrate the utility of the addressable surface within the microfluidic channel, DNA-directed immobilization (DDI) of DNA-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and DNA-conjugates of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) are carried out. DDI of AuNPs is used to demonstrate site selectivity and reversibility of the surface-modification process. In the case of the DNA-enzyme conjugates, the patterned assembly of the two enzymes allows the establishment and investigation of the coupled reaction of GOx and HRP, with particular emphasis on surface coverage and lateral flow rates. The results demonstrate that this addressable chip is well suited for the generation of fluidically coupled multi-enzyme microreactors.

  19. Refinement of light-responsive transcript lists using rice oligonucleotide arrays: evaluation of gene-redundancy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Dardick, Christopher; Bartley, Laura E; Cao, Peijian; Phetsom, Jirapa; Canlas, Patrick; Seo, Young-Su; Shultz, Michael; Ouyang, Shu; Yuan, Qiaoping; Frank, Bryan C; Ly, Eugene; Zheng, Li; Jia, Yi; Hsia, An-Ping; An, Kyungsook; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Rocke, David; Lee, Geun Cheol; Schnable, Patrick S; An, Gynheung; Buell, C Robin; Ronald, Pamela C

    2008-10-06

    Studies of gene function are often hampered by gene-redundancy, especially in organisms with large genomes such as rice (Oryza sativa). We present an approach for using transcriptomics data to focus functional studies and address redundancy. To this end, we have constructed and validated an inexpensive and publicly available rice oligonucleotide near-whole genome array, called the rice NSF45K array. We generated expression profiles for light- vs. dark-grown rice leaf tissue and validated the biological significance of the data by analyzing sources of variation and confirming expression trends with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We examined trends in the data by evaluating enrichment of gene ontology terms at multiple false discovery rate thresholds. To compare data generated with the NSF45K array with published results, we developed publicly available, web-based tools (www.ricearray.org). The Oligo and EST Anatomy Viewer enables visualization of EST-based expression profiling data for all genes on the array. The Rice Multi-platform Microarray Search Tool facilitates comparison of gene expression profiles across multiple rice microarray platforms. Finally, we incorporated gene expression and biochemical pathway data to reduce the number of candidate gene products putatively participating in the eight steps of the photorespiration pathway from 52 to 10, based on expression levels of putatively functionally redundant genes. We confirmed the efficacy of this method to cope with redundancy by correctly predicting participation in photorespiration of a gene with five paralogs. Applying these methods will accelerate rice functional genomics.

  20. The Microarray Revolution: Perspectives from Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Jay L.; Beason, K. Beth; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Evans, Irene M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, microarray analysis has become a key experimental tool, enabling the analysis of genome-wide patterns of gene expression. This review approaches the microarray revolution with a focus upon four topics: 1) the early development of this technology and its application to cancer diagnostics; 2) a primer of microarray research,…

  1. Easy and fast detection and genotyping of high-risk human papillomavirus by dedicated DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Valérie; Chevallier, Anne; Magnone, Virginie; Barbry, Pascal; Vandenbos, Fanny; Bongain, André; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2006-11-01

    Persistent cervical high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is correlated with an increased risk of developing a high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesion. A two-step method was developed for detection and genotyping of high-risk HPV. DNA was firstly amplified by asymmetrical PCR in the presence of Cy3-labelled primers and dUTP. Labelled DNA was then genotyped using DNA microarray hybridization. The current study evaluated the technical efficacy of laboratory-designed HPV DNA microarrays for high-risk HPV genotyping on 57 malignant and non-malignant cervical smears. The approach was evaluated for a broad range of cytological samples: high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and atypical squamous cells of high-grade (ASC-H). High-risk HPV was also detected in six atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) samples; among them only one cervical specimen was found uninfected, associated with no histological lesion. The HPV oligonucleotide DNA microarray genotyping detected 36 infections with a single high-risk HPV type and 5 multiple infections with several high-risk types. Taken together, these results demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the HPV DNA microarray approach. This approach could improve clinical management of patients with cervical cytological abnormalities. PMID:16879879

  2. Compact, universal DNA microarrays to comprehensively determine transcription-factor binding site specificities

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael F.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Qureshi, Aaron M.; He, Fangxue S.; Estep, Preston W.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the expression of genes involved in myriad cellular processes through sequence-specific interactions with DNA. In order to predict DNA regulatory elements and the TFs targeting them with greater accuracy, detailed knowledge of the binding preferences of TFs is needed. Protein binding microarray (PBM) technology permits rapid, high-throughput characterization of the in vitro DNA binding specificities of proteins1. Here, we present a novel, maximally compact, synthetic DNA sequence design that represents all possible DNA sequence variants of a given length k (i.e., all “k-mers”) on a single, universal microarray. We constructed such all k-mer microarrays covering all 10 base pair (bp) binding sites by converting high-density single-stranded oligonucleotide arrays to double-stranded DNA arrays. Using these microarrays, we comprehensively determined the binding specificities over a full range of affinities for five TFs of diverse structural classes from yeast, worm, mouse, and human. Importantly, the unbiased coverage of all k-mers permits an interrogation of binding site preferences, including nucleotide interdependencies, at unprecedented resolution. PMID:16998473

  3. Comparative gene expression profiling by oligonucleotide fingerprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Meier-Ewert, S; Lange, J; Gerst, H; Herwig, R; Schmitt, A; Freund, J; Elge, T; Mott, R; Herrmann, B; Lehrach, H

    1998-01-01

    The use of hybridisation of synthetic oligonucleotides to cDNAs under high stringency to characterise gene sequences has been demonstrated by a number of groups. We have used two cDNA libraries of 9 and 12 day mouse embryos (24 133 and 34 783 clones respectively) in a pilot study to characterise expressed genes by hybridisation with 110 hybridisation probes. We have identified 33 369 clusters of cDNA clones, that ranged in representation from 1 to 487 copies (0.7%). 737 were assigned to known rodent genes, and a further 13 845 showed significant homologies. A total of 404 clusters were identified as significantly differentially represented (P < 0.01) between the two cDNA libraries. This study demonstrates the utility of the fingerprinting approach for the generation of comparative gene expression profiles through the analysis of cDNAs derived from different biological materials. PMID:9547283

  4. Microarray technology for use in molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Suzanne D; Whistler, Toni

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful laboratory tool for the simultaneous assessment of the activity of thousands genes. Remarkable advances in biological sample collection, preparation and automation of hybridization have enabled the application of microarray technology to large, population-based studies. Now, microarrays have the potential to serve as screening tools for the detection of altered gene expression activity that might contribute to diseases in human populations. Reproducible and reliable microarray results depend on multiple factors. In this chapter, biological sample parameters are introduced that should be considered for any microarray experiment. Then, the microarray technology that we have successfully applied to limited biological sample from all our molecular epidemiology studies is detailed. This reproducible and reliable approach for using microarrays should be applicable to any biological questions asked.

  5. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  6. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Jun; Heo, Jin Yeong; Kim, Hi Chul; Kim, Jin Yeop; Liuzzi, Michel; Soloveva, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the biology of selected cellular models. After reverse-transfection of microRNAs and siRNA, the cellular phenotype generated by microRNAs regulated NF-κB expression comparably to the siRNA. The ability to print microRNA molecules for reverse transfection into cells is opening up the wide horizon for the phenotypic high content screening of microRNA libraries using cellular disease models.

  7. Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Eisenstein, Samuel; Rosen, Benjamin; Lau, Albert Y.; C. Walter, Johannes; LaBaer, Joshua

    2004-07-01

    Protein microarrays provide a powerful tool for the study of protein function. However, they are not widely used, in part because of the challenges in producing proteins to spot on the arrays. We generated protein microarrays by printing complementary DNAs onto glass slides and then translating target proteins with mammalian reticulocyte lysate. Epitope tags fused to the proteins allowed them to be immobilized in situ. This obviated the need to purify proteins, avoided protein stability problems during storage, and captured sufficient protein for functional studies. We used the technology to map pairwise interactions among 29 human DNA replication initiation proteins, recapitulate the regulation of Cdt1 binding to select replication proteins, and map its geminin-binding domain.

  8. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  9. Ca2+ enrichment in culture medium potentiates effect of oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Shin-ichiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Waki, Reiko; Wada, Shunsuke; Wada, Fumito; Noda, Mio; Obika, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Antisense and RNAi-related oligonucleotides have gained attention as laboratory tools and therapeutic agents based on their ability to manipulate biological events in vitro and in vivo. We show that Ca2+ enrichment of medium (CEM) potentiates the in vitro activity of multiple types of oligonucleotides, independent of their net charge and modifications, in various cells. In addition, CEM reflects in vivo silencing activity more consistently than conventional transfection methods. Microscopic analysis reveals that CEM provides a subcellular localization pattern of oligonucleotides resembling that obtained by unassisted transfection, but with quantitative improvement. Highly monodispersed nanoparticles ∼100 nm in size are found in Ca2+-enriched serum-containing medium regardless of the presence or absence of oligonucleotides. Transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals that the 100-nm particles are in fact an ensemble of much smaller nanoparticles (ϕ ∼ 15 nm). The presence of these nanoparticles is critical for the efficient uptake of various oligonucleotides. In contrast, CEM is ineffective for plasmids, which are readily transfected via the conventional calcium phosphate method. Collectively, CEM enables a more accurate prediction of the systemic activity of therapeutic oligonucleotides, while enhancing the broad usability of oligonucleotides in the laboratory. PMID:26101258

  10. Ca2+ enrichment in culture medium potentiates effect of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hori, Shin-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Waki, Reiko; Wada, Shunsuke; Wada, Fumito; Noda, Mio; Obika, Satoshi

    2015-10-30

    Antisense and RNAi-related oligonucleotides have gained attention as laboratory tools and therapeutic agents based on their ability to manipulate biological events in vitro and in vivo. We show that Ca(2+) enrichment of medium (CEM) potentiates the in vitro activity of multiple types of oligonucleotides, independent of their net charge and modifications, in various cells. In addition, CEM reflects in vivo silencing activity more consistently than conventional transfection methods. Microscopic analysis reveals that CEM provides a subcellular localization pattern of oligonucleotides resembling that obtained by unassisted transfection, but with quantitative improvement. Highly monodispersed nanoparticles ~100 nm in size are found in Ca(2+)-enriched serum-containing medium regardless of the presence or absence of oligonucleotides. Transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals that the 100-nm particles are in fact an ensemble of much smaller nanoparticles (ϕ ∼ 15 nm). The presence of these nanoparticles is critical for the efficient uptake of various oligonucleotides. In contrast, CEM is ineffective for plasmids, which are readily transfected via the conventional calcium phosphate method. Collectively, CEM enables a more accurate prediction of the systemic activity of therapeutic oligonucleotides, while enhancing the broad usability of oligonucleotides in the laboratory.

  11. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins. PMID:20726799

  12. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins.

  13. Method for the preparation of size marker for synthetic oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, G.Z.; Liu, A.; Leung, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase was used for the addition of (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)dCTP to the 3'-OH termini of oligo(dT)/sub 12-18/. A collection of oligonucleotides with chain lengths ranging continuously from 13-mer to over 100-mer was generated. The reaction mixture was then mixed with oligo(dT)/sub 12-18/ labeled with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP by T/sub 4/ polynucleotide kinase. A sequence ladder with the bottom base as 12-mer was then formed. These oligonucleotides served as size marker for the purification and identification of oligonucleotides on polyacrylamide gel.

  14. Benchmarking the CATMA Microarray. A Novel Tool forArabidopsis Transcriptome Analysis1[w

    PubMed Central

    Allemeersch, Joke; Durinck, Steffen; Vanderhaeghen, Rudy; Alard, Philippe; Maes, Ruth; Seeuws, Kurt; Bogaert, Tom; Coddens, Kathleen; Deschouwer, Kirsten; Van Hummelen, Paul; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Moreau, Yves; Kwekkeboom, Jeroen; Wijfjes, André H.M.; May, Sean; Beynon, Jim; Hilson, Pierre; Kuiper, Martin T.R.

    2005-01-01

    Transcript profiling is crucial to study biological systems, and various platforms have been implemented to survey mRNAs at the genome scale. We have assessed the performance of the CATMA microarray designed for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transcriptome analysis and compared it with the Agilent and Affymetrix commercial platforms. The CATMA array consists of gene-specific sequence tags of 150 to 500 bp, the Agilent (Arabidopsis 2) array of 60mer oligonucleotides, and the Affymetrix gene chip (ATH1) of 25mer oligonucleotide sets. We have matched each probe repertoire with the Arabidopsis genome annotation (The Institute for Genomic Research release 5.0) and determined the correspondence between them. Array performance was analyzed by hybridization with labeled targets derived from eight RNA samples made of shoot total RNA spiked with a calibrated series of 14 control transcripts. CATMA arrays showed the largest dynamic range extending over three to four logs. Agilent and Affymetrix arrays displayed a narrower range, presumably because signal saturation occurred for transcripts at concentrations beyond 1,000 copies per cell. Sensitivity was comparable for all three platforms. For Affymetrix GeneChip data, the RMA software package outperformed Microarray Suite 5.0 for all investigated criteria, confirming that the information provided by the mismatch oligonucleotides has no added value. In addition, taking advantage of replicates in our dataset, we conducted a robust statistical analysis of the platform propensity to yield false positive and false negative differentially expressed genes, and all gave satisfactory results. The results establish the CATMA array as a mature alternative to the Affymetrix and Agilent platforms. PMID:15710687

  15. A highly oriented hybrid microarray modified electrode fabricated by a template-free method for ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Chu, Zhenyu; Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Dempsey, Eithne

    2013-11-01

    Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and influence the morphologies of hybrid films. A highly oriented hybrid microarray was formed on the highly aligned and vertical SAMs of 1,4-benzenedithiol molecules with rigid backbones, which afforded an intense structure-directing power for the oriented growth of hybrid crystals. Additionally, the density of the microarray could be adjusted by controlling the surface coverage of assembled molecules. Based on the hybrid microarray modified electrode with a large specific area (ca. 10 times its geometrical area), a label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor was constructed for the detection of an oligonucleotide fragment of the avian flu virus H5N1. The DNA biosensor displayed a significantly low detection limit of 5 pM (S/N = 3), a wide linear response from 10 pM to 10 nM, as well as excellent selectivity, good regeneration and high stability. We expect that the proposed template-free method can provide a new reference for the fabrication of a highly oriented hybrid array and the as-prepared microarray modified electrode will be a promising paradigm in constructing highly sensitive and selective biosensors.

  16. Oligonucleotide-Functionalized Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew Robert

    In this thesis, we describe the properties of oligonucleotide-functionalized gold colloids under the unique set of conditions where the particles are geometrically anisotropic and have nanometer-scale dimensions. While nearly two decades of previous work elucidated numerous unexpected and emergent phenomena arising from the combination of inorganic nanoparticles with surface-bound DNA strands, virtually nothing was known about how these properties are altered when the shape of the nanoparticle core is chosen to be non-spherical. In particular, we are interested in understanding, and ultimately controlling, the ways in which these DNA-conjugated anisotropic nanostructures interact when their attraction is governed by programmable DNA hybridization events. Chapter 1 introduces the field of DNA-based materials assembly by discussing how nanoscale building blocks which present rigid, directional interactions can be thought of as possessing artificial versions of the familiar chemical principles of "bonds" and "valency". In chapter 2 we explore the fundamental interparticle binding thermodynamics of DNA-functionalized spherical and anisotropic nanoparticles, which reveals enormous preferences for collective ligand interactions occurring between flat surfaces over those that occur between curved surfaces. Using these insights, chapter 3 demonstrates that when syntheses produce mixtures of different nanoparticle shapes, the tailorable nature of DNA-mediated interparticle association can be used to selectively crystallize and purify the desired anisotropic nanostructure products, leaving spherical impurity particles behind. Chapter 4 leverages the principle that the flat facets of anisotropic particles generate directional DNA-based hybridization interactions to assemble a variety of tailorable nanoparticle superlattices whose symmetry and dimensionality are a direct consequence of the shape of the nanoparticle building block used in their construction. Chapter 5 explores

  17. Micro- and nano-structure based oligonucleotide sensors.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, David C; Shaver, Michael P; Hands, Philip J W

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents a review of micro- and nano-structure based oligonucleotide detection and quantification techniques. The characteristics of such devices make them very attractive for Point-of-Care or On-Site-Testing biosensing applications. Their small scale means that they can be robust and portable, their compatibility with modern CMOS electronics means that they can easily be incorporated into hand-held devices and their suitability for mass production means that, out of the different approaches to oligonucleotide detection, they are the most suitable for commercialisation. This review discusses the advantages of micro- and nano-structure based sensors and covers the various oligonucleotide detection techniques that have been developed to date. These include: Bulk Acoustic Wave and Surface Acoustic Wave devices, micro- and nano-cantilever sensors, gene Field Effect Transistors, and nanowire and nanopore based sensors. Oligonucleotide immobilisation techniques are also discussed.

  18. Sequence-dependent theory of oligonucleotide hybridization kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-05-07

    A theoretical approach to the prediction of the sequence and temperature-dependent rate constants for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions has been developed based on the theory of relaxation kinetics. One-sided and two-sided melting reaction mechanisms for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions have been considered, analyzed, modified, and compared to select a physically consistent as well as robust model for prediction of the relaxation times of DNA hybridization reactions that agrees with the experimental evidence. The temperature- and sequence-dependent parameters of the proposed model have been estimated using available experimental data. The relaxation time model that we developed has been combined with the nearest neighbor model of hybridization thermodynamics to estimate the temperature- and sequence-dependent rate constants of an oligonucleotide hybridization reaction. The model-predicted rate constants are compared to experimentally determined rate constants for the same oligonucleotide hybridization reactions. Finally, we consider a few important applications of kinetically controlled DNA hybridization reactions.

  19. Molecular Selection, Modification and Development of Therapeutic Oligonucleotide Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chao; Lv, Quanxia; Li, Defang; Xu, Xuegong; Liu, Baoqin; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are the dominant agents used in inhibition of biological target molecules for disease therapeutics, but there are concerns of immunogenicity, production, cost and stability. Oligonucleotide aptamers have comparable affinity and specificity to targets with monoclonal antibodies whilst they have minimal immunogenicity, high production, low cost and high stability, thus are promising inhibitors to rival antibodies for disease therapy. In this review, we will compare the detailed advantages and disadvantages of antibodies and aptamers in therapeutic applications and summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and modification approaches. We will present therapeutic oligonucleotide aptamers in preclinical studies for skeletal diseases and further discuss oligonucleotide aptamers in different stages of clinical evaluation for various disease therapies including macular degeneration, cancer, inflammation and coagulation to highlight the bright commercial future and potential challenges of therapeutic oligonucleotide aptamers. PMID:26978355

  20. Immune and inflammatory gene signature in rat cerebrum in subarachnoid hemorrhage with microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chu-I; Chou, An-Kuo; Lin, Ching-Chih; Chou, Chia-Hua; Loh, Joon-Khim; Lieu, Ann-Shung; Wang, Chih-Jen; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Howng, Shen-Long; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has been studied in terms of a contraction of the major cerebral arteries, but the effect of cerebrum tissue in SAH is not yet well understood. To gain insight into the biology of SAH-expressing cerebrum, we employed oligonucleotide microarrays to characterize the gene expression profiles of cerebrum tissue at the early stage of SAH. Functional gene expression in the cerebrum was analyzed 2 h following stage 1-hemorrhage in Sprague-Dawley rats. mRNA was investigated by performing microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses, and protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. In this study, 18 upregulated and 18 downregulated genes displayed at least a 1.5-fold change. Five genes were verified by real-time PCR, including three upregulated genes [prostaglandin E synthase (PGES), CD14 antigen, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1)] as well as two downregulated genes [KRAB-zinc finger protein-2 (KZF-2) and γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor 1 (GABA B receptor)]. Notably, there were functional implications for the three upregulated genes involved in the inflammatory SAH process. However, the mechanisms leading to decreased KZF-2 and GABA B receptor expression in SAH have never been characterized. We conclude that oligonucleotide microarrays have the potential for use as a method to identify candidate genes associated with SAH and to provide novel investigational targets, including genes involved in the immune and inflammatory response. Furthermore, understanding the regulation of MMP9/TIMP1 during the early stages of SAH may elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms in SAH rats.

  1. Oligonucleotide conjugates - Candidates for gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Evans, James C; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-10-01

    The potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of oligonucleotides (ONs) have attracted great attention in recent years. The capability of ONs to selectively inhibit target genes through antisense and RNA interference mechanisms, without causing un-intended sideeffects has led them to be investigated for various biomedical applications, especially for the treatment of viral diseases and cancer. In recent years, many researchers have focused on enhancing the stability and target specificity of ONs by encapsulating/complexing them with polymers or lipid chains to formulate nanoparticles/nanocomplexes/micelles. Also, chemical modification of nucleic acids has emerged as an alternative to impart stability to ONs against nucleases and other degrading enzymes and proteins found in blood. In addition to chemically modifying the nucleic acids directly, another strategy that has emerged, involves conjugating polymers/peptide/aptamers/antibodies/proteins, preferably to the sense strand (3'end) of siRNAs. Conjugation to the siRNA not only enhances the stability and targeting specificity of the siRNA, but also allows for the development of self-administering siRNA formulations, with a much smaller size than what is usually observed for nanoparticle (∼200nm). This review concentrates mainly on approaches and studies involving ON-conjugates for biomedical applications. PMID:27521696

  2. Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E; Mariella Jr., R P; Christian, A T; Gardner, S N; Williams, J M

    2003-11-24

    This report summarizes the work done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding project, part of the Microelectronic Bioprocesses Program at DARPA. The goal of the project was to develop a process by which long (circa 10,000 base-pair) synthetic DNA molecules could be synthesized in a timely and economic manner. During construction of the long molecule, errors in DNA sequence occur during hybridization and/or the subsequent enzymatic process. The work done on this project has resulted in a novel synthesis scheme that we call the parallel pyramid synthesis protocol, the development of a suit of computational tools to minimize and quantify errors in the synthesized DNA sequence, and experimental proof of this technique. The modeling consists of three interrelated modules: the bioinformatics code which determines the specifics of parallel pyramid synthesis for a given chain of long DNA, the thermodynamics code which tracks the products of DNA hybridization and polymerase extension during the later steps in the process, and the kinetics model which examines the temporal and spatial processes during one thermocycle. Most importantly, we conducted the first successful syntheses of a gene using small starting oligomers (tetramers). The synthesized sequence, 813 base pairs long, contained a 725 base pair gene, modified green fluorescent protein (mGFP), which has been shown to be a functional gene by cloning into cells and observing its green fluorescent product.

  3. Oligonucleotide Therapies: The Past and the Present

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Karin E.; Gissberg, Olof; Smith, C.I. Edvard

    2015-01-01

    In this review we address the development of oligonucleotide (ON) medicines from a historical perspective by listing the landmark discoveries in this field. The various biological processes that have been targeted and the corresponding ON interventions found in the literature are discussed together with brief updates on some of the more recent developments. Most ON therapies act through antisense mechanisms and are directed against various RNA species, as exemplified by gapmers, steric block ONs, antagomirs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), micro-RNA mimics, and splice switching ONs. However, ONs binding to Toll-like receptors and those forming aptamers have completely different modes of action. Similar to other novel medicines, the path to success has been lined with numerous failures, where different therapeutic ONs did not stand the test of time. Since the first ON drug was approved for clinical use in 1998, the therapeutic landscape has changed considerably, but many challenges remain until the expectations for this new form of medicine are met. However, there is room for cautious optimism. PMID:26160334

  4. Oligonucleotide conjugates - Candidates for gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Evans, James C; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-10-01

    The potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of oligonucleotides (ONs) have attracted great attention in recent years. The capability of ONs to selectively inhibit target genes through antisense and RNA interference mechanisms, without causing un-intended sideeffects has led them to be investigated for various biomedical applications, especially for the treatment of viral diseases and cancer. In recent years, many researchers have focused on enhancing the stability and target specificity of ONs by encapsulating/complexing them with polymers or lipid chains to formulate nanoparticles/nanocomplexes/micelles. Also, chemical modification of nucleic acids has emerged as an alternative to impart stability to ONs against nucleases and other degrading enzymes and proteins found in blood. In addition to chemically modifying the nucleic acids directly, another strategy that has emerged, involves conjugating polymers/peptide/aptamers/antibodies/proteins, preferably to the sense strand (3'end) of siRNAs. Conjugation to the siRNA not only enhances the stability and targeting specificity of the siRNA, but also allows for the development of self-administering siRNA formulations, with a much smaller size than what is usually observed for nanoparticle (∼200nm). This review concentrates mainly on approaches and studies involving ON-conjugates for biomedical applications.

  5. Potent Antiscrapie Activities of Degenerate Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kocisko, David A.; Vaillant, Andrew; Lee, Kil Sun; Arnold, Kevin M.; Bertholet, Nadine; Race, Richard E.; Olsen, Emily A.; Juteau, Jean-Marc; Caughey, Byron

    2006-01-01

    Although transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are incurable, a key therapeutic approach is prevention of conversion of the normal, protease-sensitive form of prion protein (PrP-sen) to the disease-specific protease-resistant form of prion protein (PrP-res). Here degenerate phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS-ONs) are introduced as low-nM PrP-res conversion inhibitors with strong antiscrapie activities in vivo. Comparisons of various PS-ON analogs indicated that hydrophobicity and size were important, while base composition was only minimally influential. PS-ONs bound avidly to PrP-sen but could be displaced by sulfated glycan PrP-res inhibitors, indicating the presence of overlapping binding sites. Labeled PS-ONs also bound to PrP-sen on live cells and were internalized. This binding likely accounts for the antiscrapie activity. Prophylactic PS-ON treatments more than tripled scrapie survival periods in mice. Survival times also increased when PS-ONs were mixed with scrapie brain inoculum. With these antiscrapie activities and their much lower anticoagulant activities than that of pentosan polysulfate, degenerate PS-ONs are attractive new compounds for the treatment of TSEs. PMID:16495266

  6. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic.

  7. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion. PMID:26536353

  8. Integrated Amplification Microarrays for Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Bryant, Lexi; Griesemer, Sara B.; Gu, Rui; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Kukhtin, Alexander; Parker, Jennifer; Zimmerman, Cynthia; George, Kirsten St.; Cooney, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    This overview describes microarray-based tests that combine solution-phase amplification chemistry and microarray hybridization within a single microfluidic chamber. The integrated biochemical approach improves microarray workflow for diagnostic applications by reducing the number of steps and minimizing the potential for sample or amplicon cross-contamination. Examples described herein illustrate a basic, integrated approach for DNA and RNA genomes, and a simple consumable architecture for incorporating wash steps while retaining an entirely closed system. It is anticipated that integrated microarray biochemistry will provide an opportunity to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of microarray consumables, equipment, and workflow, which in turn will enable a broader spectrum of users to exploit the intrinsic multiplexing power of microarrays for infectious disease diagnostics.

  9. Microarray data analysis and mining approaches.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Francesca; Botta, Marco; Calogero, Raffaele A

    2007-12-01

    Microarray based transcription profiling is now a consolidated methodology and has widespread use in areas such as pharmacogenomics, diagnostics and drug target identification. Large-scale microarray studies are also becoming crucial to a new way of conceiving experimental biology. A main issue in microarray transcription profiling is data analysis and mining. When microarrays became a methodology of general use, considerable effort was made to produce algorithms and methods for the identification of differentially expressed genes. More recently, the focus has switched to algorithms and database development for microarray data mining. Furthermore, the evolution of microarray technology is allowing researchers to grasp the regulative nature of transcription, integrating basic expression analysis with mRNA characteristics, i.e. exon-based arrays, and with DNA characteristics, i.e. comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism, tiling and promoter structure. In this article, we will review approaches used to detect differentially expressed genes and to link differential expression to specific biological functions.

  10. Silver and Cyanine Staining of Oligonucleotides in Polyacrylamide Gel

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    To explore why some oligonucleotides in denaturing polyacrylamide gel could not be silver-stained, 134 different oligonucleotides were analyzed using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis stained with silver and asymmetric cyanine. As a result, we found that the sensitivity of oligos (dA), (dC), (dG) and (dT) to silver staining could be ranged as (dA) > (dG) > (dC) > (dT) from high to low. It was unexpected that oligo (dT) was hard to be silver-stained. Moreover, the silver staining of an oligonucleotide containing base T could be partially or completely inhibited by base T. The inhibition of silver staining by base T was a competitive inhibition which could be affected by the amounts of the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, the cis-distance between the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, and the gel concentration. The changes of the intensity of an oligonucleotide band caused by the changes of DNA base composition were diverse and interesting. The intensity of some oligonucleotide bands would significantly change when the changes of DNA base composition accumulated to a certain extent (usually ≥ 4 nt). The sensitivity of cyanine staining of ≤ 11-nt long oligonucleotides could be enhanced about 250-fold by fixing the gels with methanol fixing solution. PMID:26650843

  11. Silver and Cyanine Staining of Oligonucleotides in Polyacrylamide Gel.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weizhong; Zhou, Huafu; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    To explore why some oligonucleotides in denaturing polyacrylamide gel could not be silver-stained, 134 different oligonucleotides were analyzed using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis stained with silver and asymmetric cyanine. As a result, we found that the sensitivity of oligos (dA), (dC), (dG) and (dT) to silver staining could be ranged as (dA) > (dG) > (dC) > (dT) from high to low. It was unexpected that oligo (dT) was hard to be silver-stained. Moreover, the silver staining of an oligonucleotide containing base T could be partially or completely inhibited by base T. The inhibition of silver staining by base T was a competitive inhibition which could be affected by the amounts of the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, the cis-distance between the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, and the gel concentration. The changes of the intensity of an oligonucleotide band caused by the changes of DNA base composition were diverse and interesting. The intensity of some oligonucleotide bands would significantly change when the changes of DNA base composition accumulated to a certain extent (usually ≥ 4 nt). The sensitivity of cyanine staining of ≤ 11-nt long oligonucleotides could be enhanced about 250-fold by fixing the gels with methanol fixing solution.

  12. Detection of pathogenic Vibrio spp. in shellfish by using multiplex PCR and DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Gitika; Call, Douglas R; Krug, Melissa J; Bej, Asim K

    2004-12-01

    This study describes the development of a gene-specific DNA microarray coupled with multiplex PCR for the comprehensive detection of pathogenic vibrios that are natural inhabitants of warm coastal waters and shellfish. Multiplex PCR with vvh and viuB for Vibrio vulnificus, with ompU, toxR, tcpI, and hlyA for V. cholerae, and with tlh, tdh, trh, and open reading frame 8 for V. parahaemolyticus helped to ensure that total and pathogenic strains, including subtypes of the three Vibrio spp., could be detected and discriminated. For DNA microarrays, oligonucleotide probes for these targeted genes were deposited onto epoxysilane-derivatized, 12-well, Teflon-masked slides by using a MicroGrid II arrayer. Amplified PCR products were hybridized to arrays at 50 degrees C and detected by using tyramide signal amplification with Alexa Fluor 546 fluorescent dye. Slides were imaged by using an arrayWoRx scanner. The detection sensitivity for pure cultures without enrichment was 10(2) to 10(3) CFU/ml, and the specificity was 100%. However, 5 h of sample enrichment followed by DNA extraction with Instagene matrix and multiplex PCR with microarray hybridization resulted in the detection of 1 CFU in 1 g of oyster tissue homogenate. Thus, enrichment of the bacterial pathogens permitted higher sensitivity in compliance with the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference guideline. Application of the DNA microarray methodology to natural oysters revealed the presence of V. vulnificus (100%) and V. parahaemolyticus (83%). However, V. cholerae was not detected in natural oysters. An assay involving a combination of multiplex PCR and DNA microarray hybridization would help to ensure rapid and accurate detection of pathogenic vibrios in shellfish, thereby improving the microbiological safety of shellfish for consumers. PMID:15574946

  13. Detection of Pathogenic Vibrio spp. in Shellfish by Using Multiplex PCR and DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Gitika; Call, Douglas R.; Krug, Melissa J.; Bej, Asim K.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the development of a gene-specific DNA microarray coupled with multiplex PCR for the comprehensive detection of pathogenic vibrios that are natural inhabitants of warm coastal waters and shellfish. Multiplex PCR with vvh and viuB for Vibrio vulnificus, with ompU, toxR, tcpI, and hlyA for V. cholerae, and with tlh, tdh, trh, and open reading frame 8 for V. parahaemolyticus helped to ensure that total and pathogenic strains, including subtypes of the three Vibrio spp., could be detected and discriminated. For DNA microarrays, oligonucleotide probes for these targeted genes were deposited onto epoxysilane-derivatized, 12-well, Teflon-masked slides by using a MicroGrid II arrayer. Amplified PCR products were hybridized to arrays at 50°C and detected by using tyramide signal amplification with Alexa Fluor 546 fluorescent dye. Slides were imaged by using an arrayWoRx scanner. The detection sensitivity for pure cultures without enrichment was 102 to 103 CFU/ml, and the specificity was 100%. However, 5 h of sample enrichment followed by DNA extraction with Instagene matrix and multiplex PCR with microarray hybridization resulted in the detection of 1 CFU in 1 g of oyster tissue homogenate. Thus, enrichment of the bacterial pathogens permitted higher sensitivity in compliance with the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference guideline. Application of the DNA microarray methodology to natural oysters revealed the presence of V. vulnificus (100%) and V. parahaemolyticus (83%). However, V. cholerae was not detected in natural oysters. An assay involving a combination of multiplex PCR and DNA microarray hybridization would help to ensure rapid and accurate detection of pathogenic vibrios in shellfish, thereby improving the microbiological safety of shellfish for consumers. PMID:15574946

  14. Automated Microarray Image Analysis Toolbox for MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Willse, Alan R.; Protic, Miroslava; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2005-09-01

    The Automated Microarray Image Analysis (AMIA) Toolbox for MATLAB is a flexible, open-source microarray image analysis tool that allows the user to customize analysis of sets of microarray images. This tool provides several methods of identifying and quantify spot statistics, as well as extensive diagnostic statistics and images to identify poor data quality or processing. The open nature of this software allows researchers to understand the algorithms used to provide intensity estimates and to modify them easily if desired.

  15. Surface free energy and microarray deposition technology.

    PubMed

    McHale, Glen

    2007-03-01

    Microarray techniques use a combinatorial approach to assess complex biochemical interactions. The fundamental goal is simultaneous, large-scale experimentation analogous to the automation achieved in the semiconductor industry. However, microarray deposition inherently involves liquids contacting solid substrates. Liquid droplet shapes are determined by surface and interfacial tension forces, and flows during drying. This article looks at how surface free energy and wetting considerations may influence the accuracy and reliability of spotted microarray experiments.

  16. THE ABRF MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2005: TAKING THE PULSE ON THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years microarray technology has evolved into a critical component of any discovery based program. Since 1999, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) has conducted biennial surveys designed to generate a pr...

  17. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts.

    PubMed

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  18. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  19. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays.

  20. 2008 Microarray Research Group (MARG Survey): Sensing the State of Microarray Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution and transformation, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. Th...

  1. THE ABRF-MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2004: TAKING THE PULSE OF THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. The goal of the surve...

  2. Detection and Genotyping of Arcobacter and Campylobacter Isolates from Retail Chicken Samples by Use of DNA Oligonucleotide Arrays▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Quiñones, Beatriz; Parker, Craig T.; Janda, John M.; Miller, William G.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    To explore the use of DNA microarrays for pathogen detection in food, we produced DNA oligonucleotide arrays to simultaneously determine the presence of Arcobacter and the presence of Campylobacter in retail chicken samples. Probes were selected that target housekeeping and virulence-associated genes in both Arcobacter butzleri and thermotolerant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. These microarrays showed a high level of probe specificity; the signal intensities detected for A. butzleri, C. coli, or C. jejuni probes were at least 10-fold higher than the background levels. Specific identification of A. butzleri, C. coli, and C. jejuni was achieved without the need for a PCR amplification step. By adapting an isolation method that employed membrane filtration and selective media, C. jejuni isolates were recovered from package liquid from whole chicken carcasses prior to enrichment. Increasing the time of enrichment resulted in the isolation of A. butzleri and increased the recovery of C. jejuni. C. jejuni isolates were further classified by using an additional subset of probes targeting the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) biosynthesis locus. Our results demonstrated that most of the C. jejuni isolates likely possess class B, C, or H LOS. Validation experiments demonstrated that the DNA microarray had a detection sensitivity threshold of approximately 10,000 C. jejuni cells. Interestingly, the use of C. jejuni sequence-specific primers to label genomic DNA improved the sensitivity of this DNA microarray for detection of C. jejuni in whole chicken carcass samples. C. jejuni was efficiently detected directly both in package liquid from whole chicken carcasses and in enrichment broths. PMID:17416693

  3. Detection and genotyping of Arcobacter and Campylobacter isolates from retail chicken samples by use of DNA oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, Beatriz; Parker, Craig T; Janda, John M; Miller, William G; Mandrell, Robert E

    2007-06-01

    To explore the use of DNA microarrays for pathogen detection in food, we produced DNA oligonucleotide arrays to simultaneously determine the presence of Arcobacter and the presence of Campylobacter in retail chicken samples. Probes were selected that target housekeeping and virulence-associated genes in both Arcobacter butzleri and thermotolerant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. These microarrays showed a high level of probe specificity; the signal intensities detected for A. butzleri, C. coli, or C. jejuni probes were at least 10-fold higher than the background levels. Specific identification of A. butzleri, C. coli, and C. jejuni was achieved without the need for a PCR amplification step. By adapting an isolation method that employed membrane filtration and selective media, C. jejuni isolates were recovered from package liquid from whole chicken carcasses prior to enrichment. Increasing the time of enrichment resulted in the isolation of A. butzleri and increased the recovery of C. jejuni. C. jejuni isolates were further classified by using an additional subset of probes targeting the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) biosynthesis locus. Our results demonstrated that most of the C. jejuni isolates likely possess class B, C, or H LOS. Validation experiments demonstrated that the DNA microarray had a detection sensitivity threshold of approximately 10,000 C. jejuni cells. Interestingly, the use of C. jejuni sequence-specific primers to label genomic DNA improved the sensitivity of this DNA microarray for detection of C. jejuni in whole chicken carcass samples. C. jejuni was efficiently detected directly both in package liquid from whole chicken carcasses and in enrichment broths.

  4. GeoChip: A comprehensive microarray for investigatingbiogeochemical, ecological, and environmental processes

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Gentry, T.J.; Schadt, C.W.; Wu, L.; Liebich, J.; Chong,S.C.; Wu, W.; Gu, B.; Jardine, P.; Criddle, C.; Zhou, J.

    2007-09-24

    Due to their vast diversity and as-yet uncultivated status,detection, characterization and quantification of microorganisms innatural settings are very challenging, and linking microbial diversity toecosystem processes and functions is even more difficult.Microarray-based genomic technology for detecting functional genes andprocesses has a great promise of overcoming such obstacles. Here, a novelcomprehensive microarray, termed GeoChip, has been developed, containing24,243 oligonucleotide (50mer) probes and covering>10,000 genes in>150 functional groups involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur andphosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance, and organiccontaminant degradation. The developed GeoChip was successfully used fortracking the dynamics of metal-reducing bacteria and associatedcommunities for an in situ bioremediation study, which is the first timeto demonstrate that uranium can be bioremediated to the concentrationsbelow the USA EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water.This is the first comprehensive microarray available for studyingbiogeochemical processes and functional activities of microbialcommunities important to human health, agriculture, energy, globalclimate change, ecosystem management, and environmental cleanup andrestoration. It is particularly useful for providing direct linkages ofmicrobial genes/populations to ecosystem processes andfunctions.

  5. Array painting: a protocol for the rapid analysis of aberrant chromosomes using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Susan M; Ng, Bee Ling; Prigmore, Elena; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Carter, Nigel P

    2012-01-01

    Aarray painting is a technique that uses microarray technology to rapidly map chromosome translocation breakpoints. previous methods to map translocation breakpoints have used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FIsH) and have consequently been labor-intensive, time-consuming and restricted to the low breakpoint resolution imposed by the use of metaphase chromosomes. array painting combines the isolation of derivative chromosomes (chromosomes with translocations) and high-resolution microarray analysis to refine the genomic location of translocation breakpoints in a single experiment. In this protocol, we describe array painting by isolation of derivative chromosomes using a MoFlo flow sorter, amplification of these derivatives using whole-genome amplification and hybridization onto commercially available oligonucleotide microarrays. although the sorting of derivative chromosomes is a specialized procedure requiring sophisticated equipment, the amplification, labeling and hybridization of Dna is straightforward, robust and can be completed within 1 week. the protocol described produces good quality data; however, array painting is equally achievable using any combination of the available alternative methodologies for chromosome isolation, amplification and hybridization. PMID:19893508

  6. Automated and Multiplexed Soft Lithography for the Production of Low-Density DNA Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Fredonnet, Julie; Foncy, Julie; Cau, Jean-Christophe; Séverac, Childérick; François, Jean Marie; Trévisiol, Emmanuelle

    2016-09-26

    Microarrays are established research tools for genotyping, expression profiling, or molecular diagnostics in which DNA molecules are precisely addressed to the surface of a solid support. This study assesses the fabrication of low-density oligonucleotide arrays using an automated microcontact printing device, the InnoStamp 40(®). This automate allows a multiplexed deposition of oligoprobes on a functionalized surface by the use of a MacroStamp(TM) bearing 64 individual pillars each mounted with 50 circular micropatterns (spots) of 160 µm diameter at 320 µm pitch. Reliability and reuse of the MacroStamp(TM) were shown to be fast and robust by a simple washing step in 96% ethanol. The low-density microarrays printed on either epoxysilane or dendrimer-functionalized slides (DendriSlides) showed excellent hybridization response with complementary sequences at unusual low probe and target concentrations, since the actual probe density immobilized by this technology was at least 10-fold lower than with the conventional mechanical spotting. In addition, we found a comparable hybridization response in terms of fluorescence intensity between spotted and printed oligoarrays with a 1 nM complementary target by using a 50-fold lower probe concentration to produce the oligoarrays by the microcontact printing method. Taken together, our results lend support to the potential development of this multiplexed microcontact printing technology employing soft lithography as an alternative, cost-competitive tool for fabrication of low-density DNA microarrays.

  7. Detecting and genotyping Escherichia coli O157:H7 using multiplexed PCR and nucleic acid microarrays.

    PubMed

    Call, D R; Brockman, F J; Chandler, D P

    2001-07-20

    Rapid detection and characterization of food borne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 is crucial for epidemiological investigations and food safety surveillance. As an alternative to conventional technologies, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid microarrays for detecting and genotyping E. coli O157:H7. The array was composed of oligonucleotide probes (25-30 mer) complementary to four virulence loci (intimin, Shiga-like toxins I and II, and hemolysin A). Target DNA was amplified from whole cells or from purified DNA via single or multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products were hybridized to the array without further modification or purification. The array was 32-fold more sensitive than gel electrophoresis and capable of detecting amplification products from < 1 cell equivalent of genomic DNA (1 fg). Immunomagnetic capture, PCR and a microarray were subsequently used to detect 55 CFU ml(-1) (E. coli O157:H7) from chicken rinsate without the aid of pre-enrichment. Four isolates of E. coli O157:H7 and one isolate of O91:H2, for which genotypic data were available, were unambiguously genotyped with this array. Glass-based microarrays are relatively simple to construct and provide a rapid and sensitive means to detect multiplexed PCR products; the system is amenable to automation.

  8. Automated and Multiplexed Soft Lithography for the Production of Low-Density DNA Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Fredonnet, Julie; Foncy, Julie; Cau, Jean-Christophe; Séverac, Childérick; François, Jean Marie; Trévisiol, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are established research tools for genotyping, expression profiling, or molecular diagnostics in which DNA molecules are precisely addressed to the surface of a solid support. This study assesses the fabrication of low-density oligonucleotide arrays using an automated microcontact printing device, the InnoStamp 40(®). This automate allows a multiplexed deposition of oligoprobes on a functionalized surface by the use of a MacroStamp(TM) bearing 64 individual pillars each mounted with 50 circular micropatterns (spots) of 160 µm diameter at 320 µm pitch. Reliability and reuse of the MacroStamp(TM) were shown to be fast and robust by a simple washing step in 96% ethanol. The low-density microarrays printed on either epoxysilane or dendrimer-functionalized slides (DendriSlides) showed excellent hybridization response with complementary sequences at unusual low probe and target concentrations, since the actual probe density immobilized by this technology was at least 10-fold lower than with the conventional mechanical spotting. In addition, we found a comparable hybridization response in terms of fluorescence intensity between spotted and printed oligoarrays with a 1 nM complementary target by using a 50-fold lower probe concentration to produce the oligoarrays by the microcontact printing method. Taken together, our results lend support to the potential development of this multiplexed microcontact printing technology employing soft lithography as an alternative, cost-competitive tool for fabrication of low-density DNA microarrays. PMID:27681742

  9. Detecting and Genotyping Escherichia coli O157:H7 using multiplexed PCR and nucleic acid microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J. ); Chandler, Darrell P.

    2000-12-01

    Rapid detection and characterization of food borne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 is crucial for epidemiological investigations and food safety surveillance. As an alternative to conventional technologies, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid microarrays for detecting and genotyping E. coli O157:H7. The array was composed of oligonucleotide probes (25-30 mer) complementary to four virulence loci (intimin, Shiga-like toxins I and II, and hemolysin A). Target DNA was amplified from whole cells or from purified DNA via single or multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products were hybridized to the array without further modification or purification. The array was 32-fold more sensitive than gel electrophoresis and capable of detecting amplification products from < 1 cell equivalent of genomic DNA (1 fg). Immunomagnetic capture, PCR and a microarray were subsequently used to detect 55 CFU ml-1 (E. coli O157:H7) from chicken rinsate without the aid of pre-enrichment. Four isolates of E. coli O157:H7 and one isolate of O91:H2, for which genotypic data were available, were unambiguously genotyped with this array. Glass based microarrays are relatively simple to construct and provide a rapid and sensitive means to detect multiplexed PCR products and the system is amenable to automation.

  10. Detecting and genotyping Escherichia coli O157:H7 using multiplexed PCR and nucleic acid microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-07-05

    Rapid detection and characterization of food borne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 is crucial for epidemiological investigations and food safety surveillance. As an alternative to conventional technologies, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid microarrays for detecting and genotyping E. coli O157:H7. The array was composed of oligonucleotide probes (25-30 mer) complementary to four virulence loci (intimin, Shiga-like toxins I and II, and hemolysin A). Target DNA was amplified from whole cells or from purified DNA via single or multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products were hybridized to the array without further modification or purification. The array was 32-fold more sensitive than gel electrophoresis and capable of detecting amplification products from < 1 cell equivalent of genomic DNA (1 fg). Immunomagnetic capture, PCR and a microarray were subsequently used to detect 55 CFUs ml-1 (E. coli O157:H7) from chicken rinsate without the aid of pre-enrichment. Four isolates of E. coli O157:H7 and one isolate of O91:H2, for which genotypic data were available, were unambiguously genotyped with this array. Glass based microarrays are relatively simple to construct and provide a rapid and sensitive means to detect multiplexed PCR products and the system is amenable to automation.

  11. Mechanism of oligonucleotide release from cationic liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Zelphati, O; Szoka, F C

    1996-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for oligonucleotide (ODN) release from cationic lipid complexes in cells that accounts for various observations on cationic lipid-nucleic acid-cell interactions. Fluorescent confocal microscopy of cells treated with rhodamine-labeled cationic liposome/ fluorescein-labeled ODN (F-ODN) complexes show the F-ODN separates from the lipid after internalization and enters the nucleus leaving the fluorescent lipid in cytoplasmic structures. ODN displacement from the complex was studied by fluorescent resonance energy transfer. Anionic liposome compositions (e.g., phosphatidylserine) that mimic the cytoplasmic facing monolayer of the cell membrane released ODN from the complex at about a 1:1 (-/+) charge ratio. Release was independent of ionic strength and pH. Physical separation of the F-ODN from monovalent and multivalent cationic lipids was confirmed by gel electrophoresis. Fluid but not solid phase anionic liposomes are required, whereas the physical state of the cationic lipids does not effect the release. Water soluble molecules with a high negative linear charge density, dextran sulfate, or heparin also release ODN. However, ATP, spermidine, spermine, tRNA, DNA, polyglutamic acid, polylysine, bovine serum albumin, or histone did not release ODN, even at 100-fold charge excess (-/+). Based upon these results, we propose that the complex, after internalization by endocytosis, induces flip-flop of anionic lipids from the cytoplasmic facing monolayer. Anionic lipids laterally diffuse into the complex and form a charged neutralized ion-pair with the cationic lipids. This leads to displacement of the ODN from the cationic lipid and its release into the cytoplasm. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8876163

  12. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  13. Studying bovine early embryo transcriptome by microarray.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Isabelle; Robert, Claude; Sirard, Marc-André

    2015-01-01

    Microarrays represent a significant advantage when studying gene expression in early embryo because they allow for a speedy study of a large number of genes even if the sample of interest contains small quantities of genetic material. Here we describe the protocols developed by the EmbryoGENE Network to study the bovine transcriptome in early embryo using a microarray experimental design.

  14. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  15. Application of microarray technology in pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Patlakas, George; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2004-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful tool that have multiple applications both in clinical and cell biology arenas of common lung diseases. To exemplify how this tool can be useful, in this review, we will provide an overview of the application of microarray technology in research relevant to common lung diseases and present some of the future perspectives. PMID:15585067

  16. Refinement of light-responsive transcript lists using rice oligonucleotide arrays: evaluation of gene-redundancy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Dardick, Christopher; Bartley, Laura E; Cao, Peijian; Phetsom, Jirapa; Canlas, Patrick; Seo, Young-Su; Shultz, Michael; Ouyang, Shu; Yuan, Qiaoping; Frank, Bryan C; Ly, Eugene; Zheng, Li; Jia, Yi; Hsia, An-Ping; An, Kyungsook; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Rocke, David; Lee, Geun Cheol; Schnable, Patrick S; An, Gynheung; Buell, C Robin; Ronald, Pamela C

    2008-01-01

    Studies of gene function are often hampered by gene-redundancy, especially in organisms with large genomes such as rice (Oryza sativa). We present an approach for using transcriptomics data to focus functional studies and address redundancy. To this end, we have constructed and validated an inexpensive and publicly available rice oligonucleotide near-whole genome array, called the rice NSF45K array. We generated expression profiles for light- vs. dark-grown rice leaf tissue and validated the biological significance of the data by analyzing sources of variation and confirming expression trends with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We examined trends in the data by evaluating enrichment of gene ontology terms at multiple false discovery rate thresholds. To compare data generated with the NSF45K array with published results, we developed publicly available, web-based tools (www.ricearray.org). The Oligo and EST Anatomy Viewer enables visualization of EST-based expression profiling data for all genes on the array. The Rice Multi-platform Microarray Search Tool facilitates comparison of gene expression profiles across multiple rice microarray platforms. Finally, we incorporated gene expression and biochemical pathway data to reduce the number of candidate gene products putatively participating in the eight steps of the photorespiration pathway from 52 to 10, based on expression levels of putatively functionally redundant genes. We confirmed the efficacy of this method to cope with redundancy by correctly predicting participation in photorespiration of a gene with five paralogs. Applying these methods will accelerate rice functional genomics. PMID:18836531

  17. Microarray Applications in Microbial Ecology Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, T.; Schadt, C.; Zhou, J.

    2006-04-06

    Microarray technology has the unparalleled potential tosimultaneously determine the dynamics and/or activities of most, if notall, of the microbial populations in complex environments such as soilsand sediments. Researchers have developed several types of arrays thatcharacterize the microbial populations in these samples based on theirphylogenetic relatedness or functional genomic content. Several recentstudies have used these microarrays to investigate ecological issues;however, most have only analyzed a limited number of samples withrelatively few experiments utilizing the full high-throughput potentialof microarray analysis. This is due in part to the unique analyticalchallenges that these samples present with regard to sensitivity,specificity, quantitation, and data analysis. This review discussesspecific applications of microarrays to microbial ecology research alongwith some of the latest studies addressing the difficulties encounteredduring analysis of complex microbial communities within environmentalsamples. With continued development, microarray technology may ultimatelyachieve its potential for comprehensive, high-throughput characterizationof microbial populations in near real-time.

  18. Real-time DNA microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2009-01-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e. real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation in the capturing spots, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other signal amplitude-affecting non-idealities. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing in microarrays, similar to all affinity-based biosensors, is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we subsequently use as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to empirically validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:19723688

  19. Real-time DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2009-11-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e. real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation in the capturing spots, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other signal amplitude-affecting non-idealities. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing in microarrays, similar to all affinity-based biosensors, is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we subsequently use as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to empirically validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:19723688

  20. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  1. Surface characterization of oligonucleotides immobilized on polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Duy K.; Ivanova, Elena P.; Wright, Jonathan P.; Grodzinski, Piotr A.; Lenigk, Ralf; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2002-11-01

    The immobilization and hybridization of amino-terminated oligonucleotide strands to cyclo-olefin-copolymer (COC) and polycarbonate (PC) surfaces have been investigated for potential application in micro-PCR devices. The oligonucleotides were covalently bound to the plasma-treated COC and PC surfaces via an N-hydroxy-sulfosuccinimide (NHSS) intermediate. Analysis by AFM showed that the oligonucleotides were present on the surfaces as lumps, and that the size, both vertically and laterally, of these lumps on the COC surface was larger compared to the PC surface. The immobilization efficiency of the former was also higher (15.8 x 1012 molecules / cm2) compared to the latter (3.3 x 1012 molecules / cm2). The higher efficiency of the COC surface is attributed to the more effective NHSS-functionalization and its higher surface roughness. Subsequent hybridization doubled the height of the lumps, while the lateral dimensions remained essentially unchanged. This is explained in terms of organization of the long probe strands used on the surface as flexible, coil-like polymer chains, which allow the complementary oligonucleotides to bind and increase the height of the lumps. The AFM frictional images showed that the hybridization had the effect of reversing hydrophilicity of the oligonucleotide lumps from being more hydrophilic to more hydrophobic, consistent with the hydrophilic bases of the probe strands being shielded as a result of hybridization.

  2. Structure and stability of the complex formed by oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Cui; Niu, Lin; Yan, Jingjing; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; Liang, Dehai

    2012-05-28

    Polycations and cationic lipids have been widely used as non-viral vectors for the delivery of plasmid DNA, siRNA and anti-sense oligonucleotides. To demonstrate that one polycation can form a complex with several types of DNA, we conducted a comparative study on the complexation of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) with 2000 bp salmon testes DNA (dsDNA), 21 bp double-stranded oligonucleotides (ds-oligo), and 21 nt single-stranded oligonucleotides (ss-oligo) in PBS buffer. The complexes are prepared by a titration method and the process is monitored by laser light scattering. It was found that in most cases, ss-oligo and ds-oligo form complexes with higher molecular weights than the complex formed by dsDNA at the same +/- ratio immediately after mixing. More importantly, the complexes formed by oligonucleotides are not stable, the scattered intensity gradually decreases to the level of the solvent in weeks. Atomic force microscopy measurements also indicate that the freshly prepared complex is subject to environmental changes and could dissociate very quickly. The behaviour of oligonucleotides cannot be predicted by the classical polyelectrolyte theories.

  3. Characteristic archaebacterial 16S rRNA oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, T. J.; Jurka, J.; Sobieski, J. M.; Pickett, M. H.; Woese, C. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    A method of analyzing 16S rRNA catalog data has been developed in which groupings at various taxonomic levels can be characterized in terms of specific "signature" oligonucleotides. This approach provides an alternative means for evaluating higher order branching possibilities and can be used to assess the phylogenetic position of isolates that are poorly placed by the usual clustering procedures. This signature approach has been applied to forty archaebacterial catalogs and every oligonucleotide with significant signature value has been identified. Sets of specific oligonucleotides were identified for every major group on a dendrogram produced by cluster analysis procedures. Signatures that would establish between group relationships were also sought and found. In the case of the Methanobacteriaceae the clustering methods suggest a specific relationship to the Methanococcaceae. This inclusion is in fact supported by six strong signature oligonucleotides. However there are also significant numbers of signature oligonucleotides supporting a specific relationship of the Methanobacteriaceae to either the Halobacteriaceae or the Methanomicrobiaceae. Thus the placement of the Methanobacteriaceae is less certain than the usual dendrograms imply. The signature approach also was used to assess the phylogenetic position of Thermoplasma acidophilum which is found to be more closely related to the methanogen/halophile Division than to the sulfur dependent Division of the archaebacteria. This does not imply however that Thermoplasma acidophilum is properly regarded as being in the methanogen/halophile Division.

  4. Molecular beacon probes of photodamage in thymine and uracil oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Yarasi, Soujanya; McConachie, Cheryl; Loppnow, Glen R

    2005-01-01

    Molecular beacons (MB) are becoming more common as sequence-selective detectors of nucleic acids. Although they can easily detect single-base mismatches, they have never been used to directly detect DNA or RNA damage. To measure the degree of ultraviolet (UV) light damage in oligonucleotides, we report a novel MB approach for general detection of photoproducts in UV-irradiated rU17 and dT17 oligonucleotides. With monochromatic UV light irradiation at ca 280 nm under anoxic conditions, the oligonucleotide absorption decays with a single-exponential time constant of 123+/-1 min for rU17 and with double-exponential time constants of 78+/-0.5 min (99%) and 180+/-5 min (0.05%) for dT17 oligonucleotides. Under the same conditions, the MB fluorescence decays more quickly, with single-exponential time constants of 19+/-2 and 26+/-3 min for rU17 and dT17, respectively. Similar kinetics were observed with broadband UV light irradiation of oligonucleotides. The differences in the UV damage kinetics of dT17 and rU17 and their detection by absorption and fluorescence techniques will be discussed in the context of differential instabilities introduced in the nucleic acid-MB duplex by the different photoproducts formed.

  5. A highly oriented hybrid microarray modified electrode fabricated by a template-free method for ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Chu, Zhenyu; Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Dempsey, Eithne

    2013-10-01

    Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and influence the morphologies of hybrid films. A highly oriented hybrid microarray was formed on the highly aligned and vertical SAMs of 1,4-benzenedithiol molecules with rigid backbones, which afforded an intense structure-directing power for the oriented growth of hybrid crystals. Additionally, the density of the microarray could be adjusted by controlling the surface coverage of assembled molecules. Based on the hybrid microarray modified electrode with a large specific area (ca. 10 times its geometrical area), a label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor was constructed for the detection of an oligonucleotide fragment of the avian flu virus H5N1. The DNA biosensor displayed a significantly low detection limit of 5 pM (S/N = 3), a wide linear response from 10 pM to 10 nM, as well as excellent selectivity, good regeneration and high stability. We expect that the proposed template-free method can provide a new reference for the fabrication of a highly oriented hybrid array and the as-prepared microarray modified electrode will be a promising paradigm in constructing highly sensitive and selective biosensors.Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and

  6. Rapid and accurate synthesis of TALE genes from synthetic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenghua; Zhang, Hefei; Gao, Jingxia; Chen, Fengjiao; Chen, Sijie; Zhang, Cuizhen; Peng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Custom synthesis of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) genes has relied upon plasmid libraries of pre-fabricated TALE-repeat monomers or oligomers. Here we describe a novel synthesis method that directly incorporates annealed synthetic oligonucleotides into the TALE-repeat units. Our approach utilizes iterative sets of oligonucleotides and a translational frame check strategy to ensure the high efficiency and accuracy of TALE-gene synthesis. TALE arrays of more than 20 repeats can be constructed, and the majority of the synthesized constructs have perfect sequences. In addition, this novel oligonucleotide-based method can readily accommodate design changes to the TALE repeats. We demonstrated an increased gene targeting efficiency against a genomic site containing a potentially methylated cytosine by incorporating non-conventional repeat variable di-residue (RVD) sequences.

  7. An undergraduate laboratory exercise to study the effect of darkness on plant gene expression using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Mei; Briggs, George M

    2007-11-01

    DNA microarrays are microscopic arrays on a solid surface, typically a glass slide, on which DNA oligonucleotides are deposited or synthesized in a high-density matrix with a predetermined spatial order. Several types of DNA microarrays have been developed and used for various biological studies. Here, we developed an undergraduate laboratory exercise using an Arabidopsis DNA microarray to study the gene expression of Brassica rapa, Wisconsin Fast Plant. Genes involved in senescence, cell wall loosening/degradation, and sugar transport were the most upregulated, while those involved in photosynthesis, the elimination of reactive oxygen intermediates associated with photooxidative stress and auxin synthesis, were the most downregulated. Students were able to complete the experiment successfully. Throughout the exercise, they learned various important molecular techniques including RNA isolation, quantification, reverse transcription, cRNA synthesis, labeling and purification, and microarray hybridization, washing, scanning, and feature extraction. The exercise can be integrated into a college-level molecular biology laboratory. The procedure used can be adapted to examine other effects on other organisms.

  8. An undergraduate laboratory exercise to study the effect of darkness on plant gene expression using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Mei; Briggs, George M

    2007-11-01

    DNA microarrays are microscopic arrays on a solid surface, typically a glass slide, on which DNA oligonucleotides are deposited or synthesized in a high-density matrix with a predetermined spatial order. Several types of DNA microarrays have been developed and used for various biological studies. Here, we developed an undergraduate laboratory exercise using an Arabidopsis DNA microarray to study the gene expression of Brassica rapa, Wisconsin Fast Plant. Genes involved in senescence, cell wall loosening/degradation, and sugar transport were the most upregulated, while those involved in photosynthesis, the elimination of reactive oxygen intermediates associated with photooxidative stress and auxin synthesis, were the most downregulated. Students were able to complete the experiment successfully. Throughout the exercise, they learned various important molecular techniques including RNA isolation, quantification, reverse transcription, cRNA synthesis, labeling and purification, and microarray hybridization, washing, scanning, and feature extraction. The exercise can be integrated into a college-level molecular biology laboratory. The procedure used can be adapted to examine other effects on other organisms. PMID:21591140

  9. Feasibility of assessing the community composition of prasinophytes at the Helgoland Roads sampling site with a DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Gescher, Christine; Metfies, Katja; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Knefelkamp, Britta; Wiltshire, Karen H; Medlin, Linda K

    2008-09-01

    The microalgal class Prasinophyceae (Chlorophyta) contains several picoeukaryotic species, which are known to be common in temperate and cold waters and have been observed to constitute major fractions of marine picoplankton. However, reliable detection and classification of prasinophytes are mainly hampered by their small size and few morphological markers. Consequently, very little is known about the abundance and ecology of the members of this class. In order to facilitate the assessment of the abundance of the Prasinophyceae, we have designed and evaluated an 18S rRNA gene-targeted oligonucleotide microarray consisting of 21 probes targeting different taxonomic levels of prasinophytes. The microarray contains both previously published probes from other hybridization methods and new probes, which were designed for novel prasinophyte groups. The evaluation of the probe set was done under stringent conditions with 18S PCR fragments from 20 unialgal reference cultures used as positive targets. This microarray has been applied to assess the community composition of prasinophytes at Helgoland, an island in the North Sea where time series data are collected and analyzed daily but only for the nano- and microplankton-size fractions. There is no identification of prasinophytes other than to record them numerically in the flagellate fraction. The samples were collected every 2 weeks between February 2004 and December 2006. The study here demonstrates the potential of DNA microarrays to be applied as a tool for quick general monitoring of this important picoplanktonic algal group.

  10. A novel catechol-based universal support for oligonucleotide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Keith M; Jaquinod, Laurent; Jensen, Michael A; Ngo, Nam; Davis, Ronald W

    2007-12-21

    A novel universal support for deoxyribo- and ribonucleic acid synthesis has been developed. The support, constructed from 1,4-dimethoxycatechol, represents an improvement over existing universal supports because of its ability to cleave and deprotect under mild conditions in standard reagents. Because no nonvolatile additives are required for cleavage and deprotection, the synthesized oligonucleotides do not require purification prior to use in biochemical assays. Using reverse phase HPLC and electrospray mass spectroscopy, it was determined that oligonucleotides synthesized on the universal support (UL1) 3'-dephosphorylate quickly (9 h in 28-30% ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) at 55 degrees C, 2 h in 28-30% NH4OH at 80 degrees C, or <1 h in ammonium hydroxide/methylamine (1:1) (AMA) at 80 degrees C). Oligonucleotides used as primers for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay were found to perform identically to control primers, demonstrating full biological compatibility. In addition, a method was developed for sintering the universal support directly into a filter plug which can be pressure fit into the synthesis column of a commercial synthesizer. The universal support plugs allow the synthesis of high-quality oligonucleotides at least 120 nucleotides in length, with purity comparable to non-universal commercial supports and approximately 50% lower reagent consumption. The universal support plugs are routinely used to synthesize deoxyribo-, ribo-, 3'-modified, 5'-modified, and thioated oligonucleotides. The flexibility of the universal support and the efficiency of 3'-dephosphorylation are expected to increase the use of universal supports in oligonucleotide synthesis.

  11. Oligonucleotide Array for Identification and Detection of Pythium Species†

    PubMed Central

    Tambong, J. T.; de Cock, A. W. A. M.; Tinker, N. A.; Lévesque, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    A DNA array containing 172 oligonucleotides complementary to specific diagnostic regions of internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of more than 100 species was developed for identification and detection of Pythium species. All of the species studied, with the exception of Pythium ostracodes, exhibited a positive hybridization reaction with at least one corresponding species-specific oligonucleotide. Hybridization patterns were distinct for each species. The array hybridization patterns included cluster-specific oligonucleotides that facilitated the recognition of species, including new ones, belonging to groups such as those producing filamentous or globose sporangia. BLAST analyses against 500 publicly available Pythium sequences in GenBank confirmed that species-specific oligonucleotides were unique to all of the available strains of each species, of which there were numerous economically important ones. GenBank entries of newly described species that are not putative synonyms showed no homology to sequences of the spotted species-specific oligonucleotides, but most new species did match some of the cluster-specific oligonucleotides. Further verification of the specificity of the DNA array was done with 50 additional Pythium isolates obtained by soil dilution plating. The hybridization patterns obtained were consistent with the identification of these isolates based on morphology and ITS sequence analyses. In another blind test, total DNA of the same soil samples was amplified and hybridized on the array, and the results were compared to those of 130 Pythium isolates obtained by soil dilution plating and root baiting. The 13 species detected by the DNA array corresponded to the isolates obtained by a combination of soil dilution plating and baiting, except for one new species that was not represented on the array. We conclude that the reported DNA array is a reliable tool for identification and detection of the majority of Pythium species in environmental samples

  12. Identification of candidate lung cancer susceptibility genes in mouse using oligonucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, W; Bernert, H; Sun, H; Wang, Y; You, M

    2002-01-01

    We applied microarray gene expression profiling to lungs from mouse strains having variable susceptibility to lung tumour development as a means to identify, within known quantitative trait loci (QTLs), candidate genes responsible for susceptibility or resistance to lung cancer. At least eight chromosomal regions of mice have been mapped and verified to be linked with lung tumour susceptibility or resistance. In this study, high density oligonucleotide arrays were used to measure the relative expression levels of >36 000 genes and ESTs in lung tissues of A/J, BALB/cJ, SM/J, C3H/HeJ, and C57BL/6J mice. A number of differentially expressed genes were found in each of the lung cancer susceptibility QTLs. Bioinformatic analysis of the differentially expressed genes located within QTLs produced 28 susceptibility candidates and 22 resistance candidates. These candidates may be extremely helpful in the ultimate identification of the precise genes responsible for lung tumour susceptibility or resistance in mice and, through follow up, humans. Complete data sets are available at http://thinker.med.ohio-state.edu. PMID:12205107

  13. Discovery of molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection using cell-based bioassays and oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Sarang, Satinder S; Yoshida, Takumi; Cadet, Rodolphe; Valeras, Andrew S; Jensen, Roderick V; Gullans, Steven R

    2002-10-29

    Oxidative injury and the resulting death of neurons is a major pathological factor involved in numerous neurodegenerative diseases. However, the development of drugs that target this mechanism remains limited. The goal of this study was to test a compound library of approved Food and Drug Administration drugs against a hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidant injury model in neuroblastoma cells. We identified 26 neuroprotective compounds, of which megestrol, meclizine, verapamil, methazolamide, sulindac, and retinol were examined in greater detail. Using large-scale oligonucleotide microarray analysis, we identified genes modulated by these drugs that might underlie the cytoprotection. Five key genes were either uniformly upregulated or downregulated by all six drug treatments, namely, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP1), ret-proto-oncogene, clusterin, galanin, and growth associated protein (GAP43). Exogenous addition of the neuropeptide galanin alone conferred survival to oxidant-stressed cells, comparable to that seen with the drugs. Our approach, which we term "interventional profiling," represents a general and powerful strategy for identifying new bioactive agents for any biological process, as well as identifying key downstream genes and pathways that are involved. PMID:12388792

  14. Ribonuclease H1-dependent hepatotoxicity caused by locked nucleic acid-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Takeshi; Hori, Shin-Ichiro; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Gahara, Yoshinari; Rokushima, Masatomo; Yanagimoto, Toru; Kugimiya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Gapmer antisense oligonucleotides cleave target RNA effectively in vivo, and is considered as promising therapeutics. Especially, gapmers modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) shows potent knockdown activity; however, they also cause hepatotoxic side effects. For developing safe and effective gapmer drugs, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity is required. Here, we investigated the cause of hepatotoxicity derived from LNA-modified gapmers. Chemical modification of gapmer's gap region completely suppressed both knockdown activity and hepatotoxicity, indicating that the root cause of hepatotoxicity is related to intracellular gapmer activity. Gene silencing of hepatic ribonuclease H1 (RNaseH1), which catalyses gapmer-mediated RNA knockdown, strongly supressed hepatotoxic effects. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of a target mRNA did not result in any hepatotoxic effects, while the gapmer targeting the same position on mRNA as does the siRNA showed acute toxicity. Microarray analysis revealed that several pre-mRNAs containing a sequence similar to the gapmer target were also knocked down. These results suggest that hepatotoxicity of LNA gapmer is caused by RNAseH1 activity, presumably because of off-target cleavage of RNAs inside nuclei. PMID:27461380

  15. Ribonuclease H1-dependent hepatotoxicity caused by locked nucleic acid-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Takeshi; Hori, Shin-ichiro; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Gahara, Yoshinari; Rokushima, Masatomo; Yanagimoto, Toru; Kugimiya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Gapmer antisense oligonucleotides cleave target RNA effectively in vivo, and is considered as promising therapeutics. Especially, gapmers modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) shows potent knockdown activity; however, they also cause hepatotoxic side effects. For developing safe and effective gapmer drugs, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity is required. Here, we investigated the cause of hepatotoxicity derived from LNA-modified gapmers. Chemical modification of gapmer’s gap region completely suppressed both knockdown activity and hepatotoxicity, indicating that the root cause of hepatotoxicity is related to intracellular gapmer activity. Gene silencing of hepatic ribonuclease H1 (RNaseH1), which catalyses gapmer-mediated RNA knockdown, strongly supressed hepatotoxic effects. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of a target mRNA did not result in any hepatotoxic effects, while the gapmer targeting the same position on mRNA as does the siRNA showed acute toxicity. Microarray analysis revealed that several pre-mRNAs containing a sequence similar to the gapmer target were also knocked down. These results suggest that hepatotoxicity of LNA gapmer is caused by RNAseH1 activity, presumably because of off-target cleavage of RNAs inside nuclei. PMID:27461380

  16. Microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic immunoassay system.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsik; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-05-01

    A microarray-based analytical platform has been utilized as a powerful tool in biological assay fields. However, an analyte depletion problem due to the slow mass transport based on molecular diffusion causes low reaction efficiency, resulting in a limitation for practical applications. This paper presents a novel method to improve the efficiency of microarray-based immunoassay via an optically induced electrokinetic phenomenon by integrating an optoelectrofluidic device with a conventional glass slide-based microarray format. A sample droplet was loaded between the microarray slide and the optoelectrofluidic device on which a photoconductive layer was deposited. Under the application of an AC voltage, optically induced AC electroosmotic flows caused by a microarray-patterned light actively enhanced the mass transport of target molecules at the multiple assay spots of the microarray simultaneously, which reduced tedious reaction time from more than 30 min to 10 min. Based on this enhancing effect, a heterogeneous immunoassay with a tiny volume of sample (5 μl) was successfully performed in the microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic system using immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-IgG, resulting in improved efficiency compared to the static environment. Furthermore, the application of multiplex assays was also demonstrated by multiple protein detection.

  17. Genome Engineering Using Targeted Oligonucleotide Libraries and Functional Selection

    PubMed Central

    Diner, Elie J.; Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The λ phage Red proteins greatly enhance homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Red-mediated recombination or “recombineering” can be used to construct targeted gene deletions as well as to introduce point mutations into the genome. Here, we describe our method for scanning mutagenesis using recombineered oligonucleotide libraries. This approach entails randomization of specific codons within a target gene, followed by functional selection to isolate mutants. Oligonucleotide library mutagenesis has generated hundreds of novel antibiotic resistance mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins, and should be applicable to other systems for which functional selections exist. PMID:21815087

  18. Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens using a PCR- and microarray-based assay

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background During the course of a bacterial infection, the rapid identification of the causative agent(s) is necessary for the determination of effective treatment options. We have developed a method based on a modified broad-range PCR and an oligonucleotide microarray for the simultaneous detection and identification of 12 bacterial pathogens at the species level. The broad-range PCR primer mixture was designed using conserved regions of the bacterial topoisomerase genes gyrB and parE. The primer design allowed the use of a novel DNA amplification method, which produced labeled, single-stranded DNA suitable for microarray hybridization. The probes on the microarray were designed from the alignments of species- or genus-specific variable regions of the gyrB and parE genes flanked by the primers. We included mecA-specific primers and probes in the same assay to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The feasibility of this assay in routine diagnostic testing was evaluated using 146 blood culture positive and 40 blood culture negative samples. Results Comparison of our results with those of a conventional culture-based method revealed a sensitivity of 96% (initial sensitivity of 82%) and specificity of 98%. Furthermore, only one cross-reaction was observed upon investigating 102 culture isolates from 70 untargeted bacteria. The total assay time was only three hours, including the time required for the DNA extraction, PCR and microarray steps in sequence. Conclusion The assay rapidly provides reliable data, which can guide optimal antimicrobial treatment decisions in a timely manner. PMID:19664269

  19. Selective detection of live bacteria combining propidium monoazide sample treatment with microarray technology.

    PubMed

    Nocker, Andreas; Mazza, Alberto; Masson, Luke; Camper, Anne K; Brousseau, Roland

    2009-03-01

    The use of DNA-based molecular detection tools for bacterial diagnostics is hampered by the inability to distinguish signals originating from live and dead cells. The detection of live cells is typically most relevant in molecular diagnostics. DNA-intercalating dyes like ethidium monoazide and propidium monoazide (PMA) offer a possibility to selectively remove cells with compromised cell membranes from the analysis. Once these dyes enter a cell, they bind to DNA and can be covalently crosslinked to it by light exposure. PCR amplification of such modified DNA is strongly inhibited. In this study we evaluated the suitability of propidium monoazide treatment to exclude isopropanol-killed cells from detection in defined mixtures using diagnostic microarray technology. The organisms comprised Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Serratia marcescens, and Escherichia coli O157:H7. PCR products obtained from amplification of chaperonin 60 genes (cpn60; coding for GroEL) were hybridized to a custom-designed microarray containing strain-specific cpn60-based 35-mer oligonucleotide probes. Results were compared with data from quantitative PCR, which confirmed that PMA could successfully inhibit amplification of DNA from killed cells in the mixtures. Although microarray data based on analysis of end-point PCR amplicons is not quantitative, results showed a significant signal reduction when targeting killed cells and consistently agreed with qPCR results. Treatment of samples with PMA in combination with diagnostic microarray detection can therefore be considered beneficial when analyzing mixtures of intact and membrane-compromised cells. Minimization of detection signals deriving from dead cells will render data more relevant in studies including pathogen risk assessment.

  20. Progress in the application of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed Central

    Lobenhofer, E K; Bushel, P R; Afshari, C A; Hamadeh, H K

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology has been applied to a variety of different fields to address fundamental research questions. The use of microarrays, or DNA chips, to study the gene expression profiles of biologic samples began in 1995. Since that time, the fundamental concepts behind the chip, the technology required for making and using these chips, and the multitude of statistical tools for analyzing the data have been extensively reviewed. For this reason, the focus of this review will be not on the technology itself but on the application of microarrays as a research tool and the future challenges of the field. PMID:11673116

  1. DNA Microarrays in Herbal Drug Research

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Preeti; Joshi, Kalpana; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2006-01-01

    Natural products are gaining increased applications in drug discovery and development. Being chemically diverse they are able to modulate several targets simultaneously in a complex system. Analysis of gene expression becomes necessary for better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Conventional strategies for expression profiling are optimized for single gene analysis. DNA microarrays serve as suitable high throughput tool for simultaneous analysis of multiple genes. Major practical applicability of DNA microarrays remains in DNA mutation and polymorphism analysis. This review highlights applications of DNA microarrays in pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and quality control of herbal drugs and extracts. PMID:17173108

  2. The 18S rDNA sequence of Synchytrium endobioticum and its utility in microarrays for the simultaneous detection of fungal and viral pathogens of potato.

    PubMed

    Abdullahi, Ismail; Koerbler, Marianne; Stachewicz, Hans; Winter, Stephan

    2005-08-01

    Resting spores extracted from wart (Synchytrium endobioticum)-infected potato tubers were used for DNA extraction and amplification of 18S rDNA. Analysis of the cloned, sequenced fragment revealed high similarity to members of the Chytridiomycota. Using this information, specific oligonucleotide probes were designed and arrayed onto glass slides for detection of the pathogen. Viral sequence information available in the databank was retrieved, or new viral sequences were generated, and used to design probes for specific detection of important quarantine viruses of potato. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the oligonucleotide probes, total RNA from infected plants was reverse transcribed, labelled with Cyanine 5, and hybridised with the microarray. A significant number of the oligonucleotide probes exhibited high specificity to S. endobioticum, Andean potato latent virus, Andean potato mottle virus, Potato black ringspot virus, and Potato spindle tuber viroid. Hybridisation signals of sub-arrays within slides were reproducible (r = 0.79) with a high correlation coefficient of hybridisation repetitions (0.73). Our results demonstrate the potential of microarray-based hybridisation for identification of multiple pathogen targets, which will find application in quarantine laboratories, where parallel testing for diverse pathogens is essential. PMID:15800764

  3. Biological data warehousing system for identifying transcriptional regulatory sites from gene expressions of microarray data.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Ann-Ping; Sun, Yi-Ming; Liu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Hsien-Da; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Tsai, Meng-Feng; Liu, Baw-Juine

    2006-07-01

    Identification of transcriptional regulatory sites plays an important role in the investigation of gene regulation. For this propose, we designed and implemented a data warehouse to integrate multiple heterogeneous biological data sources with data types such as text-file, XML, image, MySQL database model, and Oracle database model. The utility of the biological data warehouse in predicting transcriptional regulatory sites of coregulated genes was explored using a synexpression group derived from a microarray study. Both of the binding sites of known transcription factors and predicted over-represented (OR) oligonucleotides were demonstrated for the gene group. The potential biological roles of both known nucleotides and one OR nucleotide were demonstrated using bioassays. Therefore, the results from the wet-lab experiments reinforce the power and utility of the data warehouse as an approach to the genome-wide search for important transcription regulatory elements that are the key to many complex biological systems.

  4. Direct covalent attachment of DNA microarrays by rapid thiol-ene "click" chemistry.

    PubMed

    Escorihuela, Jorge; Bañuls, María-José; Grijalvo, Santiago; Eritja, Ramón; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Angel

    2014-03-19

    A rapid strategy for the covalent immobilization of DNA onto silicon-based materials using the UV-initiated radical thiol-ene reaction is presented in this study. Following this approach, thiol- and alkene-modified oligonucleotide probes were covalently attached in microarray format, reaching immobilization densities around 6 pmol·cm(-2). The developed methodology presents the advantages of spatially controlled probe anchoring (using a photomask), direct attachment without using cross-linkers (one-pot fashion), and short irradiation times (20 min). Using the described strategy, hybridization efficiencies up to 65% with full complementary strands were reached. The approach was evaluated by scoring single-base pair mismatches with discrimination ratios around 15. Moreover, the efficacy of the proposed DNA detection scheme is further demonstrated through the assay on a genomic target of bacterial Escherichia coli.

  5. Phylogenetic microarrays for cultivation-independent identification and metabolic characterization of microorganisms in complex samples.

    PubMed

    Loy, Alexander; Pester, Michael; Steger, Doris

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing and hybridization technologies promise new insights into the natural diversity and dynamics of microorganisms. Among these new technologies are phylogenetic oligonucleotide microarrays (phylochips) that depend on the standard molecules for taxonomic and environmental studies of microorganisms: the ribosomal RNAs and their encoding genes. The beauty of phylochip hybridization is that a sample can be analyzed with hundreds to thousands of rRNA (gene)-targeted probes simultaneously, lending itself to the efficient diagnosis of many target organisms in many samples. An emerging application of phylochips is the highly parallel analysis of structure-function relationships of microbial community members by employing in vivo substrate-mediated isotope labeling of rRNA (via the isotope array approach). This chapter provides an introduction to phylochip and isotope array analysis and detailed wet-lab protocols for preparation, labeling, and hybridization of target nucleic acids.

  6. A DNA microarray for the authentication of toxic traditional Chinese medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Carles, Maria; Cheung, Matthew Kin; Moganti, Shanti; Dong, Tina T; Tsim, Karl W; Ip, Nancy Y; Sucher, Nikolaus J

    2005-06-01

    A silicon-based DNA microarray was designed and fabricated for the identification of toxic traditional Chinese medicinal plants. Species-specific oligonucleotide probes were derived from the 5S ribosomal RNA gene of Aconitum carmichaeli, A. kusnezoffi, Alocasia macrorrhiza, Croton tiglium, Datura inoxia, D. metel, D. tatula, Dysosma pleiantha, Dy. versipellis, Euphorbia kansui, Hyoscyamus niger, Pinellia cordata, P. pedatisecta, P. ternata, Rhododendron molle, Strychnos nux-vomica, Typhonium divaricatum and T. giganteum and the leucine transfer RNA gene of Aconitum pendulum and Stellera chamaejasme. The probes were immobilized via dithiol linkage on a silicon chip. Genomic target sequences were amplified and fluorescently labeled by asymmetric polymerase chain reaction. Multiple toxic plant species were identified by parallel genotyping. Chip-based authentication of medicinal plants may be useful as inexpensive and rapid tool for quality control and safety monitoring of herbal pharmaceuticals and neutraceuticals. PMID:15971136

  7. Fabrication of polyurethane molecular stamps for the synthesis of DNA microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengchun; He, Quanguo; Xiao, Pengfeng; He, Nongyao; Lu, Zuhong; Bo, Liang

    2001-10-01

    Polyurethane based on polypropylene glycol (PPG) and Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) using 3,3'-dichloride-4,4'- methylenedianiline (MOCA) as the crosslinker is presented for the first time to fabricate molecular stamps (PU stamps) for the synthesis of DNA microarray with contact procedure. The predictability of the process is achieved by utilizing commercially available starting materials. SEM analysis of the morphology of PU stamps and master showed that PU elastometer could replicate subtly the motherboard's patterns with high fidelity. It was proved from the contact angle measurement that PU stamps surface has good affinity with acetonitrile, which guarantee the well-distribution of DNA monomers on patterned stamps. Laser confocal fluorescence microscopy images of oligonucleotide arrays confirmed polyurethane is an excellent material for molecular stamps.

  8. A New Chromosome X Exon-Specific Microarray Platform for Screening of Patients with X-Linked Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bashiardes, Stavros; Kousoulidou, Ludmila; van Bokhoven, Hans; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.; Van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Patsalis, Philippos C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies and advances in high-density oligonucleotide arrays have shown that microdeletions and microduplications occur at a high frequency in the human genome, causing various genetic conditions including mental retardation. Thus far little is known about the pathways leading to this disease, and implementation of microarrays is hampered by their increasing cost and complexity, underlining the need for new diagnostic tools. The aim of this study was to introduce a new targeted platform called “chromosome X exon-specific array” and to apply this new platform to screening of 20 families (including one blind positive control) with suspected X-linked mental retardation, to identify new causative X-linked mental retardation genes. The new microarray contains of 21,939 oligonucleotides covering 92.9% of all exons of all genes on chromosome X. Patient screening resulted in successful identification of the blind positive control included in the sample of 20 families, and one of the remaining 19 families was found to carry a 1.78-kilobase deletion involving all exons of pseudogene BRAF2. The BRAF2 deletion segregated in the family and was not found in 200 normal male samples, and no copy number variations are reported in this region. Further studies and focused investigation of X-linked disorders have the potential to reveal the molecular basis of human genetic pathological conditions that are caused by copy-number changes in chromosome X genes. PMID:19779134

  9. A new chromosome x exon-specific microarray platform for screening of patients with X-linked disorders.

    PubMed

    Bashiardes, Stavros; Kousoulidou, Ludmila; van Bokhoven, Hans; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies and advances in high-density oligonucleotide arrays have shown that microdeletions and microduplications occur at a high frequency in the human genome, causing various genetic conditions including mental retardation. Thus far little is known about the pathways leading to this disease, and implementation of microarrays is hampered by their increasing cost and complexity, underlining the need for new diagnostic tools. The aim of this study was to introduce a new targeted platform called "chromosome X exon-specific array" and to apply this new platform to screening of 20 families (including one blind positive control) with suspected X-linked mental retardation, to identify new causative X-linked mental retardation genes. The new microarray contains of 21,939 oligonucleotides covering 92.9% of all exons of all genes on chromosome X. Patient screening resulted in successful identification of the blind positive control included in the sample of 20 families, and one of the remaining 19 families was found to carry a 1.78-kilobase deletion involving all exons of pseudogene BRAF2. The BRAF2 deletion segregated in the family and was not found in 200 normal male samples, and no copy number variations are reported in this region. Further studies and focused investigation of X-linked disorders have the potential to reveal the molecular basis of human genetic pathological conditions that are caused by copy-number changes in chromosome X genes.

  10. Immunoassay, DNA Analysis, and Other Ligand Binding Assay Techniques: From Electropherograms to Multiplexed, Ultrasensitive Microarrays on a Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekins, Roger P.

    1999-06-01

    "Ligand" or "binding" assays have made a major impact on biomedical research and clinical diagnosis since their development in the late 1950s. Immunoassay techniques (relying on specific antibodies to bind the target analyte) represent the best-known example, but analogous DNA and RNA analysis methods (using oligonucleotides to recognize defined polynucleotide sequences) are rapidly gaining in importance and are likely to exert profound effects on human society. The evolution of these methods may be divided into three phases: (i) the initial development and widespread use of sensitive "competitive" assays relying on radioisotopically labeled analyte to monitor the binding reaction; (ii) the introduction in the 1980s of "ultrasensitive", "noncompetitive", labeled antibody methods relying on high-specific-activity nonisotopic labels, leading to the emergence of the automatic analyzers that now dominate the field, and (iii) the present development of "microarray"methods based on antibody or oligonucleotide microspots (each recognizing an individual analyte) arrayed on a solid support and relying on observation (typically by confocal microscopy) of fluorescent signals emitted from each spot. Miniaturized microarray methods permitting ultrasensitive measurement of hundreds of different analytes in a minute sample are likely to revolutionize medicine and related fields within the next decade.

  11. Comparison of microarray preprocessing methods.

    PubMed

    Shakya, K; Ruskin, H J; Kerr, G; Crane, M; Becker, J

    2010-01-01

    Data preprocessing in microarray technology is a crucial initial step before data analysis is performed. Many preprocessing methods have been proposed but none has proved to be ideal to date. Frequently, datasets are limited by laboratory constraints so that the need is for guidelines on quality and robustness, to inform further experimentation while data are yet restricted. In this paper, we compared the performance of four popular methods, namely MAS5, Li & Wong pmonly (LWPM), Li & Wong subtractMM (LWMM), and Robust Multichip Average (RMA). The comparison is based on the analysis carried out on sets of laboratory-generated data from the Bioinformatics Lab, National Institute of Cellular Biotechnology (NICB), Dublin City University, Ireland. These experiments were designed to examine the effect of Bromodeoxyuridine (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, BrdU) treatment in deep lamellar keratoplasty (DLKP) cells. The methodology employed is to assess dispersion across the replicates and analyze the false discovery rate. From the dispersion analysis, we found that variability is reduced more effectively by LWPM and RMA methods. From the false positive analysis, and for both parametric and nonparametric approaches, LWMM is found to perform best. Based on a complementary q-value analysis, LWMM approach again is the strongest candidate. The indications are that, while LWMM is marginally less effective than LWPM and RMA in terms of variance reduction, it has considerably improved discrimination overall.

  12. AMIC@: All MIcroarray Clusterings @ once.

    PubMed

    Geraci, Filippo; Pellegrini, Marco; Renda, M Elena

    2008-07-01

    The AMIC@ Web Server offers a light-weight multi-method clustering engine for microarray gene-expression data. AMIC@ is a highly interactive tool that stresses user-friendliness and robustness by adopting AJAX technology, thus allowing an effective interleaved execution of different clustering algorithms and inspection of results. Among the salient features AMIC@ offers, there are: (i) automatic file format detection, (ii) suggestions on the number of clusters using a variant of the stability-based method of Tibshirani et al. (iii) intuitive visual inspection of the data via heatmaps and (iv) measurements of the clustering quality using cluster homogeneity. Large data sets can be processed efficiently by selecting algorithms (such as FPF-SB and k-Boost), specifically designed for this purpose. In case of very large data sets, the user can opt for a batch-mode use of the system by means of the Clustering wizard that runs all algorithms at once and delivers the results via email. AMIC@ is freely available and open to all users with no login requirement at the following URL http://bioalgo.iit.cnr.it/amica.

  13. Protein Microarrays: Novel Developments and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Berrade, Luis; Garcia, Angie E.

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarray technology possesses some of the greatest potential for providing direct information on protein function and potential drug targets. For example, functional protein microarrays are ideal tools suited for the mapping of biological pathways. They can be used to study most major types of interactions and enzymatic activities that take place in biochemical pathways and have been used for the analysis of simultaneous multiple biomolecular interactions involving protein-protein, protein-lipid, protein-DNA and protein-small molecule interactions. Because of this unique ability to analyze many kinds of molecular interactions en masse, the requirement of very small sample amount and the potential to be miniaturized and automated, protein microarrays are extremely well suited for protein profiling, drug discovery, drug target identification and clinical prognosis and diagnosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the production, applications and analysis of protein microarrays. PMID:21116694

  14. Quality Visualization of Microarray Datasets Using Circos

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Martin; Wiese, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Quality control and normalization is considered the most important step in the analysis of microarray data. At present there are various methods available for quality assessments of microarray datasets. However there seems to be no standard visualization routine, which also depicts individual microarray quality. Here we present a convenient method for visualizing the results of standard quality control tests using Circos plots. In these plots various quality measurements are drawn in a circular fashion, thus allowing for visualization of the quality and all outliers of each distinct array within a microarray dataset. The proposed method is intended for use with the Affymetrix Human Genome platform (i.e., GPL 96, GPL570 and GPL571). Circos quality measurement plots are a convenient way for the initial quality estimate of Affymetrix datasets that are stored in publicly available databases.

  15. Genomic Imbalances in Neonates With Birth Defects: High Detection Rates by Using Chromosomal Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin-Yan; Phung, Mai T.; Shaw, Chad A.; Pham, Kim; Neil, Sarah E.; Patel, Ankita; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Lee Kang, Sung-Hae; Lalani, Seema; Chinault, A. Craig; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau W.; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Our aim was to determine the frequency of genomic imbalances in neonates with birth defects by using targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization, also known as chromosomal microarray analysis. METHODS Between March 2006 and September 2007, 638 neonates with various birth defects were referred for chromosomal microarray analysis. Three consecutive chromosomal microarray analysis versions were used: bacterial artificial chromosome-based versions V5 and V6 and bacterial artificial chromosome emulated oligonucleotide-based version V6 Oligo. Each version had targeted but increasingly extensive genomic coverage and interrogated >150 disease loci with enhanced coverage in genomic rearrangement-prone pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions. RESULTS Overall, 109 (17.1%) patients were identified with clinically significant abnormalities with detection rates of 13.7%, 16.6%, and 19.9% on V5, V6, and V6 Oligo, respectively. The majority of these abnormalities would not be defined by using karyotype analysis. The clinically significant detection rates by use of chromosomal microarray analysis for various clinical indications were 66.7% for “possible chromosomal abnormality” ± “others” (other clinical indications), 33.3% for ambiguous genitalia ± others, 27.1% for dysmorphic features + multiple congenital anomalies ± others, 24.6% for dysmorphic features ± others, 21.8% for congenital heart disease ± others, 17.9% for multiple congenital anomalies ± others, and 9.5% for the patients referred for others that were different from the groups defined. In all, 16 (2.5%) patients had chromosomal aneuploidies, and 81 (12.7%) patients had segmental aneusomies including common microdeletion or microduplication syndromes and other genomic disorders. Chromosomal mosaicism was found in 12 (1.9%) neonates. CONCLUSIONS Chromosomal microarray analysis is a valuable clinical diagnostic tool that allows precise and rapid identification of genomic imbalances

  16. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed.

  17. Chromosome-specific painting in Cucumis species using bulked oligonucleotides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome-specific painting is a powerful technique in molecular cytogenetic and genome research. We developed an oligonucleotide (oligo)-based chromosome painting technique in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) that will be applicable in any plant species with a sequenced genome. Oligos specific to a sing...

  18. Contributions to Statistical Problems Related to Microarray Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Microarray is a high throughput technology to measure the gene expression. Analysis of microarray data brings many interesting and challenging problems. This thesis consists three studies related to microarray data. First, we propose a Bayesian model for microarray data and use Bayes Factors to identify differentially expressed genes. Second, we…

  19. The Impact of Photobleaching on Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    von der Haar, Marcel; Preuß, John-Alexander; von der Haar, Kathrin; Lindner, Patrick; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    DNA-Microarrays have become a potent technology for high-throughput analysis of genetic regulation. However, the wide dynamic range of signal intensities of fluorophore-based microarrays exceeds the dynamic range of a single array scan by far, thus limiting the key benefit of microarray technology: parallelization. The implementation of multi-scan techniques represents a promising approach to overcome these limitations. These techniques are, in turn, limited by the fluorophores' susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner's laser light. In this paper the photobleaching characteristics of cyanine-3 and cyanine-5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays are studied. The effects of initial fluorophore intensity as well as laser scanner dependent variables such as the photomultiplier tube's voltage on bleaching and imaging are investigated. The resulting data is used to develop a model capable of simulating the expected degree of signal intensity reduction caused by photobleaching for each fluorophore individually, allowing for the removal of photobleaching-induced, systematic bias in multi-scan procedures. Single-scan applications also benefit as they rely on pre-scans to determine the optimal scanner settings. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the lab-to-lab comparability of microarray experiment results. PMID:26378589

  20. Automated analytical microarrays: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard

    2008-07-01

    Microarrays provide a powerful analytical tool for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes in a single experiment. The specific affinity reaction of nucleic acids (hybridization) and antibodies towards antigens is the most common bioanalytical method for generating multiplexed quantitative results. Nucleic acid-based analysis is restricted to the detection of cells and viruses. Antibodies are more universal biomolecular receptors that selectively bind small molecules such as pesticides, small toxins, and pharmaceuticals and to biopolymers (e.g. toxins, allergens) and complex biological structures like bacterial cells and viruses. By producing an appropriate antibody, the corresponding antigenic analyte can be detected on a multiplexed immunoanalytical microarray. Food and water analysis along with clinical diagnostics constitute potential application fields for multiplexed analysis. Diverse fluorescence, chemiluminescence, electrochemical, and label-free microarray readout systems have been developed in the last decade. Some of them are constructed as flow-through microarrays by combination with a fluidic system. Microarrays have the potential to become widely accepted as a system for analytical applications, provided that robust and validated results on fully automated platforms are successfully generated. This review gives an overview of the current research on microarrays with the focus on automated systems and quantitative multiplexed applications.

  1. Evaluation of Surface Chemistries for Antibody Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; White, Amanda M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-12-01

    Antibody microarrays are an emerging technology that promises to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The current technology for protein microarrays has been primarily derived from DNA microarrays and is not fully characterized for use with proteins. For example, there are a myriad of surface chemistries that are commercially available for antibody microarrays, but no rigorous studies that compare these different surfaces. Therefore, we have used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to analyze 16 different commercially available slide types. Full standard curves were generated for 24 different assays. We found that this approach provides a rigorous and quantitative system for comparing the different slide types based on spot size and morphology, slide noise, spot background, lower limit of detection, and reproducibility. These studies demonstrate that the properties of the slide surface affect the activity of immobilized antibodies and the quality of data produced. Although many slide types can produce useful data, glass slides coated with poly-L-lysine or aminosilane, with or without activation with a crosslinker, consistently produce superior results in the ELISA microarray analyses we performed.

  2. Quantitative multiplex quantum dot in-situ hybridisation based gene expression profiling in tissue microarrays identifies prognostic genes in acute myeloid leukaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Tholouli, Eleni; MacDermott, Sarah; Hoyland, Judith; Yin, John Liu; Byers, Richard

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative high throughput in situ expression profiling method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application to a tissue microarray of 242 AML bone marrow samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1 and DNMT3A as prognostic markers in AML. -- Abstract: Measurement and validation of microarray gene signatures in routine clinical samples is problematic and a rate limiting step in translational research. In order to facilitate measurement of microarray identified gene signatures in routine clinical tissue a novel method combining quantum dot based oligonucleotide in situ hybridisation (QD-ISH) and post-hybridisation spectral image analysis was used for multiplex in-situ transcript detection in archival bone marrow trephine samples from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Tissue-microarrays were prepared into which white cell pellets were spiked as a standard. Tissue microarrays were made using routinely processed bone marrow trephines from 242 patients with AML. QD-ISH was performed for six candidate prognostic genes using triplex QD-ISH for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and for HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1. Scrambled oligonucleotides were used to correct for background staining followed by normalisation of expression against the expression values for the white cell pellet standard. Survival analysis demonstrated that low expression of HOXA4 was associated with poorer overall survival (p = 0.009), whilst high expression of HOXA9 (p < 0.0001), Meis1 (p = 0.005) and DNMT3A (p = 0.04) were associated with early treatment failure. These results demonstrate application of a standardised, quantitative multiplex QD-ISH method for identification of prognostic markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical samples, facilitating measurement of gene expression signatures in routine clinical samples.

  3. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  4. Development of a magnetic nanoparticles microarray for simultaneous and simple detection of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Liu, Hongna; Deng, Yan; Lin, Lin; He, Nongyue

    2013-07-01

    Foodborne diseases are a widespread and growing public health problem affecting both developed and developing countries, microbiologically contaminated food and water are the major causes of diarrhoeal diseases. Methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microarrays are rapid and sensitive enough to detect very small quantities of microorganisms, however, the requirement for expensive equipments limits their application. In the present paper, we describe a method based on multiplex PCR and magnetic nanoparticles labelling for simultaneous detection of four major foodborne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholera and Campylobacter jejuni. The process utilizes an oligonucleotide array onto which 5' biotinylated single strand PCR products were hybridized and visualized with streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (SA-MNPs), the signal from which could be detected by the naked eye, microscope or CCD camera. By employing SA-MNPs as visible labels, the microarray unambiguously distinguished all 4 pathogens with detection sensitivity up to 316 CFU/mL. Due to its high sensitivity, specificity and simple detection procedure, the magnetic bead assay provides a powerful tool for the detection and identification of foodborne pathogens in a modestly equipped laboratory. PMID:23909141

  5. Capturing genomic signatures of DNA sequence variation using a standard anonymous microarray platform

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, C. H.; Kua, C. S.; Lobenhofer, E. K.; Hurban, P.

    2006-01-01

    Comparative genomics, using the model organism approach, has provided powerful insights into the structure and evolution of whole genomes. Unfortunately, only a small fraction of Earth's biodiversity will have its genome sequenced in the foreseeable future. Most wild organisms have radically different life histories and evolutionary genomics than current model systems. A novel technique is needed to expand comparative genomics to a wider range of organisms. Here, we describe a novel approach using an anonymous DNA microarray platform that gathers genomic samples of sequence variation from any organism. Oligonucleotide probe sequences placed on a custom 44 K array were 25 bp long and designed using a simple set of criteria to maximize their complexity and dispersion in sequence probability space. Using whole genomic samples from three known genomes (mouse, rat and human) and one unknown (Gonystylus bancanus), we demonstrate and validate its power, reliability, transitivity and sensitivity. Using two separate statistical analyses, a large numbers of genomic ‘indicator’ probes were discovered. The construction of a genomic signature database based upon this technique would allow virtual comparisons and simple queries could generate optimal subsets of markers to be used in large-scale assays, using simple downstream techniques. Biologists from a wide range of fields, studying almost any organism, could efficiently perform genomic comparisons, at potentially any phylogenetic level after performing a small number of standardized DNA microarray hybridizations. Possibilities for refining and expanding the approach are discussed. PMID:17000641

  6. Identification of human pathogens isolated from blood using microarray hybridisation and signal pattern recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger-Mayr, Herbert; Vierlinger, Klemens; Pichler, Rudolf; Kriegner, Albert; Hirschl, Alexander M; Presterl, Elisabeth; Bodrossy, Levente; Noehammer, Christa

    2007-01-01

    Background Pathogen identification in clinical routine is based on the cultivation of microbes with subsequent morphological and physiological characterisation lasting at least 24 hours. However, early and accurate identification is a crucial requisite for fast and optimally targeted antimicrobial treatment. Molecular biology based techniques allow fast identification, however discrimination of very closely related species remains still difficult. Results A molecular approach is presented for the rapid identification of pathogens combining PCR amplification with microarray detection. The DNA chip comprises oligonucleotide capture probes for 25 different pathogens including Gram positive cocci, the most frequently encountered genera of Enterobacteriaceae, non-fermenter and clinical relevant Candida species. The observed detection limits varied from 10 cells (e.g. E. coli) to 105 cells (S. aureus) per mL artificially spiked blood. Thus the current low sensitivity for some species still represents a barrier for clinical application. Successful discrimination of closely related species was achieved by a signal pattern recognition approach based on the k-nearest-neighbour method. A prototype software providing this statistical evaluation was developed, allowing correct identification in 100 % of the cases at the genus and in 96.7 % at the species level (n = 241). Conclusion The newly developed molecular assay can be carried out within 6 hours in a research laboratory from pathogen isolation to species identification. From our results we conclude that DNA microarrays can be a useful tool for rapid identification of closely related pathogens particularly when the protocols are adapted to the special clinical scenarios. PMID:17697354

  7. DNA microarray analyses in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, David W

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarrays were originally devised and described as a convenient technology for the global analysis of plant gene expression. Over the past decade, their use has expanded enormously to cover all kingdoms of living organisms. At the same time, the scope of applications of microarrays has increased beyond expression analyses, with plant genomics playing a leadership role in the on-going development of this technology. As the field has matured, the rate-limiting step has moved from that of the technical process of data generation to that of data analysis. We currently face major problems in dealing with the accumulating datasets, not simply with respect to how to archive, access, and process the huge amounts of data that have been and are being produced, but also in determining the relative quality of the different datasets. A major recognized concern is the appropriate use of statistical design in microarray experiments, without which the datasets are rendered useless. A vigorous area of current research involves the development of novel statistical tools specifically for microarray experiments. This article describes, in a necessarily selective manner, the types of platforms currently employed in microarray research and provides an overview of recent activities using these platforms in plant biology.

  8. Advancing Microarray Assembly with Acoustic Dispensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, E. Y.; Diamond, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    In the assembly of microarrays and microarray-based chemical assays and enzymatic bioassays, most approaches use pins for contact spotting. Acoustic dispensing is a technology capable of nanoliter transfers by using acoustic energy to eject liquid sample from an open source well. Although typically used for well plate transfers, when applied to microarraying it avoids drawbacks of undesired physical contact with sample, difficulty in assembling multicomponent reactions on a chip by readdressing, a rigid mode of printing that lacks patterning capabilities, and time-consuming wash steps. We demonstrated the utility of acoustic dispensing by delivering human cathepsin L in a drop-on-drop fashion into individual 50-nanoliter, pre-spotted reaction volumes to activate enzyme reactions at targeted positions on a microarray. We generated variable-sized spots ranging from 200 to 750 μm (and higher), and handled the transfer of fluorescent bead suspensions with increasing source well concentrations of 0.1 to 10 ×108 beads/mL in a linear fashion. There are no tips that can clog and liquid dispensing CVs are generally below 5%. This platform expands the toolbox for generating analytical arrays and meets needs associated with spatially-addressed assembly of multicomponent microarrays on the nanoliter scale. PMID:19035650

  9. A Synthetic Kinome Microarray Data Generator

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farhad; Kusalik, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cellular pathways involve the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins. Peptide microarrays called kinome arrays facilitate the measurement of the phosphorylation activity of hundreds of proteins in a single experiment. Analyzing the data from kinome microarrays is a multi-step process. Typically, various techniques are possible for a particular step, and it is necessary to compare and evaluate them. Such evaluations require data for which correct analysis results are known. Unfortunately, such kinome data is not readily available in the community. Further, there are no established techniques for creating artificial kinome datasets with known results and with the same characteristics as real kinome datasets. In this paper, a methodology for generating synthetic kinome array data is proposed. The methodology relies on actual intensity measurements from kinome microarray experiments and preserves their subtle characteristics. The utility of the methodology is demonstrated by evaluating methods for eliminating heterogeneous variance in kinome microarray data. Phosphorylation intensities from kinome microarrays often exhibit such heterogeneous variance and its presence can negatively impact downstream statistical techniques that rely on homogeneity of variance. It is shown that using the output from the proposed synthetic data generator, it is possible to critically compare two variance stabilization methods. PMID:27600233

  10. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    PubMed

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+).

  11. Selective release of multiple DNA oligonucleotides from gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Andy; Schaffer, Stefan B; Pallares, Ivan G; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2009-01-27

    Combination therapy, or the use of multiple drugs, has been proven to be effective for complex diseases, but the differences in chemical properties and pharmacokinetics can be challenging in terms of the loading, delivering, and releasing multiple drugs. Here we demonstrate that we can load and selectively release two different DNA oligonucleotides from two different gold nanorods. DNA was loaded on the nanorods via thiol conjugation. Selective releases were induced by selective melting of gold nanorods via ultrafast laser irradiation at the nanorods' longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peaks. Excitation at one wavelength could selectively melt one type of gold nanorods and selectively release one type of DNA strand. Releases were efficient (50-80%) and externally tunable by laser fluence. Released oligonucleotides were still functional. This proof of concept is potentially a powerful method for multiple-drug delivery strategies.

  12. Mechanism of Oligonucleotide Uptake by Cells: Involvement of Specific receptors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakubov, Leonid A.; Deeva, Elena A.; Zarytova, Valentina F.; Ivanova, Eugenia M.; Ryte, Antonina S.; Yurchenko, Lyudmila V.; Vlassov, Valentin V.

    1989-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of oligonucleotides and their alkylating derivatives with mammalian cells. In experiments with L929 mouse fibroblast and Krebs 2 ascites carcinoma cells, it was found that cellular uptake of oligodeoxynucleotide derivatives is achieved by an endocytosis mechanism. Uptake is considerably more efficient at low oligomer concentration (< 1 μ M), because at this concentration a significant percentage of the total oligomer pool is absorbed on the cell surface and internalized by a more efficient absorptive endocytosis process. Two modified proteins were detected in mouse fibroblasts that were treated with the alkylating oligonucleotide derivatives. The binding of the oligomers to the proteins is inhibited by other oligodeoxynucleotides, single- and double-stranded DNA, and RNA. The polyanions heparin and chondroitin sulfates A and B do not inhibit binding. These observations suggest the involvement of specific receptor proteins in binding of oligomers to mammalian cells.

  13. Palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Kevin H

    2015-05-22

    Synthetic modification of nucleoside structures provides access to molecules of interest as pharmaceuticals, biochemical probes, and models to study diseases. Covalent modification of the purine and pyrimidine bases is an important strategy for the synthesis of these adducts. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling is a powerful method to attach groups to the base heterocycles through the formation of new carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. In this review, approaches to palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides are reviewed. Polar reaction media, such as water or polar aprotic solvents, allow reactions to be performed directly on the hydrophilic nucleosides and nucleotides without the need to use protecting groups. Homogeneous aqueous-phase coupling reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes of water-soluble ligands provide a general approach to the synthesis of modified nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

  14. Synthesis and properties of oligonucleotides containing aminodeoxythymidine units.

    PubMed Central

    Gryaznov, S M; Letsinger, R L

    1992-01-01

    Procedures are described for synthesis via solid support methodology of oligonucleotide analogues derived in part from 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine or 5'-amino-5'-deoxythymidine. Oligothymidylate decamers terminated with a 3'-amino group or containing a 3'-NHP(O)(O-)O-5' internucleoside link are found to form unusually stable complexes with poly(dA), poly(A), and oligo(dA). For related derivatives of 5'-amino-5'-deoxythymidine enhancement is less or absent, and in the case of multiple substitution destabilization of the heteroduplex may be observed. That the effect of the 3'-amino group is general for oligonucleotide derivatives is indicated by enhanced Tm values for heteroduplex complexes of the mixed-base oligomer, d(TATTCAGTCAT(NH2)), and the methyl phosphonate derivatives, TmTmTmTmTmTmTmTmTmT(NH2) and d(TmAmTmTmCmAmGmTmCmAmT(NH2)). PMID:1630911

  15. Nanomaterial building blocks based on spider silk-oligonucleotide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Humenik, Martin; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-02-25

    Self-assembling protein nanofibrils are promising structures for the "bottom-up" fabrication of bionanomaterials. Here, the recombinant protein eADF4(C16), a variant of Araneus diadematus dragline silk ADF4, which self-assembles into nanofibrils, and short oligonucleotides were modified for site-specific azide-alkyne coupling. Corresponding oligonuleotide-eADF4(C16) "click" conjugates were hybridized in linear or branched fashion according to the designed complementarities of the DNA moieties. Self-assembly properties of higher ordered structures of the spider silk-DNA conjugates were dominated by the silk component. Assembled β-sheet rich conjugate fibrils were similar in appearance to fibrils of unmodified eADF4(C16) but enabled the specific attachment of neutravidin-modified gold nanoparticles on their surface directed by complementary biotin-oligonucleotides, providing the basis for functionalization of such conjugates.

  16. Selective release of multiple DNA oligonucleotides from gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Andy; Schaffer, Stefan B; Pallares, Ivan G; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2009-01-27

    Combination therapy, or the use of multiple drugs, has been proven to be effective for complex diseases, but the differences in chemical properties and pharmacokinetics can be challenging in terms of the loading, delivering, and releasing multiple drugs. Here we demonstrate that we can load and selectively release two different DNA oligonucleotides from two different gold nanorods. DNA was loaded on the nanorods via thiol conjugation. Selective releases were induced by selective melting of gold nanorods via ultrafast laser irradiation at the nanorods' longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peaks. Excitation at one wavelength could selectively melt one type of gold nanorods and selectively release one type of DNA strand. Releases were efficient (50-80%) and externally tunable by laser fluence. Released oligonucleotides were still functional. This proof of concept is potentially a powerful method for multiple-drug delivery strategies. PMID:19206252

  17. Cationic carbosilane dendrimers and oligonucleotide binding: an energetic affair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marson, D.; Laurini, E.; Posocco, P.; Fermeglia, M.; Pricl, S.

    2015-02-01

    Generation 2 cationic carbosilane dendrimers hold great promise as internalizing agents for gene therapy as they present low toxicity and retain and internalize the genetic material as an oligonucleotide or siRNA. In this work we carried out complete in silico structural and energetical characterization of the interactions of a set of G2 carbosilane dendrimers, showing different affinity towards two single strand oligonucleotide (ODN) sequences in vitro. Our simulations predict that these four dendrimers and the relevant ODN complexes are characterized by similar size and shape, and that the molecule-specific ODN binding ability can be rationalized only by considering a critical molecular design parameter: the normalized effective binding energy ΔGbind,eff/Neff, i.e. the performance of each active individual dendrimer branch directly involved in a binding interaction.Generation 2 cationic carbosilane dendrimers hold great promise as internalizing agents for gene therapy as they present low toxicity and retain and internalize the genetic material as an oligonucleotide or siRNA. In this work we carried out complete in silico structural and energetical characterization of the interactions of a set of G2 carbosilane dendrimers, showing different affinity towards two single strand oligonucleotide (ODN) sequences in vitro. Our simulations predict that these four dendrimers and the relevant ODN complexes are characterized by similar size and shape, and that the molecule-specific ODN binding ability can be rationalized only by considering a critical molecular design parameter: the normalized effective binding energy ΔGbind,eff/Neff, i.e. the performance of each active individual dendrimer branch directly involved in a binding interaction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures and tables. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04510f

  18. Thermoplastic polymers surfaces for Dip-Pen Nanolithography of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Biella, Serena; Cesura, Federico; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    Different thermoplastic polymers were spin-coated to prepare smooth surfaces for the direct deposition of end-group modified oligonucleotides by Dip-Pen Nanolithography. A study of the diffusion process was done in order to investigate the dependence of calibration coefficient and quality of deposited features on environmental parameters (temperature, relative humidity) and ink's molecular weight and functionality. The optimization of the process parameters led to the realization of high quality and density nanoarrays on plastics.

  19. An oligonucleotide barcode for species identification in Trichoderma and Hypocrea.

    PubMed

    Druzhinina, Irina S; Kopchinskiy, Alexei G; Komoń, Monika; Bissett, John; Szakacs, George; Kubicek, Christian P

    2005-10-01

    One of the biggest obstructions to studies on Trichoderma has been the incorrect and confused application of species names to isolates used in industry, biocontrol of plant pathogens and ecological surveys, thereby making the comparison of results questionable. Here we provide a convenient, on-line method for the quick molecular identification of Hypocrea/Trichoderma at the genus and species levels based on an oligonucleotide barcode: a diagnostic combination of several oligonucleotides (hallmarks) specifically allocated within the internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2 (ITS1 and 2) sequences of the rDNA repeat. The barcode was developed on the basis of 979 sequences of 88 vouchered species which displayed in total 135 ITS1 and 2 haplotypes. Oligonucleotide sequences which are constant in all known ITS1 and 2 of Hypocrea/Trichoderma but different in closely related fungal genera, were used to define genus-specific hallmarks. The library of species-, clade- and genus-specific hallmarks is stored in the MySQL database and integrated in the TrichOKey v. 1.0 - barcode sequence identification program with the web interface located on . TrichOKey v. 1.0 identifies 75 single species, 5 species pairs and 1 species triplet. Verification of the DNA-barcode was done by a blind test on 53 unknown isolates of Trichoderma, collected in Central and South America. The obtained results were in a total agreement with phylogenetic identification based on tef1 (large intron), NCBI BLAST of vouchered records and postum morphological analysis. We conclude that oligonucleotide barcode is a powerful tool for the routine identification of Hypocrea/Trichoderma species and should be useful as a complement to traditional methods.

  20. Protein microarrays for parasite antigen discovery.

    PubMed

    Driguez, Patrick; Doolan, Denise L; Molina, Douglas M; Loukas, Alex; Trieu, Angela; Felgner, Phil L; McManus, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The host serological profile to a parasitic infection, such as schistosomiasis, can be used to define potential vaccine and diagnostic targets. Determining the host antibody response using traditional approaches is hindered by the large number of putative antigens in any parasite proteome. Parasite protein microarrays offer the potential for a high-throughput host antibody screen to simplify this task. In order to construct the array, parasite proteins are selected from available genomic sequence and protein databases using bioinformatic tools. Selected open reading frames are PCR amplified, incorporated into a vector for cell-free protein expression, and printed robotically onto glass slides. The protein microarrays can be probed with antisera from infected/immune animals or humans and the antibody reactivity measured with fluorophore labeled antibodies on a confocal laser microarray scanner to identify potential targets for diagnosis or therapeutic or prophylactic intervention. PMID:25388117

  1. Functional microarray analysis of nitrogen and carbon cycling genes across an Antarctic latitudinal transect.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Kang, Sanghoon; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Kowalchuk, George A

    2007-06-01

    Soil-borne microbial communities were examined via a functional gene microarray approach across a southern polar latitudinal gradient to gain insight into the environmental factors steering soil N- and C-cycling in terrestrial Antarctic ecosystems. The abundance and diversity of functional gene families were studied for soil-borne microbial communities inhabiting a range of environments from 51 degrees S (cool temperate-Falkland Islands) to 72 degrees S (cold rock desert-Coal Nunatak). The recently designed functional gene array used contains 24,243 oligonucleotide probes and covers >10,000 genes in >150 functional groups involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance and organic contaminant degradation (He et al. 2007). The detected N- and C-cycle genes were significantly different across different sampling locations and vegetation types. A number of significant trends were observed regarding the distribution of key gene families across the environments examined. For example, the relative detection of cellulose degradation genes was correlated with temperature, and microbial C-fixation genes were more present in plots principally lacking vegetation. With respect to the N-cycle, denitrification genes were linked to higher soil temperatures, and N2-fixation genes were linked to plots mainly vegetated by lichens. These microarray-based results were confirmed for a number of gene families using specific real-time PCR, enzymatic assays and process rate measurements. The results presented demonstrate the utility of an integrated functional gene microarray approach in detecting shifts in functional community properties in environmental samples and provide insight into the forces driving important processes of terrestrial Antarctic nutrient cycling. PMID:18043626

  2. Functional microarray analysis of nitrogen and carbon cycling genes across an Antarctic latitudinal transect.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Kang, Sanghoon; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Kowalchuk, George A

    2007-06-01

    Soil-borne microbial communities were examined via a functional gene microarray approach across a southern polar latitudinal gradient to gain insight into the environmental factors steering soil N- and C-cycling in terrestrial Antarctic ecosystems. The abundance and diversity of functional gene families were studied for soil-borne microbial communities inhabiting a range of environments from 51 degrees S (cool temperate-Falkland Islands) to 72 degrees S (cold rock desert-Coal Nunatak). The recently designed functional gene array used contains 24,243 oligonucleotide probes and covers >10,000 genes in >150 functional groups involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance and organic contaminant degradation (He et al. 2007). The detected N- and C-cycle genes were significantly different across different sampling locations and vegetation types. A number of significant trends were observed regarding the distribution of key gene families across the environments examined. For example, the relative detection of cellulose degradation genes was correlated with temperature, and microbial C-fixation genes were more present in plots principally lacking vegetation. With respect to the N-cycle, denitrification genes were linked to higher soil temperatures, and N2-fixation genes were linked to plots mainly vegetated by lichens. These microarray-based results were confirmed for a number of gene families using specific real-time PCR, enzymatic assays and process rate measurements. The results presented demonstrate the utility of an integrated functional gene microarray approach in detecting shifts in functional community properties in environmental samples and provide insight into the forces driving important processes of terrestrial Antarctic nutrient cycling.

  3. Microarray on digital versatile disc for identification and genotyping of Salmonella and Campylobacter in meat products.

    PubMed

    Tortajada-Genaro, Luis Antonio; Rodrigo, Alejandro; Hevia, Elizabeth; Mena, Salvador; Niñoles, Regina; Maquieira, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    Highly portable, cost-effective, and rapid-response devices are required for the subtyping of the most frequent food-borne bacteria; thereby the sample rejection strategies and hygienization techniques along the food chain can be tailor-designed. Here, a novel biosensor is presented for the generic detection of Salmonella and Campylobacter and the discrimination between their most prevalent serovars (Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium) and species (Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli), respectively. The method is based on DNA microarray developed on a standard digital versatile disc (DVD) as support for a hybridization assay and a DVD driver as scanner. This approach was found to be highly sensitive (detection limit down to 0.2 pg of genomic DNA), reproducible (relative standard deviation 4-19 %), and high working capacity (20 samples per disc). The inclusivity and exclusivity assays indicated that designed oligonucleotides (primers and probes) were able to discriminate targeted pathogens from other Salmonella serovars, Campylobacter species, or common food-borne pathogens potentially present in the indigenous microflora. One hundred isolates from meat samples, collected in a poultry factory, were analyzed by the DVD microarraying and fluorescent real-time PCR. An excellent correlation was observed for both generic and specific detection (relative sensitivity 93-99 % and relative specificity 93-100 %). Therefore, the developed assay has been shown to be a reliable tool to be used in routine food safety analysis, especially in settings with limited infrastructure due to the excellent efficiency-cost ratio of compact disc technology. Graphical Abstract DNA microarray performed by DVD technology for pathogen genotyping.

  4. Dip-pen microarraying of molecular beacon probes on microgel thin-film substrates.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoguang; Libera, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    The integration of microarray-based nucleic acid detection technologies and microfluidics is attractive, because the combination of small sample volumes, relatively short diffusion distances, and solid-phase detection enhances the development of multiplexed assays with improved sensitivity and minimal sample size. However, traditional microarray spotting methods typically create probe spot sizes of ∼50-100 μm diameter, comparable to the dimensions of many microfluidic channels. In addition, detection of hybridization events typically requires a post-hybridization labeling step. We address both issues by exploring the use of dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) to pattern linear oligonucleotides and self-reporting molecular beacon (MB) probes on streptavidin-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) microgel thin-film substrates. In contrast to many systems involving DPN deposition, the fluorescence of the labeled probes enables their amount and spatial distribution to be characterized by optical microscopy. Their deposition rate decreases with increasing DPN dwell time, consistent with a Langmuir adsorption model, but the linear relationship between spot diameter and time(1/2) indicates that spot size is diffusion controlled. We then use DPN to pattern MB probes for the mecA and spa genes in Staphylococcus aureus as a 2-column array with 1 μm spot sizes and 5 μm spot spacings, and we use this array to differentiate targets characteristic of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. This duplexed self-reporting gel-tethered MB microarray not only shows high specificity but also a high signal-to-background ratio.

  5. Therapeutic antisense oligonucleotides against cancer: hurdling to the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Pêgo, Ana P.

    2014-01-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90's and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics has not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given toward a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field. PMID:25353019

  6. G-Quadruplex Forming Oligonucleotides as Anti-HIV Agents.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Domenica; Riccardi, Claudia; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-09-22

    Though a variety of different non-canonical nucleic acids conformations have been recognized, G-quadruplex structures are probably the structural motifs most commonly found within known oligonucleotide-based aptamers. This could be ascribed to several factors, as their large conformational diversity, marked responsiveness of their folding/unfolding processes to external stimuli, high structural compactness and chemo-enzymatic and thermodynamic stability. A number of G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides having relevant in vitro anti-HIV activity have been discovered in the last two decades through either SELEX or rational design approaches. Improved aptamers have been obtained by chemical modifications of natural oligonucleotides, as terminal conjugations with large hydrophobic groups, replacement of phosphodiester linkages with phosphorothioate bonds or other surrogates, insertion of base-modified monomers, etc. In turn, detailed structural studies have elucidated the peculiar architectures adopted by many G-quadruplex-based aptamers and provided insight into their mechanism of action. An overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge of the relevance of putative G-quadruplex forming sequences within the viral genome and of the most studied G-quadruplex-forming aptamers, selectively targeting HIV proteins, is here presented.

  7. DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide for highly efficient gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Nishina, Kazutaka; Piao, Wenying; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Sujino, Yumiko; Nishina, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Keiko; Yoshioka, Kotaro; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Baba, Takeshi; Ono, Fumiko; Miyata, Kanjiro; Miyake, Koichi; Seth, Punit P.; Low, Audrey; Yoshida, Masayuki; Bennett, C. Frank; Kataoka, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Obika, Satoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are recognized therapeutic agents for the modulation of specific genes at the post-transcriptional level. Similar to any medical drugs, there are opportunities to improve their efficacy and safety. Here we develop a short DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide (HDO) with a structure different from double-stranded RNA used for short interfering RNA and single-stranded DNA used for ASO. A DNA/locked nucleotide acid gapmer duplex with an α-tocopherol-conjugated complementary RNA (Toc-HDO) is significantly more potent at reducing the expression of the targeted mRNA in liver compared with the parent single-stranded gapmer ASO. Toc-HDO also improves the phenotype in disease models more effectively. In addition, the high potency of Toc-HDO results in a reduction of liver dysfunction observed in the parent ASO at a similar silencing effect. HDO technology offers a novel concept of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and the development of this molecular design opens a new therapeutic field. PMID:26258894

  8. Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides against Cancer: Hurdling to the Clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Pedro; Pêgo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  9. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to

  10. Gene expression profiling and identification of resistance genes to Aspergillus flavus infection in peanut through EST and microarray strategies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baozhu; Fedorova, Natalie D; Chen, Xiaoping; Wan, Chun-Hua; Wang, Wei; Nierman, William C; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Yu, Jiujiang

    2011-07-01

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus infect peanut seeds and produce aflatoxins, which are associated with various diseases in domestic animals and humans throughout the world. The most cost-effective strategy to minimize aflatoxin contamination involves the development of peanut cultivars that are resistant to fungal infection and/or aflatoxin production. To identify peanut Aspergillus-interactive and peanut Aspergillus-resistance genes, we carried out a large scale peanut Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) project which we used to construct a peanut glass slide oligonucleotide microarray. The fabricated microarray represents over 40% of the protein coding genes in the peanut genome. For expression profiling, resistant and susceptible peanut cultivars were infected with a mixture of Aspergillusflavus and parasiticus spores. The subsequent microarray analysis identified 62 genes in resistant cultivars that were up-expressed in response to Aspergillus infection. In addition, we identified 22 putative Aspergillus-resistance genes that were constitutively up-expressed in the resistant cultivar in comparison to the susceptible cultivar. Some of these genes were homologous to peanut, corn, and soybean genes that were previously shown to confer resistance to fungal infection. This study is a first step towards a comprehensive genome-scale platform for developing Aspergillus-resistant peanut cultivars through targeted marker-assisted breeding and genetic engineering. PMID:22069737

  11. Fabrication and characterization of RNA aptamer microarrays for the study of protein–aptamer interactions with SPR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Lee, Hye Jin; Corn, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    RNA microarrays were created on chemically modified gold surfaces using a novel surface ligation methodology and employed in a series of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) measurements of DNA–RNA hybridization and RNA aptamer–protein binding. Various unmodified single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) oligonucleotides were ligated onto identical 5′-phosphate-terminated ssDNA microarray elements with a T4 RNA ligase surface reaction. A combination of ex situ polarization modulation FTIR measurements of the RNA monolayer and in situ SPRI measurements of DNA hybridization adsorption onto the surface were used to determine an ssRNA surface density of 4.0 × 1012 molecules/cm2 and a surface ligation efficiency of 85 ± 10%. The surface ligation methodology was then used to create a five-component RNA microarray of potential aptamers for the protein factor IXa (fIXa). The relative surface coverages of the different aptamers were determined through a novel enzymatic method that employed SPRI measurements of a surface RNase H hydrolysis reaction. SPRI measurements were then used to correctly identify the best aptamer to fIXa, which was previously determined from SELEX measurements. A Langmuir adsorption coefficient of 1.6 × 107 M−1 was determined for fIXa adsorption to this aptamer. Single-base variations from this sequence were shown to completely destroy the aptamer–fIXa binding interaction. PMID:17130155

  12. A Unique Procedure to Identify Cell Surface Markers Through a Spherical Self-Organizing Map Applied to DNA Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Yuh; Kasai, Tomonari; Ikeda, Masashi; Vaidyanath, Arun; Kumon, Kazuki; Mizutani, Akifumi; Seno, Akimasa; Tokutaka, Heizo; Kudoh, Takayuki; Seno, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    To identify cell-specific markers, we designed a DNA microarray platform with oligonucleotide probes for human membrane-anchored proteins. Human glioma cell lines were analyzed using microarray and compared with normal and fetal brain tissues. For the microarray analysis, we employed a spherical self-organizing map, which is a clustering method suitable for the conversion of multidimensional data into two-dimensional data and displays the relationship on a spherical surface. Based on the gene expression profile, the cell surface characteristics were successfully mirrored onto the spherical surface, thereby distinguishing normal brain tissue from the disease model based on the strength of gene expression. The clustered glioma-specific genes were further analyzed by polymerase chain reaction procedure and immunocytochemical staining of glioma cells. Our platform and the following procedure were successfully demonstrated to categorize the genes coding for cell surface proteins that are specific to glioma cells. Our assessment demonstrates that a spherical self-organizing map is a valuable tool for distinguishing cell surface markers and can be employed in marker discovery studies for the treatment of cancer.

  13. A Unique Procedure to Identify Cell Surface Markers Through a Spherical Self-Organizing Map Applied to DNA Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sugii, Yuh; Kasai, Tomonari; Ikeda, Masashi; Vaidyanath, Arun; Kumon, Kazuki; Mizutani, Akifumi; Seno, Akimasa; Tokutaka, Heizo; Kudoh, Takayuki; Seno, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    To identify cell-specific markers, we designed a DNA microarray platform with oligonucleotide probes for human membrane-anchored proteins. Human glioma cell lines were analyzed using microarray and compared with normal and fetal brain tissues. For the microarray analysis, we employed a spherical self-organizing map, which is a clustering method suitable for the conversion of multidimensional data into two-dimensional data and displays the relationship on a spherical surface. Based on the gene expression profile, the cell surface characteristics were successfully mirrored onto the spherical surface, thereby distinguishing normal brain tissue from the disease model based on the strength of gene expression. The clustered glioma-specific genes were further analyzed by polymerase chain reaction procedure and immunocytochemical staining of glioma cells. Our platform and the following procedure were successfully demonstrated to categorize the genes coding for cell surface proteins that are specific to glioma cells. Our assessment demonstrates that a spherical self-organizing map is a valuable tool for distinguishing cell surface markers and can be employed in marker discovery studies for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26966393

  14. Analysis of High-Throughput ELISA Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-23

    Our research group develops analytical methods and software for the high-throughput analysis of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays. ELISA microarrays differ from DNA microarrays in several fundamental aspects and most algorithms for analysis of DNA microarray data are not applicable to ELISA microarrays. In this review, we provide an overview of the steps involved in ELISA microarray data analysis and how the statistically sound algorithms we have developed provide an integrated software suite to address the needs of each data-processing step. The algorithms discussed are available in a set of open-source software tools (http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT).

  15. Photo-Generation of Carbohydrate Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Gregory T.; Wang, Denong; Turro, Nicholas J.; Koberstein, Jeffrey T.

    The unparalleled structural diversity of carbohydrates among biological molecules has been recognized for decades. Recent studies have highlighted carbohydrate signaling roles in many important biological processes, such as fertilization, embryonic development, cell differentiation and cellȁ4cell communication, blood coagulation, inflammation, chemotaxis, as well as host recognition and immune responses to microbial pathogens. In this chapter, we summarize recent progress in the establishment of carbohydrate-based microarrays and the application of these technologies in exploring the biological information content in carbohydrates. A newly established photochemical platform of carbohydrate microarrays serves as a model for a focused discussion.

  16. Protein Microarrays for the Detection of Biothreats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Amy E.

    Although protein microarrays have proven to be an important tool in proteomics research, the technology is emerging as useful for public health and defense applications. Recent progress in the measurement and characterization of biothreat agents is reviewed in this chapter. Details concerning validation of various protein microarray formats, from contact-printed sandwich assays to supported lipid bilayers, are presented. The reviewed technologies have important implications for in vitro characterization of toxin-ligand interactions, serotyping of bacteria, screening of potential biothreat inhibitors, and as core components of biosensors, among others, research and engineering applications.

  17. Pineal Function: Impact of Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Klein, David C.; Bailey, Michael J.; Carter, David A.; Kim, Jong-so; Shi, Qiong; Ho, Anthony; Chik, Constance; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Morin, Fabrice; Ganguly, Surajit; Rath, Martin F.; Møller, Morten; Sugden, David; Rangel, Zoila G.; Munson, Peter J.; Weller, Joan L.; Coon, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Microarray analysis has provided a new understanding of pineal function by identifying genes that are highly expressed in this tissue relative to other tissues and also by identifying over 600 genes that are expressed on a 24-hour schedule. This effort has highlighted surprising similarity to the retina and has provided reason to explore new avenues of study including intracellular signaling, signal transduction, transcriptional cascades, thyroid/retinoic acid hormone signaling, metal biology, RNA splicing, and the role the pineal gland plays in the immune/inflammation response. The new foundation that microarray analysis has provided will broadly support future research on pineal function. PMID:19622385

  18. MicroRNA expression profiling using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Love, Cassandra; Dave, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs which are able to regulate gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. There is a growing recognition of the role of microRNAs in nearly every tissue type and cellular process. Thus there is an increasing need for accurate quantitation of microRNA expression in a variety of tissues. Microarrays provide a robust method for the examination of microRNA expression. In this chapter, we describe detailed methods for the use of microarrays to measure microRNA expression and discuss methods for the analysis of microRNA expression data. PMID:23666707

  19. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer.

  20. Regions of homozygosity identified by oligonucleotide SNP arrays: evaluating the incidence and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Chi; Ross, Leslie; Mahon, Loretta W; Owen, Renius; Hemmat, Morteza; Wang, Boris T; El Naggar, Mohammed; Kopita, Kimberly A; Randolph, Linda M; Chase, John M; Matas Aguilera, Maria J; Siles, Juan López; Church, Joseph A; Hauser, Natalie; Shen, Joseph J; Jones, Marilyn C; Wierenga, Klaas J; Jiang, Zhijie; Haddadin, Mary; Boyar, Fatih Z; Anguiano, Arturo; Strom, Charles M; Sahoo, Trilochan

    2015-05-01

    Copy neutral segments with allelic homozygosity, also known as regions of homozygosity (ROHs), are frequently identified in cases interrogated by oligonucleotide single-nucleotide polymorphism (oligo-SNP) microarrays. Presence of ROHs may be because of parental relatedness, chromosomal recombination or rearrangements and provides important clues regarding ancestral homozygosity, consanguinity or uniparental disomy. In this study of 14 574 consecutive cases, 832 (6%) were found to harbor one or more ROHs over 10 Mb, of which 651 cases (78%) had multiple ROHs, likely because of identity by descent (IBD), and 181 cases (22%) with ROHs involving a single chromosome. Parental relatedness was predicted to be first degree or closer in 5%, second in 9% and third in 19%. Of the 181 cases, 19 had ROHs for a whole chromosome revealing uniparental isodisomy (isoUPD). In all, 25 cases had significant ROHs involving a single chromosome; 5 cases were molecularly confirmed to have a mixed iso- and heteroUPD15 and 1 case each with segmental UPD9pat and segmental UPD22mat; 17 cases were suspected to have a mixed iso- and heteroUPD including 2 cases with small supernumerary marker and 2 cases with mosaic trisomy. For chromosome 15, 12 (92%) of 13 molecularly studied cases had either Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome. Autosomal recessive disorders were confirmed in seven of nine cases from eight families because of the finding of suspected gene within a ROH. This study demonstrates that ROHs are much more frequent than previously recognized and often reflect parental relatedness, ascertain autosomal recessive diseases or unravel UPD in many cases. PMID:25118026

  1. Survivin Antisense Oligonucleotides Effectively Radiosensitize Colorectal Cancer Cells in Both Tissue Culture and Murine Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Survivin shows a radiation resistance factor in colorectal cancer. In the present study, we determined whether survivin messenger RNA levels in patients with rectal cancer predict tumor response after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and whether inhibition of survivin by the use of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) enhances radiation responses. Methods and Materials: SW480 colorectal carcinoma cells were transfected with survivin ASO (LY2181308) and irradiated with doses ranging from 0-8 Gy. Survivin expression, cell-cycle distribution, {gamma}H2AX fluorescence, and induction of apoptosis were monitored by means of immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and caspase 3/7 activity. Clonogenic survival was determined by using a colony-forming assay. An SW480 xenograft model was used to investigate the effect of survivin attenuation and irradiation on tumor growth. Furthermore, survivin messenger RNA levels were studied in patient biopsy specimens by using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Results: In the translational study of 20 patients with rectal cancer, increased survivin levels were associated with significantly greater risk of local tumor recurrence (p = 0.009). Treatment of SW480 cells with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in an increased percentage of apoptotic cells, caspase 3/7 activity, fraction of cells in the G{sub 2}/M phase, and H2AX phosphorylation. Clonogenic survival decreased compared with control-treated cells. Furthermore, treatment of SW480 xenografts with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in a significant delay in tumor growth. Conclusion: Survivin appears to be a molecular biomarker in patients with rectal cancer. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo data suggest a potential role of survivin as a molecular target to improve treatment response to radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  2. Regions of homozygosity identified by oligonucleotide SNP arrays: evaluating the incidence and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Chi; Ross, Leslie; Mahon, Loretta W; Owen, Renius; Hemmat, Morteza; Wang, Boris T; El Naggar, Mohammed; Kopita, Kimberly A; Randolph, Linda M; Chase, John M; Matas Aguilera, Maria J; Siles, Juan López; Church, Joseph A; Hauser, Natalie; Shen, Joseph J; Jones, Marilyn C; Wierenga, Klaas J; Jiang, Zhijie; Haddadin, Mary; Boyar, Fatih Z; Anguiano, Arturo; Strom, Charles M; Sahoo, Trilochan

    2015-05-01

    Copy neutral segments with allelic homozygosity, also known as regions of homozygosity (ROHs), are frequently identified in cases interrogated by oligonucleotide single-nucleotide polymorphism (oligo-SNP) microarrays. Presence of ROHs may be because of parental relatedness, chromosomal recombination or rearrangements and provides important clues regarding ancestral homozygosity, consanguinity or uniparental disomy. In this study of 14 574 consecutive cases, 832 (6%) were found to harbor one or more ROHs over 10 Mb, of which 651 cases (78%) had multiple ROHs, likely because of identity by descent (IBD), and 181 cases (22%) with ROHs involving a single chromosome. Parental relatedness was predicted to be first degree or closer in 5%, second in 9% and third in 19%. Of the 181 cases, 19 had ROHs for a whole chromosome revealing uniparental isodisomy (isoUPD). In all, 25 cases had significant ROHs involving a single chromosome; 5 cases were molecularly confirmed to have a mixed iso- and heteroUPD15 and 1 case each with segmental UPD9pat and segmental UPD22mat; 17 cases were suspected to have a mixed iso- and heteroUPD including 2 cases with small supernumerary marker and 2 cases with mosaic trisomy. For chromosome 15, 12 (92%) of 13 molecularly studied cases had either Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome. Autosomal recessive disorders were confirmed in seven of nine cases from eight families because of the finding of suspected gene within a ROH. This study demonstrates that ROHs are much more frequent than previously recognized and often reflect parental relatedness, ascertain autosomal recessive diseases or unravel UPD in many cases.

  3. Interspecies hybridization on DNA resequencing microarrays: efficiency of sequence recovery and accuracy of SNP detection in human, ape, and codfish mitochondrial DNA genomes sequenced on a human-specific MitoChip

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Sarah MC; Carr, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    Background Iterative DNA "resequencing" on oligonucleotide microarrays offers a high-throughput method to measure intraspecific biodiversity, one that is especially suited to SNP-dense gene regions such as vertebrate mitochondrial (mtDNA) genomes. However, costs of single-species design and microarray fabrication are prohibitive. A cost-effective, multi-species strategy is to hybridize experimental DNAs from diverse species to a common microarray that is tiled with oligonucleotide sets from multiple, homologous reference genomes. Such a strategy requires that cross-hybridization between the experimental DNAs and reference oligos from the different species not interfere with the accurate recovery of species-specific data. To determine the pattern and limits of such interspecific hybridization, we compared the efficiency of sequence recovery and accuracy of SNP identification by a 15,452-base human-specific microarray challenged with human, chimpanzee, gorilla, and codfish mtDNA genomes. Results In the human genome, 99.67% of the sequence was recovered with 100.0% accuracy. Accuracy of SNP identification declines log-linearly with sequence divergence from the reference, from 0.067 to 0.247 errors per SNP in the chimpanzee and gorilla genomes, respectively. Efficiency of sequence recovery declines with the increase of the number of interspecific SNPs in the 25b interval tiled by the reference oligonucleotides. In the gorilla genome, which differs from the human reference by 10%, and in which 46% of these 25b regions contain 3 or more SNP differences from the reference, only 88% of the sequence is recoverable. In the codfish genome, which differs from the reference by > 30%, less than 4% of the sequence is recoverable, in short islands ≥ 12b that are conserved between primates and fish. Conclusion Experimental DNAs bind inefficiently to homologous reference oligonucleotide sets on a re-sequencing microarray when their sequences differ by more than a few percent. The

  4. A new method for gridding DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Christoforos C; Matsopoulos, George K

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, a new methodological scheme for the gridding of DNA microarrays is proposed. The scheme composes of a series of processes applied sequentially. Each DNA microarray image is pre-processed to remove any noise and the center of each spot is detected using a template matching algorithm. Then, an initial gridding is automatically placed on the DNA microarray image by 'building' rectangular pyramids around the detected spots' centers. The gridlines "move" between the pyramids, horizontally and vertically, forming this initial grid. Furthermore, a refinement process is applied composing of a five-step approach in order to correct gridding imperfections caused by its initial placement, both in non-spot cases and in more than one spot enclosure cases. The proposed gridding scheme is applied on DNA microarray images under known transformations and on real-world DNA data. Its performance is compared against the projection pursuit method, which is often used due to its speed and simplicity, as well as against a state-of-the-art method, the Optimal Multi-level Thresholding Gridding (OMTG). According to the obtained results, the proposed gridding scheme outperforms both methods, qualitatively and quantitatively.

  5. Data Analysis Strategies for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Paula; Dasilva, Noelia; González-González, María; Matarraz, Sergio; Casado-Vela, Juan; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays constitute a new platform which allows the discovery and characterization of proteins. According to different features, such as content, surface or detection system, there are many types of protein microarrays which can be applied for the identification of disease biomarkers and the characterization of protein expression patterns. However, the analysis and interpretation of the amount of information generated by microarrays remain a challenge. Further data analysis strategies are essential to obtain representative and reproducible results. Therefore, the experimental design is key, since the number of samples and dyes, among others aspects, would define the appropriate analysis method to be used. In this sense, several algorithms have been proposed so far to overcome analytical difficulties derived from fluorescence overlapping and/or background noise. Each kind of microarray is developed to fulfill a specific purpose. Therefore, the selection of appropriate analytical and data analysis strategies is crucial to achieve successful biological conclusions. In the present review, we focus on current algorithms and main strategies for data interpretation.

  6. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n < p. This leads to a biased estimate of the covariance matrix. In this study, the Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  7. Microarrays (DNA Chips) for the Classroom Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy; Sussman, Michael; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Nienhuis, James; Krysan, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and optimized the necessary laboratory materials to make DNA microarray technology accessible to all high school students at a fraction of both cost and data size. The primary component is a DNA chip/array that students "print" by hand and then analyze using research tools that have been adapted for classroom use. The primary…

  8. Data Analysis Strategies for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Paula; Dasilva, Noelia; González-González, María; Matarraz, Sergio; Casado-Vela, Juan; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays constitute a new platform which allows the discovery and characterization of proteins. According to different features, such as content, surface or detection system, there are many types of protein microarrays which can be applied for the identification of disease biomarkers and the characterization of protein expression patterns. However, the analysis and interpretation of the amount of information generated by microarrays remain a challenge. Further data analysis strategies are essential to obtain representative and reproducible results. Therefore, the experimental design is key, since the number of samples and dyes, among others aspects, would define the appropriate analysis method to be used. In this sense, several algorithms have been proposed so far to overcome analytical difficulties derived from fluorescence overlapping and/or background noise. Each kind of microarray is developed to fulfill a specific purpose. Therefore, the selection of appropriate analytical and data analysis strategies is crucial to achieve successful biological conclusions. In the present review, we focus on current algorithms and main strategies for data interpretation. PMID:27605336

  9. DISC-BASED IMMUNOASSAY MICROARRAYS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology as applied to areas that include genomics, diagnostics, environmental, and drug discovery, is an interesting research topic for which different chip-based devices have been developed. As an alternative, we have explored the principle of compact disc-based...

  10. MICROARRAY DATA ANALYSIS USING MULTIPLE STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray Data Analysis Using Multiple Statistical Models

    Wenjun Bao1, Judith E. Schmid1, Amber K. Goetz1, Ming Ouyang2, William J. Welsh2,Andrew I. Brooks3,4, ChiYi Chu3,Mitsunori Ogihara3,4, Yinhe Cheng5, David J. Dix1. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Researc...

  11. Raman-based microarray readout: a review.

    PubMed

    Haisch, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    For a quarter of a century, microarrays have been part of the routine analytical toolbox. Label-based fluorescence detection is still the commonest optical readout strategy. Since the 1990s, a continuously increasing number of label-based as well as label-free experiments on Raman-based microarray readout concepts have been reported. This review summarizes the possible concepts and methods and their advantages and challenges. A common label-based strategy is based on the binding of selective receptors as well as Raman reporter molecules to plasmonic nanoparticles in a sandwich immunoassay, which results in surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals of the reporter molecule. Alternatively, capture of the analytes can be performed by receptors on a microarray surface. Addition of plasmonic nanoparticles again leads to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal, not of a label but directly of the analyte. This approach is mostly proposed for bacteria and cell detection. However, although many promising readout strategies have been discussed in numerous publications, rarely have any of them made the step from proof of concept to a practical application, let alone routine use. Graphical Abstract Possible realization of a SERS (Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering) system for microarray readout. PMID:26973235

  12. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thorsten L; Beliveau, Brian J; Uca, Yavuz O; Theilmann, Mark; Da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M

    2015-11-16

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes.

  13. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Thorsten L.; Beliveau, Brian J.; Uca, Yavuz O.; Theilmann, Mark; Da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes. PMID:26567534

  14. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thorsten L.; Beliveau, Brian J.; Uca, Yavuz O.; Theilmann, Mark; da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M.

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes.

  15. Flexibility of C3h -Symmetrical Linkers in Tris-oligonucleotide-Based Tetrahedral Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, Christos; Kath-Schorr, Stephanie; von Kiedrowski, Günter

    2016-02-01

    Flexibility of tris-oligonucleotides is determined by the length of their connecting hydrocarbon chains. Tris-oligonucleotides are branched DNA building blocks with three oligonucleotide arms attached to a C3h -symmetrical linker core at these chains. Four tris-oligonucleotides hybridise into a tetrahedral nanocage by sequence-determined self-assembly. The influence of methylene, ethylene and propylene chains was studied by synthesising sets of tris-oligonucleotides and analysing the relative stability of the hybridisation products against digestion by mung bean nuclease by using gel electrophoresis. Linkers with ethylene chains showed sufficient flexibility, whereas methylene-chain linkers were too rigid. Tris-oligonucleotides based on the latter still formed tetrahedral scaffolds in intermixing experiments with linkers of higher flexibility. Thus, a new generation of versatile isocyanurate-based linkers was established.

  16. Nanoparticle-bridge assay for amplification-free electrical detection of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Manouchehr

    The aim of this research is to investigate a highly sensitive, fast, inexpensive, and field-applicable amplification-free nanoparticle-based oligonucleotide detection method which does not rely on any enzymatic or signal amplification process. In this approach, target oligonucleotide strands are detected through the formation of nanoparticle satellites which make an electrical path between two electrodes. This method enables an extremely sensitive oligonucleotide detection because even a few oligonucleotide strands can form a single nanoparticle satellite which can solely generates an electrical output signal. Results showed that this oligonucleotide detection method can detect oligonucleotide single strands at concentrations as low as 50 femtomolar without any amplification process. This detection method can be implemented in many fields such as biodefense, food safety, clinical research, and forensics.

  17. Discrimination of oligonucleotides of different lengths with a wild-type aerolysin nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chan; Ying, Yi-Lun; Hu, Zheng-Li; Liao, Dong-Fang; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Protein nanopores offer an inexpensive, label-free method of analysing single oligonucleotides. The sensitivity of the approach is largely determined by the characteristics of the pore-forming protein employed, and typically relies on nanopores that have been chemically modified or incorporate molecular motors. Effective, high-resolution discrimination of oligonucleotides using wild-type biological nanopores remains difficult to achieve. Here, we show that a wild-type aerolysin nanopore can resolve individual short oligonucleotides that are 2 to 10 bases long. The sensing capabilities are attributed to the geometry of aerolysin and the electrostatic interactions between the nanopore and the oligonucleotides. We also show that the wild-type aerolysin nanopores can distinguish individual oligonucleotides from mixtures and can monitor the stepwise cleavage of oligonucleotides by exonuclease I.

  18. Flexibility of C3h -Symmetrical Linkers in Tris-oligonucleotide-Based Tetrahedral Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, Christos; Kath-Schorr, Stephanie; von Kiedrowski, Günter

    2016-02-01

    Flexibility of tris-oligonucleotides is determined by the length of their connecting hydrocarbon chains. Tris-oligonucleotides are branched DNA building blocks with three oligonucleotide arms attached to a C3h -symmetrical linker core at these chains. Four tris-oligonucleotides hybridise into a tetrahedral nanocage by sequence-determined self-assembly. The influence of methylene, ethylene and propylene chains was studied by synthesising sets of tris-oligonucleotides and analysing the relative stability of the hybridisation products against digestion by mung bean nuclease by using gel electrophoresis. Linkers with ethylene chains showed sufficient flexibility, whereas methylene-chain linkers were too rigid. Tris-oligonucleotides based on the latter still formed tetrahedral scaffolds in intermixing experiments with linkers of higher flexibility. Thus, a new generation of versatile isocyanurate-based linkers was established. PMID:26593127

  19. Examining microarray slide quality for the EPA using SNL's hyperspectral microarray scanner.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Rachel M.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes research performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess microarray quality on arrays from two platforms of interest to the EPA. Custom microarrays from two novel, commercially produced array platforms were imaged with SNL's unique hyperspectral imaging technology and multivariate data analysis was performed to investigate sources of emission on the arrays. No extraneous sources of emission were evident in any of the array areas scanned. This led to the conclusions that either of these array platforms could produce high quality, reliable microarray data for the EPA toxicology programs. Hyperspectral imaging results are presented and recommendations for microarray analyses using these platforms are detailed within the report.

  20. Facilitating functional annotation of chicken microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Modeling results from chicken microarray studies is challenging for researchers due to little functional annotation associated with these arrays. The Affymetrix GenChip chicken genome array, one of the biggest arrays that serve as a key research tool for the study of chicken functional genomics, is among the few arrays that link gene products to Gene Ontology (GO). However the GO annotation data presented by Affymetrix is incomplete, for example, they do not show references linked to manually annotated functions. In addition, there is no tool that facilitates microarray researchers to directly retrieve functional annotations for their datasets from the annotated arrays. This costs researchers amount of time in searching multiple GO databases for functional information. Results We have improved the breadth of functional annotations of the gene products associated with probesets on the Affymetrix chicken genome array by 45% and the quality of annotation by 14%. We have also identified the most significant diseases and disorders, different types of genes, and known drug targets represented on Affymetrix chicken genome array. To facilitate functional annotation of other arrays and microarray experimental datasets we developed an Array GO Mapper (AGOM) tool to help researchers to quickly retrieve corresponding functional information for their dataset. Conclusion Results from this study will directly facilitate annotation of other chicken arrays and microarray experimental datasets. Researchers will be able to quickly model their microarray dataset into more reliable biological functional information by using AGOM tool. The disease, disorders, gene types and drug targets revealed in the study will allow researchers to learn more about how genes function in complex biological systems and may lead to new drug discovery and development of therapies. The GO annotation data generated will be available for public use via AgBase website and will be updated on regular

  1. Microarray analysis at single molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mureşan, Leila; Jacak, Jarosław; Klement, Erich Peter; Hesse, Jan; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bioanalytical chip-based assays have been enormously improved in sensitivity in the recent years; detection of trace amounts of substances down to the level of individual fluorescent molecules has become state of the art technology. The impact of such detection methods, however, has yet not fully been exploited, mainly due to a lack in appropriate mathematical tools for robust data analysis. One particular example relates to the analysis of microarray data. While classical microarray analysis works at resolutions of two to 20 micrometers and quantifies the abundance of target molecules by determining average pixel intensities, a novel high resolution approach [1] directly visualizes individual bound molecules as diffraction limited peaks. The now possible quantification via counting is less susceptible to labeling artifacts and background noise. We have developed an approach for the analysis of high-resolution microarray images. It consists first of a single molecule detection step, based on undecimated wavelet transforms, and second, of a spot identification step via spatial statistics approach (corresponding to the segmentation step in the classical microarray analysis). The detection method was tested on simulated images with a concentration range of 0.001 to 0.5 molecules per square micron and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between 0.9 and 31.6. For SNR above 15 the false negatives relative error was below 15%. Separation of foreground/background proved reliable, in case foreground density exceeds background by a factor of 2. The method has also been applied to real data from high-resolution microarray measurements. PMID:20123580

  2. Hemopoiesis-stimulating activity of immobilized oligonucleotides and hyaluronidase during cytostatic-induced myelosuppression.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Skurikhin, E G; Pershina, O V; Zhdanov, V V; Khmelevskaya, A M; Andreeva, T V; Poponina, A M; Zjuzkov, G N; Udut, E V; Khrichkova, T Ju; Simanina, E V; Miroshnichenko, L A; Stavrova, L A; Tchaikovsky, A S; Markova, T S; Gurto, R V; Brjushinina, O S; Slepichev, V A

    2011-03-01

    The hemopoiesis-stimulating effect of combined treatment with immobilized oligonucleotides and hyaluronidase preparations was studied during cytostatic-induced myelosuppression caused by cyclophosphamide administration. Immobilized hyaluronidase was shown to increase the efficiency of correction of changes in the erythroid and granulocytic hemopoietic stems with immobilized oligonucleotides. This potentiation of the effect of immobilized oligonucleotides by immobilized hyaluronidase was related to an increase in functional activity of committed hemopoietic precursors.

  3. MALDI MS analysis of oligonucleotides: desalting by functional magnetite beads using microwave-assisted extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2007-11-01

    The presence of alkali cation adductions of oligonucleotides commonly deteriorates matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectra. Thus, desalting is required for oligonucleotide samples prior to MALDI MS analysis in order to prevent the mass spectra from developing poor quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a new approach to extract traces of oligonucleotides from aqueous solutions containing high concentrations of salts using microwave-assisted extraction. The C18-presenting magnetite beads, capable of absorbing microwave irradiation, are used as affinity probes for oligonucleotides with the addition of triethylammonium acetate as the counterions. This new microwave-assisted extraction approach using magnetite beads as the trapping agents and as microwave-absorbers has been demonstrated to be very effective in the selective binding of oligonucleotides from aqueous solutions. The extraction of oligonucleotides from solutions onto the C18-presenting magnetite beads takes only 30 s to enrich oligonucleotides in sufficient quantities for MALDI MS analysis. After using this desalting approach, alkali cation adductions of oligonucleotides are dramatically reduced in the MALDI mass spectra. The presence of saturated NaCl (approximately 6 M) in the oligonucleotide sample is tolerated without degrading the mass spectra. The detection limit for d(A)6 is approximately 2.8 fmol. PMID:17902633

  4. 2'-O-[2-(guanidinium)ethyl]-modified oligonucleotides: stabilizing effect on duplex and triplex structures

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, T.P.; Puschl, A.; Lesnik, E.; Mohan, V.; Tereshko, V.; Egli, M.; Manoharan, M.

    2010-03-08

    Oligonucleotides with a novel 2'-O-[2-(guanidinium)ethyl] (2'-O-GE) modification have been synthesized using a novel protecting group strategy for the guanidinium group. This modification enhances the binding affinity of oligonucleotides to RNA as well as duplex DNA ({Delta}T{sub m} 3.2 C per modification). The 2'-O-GE modified oligonucleotides exhibited exceptional resistance to nuclease degradation. The crystal structure of a palindromic duplex formed by a DNA oligonucleotide with a single 2'-O-GE modification was solved at 1.16 {angstrom} resolution.

  5. Properties of amphiphilic oligonucleotide films at the air/water interface and after film transfer.

    PubMed

    Keller, R; Kwak, M; de Vries, J W; Sawaryn, C; Wang, J; Anaya, M; Müllen, K; Butt, H-J; Herrmann, A; Berger, R

    2013-11-01

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic hybrid materials containing an oligonucleotide sequence at the air/water interface was investigated by means of pressure-molecular area (Π-A) isotherms. In addition, films were transferred onto solid substrates and imaged using scanning force microscopy. We used oligonucleotide molecules with lipid tails, which consisted of a single stranded oligonucleotide 11 mer containing two hydrophobically modified 5-(dodec-1-ynyl)uracil nucleobases (dU11) at the 5'-end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The air/water interface was used as confinement for the self-assembling process of dU11. Scanning force microscopy of films transferred via Langmuir-Blodgett technique revealed mono-, bi- (Π ≥ 2 mN/m) and multilayer formation (Π ≥ 30 mN/m). The first layer was 1.6 ± 0.1 nm thick. It was oriented with the hydrophilic oligonucleotide moiety facing the hydrophilic substrate while the hydrophobic alkyl chains faced air. In the second layer the oligonucleotide moiety was found to face the air. The second layer was found to cover up to 95% of the sample area. Our measurements indicated that the rearrangement of the molecules into bi- and multiple bilayers happened already at the air/water interface. Similar results were obtained with a second type of oligonucleotide amphiphile, an oligonucleotide block copolymer, which was composed of an oligonucleotide 11 mer covalently attached at the terminus to polypropyleneoxide (PPO).

  6. A DNA Microarray Platform Based on Direct Detection of rRNA for Characterization of Freshwater Sediment-Related Prokaryotic Communities

    PubMed Central

    Peplies, Jörg; Lachmund, Christine; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Manz, Werner

    2006-01-01

    A DNA microarray platform for the characterization of bacterial communities in freshwater sediments based on a heterogeneous set of 70 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and directly labeled environmental RNA was developed and evaluated. Application of a simple protocol for the efficient background blocking of aminosilane-coated slides resulted in an improved signal-to-noise ratio and a detection limit of 10 ng for particular 16S rRNA targets. An initial specificity test of the system using RNA from pure cultures of different phylogenetic lineages showed a fraction of false-positive signals of ∼5% after protocol optimization and a marginal loss of correct positive signals. Subsequent microarray analysis of sediment-related community RNA from four different German river sites suggested low diversity for the groups targeted but indicated distinct differences in community composition. The results were supported by parallel fluorescence in situ hybridization in combination with sensitive catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH). In comparisons of the data of different sampling sites, specific detection of populations with relative cellular abundances down to 2% as well as a correlation of microarray signal intensities and population size is suggested. Our results demonstrate that DNA microarray technology allows for the fast and efficient precharacterization of complex bacterial communities by the use of standard single-cell hybridization probes and the direct detection of environmental rRNA, also in methodological challenging habitats such as heterogeneous lotic freshwater sediments. PMID:16820477

  7. Parallel characterization of anaerobic toluene- and ethylbenzene-degrading microbial consortia by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, RNA-DNA membrane hybridization, and DNA microarray technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kelly, John J.; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El-Fantroussi, Said; Al-Muzaini, Saleh; Fukui, Manabu; Urushigawa, Yoshikuni; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A mesophilic toluene-degrading consortium (TDC) and an ethylbenzene-degrading consortium (EDC) were established under sulfate-reducing conditions. These consortia were first characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, followed by sequencing. The sequences of the major bands (T-1 and E-2) belonging to TDC and EDC, respectively, were affiliated with the family Desulfobacteriaceae. Another major band from EDC (E-1) was related to an uncultured non-sulfate-reducing soil bacterium. Oligonucleotide probes specific for the 16S rRNAs of target organisms corresponding to T-1, E-1, and E-2 were designed, and hybridization conditions were optimized for two analytical formats, membrane and DNA microarray hybridization. Both formats were used to characterize the TDC and EDC, and the results of both were consistent with DGGE analysis. In order to assess the utility of the microarray format for analysis of environmental samples, oil-contaminated sediments from the coast of Kuwait were analyzed. The DNA microarray successfully detected bacterial nucleic acids from these samples, but probes targeting specific groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria did not give positive signals. The results of this study demonstrate the limitations and the potential utility of DNA microarrays for microbial community analysis.

  8. Molecular Crowding Effects on Microgel-Tethered Oligonucleotide Probes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Youlong; Libera, Matthew

    2016-06-28

    Microgel tethering is a nontraditional method with which to bind oligonucleotide hybridization probes to a solid surface. Microgel-tethering physically positions the probes away from the underlying hard substrate and maintains them in a highly waterlike environment. This paper addresses the question of whether molecular crowding affects the performance of microgel-tethered molecular beacon probes. The density of probe-tethering sites is controlled experimentally using thin-film blends of biotin-terminated [PEG-B] and hydroxyl-terminated [PEG-OH] poly(ethylene glycol) from which microgels are synthesized and patterned by electron beam lithography. Fluorescence measurements indicate that the number of streptavidins, linear DNA probes, hairpin probes, and molecular beacon probes bound to the microgels increases linearly with increasing PEG-B/PEG-OH ratio. For a given tethering-site concentration, more linear probes can bind than structured probes. Crowding effects emerge during the hybridization of microgel-tethered molecular beacons but not during the hybridization of linear probes, as the tethering density increases. Crowding during hybridization is associated with conformational constraints imposed by the close proximity of closed and hybridized structured probes. The signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of hybridized beacons is highest and roughly constant for low tethering densities and decreases at the highest tethering densities. Despite differences between microgel tethering and traditional oligonucleotide surface-immobilization approaches, these results show that crowding defines an optimum tethering density for molecular beacon probes that is less than the maximum possible, which is consistent with previous studies involving various linear and structured oligonucleotide probes. PMID:27253904

  9. Molecular Crowding Effects on Microgel-Tethered Oligonucleotide Probes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Youlong; Libera, Matthew

    2016-06-28

    Microgel tethering is a nontraditional method with which to bind oligonucleotide hybridization probes to a solid surface. Microgel-tethering physically positions the probes away from the underlying hard substrate and maintains them in a highly waterlike environment. This paper addresses the question of whether molecular crowding affects the performance of microgel-tethered molecular beacon probes. The density of probe-tethering sites is controlled experimentally using thin-film blends of biotin-terminated [PEG-B] and hydroxyl-terminated [PEG-OH] poly(ethylene glycol) from which microgels are synthesized and patterned by electron beam lithography. Fluorescence measurements indicate that the number of streptavidins, linear DNA probes, hairpin probes, and molecular beacon probes bound to the microgels increases linearly with increasing PEG-B/PEG-OH ratio. For a given tethering-site concentration, more linear probes can bind than structured probes. Crowding effects emerge during the hybridization of microgel-tethered molecular beacons but not during the hybridization of linear probes, as the tethering density increases. Crowding during hybridization is associated with conformational constraints imposed by the close proximity of closed and hybridized structured probes. The signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of hybridized beacons is highest and roughly constant for low tethering densities and decreases at the highest tethering densities. Despite differences between microgel tethering and traditional oligonucleotide surface-immobilization approaches, these results show that crowding defines an optimum tethering density for molecular beacon probes that is less than the maximum possible, which is consistent with previous studies involving various linear and structured oligonucleotide probes.

  10. Creating highly dense and uniform protein and DNA microarrays through photolithography and plasma modification of glass substrates.

    PubMed

    Malainou, A; Petrou, P S; Kakabakos, S E; Gogolides, E; Tserepi, A

    2012-04-15

    We demonstrate a method to create high density protein microarrays with excellent spot uniformity using photolithography and plasma processing on low cost commercially available microscope glass slides. Protein deposition and fluorescence signal evaluation on these substrates are performed by standard arrayers and scanners. To this end, spots of commercial photoresists (AZ5214, SU8 and Ormocomp(®)) were defined through lithography on glass substrates followed by short SF(6) plasma treatment and selective protein adsorption on these spots with respect to glass (spot to background fluorescence signal ratios 30:1 to 40:1) was demonstrated using model protein binding assays. Among the photoresists tested, Ormocomp was selected since it provided the highest protein binding capacity. No ageing of Ormocomp/glass substrates in terms of protein binding capacity was observed for at least two months. Besides to protein microarrays, DNA microarrays were also developed by spotting streptavidin-biotinylated oligonucleotide conjugates corresponding to wild- and mutant-type sequences of four deleterious BRCA1 gene mutations. For all of the examined mutations, higher specific hybridization signals (1.5-4 times) and improved discrimination ratios between wild- and mutant-type sequences as well as higher spot uniformity and repeatability were demonstrated on Ormocomp/glass substrates with intra- and inter-spot CVs of 8.0% and 4.5%, respectively, compared to commercial polystyrene (intra- and inter-spot CVs 36% and 18%) and epoxy-coated glass (intra- and inter-spot CVs 26% and 20%) slides. Thus, the proposed substrates can be readily applied to protein and DNA microarrays fabrication and, moreover, the described method for selective protein adsorption can be advantageously implemented in various analytical microdevices for multi-analyte detection.

  11. A Novel Rapid DNA Microarray Assay Enables Identification of 37 Mycoplasma Species and Highlights Multiple Mycoplasma Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schnee, Christiane; Schulsse, Samuel; Hotzel, Helmut; Ayling, Roger D.; Nicholas, Robin A. J.; Schubert, Evelyn; Heller, Martin; Ehricht, Ralf; Sachse, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasmas comprise a conglomerate of pathogens and commensals occurring in humans and animals. The genus Mycoplasma alone contains more than 120 species at present, and new members are continuously being discovered. Therefore, it seems promising to use a single highly parallel detection assay rather than develop separate tests for each individual species. In this study, we have designed a DNA microarray carrying 70 oligonucleotide probes derived from the 23S rRNA gene and 86 probes from the tuf gene target regions. Following a PCR amplification and biotinylation step, hybridization on the array was shown to specifically identify 31 Mycoplasma spp., as well as 3 Acholeplasma spp. and 3 Ureaplasma spp. Members of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster can be recognized at subgroup level. This procedure enables parallel detection of Mollicutes spp. occurring in humans, animals or cell culture, from mono- and multiple infections, in a single run. The main advantages of the microarray assay include ease of operation, rapidity, high information content, and affordability. The new test's analytical sensitivity is equivalent to that of real-time PCR and allows examination of field samples without the need for culture. When 60 field samples from ruminants and birds previously analyzed by denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were tested by the microarray assay both tests identified the same agent in 98.3% of the cases. Notably, microarray testing revealed an unexpectedly high proportion (35%) of multiple mycoplasma infections, i.e., substantially more than DGGE (15%). Two of the samples were found to contain four different Mycoplasma spp. This phenomenon deserves more attention, particularly its implications for epidemiology and treatment. PMID:22479374

  12. Gene expression profiles in the rat streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model identified using microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Inmaculada; Clayton, Chris L; Graham, Simon J; Life, Paul F; Dickson, Marion C

    2005-01-01

    Experimental arthritis models are considered valuable tools for delineating mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmune phenomena. Use of microarray-based methods represents a new and challenging approach that allows molecular dissection of complex autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. In order to characterize the temporal gene expression profile in joints from the reactivation model of streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rats, total RNA was extracted from ankle joints from naive, SCW injected, or phosphate buffered saline injected animals (time course study) and gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray technology (RAE230A). After normalization and statistical analysis of data, 631 differentially expressed genes were sorted into clusters based on their levels and kinetics of expression using Spotfire profile search and K-mean cluster analysis. Microarray-based data for a subset of genes were validated using real-time PCR TaqMan analysis. Analysis of the microarray data identified 631 genes (441 upregulated and 190 downregulated) that were differentially expressed (Delta > 1.8, P < 0.01), showing specific levels and patterns of gene expression. The genes exhibiting the highest fold increase in expression on days -13.8, -13, or 3 were involved in chemotaxis, inflammatory response, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodelling. Transcriptome analysis identified 10 upregulated genes (Delta > 5), which have not previously been associated with arthritis pathology and are located in genomic regions associated with autoimmune disease. The majority of the downregulated genes were associated with metabolism, transport and regulation of muscle development. In conclusion, the present study describes the temporal expression of multiple disease-associated genes with potential pathophysiological roles in the reactivation model of SCW-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rat. These findings improve our understanding of

  13. Assembly of a gene sequence tag microarray by reversible biotin-streptavidin capture for transcript analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wirta, Valtteri; Holmberg, Anders; Lukacs, Morten; Nilsson, Peter; Hilson, Pierre; Uhlén, Mathias; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2005-01-01

    Background Transcriptional profiling using microarrays has developed into a key molecular tool for the elucidation of gene function and gene regulation. Microarray platforms based on either oligonucleotides or purified amplification products have been utilised in parallel to produce large amounts of data. Irrespective of platform examined, the availability of genome sequence or a large number of representative expressed sequence tags (ESTs) is, however, a pre-requisite for the design and selection of specific and high-quality microarray probes. This is of great importance for organisms, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, with a high number of duplicated genes, as cross-hybridisation signals between evolutionary related genes cannot be distinguished from true signals unless the probes are carefully designed to be specific. Results We present an alternative solid-phase purification strategy suitable for efficient preparation of short, biotinylated and highly specific probes suitable for large-scale expression profiling. Twenty-one thousand Arabidopsis thaliana gene sequence tags were amplified and subsequently purified using the described technology. The use of the arrays is exemplified by analysis of gene expression changes caused by a four-hour indole-3-acetic (auxin) treatment. A total of 270 genes were identified as differentially expressed (120 up-regulated and 150 down-regulated), including several previously known auxin-affected genes, but also several previously uncharacterised genes. Conclusions The described solid-phase procedure can be used to prepare gene sequence tag microarrays based on short and specific amplified probes, facilitating the analysis of more than 21 000 Arabidopsis transcripts. PMID:15689241

  14. Chromosomal microarray analysis of consecutive individuals with autism spectrum disorders or learning disability presenting for genetic services.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer L; Hovanes, Karine; Dasouki, Majed; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2014-02-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis is now commonly used in clinical practice to identify copy number variants (CNVs) in the human genome. We report our experience with the use of the 105 K and 180K oligonucleotide microarrays in 215 consecutive patients referred with either autism or autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or developmental delay/learning disability for genetic services at the University of Kansas Medical Center during the past 4 years (2009-2012). Of the 215 patients [140 males and 75 females (male/female ratio=1.87); 65 with ASD and 150 with learning disability], abnormal microarray results were seen in 45 individuals (21%) with a total of 49 CNVs. Of these findings, 32 represented a known diagnostic CNV contributing to the clinical presentation and 17 represented non-diagnostic CNVs (variants of unknown significance). Thirteen patients with ASD had a total of 14 CNVs, 6 CNVs recognized as diagnostic and 8 as non-diagnostic. The most common chromosome involved in the ASD group was chromosome 15. For those with a learning disability, 32 patients had a total of 35 CNVs. Twenty-six of the 35 CNVs were classified as a known diagnostic CNV, usually a deletion (n=20). Nine CNVs were classified as an unknown non-diagnostic CNV, usually a duplication (n=8). For the learning disability subgroup, chromosomes 2 and 22 were most involved. Thirteen out of 65 patients (20%) with ASD had a CNV compared with 32 out of 150 patients (21%) with a learning disability. The frequency of chromosomal microarray abnormalities compared by subject group or gender was not statistically different. A higher percentage of individuals with a learning disability had clinical findings of seizures, dysmorphic features and microcephaly, but not statistically significant. While both groups contained more males than females, a significantly higher percentage of males were present in the ASD group. PMID:24188901

  15. Chromosomal Microarray Analysis of Consecutive Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders or Learning Disability Presenting for Genetic Services

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jennifer L.; Hovanes, Karine; Dasouki, Majed; Manzardo, Ann M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis is now commonly used in clinical practice to identify copy number variants (CNVs) in the human genome. We report our experience with the use of the 105K and 180K oligonucleotide microarrays in 215 consecutive patients referred with either autism or autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or developmental delay/learning disability for genetic services at the University of Kansas Medical Center during the past 4 years (2009–2012). Of the 215 patients [140 males and 75 females (male/female ratio = 1.87); 65 with ASD and 150 with learning disability], abnormal microarray results were seen in 45 individuals (21%) with a total of 49 CNVs. Of these findings, 32 represented a known diagnostic CNV contributing to the clinical presentation and 17 represented non-diagnostic CNVs (variants of unknown significance). Thirteen patients with ASD had a total of 14 CNVs, 6 CNVs recognized as diagnostic and 8 as non-diagnostic. The most common chromosome involved in the ASD group was chromosome 15. For those with a learning disability, 32 patients had a total of 35 CNVs. Twenty-six of the 35 CNVs were classified as a known diagnostic CNV, usually a deletion (n = 20). Nine CNVs were classified as an unknown non-diagnostic CNV, usually a duplication (n = 8). For the learning disability subgroup, chromosomes 2 and 22 were most involved. Thirteen out of 65 patients (20%) with ASD had a CNV compared with 32 out of 150 patients (21%) with a learning disability. The frequency of chromosomal microarray abnormalities compared by subject group or gender was not statistically different. A higher percentage of individuals with a learning disability had clinical findings of seizures, dysmorphic features and microcephaly, but not statistically significant. While both groups contained more males than females, a significantly higher percentage of males were present in the ASD group. PMID:24188901

  16. Species-Level Identification of Orthopoxviruses with an Oligonucleotide Microchip

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Sergey; Mikheev, Maxim; Shchelkunov, Sergei; Mikhailovich, Vladimir; Sobolev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Babkin, Igor; Guskov, Alexander; Sokunova, Elena; Zasedatelev, Alexander; Sandakhchiev, Lev; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2002-01-01

    A method for species-specific detection of orthopoxviruses pathogenic for humans and animals is described. The method is based on hybridization of a fluorescently labeled amplified DNA specimen with the oligonucleotide DNA probes immobilized on a microchip (MAGIChip). The probes identify species-specific sites within the crmB gene encoding the viral analogue of tumor necrosis factor receptor, one of the most important determinants of pathogenicity in this genus of viruses. The diagnostic procedure takes 6 h and does not require any sophisticated equipment (a portable fluorescence reader can be used). PMID:11880388

  17. Reliable and fast allele-specific extension of 3'-LNA modified oligonucleotides covalently immobilized on a plastic base, combined with biotin-dUTP mediated optical detection.

    PubMed

    Michikawa, Yuichi; Fujimoto, Kentaro; Kinoshita, Kenji; Kawai, Seiko; Sugahara, Keisuke; Suga, Tomo; Otsuka, Yoshimi; Fujiwara, Kazuhiko; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi

    2006-12-01

    In the present work, a convenient microarray SNP typing system has been developed using a plastic base that covalently immobilizes amino-modified oligonucleotides. Reliable SNP allele discrimination was achieved by using allelic specificity-enhanced enzymatic extension of immobilized oligonucleotide primer, with a locked nucleic acid (LNA) modification at the SNP-discriminating 3'-end nucleotide. Incorporation of multiple biotin-dUTP molecules during primer extension, followed by binding of alkaline phosphatase-conjugated streptavidin, allowed optical detection of the genotyping results through precipitation of colored alkaline phosphatase substrates onto the surface of the plastic base. Notably, rapid primer extension was demonstrated without a preliminary annealing step of double-stranded template DNA, allowing overall processes to be performed within a couple of hours. Simultaneous evaluation of three SNPs in the genes TGFB1, SOD2 and APEX1, previously investigated for association with radiation sensitivity, in 25 individuals has shown perfect assignment with data obtained by another established technique (MassARRAY system).

  18. Microgel Tethering For Microarray-Based Nucleic Acid Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaoguang

    Molecular diagnostics (MDx) have radically changed the process of clinical microbial identification based on identifying genetic information, MDx approaches are both specific and fast. They can identify microbes to the species and strain level over a time scale that can be as short as one hour. With such information clinicians can administer the most effective and appropriate antimicrobial treatment at an early time point with substantial implications both for patient well-being and for easing the burden on the health-care system. Among the different MDx approaches, such as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, microarrays, next-generation sequencing, and mass spectrometry, point-of-care MDx platforms are drawing particular interest due to their low cost, robustness, and wide application. This dissertation develops a novel MDx technology platform capable of high target amplification and detection performance. For nucleic acid target detection, we fabricate an array of electron-beam-patterned microgels on a standard glass microscope slide. The microgels can be as small as a few hundred nanometers. The unique way of energy deposition during electron-beam lithography provides the microgels with a very diffuse water -gel interface that enables them to not only serve as substrates to immobilize DNA probes but do so while preserving them in a highly hydrated environment that optimizes their performance. Benefiting from the high spatial resolution provided by such techniques as position-sensitive microspotting and dip-pen nanolithography, multiple oligonucleotide probes known as molecular beacons (MBs) can be patterned on microgels. Furthermore, nucleic acid target amplification can be conducted in direct contact with the microgel-tethered detection array. Specifically, we use an isothermal RNA amplification reaction - nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). ssRNA amplicons of from the NASBA reaction can directly hybridize with microgel-tethered MBs, and the

  19. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips identified Bovine herpes virus-1 (BHV-1), Canine Adeno Virus-1 (CAV-1), and Canine Parvo Virus-2 (CPV-2) in clinical samples. Microarray identified specific probes were further confirmed using RT-PCR in all clinical and known samples. Therefore, the application of microarray chips during viral disease outbreaks in Indian livestock is possible where conventional methods are unsuitable. It should be noted that customized application requires a detailed cost efficiency calculation.

  20. Advancing translational research with next-generation protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; Petritis, Brianne; LaBaer, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    Protein microarrays are a high-throughput technology used increasingly in translational research, seeking to apply basic science findings to enhance human health. In addition to assessing protein levels, posttranslational modifications, and signaling pathways in patient samples, protein microarrays have aided in the identification of potential protein biomarkers of disease and infection. In this perspective, the different types of full-length protein microarrays that are used in translational research are reviewed. Specific studies employing these microarrays are presented to highlight their potential in finding solutions to real clinical problems. Finally, the criteria that should be considered when developing next-generation protein microarrays are provided. PMID:26749402

  1. [Differential gene expression in incompatible interaction between Lilium regale Wilson and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lilii revealed by combined SSH and microarray analysis].

    PubMed

    Rao, J; Liu, D; Zhang, N; He, H; Ge, F; Chen, C

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium wilt, caused by a soilborne pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lilii, is the major disease of lily (Lilium L.). In order to isolate the genes differentially expressed in a resistant reaction to F. oxysporum in L. regale Wilson, a cDNA library was constructed with L. regale root during F. oxysporum infection using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), and a total of 585 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained. Furthermore, the gene expression profiles in the incompatible interaction between L. regale and F. oxysporum were revealed by oligonucleotide microarray analysis of 585 unique ESTs comparison to the compatible interaction between a susceptible Lilium Oriental Hybrid 'Siberia' and F. oxysporum. The result of expression profile analysis indicated that the genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs), antioxidative stress enzymes, secondary metabolism enzymes, transcription factors, signal transduction proteins as well as a large number of unknown genes were involved in early defense response of L. regale to F. oxysporum infection. Moreover, the following quantitative reverse transcription PCR (QRT-PCR) analysis confirmed reliability of the oligonucleotide microarray data. In the present study, isolation of differentially expressed genes in L. regale during response to F. oxysporum helped to uncover the molecular mechanism associated with the resistance of L. regale against F. oxysporum.

  2. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-Hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2016-01-27

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn.

  3. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn. PMID:26813635

  4. Statistical Considerations for Analysis of Microarray Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Owzar, Kouros; Barry, William T.; Jung, Sin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Microarray technologies enable the simultaneous interrogation of expressions from thousands of genes from a biospecimen sample taken from a patient. This large set of expressions generate a genetic profile of the patient that may be used to identify potential prognostic or predictive genes or genetic models for clinical outcomes. The aim of this article is to provide a broad overview of some of the major statistical considerations for the design and analysis of microarrays experiments conducted as correlative science studies to clinical trials. An emphasis will be placed on how the lack of understanding and improper use of statistical concepts and methods will lead to noise discovery and misinterpretation of experimental results. PMID:22212230

  5. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  6. Microarrays: how many do you need?

    PubMed

    Zien, Alexander; Fluck, Juliane; Zimmer, Ralf; Lengauer, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We estimate the number of microarrays that is required in order to gain reliable results from a common type of study: the pairwise comparison of different classes of samples. We show that current knowledge allows for the construction of models that look realistic with respect to searches for individual differentially expressed genes and derive prototypical parameters from real data sets. Such models allow investigation of the dependence of the required number of samples on the relevant parameters: the biological variability of the samples within each class, the fold changes in expression that are desired to be detected, the detection sensitivity of the microarrays, and the acceptable error rates of the results. We supply experimentalists with general conclusions as well as a freely accessible Java applet at www.scai.fhg.de/special/bio/howmanyarrays/ for fine tuning simulations to their particular settings. PMID:12935350

  7. A Flexible Microarray Data Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Dembélé, Doulaye

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology allows monitoring of gene expression profiling at the genome level. This is useful in order to search for genes involved in a disease. The performances of the methods used to select interesting genes are most often judged after other analyzes (qPCR validation, search in databases...), which are also subject to error. A good evaluation of gene selection methods is possible with data whose characteristics are known, that is to say, synthetic data. We propose a model to simulate microarray data with similar characteristics to the data commonly produced by current platforms. The parameters used in this model are described to allow the user to generate data with varying characteristics. In order to show the flexibility of the proposed model, a commented example is given and illustrated. An R package is available for immediate use.

  8. Profiling protein function with small molecule microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Winssinger, Nicolas; Ficarro, Scott; Schultz, Peter G.; Harris, Jennifer L.

    2002-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through posttranslational modification, local environment, and protein–protein interaction is critical to cellular function. The ability to analyze on a genome-wide scale protein functional activity rather than changes in protein abundance or structure would provide important new insights into complex biological processes. Herein, we report the application of a spatially addressable small molecule microarray to an activity-based profile of proteases in crude cell lysates. The potential of this small molecule-based profiling technology is demonstrated by the detection of caspase activation upon induction of apoptosis, characterization of the activated caspase, and inhibition of the caspase-executed apoptotic phenotype using the small molecule inhibitor identified in the microarray-based profile. PMID:12167675

  9. Oligonucleotide Aptamers: New Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongguang; Zhu, Xun; Lu, Patrick Y; Rosato, Roberto R; Tan, Wen; Zu, Youli

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of small nucleic acid ligands that are composed of RNA or single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and have high specificity and affinity for their targets. Similar to antibodies, aptamers interact with their targets by recognizing a specific three-dimensional structure and are thus termed “chemical antibodies.” In contrast to protein antibodies, aptamers offer unique chemical and biological characteristics based on their oligonucleotide properties. Hence, they are more suitable for the development of novel clinical applications. Aptamer technology has been widely investigated in various biomedical fields for biomarker discovery, in vitro diagnosis, in vivo imaging, and targeted therapy. This review will discuss the potential applications of aptamer technology as a new tool for targeted cancer therapy with emphasis on the development of aptamers that are able to specifically target cell surface biomarkers. Additionally, we will describe several approaches for the use of aptamers in targeted therapeutics, including aptamer-drug conjugation, aptamer-nanoparticle conjugation, aptamer-mediated targeted gene therapy, aptamer-mediated immunotherapy, and aptamer-mediated biotherapy. PMID:25093706

  10. In vivo delivery of transcription factors with multifunctional oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kunwoo; Rafi, Mohammad; Wang, Xiaojian; Aran, Kiana; Feng, Xuli; Lo Sterzo, Carlo; Tang, Richard; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Murthy, Niren

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutics based on transcription factors have the potential to revolutionize medicine but have had limited clinical success as a consequence of delivery problems. The delivery of transcription factors is challenging because it requires the development of a delivery vehicle that can complex transcription factors, target cells and stimulate endosomal disruption, with minimal toxicity. Here, we present a multifunctional oligonucleotide, termed DARTs (DNA assembled recombinant transcription factors), which can deliver transcription factors with high efficiency in vivo. DARTs are composed of an oligonucleotide that contains a transcription-factor-binding sequence and hydrophobic membrane-disruptive chains that are masked by acid-cleavable galactose residues. DARTs have a unique molecular architecture, which allows them to bind transcription factors, trigger endocytosis in hepatocytes, and stimulate endosomal disruption. The DARTs have enhanced uptake in hepatocytes as a result of their galactose residues and can disrupt endosomes efficiently with minimal toxicity, because unmasking of their hydrophobic domains selectively occurs in the acidic environment of the endosome. We show that DARTs can deliver the transcription factor nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the liver, catalyse the transcription of Nrf2 downstream genes, and rescue mice from acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

  11. Molecular dynamics study on DNA oligonucleotide translocation through carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Q X; Lim, C G; Cheng, Y; Gao, Huajian

    2008-09-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the translocation of a DNA oligonucleotide in a carbon nanotube (CNT) channel consisting of CNTs of two different diameters. A strong gravitational acceleration field is applied to the DNA molecule and water solvent as an external driving force for the translocation. It is observed that both the CNT channel size and the strength of gravitational field have significant influence on the DNA translocation process. It is found that the DNA oligonucleotide is unable to pass through the (8,8) CNT even under strong gravitational fields, which extends previous finding that DNA cannot be self-inserted into a (8,8) CNT. It is shown that the DNA can pass through the (10,10)-(12,12) and (12,12)-(14,14) CNTs with stronger gravitational field resulting in faster translocation. The translocation time tau is found to follow the inverse power law relationship with the gravitational acceleration a as tau approximately a(-1.21). The energetic analysis of the translocation process shows that there is an energy barrier for DNA translocation into the (10,10) tube from the (14,14) tube, which is in contrast to previous report that DNA can be self-inserted into a (10,10) tube from outside the CNT. This difference with previous report shows that the dynamic behavior of DNA translocation inside a CNT channel is quite different from that of DNA translocation into a CNT from outside the CNT.

  12. Dendritic nanoconjugates for intracellular delivery of neutral oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Xin; Wu, Lin; Carver, Kyle; Yuan, Ahu; Min, Yuanzeng

    2015-07-01

    Dendrimer-based gene delivery has been constrained by intrinsic toxicity and suboptimal nanostructure. Conjugation of neutral morpholino oligonucleotides (ONs) with PAMAM dendrimers resulted in neutral, uniform, and ultra-small (~10 nm) nanoconjugates. The nanoconjugates dramatically enhanced cellular delivery of the ONs in cancer cells. After release from the dendrimer in the cytosol, the ONs produced potent functional activity without causing significant cytotoxicity. When carrying an apoptosis-promoting ON, the nanoconjugates produced cancer cell killing directly. Thus, the dendritic nanoconjugates may provide an effective tool for delivering ONs to tumors and other diseased tissues.Dendrimer-based gene delivery has been constrained by intrinsic toxicity and suboptimal nanostructure. Conjugation of neutral morpholino oligonucleotides (ONs) with PAMAM dendrimers resulted in neutral, uniform, and ultra-small (~10 nm) nanoconjugates. The nanoconjugates dramatically enhanced cellular delivery of the ONs in cancer cells. After release from the dendrimer in the cytosol, the ONs produced potent functional activity without causing significant cytotoxicity. When carrying an apoptosis-promoting ON, the nanoconjugates produced cancer cell killing directly. Thus, the dendritic nanoconjugates may provide an effective tool for delivering ONs to tumors and other diseased tissues. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01665g

  13. Gas-phase Dissociation of homo-DNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Silvan R.; Désiron, Camille; Nyakas, Adrien; Marti, Simon; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic modified oligonucleotides are of interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, as their biological stability, pairing selectivity, and binding strength can be considerably increased by the incorporation of unnatural structural elements. Homo-DNA is an oligonucleotide homologue based on dideoxy-hexopyranosyl sugar moieties, which follows the Watson-Crick A-T and G-C base pairing system, but does not hybridize with complementary natural DNA and RNA. Homo-DNA has found application as a bioorthogonal element in templated chemistry applications. The gas-phase dissociation of homo-DNA has been investigated by ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MS/MS, and mechanistic aspects of its gas-phase dissociation are discussed. Experiments revealed a charge state dependent preference for the loss of nucleobases, which are released either as neutrals or as anions. In contrast to DNA, nucleobase loss from homo-DNA was found to be decoupled from backbone cleavage, thus resulting in stable products. This renders an additional stage of ion activation necessary in order to generate sequence-defining fragment ions. Upon MS3 of the primary base-loss ion, homo-DNA was found to exhibit unspecific backbone dissociation resulting in a balanced distribution of all fragment ion series.

  14. Weighted analysis of general microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, Anders; Kristiansson, Erik; Rudemo, Mats; Nerman, Olle

    2007-01-01

    Background In DNA microarray experiments, measurements from different biological samples are often assumed to be independent and to have identical variance. For many datasets these assumptions have been shown to be invalid and typically lead to too optimistic p-values. A method called WAME has been proposed where a variance is estimated for each sample and a covariance is estimated for each pair of samples. The current version of WAME is, however, limited to experiments with paired design, e.g. two-channel microarrays. Results The WAME procedure is extended to general microarray experiments, making it capable of handling both one- and two-channel datasets. Two public one-channel datasets are analysed and WAME detects both unequal variances and correlations. WAME is compared to other common methods: fold-change ranking, ordinary linear model with t-tests, LIMMA and weighted LIMMA. The p-value distributions are shown to differ greatly between the examined methods. In a resampling-based simulation study, the p-values generated by WAME are found to be substantially more correct than the alternatives when a relatively small proportion of the genes is regulated. WAME is also shown to have higher power than the other methods. WAME is available as an R-package. Conclusion The WAME procedure is generalized and the limitation to paired-design microarray datasets is removed. The examined other methods produce invalid p-values in many cases, while WAME is shown to produce essentially valid p-values when a relatively small proportion of genes is regulated. WAME is also shown to have higher power than the examined alternative methods. PMID:17937807

  15. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    PubMed

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  16. Microarray analysis in gastric cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Giovanna; Di Rienzo, Teresa; Ojetti, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. Although several treatment options have been developed, the mortality rate is increasing. Lymph node involvement is considered the most reliable prognostic indicator in gastric cancer. Early diagnosis improves the survival rate of patients and increases the likelihood of successful treatment. The most reliable diagnostic method is endoscopic examination, however, it is expensive and not feasible in poorer countries. Therefore, many innovative techniques have been studied to develop a new non-invasive screening test and to identify specific serum biomarkers. DNA microarray analysis is one of the new technologies able to measure the expression levels of a large number of genes simultaneously. It is possible to define the gene expression profile of the tumor and to correlate it with the prognosis and metastasis formation. Several studies in the literature have been published on the role of microarray analysis in gastric cancer and the mechanisms of proliferation and metastasis formation. The aim of this review is to analyze the importance of microarray analysis and its clinical applications to better define the genetic characteristics of gastric cancer and its possible implications in a more decisive treatment. PMID:25232233

  17. Repeatability of published microarray gene expression analyses.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A; Allison, David B; Ball, Catherine A; Coulibaly, Issa; Cui, Xiangqin; Culhane, Aedín C; Falchi, Mario; Furlanello, Cesare; Game, Laurence; Jurman, Giuseppe; Mangion, Jon; Mehta, Tapan; Nitzberg, Michael; Page, Grier P; Petretto, Enrico; van Noort, Vera

    2009-02-01

    Given the complexity of microarray-based gene expression studies, guidelines encourage transparent design and public data availability. Several journals require public data deposition and several public databases exist. However, not all data are publicly available, and even when available, it is unknown whether the published results are reproducible by independent scientists. Here we evaluated the replication of data analyses in 18 articles on microarray-based gene expression profiling published in Nature Genetics in 2005-2006. One table or figure from each article was independently evaluated by two teams of analysts. We reproduced two analyses in principle and six partially or with some discrepancies; ten could not be reproduced. The main reason for failure to reproduce was data unavailability, and discrepancies were mostly due to incomplete data annotation or specification of data processing and analysis. Repeatability of published microarray studies is apparently limited. More strict publication rules enforcing public data availability and explicit description of data processing and analysis should be considered.

  18. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  19. Integrating data from heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms.

    PubMed

    Valente, Eduardo; Rocha, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays are one of the most used technologies for gene expression measurement. However, there are several distinct microarray platforms, from different manufacturers, each with its own measurement protocol, resulting in data that can hardly be compared or directly integrated. Data integration from multiple sources aims to improve the assertiveness of statistical tests, reducing the data dimensionality problem. The integration of heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms comprehends a set of tasks that range from the re-annotation of the features used on gene expression, to data normalization and batch effect elimination. In this work, a complete methodology for gene expression data integration and application is proposed, which comprehends a transcript-based re-annotation process and several methods for batch effect attenuation. The integrated data will be used to select the best feature set and learning algorithm for a brain tumor classification case study. The integration will consider data from heterogeneous Agilent and Affymetrix platforms, collected from public gene expression databases, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas and Gene Expression Omnibus. PMID:26673932

  20. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed.

  1. Metadata management and semantics in microarray repositories.

    PubMed

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-12-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework. PMID:24052712

  2. Chicken sperm transcriptome profiling by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Shafeeque, C M; Sharma, S K; Singh, R; Mohan, J; Sastry, K V H; Saxena, V K; Azeez, P A

    2016-03-01

    It has been confirmed that mammalian sperm contain thousands of functional RNAs, and some of them have vital roles in fertilization and early embryonic development. Therefore, we attempted to characterize transcriptome of the sperm of fertile chickens using microarray analysis. Spermatozoal RNA was pooled from 10 fertile males and used for RNA preparation. Prior to performing the microarray, RNA quality was assessed using a bioanalyzer, and gDNA and somatic cell RNA contamination was assessed by CD4 and PTPRC gene amplification. The chicken sperm transcriptome was cross-examined by analysing sperm and testes RNA on a 4 × 44K chicken array, and results were verified by RT-PCR. Microarray analysis identified 21,639 predominantly nuclear-encoded transcripts in chicken sperm. The majority (66.55%) of the sperm transcripts were shared with the testes, while surprisingly, 33.45% transcripts were detected (raw signal intensity greater than 50) only in the sperm and not in the testes. The greatest proportion of up-regulated transcripts were responsible for signal transduction (63.20%) followed by embryonic development (56.76%) and cell structure (56.25%). Of the 20 most abundant transcripts, 18 remain uncharacterized, whereas the least abundant genes were mostly associated with the ribosome. These findings lay a foundation for more detailed investigations on sperm RNAs in chickens to identify sperm-based biomarkers for fertility.

  3. [Genomic medicine. Polymorphisms and microarray applications].

    PubMed

    Spalvieri, Mónica P; Rotenberg, Rosa G

    2004-01-01

    This update shows new concepts related to the significance of DNA variations among individuals, as well as to their detection by using a new technology. The sequencing of the human genome is only the beginning of what will enable us to understand genetic diversity. The unit of DNA variability is the polymorphism of a single nucleotide (SNP). At present, studies on SNPs are restricted to basic research but the large number of papers on this subject makes feasible their entrance into clinical practice. We illustrate here the use of SNPs as molecular markers in ethnical genotyping, gene expression in some diseases and as potential targets in pharmacological response, and also introduce the technology of arrays. Microarrays experiments allow the quantification and comparison of gene expression on a large scale, at the same time, by using special chips and array designs. Conventional methods provide data from up to 20 genes, while a single microarray may provide information about thousands of them simultaneously, leading to a more rapid and accurate genotyping. Biotechnology improvements will facilitate our knowledge of each gene sequence, the frequency and exact location of SNPs and their influence on cellular behavior. Although experimental efficiency and validity of results from microarrays are still controversial, the knowledge and characterization of a patient's genetic profile will lead, undoubtedly, to advances in prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of human diseases. PMID:15637833

  4. Hydrogel-based protein and oligonucleotide microchips on metal-coated surfaces: enhancement of fluorescence and optimization of immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Zubtsova, Zh I; Zubtsov, D A; Savvateeva, E N; Stomakhin, A A; Chechetkin, V R; Zasedatelev, A S; Rubina, A Yu

    2009-10-26

    Manufacturing of hydrogel-based microchips on metal-coated substrates significantly enhances fluorescent signals upon binding of labeled target molecules. This observation holds true for both oligonucleotide and protein microchips. When Cy5 is used as fluorophore, this enhancement is 8-10-fold in hemispherical gel elements and 4-5-fold in flattened gel pads, as compared with similar microchips manufactured on uncoated glass slides. The effect also depends on the hydrophobicity of metal-coated substrate and on the presence of a layer of liquid over the gel pads. The extent of enhancement is insensitive to the nature of formed complexes and immobilized probes and remains linear within a wide range of fluorescence intensities. Manufacturing of gel-based protein microarrays on metal-coated substrates improves their sensitivity using the same incubation time for immunoassay. Sandwich immunoassay using these microchips allows shortening the incubation time without loss of sensitivity. Unlike microchips with probes immobilized directly on a surface, for which the plasmon mechanism is considered responsible for metal-enhanced fluorescence, the enhancement effect observed using hydrogel-based microchips on metal-coated substrates might be explained within the framework of geometric optics.

  5. Spatially Defined Oligonucleotide Arrays. Technical Report for Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-15

    The goal of the Human Genome Project is to sequence all 3 billion base pairs of the human genome. Progress in this has been rapid; GenBank{reg_sign} finished 1994 with 286 million bases of sequence and grew by 2470 in the first quarter of 1995. The challenge to the scientific community is to understand the biological relevance of this genetic information. In most cases the sequence being generated for any single region of the genome represents the genotype of a single individual. A complete understanding of the function of specific genes and other regions of the genome and their role in human disease and development will only become apparent when the sequence of many more individuals is known. Access to genetic information is ultimately limited by the ability to screen DNA sequence. Although the pioneering sequencing methods of Sanger et al. (15) and Maxam and Gilbert (11) have become standard in virtually all molecular biology laboratories, the basic protocols remain largely unchanged. The throughput of this sequencing technology is now becoming the rate-limiting step in both large-scale sequencing projects such as the Human Genome Project and the subsequent efforts to understand genetic diversity. This has inspired the development of advanced DNA sequencing technologies (9), Incremental improvements to Sanger sequencing have been made in DNA labeling and detection. High-speed electrophoresis methods using ultrathin gels or capillary arrays are now being more widely employed. However, these methods are throughput-limited by their sequential nature and the speed and resolution of separations. This limitation will become more pronounced as the need to rapidly screen newly discovered genes for biologically relevant polymorphisms increases. An alternative to gel-based sequencing is to use high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays. Oligonucleotide probe arrays display specific oligonucleotide probes at precise locations in a high density, information-rich format (5

  6. Empirical Evaluation of a New Method for Calculating Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) for Microarray Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-03-06

    Signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) thresholds for microarray data analysis were experimentally determined with an oligonucleotide array that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes based upon four genes from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A new SNR calculation, called signal to both standard deviations ratio (SSDR) was developed, and evaluated along with other two methods, signal to standard deviation ratio (SSR), and signal to background ratio (SBR). At a low stringency, the thresholds of SSR, SBR, and SSDR were 2.5, 1.60 and 0.80 with oligonucleotide and PCR amplicon as target templates, and 2.0, 1.60 and 0.70 with genomic DNA as target templates. Slightly higher thresholds were obtained at the high stringency condition. The thresholds of SSR and SSDR decreased with an increase in the complexity of targets (e.g., target types), and the presence of background DNA, and a decrease in the composition of targets, while SBR remained unchanged under all situations. The lowest percentage of false positives (FP) and false negatives (FN) was observed with the SSDR calculation method, suggesting that it may be a better SNR calculation for more accurate determination of SNR thresholds. Positive spots identified by SNR thresholds were verified by the Student t-test, and consistent results were observed. This study provides general guidance for users to select appropriate SNR thresholds for different samples under different hybridization conditions.

  7. Site selective bis-intercalation of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye in DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, J P; Pedersen, J B; Hansen, L F; Wemmer, D E

    1995-01-01

    We have used one and two dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy to characterize the binding of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye, 1,1'-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4,8-diaza-undecamethylene)-bis-4- (3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-thiazole)-2-methylidene)-quinolin ium tetraiodide (TOTO), to various double stranded DNA oligonucleotides. TOTO binds strongly to all the oligonucleotides used, but usually more than one complex is observed and exchange between different binding sites broadens the lines in the NMR spectra. Complete precipitation occurs when TOTO is bound to small oligonucleotides. Binding to larger oligonucleotides occurs by bis-intercalation. The 1:1 complex of TOTO with the oligonucleotide d(CCGACTGATGC):d (GCATCAGTCGG) gave only one complex that was shown to be a bis-intercalation in the CTGA:TCAG binding site. The binding to this site was also characterized by studying the TOTO complex with the d(CCGCTGAGC):d(GCTCAGCGG) oligonucleotide. NOE connectivities and molecular modelling were used to characterize the complex. The 1:1 complex of TOTO with the oligonucleotide d(CCGCTAGCG):d(CGCTAGCGG) containing a CTAG:CTAG binding site was similarly characterized by NMR. It was concluded that the binding of TOTO to larger oligonucleotides is site selective with CTAG:CTAG as the preferred binding site. PMID:7708489

  8. A convenient solid-phase method for synthesis of 3'-conjugates of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Stetsenko, D A; Gait, M J

    2001-01-01

    We present a new procedure for the preparation of 3'-conjugates of oligonucleotides through solid-phase synthesis. A suitable universal solid support was readily prepared using a series of peptide-like coupling reactions to incorporate first a spacer and then an L-homoserine branching unit. The N-alpha-position of the homoserine carries an Fmoc protecting group that is removed by treatment with piperidine to liberate an amino group suitable for attachment of the conjugate (e.g., small organic molecule, fluorescent group, cholesterol, biotin, amino acid, etc.) or for assembly of a short peptide. The side-chain hydroxyl group of the homoserine carries a trityl protecting group. After TFA deprotection, the hydroxyl group acts as the site for oligonucleotide assembly. An additional spacer, such as aminohexanoyl, may be incorporated easily between the conjugate molecule and the oligonucleotide. A number of examples of synthesis of 3'-conjugates of oligonucleotides and their analogues are described that involve standard automated oligonucleotide assembly and use of commercially available materials. The linkage between oligonucleotide and 3'-conjugate is chirally pure and is stable to conventional ammonia treatment used for oligonucleotide deprotection and release from the solid support. The homoserine-functionalized solid support system represents a simple and universal route to 3'-conjugates of oligonucleotides and their derivatives.

  9. Synthesis and triplex-forming properties of cyclic oligonucleotides with (G,A)-antiparallel strands.

    PubMed

    Grimau, Marta G; Aviñó, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo; Eritja, Ramon

    2005-02-01

    Cyclic oligonucleotides carrying an oligopurine Watson-Crick sequence linked to the corresponding (G,A)- and (G,T)-antiparallel strands were prepared by nonenzymatic template-assisted cyclization of phosphorylated precursors. Cyclization was attempted using 3'-phosphate and 5'-phosphate linear precursors with carbodiimide or BrCN activation. The best results were obtained with the 5'-phosphorylated precursors and carbodiimide activation. Cyclic oligonucleotides bind polypyrimidine target sequence by formation of antiparallel triplexes. We have used UV and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to analyze triplexes formed by cyclic oligonucleotides carrying G and A in the reverse-Hoogsteen strand. The relative stability of the triplexes formed by cyclic and linear oligonucleotides with a common polypyrimidine target was determined by melting experiments. The most-stable triplexes were formed by the cyclic oligonucleotide, followed by the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated oligonucleotide precursors, and, finally, the corresponding hairpin. Although the differences in binding affinity between cyclic oligonucleotides and their corresponding linear precursors are small, the use of cyclic oligonucleotides offers a clear advantage over conventional duplex recognition.

  10. Site selective bis-intercalation of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye in DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, J P; Pedersen, J B; Hansen, L F; Wemmer, D E

    1995-03-11

    We have used one and two dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy to characterize the binding of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye, 1,1'-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4,8-diaza-undecamethylene)-bis-4- (3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-thiazole)-2-methylidene)-quinolin ium tetraiodide (TOTO), to various double stranded DNA oligonucleotides. TOTO binds strongly to all the oligonucleotides used, but usually more than one complex is observed and exchange between different binding sites broadens the lines in the NMR spectra. Complete precipitation occurs when TOTO is bound to small oligonucleotides. Binding to larger oligonucleotides occurs by bis-intercalation. The 1:1 complex of TOTO with the oligonucleotide d(CCGACTGATGC):d (GCATCAGTCGG) gave only one complex that was shown to be a bis-intercalation in the CTGA:TCAG binding site. The binding to this site was also characterized by studying the TOTO complex with the d(CCGCTGAGC):d(GCTCAGCGG) oligonucleotide. NOE connectivities and molecular modelling were used to characterize the complex. The 1:1 complex of TOTO with the oligonucleotide d(CCGCTAGCG):d(CGCTAGCGG) containing a CTAG:CTAG binding site was similarly characterized by NMR. It was concluded that the binding of TOTO to larger oligonucleotides is site selective with CTAG:CTAG as the preferred binding site.

  11. DNA Microarray for Detection of Gastrointestinal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Soto-del Río, María de los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 103 virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  12. DNA microarray for detection of gastrointestinal viruses.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel A; Soto-Del Río, María de Los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y; Greninger, Alexander L; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Isa, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 10(3) virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  13. Affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release using nucleic acid aptamers and complementary oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Soontornworajit, Boonchoy; Zhou, Jing; Snipes, Matthew P; Battig, Mark R; Wang, Yong

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials for the precise control of protein release are important to the development of new strategies for treating human diseases. This study aimed to fundamentally understand aptamer--protein dissociation triggered by complementary oligonucleotides, and to apply this understanding to develop affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release. The results showed that the oligonucleotide tails of the aptamers played a critical role in inducing intermolecular hybridization and triggering aptamer--protein dissociation. In addition, the attachment of the oligonucleotide tails to the aptamers and the increase of hybridizing length could produce a synergistic effect on the dissociation of bound proteins from their aptamers. More importantly, pegylated complementary oligonucleotides could successfully trigger protein release from the aptamer-functionalized hydrogels at multiple time points. Based on these results, it is believed that aptamer-functionalized hydrogels and complementary oligonucleotides hold great potential of controlling the release of protein drugs to treat human diseases.

  14. Design and synthesis of polyacrylamide-based oligonucleotide supports for use in nucleic acid diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Fahy, E; Davis, G R; DiMichele, L J; Ghosh, S S

    1993-04-25

    Polyacrylamide supports, in a range of pore sizes, were investigated as nucleic acid affinity matrices for the detection of target DNA or RNA sequences using a sandwich hybridization format. Bromoacetyl and thiol oligonucleotide derivatives were covalently linked to sulfhydryl- and bromoacetyl-polyacrylamide supports with greater than 95% end-attachment efficiencies. These polyacrylamide-oligonucleotide supports were further derivatized with anionic residues to provide multi-functional supports which show low non-specific binding for non-complementary nucleic acids. While all the polyacrylamide-oligonucleotide supports capture complementary oligonucleotides with high affinity, the pore size was found to be a critical parameter in sandwich hybridization reactions. The superior hybridization characteristics of the Trisacryl support was ascribed to a combination of its macroporous nature, hydrophilicity and the terminal attachment of its capture oligonucleotides.

  15. Direct fluorescence analysis of genetic polymorphisms by hybridization with oligonucleotide arrays on glass supports.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Z; Guilfoyle, R A; Thiel, A J; Wang, R; Smith, L M

    1994-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the analysis of genetic polymorphisms has been developed using allele-specific oligonucleotide arrays bound to glass supports. Allele-specific oligonucleotides are covalently immobilized on glass slides in arrays of 3 mm spots. Genomic DNA is amplified by PCR using one fluorescently tagged primer oligonucleotide and one biotinylated primer oligonucleotide. The two complementary DNA strands are separated, the fluorescently tagged strand is hybridized to the support-bound oligonucleotide array, and the hybridization pattern is detected by fluorescence scanning. Multiple polymorphisms present in the PCR product may be detected in parallel. The effect of spacer length, surface density and hybridization conditions were evaluated, as was the relative efficacy of hybridization with single or double-stranded PCR products. The utility of the method was demonstrated in the parallel analysis of 5 point mutations from exon 4 of the human tyrosinase gene. Images PMID:7816638

  16. Statistically designing microarrays and microarray experiments to enhance sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jason C; Chang, Jane; Wang, Tao; Steingrímsson, Eiríkur; Magnússon, Magnús Karl; Bergsteinsdottir, Kristin

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression signatures from microarray experiments promise to provide important prognostic tools for predicting disease outcome or response to treatment. A number of microarray studies in various cancers have reported such gene signatures. However, the overlap of gene signatures in the same disease has been limited so far, and some reported signatures have not been reproduced in other populations. Clearly, the methods used for verifying novel gene signatures need improvement. In this article, we describe an experiment in which microarrays and sample hybridization are designed according to the statistical principles of randomization, replication and blocking. Our results show that such designs provide unbiased estimation of differential expression levels as well as powerful tests for them.

  17. Comments on selected fundamental aspects of microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Riva, Alessandra; Carpentier, Anne-Sophie; Torrésani, Bruno; Hénaut, Alain

    2005-10-01

    Microarrays are becoming a ubiquitous tool of research in life sciences. However, the working principles of microarray-based methodologies are often misunderstood or apparently ignored by the researchers who actually perform and interpret experiments. This in turn seems to lead to a common over-expectation regarding the explanatory and/or knowledge-generating power of microarray analyses. In this note we intend to explain basic principles of five (5) major groups of analytical techniques used in studies of microarray data and their interpretation: the principal component analysis (PCA), the independent component analysis (ICA), the t-test, the analysis of variance (ANOVA), and self organizing maps (SOM). We discuss answers to selected practical questions related to the analysis of microarray data. We also take a closer look at the experimental setup and the rules, which have to be observed in order to exploit microarrays efficiently. Finally, we discuss in detail the scope and limitations of microarray-based methods. We emphasize the fact that no amount of statistical analysis can compensate for (or replace) a well thought through experimental setup. We conclude that microarrays are indeed useful tools in life sciences but by no means should they be expected to generate complete answers to complex biological questions. We argue that even well posed questions, formulated within a microarray-specific terminology, cannot be completely answered with the use of microarray analyses alone.

  18. Genomic resources for Myzus persicae: EST sequencing, SNP identification, and microarray design

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, John S; Wilson, Alex CC; de Vos, Martin; Sun, Qi; Tamborindeguy, Cecilia; Winfield, Agnese; Malloch, Gaynor; Smith, Dawn M; Fenton, Brian; Gray, Stewart M; Jander, Georg

    2007-01-01

    Background The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), is a world-wide insect pest capable of infesting more than 40 plant families, including many crop species. However, despite the significant damage inflicted by M. persicae in agricultural systems through direct feeding damage and by its ability to transmit plant viruses, limited genomic information is available for this species. Results Sequencing of 16 M. persicae cDNA libraries generated 26,669 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Aphids for library construction were raised on Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana benthamiana, Brassica oleracea, B. napus, and Physalis floridana (with and without Potato leafroll virus infection). The M. persicae cDNA libraries include ones made from sexual and asexual whole aphids, guts, heads, and salivary glands. In silico comparison of cDNA libraries identified aphid genes with tissue-specific expression patterns, and gene expression that is induced by feeding on Nicotiana benthamiana. Furthermore, 2423 genes that are novel to science and potentially aphid-specific were identified. Comparison of cDNA data from three aphid lineages identified single nucleotide polymorphisms that can be used as genetic markers and, in some cases, may represent functional differences in the protein products. In particular, non-conservative amino acid substitutions in a highly expressed gut protease may be of adaptive significance for M. persicae feeding on different host plants. The Agilent eArray platform was used to design an M. persicae oligonucleotide microarray representing over 10,000 unique genes. Conclusion New genomic resources have been developed for M. persicae, an agriculturally important insect pest. These include previously unknown sequence data, a collection of expressed genes, molecular markers, and a DNA microarray that can be used to study aphid gene expression. These resources will help elucidate the adaptations that allow M. persicae to develop compatible interactions with its

  19. Fluorescent properties of oligonucleotide-conjugated thiazole orange probes.

    PubMed

    Privat, Eric; Melvin, Tracy; Mérola, Fabienne; Schweizer, Gerd; Prodhomme, Sylvie; Asseline, Ulysse; Vigny, Paul

    2002-03-01

    The fluorescence properties of thiazole orange, linked via a (1) hydrophobic alkyl or a (2) hydrophilic ethylene glycol chain to the central internucleotidic phosphate group of a pentadeca-2'-deoxyriboadenylate (dA15), are evaluated. Linkage at the phosphate group yields two stereoisomers, S-isomer of the phosphorus chiral center (Sp) and R-isomer of the phosphorus chiral center (Rp); these are studied separately. The character of the linkage chain and the chirality of the internucleotidic phosphate linkage site influence the fluorescent properties of these thiazole orange-oligonucleotide conjugates (TO-probes). Quantum yields of fluorescence (phifl) of between 0.04 and 0.07 were determined for the single-stranded conjugates. The fluorescence yield increased by up to five times upon hybridization with the complementary sequence (d5'[CACT15CAC3']); (phifl values of between 0.06-0.35 were determined for the double-stranded conjugates. The phifl value (0.17) of thiazole orange, 1-(N,N'-trimethylaminopropyl)-4-[3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-thiazole)-2-methylidene]-quinolinium iodide (TO-Pro 1) in the presence of the oligonucleotide duplex (TO-Pro 1: dA15.d5'[CACT15CAC3'] (1:1)) is much less than that for some of the hybrids of the conjugates. Our studies, using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments, show that a number of discrete fluorescent association species between the thiazole orange and the helix are formed. Time-resolved studies on the four double-stranded TO-probes revealed that the fluorescent oligonucleotide-thiazole orange complexes are common, only the distribution of the species varies with the character of the chain and the chirality at the internucleotidic phosphate site. Those TO-probes in which the isomeric structure of the phosphate-chain linkage is Rp, and therefore such that the fluorophore is directed toward the minor groove, have higher phifl values than the Sp isomer. Of the systems studied, thiazole orange linked by an alkyl

  20. Insights to primitive replication derived from structures of small oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. K.; Fox, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    Available information on the structure of small oligonucleotides is surveyed. It is observed that even small oligomers typically exhibit defined structures over a wide range of pH and temperature. These structures rely on a plethora of non-standard base-base interactions in addition to the traditional Watson-Crick pairings. Stable duplexes, though typically antiparallel, can be parallel or staggered and perfect complementarity is not essential. These results imply that primitive template directed reactions do not require high fidelity. Hence, the extensive use of Watson-Crick complementarity in genes rather than being a direct consequence of the primitive condensation process, may instead reflect subsequent selection based on the advantage of accuracy in maintaining the primitive genetic machinery once it arose.

  1. Efficient site-directed saturation mutagenesis using degenerate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Steffens, David L; Williams, John G K

    2007-07-01

    We describe a reliable protocol for constructing single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries consisting of all 20 naturally occurring amino acids at a specific site within a protein. Such libraries are useful for structure-function studies and directed evolution. This protocol extends the utility of Stratagene's QuikChange Site-Directed Mutagenesis Kit, which is primarily recommended for single amino acid substitutions. Two complementary primers are synthesized, containing a degenerate mixture of the four bases at the three positions of the selected codon. These primers are added to starting plasmid template and thermal cycled to produce mutant DNA molecules, which are subsequently transformed into competent bacteria. The protocol does not require purification of mutagenic oligonucleotides or PCR products. This reduces both the cost and turnaround time in high-throughput directed evolution applications. We have utilized this protocol to generate over 200 site-saturation libraries in a DNA polymerase, with a success rate of greater than 95%. PMID:17595310

  2. Oligonucleotide synthesis catalyzed by the Zn/2+/ ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawai, H.; Orgel, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results of experiments are reported in which Zn(2+) ion catalyzed the formation of oligonucleotides from nucleoside phosphorimidazolides in aqueous solution, even in the absence of a template. Specifically, the imidazolides (ImpU or ImpA) polymerized to form ImpApA, and pApA, pApApA, and pApApApA, or the analogous uracil compounds. In addition, the expected hydrolysis products of the hydrolysis of ImpA were formed (pA, imidazole). Judging from the ratio of pA(n) over pA (with and without zinc ion), this ion increased the efficiency of phosphodiester-bond formation by up to 10 times. Possible mechanisms for the reaction are tentatively proposed.

  3. Aptamer Oligonucleotides: Novel Potential Therapeutic Agents in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Weibin; Lan, Xiaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid or ribonucleic acid oligonucleotides generated in vitro based on affinity for certain target molecules by a process known as Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment. Aptamers can bind their target molecules with high specificity and selectivity by means of structure compatibility, stacking of aromatic rings, electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, and hydrogen bonding. With several advantages over monoclonal antibodies and other conventional small-molecule therapeutics, such as high specificity and affinity, negligible batch to batch variation, flexible modification and stability, lack of toxicity and low immunogenicity, aptamers are becoming promising novel diagnostic and therapeutic agents. This review focuses on the development of aptamers as potential therapeutics for autoimmune diseases, including diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:25993618

  4. Computer simulation in template-directed oligonucleotide synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Benasconi, Claude F.

    1990-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that template-directed polymerizations have played a key role in prebiotic evolution. A computer simulation that models up to 33 competing reactions was used to investigate the product distribution in a template-directed oligonucleotide synthesis as a function of time and concentration of the reactants. The study focuses on the poly(C)-directed elongation reaction of oligoguanylates, and how it is affected by the competing processes of hydrolysis and dimerization of the activated monomer, which have the potential of severely curtailing the elongation and reducing the size and yield of the synthesized polymers. The simulations show that realistic and probably prebiotically plausible conditions can be found where hydrolysis and dimerization are either negligible or where a high degree of polymerization can be attained even in the face of substantial hydrolysis and/or dimerization.

  5. DNA Oligonucleotide Fragment Ion Rearrangements Upon Collision-Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Brett; Neumann, Elizabeth K.; Solouki, Touradj

    2015-08-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of m/z-isolated w type fragment ions and an intact 5' phosphorylated DNA oligonucleotide generated rearranged product ions. Of the 21 studied w ions of various nucleotide sequences, fragment ion sizes, and charge states, 18 (~86%) generated rearranged product ions upon CID in a Synapt G2-S HDMS (Waters Corporation, Manchester, England, UK) ion mobility-mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometry (MS), ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and theoretical modeling data suggest that purine bases can attack the free 5' phosphate group in w type ions and 5' phosphorylated DNA to generate sequence permuted [phosphopurine]- fragment ions. We propose and discuss a potential mechanism for generation of rearranged [phosphopurine]- and complementary y-B type product ions.

  6. Genomic resources for a commercial flatfish, the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis): EST sequencing, oligo microarray design, and development of the Soleamold bioinformatic platform

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà, Joan; Mercadé, Jaume; Lozano, Juan José; Manchado, Manuel; Tingaud-Sequeira, Angèle; Astola, Antonio; Infante, Carlos; Halm, Silke; Viñas, Jordi; Castellana, Barbara; Asensio, Esther; Cañavate, Pedro; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Piferrer, Francesc; Planas, Josep V; Prat, Francesc; Yúfera, Manuel; Durany, Olga; Subirada, Francesc; Rosell, Elisabet; Maes, Tamara

    2008-01-01

    Background The Senegalese sole, Solea senegalensis, is a highly prized flatfish of growing commercial interest for aquaculture in Southern Europe. However, despite the industrial production of Senegalese sole being hampered primarily by lack of information on the physiological mechanisms involved in reproduction, growth and immunity, very limited genomic information is available on this species. Results Sequencing of a S. senegalensis multi-tissue normalized cDNA library, from adult tissues (brain, stomach, intestine, liver, ovary, and testis), larval stages (pre-metamorphosis, metamorphosis), juvenile stages (post-metamorphosis, abnormal fish), and undifferentiated gonads, generated 10,185 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Clones were sequenced from the 3'-end to identify isoform specific sequences. Assembly of the entire EST collection into contigs gave 5,208 unique sequences of which 1,769 (34%) had matches in GenBank, thus showing a low level of redundancy. The sequence of the 5,208 unigenes was used to design and validate an oligonucleotide microarray representing 5,087 unique Senegalese sole transcripts. Finally, a novel interactive bioinformatic platform, Soleamold, was developed for the Senegalese sole EST collection as well as microarray and ISH data. Conclusion New genomic resources have been developed for S. senegalensis, an economically important fish in aquaculture, which include a collection of expressed genes, an oligonucleotide microarray, and a publicly available bioinformatic platform that can be used to study gene expression in this species. These resources will help elucidate transcriptional regulation in wild and captive Senegalese sole for optimization of its production under intensive culture conditions. PMID:18973667

  7. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of hepatitis C virus gene expression in transformed hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanecak, R; Brown-Driver, V; Fox, M C; Azad, R F; Furusako, S; Nozaki, C; Ford, C; Sasmor, H; Anderson, K P

    1996-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies have provided convincing evidence that the 5' noncoding region (5' NCR) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly conserved among viral isolates worldwide and that translation of HCV is directed by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) located within the 5' NCR. We have investigated inhibition of HCV gene expression using antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the 5' NCR, translation initiation codon, and core protein coding sequences. Oligonucleotides were evaluated for activity after treatment of a human hepatocyte cell line expressing the HCV 5' NCR, core protein coding sequences, and the majority of the envelope gene (E1). More than 50 oligonucleotides were evaluated for inhibition of HCV RNA and protein expression. Two oligonucleotides, ISIS 6095, targeted to a stem-loop structure within the 5' NCR known to be important for IRES function, and ISIS 6547, targeted to sequences spanning the AUG used for initiation of HCV polyprotein translation, were found to be the most effective at inhibiting HCV gene expression. ISIS 6095 and 6547 caused concentration-dependent reductions in HCV RNA and protein levels, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 0.1 to 0.2 microM. Reduction of RNA levels, and subsequently protein levels, by these phosphorothioate oligonucleotides was consistent with RNase H cleavage of RNA at the site of oligonucleotide hybridization. Chemically modified HCV antisense phosphodiester oligonucleotides were designed and evaluated for inhibition of core protein expression to identify oligonucleotides and HCV target sequences that do not require RNase H activity to inhibit expression. A uniformly modified 2'-methoxyethoxy phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotide complementary to the initiator AUG reduced HCV core protein levels as effectively as phosphorothioate oligonucleotide ISIS 6095 but without reducing HCV RNA levels. Results of our studies show that HCV gene expression is reduced by antisense oligonucleotides and

  8. Guanine modification of inhibitory oligonucleotides potentiates their suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Römmler, Franziska; Jurk, Marion; Uhlmann, Eugen; Hammel, Monika; Waldhuber, Anna; Pfeiffer, Lavinia; Wagner, Hermann; Vollmer, Jörg; Miethke, Thomas

    2013-09-15

    Inhibitory TLR7 and/or TLR9 oligonucleotides (inhibitory oligonucleotide [INH-ODN]) are characterized by a phosphorothioate backbone and a CC(T)XXX₃₋₅GGG motif, respectively. INH-ODN 2088 is a prototypic member of this class of INH-ODN and acts as a TLR7 and TLR9 antagonist. It contains a G quadruple that leads to higher order structures by the formation of G tetrads. These structures are unfavorable for the prediction of their pharmacological and immunological behavior. We show in this study that modification of Gs within the G quadruple by 7-deaza-guanine or 7-deaza-2'-O-methyl-guanine avoids higher order structures and improves their inhibitory potential. Whereas TLR9-induced TNF-α secretion of bone marrow-derived macrophages and conventional dendritic cells was equally inhibited by INH-ODN 2088 and G-modified INH-ODNs such as INH-ODN 24888, TLR7-induced TNF-α release and TLR7- and TLR9-induced IL-12p40 release were significantly more impaired by G-modified INH-ODNs. Similarly, the IL-6 release of B cells from wild-type and autoimmune MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice was more efficiently impaired by G-modified INH-ODNs. Surprisingly, INH-ODN 2088 stimulated B cells to proliferate when used in higher doses. Finally, in vivo, in wild-type and autoimmune MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice, G-modified INH-ODN 24888 was significantly more efficient than unmodified INH-ODN 2088. In summary, G modification allows the development of INH-ODNs with superior inhibitory potency for inflammatory diseases with high medical need such as systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:23966630

  9. High-throughput allogeneic antibody detection using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jed; Sahaf, Bita; Perloff, Spenser; Schoenrock, Kelsi; Wu, Fang; Nakasone, Hideki; Coller, John; Miklos, David

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have traditionally been used to detect alloantibodies in patient plasma samples post hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT); however, protein microarrays have the potential to be multiplexed, more sensitive, and higher throughput than ELISAs. Here, we describe the development of a novel and sensitive microarray method for detection of allogeneic antibodies against minor histocompatibility antigens encoded on the Y chromosome, called HY antigens. Six microarray surfaces were tested for their ability to bind recombinant protein and peptide HY antigens. Significant allogeneic immune responses were determined in male patients with female donors by considering normal male donor responses as baseline. HY microarray results were also compared with our previous ELISA results. Our overall goal was to maximize antibody detection for both recombinant protein and peptide epitopes. For detection of HY antigens, the Epoxy (Schott) protein microarray surface was both most sensitive and reliable and has become the standard surface in our microarray platform. PMID:26902899

  10. Detection of human genome mutations associated with pregnancy complications using 3-D microarray based on macroporous polymer monoliths.

    PubMed

    Glotov, A S; Sinitsyna, E S; Danilova, M M; Vashukova, E S; Walter, J G; Stahl, F; Baranov, V S; Vlakh, E G; Tennikova, T B

    2016-01-15

    Analysis of variations in DNA structure using a low-density microarray technology for routine diagnostic in evidence-based medicine is still relevant. In this work the applicability of 3-D macroporous monolithic methacrylate-based platforms for detection of different pathogenic genomic substitutions was studied. The detection of nucleotide replacements in F5 (Leiden G/A, rs6025), MTHFR (C/T, rs1801133) and ITGB3 (T/C, rs5918), involved in coagulation, and COMT (C/G, rs4818), TPH2 (T/A, rs11178997), PON1 (T/A rs854560), AGTR2 (C/A, rs11091046) and SERPINE1 (5G/4G, rs1799889), associated with pregnancy complications, was performed. The effect of such parameters as amount and type of oligonucleotide probe, amount of PCR product on signal-to-noise ratio, as well as mismatch discrimination was analyzed. Sensitivity and specificity of mutation detections were coincided and equal to 98.6%. The analysis of SERPINE1 and MTHFR genotypes by both NGS and developed microarray was performed and compared. PMID:26592644

  11. Identification of Differential Gene Expression Profiles in Placentas from Preeclamptic Pregnancies Versus Normal Pregnancies by DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiying; Sun, Manni; Wang, He; Zhao, Ge; Wang, Xiaoshuang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive analysis of gene expression profiles in placentas from preeclamptic pregnancies versus normal placentas. Placental tissues were obtained immediately after delivery from women with normal pregnancies (n=6) and patients with preeclampsia (n=6). The gene expression profile was assessed by oligonucleotide-based DNA microarrays and validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Functional relationships and canonical pathways/networks of differentially-expressed genes were evaluated by GeneSpring™ GX 11.0 software, and ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA). A total of 939 genes were identified that differed significantly in expression: 483 genes were upregulated and 456 genes were downregulated in preeclamptic placentas compared with normal placentas (fold change ≥2 and p<0.05 by unpaired t-test corrected with Bonferroni multiple testing). The IPA revealed that the primary molecular functions of these genes are involved in cellular function and maintenance, cellular development, cell signaling, and lipid metabolism. Pathway analysis provided evidence that a number of biological pathways, including Notch, Wnt, NF-κB, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathways, were aberrantly regulated in preeclampsia. In conclusion, our microarray analysis represents a comprehensive list of placental gene expression profiles and various dysregulated signaling pathways that are altered in preeclampsia. These observations may provide the basis for developing novel predictive, diagnostic, and prognostic biomarkers of preeclampsia to improve reproductive outcomes and reduce the risk for subsequent cardiovascular disease. PMID:22702245

  12. ProMAT: protein microarray analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Zangar, Richard C.

    2006-04-04

    Summary: ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from ELISA microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code. Availability: ProMAT is available at http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT. ProMAT requires Java version 1.5.0 and R version 1.9.1 (or more recent versions) which are distributed with the tool.

  13. Protein Microarrays--Without a Trace

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A

    2007-04-05

    Many experimental approaches in biology and biophysics, as well as applications in diagnosis and drug discovery, require proteins to be immobilized on solid supports. Protein microarrays, for example, provide a high-throughput format to study biomolecular interactions. The technique employed for protein immobilization is a key to the success of these applications. Recent biochemical developments are allowing, for the first time, the selective and traceless immobilization of proteins generated by cell-free systems without the need for purification and/or reconcentration prior to the immobilization step.

  14. Oligonucleotides designed to inhibit TLR9 block Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection at multiple steps.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Monica M; Gauger, Joshua J L; Brandt, Curtis R

    2014-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is an important human pathogen which requires activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) during its replication cycle. The persistent nature of HSV-1 infection, and the emergence of drug-resistant strains, highlights the importance of research to develop new antiviral agents. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a prominent role during the early antiviral response by recognizing viral nucleic acid and gene products, activating NFκB, and stimulating the production of inflammatory cytokines. We demonstrate a significant effect on HSV-1 replication in ARPE-19 and Vero cells when oligonucleotides designed to inhibit TLR9 are added 2h prior to infection. A greater than 90% reduction in the yield of infectious virus was achieved at oligonucleotide concentrations of 10-20 μM. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides prevented expression of essential immediate early herpes gene products as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. TLR9 oligonucleotides also interfered with viral attachment and entry. A TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide containing five adjacent guanosine residues (G-ODN) exhibited virucidal activity and inhibited HSV-1 replication when added post-infection. The antiviral effect of the TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides did not depend on the presence of TLR9 protein, suggesting a mechanism of inhibition that is not TLR9 specific. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides also reduced NFκB activity in nuclear extracts. Studies using these TLR inhibitors in the context of viral infection should be interpreted with caution.

  15. Stereospecificity of Oligonucleotide Interactions Revisited: No Evidence for Heterochiral Hybridization and Ribozyme/DNAzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hoehlig, Kai; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for the application of RNA- or DNA-oligonucleotides in biotechnology and molecular medicine is their susceptibility to abundant nucleases. One intriguing possibility to tackle this problem is the use of mirror-image (l-)oligonucleotides. For aptamers, this concept has successfully been applied to even develop therapeutic agents, so-called Spiegelmers. However, for technologies depending on RNA/RNA or RNA/DNA hybridization, like antisense or RNA interference, it has not been possible to use mirror-image oligonucleotides because Watson-Crick base pairing of complementary strands is (thought to be) stereospecific. Many scientists consider this a general principle if not a dogma. A recent publication proposing heterochiral Watson-Crick base pairing and sequence-specific hydrolysis of natural RNA by mirror-image ribozymes or DNAzymes (and vice versa) prompted us to systematically revisit the stereospecificity of oligonucleotides hybridization and catalytic activity. Using hyperchromicity measurements we demonstrate that hybridization only occurs among homochiral anti-parallel complementary oligonucleotide strands. As expected, achiral PNA hybridizes to RNA and DNA irrespective of their chirality. In functional assays we could not confirm an alleged heterochiral hydrolytic activity of ribozymes or DNAzymes. Our results confirm a strict stereospecificity of oligonucleotide hybridization and clearly argue against the possibility to use mirror-image oligonucleotides for gene silencing or antisense applications. PMID:25679211

  16. Enzymatic synthesis of modified oligonucleotides by PEAR using Phusion and KOD DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuxiang; Zhang, Jianye; Li, Yingjia; Chen, Gang; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-02-01

    Antisense synthetic oligonucleotides have been developed as potential gene-targeted therapeutics. We previously reported polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR) for amplification of natural and 5'-O-(1-thiotriphosphate) (S)-modified oligonucleotides. Here, we extended the PEAR technique for enzymatic preparation of 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-(2'-F) and 2'-F/S double-modified oligonucleotides. The result showed that KOD and Phusion DNA polymerase could synthesize oligonucleotides with one or two modified nucleotides, and KOD DNA polymerase is more suitable than Phusion DNA polymerase for PEAR amplification of 2'-F and 2'-F/S double modified oligonucleotides. The composition of PEAR products were analyzed by electrospray ionization liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (ESI/LC/MS) detection and showed that the sequence of the PEAR products are maintained at an extremely high accuracy (>99.9%), and after digestion the area percent of full-length modified oligonucleotides reaches 89.24%. PEAR is suitable for synthesis of modified oligonucleotides efficiently and with high purity. PMID:25517220

  17. Applications of Functional Protein Microarrays in Basic and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The protein microarray technology provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds of thousands of proteins in a highly parallel and high-throughput manner. It is viewed as a new tool that overcomes the limitation of DNA microarrays. On the basis of its application, protein microarrays fall into two major classes: analytical and functional protein microarrays. In addition, tissue or cell lysates can also be directly spotted on a slide to form the so-called “reverse-phase” protein microarray. In the last decade, applications of functional protein microarrays in particular have flourished in studying protein function and construction of networks and pathways. In this chapter, we will review the recent advancements in the protein microarray technology, followed by presenting a series of examples to illustrate the power and versatility of protein microarrays in both basic and clinical research. As a powerful technology platform, it would not be surprising if protein microarrays will become one of the leading technologies in proteomic and diagnostic fields in the next decade. PMID:22989767

  18. Refractive index change detection based on porous silicon microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)