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Sample records for 70-mer oligonucleotide probes

  1. Empirical establishment of oligonucleotide probe design criteriausing perfect match and mismatch probes and artificial targets

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Wu, L.; Li, X.; Fields, M.; Zhou, J.-Z.

    2004-09-16

    Criteria for the design of gene-specific and group-specific oligonucleotide probes were established experimentally via anoligonucleotide array that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch probes (50-mers and 70-mers) based upon four genes. The effects of probe-target identity, continuous stretch, mismatch position, and hybridization free energy on specificity were tested. Little hybridization was observed at a probe-target identity of 85 percent for both 50-mer and 70-mer probes. PM signal intensities (33 to 48 percent) were detected at a probe-target identity of 94 percent for 50-meroligonucleotides and 43 to 55 percent for 70-mer probes at a probe-target identity of 96 percent. When the effects of sequence identity and continuous stretch were considered independently, a stretch probe (>15bases) contributed an additional 9 percent of the PM signal intensity compared to a nonstretch probe (15 bases) at the same identity level. Cross-hybridization increased as the length of continuous stretch increased. A 35-base stretch for 50-mer probes or a 50-base stretch for 70-mer probes had approximately 55 percent of the PM signal. Little cross-hybridization was observed for probes with a minimal binding free energy greater than 30 kcal/mol for 50-mer probes or 40 kcal/mol for 70-mer probes. Based on the experimental results, a set of criteria are suggested for the design of gene-specific and group-specific oligonucleotide probes, and the experimentally established criteria should provide valuable information for new software and algorithms for microarray-based studies.

  2. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  3. Molecular Crowding Effects on Microgel-Tethered Oligonucleotide Probes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Youlong; Libera, Matthew

    2016-06-28

    Microgel tethering is a nontraditional method with which to bind oligonucleotide hybridization probes to a solid surface. Microgel-tethering physically positions the probes away from the underlying hard substrate and maintains them in a highly waterlike environment. This paper addresses the question of whether molecular crowding affects the performance of microgel-tethered molecular beacon probes. The density of probe-tethering sites is controlled experimentally using thin-film blends of biotin-terminated [PEG-B] and hydroxyl-terminated [PEG-OH] poly(ethylene glycol) from which microgels are synthesized and patterned by electron beam lithography. Fluorescence measurements indicate that the number of streptavidins, linear DNA probes, hairpin probes, and molecular beacon probes bound to the microgels increases linearly with increasing PEG-B/PEG-OH ratio. For a given tethering-site concentration, more linear probes can bind than structured probes. Crowding effects emerge during the hybridization of microgel-tethered molecular beacons but not during the hybridization of linear probes, as the tethering density increases. Crowding during hybridization is associated with conformational constraints imposed by the close proximity of closed and hybridized structured probes. The signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of hybridized beacons is highest and roughly constant for low tethering densities and decreases at the highest tethering densities. Despite differences between microgel tethering and traditional oligonucleotide surface-immobilization approaches, these results show that crowding defines an optimum tethering density for molecular beacon probes that is less than the maximum possible, which is consistent with previous studies involving various linear and structured oligonucleotide probes. PMID:27253904

  4. Molecular Crowding Effects on Microgel-Tethered Oligonucleotide Probes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Youlong; Libera, Matthew

    2016-06-28

    Microgel tethering is a nontraditional method with which to bind oligonucleotide hybridization probes to a solid surface. Microgel-tethering physically positions the probes away from the underlying hard substrate and maintains them in a highly waterlike environment. This paper addresses the question of whether molecular crowding affects the performance of microgel-tethered molecular beacon probes. The density of probe-tethering sites is controlled experimentally using thin-film blends of biotin-terminated [PEG-B] and hydroxyl-terminated [PEG-OH] poly(ethylene glycol) from which microgels are synthesized and patterned by electron beam lithography. Fluorescence measurements indicate that the number of streptavidins, linear DNA probes, hairpin probes, and molecular beacon probes bound to the microgels increases linearly with increasing PEG-B/PEG-OH ratio. For a given tethering-site concentration, more linear probes can bind than structured probes. Crowding effects emerge during the hybridization of microgel-tethered molecular beacons but not during the hybridization of linear probes, as the tethering density increases. Crowding during hybridization is associated with conformational constraints imposed by the close proximity of closed and hybridized structured probes. The signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of hybridized beacons is highest and roughly constant for low tethering densities and decreases at the highest tethering densities. Despite differences between microgel tethering and traditional oligonucleotide surface-immobilization approaches, these results show that crowding defines an optimum tethering density for molecular beacon probes that is less than the maximum possible, which is consistent with previous studies involving various linear and structured oligonucleotide probes.

  5. Microarray oligonucleotide probe designer (MOPeD): A web service

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Viren C; Mondal, Kajari; Shetty, Amol Carl; Horner, Vanessa L; Bedoyan, Jirair K; Martin, Donna; Caspary, Tamara; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Methods of genomic selection that combine high-density oligonucleotide microarrays with next-generation DNA sequencing allow investigators to characterize genomic variation in selected portions of complex eukaryotic genomes. Yet choosing which specific oligonucleotides to be use can pose a major technical challenge. To address this issue, we have developed a software package called MOPeD (Microarray Oligonucleotide Probe Designer), which automates the process of designing genomic selection microarrays. This web-based software allows individual investigators to design custom genomic selection microarrays optimized for synthesis with Roche NimbleGen’s maskless photolithography. Design parameters include uniqueness of the probe sequences, melting temperature, hairpin formation, and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms. We generated probe databases for the human, mouse, and rhesus macaque genomes and conducted experimental validation of MOPeD-designed microarrays in human samples by sequencing the human X chromosome exome, where relevant sequence metrics indicated superior performance relative to a microarray designed by the Roche NimbleGen proprietary algorithm. We also performed validation in the mouse to identify known mutations contained within a 487-kb region from mouse chromosome 16, the mouse chromosome 16 exome (1.7 Mb), and the mouse chromosome 12 exome (3.3 Mb). Our results suggest that the open source MOPeD software package and website (http://moped.genetics.emory.edu/) will make a valuable resource for investigators in their sequence-based studies of complex eukaryotic genomes. PMID:21379402

  6. [Research progress of probe design software of oligonucleotide microarrays].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Zaoquan; Liu, Zhengchun

    2014-02-01

    DNA microarray has become an essential medical genetic diagnostic tool for its high-throughput, miniaturization and automation. The design and selection of oligonucleotide probes are critical for preparing gene chips with high quality. Several sets of probe design software have been developed and are available to perform this work now. Every set of the software aims to different target sequences and shows different advantages and limitations. In this article, the research and development of these sets of software are reviewed in line with three main criteria, including specificity, sensitivity and melting temperature (Tm). In addition, based on the experimental results from literatures, these sets of software are classified according to their applications. This review will be helpful for users to choose an appropriate probe-design software. It will also reduce the costs of microarrays, improve the application efficiency of microarrays, and promote both the research and development (R&D) and commercialization of high-performance probe design software.

  7. EvoOligo: oligonucleotide probe design with multiobjective evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Lee, In-Hee; Cho, Young-Min; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2009-12-01

    Probe design is one of the most important tasks in successful deoxyribonucleic acid microarray experiments. We propose a multiobjective evolutionary optimization method for oligonucleotide probe design based on the multiobjective nature of the probe design problem. The proposed multiobjective evolutionary approach has several distinguished features, compared with previous methods. First, the evolutionary approach can find better probe sets than existing simple filtering methods with fixed threshold values. Second, the multiobjective approach can easily incorporate the user's custom criteria or change the existing criteria. Third, our approach tries to optimize the combination of probes for the given set of genes, in contrast to other tools that independently search each gene for qualifying probes. Lastly, the multiobjective optimization method provides various sets of probe combinations, among which the user can choose, depending on the target application. The proposed method is implemented as a platform called EvoOligo and is available for service on the web. We test the performance of EvoOligo by designing probe sets for 19 types of Human Papillomavirus and 52 genes in the Arabidopsis Calmodulin multigene family. The design results from EvoOligo are proven to be superior to those from well-known existing probe design tools, such as OligoArray and OligoWiz.

  8. Fluorescent properties of oligonucleotide-conjugated thiazole orange probes.

    PubMed

    Privat, Eric; Melvin, Tracy; Mérola, Fabienne; Schweizer, Gerd; Prodhomme, Sylvie; Asseline, Ulysse; Vigny, Paul

    2002-03-01

    The fluorescence properties of thiazole orange, linked via a (1) hydrophobic alkyl or a (2) hydrophilic ethylene glycol chain to the central internucleotidic phosphate group of a pentadeca-2'-deoxyriboadenylate (dA15), are evaluated. Linkage at the phosphate group yields two stereoisomers, S-isomer of the phosphorus chiral center (Sp) and R-isomer of the phosphorus chiral center (Rp); these are studied separately. The character of the linkage chain and the chirality of the internucleotidic phosphate linkage site influence the fluorescent properties of these thiazole orange-oligonucleotide conjugates (TO-probes). Quantum yields of fluorescence (phifl) of between 0.04 and 0.07 were determined for the single-stranded conjugates. The fluorescence yield increased by up to five times upon hybridization with the complementary sequence (d5'[CACT15CAC3']); (phifl values of between 0.06-0.35 were determined for the double-stranded conjugates. The phifl value (0.17) of thiazole orange, 1-(N,N'-trimethylaminopropyl)-4-[3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-thiazole)-2-methylidene]-quinolinium iodide (TO-Pro 1) in the presence of the oligonucleotide duplex (TO-Pro 1: dA15.d5'[CACT15CAC3'] (1:1)) is much less than that for some of the hybrids of the conjugates. Our studies, using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments, show that a number of discrete fluorescent association species between the thiazole orange and the helix are formed. Time-resolved studies on the four double-stranded TO-probes revealed that the fluorescent oligonucleotide-thiazole orange complexes are common, only the distribution of the species varies with the character of the chain and the chirality at the internucleotidic phosphate site. Those TO-probes in which the isomeric structure of the phosphate-chain linkage is Rp, and therefore such that the fluorophore is directed toward the minor groove, have higher phifl values than the Sp isomer. Of the systems studied, thiazole orange linked by an alkyl

  9. Molecular beacon probes of oligonucleotides photodamaged by psoralen.

    PubMed

    Shire, Zahra J; Loppnow, Glen R

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA)-irradiated 4'-hydroxymethyl-4,5',8-trimethyl psoralen (HMT) in the presence of a poly-dT(17) and dA(7) TTA(8) oligonucleotides produces HMT-dT(17) and HMT-dA(7) TTA(8) adducts in aqueous solution. In this article, we determine whether these HMT-dT(17) and HMT-dA(7) TTA(8) adducts can be detected with a molecular beacon (MB) probe. We measure the degree of damage in dT(17) and dA(7) TTA(8) solutions containing UVA-activated HMT via monitoring the decrease in MB fluorescence. Photoproduct formation is confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-fight mass spectrometry measurements) and absorption spectroscopy. The MB fluorescence decreases upon UVA irradiation in the presence of HMT with a single-exponential time constants of 114.2 ± 6.5 min for HMT-dT(17) adducts and 677.8 ± 181.8 min for HMT-dA(7) TTA(8) adducts. Our results show that fluorescent MB probes are a selective, robust and accurate tool for detecting UVA-activated HMT-induced DNA damage.

  10. Molecular Cloning of MAPK Gene Family Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probe.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Song; Wang, Qin; Chen, Jing; Chen, Jiang-Ye

    1999-01-01

    MAPK(mitogen activated protein kinase) is a kind of Ser/Thr protein kinase. The MAPKs play an important role in several different signal transduction pathways. The MAPKs may also have a role in morphorgenesis of Candida albicans. An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen novel MAPKs in C. albicans. All MAPKs shared high homogeneity in their eleven kinase subdomains, especially subdoman VII and VIII. In subdomain VII, nearly all MAPKs have the same KIDFGLAR sequence, and the two known MAPKs in C. albicans CEK1 and MKC1 have only one different nucleotide in that DNA sequence. This probe was hybridized with C. albicans genomic DNA. Under stringent conditions, the probe could only hybridize with CEK1 and MKC1 gene fragment. But when hybridized at 40 degrees in non-SDS solution, two novel bands appeared. This condition was used to screen SC5314 DNA library, and many positive clones with different hybridization density were obtained. The strongest hybridization clones were identified to contain CEK1 and MKC1 gene. From the stronger positive hybridization clones, two novel genes were identified. The first gene, named CRK1(CDC2-related protein kinase 1), shared high homogeneity to MAPKs, but was not of them. It is closest to SGV1 from S. cerevisiae (with homology 47%) and PITALRE from human (with homology 41%), both of which are CDC2-related protein kinases. The second gene called CEK2(Candida albicans extracelluar signal-regulated kinase 2) is a novel MAPK of Candida albicans, which shares the highest identity with CEK1 and its S. cerevisiae homologs, FUS3 and KSS1, two redundant MAPKs in yeast pheromone response and morphogenesis. PMID:12114967

  11. Photoluminescence and electrochemiluminescence of a Ru(II)(bpy)3-quencher dual-labeled oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert; Johansson, Mary Katherine

    2003-11-01

    A molecular beacon oligonucleotide probe covalently labeled with Ru(II)(bpy)3 and Black Hole Quencher-2 is synthesized, and hybridization assays are performed using photoluminescence and electrochemiluminescence methods of excitation.

  12. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries.

    PubMed

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-Ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection-based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization.

  13. Oligonucleotide probes for Bordetella bronchiseptica based on 16S ribosomal RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Taneda, A; Futo, S; Mitsuse, S; Seto, Y; Okada, M; Sakano, T

    1994-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was cloned and identified. On the basis of information from computer-assisted sequence comparison of the B. bronchiseptica 16S RRNA sequences with that of other bacterial species, we constructed B. bronchiseptica-specific oligonucleotide probes complementary to variable regions in the 16S rRNA molecule. Specificity of these 32P-labeled oligo-nucleotide probes was tested in a RNA/DNA hybridization with B. bronchiseptica strains and other bacterial strains. Probe BB4 was more specific than three other oligonucleotide probes. This probe BB4 was sensitive enough to be able to detect 10(4) bacterial cells. PMID:9133055

  14. Molecular beacon probes of photodamage in thymine and uracil oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Yarasi, Soujanya; McConachie, Cheryl; Loppnow, Glen R

    2005-01-01

    Molecular beacons (MB) are becoming more common as sequence-selective detectors of nucleic acids. Although they can easily detect single-base mismatches, they have never been used to directly detect DNA or RNA damage. To measure the degree of ultraviolet (UV) light damage in oligonucleotides, we report a novel MB approach for general detection of photoproducts in UV-irradiated rU17 and dT17 oligonucleotides. With monochromatic UV light irradiation at ca 280 nm under anoxic conditions, the oligonucleotide absorption decays with a single-exponential time constant of 123+/-1 min for rU17 and with double-exponential time constants of 78+/-0.5 min (99%) and 180+/-5 min (0.05%) for dT17 oligonucleotides. Under the same conditions, the MB fluorescence decays more quickly, with single-exponential time constants of 19+/-2 and 26+/-3 min for rU17 and dT17, respectively. Similar kinetics were observed with broadband UV light irradiation of oligonucleotides. The differences in the UV damage kinetics of dT17 and rU17 and their detection by absorption and fluorescence techniques will be discussed in the context of differential instabilities introduced in the nucleic acid-MB duplex by the different photoproducts formed.

  15. Kinetic effects on signal normalization in oligonucleotide microchips with labeled immobilized probes.

    PubMed

    Pan'kov, S V; Chechetkin, V R; Somova, O G; Antonova, O V; Moiseeva, O V; Prokopenko, D V; Yurasov, R A; Gryadunov, D A; Chudinov, A V

    2009-10-01

    Among various factors affecting operation of oligonucleotide microchips, the variations in concentration and in homogeneous distribution of immobilized probes over the cells are one of the most important. The labeling of immobilized probes ensures the complete current monitoring on the probe distribution and is reliable and convenient. Using hydrogel-based oligonucleotide microchips, the applicability of Cy3-labeled immobilized probes for quality control and signal normalization after hybridization with Cy5-labeled target DNA was investigated. This study showed that proper signal normalization should be different in thermodynamic conditions and in transient regime with hybridization far from saturation. This kinetic effect holds for both hydrogel-based and surface oligonucleotide microchips. Besides proving basic features, the technique was assessed on a sampling batch of 50 microchips developed for identifying mutations responsible for rifampicin and isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  16. Oligonucleotide primers, probes and molecular methods for the environmental monitoring of methanogenic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Narihiro, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Summary For the identification and quantification of methanogenic archaea (methanogens) in environmental samples, various oligonucleotide probes/primers targeting phylogenetic markers of methanogens, such as 16S rRNA, 16S rRNA gene and the gene for the α‐subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), have been extensively developed and characterized experimentally. These oligonucleotides were designed to resolve different groups of methanogens at different taxonomic levels, and have been widely used as hybridization probes or polymerase chain reaction primers for membrane hybridization, fluorescence in situ hybridization, rRNA cleavage method, gene cloning, DNA microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for studies in environmental and determinative microbiology. In this review, we present a comprehensive list of such oligonucleotide probes/primers, which enable us to determine methanogen populations in an environment quantitatively and hierarchically, with examples of the practical applications of the probes and primers. PMID:21375721

  17. Ultramild protein-mediated click chemistry creates efficient oligonucleotide probes for targeting and detecting nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nåbo, Lina J; Madsen, Charlotte S; Jensen, Knud J; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2015-05-26

    Functionalized synthetic oligonucleotides are finding growing applications in research, clinical studies, and therapy. However, it is not easy to prepare them in a biocompatible and highly efficient manner. We report a new strategy to synthesize oligonucleotides with promising nucleic acid targeting and detection properties. We focus in particular on the pH sensitivity of these new probes and their high target specificity. For the first time, human copper(I)-binding chaperon Cox17 was applied to effectively catalyze click labeling of oligonucleotides. This was performed under ultramild conditions with fluorophore, peptide, and carbohydrate azide derivatives. In thermal denaturation studies, the modified probes showed specific binding to complementary DNA and RNA targets. Finally, we demonstrated the pH sensitivity of the new rhodamine-based fluorescent probes in vitro and rationalize our results by electronic structure calculations.

  18. probeBase--an online resource for rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and primers: new features 2016.

    PubMed

    Greuter, Daniel; Loy, Alexander; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    probeBase http://www.probebase.net is a manually maintained and curated database of rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and primers. Contextual information and multiple options for evaluating in silico hybridization performance against the most recent rRNA sequence databases are provided for each oligonucleotide entry, which makes probeBase an important and frequently used resource for microbiology research and diagnostics. Here we present a major update of probeBase, which was last featured in the NAR Database Issue 2007. This update describes a complete remodeling of the database architecture and environment to accommodate computationally efficient access. Improved search functions, sequence match tools and data output now extend the opportunities for finding suitable hierarchical probe sets that target an organism or taxon at different taxonomic levels. To facilitate the identification of complementary probe sets for organisms represented by short rRNA sequence reads generated by amplicon sequencing or metagenomic analysis with next generation sequencing technologies such as Illumina and IonTorrent, we introduce a novel tool that recovers surrogate near full-length rRNA sequences for short query sequences and finds matching oligonucleotides in probeBase. PMID:26586809

  19. Trace and label-free microRNA detection using oligonucleotide encapsulated silver nanoclusters as probes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haifeng; Jin, Shi; Ju, Huangxian; Hao, Kaihong; Xu, Li-Ping; Lu, Huiting; Zhang, Xueji

    2012-10-16

    A simple, sensitive, and label-free method for microRNA (miRNA) biosensing was described using oligonucleotide encapsulated silver nanoclusters (Ag-NCs) as effective electrochemical probes. The functional oligonucleotide probe integrates both recognition sequence for hybridization and template sequence for in situ synthesis of Ag-NCs, which appears to possess exceptional metal mimic enzyme properties for catalyzing H(2)O(2) reduction. The miRNA assay employs gold electrodes to immobilize the molecular beacon (MB) probe. After the MB probe subsequently hybridizes with the target and functional probe, the oligonucleotide encapsulated Ag-NCs are brought to the electrode surface and produce a detection signal, in response to H(2)O(2) reduction. An electrochemical miRNA biosensor down to 67 fM with a linear range of 5 orders of magnitude was obtained. Meanwhile, the MB probe allows the biosensor to detect the target with high selectivity. The Ag-NCs-based approach provides a novel avenue to detect miRNA with high sensitivity and selectivity while avoiding laborious label and signal amplification. It is convinced that rational introduction of signal amplification strategy to the Ag-NCs-based bioanalysis can further improve the sensitivity. To our best knowledge, this is the first application of the electrocatalytic activity of Ag-NCs in bioanalysis, which would be attractive for genetic analysis and clinic biomedical application.

  20. FRET study of G-quadruplex forming fluorescent oligonucleotide probes at the lipid monolayer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatkowska, Angelika; Kosman, Joanna; Juskowiak, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Spectral properties and G-quadruplex folding ability of fluorescent oligonucleotide probes at the cationic dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) monolayer interface are reported. Two oligonucleotides, a 19-mer bearing thrombin binding aptamer sequence and a 21-mer with human telomeric sequence, were end-labeled with fluorescent groups (FAM and TAMRA) to give FRET probes F19T and F21T, respectively. The probes exhibited abilities to fold into a quadruplex structure and to bind metal cations (Na+ and K+). Fluorescence spectra of G-quadruplex FRET probes at the monolayer interface are reported for the first time. Investigations included film balance measurements (π-A isotherms) and fluorescence spectra recording using a fiber optic accessory interfaced with a spectrofluorimeter. The effect of the presence of DODAB monolayer, metal cations and the surface pressure of monolayer on spectral behavior of FRET probes were examined. Adsorption of probe at the cationic monolayer interface resulted in the FRET signal enhancement even in the absence of metal cations. Variation in the monolayer surface pressure exerted rather modest effect on the spectral properties of probes. The fluorescence energy transfer efficiency of monolayer adsorbed probes increased significantly in the presence of sodium or potassium ion in subphase, which indicated that the probes retained their cation binding properties when adsorbed at the monolayer interface.

  1. Fluorescent oligonucleotide rDNA probes that specifically bind to a common nanoflagellate, Paraphysomonas vestita.

    PubMed

    Rice, J; O'Connor, C D; Sleigh, M A; Burkill, P H; Giles, I G; Zubkov, M V

    1997-05-01

    Nanoflagellates are ecologically important, but morphological identification requires techniques which are not practicable for use in quantitative studies of populations; alternative methods of accurate recognition of nanoflagellate species in mixed populations are therefore desirable. Fluorescent oligonucleotide probes which hybridize with unique sequences of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA have been exploited as 'phylogenetic stains' in the identification of bacteria. In this paper we describe the preparation and application of probes which specifically hybridize with a common nanoflagellate species, Paraphysomonas vestita. The sequence of nucleotides in the SSU rRNA gene of this flagellate was determined and compared with those of related species to select unique P. vestita sequences 18-21 nucleotides in length. Five sequences in different parts of the SSU rRNA gene were used to design 5'-fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes. Published sequences were used to make probes that hybridized with all eukaryotes (EUK) or any cellular organism (UNI), and probes were designed not to hybridize with rRNA (CON). Optimum conditions for hybridization were determined. In all cases, UNI probes hybridized with the cells, but CON probes were only bound to a limited extent. All five probes targeted to P. vestita proved to be species-specific; they hybridized well with this species, but not with three other species of the same genus, nor with three more distantly related flagellate species, nor with a ciliate, nor with bacteria. These probes provide a means of quantitatively measuring the proportion of P. vestita cells in samples of mixed protists.

  2. chipD: a web tool to design oligonucleotide probes for high-density tiling arrays

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Yann S.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Tritt, Andrew J.; Glasner, Jeremy D.; Perna, Nicole T.; Mitchell, Julie C.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    chipD is a web server that facilitates design of DNA oligonucleotide probes for high-density tiling arrays, which can be used in a number of genomic applications such as ChIP-chip or gene-expression profiling. The server implements a probe selection algorithm that takes as an input, in addition to the target sequences, a set of parameters that allow probe design to be tailored to specific applications, protocols or the array manufacturer’s requirements. The algorithm optimizes probes to meet three objectives: (i) probes should be specific; (ii) probes should have similar thermodynamic properties; and (iii) the target sequence coverage should be homogeneous and avoid significant gaps. The output provides in a text format, the list of probe sequences with their genomic locations, targeted strands and hybridization characteristics. chipD has been used successfully to design tiling arrays for bacteria and yeast. chipD is available at http://chipd.uwbacter.org/. PMID:20529880

  3. Fluorescently-labeled oligonucleotide probes can be used to identify protistan food vacuole contents.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, J H; Goss, S H

    1997-01-01

    In situ hybridization using fluorescent oligonucleotide probes complementary to unique regions of 16S rRNA molecules provides a way of identifying the food vacuole contents of bactivorous protists. Laboratory experiments with Tetrahymena showed rRNAs in food vacuoles are degraded slowly enough to permit their use as hybridization targets for such probes. A probe specific for a hypervariable region of the small subunit rRNA of an unnamed proteobacterium abundant in a local lake was then synthesized. It was used to probe the food vacuoles of the ciliates present in fixed water samples collected from the same lake. The vacuoles of several filter-feeding ciliates bound the probe, indicating that such probes can be used to identify the food vacuole contents of ciliates collected from natural samples.

  4. Detection of cyclin D1 mRNA by hybridization sensitive NIC-oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Kovaliov, Marina; Segal, Meirav; Kafri, Pinhas; Yavin, Eylon; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Fischer, Bilha

    2014-05-01

    A large group of fluorescent hybridization probes, includes intercalating dyes for example thiazole orange (TO). Usually TO is coupled to nucleic acids post-synthetically which severely limits its use. Here, we have developed a phosphoramidite monomer, 10, and prepared a 2'-OMe-RNA probe, labeled with 5-(trans-N-hexen-1-yl-)-TO-2'-deoxy-uridine nucleoside, dU(TO), (Nucleoside bearing an Inter-Calating moiety, NIC), for selective mRNA detection. We investigated a series of 15-mer 2'-OMe-RNA probes, targeting the cyclin D1 mRNA, containing one or several dU(TO) at various positions. dU(TO)-2'-OMe-RNA exhibited up to 7-fold enhancement of TO emission intensity upon hybridization with the complementary RNA versus that of the oligomer alone. This NIC-probe was applied for the specific detection of a very small amount of a breast cancer marker, cyclin D1 mRNA, in total RNA extract from cancerous cells (250 ng/μl). Furthermore, this NIC-probe was found to be superior to our related NIF (Nucleoside with Intrinsic Fluorescence)-probe which could detect cyclin D1 mRNA target only at high concentrations (1840 ng/μl). Additionally, dU(T) can be used as a monomer in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis, thus avoiding the need for post-synthetic modification of oligonucleotide probes. Hence, we propose dU(TO) oligonucleotides, as hybridization probes for the detection of specific RNA in homogeneous solutions and for the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  5. Chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides containing a free sulphydryl group and subsequent attachment of thiol specific probes.

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, B A; Rider, P

    1985-01-01

    Oligonucleotides containing a free sulphydryl group at their 5'-termini have been synthesised and further derivatised with thiol specific probes. The nucleotide sequence required is prepared using standard solid phase phosphoramidite techniques and an extra round of synthesis is then performed using the S-triphenylmethyl O-methoxymorpholinophosphite derivatives of 2-mercaptoethanol, 3-mercaptopropan (1) ol or 6-mercaptohexan (1) ol. After cleavage from the resin and removal of the phosphate and base protecting groups, this yields an oligonucleotide containing an S-triphenylmethyl group attached to the 5'-phosphate group via a two, three or six carbon chain. The triphenylmethyl group can be readily removed with silver nitrate to give the free thiol. With the three and six carbon chain oligonucleotides, this thiol can be used, at pH 8, for the attachment of thiol specific probes as illustrated by the reaction with fluorescent conjugates of iodoacetates and maleiimides. However, oligonucleotides containing a thiol attached to the 5'-phosphate group via a two carbon chain are unstable at pH 8 decomposing to the free 5'-phosphate and so are unsuitable for further derivatisation. PMID:4011448

  6. Oligonucleotide Probes for ND-FISH Analysis to Identify Rye and Wheat Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shulan; Chen, Lei; Wang, Yangyang; Li, Meng; Yang, Zujun; Qiu, Ling; Yan, Benju; Ren, Zhenglong; Tang, Zongxiang

    2015-05-21

    Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) has been widely used to detect rye (Secale cereale L.) chromosomes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) introgression lines. The routine procedure of GISH using genomic DNA of rye as a probe is time-consuming and labor-intensive because of the preparation and labeling of genomic DNA of rye and denaturing of chromosomes and probes. In this study, new oligonucleotide probes Oligo-1162, Oligo-pSc200 and Oligo-pSc250 were developed. The three new probes can be used for non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization (ND-FISH) assays and replace genomic DNA of rye as a probe to discriminate rye chromosomes in wheat backgrounds. In addition, previously developed oligonucleotide probes Oligo-pSc119.2-1, Oligo-pSc119.2-2, Oligo-pTa535-1, Oligo-pTa535-2, Oligo-pTa71-2, Oligo-pAWRC.1 and Oligo-CCS1 can also be used for ND-FISH of wheat and rye. These probes have provided an easier, faster and more cost-effective method for the FISH analysis of wheat and hybrids derived from wheat × rye.

  7. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  8. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  9. Selection of optimal oligonucleotide probes for microarrays usingmultiple criteria, global alignment and parameter estimation.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xingyuan; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-10-30

    The oligonucleotide specificity for microarray hybridizationcan be predicted by its sequence identity to non-targets, continuousstretch to non-targets, and/or binding free energy to non-targets. Mostcurrently available programs only use one or two of these criteria, whichmay choose 'false' specific oligonucleotides or miss 'true' optimalprobes in a considerable proportion. We have developed a software tool,called CommOligo using new algorithms and all three criteria forselection of optimal oligonucleotide probes. A series of filters,including sequence identity, free energy, continuous stretch, GC content,self-annealing, distance to the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) andmelting temperature (Tm), are used to check each possibleoligonucleotide. A sequence identity is calculated based on gapped globalalignments. A traversal algorithm is used to generate alignments for freeenergy calculation. The optimal Tm interval is determined based on probecandidates that have passed all other filters. Final probes are pickedusing a combination of user-configurable piece-wise linear functions andan iterative process. The thresholds for identity, stretch and freeenergy filters are automatically determined from experimental data by anaccessory software tool, CommOligo_PE (CommOligo Parameter Estimator).The program was used to design probes for both whole-genome and highlyhomologous sequence data. CommOligo and CommOligo_PE are freely availableto academic users upon request.

  10. Oligonucleotides as probes for studying polymerization reactions in dilute aqueous solution: II. Polycondensations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, V.; Orgel, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    We have prepared a [32P]-labeled oligonucleotide probe carrying a ureido (-NH-CO-NH2) function at its 3'-terminus. This labeled oligomer was used to study polycondensations of urea and formaldehyde and of various phenols and formaldehyde in aqueous solution. The formation of formaldehyde copolymers attached to the amido-function of the probe was monitored by gel electrophoresis. Our results are generally in agreement with those obtained using conventional techniques. Our method is suitable for monitoring potentially prebiotic polycondensation reactions involving formaldehyde.

  11. Oligonucleotides as probes for studying polymerization reactions in dilute aqueous solution. 2: Polycondensations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1995-01-01

    We have prepared a (P-32)-labeled oligonucleotide probe carrying a ureido (-NH-CO-NH2) function at its 3'-terminus. This labeled oligomer was used to study polycondensations of urea and formaldehyde and of various phenols and formaldehyde in aqueous solution. The formation of formaldehyde copolymers attached to the amido-function of the probe was monitored by gel electrophoresis. Our results are generally in agreement with those obtained using conventional techniques. Our method is suitable for monitoring potentially prebiotic polycondensation reactions involving formaldehyde.

  12. Wash-free magnetic oligonucleotide probes-based NMR sensor for detecting the Hg ion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenwei; Hao, Changlong; Ma, Wei; Xing, Changrui; Yan, Wenjing; Kuang, Hua; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2011-12-14

    An easily applied and sensitive sensor for the detection of heavy metal ion residues based entirely on magnetic nanoparticle and oligonucleotide was developed. The tool is established on the relaxation of magnetic nanoparticles with different dispersion states. The target analyte, Hg ions, induce the aggregation of the MNP oligonucleotide probes. Accordingly, the light produced by the magnetic relaxation image and the transverse relaxation time (T(2)) all change due to the effect of the aggregation. The limit of qualitative detection of the sensor is 0.15 ppt. The recoveries from test samples range between 97.1-101.8%. Using the nuclear resonance instrument, the method is a high throughput and sensitive sensor.

  13. Thiol- and biotin-labeled probes for oligonucleotide quartz crystal microbalance biosensors of microalga alexandrium minutum.

    PubMed

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency. PMID:25585927

  14. Thiol- and Biotin-Labeled Probes for Oligonucleotide Quartz Crystal Microbalance Biosensors of Microalga Alexandrium Minutum

    PubMed Central

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency. PMID:25585927

  15. Improvement of the specificity of a pan-viral microarray by using genus-specific oligonucleotides and reduction of interference by host genomes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaoping; Qin, Chengfeng; Li, Yongqiang; Liu, Hong; Lin, Fang; Li, Yuchang; Li, Jing; Zhu, Qingyu; Yang, Yinhui

    2011-09-01

    Rapid detection of viral pathogens is crucial for antiviral therapy. High-density 60-70-mer oligonucleotide microarrays have been explored for broad detection of many viruses. However, relatively low specificity and the complex analytical processes are the major limitations when pan-viral oligonucleotide microarrays are used to detect viral pathogens. In this study, genus-specific oligonucleotides were used as probes and modified sample preparations were carried out to improve the specificity and accuracy of the pan-viral oligonucleotide microarray. Genus-specific 63-mer oligonucleotide probes were used for screening human pathogenic RNA viruses. A total of 628 oligonucleotide probes covering 32 RNA viral genera from 14 viral families were used. The number of oligonucleotide probes was decreased to simplify the analytical process of hybridization and to minimize cross-hybridization. Host genomes were removed by DNase I/RNase T1 digestion before viral nucleic acid extraction, and non-ribosomal hexanucleotides were used for reverse transcription to minimize interference of host genomes. Cultured viruses were used for microarray validation. The microarray was validated by cultured isolates that belonged to five viral genera. By using DNase I/RNase T1 digestion before viral nucleic acid extraction and non-ribosomal hexanucleotides for reverse transcription, the specificity of the microarray was improved. Furthermore, the analytical process of hybridization results was simplified. The specificity of pan-viral microarray could be improved by using genus-specific oligonucleotides as probes and by using non-ribosomal hexanucleotides for reverse transcription. Combined with subsequent degenerate reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing processes, this improved genus-specific oligonucleotides microarray provides a relatively flexible strategy for diagnosis of RNA virus diseases.

  16. Label-free liquid crystal biosensor based on specific oligonucleotide probes for heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengyuan; Wu, Chao; Tan, Hui; Wu, Yan; Liao, Shuzhen; Wu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, to enhance the capability of metal ions disturbing the orientation of liquid crystals (LCs), we designed a new label-free LC biosensor for the highly selective and sensitive detection of heavy metal ions. This strategy makes use of the target-induced DNA conformational change to enhance the disruption of target molecules for the orientation of LC leading to an amplified optical signal. The Hg(2+) ion, which possesses a unique property to bind specifically to two DNA thymine (T) bases, is used as a model heavy metal ion. In the presence of Hg(2+), the specific oligonucleotide probes form a conformational reorganization of the oligonucleotide probes from hairpin structure to duplex-like complexes. The duplex-like complexes are then bound on the triethoxysilylbutyraldehyde/N,N-dimethyl-N-octadecyl (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilyl chloride (TEA/DMOAP)-coated substrate modified with capture probes, which can greatly distort the orientational profile of LC, making the optical image of LC cell birefringent as a result. The optical signal of LC sensor has a visible change at the Hg(2+) concentration of low to 0.1 nM, showing good detection sensitivity. The cost-effective LC sensing method can translate the concentration signal of heavy metal ions in solution into the presence of DNA duplexes and is expected to be a sensitive detection platform for heavy metal ions and other small molecule monitors. PMID:23214408

  17. Oligonucleotides as probes for studying polymerization reactions in dilute aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, V.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    We have prepared a [32P]-labled oligonucleotide probe carrying a free primary amine at its 3'-terminus. This probe is used to initiate polymerization of aziridine (ethyleneimine) in aqueous solution. The nature of the oligomeric products and the kinetics of their formation are then monitored by gel electrophoresis. Our results are generally consistent with those obtained using conventional techniques. We have also investigated the effect of polyanionic templates on the rate of oligomerization of aziridine. We find that water-soluble polyanions generally accelerate the polymerization. The sodium salt of polymethacrylic acid is the most effective of the templates that we studied. The methods introduced in this paper should be applicable to a variety of polymerization reactions in aqueous solution. They should greatly simplify the screening of potentially prebiotic polymerization reactions.

  18. An oligonucleotide probe that distinguishes isolates of low virulence from the more pathogenic strains of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jarecki-Black, J C; King, D J

    1993-01-01

    A synthesized oligonucleotide, termed cleavage probe (NDV-CL), has been designed to complement the cleavage-activation site of the fusion gene of the Texas GB isolate of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). This oligonucleotide probe, 21 bases in length, bound with RNA from velogenic strains of NDV tested in a slot-blot hybridization assay. The probe also recognized RNA from the mesogenic strains used in this assay, although no signal was observed with RNA isolated from lentogenic NDVs or with that from other common avian viruses used as controls. This probe did not recognize RNA from isolates of other paramyxovirus serotypes (PMV-2 or PMV-3) included in this study. The ability of this probe to distinguish lentogenic NDVs, which cause little or no clinical disease, from those strains that may produce severe morbidity and/or mortality suggests a potential use for the probe in a molecular diagnostic assay.

  19. The unique probe selector: a comprehensive web service for probe design and oligonucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu-Hwa; Lo, Chen-Zen; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Hsiung, Chao A; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2008-01-01

    Background Nucleic acid hybridization, a fundamental technique in molecular biology, can be modified into very effective and sensitive methods for detecting particular targets mixed with millions of non-target sequences. Therefore, avoiding cross-hybridization is the most crucial issue for developing diagnostic methods based on hybridization. Results To develop a probe with a high discriminating power, this study constructed a web service, the Unique Probe Selector (UPS), for customized probe design. The UPS service integrates a probe design mechanism and a scoring system for evaluating the performance of probe annealing and the uniqueness of a probe in a user-defined genetic background. Starting from an intuitive web interface, the UPS accepts a query with single or multiple sequences in fasta format. The best probe(s) for each sequence can be downloaded from result pages in a fasta or .csv format with a summary of probe characteristics. The option "Unique probe within group" selects the most unique probe for each target sequence with low probability to hybridize to the other sequences in the same submitted query. The option "Unique probe in the specific organism" devises probes for each submitted sequence to identify its target among selected genetic backgrounds based on Unigene. Conclusion The UPS evaluates probe-to-target hybridization under a user-defined condition in silico to ensure high-performance hybridization and minimizes the possibility of non-specific reactions. UPS has been applied to design human arrays for gene expression studies and to develop several small arrays of gene families that were inferred as molecular signatures of cancer typing/staging or pathogen signatures. Notably, UPS is freely accessible at . PMID:18315861

  20. Fluorescent-oligonucleotide probing of whole cells for determinative, phylogenetic, and environmental studies in microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Amann, R I; Krumholz, L; Stahl, D A

    1990-01-01

    Fluorescent-dye-conjugated oligonucleotides were used to classify 14 Fibrobacter strains by fluorescence microscopy. On the basis of partial 16S rRNA sequences of six Fibrobacter strains, four hybridization probes were designed to discriminate between the species Fibrobacter succinogenes and Fibrobacter intestinalis and to identify F. succinogenes subsp. succinogenes. After in situ hybridization to whole cells of the six sequenced strains, epifluorescence microscopy confirmed probe specificity. The four probes were then used to make presumptive species and subspecies assignments of eight additional Fibrobacter strains not previously characterized by comparative sequencing. These assignments were confirmed by comparative sequencing of the 16S rRNA target regions from the additional organisms. Single-mismatch discrimination between certain probe and nontarget sequences was demonstrated, and fluorescent intensity was shown to be enhanced by hybridization to multiple probes of the same specificity. The direct detection of F. intestinalis in mouse cecum samples demonstrated the application of this technique to the characterization of complex natural samples. Images FIG. 3a-3c FIG. 3d-3e FIG. 5 PMID:1688842

  1. Interfacing click chemistry with automated oligonucleotide synthesis for the preparation of fluorescent DNA probes containing internal xanthene and cyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-14

    Double-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing fluorophores interacting by energy-transfer mechanisms are essential for modern bioanalysis, molecular diagnostics, and in vivo imaging techniques. Although bright xanthene and cyanine dyes are gaining increased prominence within these fields, little attention has thus far been paid to probes containing these dyes internally attached, a fact which is mainly due to the quite challenging synthesis of such oligonucleotide probes. Herein, by using 2'-O-propargyl uridine phosphoramidite and a series of xanthenes and cyanine azide derivatives, we have for the first time performed solid-phase copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click labeling during the automated phosphoramidite oligonucleotide synthesis followed by postsynthetic click reactions in solution. We demonstrate that our novel strategy is rapid and efficient for the preparation of novel oligonucleotide probes containing internally positioned xanthene and cyanine dye pairs and thus represents a significant step forward for the preparation of advanced fluorescent oligonucleotide probes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the novel xanthene and cyanine labeled probes display unusual and very promising photophysical properties resulting from energy-transfer interactions between the fluorophores controlled by nucleic acid assembly. Potential benefits of using these novel fluorescent probes within, for example, molecular diagnostics and fluorescence microscopy include: Considerable Stokes shifts (40-110 nm), quenched fluorescence of single-stranded probes accompanied by up to 7.7-fold light-up effect of emission upon target DNA/RNA binding, remarkable sensitivity to single-nucleotide mismatches, generally high fluorescence brightness values (FB up to 26), and hence low limit of target detection values (LOD down to <5 nM).

  2. Rapid identification of bacteria in blood cultures by using fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Jansen, G J; Mooibroek, M; Idema, J; Harmsen, H J; Welling, G W; Degener, J E

    2000-02-01

    The applicability of whole-cell hybridization for the identification of pathogenic bacteria in blood from septic patients was examined. Oligonucleotide probes, fluorescently labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, directed against the variable regions of the 16S rRNAs of the following bacterial species and/or genera were used: Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Enterobacteriaceae family. A probe specific for the rRNAs of almost all bacteria and its complementary, reversed counterpart was used as positive and negative control, respectively. The probes were used in conjunction with a fast and simple-to-use protocol for whole-cell hybridization. This protocol yields an identification after 25 to 45 min, depending on whether the bacterium is gram positive or gram negative. A total of 182 blood samples which tested positive in a blood culture machine were investigated. All probes except for the ones for S. aureus and the CoNS showed sensitivities and specificities of 1.000. It was concluded that whole-cell hybridization is well suited for the fast screening of septic blood containing streptococci and/or enterococci or gram-negative rods.

  3. Analysis of microRNA expression by in situ hybridization with RNA oligonucleotide probes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Robert C.; Deo, Monika; Turner, David L.

    2007-01-01

    In situ hybridization is an important tool for analyzing gene expression and developing hypotheses about gene functions. The discovery of hundreds of microRNA (miRNA) genes in animals has provided new challenges for analyzing gene expression and functions. The small size of the mature miRNAs (∼20-24 nucleotides in length) presents difficulties for conventional in situ hybridization methods. However, we have developed a modified in situ hybridization method for detection of mammalian miRNAs in tissue sections, based upon the use of RNA oligonucleotide probes in combination with highly specific wash conditions. Here we present detailed procedures for detection of miRNAs in tissue sections or cultured cells. The methods described can utilize either nonradioactive hapten-conjugated probes that are detected by enzyme-coupled antibodies, or radioactively labeled probes that are detected by autoradiography. The ability to visualize miRNA expression patterns in tissue sections provides an additional tool for the analyses of miRNA expression and function. In addition, the use of radioactively labeled probes should facilitate quantitative analyses of changes in miRNA gene expression. PMID:17889803

  4. Preparation and Analysis of Oligonucleotides Containing the C4′-Oxidized Abasic Site and Related Mechanistic Probes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeseung; Kreller, Cortney R.; Greenberg, Marc M.

    2005-01-01

    The C4′-oxidized abasic site (C4-AP) is produced by a variety of DNA damaging agents. This alkali labile lesion can exist in up to four diastereomeric cyclic forms, in addition to the acyclic keto-aldehyde. Synthetic oligonucleotides containing the lesion were prepared from a stable photochemical precursor. Chemical integrity of the lesion containing oligonucleotides was probed using phosphodiesterase lability. Analysis of the 3′,5′-phosphate diester of the monomeric lesion released from single diastereomers of photolabile precursors by 1H NMR indicates that isomerization of the hemiacetal and/or hemiketal is rapid. The syntheses and characterization of oligonucleotides containing configurationally stable analogues of C4-AP, which serve as mechanistic probes for deciphering the structural basis of the biochemical and biological effects of the C4′-oxidized abasic lesion, are also described. PMID:16277338

  5. Development of mercury (II) ion biosensors based on mercury-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Li, Lanying; Wen, Yanli; Xu, Li; Xu, Qin; Song, Shiping; Zuo, Xiaolei; Yan, Juan; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-15

    Mercury (II) ion (Hg(2+)) contamination can be accumulated along the food chain and cause serious threat to the public health. Plenty of research effort thus has been devoted to the development of fast, sensitive and selective biosensors for monitoring Hg(2+). Thymine was demonstrated to specifically combine with Hg(2+) and form a thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) structure, with binding constant even higher than T-A Watson-Crick pair in DNA duplex. Recently, various novel Hg(2+) biosensors have been developed based on T-rich Mercury-Specific Oligonucleotide (MSO) probes, and exhibited advanced selectivity and excellent sensitivity for Hg(2+) detection. In this review, we explained recent development of MSO-based Hg(2+) biosensors mainly in 3 groups: fluorescent biosensors, colorimetric biosensors and electrochemical biosensors.

  6. Bifunctional colorimetric oligonucleotide probe based on a G-quadruplex DNAzyme molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libing; Zhu, Jinbo; Li, Tao; Wang, Erkang

    2011-12-01

    A label-free bifunctional colorimetric oligonucleotide probe for DNA and protein detection has been developed on the basis of a novel catalytic molecular beacon consisting of two hairpin structures and a split G-quadruplex DNAzyme in the middle. The two loops of this molecular beacon consist of thrombin aptamer sequence and the complementary sequence of target DNA, which are utilized to sense single-stranded DNA and thrombin. The G-quadruplex DNAzyme can effectively catalyze the H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine sulfate to generate colorimetric signal. Upon addition of the target, the DNA or protein combines with one loop of the hairpin structures, and meanwhile drives the middle G-quadruplex DNAzyme to dissociate. This results in a decrease of catalytic activity, enabling the separate analysis of DNA and thrombin.

  7. Effect of oligonucleotide probes substituted by deoxyinosines on the specificity of SNP detection on the DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoting; Pu, Dan; Liu, Bicheng; Xiao, Pengfeng

    2015-01-01

    One of the main factors that can affect the quality of microarray results is the microarray hybridization specificity. The key factor that affects hybridization specificity is the design of the probes. In this paper, we described a novel oligonucleotide probe containing deoxyinosines aimed at improving DNA hybridization specificity. We compared different probes to determine the distance between deoxyinosine base and SNPs site and the number of deoxyinosine bases. The new probe sequences contained two set of deoxyinosines (each set had two deoxyinosines), in which the interval between SNP site and each set of deoxyinosines was two bases. The new probes could obtain the highest hybridization specificity. The experimental results showed that probes containing deoxyinosines hybridized effectively to the perfectly matched target and improved the hybridization specificity of DNA microarray. By including a simple washing step after hybridization, these probes could distinguish matched targets from single-base-mismatched sequences perfectly. For the probes containing deoxyinosines, the fluorescence intensity of a match sequence was more than eight times stronger than that of a mismatch. However, the intensity ratio was only 1.3 times or less for the probes without deoxyinosines. Finally, using hybridization of the PCR product microarrays, we successfully genotyped SNP of 140 samples using these new labeled probes. Our results show that this is a useful new strategy for modifying oligonucleotide probes for use in DNA microarray analysis.

  8. Order-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for (hyper)thermophilic archaea and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rusch, Antje; Amend, Jan P

    2004-10-01

    New oligonucleotide probes were designed and evaluated for application in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies on (hyper)thermophilic microbial communities--Arglo32, Tcoc164, and Aqui1197 target the 16S rRNA of Archaeoglobales, Thermococcales, and Aquificales, respectively. Both sequence information and experimental evaluation showed high coverage and specificity of all three probes. The signal intensity of Aqui1197 was improved by addition of a newly designed, unlabeled "helper" oligonucleotide, hAqui1045. It was shown that in addition to its function as a probe for Aquificales, Aqui1197 is suitable as a supplementary probe to extend the coverage of the domain-specific bacterial probe EUB338. In sediments from two hydrothermal seeps on Vulcano Island, Italy, the microbial community structure was analyzed by FISH with both established and the new oligonucleotide probes, showing the applicability of Arglo32, Tcoc164, and Aqui1197/hAqui1045 to natural samples. At both sites, all major groups of (hyper)thermophiles, except for methanogens, were detected: Crenarchaeota (19%, 16%), Thermococcales (14%, 22%), Archaeoglobales (14%, 12%), Aquificales (5%, 8%), Thermotoga/Thermosipho spp. (12%, 9%), Thermus sp. (12%, none), and thermophilic Bacillus sp. (12%, 8%).

  9. Development and field application of a quantitative method for examining natural assemblages of protists with oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Lim, E L; Caron, D A; Delong, E F

    1996-04-01

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization method that uses rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for counting protists in cultures and environmental water samples is described. Filtration, hybridization, and enumeration of fixed cells with biotinylated eukaryote-specific probes and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated avidin were performed directly on 0.4-microns-pore-size polycarbonate filters of Transwell cell culture inserts (Costar Corp., Cambridge, Mass.). Counts of various species of cultured protists by this probe hybridization method were not significantly different from counts obtained by the 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and acridine orange (AO) staining methods. However, counts of total nanoplankton (TNAN) based on probe hybridizations in several field samples and in samples collected from a mesocosm experiment were frequently higher than TNAN counts obtained by staining with DAPI or AO. On the basis of these results, 25 to 70% of the TNAN determined with probes were not detectable by DAPI or AO staining. The underestimation of TNAN abundances in samples stained with DAPI or AO was attributed to the existence of small nanoplanktonic cells which could be detected with probes but not DAPI or AO and the difficulty associated with distinguishing DAPI- or AO-stained protists attached to or embedded in aggregates. We conclude from samples examined in this study that enumeration of TNAN with oligonucleotide probes provides estimates of natural TNAN abundances that are at least as high as (and in some cases higher than) counts obtained with commonly employed fluorochrome stains. The quantitative in situ hybridization method we have described here enables the direct enumeration of free-living protists in water samples with oligonucleotide probes. When combined with species-specific probes, this method will enable quantitative studies of the abundance and distribution of specific protistan taxa.

  10. Transcription profiling of the early gravitropic response in Arabidopsis using high-density oligonucleotide probe microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Zhu, Tong; Chang, Hur-Song; Wang, Xun; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of plant tropisms, the directed growth toward or away from external stimuli such as light and gravity, began more than a century ago. Yet biochemical, physiological, and especially molecular mechanisms of plant tropic responses remain for the most part unclear. We examined expression of 8,300 genes during early stages of the gravitropic response using high-density oligonucleotide probe microarrays. Approximately 1.7% of the genes represented on the array exhibited significant expression changes within the first 30 min of gravity stimulation. Among gravity-induced genes were a number of genes previously implicated to be involved in gravitropism. However, a much larger number of the identified genes have not been previously associated with gravitropism. Because reorientation of plants may also expose plants to mechanical perturbations, we also compared the effects of a gentle mechanical perturbation on mRNA levels during the gravity response. It was found that approximately 39% of apparently gravity-regulated genes were also regulated by the mechanical perturbation caused by plant reorientation. Our study revealed the induction of complex gene expression patterns as a consequence of gravitropic reorientation and points to an interplay between the gravitropic and mechanical responses and to the extreme sensitivity of plants to even very gentle mechanical perturbations.

  11. Hairpin oligonucleotides anchored terbium ion: a fluorescent probe to specifically detect lead(II) at sub-nM levels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yueteng; Liu, Ru; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Yuliang; Cai, Zhifang; Gao, Xueyun

    2013-04-21

    A terbium based fluorescent probe was synthesized by coordinating terbium ions with a designed oligonucleotides (5'-ATATGGGGGATAT-3', termed GH5). GH5 improved the fluorescence of terbium ions by four orders of magnitude. The fluorescence enhancement of terbium ions by different oligonucleotides sequences indicated that the polyguanine loop of the hairpin GH5 is key to enhance terbium ion emission. The quantum yield of Tb-GH5 probe was 10.5% and the probe was photo-stable. The result of conductivity titration indicated that the stoichiometry of the probe is 3.5 Tb: 1 GH5, which is confirmed by fluorescence titration. This probe had high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of lead ions. The fluorescence intensity of this probe was linear with respect to lead concentration over a range 0.3-2.1 nM (R(2) = 0.99). The limit of detection for lead ions was 0.1 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.

  12. Microarray-based long oligonucleotides probe designed for Brucella Spp. detection and identification of antibiotic susceptibility pattern.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Zahra; Najafi, Ali; Piranfar, Vahhab; Mirnejad, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Brucella spp. is a common zoonotic infection referred to as Brucellosis, and it is a serious public health problem around the world. There are currently six classical species (pathogenic species in both animals and humans) within the genus Brucella. The ability and practicality facilitated by a microarray experiment help us to recognize Brucella spp. and its antibiotic resistant gene. Rapid phenotypic determination of antibiotic resistance is not possible by disk diffusion methods. Thus, evaluating antibiotics pattern and Brucella detection appear necessary technique by molecular methods in brucellosis. So, the aim of this study was to design a microarray long oligonucleotides probe and primer for the complete diagnosis of Brucella spp. and obtaining genetic profiles for antibiotic resistance in bacteria at the same time. In this study, we designed 16 antibiotic-resistant gene solid-phase primers with similar melting temperatures of 60 °C and 16 long oligonucleotide probes. These primers and probes can identify tetracycline-, chloramphenicol-, and aminoglycoside-resistant genes, respectively. The design of microarray probes is a versatile process that be done in a wide range of selections. Since the long oligo microarray probes are the best choices for specific diagnosis and definite treatment, this group of probes was designed in the present survey. PMID:27280008

  13. Microarray-based long oligonucleotides probe designed for Brucella Spp. detection and identification of antibiotic susceptibility pattern

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, Zahra; Najafi, Ali; Piranfar, Vahhab; Mirnejad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Brucella spp. is a common zoonotic infection referred to as Brucellosis, and it is a serious public health problem around the world. There are currently six classical species (pathogenic species in both animals and humans) within the genus Brucella. The ability and practicality facilitated by a microarray experiment help us to recognize Brucella spp. and its antibiotic resistant gene. Rapid phenotypic determination of antibiotic resistance is not possible by disk diffusion methods. Thus, evaluating antibiotics pattern and Brucella detection appear necessary technique by molecular methods in brucellosis. So, the aim of this study was to design a microarray long oligonucleotides probe and primer for the complete diagnosis of Brucella spp. and obtaining genetic profiles for antibiotic resistance in bacteria at the same time. In this study, we designed 16 antibiotic-resistant gene solid-phase primers with similar melting temperatures of 60 °C and 16 long oligonucleotide probes. These primers and probes can identify tetracycline-, chloramphenicol-, and aminoglycoside-resistant genes, respectively. The design of microarray probes is a versatile process that be done in a wide range of selections. Since the long oligo microarray probes are the best choices for specific diagnosis and definite treatment, this group of probes was designed in the present survey. PMID:27280008

  14. Microarray-based long oligonucleotides probe designed for Brucella Spp. detection and identification of antibiotic susceptibility pattern.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Zahra; Najafi, Ali; Piranfar, Vahhab; Mirnejad, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Brucella spp. is a common zoonotic infection referred to as Brucellosis, and it is a serious public health problem around the world. There are currently six classical species (pathogenic species in both animals and humans) within the genus Brucella. The ability and practicality facilitated by a microarray experiment help us to recognize Brucella spp. and its antibiotic resistant gene. Rapid phenotypic determination of antibiotic resistance is not possible by disk diffusion methods. Thus, evaluating antibiotics pattern and Brucella detection appear necessary technique by molecular methods in brucellosis. So, the aim of this study was to design a microarray long oligonucleotides probe and primer for the complete diagnosis of Brucella spp. and obtaining genetic profiles for antibiotic resistance in bacteria at the same time. In this study, we designed 16 antibiotic-resistant gene solid-phase primers with similar melting temperatures of 60 °C and 16 long oligonucleotide probes. These primers and probes can identify tetracycline-, chloramphenicol-, and aminoglycoside-resistant genes, respectively. The design of microarray probes is a versatile process that be done in a wide range of selections. Since the long oligo microarray probes are the best choices for specific diagnosis and definite treatment, this group of probes was designed in the present survey.

  15. Rapid detection and identification of Vibrio anguillarum by using a specific oligonucleotide probe complementary to 16S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Picado, J; Blanch, A R; Jofre, J

    1994-01-01

    Partial 16S rDNA from Vibrio collection type strains and recent isolates of Vibrio-related strains were sequenced and compared with previously published sequences. A 24-base DNA oligonucleotide (VaV3) was designed and used as a specific probe for detection and identification of Vibrio anguillarum. Its specificity was tested against collection type strains and environmental isolates and no cross-reaction was found. The probe detected 8 of the 10 V. anguillarum serovars. It was applied to screen different Vibrio-related strains isolated from marine hatcheries and fish farms. The detection limit in DNA-DNA slot blot hybridization was 150 pg. Images PMID:7510943

  16. Selective and sensitive turn-on detection of adenosine triphosphate and thrombin based on bifunctional fluorescent oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Du, Zongfeng; Yang, Limin; Tang, Bo

    2013-03-15

    A bifunctional fluorescent oligonucleotide probe for small molecules and protein detection has been developed based on turn on fluorescence response via the target induced structure-switching of molecular beacon. The two loops of this molecular beacon are designed in such a manner that they consist of thrombin (Tmb) aptamer sequence and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer sequence, respectively, which are utilized to sense thrombin and ATP. The oligonucleotide forms double stem-loops in the absence of targets, yielding no fluorescence emission because of the FRET from the excited fluorophore to the proximal quencher. Upon addition of the target, the ATP or Tmb, its specific interaction with loop sequence of the hairpin structure induce the separation of reporter fluorophore and the fluorescence quencher of the molecular beacon, resulting in an increase of fluorescence response. Hence, the separate analysis of ATP and Tmb could be realized through only one designed molecular beacon. The detection limits were estimated to be 25 nM for ATP and 12 nM for Tmb, respectively. The results of this study should substantially broaden the perspective for future development of oligonucleotide probe for analysis of other analytes.

  17. Pigeons: A Novel GUI Software for Analysing and Parsing High Density Heterologous Oligonucleotide Microarray Probe Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hung-Ming; May, Sean T.; Mayes, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Genomic DNA-based probe selection by using high density oligonucleotide arrays has recently been applied to heterologous species (Xspecies). With the advent of this new approach, researchers are able to study the genome and transcriptome of a non-model or an underutilised crop species through current state-of-the-art microarray platforms. However, a software package with a graphical user interface (GUI) to analyse and parse the oligonucleotide probe pair level data is still lacking when an experiment is designed on the basis of this cross species approach. A novel computer program called Pigeons has been developed for customised array data analysis to allow the user to import and analyse Affymetrix GeneChip® probe level data through XSpecies. One can determine empirical boundaries for removing poor probes based on genomic hybridisation of the test species to the Xspecies array, followed by making a species-specific Chip Description File (CDF) file for transcriptomics in the heterologous species, or Pigeons can be used to examine an experimental design to identify potential Single-Feature Polymorphisms (SFPs) at the DNA or RNA level. Pigeons is also focused around visualization and interactive analysis of the datasets. The software with its manual (the current release number version 1.2.1) is freely available at the website of the Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre (NASC).

  18. Invader Assisted Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Colorimetric Detection of Disease Biomarkers Using Oligonucleotide Probe-Modified Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Song, Qinxin; Qi, Xiemin; Jia, Huning; He, Liang; Kumar, Shalen; Pitman, Janet L; Zou, Bingjie; Zhou, Guohua

    2016-04-01

    We successfully developed an invader assisted ELISA assay (iaELISA) for sensitive detection of disease biomarkers. The method includes three key steps as follows; biotinylated detection antibody was at first used to capture targeted antigen by sandwich ELISA. The biotinylated oligonucleotide was then attached to detection antibody via streptavidin. Finally, the cascade invader reactions were employed to amplify the biotinylated oligonucleotide specific to the antigen so that detection of the antigen was transformed into signal amplification of the antigen-specific DNA. To achieve colorimetric detection, oligonucleotide probe and modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were coupled with the invader assay. Utilization of the hairpin probes in the invader reaction brought about free AuNPs, resulting in the positive read-out (red color). On the other hand, aggregation of the AuNPs occurred when the hairpin probes were not utilized in the reaction. This method was successfully used to detect as low as 2.4 x 10(-11) g/mL of HBsAg by both naked eye and spectrophotometer. This sensitivity was about 100 times higher than that of conventional ELISA method. The method was also used to assay 16 serum specimens from HBV-infected patients and 8 serum specimens from HBV-negative donors and results were in good agreement with those obtained from the conventional ELISA. As the invader assay is sensitive to one base sequence, a good specificity was also obtained by detecting other antigens like hepatitis A virus (HAV) and BSA. The method has therefore much potential for ultrasensitive and cost-effective detection of targeted proteins that have clinical importance.

  19. Invader Assisted Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Colorimetric Detection of Disease Biomarkers Using Oligonucleotide Probe-Modified Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Song, Qinxin; Qi, Xiemin; Jia, Huning; He, Liang; Kumar, Shalen; Pitman, Janet L; Zou, Bingjie; Zhou, Guohua

    2016-04-01

    We successfully developed an invader assisted ELISA assay (iaELISA) for sensitive detection of disease biomarkers. The method includes three key steps as follows; biotinylated detection antibody was at first used to capture targeted antigen by sandwich ELISA. The biotinylated oligonucleotide was then attached to detection antibody via streptavidin. Finally, the cascade invader reactions were employed to amplify the biotinylated oligonucleotide specific to the antigen so that detection of the antigen was transformed into signal amplification of the antigen-specific DNA. To achieve colorimetric detection, oligonucleotide probe and modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were coupled with the invader assay. Utilization of the hairpin probes in the invader reaction brought about free AuNPs, resulting in the positive read-out (red color). On the other hand, aggregation of the AuNPs occurred when the hairpin probes were not utilized in the reaction. This method was successfully used to detect as low as 2.4 x 10(-11) g/mL of HBsAg by both naked eye and spectrophotometer. This sensitivity was about 100 times higher than that of conventional ELISA method. The method was also used to assay 16 serum specimens from HBV-infected patients and 8 serum specimens from HBV-negative donors and results were in good agreement with those obtained from the conventional ELISA. As the invader assay is sensitive to one base sequence, a good specificity was also obtained by detecting other antigens like hepatitis A virus (HAV) and BSA. The method has therefore much potential for ultrasensitive and cost-effective detection of targeted proteins that have clinical importance. PMID:27301208

  20. Rapid In Situ Hybridization using Oligonucleotide Probes on Paraformaldehyde-prefixed Brain of Rats with Serotonin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shokry, Ibrahim M; Callanan, John J; Sousa, John; Tao, Rui

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) toxicity may cause region-specific changes in serotonergic mRNA expression due to acute serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) syndrome. This hypothesis can be tested using in situ hybridization to detect the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene htr2a. In the past, such procedures, utilizing radioactive riboprobe, were difficult because of the complicated workflow that needs several days to perform and the added difficulty that the technique required the use of fresh frozen tissues maintained in an RNase-free environment. Recently, the development of short oligonucleotide probes has simplified in situ hybridization procedures and allowed the use of paraformaldehyde-prefixed brain sections, which are more widely available in laboratories. Here, we describe a detailed protocol using non-radioactive oligonucleotide probes on the prefixed brain tissues. Hybridization probes used for this study include dapB (a bacterial gene coding for dihydrodipicolinate reductase), ppiB (a housekeeping gene coding for peptidylprolyl isomerase B), and htr2a (a serotonin gene coding for 5-HT2A receptors). This method is relatively simply, cheap, reproducible and requires less than two days to complete. PMID:26437182

  1. vanA-targeted oligonucleotide DNA probe designed to monitor vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant bacteria in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Nakipoglu, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Fadime; Icgen, Bulent

    2016-10-01

    The glycopeptide antibiotics teicoplanin and vancomycin are common to treat severe Gram-positive bacterial infections. The gene vanA confers high-level resistance to these antibiotics, and these phenomena have been shown to be transferable. Release of vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant bacteria to surface waters is, therefore, of particular concern since they might proliferate and spread in different environments. Monitoring of the fate of vanA gene in these waters provides information on the exposure and potential threats of those bacteria for the environment and public health. Therefore, this study aimed at preparing a 25-mer-oligonucleotide DNA probe based on the 909 bp BamHI-ClaI fragment from Enterococcus faecium plasmids pVEF1 and pVEF2 through the use of Vector NTI Express Software. The newly designed vanA probe displayed highly specific hybridization with vanA-positive Enterococcus faecalis tested at 46 °C, 55 % formamide, and 0.020 M NaCl stringency conditions. In situ fluorescein hybridizations under the same stringency conditions were also used to monitor river water samples by using fluorescein microscopy. The results showed that the vanA-targeted oligonucleotide DNA probe prepared was not only highly specific but also quantitative tool for monitoring vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant bacteria in surface waters. PMID:27640164

  2. Group-Specific 16S rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes To Identify Thermophilic Bacteria in Marine Hydrothermal Vents

    PubMed Central

    Harmsen, H.; Prieur, D.; Jeanthon, C.

    1997-01-01

    Four 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the detection of thermophilic members of the domain Bacteria known to thrive in marine hydrothermal systems. We developed and characterized probes encompassing most of the thermophilic members of the genus Bacillus, most species of the genus Thermus, the genera Thermotoga and Thermosipho, and the Aquificales order. The temperature of dissociation of each probe was determined. Probe specificities to the target groups were demonstrated by whole-cell and dot blot hybridization against a collection of target and nontarget rRNAs. Whole-cell hybridizations with the specific probes were performed on cells extracted from hydrothermal vent chimneys. One of the samples contained cells that hybridized to the probe specific to genera Thermotoga and Thermosipho. No positive signals could be detected in the samples tested with the probes whose specificities encompassed either the genus Thermus or the thermophilic members of the genus Bacillus. However, when simultaneous hybridizations with the probe specific to the order Aquificales and a probe specific to the domain Bacteria (R. I. Amann, B. Binder, R. J. Olson, S. W. Chisholm, R. Devereux, and D. A. Stahl, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:1919-1925, 1990) were performed on cells extracted from the top and exterior subsamples of chimneys, positive signals were obtained from morphologically diverse bacteria representing about 40% of the bacterial population. Since specificity studies also revealed that the bacterial probe did not hybridize with the members of the order Aquificales, the detected cells may therefore correspond to a new type of bacteria. One of the observed morphotypes was similar to that of a strictly anaerobic autotrophic sulfur-reducing strain that we isolated from the chimney samples. This work demonstrates that application of whole-cell hybridization with probes specific for different phylogenetic levels is a useful tool for detailed studies of

  3. Quantification of Gordona amarae Strains in Foaming Activated Sludge and Anaerobic Digester Systems with Oligonucleotide Hybridization Probes

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, M. Fiorella; de los Reyes, Francis L.; Hernandez, Mark; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  4. A synthetic oligonucleotide probe and a cloned polynucleotide probe based on the yopA gene for detection and enumeration of virulent Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Kapperud, G; Dommarsnes, K; Skurnik, M; Hornes, E

    1990-01-01

    We compared a synthetically produced 19-mer oligonucleotide probe with a polynucleotide probe consisting of a cloned fragment of the virulence gene yopA for their relative efficiencies in identification and enumeration of virulent Yersinia enterocolitica. The probes were used in DNA-DNA colony hybridization assays to differentiate 70 Yersinia strains with known plasmid profiles. All 19 strains harboring the 40- to 50-megadalton virulence plasmid were positive in the hybridization assay, whereas their isogenic derivatives lacking this plasmid were negative. Both probes correctly identified plasmid-bearing variants of Y. enterocolitica serogroups O:3, O:5,27, O:8, O:9, O:13, and O:21 from three continents. In contrast, none of the probes hybridized with DNA from 32 environmental yersiniae belonging to 26 serogroups not associated with disease. Colony hybridization was used to detect and enumerate virulent Y. enterocolitica in three artificially contaminated food samples. Despite a large background of indigenous bacteria (3 x 10(4) CFU), the efficiency of enumeration ranged from 33 to 82%. The use of nylon filters did not impair the growth of virulent yersiniae. Both probes showed a perfect concordance in their specific differentiation and enumeration of virulent Y. enterocolitica. DNA colony hybridization with these two probes permitted rapid and reliable identification of all common pathogenic serogroups without the need for enrichment or esoteric identification protocols.

  5. Novel oligonucleotide probes for in situ detection of pederin-producing endosymbionts of Paederus riparius rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae).

    PubMed

    Kador, Matthias; Horn, Marcus A; Dettner, Konrad

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts from female Paederus rove beetles are hitherto uncultured, phylogenetically related to Pseudomonas sp., and produce the polyketide pederin, which exhibits strong cytotoxic effects and antitumoral activities. The location of such endosymbionts inside beetles and on beetles' eggs is hypothesized based on indirect evidence rather than elucidated. Thus, an endosymbiont-specific and a competitor oligonucleotide probe (Cy3-labelled PAE444 and unlabelled cPAE444, respectively) were designed and utilized for FISH with semi-thin sections of Paederus riparius eggs. Cy3-PAE444-positive cells were densely packed and covered the whole eggshell. Hundred percent of EUB338-Mix-positive total bacterial cells were PAE444 positive, indicating a biofilm dominated by Paederus endosymbionts. Analysis of different egg deposition stadiums by electron microscopy and pks (polyketide synthase gene, a structural gene associated with pederin biosynthesis)-PCR supported results obtained by FISH and revealed that the endosymbiont-containing layer is applied to the eggshell inside the efferent duct. These findings suggest that P. riparius endosymbionts are located inside unknown structures of the female genitalia, which allow for a well-regulated release of endosymbionts during oviposition. The novel oligonucleotide probes developed in this study will facilitate (1) the identification of symbiont-containing structures within genitalia of their beetle hosts and (2) directed cultivation approaches in the future.

  6. Highly specific identification of single nucleic polymorphism in M. tuberculosis using smart probes and single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with blocking oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Achim; Müller, Matthias; Nolte, Oliver; Wolfrum, Jürgen; Sauer, Markus; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter; Marme, Nicole

    2008-02-01

    In this article we present a method for the highly specific identification of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) responsible for rifampicin resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This approach applies fluorescently labeled hairpin-structured oligonucleotides (smart probes) and confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Smart probes are fluorescently labeled at the 5'-end. The dye's fluorescence is quenched in the closed hairpin conformation due to close proximity of the guanosine residues located at the 3'-end. As a result of the hybridization to the complementary target sequence the hairpin structure and thus fluorescence quenching gets lost and a strong fluorescence increase appears. To enhance the specificity of the SNP detection unlabeled "blocking oligonucleotides" were added to the sample. These oligonucleotides hybridizes to the DNA sequence containing the mismatch thus masking this sequence and hereby preventing the smart probe from hybridizing to the mismatched sequence.

  7. A regenerated electrochemical biosensor for label-free detection of glucose and urea based on conformational switch of i-motif oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Chen, Dong Mei; Lei, Jing Lei; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2015-10-15

    Improving the reproducibility of electrochemical signal remains a great challenge over the past decades. In this work, i-motif oligonucleotide probe-based electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor is introduced for the first time as a regenerated sensing platform, which enhances the reproducibility of electrochemical signal, for label-free detection of glucose and urea. The addition of glucose or urea is able to activate glucose oxidase-catalyzed or urease-catalyzed reaction, inducing or destroying the formation of i-motif oligonucleotide probe. The conformational switch of oligonucleotide probe can be recorded by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Thus, the difference of electron transfer resistance is utilized for the quantitative determination of glucose and urea. We further demonstrate that the E-DNA sensor exhibits high selectivity, excellent stability, and remarkable regenerated ability. The human serum analysis indicates that this simple and regenerated strategy holds promising potential in future biosensing applications.

  8. A regenerated electrochemical biosensor for label-free detection of glucose and urea based on conformational switch of i-motif oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Chen, Dong Mei; Lei, Jing Lei; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2015-10-15

    Improving the reproducibility of electrochemical signal remains a great challenge over the past decades. In this work, i-motif oligonucleotide probe-based electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor is introduced for the first time as a regenerated sensing platform, which enhances the reproducibility of electrochemical signal, for label-free detection of glucose and urea. The addition of glucose or urea is able to activate glucose oxidase-catalyzed or urease-catalyzed reaction, inducing or destroying the formation of i-motif oligonucleotide probe. The conformational switch of oligonucleotide probe can be recorded by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Thus, the difference of electron transfer resistance is utilized for the quantitative determination of glucose and urea. We further demonstrate that the E-DNA sensor exhibits high selectivity, excellent stability, and remarkable regenerated ability. The human serum analysis indicates that this simple and regenerated strategy holds promising potential in future biosensing applications. PMID:26515000

  9. Design and validation of an oligonucleotide probe for detection of protozoa from the order Trichomonadida using chromogenic in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Mostegl, Meike Marissa; Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Maderner, Anton; Dinhopl, Nora; Kulda, Jaroslav; Liebhart, Dieter; Hess, Michael; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Infections with protozoal parasites of the order Trichomonadida are often observed in veterinary medicine. Based on the trichomonad species involved these infections are either asymptomatic or can lead to sometimes serious disease. To further study protozoal agents of the order Trichomonadida the establishment of a method to detect trichomonads directly in the tissue, allowing parasite-lesion correlation, is necessary. Here we describe the design and evaluation of an oligonucleotide probe for chromogenic in situ hybridization, theoretically allowing detection of all hitherto known members of the order Trichomonadida. The probe was designed on a region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene homologue for all representatives of the order Trichomonadida available in the GenBank. Functionality of the probe was proven using protozoal cultures containing different trichomonads (Monocercomonas colubrorum, Hypotrichomonas acosta, Pentatrichomonas hominis, Trichomitus batrachorum, Trichomonas gallinae, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum, Tritrichomonas foetus, and Tritrichomonas augusta). Furthermore, three different tissue sections containing either Trichomonas gallinae, Tritrichomonas foetus or Histomonas meleagridis were tested positive. Additionally, to rule out cross reactivity of the probe a large number of different pathogenic protozoal agents, fungi, bacteria and viruses were tested and gave negative results. The probe presented here can be considered an important tool for diagnosis of all to date described relevant protozoal parasites of the order Trichomonadida in tissue samples. PMID:20395049

  10. Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, K.H.; Ahring, B.K.; Raskin, L.

    1999-11-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S.wolfei LYB was closely related to S.wolfei subsp. solfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, or which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas.

  11. Detection of supercoiled hepatitis B virus DNA and related forms by means of molecular hybridization to an oligonucleotide probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.J.; Chung, H.T.; Lai, C.L.; Leong, S.; Tam, O.S. )

    1989-12-01

    A novel assay for supercoiled and other fully double-stranded forms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in blood is presented that utilizes molecular hybridisation to a radiophosphorous-labeled oligonucleotide probe. The probe (5'-d(ACGTGCAGAGGTGAAGCGA)) is complementary to the S(+)-strand sequence furthest downstream, at the end of the gap. We examined blood specimens from 137 healthy HBsAg-positive individuals, applying the probe to dots representing 2-3.5 ml serum or plasma. We found that supercoiled HBV is present in many HBV DNA-positive blood specimens albeit in small quantities. Of the 104 specimens that were positive for HBV DNA of any form, 53 annealed to the probe. Serial specimens from the same subject taken over a period of months showed that the proportion of supercoil to other HBV DNA forms was variable. The presence of supercoil HBV DNA was not closely correlated with the level of serum HBV DNA polymerase. The supercoil is an HBV DNA form that can persist in the liver in the presence or absence of other replicative intermediates. This assay may enable further characterization of the status of HBV infection.

  12. Use of Specific rRNA Oligonucleotide Probes for Microscopic Detection of Mycobacterium avium Complex Organisms in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Amand, Allison L. St.; Frank, Daniel N.; De Groote, Mary Ann; Pace, Norman R.

    2005-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are important environmental pathogens that are implicated in several chronic, idiopathic diseases. Diagnosis of MAC-based diseases is compromised by the need to cultivate these fastidious and slowly growing organisms in order to identify which mycobacterial species are present. Detection is particularly difficult when MAC is intracellular or embedded within mammalian tissues. We report on the development of culture-independent, in situ hybridization (ISH) assays for the detection of MAC in culture, sputum, and tissue. This assay includes a highly reliable technique for the permeabilization of mycobacterial cells within culture and tissues. We describe a set of rRNA-based oligonucleotide probes that specifically detect either M. intracellulare, the two M. avium subspecies associated with human disease, or all members of MAC. The results call into question the validity of ISH results derived by the use of other gene loci, such as IS900. PMID:15814959

  13. Oligonucleotide-conjugated thiazole orange probes as "light-up" probes for messenger ribonucleic acid molecules in living cells.

    PubMed

    Privat, E; Melvin, T; Asseline, U; Vigny, P

    2001-10-01

    "Light-up" probes, icosa-alpha-thymidylate-thiazole orange conjugates, for the in situ time-resolved detection of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in living cells are evaluated. Upon annealing with polyA in aqueous solutions, the icosa-alpha-thymidylate-thiazole orange conjugates were shown to be up to 15 times more fluorescent. Microinjection of these probes into adherent fibroblasts resulted in high yields of hybridization and fluorescent signals. Incubation of cells in the presence of these probes resulted in facile internalization of the probe and similar painting of the messenger RNA in the nuclear and cytosolic regions.

  14. In situ probing of gram-positive bacteria with high DNA G + C content using 23S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Roller, C; Wagner, M; Amann, R; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H

    1994-10-01

    23S-rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the phylogenetic group 'Gram-positive bacteria with high G + C content of DNA' (GPBHGC). A sequence idiosyncrasy in two adjacent base pairs in the stem of helix 69 in domain IV of the 23S rRNA is present in all hitherto analysed strains of GPBHGC. An oligonucleotide probe targeted to this region hybridized only with strains of GPBHGC and was successfully used for in situ monitoring of these cells in activated sludge. Another unique feature of the 23S rRNA molecules of GPBHGC is a large insertion in domain III. Fluorescent oligonucleotides targeted to the highly variable regions of the rRNA within the insertions of Corynebacterium glutamicum DSM 20300, Aureobacterium testaceum DSM 20166 and Brevibacterium sp. DSM 20165 hybridized specifically to their target strains, whereas probing with oligonucleotides complementary to the rRNA-coding strand of the 23S rDNA and to the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA of C. glutamicum did not result in detectable fluorescence. This confirmed that the large 23S insertions are indeed present in 23S rRNAs of GPBHGC and provide potential target sites for highly specific nucleic acid probes.

  15. Use of a Multiplexed CMOS Microarray to Optimize and Compare Oligonucleotide Binding to DNA Probes Synthesized or Immobilized on Individual Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Karl; Yazvenko, Nina; Wilmoth, Jodi; Cooper, John; Lyon, Wanda; Danley, David

    2010-01-01

    The CombiMatrix microarray with 12,544 electrodes supports in situ electrochemical synthesis of user-defined DNA probes. As an alternative, we immobilized commercially synthesized DNA probes on individual electrodes coated with electropolymerized polypyrrole (Ppy). Hybridization was measured using a biotinylated target oligonucleotide and either Cy5-streptavidin and fluorescence detection or horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin and enzyme-enhanced electrochemical detection. Detection efficiencies were optimized by varying the deposition of the Ppy, the terminal groups on the DNA probes, and other factors that impacted fluorescence quenching and electrical conductivity. Optimized results were compared against those obtained using a microarray with the same DNA sequences synthesized in situ. Immobilized probes produced higher fluorescence signals, possibly by providing a greater stand off between the Cy5 on the target oligonucleotide and the quenching effects of the Ppy and the platinum electrode. PMID:22163607

  16. Structurally responsive oligonucleotide-based single-probe lateral-flow test for detection of miRNA-21 mimics.

    PubMed

    Kor, Kamalodin; Turner, Anthony P F; Zarei, Kobra; Atabati, Morteza; Beni, Valerio; Mak, Wing Cheung

    2016-02-01

    A single-probe strip test for the rapid and sensitive detection of miRNA-21 mimics is reported herein. Highly specific structurally responsive bi-functional, thiol and biotin, DNA/LNA oligonucleotide probes (molecular beacons-MB) were designed and conjugated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (i.e. biotin-MB-AuNPs). The proposed design had the ability to modulate the accessibility of the biotin group as a function of the presence of a miRNA target allowing the interaction of the boilable with the streptavidin test zone only in the presence of the miRNA-21 mimics. For quantitative evaluation, images of the strip tests were recorded using a flatbed scanner (Epson Perfection V370 Photo). The colour intensities of the test zones of the strip tests were analysed with the ImageJ software (Scion Corp., USA) and quantified as a function of pixel intensity. The response of the strip test was linear over the range 0.5 to 20 nM miRNA-21 (limit of detection of 115 pM) and showed good reproducibility (intra and inter CVs below 8%); furthermore, the assay was shown to be highly selective, discriminating other interference miRNAs mimics (e.g. miRNA-221 and miRNA-205). Finally, the proposed strip test was used for detection of miRNA-21 mimics in spiked serum samples, demonstrating its potential for point-of-care clinical applications. Main advantages of the single-probe strip test design are its versatility, simplicity and robustness, which can be easily extended to other miRNA targets by tuning the sequence of the single probe. Furthermore, the use of the structurally responsive single probe is particularly relevant in the case of short-length targets, such as miRNA, whereas a conventional sandwich approach might require a careful control of assay conditions such as hybridization temperature and salt concentration.

  17. Vasopressin mRNA in situ hybridization: localization and regulation studied with oligonucleotide cDNA probes in normal and Brattleboro rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, G.R.; Zingg, H.H.; Habener, J.F.

    1985-08-01

    Hybridizable vasopressin mRNA may be quantitatively localized in situ in sections from rat hypothalamus. Radiolabeled oligonucleotide cDNA probes, synthesized by chemical and enzymatic means, provide strong hybridization in zones known to contain vasopressin cell bodies. Multiple single-stranded /sup 32/P-, /sup 35/S-, or /sup 3/H-labeled oligonucleotides demonstrate localized hybridization that increases as probes are lengthened from 8 to 75 bases. Competition studies, RNase experiments, anatomic localization, and use of multiple probes all support hybridization specificity. An approximate doubling of hybridizable mRNA in both supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei can be detected with dehydration of the animals. Hybridizable mRNA densities are virtually normal in hypothalamic nuclei of Brattleboro rats given free access to water. These methods can provide insight into regional mRNA dynamics and may reflect functional activity of peptidergic neurons.

  18. Programmable oligonucleotide probes design and applications for in situ and in vivo RNA imaging in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheglakov, Zoya

    Unequal spreading of mRNA is a frequent experience observed in varied cell lines. The study of cellular processes dynamics and precise localization of mRNAs offers a vital toolbox to target specific proteins in precise cytoplasmic areas and provides a convenient instrument to uncover their mechanisms and functions. Latest methodological innovations have allowed imaging of a single mRNA molecule in situ and in vivo. Today, Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) methods allow the studying of mRNA expression and offer a vital toolbox for accurate biological models. Studies enable analysis of the dynamics of an individual mRNA, have uncovered the multiplex RNA transport systems. With all current approaches, a single mRNA tracking in the mammalian cells is still challenging. This thesis describes mRNA detection methods based on programmable fluorophore-labeled DNA structures complimentary to native targets providing an accurate mRNA imaging in mammalian cells. First method represents beta-actin (ACTB) transcripts in situ detection in human cells, the technique strategy is based on programmable DNA probes, amplified by rolling circle amplification (RCA). The method reports precise localization of molecule of interest with an accuracy of a single-cell. Visualization and localization of specific endogenous mRNA molecules in real-time in vivo has the promising to innovate cellular biology studies, medical analysis and to provide a vital toolbox in drugs invention area. Second method described in this thesis represents miR-21 miRNA detection within a single live-cell resolution. The method using fluorophore-labeled short synthetic DNAs probes forming a stem-loop shape and generating Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) as a result of target-probes hybridization. Catalytic nucleic acid (DNAzymes) probes are cooperative tool for precise detection of different mRNA targets. With assistance of a complementary fluorophore-quencher labeled substrate, the DNAzymes provide

  19. Analysis of HLA-DQB and HLA-DPB alleles in Graves' disease by oligonucleotide probing of enzymatically amplified DNA.

    PubMed

    Weetman, A P; Zhang, L; Webb, S; Shine, B

    1990-07-01

    We have tested the possible association of HLA-DQB and HLA-DPB alleles with Graves' thyrotoxicosis, with or without severe ophthalmopathy, by polymerase chain amplification of genomic DNA and allele-specific oligonucleotide probing. There was no significantly abnormal distribution of DQB alleles compared to 50 control subjects except for a reduced prevalence of DQw 3.1 in the Graves' patients with severe ophthalmopathy (X2 = 6.23, P less than 0.02). HLA-DPB 2.1/8 was found in only 1 of 40 of these patients compared with 15 of the controls (X2 = 11.49, P less than 0.001). Ten of 48 patients with Graves' disease but without clinically significant eye involvement were HLA-DPB 2.1/8 positive, not significantly different from controls, but significantly different from the ophthalmopathy group (X2 = 6.70, P less than 0.01). The other DPB alleles in both groups of Graves' disease patients were the same as controls. These results suggest that HLA-DPB 2.1/8 may confer a protective effect in Graves' disease with respect to ophthalmopathy. PMID:2401099

  20. Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes for Clinical and Environmental Detection of Acanthamoeba and the T4 18S rRNA Gene Sequence Type

    PubMed Central

    Stothard, Diane R.; Hay, John; Schroeder-Diedrich, Jill M.; Seal, David V.; Byers, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    The first genus- and subgenus-specific fluorescent oligonucleotide probes for in situ staining of Acanthamoeba are described. Sequences of these phylogeny-based probes complement the 18S rRNA and the gene encoding it (18S rDNA). The genus-specific probe (GSP) is a fluorescein-labeled 22-mer specific for Acanthamoeba as shown here by its hybridization to growing trophozoites of all 12 known Acanthamoeba 18S rDNA sequence types and by its failure to hybridize with amoebae of two other genera (Hartmannella vermiformis and Balamuthia mandrillaris), two human cell lines, and two bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli). The sequence type T4-specific probe (ST4P) is a rhodamine-labeled 30-mer specific for Acanthamoeba 18S rDNA sequence type T4, as shown here in hybridization tests with trophozoites of all 12 sequence types. T4 is the subgenus group associated most closely with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). GSP also was tested with corneal scrapings from 17 patients with a high index of clinical suspicion of AK plus 5 patient controls. GSP stained both trophozoites and cysts, although nonspecific cyst wall autofluorescence also was observed. Results could be obtained with GSP in 1 to 2 days, and based on results from cell culture tests, the probe correctly detected the presence or absence of Acanthamoeba in 21 of 24 specimens from the 22 patients. The use of GSP with cultured trophozoites and cysts from corneal scrapings has illustrated the suitability of using fluorescent oligonucleotide probes for identification of the genus Acanthamoeba in both environmental and clinical samples. In addition, the use of ST4P with cultured amoebae has indicated the potential of oligonucleotide probes for use in subgenus classification. PMID:10405422

  1. Construction and Evaluation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Whole-Genome Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Z. He; Q. He; L. Wu; M.E. Clark; J.D. Wall; Jizhong Zhou; Matthew W. Fields

    2004-03-17

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has been the focus of biochemical and physiological studies in the laboratory, and the metabolic versatility of this organism has been largely recognized, particularly the reduction of sulfate, fumarate, iron, uranium and chromium. In addition, a Desulfovibrio sp. has been shown to utilize uranium as the sole electron acceptor. D. vulgaris is a d-Proteobacterium with a genome size of 3.6 Mb and 3584 ORFs. The whole-genome microarrays of D. vulgaris have been constructed using 70mer oligonucleotides. All ORFs in the genome were represented with 3471 (97.1%) unique probes and 103 (2.9%) non-specific probes that may have cross-hybridization with other ORFs. In preparation for use of the experimental microarrays, artificial probes and targets were designed to assess specificity and sensitivity and identify optimal hybridization conditions for oligonucleotide microarrays. The results indicated that for 50mer and 70mer oligonucleotide arrays, hybridization at 45 C to 50 C, washing at 37 C and a wash time of 2.5 to 5 minutes obtained specific and strong hybridization signals. In order to evaluate the performance of the experimental microarrays, growth conditions were selected that were expected to give significant hybridization differences for different sets of genes. The initial evaluations were performed using D. vulgaris cells grown at logarithmic and stationary phases. Transcriptional analysis of D. vulgaris cells sampled during logarithmic phase growth indicated that 25% of annotated ORFs were up-regulated and 3% of annotated ORFs were downregulated compared to stationary phase cells. The up-regulated genes included ORFs predicted to be involved with acyl chain biosynthesis, amino acid ABC transporter, translational initiation factors, and ribosomal proteins. In the stationary phase growth cells, the two most up-regulated ORFs (70-fold) were annotated as a carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase and a 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2

  2. A versatile label-free and signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform based on triplex-forming oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuzhong; Jiang, Aiwen; Hou, Ting; Li, Feng

    2015-08-26

    Nucleic acid and protein assays are very important in modern life sciences, and the recently developed triplex-forming oligonucleotide probes provide a unique means for biological analysis of different kinds of analytes. Herein, we report a label-free and signal-on electrochemical sensor for the detection of specific targets, which is based on the triple-helix structure formation between the hairpin molecular beacon and the capture probe through the intermolecular DNA hybridization induced by Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairings. Upon the introduction of a specific target, the triple-helical stem region is dissembled to liberate the hemin aptamer, and a G-quadruplex- hemin complex can be formed in the presence of K(+) and hemin on the electrode surface to give an electrochemical response, thus signaling the presence of the target. With the use of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) as a proof-of-principle analyte, we first demonstrated this approach by using a molecular beacon, which consists of a central section with the DNA sequence complementary to HIV-1, flanked by two arm segments. This newly designed protocol provides an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of HIV-1 with a limit of detection down to 0.054 nM, and also exhibit good selectivity. Therefore, the as-proposed strategy holds a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases, and with further development, it could be used as a universal protocol for the detection of various DNA sequences and may be extended for the detection of aptamer-binding molecules.

  3. Loop region-specific oligonucleotide probes for loop-mediated isothermal amplification-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay truly minimize the instrument needed for detection process.

    PubMed

    Ravan, Hadi; Yazdanparast, Razieh

    2013-08-15

    Enteric fever represents a significant public health burden in less-developed countries. Therefore, there is a great need for developing an improved diagnostic tool adapted to the demands of poor-resource clinical laboratories in those countries. The current study has developed a reliable loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for diagnosis of enteric fever with a minimal equipment dependency. The LAMP-ELISA assay involves direct incorporation of a labeled nucleotide into amplicons during the amplification of the SPA3440 gene, their hybridization to the unique tagged oligonucleotide probes during the LAMP reaction, and finally detection of labeled LAMP amplicons by immunoassay technology. Because the designed oligonucleotide probes target the single-stranded DNA segment within the LAMP amplicons, the probe hybridization stage is performed simultaneously with the amplification process. This novel probe design strategy allows both the amplification and hybridization stages to be performed simultaneously and isothermally in a water bath. Among the bacteria tested, positive results were observed only with enteric fever causative bacteria. The LAMP-ELISA assay was successfully applied to artificially contaminated blood samples with a detection limit of 10 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml, which was 100 times more sensitive than polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and turbidity assessment-based conventional LAMP methods. The new assay is considered to be an effective method for diagnosis of enteric fever.

  4. Whole-Cell Hybridization of Frankia Strains with Fluorescence- or Digoxigenin-Labeled, 16S rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Dittmar; Amann, Rudolf I.; Zeyer, Josef

    1993-01-01

    Whole-cell hybridization with non-radioactively labeled oligonucleotide probes was used to detect and identify Frankia strains in pure cultures and in nodules. Digoxigenin-labeled probes, which were detected with antibody-alkaline phosphatase conjugates, were more suitable for in situ detection of Frankia strains than fluorescent probes since the sensitivity of the former was higher and problems arising from the autofluorescence of cells and plant material were avoided. Successful detection of Frankia strains in paraformaldehyde-fixed cell material with digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probes depended on pretreatments to permeabilize the cells. Specific hybridization signals on vesicles were obtained after lysozyme pretreatment (1 mg ml-1 for 30 min at 20°C). Reliable penetration of the antibody-enzyme conjugate into hyphae required additional washing with the detergent Nonidet P-40 (0.1%) and toluene (1% in ethanol) after lysozyme treatment. Identification of Frankia vesicles in nodule homogenates was possible only after the removal of the polysaccharide capsule surrounding the vesicles. Incubation with H2O2 (15% in water for 1 h at room temperature) before lysozyme and detergent treatments was found to facilitate specific hybridization. No filaments or spores could be detected in nodule homogenates. This technique should be a powerful tool in the identification of Frankia isolates, in the characterization of as-yet-uncultured nodule populations, and in the confirmation of the origin of unusual Frankia isolates. Images PMID:16348948

  5. Electrochemical detection of DNA binding by tumor suppressor p53 protein using osmium-labeled oligonucleotide probes and catalytic hydrogen evolution at the mercury electrode.

    PubMed

    Němcová, Kateřina; Sebest, Peter; Havran, Luděk; Orság, Petr; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present an electrochemical DNA-protein interaction assay based on a combination of protein-specific immunoprecipitation at magnetic beads (MBIP) with application of oligonucleotide (ON) probes labeled with an electroactive oxoosmium complex (Os,bipy). We show that double-stranded ONs bearing a dT20 tail labeled with Os,bipy are specifically recognized by the tumor suppressor p53 protein according to the presence or absence of a specific binding site (p53CON) in the double-stranded segment. We demonstrate the applicability of the Os,bipy-labeled probes in titration as well as competition MBIP assays to evaluate p53 relative affinity to various sequence-specific or structurally distinct unlabeled DNA substrates upon modulation of the p53-DNA binding by monoclonal antibodies used for the immunoprecipitation. To detect the p53-bound osmium-labeled probes, we took advantage of a catalytic peak yielded by Os,bipy-modified DNA at the mercury-based electrodes, allowing facile determination of subnanogram quantities of the labeled oligonucleotides. Versatility of the electrochemical MBIP technique and its general applicability in studies of any DNA-binding protein is discussed.

  6. Sequence determination of rRNA genes of pathogenic Vibrio species and whole-cell identification of Vibrio vulnificus with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Aznar, R; Ludwig, W; Amann, R I; Schleifer, K H

    1994-04-01

    A comparative analysis of seven new 16S rRNA gene sequences of pathogenic Vibrio species with previously published vibrio sequences confirmed that Vibrio vulnificus represents a group that is not closely related to the core organisms of the genus Vibrio. In addition, we found that V. vulnificus, Listonella (Vibrio) anguillarum and Vibrio diazotrophicus branch off separately from the core group. A comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of V. vulnificus strains belonging to biotypes 1 and 2 revealed that the sequences of all but four biotype 1 strains were identical to each other but slightly different (17 bases) from the sequences of the rest of the V. vulnificus strains investigated. In addition, the sequences of variable regions of the 23S rRNA genes of Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio furnissii, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio cholerae, and V. vulnificus C7184 and TW1 were determined, aligned, and compared with all available bacterial 23S rRNA sequences in order to search for specific target sites. As a result, four oligonucleotide probes specific for V. vulnificus were synthesized, and the specificities of these probes were evaluated by dot blot hybridization to membrane-bound RNAs from 21 V. vulnificus strains, 13 strains belonging to other Vibrio species, 61 strains belonging to species that are members of the alpha, beta, and gamma subclasses of the Proteobacteria, and 3 eucaryotic microorganisms. Two probes hybridized with all of the V. vulnificus strains tested, and the other two probes distinguished V. vulnificus biotype 1 strains from all other organisms. In situ identification of V. vulnificus by using tetramethylrhodamine- or fluorescein-labelled oligonucleotides is now possible.

  7. Superiorities of time-correlated single-photon counting against standard fluorimetry in exploiting the potential of fluorochromized oligonucleotide probes for biomedical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamperti, Marco; Nardo, Luca; Bondani, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Site-specific fluorescence-resonance-energy-transfer donor-acceptor dual-labelled oligonucleotide probes are widely used in state-of-art biotechnological applications. Such applications include their usage as primers in polymerase chain reaction. However, the steady-state fluorescence intensity signal emitted by these molecular tools strongly depends from the specificities of the probe conformation. For this reason, the information which can be reliably inferred by steady-state fluorimetry performed on such samples is forcedly confined to a semi-qualitative level. Namely, fluorescent emission is frequently used as ON/OFF indicator of the probe hybridization state, i.e. detection of fluorescence signals indicates either hybridization to or detachment from the template DNA of the probe. Nonetheless, a fully quantitative analysis of their fluorescence emission properties would disclose other exciting applications of dual-labelled probes in biosensing. Here we show how time-correlated single-photon counting can be applied to get rid of the technical limitations and interpretational ambiguities plaguing the intensity analysis, and to derive information on the template DNA reaching single-base.

  8. Design and Performance of rRNA Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes for in Situ Detection and Phylogenetic Identification of Microorganisms Inhabiting Acid Mine Drainage Environments.

    PubMed

    Bond, P.L.; Banfield, J.F.

    2001-02-01

    At Iron Mountain, CA, there is an extreme occurrence of acid mine drainage (AMD). This is a result of past mining activity that has exposed a sulfide ore body to weathering and microbial activity. This study presents seven new oligonucleotide probes for the detection of microorganisms at this AMD site by fluorescent in situ hybridization. In the design of these probes we have accounted for a large body of 16S rRNA sequence data recently compiled by us. This was obtained by PCR and cloning directly from environmental DNA and was mostly represented by novel sequences. The probes were developed to include detection of novel and uncultivated organisms. This includes detection for the Thermoplasmales group, a new group of Leptospirillum, the genus Sulfobacillus, the Acidiphilium genus, Acidimicrobium and relatives, and for organisms within the delta Proteobacteria. These probes have been used to examine the abundance and distribution of organisms, including novel and uncultivated taxa, and to clarify their potential contributions to AMD production at the site. We anticipate that these probes will be useful tools for exploration of the microbiology of other natural acidic environments and bioleaching systems. PMID:12032620

  9. Comparative study of colony hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotide probes and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfelt, H; Svennerholm, A M; Kalland, K H; Haukanes, B I; Bjorvatn, B

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of the published nucleotide sequences of the genes that code for the heat-labile toxin LTh and the heat-stable toxins STaI and STaII of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, a 34-mer and two 33-mer oligonucleotide probes were synthesized. To compare their relative efficacies in the detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic E. coli, a colony hybridization technique using these probes and a GM1 ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal anti-LT and anti-ST antibodies were used with 76 strains of E. coli with known enterotoxin profiles. For further evaluation of probe specificity, the enterotoxigenic bacteria Vibrio cholerae O1 and non-O1 and Yersinia enterocolitica were examined with the colony hybridization technique. The sensitivity of colony hybridization compared favorably with that of GM1 ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the two assays showed a high level of concordance in specific detection and differentiation of E. coli with various enterotoxin profiles (kappa = 0.906, P less than 0.00001). The probes did not hybridize with DNAs from strains of V. cholerae O1 or non-O1 or Y. enterocolitica. PMID:3281978

  10. Detection of harmful algal bloom causing microalgae using covalently immobilised capture oligonucleotide probes on glass and poly(dimethylsiloxane) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Karen L.; Ellis, Amanda V.; Leterme, Sophie C.; Khodakov, Dmitriy A.; Lenehan, Claire E.

    2013-12-01

    Harmful algal bloom (HAB) events have been on the rise in the last few decades with some of the causative microalgae exhibiting toxic properties. Therefore, detection is essential in order to prevent mortality of aquatic life and poisoning events from consumption of these biotoxins. Here, oligonucleotide modified glass and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces have been developed for the detection of the HAB causing microalgae, Alexandrium catenella, in a model system. Our preliminary studies show that the glass surface offers superior stability and analytical response when compared to those prepared from PDMS.

  11. Development of a Flow Cytometry-Based Method for Rapid Detection of Escherichia coli and Shigella Spp. Using an Oligonucleotide Probe.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yong; Wilkes, Jon G; Moskal, Ted J; Williams, Anna J; Cooper, Willie M; Nayak, Rajesh; Rafii, Fatemeh; Buzatu, Dan A

    2016-01-01

    Standard methods to detect Escherichia coli contamination in food use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and agar culture plates. These methods require multiple incubation steps and take a long time to results. An improved rapid flow-cytometry based detection method was developed, using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe specifically binding a16S rRNA sequence. The method positively detected 51 E. coli isolates as well as 4 Shigella species. All 27 non-E. coli strains tested gave negative results. Comparison of the new genetic assay with a total plate count (TPC) assay and agar plate counting indicated similar sensitivity, agreement between cytometry cell and colony counts. This method can detect a small number of E.coli cells in the presence of large numbers of other bacteria. This method can be used for rapid, economical, and stable detection of E. coli and Shigella contamination in the food industry and other contexts.

  12. Development of a Flow Cytometry-Based Method for Rapid Detection of Escherichia coli and Shigella Spp. Using an Oligonucleotide Probe.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yong; Wilkes, Jon G; Moskal, Ted J; Williams, Anna J; Cooper, Willie M; Nayak, Rajesh; Rafii, Fatemeh; Buzatu, Dan A

    2016-01-01

    Standard methods to detect Escherichia coli contamination in food use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and agar culture plates. These methods require multiple incubation steps and take a long time to results. An improved rapid flow-cytometry based detection method was developed, using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe specifically binding a16S rRNA sequence. The method positively detected 51 E. coli isolates as well as 4 Shigella species. All 27 non-E. coli strains tested gave negative results. Comparison of the new genetic assay with a total plate count (TPC) assay and agar plate counting indicated similar sensitivity, agreement between cytometry cell and colony counts. This method can detect a small number of E.coli cells in the presence of large numbers of other bacteria. This method can be used for rapid, economical, and stable detection of E. coli and Shigella contamination in the food industry and other contexts. PMID:26913737

  13. Development of a Flow Cytometry-Based Method for Rapid Detection of Escherichia coli and Shigella Spp. Using an Oligonucleotide Probe

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yong; Wilkes, Jon G.; Moskal, Ted J.; Williams, Anna J.; Cooper, Willie M.; Nayak, Rajesh; Rafii, Fatemeh; Buzatu, Dan A.

    2016-01-01

    Standard methods to detect Escherichia coli contamination in food use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and agar culture plates. These methods require multiple incubation steps and take a long time to results. An improved rapid flow-cytometry based detection method was developed, using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe specifically binding a16S rRNA sequence. The method positively detected 51 E. coli isolates as well as 4 Shigella species. All 27 non-E. coli strains tested gave negative results. Comparison of the new genetic assay with a total plate count (TPC) assay and agar plate counting indicated similar sensitivity, agreement between cytometry cell and colony counts. This method can detect a small number of E.coli cells in the presence of large numbers of other bacteria. This method can be used for rapid, economical, and stable detection of E. coli and Shigella contamination in the food industry and other contexts. PMID:26913737

  14. Detection of transgenes in soybean via a polymerase chain reaction and a simple bioluminometric assay based on a universal aequorin-labeled oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Glynou, Kyriaki; Ioannou, Penelope C; Christopoulos, Theodore K

    2004-04-01

    The recombinant photoprotein aequorin was used as a reporter in highly sensitive and automatable hybridization assays for the analysis of transgenic sequences in genetically modified organisms (GMO). The terminator of the nopaline synthase gene (NOS) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and the 35S promoter sequence were detected in genetically modified soybean. The endogenous, soybean-specific, lectin gene was also detected for confirmation of the integrity of extracted DNA. A universal detection reagent was produced through conjugation of aequorin to the oligonucleotide (dA)(30). Biotinylated (through PCR) products for the three target sequences were captured onto streptavidin-coated wells, and one strand was removed by NaOH treatment. The immobilized single-stranded DNAs were then hybridized with oligonucleotide probes consisting of a target-specific segment and a poly(dT) tail. This allowed the subsequent determination of all hybrids through the use of the (dA)(30)-aequorin conjugate as a universal reagent. The bound aequorin was measured by adding Ca(2+) and integrating the light emission for 3 s. As low as 2 pM (100 amol per well) of amplified DNA was detectable for all three targets, with a signal-to-background ratio of about 2. The analytical range extended up to 2000 pM. As low as 0.05% GMO content in soybean can be detected with a signal-to-background ratio of 8.2. The overall repeatability of the proposed assay, including DNA extraction, PCR, and hybridization assay, ranged from 7.5-19.8%. The use of a (dA)(30)-aequorin conjugate renders the assay configuration general for any target DNA, provided that the specific probe carries a poly(dT) tail.

  15. Isolation of a human anti-haemophilic factor IX cDNA clone using a unique 52-base synthetic oligonucleotide probe deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine factor IX.

    PubMed

    Jaye, M; de la Salle, H; Schamber, F; Balland, A; Kohli, V; Findeli, A; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    1983-04-25

    A unique 52mer oligonucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine Factor IX was synthesized and used as a probe to screen a human liver cDNA bank. The Factor IX clone isolated shows 5 differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence as compared to a previously isolated clone. In addition, precisely one codon has been deleted.Images

  16. Use of a D17Z1 oligonucleotide probe for human DNA quantitation prior to PCR analysis of polymorphic DNA markers

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, S.; Alavaren, M.; Varlaro, J.

    1994-09-01

    The alpha-satellite DNA locus D17Z1 contains primate-specific sequences which are repeated several hundred times per chromosome 17. A probe that was designed to hybridize to a subset of the D17Z1 sequence can be used for very sensitive and specific quantitation of human DNA. Sample human genomic DNA is immobilized on nylon membrane using a slot blot apparatus, and then hybridized with a biotinylated D17Z1 oligonucleotide probe. The subsequent binding of streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase to the bound probe allows for either calorimetric (TMB) or chemiluminescent (ECL) detection. Signals obtained for sample DNAs are then compared to the signals obtained for a series of human DNA standards. For either detection method, forty samples can be quantitated in less than two hours, with a sensitivity of 150 pg. As little as 20 pg of DNA can be quantitated when using chemiluminescent detection with longer film exposures. PCR analysis of several VNTR and STR markers has indicated that optimal typing results are generally obtained within a relatively narrow range of input DNA quantities. Too much input DNA can lead to PCR artifacts such as preferential amplification of smaller alleles, non-specific amplification products, and exaggeration of the DNA synthesis slippage products that are seen with STR markers. Careful quantitation of human genomic DNA prior to PCR can avoid or minimize these problems and ultimately give cleaner, more unambiguous PCR results.

  17. A rapid simple in situ hybridization method for herpes simplex virus employing a synthetic biotin-labeled oligonucleotide probe: a comparison with immunohistochemical methods for HSV detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Y; Montone, K T

    1994-01-01

    We examined 28 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens with histologic evidence of herpes virus infection by in situ hybridization (ISH) utilizing manual capillary action technology (MicroProbe Staining System) and a 21 base synthetic multibiotinylated oligonucleotide probe from the HSV glycoprotein C region. The results were compared to a rapid simple immunohistochemical (IHC) protocol for detection of HSV proteins. HSV was detected by ISH and IHC in all but one specimen which was shown to be positive for varicella zoster virus by direct fluorescent antibody studies. Hybridization signal was confined to the nucleus in all cases. Staining was identified in cells with early as well as late cytopathic effect. IHC produced intense nuclear and/or cytoplasmic signal in infected cells and stained in areas of necrosis which were otherwise spared by ISH. HSV was detected by IHC and/or ISH in 3/5 specimens with histology suggestive of, but not diagnostic for, HSV infection. Both techniques were sensitive and specific for HSV, resulted in rapid detection of the pathogen in routinely processed tissues, and may be useful in cases where the histologic impression is equivocal for HSV infection. ISH for HSV may be preferred because it can identify early HSV infection, which in turn can be treated with antiviral agents.

  18. In situ identification of symbiotic dinoflagellates, the genus Symbiodinium with fluorescence-labeled rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Yokouchi, Hiroko; Takeyama, Haruko; Miyashita, Hideaki; Maruyama, Tadashi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2003-06-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization has been used for the identification and analysis of populations of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium that lives symbiotically in marine invertebrates. Conditions for in situ hybridization of Symbiodinium were optimized and used to identify the clade to which the isolate belongs using specific probes. The optimized in situ hybridization procedure used a combination of chlorophyll removal and permeabilization with hot ethanol. Incubation of the cells in 50% ethanol at 80 degrees C for 20 min rendered the cell wall permeable to Cy3-labeled probes. Symbiodinium clade-specific probes were designed based on 18S rRNA sequences. Symbiodinium A, B and C were distinguished by in situ hybridization with the specific probes SymA, SymB and SymC, respectively. The hybridization results using clade-specific probes corresponded with results obtained using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Symbiodinium isolated from jellyfish Cassiopea sp. and sea anemone Aiptasia sp. were classified as belonging to clades A and B using the FISH procedure established in this study. PMID:12689710

  19. Evaluation of a fluorescence-labelled oligonucleotide probe targeting 23S rRNA for in situ detection of Salmonella serovars in paraffin-embedded tissue sections and their rapid identification in bacterial smears.

    PubMed Central

    Nordentoft, S; Christensen, H; Wegener, H C

    1997-01-01

    A method for the detection of Salmonella based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been developed and applied for the direct detection of Salmonella in pure cultures and in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. On the basis of the 23S rRNA gene sequences representing all of the S. enterica subspecies and S. bongori, an 18-mer oligonucleotide probe was selected. The specificity of the probe was tested by in situ hybridization to bacterial cell smears of pure cultures. Forty-nine of 55 tested Salmonella serovars belonging to subspecies I, II, IIIb, IV, and VI hybridized with the probe. The probe did not hybridize to serovars from subspecies IIIa (S. arizonae) or to S. bongori. No cross-reaction to 64 other strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae or 18 other bacterial strains outside this family was observed. The probe was tested with sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from experimentally infected mice or from animals with a history of clinical salmonellosis. In these tissue sections the probe hybridized specifically to Salmonella serovars, allowing for the detection of single bacterial cells. The development of a fluorescence-labelled specific oligonucleotide probe makes the FISH technique a promising tool for the rapid identification of S. enterica in bacterial smears, as well as for the detection of S. enterica in histological tissue sections. PMID:9316923

  20. Isolation of a Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific DNA probe by subtraction hybridization and construction of species-specific oligonucleotide primers for sensitive detection by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Seal, S E; Jackson, L A; Daniels, M J

    1992-01-01

    A subtraction hybridization technique was employed to make a library enriched for Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific sequences. One cloned fragment, PS2096, hybridized under stringent conditions to DNA of 82 P. solanacearum strains representing all subgroups of the species. Other plant-associated bacteria, including closely related species such as Pseudomonas capacia, Pseudomonas picketti, or Pseudomonas syzygii, did not hybridize to PS2096. A minimum number of between 4 x 10(5) and 4 x 10(6) P. solanacearum cells could routinely be detected with PS2096 labelled either with [32P]dCTP or with digoxigenin-11-dUTP. To improve the sensitivity of detection, PS2096 was sequenced to allow the construction of specific oligonucleotide primers to be used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. After 50 cycles of amplification, 5 to 116 cells, depending on the strain, could reproducibly be detected by visualization of a 148-bp PCR product on an agarose gel. A preliminary field trial in Burundi with the probe and PCR primers has confirmed that they are sensitive tools for specifically detecting low-level infections of P. solanacearum in potato tubers. Images PMID:1482193

  1. Specific oligonucleotide probes for in situ detection of a major group of gram-positive bacteria with low DNA G + C content.

    PubMed

    Meier, H; Amann, R; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H

    1999-05-01

    Almost one thousand 16S rRNA sequences of Gram-positive bacteria with a low DNA G + C content from public databases were analyzed using the ARB software package. A signature region was identified between positions 354 and 371 (E. coli numbering) for the Bacillus sub-branch of the Gram-positive bacteria with a low DNA G + C content, the former orders Bacillales and Lactobacillales. Three oligonucleotide probes, namely LGC354A, LGC354B, and LGC354C, were designed to target this diagnostic site. Their fluorescent derivatives were suitable for whole cell detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Hybridization conditions were adjusted for differentiation of target and related non-target reference species. When applying FISH to whole bacterial cells in a sample of activated sludge from a communal wastewater treatment plant, members of the Bacillus sub-branch were detected at levels from 0.01% of cells in samples fixed with paraformaldehyde to over 8 percent in the same samples fixed with ethanol and treated with lysozyme. The problems of quantitative in situ analysis of Gram-positive bacteria with a low DNA G + C content in biofilm flocs are discussed and recommendations made. Members of the Bacillus sub-branch were detected in different abundances in activated sludge samples from different wastewater plants.

  2. High levels of Gardnerella vaginalis detected with an oligonucleotide probe combined with elevated pH as a diagnostic indicator of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sheiness, D; Dix, K; Watanabe, S; Hillier, S L

    1992-01-01

    We have demonstrated a new approach to diagnosing bacterial vaginosis (BV) that is based on measuring the concentration of Gardnerella vaginalis in vaginal fluid with DNA probes. G. vaginalis is virtually always present at high concentrations in women who have BV but is also detected frequently in normal women, usually at concentrations of less than 10(7) CFU/ml of vaginal fluid. Elevated vaginal pH is another sensitive indicator of BV, although it can occur in conjunction with other conditions. We have proposed that quantitative measurements of G. vaginalis using specific DNA probes can serve as a useful aid in diagnosing BV, provided the vaginal pH is above 4.5. To test this hypothesis, a group of 113 women were first evaluated for BV by the standard set of clinical signs. Vaginal washes were collected, and aliquots were analyzed by quantitative culture for the concentration of G. vaginalis. Portions of these same samples were immobilized on nylon filters, along with standards for quantitation. The filters were incubated with a radiolabelled oligonucleotide specific for G. vaginalis 16S rRNA, and the subsequent autoradiographs were examined to determine levels of G. vaginalis in each sample. G. vaginalis at concentrations of greater than or equal to 2 x 10(7) CFU/ml and vaginal pH of greater than 4.5 were then analyzed for concurrence with the diagnoses based on clinical criteria. Results of this slot blot analysis gave a sensitivity of 95%, correctly categorizing 41 of 43 BV-positive specimens, and a specificity of 99%, correctly identifying 69 of 70 BV-negative specimens, compared with diagnosis based on clinical criteria. Images PMID:1372621

  3. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) genotyping assay for detection of genes associated with rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Konstantina; Kalatzis, Fanis G; Giannakeas, Nikolaos; Markoula, Sofia; Chatzikyriakidou, Anthi; Georgiou, Ioannis; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2010-01-01

    In this paper an assay for the detection of genes associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) is presented, in order to be further applied in a portable Lab-On-Chip (LOC) device. A substantial part of these reagents were based on the literature (11th International Histocompatibility Workshop, IHW), bearing the advantage of proven successful implementation in genotyping, while others were designed for this study. More precisely, our methodology discriminates HLA-DRB1 as DRB1*01, *04 and *10, which include shared epitope (SE) alleles associated with RA and additionally DRB1*15 allele, including DRB1*1501 associated with MS (broad genotyping method). To further present the basic elements of the assay for high resolution genotyping of SE DRB1 alleles, we provide as an example the case of HLA-DRB1*10 alleles (HLADRB1* 100101, *100102, *100103, *1002 and *1003). Regarding the methodology for developing a detection assay, for SNPs associated with RA or MS the basic steps are presented. DNA sequence data are obtained from IMGT/HLA and SNP database. Online software tools are used to define hybridization specificity of primers and probes towards human DNA, leading to hybridization patterns that uniquely designate a target allele and evaluate parameters influencing PCR efficiency. Respecting current technological limitations of autonomous molecular-based LOC systems the approach of broad genotyping of HLA-DRB1*01/*04/*10/*15 genes, is intended to be initially used, leaving, high resolution genotyping of SE alleles for future implementations. This method is easy to be updated and extended to detect additional associated loci with RA or MS.

  4. Human Leukocyte Antigen Typing Using a Knowledge Base Coupled with a High-Throughput Oligonucleotide Probe Array Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Keskin, Derin B.; Lin, Hsin-Nan; Lin, Hong Huang; DeLuca, David S.; Leppanen, Scott; Milford, Edgar L.; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Brusic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are important biomarkers because multiple diseases, drug toxicity, and vaccine responses reveal strong HLA associations. Current clinical HLA typing is an elimination process requiring serial testing. We present an alternative in situ synthesized DNA-based microarray method that contains hundreds of thousands of probes representing a complete overlapping set covering 1,610 clinically relevant HLA class I alleles accompanied by computational tools for assigning HLA type to 4-digit resolution. Our proof-of-concept experiment included 21 blood samples, 18 cell lines, and multiple controls. The method is accurate, robust, and amenable to automation. Typing errors were restricted to homozygous samples or those with very closely related alleles from the same locus, but readily resolved by targeted DNA sequencing validation of flagged samples. High-throughput HLA typing technologies that are effective, yet inexpensive, can be used to analyze the world’s populations, benefiting both global public health and personalized health care. PMID:25505899

  5. Cytokines and therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G; Bidlingmaier, M; Eigler, A; Hacker, U; Endres, S

    1997-12-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides - short strands of synthetic nucleic acids - encompass antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides. Antisense oligonucleotides are designed to bind to target RNA by complementary base pairing and to inhibit translation of the target protein. Antisense oligonucleotides enable specific inhibition of cytokine synthesis. In contrast, aptamer oligonucleotides are able to bind directly to specific proteins. This binding depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide. Aptamer oligonucleotides with CpG motifs can exert strong immunostimulatory effects. Both kinds of therapeutic oligonucleotides - antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides - provide promising tools to modulate immunological functions. Recently, therapeutic oligonucleotides have moved towards clinical application. An antisense oligonucleotide directed against the proinflammatory intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is currently being tested in clinical trials for therapy of inflammatory disease. Immunostimulatory aptamer oligonucleotides are in preclinical development for immunotherapy. In the present review we summarize the application of therapeutic oligonucleotides to modulate immunological functions. We include technological aspects as well as current therapeutic concepts and clinical studies.

  6. PCR/oligonucleotide probe typing of HLA class II alleles in a Filipino population reveals an unusual distribution of HLA haplotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Bugawan, T.L.; Chang, J.D.; Erlich, H.A. ); Klitz, W. )

    1994-02-01

    The authors have analyzed the distribution of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes in a Filipino population by PCR amplification of the DRB1, DQB1, and DPB1 second-exon sequences from buccal swabs obtained from 124 family members and 53 unrelated individuals. The amplified DNA was typed by using nonradioactive sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. Twenty-two different DRB1 alleles, including the novel Filipino *1105, and 46 different DRB1/DQB1 haplotypes, including the unusual DRB1*0405-DQB1*0503, were identified. An unusually high frequency (f = .383) of DPB1*0101, a rare allele in other Asian populations, was also observed. In addition, an unusual distribution of DRB1 alleles and haplotypes was seen in this population, with DR2 (f = .415) and DRB1*1502-DQB1*0502 (f = .233) present at high frequencies. This distribution of DRB1 alleles differs from the typical HLA population distribution, in which the allele frequencies are more evenly balanced. The distribution of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes in this Filipino population is different from that of other Asian and Pacific groups: of those populations studied to date, the Indonesian population is the most similar. DRB1*1502-DQB1*0502 was in strong linkage disequilibrium (D[prime] = .41) with DPB 1*0101 (f = .126, for the extended haplotype), which is consistent with selection for this DR, DQ, DP haplotype being responsible for the high frequency of these three class II alleles in this populations. 30 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Enzymatic Production of Monoclonal Stoichiometric Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Ducani, Cosimo; Kaul, Corinna; Moche, Martin; Shih, William M.; Högberg, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides are important as research tools as probes for diagnostics and gene therapy. Today, production of oligonucleotides is done via solid-phase synthesis. However, the capabilities of current polymer chemistry are limited in comparison to what can be produced in biological systems. The errors in synthetic DNA increases with oligonucleotide length, and sequence diversity can often be a problem. Here, we present the Monoclonal Stoichiometric (MOSIC) method for enzymatic DNA oligonucleotide production. Using this method, we amplify oligonucleotides from clonal templates followed by digestion of a cutter-hairpin, resulting in pools of monoclonal oligonucleotides with precisely controlled relative stoichiometric ratios. We present data where MOSIC oligonucleotides, 14–378 nt long, were prepared either by in vitro rolling-circle amplification, or by amplification in Escherichia coli in the form of phagemid DNA. The formation of a DNA crystal and folding of DNA nanostructures confirmed the scalability, purity and stoichiometry of the produced oligonucleotides. PMID:23727986

  8. A signal-on electrochemical DNA biosensor based on potential-assisted Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition mediated labeling of hairpin-like oligonucleotide with electroactive probe.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiong; Kong, Jinming; Li, Yajie; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-01-15

    A novel electrochemical biosensor was developed for the signal-on detection of sequence-specific DNA by exploiting potential-assisted Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (φCuAAC) as an efficient approach for the labeling of hairpin-like oligonucleotide (hairpin) with electroactive probe. The hairpins, dually labeled with thiol and azide at either terminal, were firstly self-assembled on gold electrode and served as the capture probes for the specific recognition of target DNA. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the surface-confined hairpins were unfolded, liberating the azide-containing terminals away from electrode surface. Subsequently, the unfolded hairpins were conveniently and efficiently labeled with ethynylferrocene (EFC) via the φCuAAC. The quantitatively labeled EFC was finally measured via differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) for the signal-on electrochemical detection of sequence-specific DNA. The biosensor presented a good linear response over the range from 1pM to 1nM with a detection limit of 0.62pM. Results also revealed that it was highly specific and held a good detection capability in serum samples. Furthermore, the ability to chemoselectively label hairpin-like oligonucleotide with signal reporter by electrical addressing, together with the simplicity and efficiency of the φCuAAC, makes it compatible with microfluidic devices and microelectrode arrays to achieve the miniaturized and multiplexed detections.

  9. Highly parallel microbial diagnostics using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Loy, Alexander; Bodrossy, Levente

    2006-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are highly parallel hybridization platforms, allowing rapid and simultaneous identification of many different microorganisms and viruses in a single assay. In the past few years, researchers have been confronted with a dramatic increase in the number of studies reporting development and/or improvement of oligonucleotide microarrays for microbial diagnostics, but use of the technology in routine diagnostics is still constrained by a variety of factors. Careful development of microarray essentials (such as oligonucleotide probes, protocols for target preparation and hybridization, etc.) combined with extensive performance testing are thus mandatory requirements for the maturation of diagnostic microarrays from fancy technological gimmicks to robust and routinely applicable tools.

  10. Evolution of the MIDTAL microarray: the adaption and testing of oligonucleotide 18S and 28S rDNA probes and evaluation of subsequent microarray generations with Prymnesium spp. cultures and field samples.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Gary R; Touzet, Nicolas; Fleming, Gerard T A; Raine, Robin

    2015-07-01

    The toxic microalgal species Prymnesium parvum and Prymnesium polylepis are responsible for numerous fish kills causing economic stress on the aquaculture industry and, through the consumption of contaminated shellfish, can potentially impact on human health. Monitoring of toxic phytoplankton is traditionally carried out by light microscopy. However, molecular methods of identification and quantification are becoming more common place. This study documents the optimisation of the novel Microarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae (MIDTAL) microarray from its initial stages to the final commercial version now available from Microbia Environnement (France). Existing oligonucleotide probes used in whole-cell fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) for Prymnesium species from higher group probes to species-level probes were adapted and tested on the first-generation microarray. The combination and interaction of numerous other probes specific for a whole range of phytoplankton taxa also spotted on the chip surface caused high cross reactivity, resulting in false-positive results on the microarray. The probe sequences were extended for the subsequent second-generation microarray, and further adaptations of the hybridisation protocol and incubation temperatures significantly reduced false-positive readings from the first to the second-generation chip, thereby increasing the specificity of the MIDTAL microarray. Additional refinement of the subsequent third-generation microarray protocols with the addition of a poly-T amino linker to the 5' end of each probe further enhanced the microarray performance but also highlighted the importance of optimising RNA labelling efficiency when testing with natural seawater samples from Killary Harbour, Ireland.

  11. Poly(dG) spacers lead to increased surface coverage of DNA probes: an XPS study of oligonucleotide binding to zirconium phosphonate modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lane, Sarah M; Monot, Julien; Petit, Marc; Tellier, Charles; Bujoli, Bruno; Talham, Daniel R

    2008-07-15

    A spacer is often employed between the surface linking group and the probe sequence to improve the performance of DNA microarrays. Previous work demonstrated that a consecutive stretch of guanines as a spacer increased target capture during hybridization relative to probes with either no spacer or a similar stretch of one of the other nucleotides. Using zirconium phosphonate modified surfaces with 5'-phosphorylated ssDNA probes, the present study compares the surface coverage of ssDNA probes containing either a poly(dG) spacer or a poly(dA) spacer. Surface coverages are quantified by XPS using a modified overlayer model. The results show that after treatment to mimic conditions of the passivation and hybridization steps the probe with the poly(dG) spacer has about twice the surface coverage as the probe with the poly(dA) spacer, indicating that increased target capture is due to higher probe coverage. When monitoring the surface coverage after each rinsing step, it is observed that the probe with the poly(dA) spacer is more susceptible to rinsing, suggesting the interaction with the surface is different for the two probes. It is suggested that the formation of G quadruplexes causes an increased avidity of the probe for the zirconium phosphonate surface.

  12. A nucleic acid probe labeled with desmethyl thiazole orange: a new type of hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide for live-cell RNA imaging.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sugizaki, Kaori; Yuki, Mizue; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Shuji; Sueoka, Takuma; Hayashi, Gosuke; Wang, Dan Ohtan

    2013-01-14

    A new fluorescent nucleotide with desmethyl thiazole orange dyes, D'(505), has been developed for expansion of the function of fluorescent probes for live-cell RNA imaging. The nucleoside unit of D'(505) for DNA autosynthesis was soluble in organic solvents, which made the preparation of nucleoside units and the reactions in the cycles of DNA synthesis more efficient. The dyes of D'(505)-containing oligodeoxynucleotide were protonated below pH 7 and the oligodeoxynucleotide exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission through the control of excitonic interactions of the dyes of D'(505). The simplified procedure and effective hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission produced multicolored hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probes, which were useful for live-cell RNA imaging. The acceptor-bleaching method gave us information on RNA in a specific cell among many living cells.

  13. A Universal Oligonucleotide Microarray with a Minimal Number of Probes for the Detection and Identification of Viroids at the Genus Level

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dongmei; Xin, Yanyan; Ding, Fang; Deng, Ziniu; Wang, Guoping; Ma, Xianfeng; Li, Fang; Li, Guifen; Li, Mingfu; Li, Shifang; Zhu, Shuifang

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in the agricultural industry is the development of techniques that can screen plant samples for viroid infection. Microarrays are promising in this regard, as their high throughput nature can potentially allow for the detection of a range of viroids in a single test. In this paper we present a microarray that can detect a wide spectrum of all 8 reported viroid genera including 37 known plant viroid species. The array was constructed using an automated probe design protocol which generated a minimal number of probes to detect viroids at the genus level. The designed microarray showed a high specificity and sensitivity when tested with a set of standard virus samples. Finally, the microarray was applied to screen infected field samples, with Hop stunt viroid infection identified as the major disease causing pathogen for an infected citrus sample. PMID:23734201

  14. In situ hybridisation for the detection of Leishmania species in paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues using a digoxigenin-labelled oligonucleotide probe

    PubMed Central

    Dinhopl, N.; Mostegl, M. M.; Richter, B.; Nedorost, N.; Maderner, A.; Fragner, K.; Weissenböck, H.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is currently predominantly achieved by cytological or histological identification of amastigotes in biopsy samples, demonstration of specific anti-Leishmania antibodies and PCR-based approaches. All these methods have the advantage of being sensitive and more or less specific; nevertheless, most of them also have disadvantages. A chromogenic in situ hybridisation (ISH) procedure with a digoxigenin-labelled probe, targeting a fragment of the 5.8S rRNA was developed for the detection of all species of Leishmania parasites in routinely paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues. This method was validated in comparison with traditional techniques (histology, PCR), on various tissues from three dogs with histological changes consistent with a florid leishmaniosis. Amastigote forms of Leishmania gave clear signals and were easily identified using ISH. Various tissues from 10 additional dogs with clinical suspicion or/and a positive serological test but without histological presence of amastigotes did not show any ISH signals. Potential cross-reactivity of the probe was ruled out by negative outcome of the ISH against selected protozoa (including the related Trypanosoma cruzi) and fungi. Thus, ISH proved to be a powerful tool for unambiguous detection of Leishmania parasites in paraffin wax-embedded tissues. PMID:21921059

  15. In situ hybridisation for the detection of Leishmania species in paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues using a digoxigenin-labelled oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Dinhopl, N; Mostegl, M M; Richter, B; Nedorost, N; Maderner, A; Fragner, K; Weissenböck, H

    2011-11-12

    The diagnosis of canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is currently predominantly achieved by cytological or histological identification of amastigotes in biopsy samples, demonstration of specific anti-Leishmania antibodies and PCR-based approaches. All these methods have the advantage of being sensitive and more or less specific; nevertheless, most of them also have disadvantages. A chromogenic in situ hybridisation (ISH) procedure with a digoxigenin-labelled probe, targeting a fragment of the 5.8S rRNA was developed for the detection of all species of Leishmania parasites in routinely paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues. This method was validated in comparison with traditional techniques (histology, PCR), on various tissues from three dogs with histological changes consistent with a florid leishmaniosis. Amastigote forms of Leishmania gave clear signals and were easily identified using ISH. Various tissues from 10 additional dogs with clinical suspicion or/and a positive serological test but without histological presence of amastigotes did not show any ISH signals. Potential cross-reactivity of the probe was ruled out by negative outcome of the ISH against selected protozoa (including the related Trypanosoma cruzi) and fungi. Thus, ISH proved to be a powerful tool for unambiguous detection of Leishmania parasites in paraffin wax-embedded tissues.

  16. In situ hybridisation for the detection of Leishmania species in paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues using a digoxigenin-labelled oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Dinhopl, N; Mostegl, M M; Richter, B; Nedorost, N; Maderner, A; Fragner, K; Weissenböck, H

    2011-11-12

    The diagnosis of canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is currently predominantly achieved by cytological or histological identification of amastigotes in biopsy samples, demonstration of specific anti-Leishmania antibodies and PCR-based approaches. All these methods have the advantage of being sensitive and more or less specific; nevertheless, most of them also have disadvantages. A chromogenic in situ hybridisation (ISH) procedure with a digoxigenin-labelled probe, targeting a fragment of the 5.8S rRNA was developed for the detection of all species of Leishmania parasites in routinely paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues. This method was validated in comparison with traditional techniques (histology, PCR), on various tissues from three dogs with histological changes consistent with a florid leishmaniosis. Amastigote forms of Leishmania gave clear signals and were easily identified using ISH. Various tissues from 10 additional dogs with clinical suspicion or/and a positive serological test but without histological presence of amastigotes did not show any ISH signals. Potential cross-reactivity of the probe was ruled out by negative outcome of the ISH against selected protozoa (including the related Trypanosoma cruzi) and fungi. Thus, ISH proved to be a powerful tool for unambiguous detection of Leishmania parasites in paraffin wax-embedded tissues. PMID:21921059

  17. One-strand oligonucleotide probe for fluorescent label-free "turn-on" detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity and its inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fu; Wang, Guangfeng; Shi, Dongmin; Sun, Yue; Sha, Liang; Qiu, Yuwei; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2015-08-21

    Thioflavin T (ThT), as one of the most exciting fluorogenic molecules, boasts the "molecular-rotor" ability to induce DNA sequences containing guanine repeats to fold into G-quadruplex structures. It has been demonstrated to sense this change by its remarkable fluorescence enhancement. In this work, taking T4 polynucleotide kinase (PNK) as a model, the ThT/G-quadruplex based platform and λexonuclease (λexo) cleavage reaction were combined to design a label-free "turn-on" strategy for fast, simple and accurate detection of T4 PNK activity and its inhibition. In the presence of T4 PNK, the designed thioflavin T based molecular beacon (TMB) DNA probe could be phosphorylated and then digested by the cleavage of λexo, releasing the G-quartets. These then bound to ThT to form ThT/G-quadruplexes with an obvious fluorescence generation, for the "turn-on" detection of T4 PNK. In comparison to traditional methods, the proposed TMB probe is convenient, requiring no sophisticated labeling and separation processes and displaying high analytical performance. It exhibits a satisfying detection result for the activity of T4 PNK with a low detection limit of 0.001 U mL(-1). This is not only meaningful for further research on disease-related biochemical processes, but also valuable for molecular-target therapies.

  18. Array of Synthetic Oligonucleotides to Generate Unique Multi-Target Artificial Positive Controls and Molecular Probe-Based Discrimination of Liposcelis Species

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Opit, George; Mendoza-Yerbafría, Abigail; Dobhal, Shefali; Li, Zhihong; Kučerová, Zuzana; Ochoa-Corona, Francisco M.

    2015-01-01

    Several species of the genus Liposcelis are common insect pests that cause serious qualitative and quantitative losses to various stored grains and processed grain products. They also can contaminate foods, transmit pathogenic microorganisms and cause allergies in humans. The common occurrence of multi-species infestations and the fact that it is difficult to identify and discriminate Liposcelis spp. make accurate, rapid detection and discriminatory tools absolutely necessary for confirmation of their identity. In this study, PCR primers and probes specific to different Liposcelis spp. were designed based on nucleotide sequences of the cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) gene. Primer sets ObsCo13F/13R, PeaCo15F/14R, BosCO7F/7R, BruCo5F/5R, and DecCo11F/11R were used to specifically detect Liposcelis obscura Broadhead, Liposcelis pearmani Lienhard, Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel, Liposcelis brunnea Motschulsky and Liposcelis decolor (Pearman) in multiplex endpoint PCRs, which amplified products of 438-, 351-, 191-, 140-, and 87-bp, respectively. In multiplex TaqMan qPCR assays, orange, yellow, red, crimson and green channels corresponding to reporter dyes 6-ROXN, HEX, Cy5, Quasar705 and 6-FAM specifically detected L. obscura, L. brunnea, L. bostrychophila, L. pearmani and L. decolor, respectively. All developed primer and probe sets allowed specific amplification of corresponding targeted Liposcelis species. The development of multiplex endpoint PCR and multiplex TaqMan qPCR will greatly facilitate psocid identification and their management. The use of APCs will streamline and standardize PCR assays. APC will also provide the opportunity to have all positive controls in a single tube, which reduces maintenance cost and labor, but increases the accuracy and reliability of the assays. These novel methods from our study will have applications in pest management, biosecurity, quarantine, food safety, and routine diagnostics. PMID:26086728

  19. [Preliminary study on HLA-B genotyping by oligonucleotide chips].

    PubMed

    Lan, Ke; Hu, Shou-Wang; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Hui; Guan, Wei; Ding, Yu; Sun, Ou-Jun; Wang, Sheng-Qi

    2003-04-01

    HLA genes constitute a highly polymorphic multigene system. In the present study, HLA-B oligonucleotide chips were manufactured by using a set of sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes derived from polymorphic regions in exon 2 and exon 3 of HLA-B gene spotted by microarrayer onto the aldehyde modified glass slides. In addition, the sequenced HLA-B gene clones used as standard samples were amplified from exon 2 and exon 3 by PCR. Together with the correct hybridization and wash conditions, the PCR products were bound with the array probes on the chip, and the hybridization patterns were transformed to HLA-B genotypes. The results showed that the genotypes of standard samples by the HLA-B oligonucleotide chips were completely identical with the sequenced clones. In conclusion, the oligonucleotide chip method presented here for HLA-B genotyping is a rapid, accurate, sensitive and attractive high throughput biochemical way.

  20. Detection of different mRnas expressed in the thyro-parathyroid complex of the rat by in situ hybridization using digoxigenin-labelled oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Santos, J M; Martín-Lacave, I

    2000-04-01

    The effects have been examined of different methods and regimens for tissue fixation, preservation, permeabilization and immunostaining of different mRNAs detected by in situ hybridization in paraffin-embedded samples. The three main hormone mRNAs expressed in the thyro-parathyroid glands, namely thyroglobulin, calcitonin and parathyroid hormone mRNAs, were chosen as the target nucleic acid sequences to be detected using digoxigenin-labelled probes. Our results suggest that chemical fixation and permeabilization of tissue samples are restrictive steps. Thus, paraformaldehyde fixation provides excellent signal intensities and non-detectable background levels whereas routine formalin and Bouin's solution give unsatisfactory results. A clear linear correlation was also found between signal intensity and proteinase K permeabilization. Moreover, the optimization of immunohistochemical steps, such as anti-digoxigenin antibody concentration and colour development times, enhance the intensity and specificity of hybrid signals. Furthermore, our results show that, in contrast to some data in the literature, paraffin-embedded tissue is suitable for detection of mRNAs by in situ hybridization. It gives equivalent intensities of specific signal and superior histological and cellular resolutions when compared to cryopreserved tissue.

  1. Pentopyranosyl Oligonucleotide Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, Folkert; Kudick, Rene; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Eschenmoser, Albert; Wippo, Harald

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether the remarkable chemical properties of the pyranosyl isomer of RNA as an informational Watson-Crick base-pairing system are unique to the pentopyranosyl-(4 + 2)-oligonucleotide isomer derived from the RNA-building block D-ribose, studies on the entire family of diastereoisomeric pyranosyL(4 - Z)-oligonucleotide systems deriving from D-ribose. L-lyxose. D-xylose, and L-arabinose were carried out. The result of these extended studies is unambiguous: not only pyranosyl-RNA, but all members of the pentopyranosyl(4 + 2)-oligonucleotide family are highly efficient Watson-Crick base-pairing systems. Their synthesis and pairing properties will be described in a series of publications in this journal.

  2. Fluorescent triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides labeled with a thiazole orange dimer unit.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shuji; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Yuki, Mizue; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent probes for the detection of a double-stranded DNA were prepared by labeling a triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotide with a thiazole orange (TO) dimer unit. They belong to ECHO (exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide) probes which we have previously reported. The excitonic interaction between the two TO molecules was expected to effectively suppress the background fluorescence of the probes. The applicability of the ECHO probes for the detection of double-stranded DNA was confirmed by examining the thermal stability and photophysical and kinetic properties of the DNA triplexes formed by the ECHO probes.

  3. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thorsten L; Beliveau, Brian J; Uca, Yavuz O; Theilmann, Mark; Da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M

    2015-11-16

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes.

  4. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Thorsten L.; Beliveau, Brian J.; Uca, Yavuz O.; Theilmann, Mark; Da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes. PMID:26567534

  5. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thorsten L.; Beliveau, Brian J.; Uca, Yavuz O.; Theilmann, Mark; da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M.

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes.

  6. Surface characterization of oligonucleotides immobilized on polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Duy K.; Ivanova, Elena P.; Wright, Jonathan P.; Grodzinski, Piotr A.; Lenigk, Ralf; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2002-11-01

    The immobilization and hybridization of amino-terminated oligonucleotide strands to cyclo-olefin-copolymer (COC) and polycarbonate (PC) surfaces have been investigated for potential application in micro-PCR devices. The oligonucleotides were covalently bound to the plasma-treated COC and PC surfaces via an N-hydroxy-sulfosuccinimide (NHSS) intermediate. Analysis by AFM showed that the oligonucleotides were present on the surfaces as lumps, and that the size, both vertically and laterally, of these lumps on the COC surface was larger compared to the PC surface. The immobilization efficiency of the former was also higher (15.8 x 1012 molecules / cm2) compared to the latter (3.3 x 1012 molecules / cm2). The higher efficiency of the COC surface is attributed to the more effective NHSS-functionalization and its higher surface roughness. Subsequent hybridization doubled the height of the lumps, while the lateral dimensions remained essentially unchanged. This is explained in terms of organization of the long probe strands used on the surface as flexible, coil-like polymer chains, which allow the complementary oligonucleotides to bind and increase the height of the lumps. The AFM frictional images showed that the hybridization had the effect of reversing hydrophilicity of the oligonucleotide lumps from being more hydrophilic to more hydrophobic, consistent with the hydrophilic bases of the probe strands being shielded as a result of hybridization.

  7. Patterns of gene expression in pig adipose tissue: insulin-like growth factor system proteins, neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptors, neurotrophic factors and other secreted factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total RNA was collected at slaughter from outer subcutaneous adipose tissue (OSQ) and middle subcutaneous adipose tissue (MSQ) samples from gilts at 90, 150, and 210 d ( n =5 / age). Dye labeled cDNA probes were hybridized to custom microarrays (70 mer oligonucleotides) representing over 600 pig gen...

  8. Patterns of gene expression in pig adipose tissue: transforming growth factors, interferons, interleukins and apolipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total RNA was collected at slaughter from outer s.c. adipose tissue (OSQ), middle s.c. adipose tissue (MSQ), ovary, uterus, hypothalamus, and pituitary tissues samples from gilts at 90, 150, and 210 d ( n =5 / age). Dye labeled cDNA probes were hybridized to custom microarrays (70 mer oligonucleotid...

  9. MALDI MS analysis of oligonucleotides: desalting by functional magnetite beads using microwave-assisted extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2007-11-01

    The presence of alkali cation adductions of oligonucleotides commonly deteriorates matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectra. Thus, desalting is required for oligonucleotide samples prior to MALDI MS analysis in order to prevent the mass spectra from developing poor quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a new approach to extract traces of oligonucleotides from aqueous solutions containing high concentrations of salts using microwave-assisted extraction. The C18-presenting magnetite beads, capable of absorbing microwave irradiation, are used as affinity probes for oligonucleotides with the addition of triethylammonium acetate as the counterions. This new microwave-assisted extraction approach using magnetite beads as the trapping agents and as microwave-absorbers has been demonstrated to be very effective in the selective binding of oligonucleotides from aqueous solutions. The extraction of oligonucleotides from solutions onto the C18-presenting magnetite beads takes only 30 s to enrich oligonucleotides in sufficient quantities for MALDI MS analysis. After using this desalting approach, alkali cation adductions of oligonucleotides are dramatically reduced in the MALDI mass spectra. The presence of saturated NaCl (approximately 6 M) in the oligonucleotide sample is tolerated without degrading the mass spectra. The detection limit for d(A)6 is approximately 2.8 fmol. PMID:17902633

  10. Amplification-Free Detection of Circulating microRNA Biomarkers from Body Fluids Based on Fluorogenic Oligonucleotide-Templated Reaction between Engineered Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes: Application to Prostate Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Gavin A D; Shibakawa, Akifumi; Patel, Hinesh; Sita-Lumsden, Ailsa; Zivi, Andrea; Rama, Nona; Bevan, Charlotte L; Ladame, Sylvain

    2016-08-16

    Highly abundant in cells, microRNAs (or miRs) play a key role as regulators of gene expression. A proportion of them are also detectable in biofluids making them ideal noninvasive biomarkers for pathologies in which miR levels are aberrantly expressed, such as cancer. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are engineered uncharged oligonucleotide analogues capable of hybridizing to complementary nucleic acids with high affinity and high specificity. Herein, novel PNA-based fluorogenic biosensors have been designed and synthesized that target miR biomarkers for prostate cancer (PCa). The sensing strategy is based on oligonucleotide-templated reactions where the only miR of interest serves as a matrix to catalyze an otherwise highly unfavorable fluorogenic reaction. Validated in vitro using synthetic RNAs, these newly developed biosensors were then shown to detect endogenous concentrations of miR in human blood samples without the need for any amplification step and with minimal sample processing. This low-cost, quantitative, and versatile sensing technology has been technically validated using gold-standard RT-qPCR. Compared to RT-qPCR however, this enzyme-free, isothermal blood test is amenable to incorporation into low-cost portable devices and could therefore be suitable for widespread public screening. PMID:27498854

  11. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    PubMed

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+).

  12. Typing of enteroviruses by use of microwell oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Susi, P; Hattara, L; Waris, M; Luoma-Aho, T; Siitari, H; Hyypiä, T; Saviranta, P

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a straightforward assay for the rapid typing of enteroviruses using oligonucleotide arrays in microtiter wells. The viral nucleic acids are concomitantly amplified and labeled during reverse transcription-PCR, and unpurified PCR products are used for hybridization. DNA strands are separated by alkaline denaturation, and hybridization is started by neutralization. The microarray hybridization reactions and the subsequent washes are performed in standard 96-well microtiter plates, which makes the method easily adaptable to high-throughput analysis. We describe here the assay principle and its potential in clinical laboratory use by correctly identifying 10 different enterovirus reference strains. Furthermore, we explore the detection of unknown sequence variants using serotype consensus oligonucleotide probes. With just two consensus probes for the coxsackievirus A9 (CVA9) serotype, we detected 23 out of 25 highly diverse CVA9 isolates. Overall, the assay involves several features aiming at ease of performance, robustness, and applicability to large-scale studies.

  13. Probing the Influence of Stereoelectronic Effects on the Biophysical Properties of Oligonucleotides: Comprehensive Analysis of the RNA Affinity, Nuclease Resistance, and Crystal Structure of Ten 2'-O-Ribonucleic Acid Modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Minasov, George; Tereshko, Valentina; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Teplova, Marianna; Inamati, Gopal B.; Lesnik, Elena A.; Owens, Steve R.; Ross, Bruce S.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2010-03-05

    The syntheses of 10 new RNA 2'-O-modifications, their incorporation into oligonucleotides, and an evaluation of their properties such as RNA affinity and nuclease resistance relevant to antisense activity are presented. All modifications combined with the natural phosphate backbone lead to significant gains in terms of the stability of hybridization to RNA relative to the first-generation DNA phosphorothioates (PS-DNA). The nuclease resistance afforded in particular by the 2'-O-modifications carrying a positive charge surpasses that of PS-DNA. However, small electronegative 2'-O-substituents, while enhancing the RNA affinity, do not sufficiently protect against degradation by nucleases. Similarly, oligonucleotides containing 3'-terminal residues modified with the relatively large 2'-O-[2-(benzyloxy)ethyl] substituent are rapidly degraded by exonucleases, proving wrong the assumption that steric bulk will generally improve protection against nuclease digestion. To analyze the factors that contribute to the enhanced RNA affinity and nuclease resistance we determined crystal structures of self-complementary A-form DNA decamer duplexes containing single 2'-O-modified thymidines per strand. Conformational preorganization of substituents, favorable electrostatic interactions between substituent and sugar-phosphate backbone, and a stable water structure in the vicinity of the 2'-O-modification all appear to contribute to the improved RNA affinity. Close association of positively charged substituents and phosphate groups was observed in the structures with modifications that protect most effectively against nucleases. The promising properties exhibited by some of the analyzed 2'-O-modifications may warrant a more detailed evaluation of their potential for in vivo antisense applications. Chemical modification of RNA can also be expected to significantly improve the efficacy of small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Therefore, the 2'-O-modifications introduced here may benefit the

  14. Comparative gene expression profiling by oligonucleotide fingerprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Meier-Ewert, S; Lange, J; Gerst, H; Herwig, R; Schmitt, A; Freund, J; Elge, T; Mott, R; Herrmann, B; Lehrach, H

    1998-01-01

    The use of hybridisation of synthetic oligonucleotides to cDNAs under high stringency to characterise gene sequences has been demonstrated by a number of groups. We have used two cDNA libraries of 9 and 12 day mouse embryos (24 133 and 34 783 clones respectively) in a pilot study to characterise expressed genes by hybridisation with 110 hybridisation probes. We have identified 33 369 clusters of cDNA clones, that ranged in representation from 1 to 487 copies (0.7%). 737 were assigned to known rodent genes, and a further 13 845 showed significant homologies. A total of 404 clusters were identified as significantly differentially represented (P < 0.01) between the two cDNA libraries. This study demonstrates the utility of the fingerprinting approach for the generation of comparative gene expression profiles through the analysis of cDNAs derived from different biological materials. PMID:9547283

  15. [A prototype of oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogens relating to arena- and Filoviridae families].

    PubMed

    Zhirnov, I V; Ryabinin, V A; Sinyakov, A N; Ternovoy, V A; Shikov, A N

    2015-01-01

    A prototype of oligonucleotide microarray for detection of Lassa, Junin, Machupo, Guanarito viruses (Arenaviridae family), Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae family) was presented. An original approach founded on virus proteins (nucleocapsid protein for Junin, Guanarito, Machupo viruses and RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase for Lassa, Ebola and Marburg viruses) amino acid sequences analysis with subsequent transform of revealed unique peptides into due sets of oligonucleotides was used to design probes for hybridization and primers.

  16. Advanced surface-enhanced Raman gene probe systems and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2001-01-01

    The subject invention is a series of methods and systems for using the Surface-Enhanced Raman (SER)-labeled Gene Probe for hybridization, detection and identification of SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material comprising the steps of immobilizing SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material on a support means, wherein the SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material comprise a SER label attached either to a target oligonucleotide of unknown sequence or to a gene probe of known sequence complementary to the target oligonucleotide sequence, the SER label is unique for the target oligonucleotide strands of a particular sequence wherein the SER-labeled oligonucleotide is hybridized to its complementary oligonucleotide strand, then the support means having the SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material adsorbed thereon is SERS activated with a SERS activating means, then the support means is analyzed.

  17. Species-Level Identification of Orthopoxviruses with an Oligonucleotide Microchip

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Sergey; Mikheev, Maxim; Shchelkunov, Sergei; Mikhailovich, Vladimir; Sobolev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Babkin, Igor; Guskov, Alexander; Sokunova, Elena; Zasedatelev, Alexander; Sandakhchiev, Lev; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2002-01-01

    A method for species-specific detection of orthopoxviruses pathogenic for humans and animals is described. The method is based on hybridization of a fluorescently labeled amplified DNA specimen with the oligonucleotide DNA probes immobilized on a microchip (MAGIChip). The probes identify species-specific sites within the crmB gene encoding the viral analogue of tumor necrosis factor receptor, one of the most important determinants of pathogenicity in this genus of viruses. The diagnostic procedure takes 6 h and does not require any sophisticated equipment (a portable fluorescence reader can be used). PMID:11880388

  18. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-05-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply rigorous thermodynamic analysis to an important biochemical problem. Because the stacking of base pairs on top of one another is a significant factor in the energetics of oligonucleotide melting, several investigators have applied van't Hoff analysis to melting temperature data using a nearest-neighbor model and have obtained entropies and enthalpies for the stacking of bases. The present article explains how the equilibrium constant for the dissociation of strands from double-stranded oligonucleotides can be expressed in terms of the total strand concentration and thus how the total strand concentration influences the melting temperature. It also presents a simplified analysis based on the entropies and enthalpies of stacking that is manually tractable so that students can work examples to help them understand the thermodynamics of oligonucleotide melting.

  19. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  20. [Study toward practical use of oligonucleotide therapeutics].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takao; Yoshida, Tokuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, oligonucleotide-based therapeutics such as antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been developed extensively. For example, mipomersen (Kynamro; ISIS Pharmaceuticals), which is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide administered by subcutaneous injection, has recently been approved by the FDA for the treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. On the other hands, methods for the evaluation of quality, efficacy and safety of oligonucleotide therapeutics have not been fully discussed. Furthermore, the regulatory guidance specific for oligonucleotide therapeutics has not been established yet. Under these circumstances, we started to collaborate with Osaka University and PMDA to discuss regulatory science focused on oligonucleotide therapeutics. Through the collaboration, we would like to propose the possible design of quality evaluation and preclinical safety-evaluation of oligonucleotide therapeutics. PMID:25707197

  1. The synthesis of oligonucleotides containing a primary amino group at the 5'-terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, B A

    1987-01-01

    Oligonucleotides containing a primary amino group at their 5'-termini have been prepared and further derivatised with amino specific probes. The sequence required is prepared using standard solid phase phosphoramidite techniques and an extra round of synthesis is then performed with N-monomethoxytrityl-0-methoxydiisopropylaminophosphinyl 3-aminopropan(1)ol. After cleavage from the resin, removal of the phosphate and base protecting groups and purification gives a monomethoxytrityl-NH(CH2)3PO4-oligomer. The monomethoxytrityl group can be removed with acetic acid to give the desired amino containing oligomer. The amino group can be further derivatised with amino specific probes yielding fluorescent or biotinylated oligonucleotide products. PMID:3562247

  2. Arrays of nucleic acid probes on biological chips

    DOEpatents

    Chee, Mark; Cronin, Maureen T.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Huang, Xiaohua X.; Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Lobban, Peter E.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Sheldon, Edward L.

    1998-11-17

    DNA chips containing arrays of oligonucleotide probes can be used to determine whether a target nucleic acid has a nucleotide sequence identical to or different from a specific reference sequence. The array of probes comprises probes exactly complementary to the reference sequence, as well as probes that differ by one or more bases from the exactly complementary probes.

  3. Palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Kevin H

    2015-05-22

    Synthetic modification of nucleoside structures provides access to molecules of interest as pharmaceuticals, biochemical probes, and models to study diseases. Covalent modification of the purine and pyrimidine bases is an important strategy for the synthesis of these adducts. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling is a powerful method to attach groups to the base heterocycles through the formation of new carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. In this review, approaches to palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides are reviewed. Polar reaction media, such as water or polar aprotic solvents, allow reactions to be performed directly on the hydrophilic nucleosides and nucleotides without the need to use protecting groups. Homogeneous aqueous-phase coupling reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes of water-soluble ligands provide a general approach to the synthesis of modified nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

  4. Detection of sickle cell beta S-globin allele by hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Conner, B J; Reyes, A A; Morin, C; Itakura, K; Teplitz, R L; Wallace, R B

    1983-01-01

    Two 19-base-long oligonucleotides were synthesized, one complementary to the normal human beta-globin gene (beta A) and one complementary to the sickle cell beta-globin gene (beta S). The nonadecanucleotides were radioactively labeled and used as probes in DNA hybridization. Under appropriate hybridization conditions, these probes can be used to distinguish the beta A gene from the beta S allele. The DNA from individuals homozygous for the normal beta-globin gene (beta A beta A) only hybridized with the beta A specific probe; the DNA from those homozygous for the sickle cell beta-globin gene (beta S beta S) only hybridized with the beta S specific probe. The DNA from heterozygous individuals (beta A beta S) hybridized with both probes. This allele-specific hybridization behavior of oligonucleotides provides a general method for diagnosis of any genetic disease which involves a point mutation in the DNA sequence of a single-copy gene.

  5. Biopolymer synthesis on polypropylene supports. I. Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Matson, R S; Rampal, J B; Coassin, P J

    1994-03-01

    We have modified polypropylene to serve as a new solid-phase support for oligonucleotide synthesis. The plastic is first surface aminated by exposure to an ammonia plasma generated by radiofrequency plasma discharge. The aminated polypropylene has been found to be useful as a support for the in situ synthesis of oligonucleotides from monomers. Furthermore, oligonucleotides synthesized on the surface of the plastic remain attached following deprotection and can be used directly for hybridization. PMID:8203760

  6. The prebiotic synthesis of oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Stephen-Sherwood, E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper is primarily a review of recent developments in the abiotic synthesis of nucleotides, short chain oligonucleotides, and their mode of replication in solution. It also presents preliminary results from this laboratory on the prebiotic synthesis of thymidine oligodeoxynucleotides. A discussion, based on the physicochemical properties of RNA and DNA oligomers, relevant to the molecular evolution of these compounds leads to the tentative hypothesis that oligodeoxyribonucleotides of about 12 units may have been of sufficient length to initiate a self replicating coding system. Two models are suggested to account for the synthesis of high molecular weight oligomers using short chain templates and primers.

  7. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S.; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander N.; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Shipma, Matthew; White, Amanda M.; Willse, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic, genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using DNA oligonucleotide microarrays was used for high-resolution differentiation between closely related Bacillus strains, including two strains of Bacillus anthracis that are monomorphic (indistinguishable) via amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting techniques. Replicated hybridizations on 391-probe nonamer arrays were used to construct a prototype fingerprint library for quantitative comparisons. Descriptive analysis of the fingerprints, including phylogenetic reconstruction, is consistent with previous taxonomic organization of the genus. Newly developed statistical analysis methods were used to quantitatively compare and objectively confirm apparent differences in microarray fingerprints with the statistical rigor required for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics. These data suggest that a relatively simple fingerprinting microarray and statistical analysis method can differentiate between species in the Bacillus cereus complex, and between strains of B. anthracis. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand underlying microarray and process-level variability, leading to specific recommendations for the development of a standard operating procedure and/or continued technology enhancements for microbial forensics and diagnostics.

  8. Cellular Uptake and Intracellular Trafficking of Oligonucleotides: Implications for Oligonucleotide Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Laing, Brian

    2014-01-01

    One of the major constraints on the therapeutic use of oligonucleotides is inefficient delivery to their sites of action in the cytosol or nucleus. Recently it has become evident that the pathways of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides can strongly influence their pharmacological actions. Here we provide background information on the basic processes of endocytosis and trafficking and then review recent literature on targeted delivery and subcellular trafficking of oligonucleotides in that context. A variety of approaches including molecular scale ligand-oligonucleotide conjugates, ligand-targeted nanocarriers, and the use of small molecules to enhance oligonucleotide effects are discussed. PMID:24383421

  9. A novel, one-step amplification and oligonucleotide ligation procedure for multiplex genetic typing

    SciTech Connect

    Eggerding, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    A new technique, coupled amplification and oligonucleotide ligation (CAL), has been developed for simultaneous multiplex amplification and genotyping of DNA. CAL is a biphasic method which combines in one assay DNA amplification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with DNA genotyping by the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). By virtue of a difference in the melting temperatures of PCR primer-target DNA and OLA probe-target DNA hybrids, the method allows preferential amplification of DNA during stage I and oligonucleotide ligation during stage II of the reaction. In stage I target DNA is amplified using high-melting primers in a two-step PCR cycle that employs a 72{degrees}C anneal-elongation step. In stage II genotyping of PCR products by competitive oligonucleotide ligation with oligonucleotide probes located between PCR primers is accomplished by several cycles of denaturation at 94{degrees}C followed by anneal-ligation at 55{degrees}C. Ligation products are fluorochrome-labeled at their 3{prime}-ends and analyzed electrophoretically on a fluorescent DNA sequencer. The CAL procedure has been used for multiplex detection of 30 cystic fibrosis mutations and for analysis of ras gene point mutations. Because mutation detection occurs concurrently with target amplification, the technique is rapid, highly sensitive and specific, easily automatable, and requires minimal sample processing.

  10. Oligonucleotide therapeutics: chemistry, delivery and clinical progress.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek K; Watts, Jonathan K

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide therapeutics have the potential to become a third pillar of drug development after small molecules and protein therapeutics. However, the three approved oligonucleotide drugs over the past 17 years have not proven to be highly successful in a commercial sense. These trailblazer drugs have nonetheless laid the foundations for entire classes of drug candidates to follow. This review will examine further advances in chemistry that are earlier in the pipeline of oligonucleotide drug candidates. Finally, we consider the possible effect of delivery systems that may provide extra footholds to improve the potency and specificity of oligonucleotide drugs. Our overview focuses on strategies to imbue antisense oligonucleotides with more drug-like properties and their applicability to other nucleic acid therapeutics.

  11. Electron Transfer Dissociation of Oligonucleotide Cations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Suncerae I; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-06-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of multi-protonated 6 - 20-mer oligonucleotides and 12- and 14-mer duplexes is compared to collision activated dissociation (CAD). ETD causes efficient charge reduction of the multi-protonated oligonucleotides in addition to limited backbone cleavages to yield sequence ions of low abundance. Subsequent CAD of the charge-reduced oligonucleotides formed upon electron transfer, in a net process termed electron transfer collision activated dissociation (ETcaD), results in rich fragmentation in terms of w, a, z, and d products, with a marked decrease in the abundance of base loss ions and internal fragments. Complete sequencing was possible for nearly all oligonucleotides studied. ETcaD of an oligonucleotide duplex resulted in specific backbone cleavages, with conservation of weaker non-covalent bonds. PMID:20161288

  12. Drop drying on surfaces determines chemical reactivity - the specific case of immobilization of oligonucleotides on microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drop drying is a key factor in a wide range of technical applications, including spotted microarrays. The applied nL liquid volume provides specific reaction conditions for the immobilization of probe molecules to a chemically modified surface. Results We investigated the influence of nL and μL liquid drop volumes on the process of probe immobilization and compare the results obtained to the situation in liquid solution. In our data, we observe a strong relationship between drop drying effects on immobilization and surface chemistry. In this work, we present results on the immobilization of dye labeled 20mer oligonucleotides with and without an activating 5′-aminoheptyl linker onto a 2D epoxysilane and a 3D NHS activated hydrogel surface. Conclusions Our experiments identified two basic processes determining immobilization. First, the rate of drop drying that depends on the drop volume and the ambient relative humidity. Oligonucleotides in a dried spot react unspecifically with the surface and long reaction times are needed. 3D hydrogel surfaces allow for immobilization in a liquid environment under diffusive conditions. Here, oligonucleotide immobilization is much faster and a specific reaction with the reactive linker group is observed. Second, the effect of increasing probe concentration as a result of drop drying. On a 3D hydrogel, the increasing concentration of probe molecules in nL spotting volumes accelerates immobilization dramatically. In case of μL volumes, immobilization depends on whether the drop is allowed to dry completely. At non-drying conditions, very limited immobilization is observed due to the low oligonucleotide concentration used in microarray spotting solutions. The results of our study provide a general guideline for microarray assay development. They allow for the initial definition and further optimization of reaction conditions for the immobilization of oligonucleotides and other probe molecule classes to different

  13. Spatially Defined Oligonucleotide Arrays. Technical Report for Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-15

    The goal of the Human Genome Project is to sequence all 3 billion base pairs of the human genome. Progress in this has been rapid; GenBank{reg_sign} finished 1994 with 286 million bases of sequence and grew by 2470 in the first quarter of 1995. The challenge to the scientific community is to understand the biological relevance of this genetic information. In most cases the sequence being generated for any single region of the genome represents the genotype of a single individual. A complete understanding of the function of specific genes and other regions of the genome and their role in human disease and development will only become apparent when the sequence of many more individuals is known. Access to genetic information is ultimately limited by the ability to screen DNA sequence. Although the pioneering sequencing methods of Sanger et al. (15) and Maxam and Gilbert (11) have become standard in virtually all molecular biology laboratories, the basic protocols remain largely unchanged. The throughput of this sequencing technology is now becoming the rate-limiting step in both large-scale sequencing projects such as the Human Genome Project and the subsequent efforts to understand genetic diversity. This has inspired the development of advanced DNA sequencing technologies (9), Incremental improvements to Sanger sequencing have been made in DNA labeling and detection. High-speed electrophoresis methods using ultrathin gels or capillary arrays are now being more widely employed. However, these methods are throughput-limited by their sequential nature and the speed and resolution of separations. This limitation will become more pronounced as the need to rapidly screen newly discovered genes for biologically relevant polymorphisms increases. An alternative to gel-based sequencing is to use high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays. Oligonucleotide probe arrays display specific oligonucleotide probes at precise locations in a high density, information-rich format (5

  14. Synthesis of 5'-Aldehyde Oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Lartia, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of oligonucleotide ending with an aldehyde functional group at their 5'-end (5'-AON) is possible for both DNA (5'-AODN) and RNA (5'-AORN) series irrespectively of the nature of the last nucleobase. The 5'-alcohol of on-support ODN is mildly oxidized under Moffat conditions. Transient protection of the resulting aldehyde by N,N'-diphenylethylenediamine derivatives allows cleavage, deprotection, and RP-HPLC purification of the protected 5'-AON. Finally, 5'-AON is deprotected by usual acetic acid treatment. In the aggregates, 5'-AON can be now synthesized and purified as routinely as non-modified ODNs, following procedures similar to the well-known "DMT-On" strategy. PMID:26967469

  15. Avian oncogenic virus differential diagnosis in chickens using oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lih-Chiann; Huang, Dean; Pu, Chang-En; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2014-12-15

    Avian oncogenic viruses include the avian leukosis virus (ALV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) and Marek's disease virus (MDV). Multiple oncogenic viral infections are frequently seen, with even Marek's disease vaccines reported to be contaminated with ALV and REV. The gross lesions caused by avian oncogenic viruses often overlap, making differentiation diagnosis based on histopathology difficult. The objective of this study is to develop a rapid approach to simultaneously differentiate, subgroup and pathotype the avian oncogenic viruses. The oligonucleotide microarray was employed in this study. Particular DNA sequences were recognized using specific hybridization between the DNA target and probe on the microarray, followed with colorimetric development through enzyme reaction. With 10 designed probes, ALV-A, ALV-E, ALV-J, REV, MDV pathogenic and vaccine strains were clearly discriminated on the microarray with the naked eyes. The detection limit was 27 copy numbers, which was 10-100 times lower than multiplex PCR. Of 102 field samples screened using the oligonucleotide microarray, 32 samples were positive for ALV-E, 17 samples were positive for ALV-J, 6 samples were positive for REV, 4 samples were positive for MDV, 7 samples were positive for both ALV-A and ALV-E, 5 samples were positive for ALV-A, ALV-E and ALV-J, one sample was positive for both ALV-J and MDV, and 3 samples were positive for both REV and MDV. The oligonucleotide microarray, an easy-to-use, high-specificity, high-sensitivity and extendable assay, presents a potent technique for rapid differential diagnosis of avian oncogenic viruses and the detection of multiple avian oncogenic viral infections under field conditions.

  16. Stem-loop oligonucleotides: a robust tool for molecular biology and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Broude, Natalia E

    2002-06-01

    The specific structural features of stem-loop (hairpin) DNA constructs provide increased specificity of target recognition. Recently, several robust assays have been developed that exploit the potential of structurally constrained oligonucleotides to hybridize with their cognate targets. Here, I review new diagnostic approaches based on the formation of stem-loop DNA oligonucleotides: molecular beacon methodology, suppression PCR approaches and the use of hairpin probes in DNA microarrays. The advantages of these techniques over existing ones for sequence-specific DNA detection, amplification and manipulation are discussed.

  17. Tandem oligonucleotide synthesis using linker phosphoramidites

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Richard T.; Yu, Shuyuan

    2005-01-01

    Multiple oligonucleotides of the same or different sequence, linked end-to-end in tandem can be synthesized in a single automated synthesis. A linker phosphoramidite [R. T. Pon and S. Yu (2004) Nucleic Acids Res., 32, 623–631] is added to the 5′-terminal OH end of a support-bound oligonucleotide to introduce a cleavable linkage (succinic acid plus sulfonyldiethanol) and the 3′-terminal base of the new sequence. Conventional phosphoramidites are then used for the rest of the sequence. After synthesis, treatment with ammonium hydroxide releases the oligonucleotides from the support and cleaves the linkages between each sequence. Mixtures of one oligonucleotide with both 5′- and 3′-terminal OH ends and other oligonucleotides with 5′-phosphorylated and 3′-OH ends are produced, which are deprotected and worked up as a single product. Tandem synthesis can be used to make pairs of PCR primers, sets of cooperative oligonucleotides or multiple copies of the same sequence. When tandem synthesis is used to make two self-complementary sequences, double-stranded structures spontaneously form after deprotection. Tandem synthesis of oligonucleotide chains containing up to six consecutive 20mer (120 bases total), various trinucleotide codons and primer pairs for PCR, or self-complementary strands for in situ formation of double-stranded DNA fragments has been demonstrated. PMID:15814811

  18. Quantitation of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Leeds, J M; Graham, M J; Truong, L; Cummins, L L

    1996-03-01

    Methods are presented for the extraction of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides from human plasma to permit quantitation by capillary gel electrophoresis. Extraction of the phosphorothioate oligonucleotides from plasma was accomplished using two solid-phase extraction columns, a strong anion-exchange column to remove plasma proteins and lipids, followed by a reverse-phase column to remove salts. A second desalting step, achieved by dialysis utilizing a membrane with a molecular weight cutoff of 2500 Da floating on distilled water, was required to remove residual ionic material from the extracted sample. This method should be generally applicable to the analysis and quantitation of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. PMID:8850544

  19. Designed thiazole orange nucleotides for the synthesis of single labelled oligonucleotides that fluoresce upon matched hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bethge, Lucas; Singh, Ishwar; Seitz, Oliver

    2010-05-21

    Probe molecules that enable the detection of specific DNA sequences are used in diagnostic and basic research. Most methods rely on the specificity of hybridization reactions, which complicates the detection of single base mutations at low temperature. Significant efforts have been devoted to the development of oligonucleotides that allow discrimination of single base mutations at temperatures where both the match and the mismatch probe-target complexes coexist. Oligonucleotides that contain environmentally sensitive fluorescence dyes such as thiazole orange (TO) provide single nucleotide specific fluorescence. However, most previously reported dye-DNA conjugates showed only little if any difference between the fluorescence of the single and the double stranded state. Here, we introduce a TO-containing acyclic nucleotide, which is coupled during automated oligonucleotide synthesis and provides for the desired fluorescence-up properties. The study reveals the conjugation mode as the most important issue. We show a design that leads to low fluorescence of the unbound probe (background) yet permits TO to adopt fluorescent binding modes after the probe-target complex has formed. In these probes, TO replaces a canonical nucleobase. Of note, the fluorescence of the "TO-base" remains low when a base mismatch is positioned in immediate vicinity.

  20. Minimizing DNA microarrays to a single molecule per spot: using zero-mode waveguide technology to obtain kinetic data for a large number of short oligonucleotide hybridization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, Jens; Rehrauer, Hubert; Kuhn, Gerrit; Schlapbach, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    We have shown recently that the hybridization of short oligonucleotides can be studied in a zero-mode waveguide nanostructure (ZMW) chip using a modified DNA sequencer.[1] Here we present an extension of this method enabling the parallel measurement of kinetic constants of a large number of hybridization reactions on a single chip. This can be achieved by immobilization of a mixture of oligonucleotides, which leads to a statistical and random distribution of single molecules in the 150'000 ZMWs of a SMRT™ cell. This setup is comparable to a classical microarray with ZMWs in place of spots but unknown allocation of probes. The probe surface density is reduced by a factor of ~1010 allowing the study of hybridization in the absence of interactions with neighboring probes. Hybridization with a dye labelled oligonucleotide results in trains of fluorescence pulses from which interpulse durations (IPDs) and pulse widths (PWs) can be extracted. Since the identity of a probe in a ZMW is unknown, the immobilized oligonucleotide is sequenced in a subsequent step. After mapping the fluorescence traces to the sequence, the association and dissociation rate constant for each oligonucleotide can be calculated. By selecting suitable probes, the method can be used to determine rate constants of hybridization for a large number of mismatch oligonucleotides in a single measurement and at single-molecule level.

  1. Immobilization of DNA in polyacrylamide gel for the manufacture of DNA and DNA-oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Timofeev, E.; Mirzabekov, A.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    1998-05-15

    Activated DNA was immobilized in aldehyde-containing polyacrylamide gel for use in manufacturing the MAGIChip (microarrays of gel-immobilized compounds on a chip). First, abasic sites were generated in DNA by partial acidic depurination. Amino groups were then introduced into the abasic sites by reaction with ethylenediamine and reduction of the aldimine bonds formed. It was found that DNA could be fragmented at the site of amino group incorporation or preserved mostly unfragmented. In similar reactions, both amino-DNA and amino-oligonucleotides were attached through their amines to polyacrylamide gel derivatized with aldehyde groups. Single- and double-stranded DNA of 40 to 972 nucleotides or base pairs were immobilized on the gel pads to manufacture a DNA microchip. The microchip was hybridized with fluorescently labeled DNA-specific oligonucleotide probes. This procedure for immobilization of amino compounds was used to manufacture MAGIChips containing both DNA and oligonucleotides.

  2. New protocol for oligonucleotide microarray fabrication using SU-8-coated glass microslides.

    PubMed

    Sethi, D; Kumar, A; Gandhi, R P; Kumar, P; Gupta, K C

    2010-09-15

    Microarray technology has become an important tool for detection and analysis of nucleic acid targets. Immobilization of modified and unmodified oligonucleotides on epoxy-functionalized glass surfaces is often used in microarray fabrication. Here, we demonstrate a protocol that employs coating of SU-8 (glycidyl ether of bisphenol A) onto glass microslides to obtain high density of epoxy functions for efficient immobilization of aminoalkyl-, thiophosphoryl-, and phosphorylated oligonucleotides with uniform spot morphology. The resulting microarrays exhibited high immobilization (∼65%) and hybridization efficiency (30-36%) and were sufficiently stable over a range of temperature and pH conditions. The prominent feature of the protocol is that spots can be visualized distinctly at 0.05 μM probe (a 20-mer oligonucleotide) concentration. The constructed microarrays were subsequently used for detection of base mismatches and bacterial diseases (meningitis and typhoid).

  3. Visualizing genomes with Oligopaint FISH probes

    PubMed Central

    Beliveau, Brian J.; Apostolopoulos, Nicholas; Wu, Chao-ting

    2014-01-01

    Oligopaint probes are fluorescently-labeled, single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that can be used to visualize genomic regions ranging in size from tens of kilobases to many megabases. This unit details how Oligopaint probes can be synthesized using basic molecular biological techniques as well as provides protocols for FISH, 3D-FISH, and sample preparation. PMID:24510436

  4. Gene Assembly from Chip-Synthesized Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Eroshenko, Nikolai; Kosuri, Sriram; Marblestone, Adam H; Conway, Nicholas; Church, George M.

    2012-01-01

    De novo synthesis of long double-stranded DNA constructs has a myriad of applications in biology and biological engineering. However, its widespread adoption has been hindered by high costs. Cost can be significantly reduced by using oligonucleotides synthesized on high-density DNA chips. However, most methods for using off-chip DNA for gene synthesis have failed to scale due to the high error rates, low yields, and high chemical complexity of the chip-synthesized oligonucleotides. We have recently demonstrated that some commercial DNA chip manufacturers have improved error rates, and that the issues of chemical complexity and low yields can be solved by using barcoded primers to accurately and efficiently amplify subpools of oligonucleotides. This article includes protocols for computationally designing the DNA chip, amplifying the oligonucleotide subpools, and assembling 500-800 basepair (bp) constructs. PMID:25077042

  5. Copper(II)-quenched oligonucleotide probes for fluorescent DNA sensing.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Jens; Kraemer, Roland

    2004-10-27

    A copper(II)-quenched molecular beacon was prepared by attaching fluorescein to the 3'-end and a copper(II) complex to the 5'-end of DNA. In the presence of complementary DNA, copper(II) and dye are spatially separated in the duplex and fluorescence increases up to 15-fold, with excellent discrimination of single base mismatches.

  6. Chromosome-Specific Painting in Cucumis Species Using Bulked Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Han, Yonghua; Zhang, Tao; Thammapichai, Paradee; Weng, Yiqun; Jiang, Jiming

    2015-07-01

    Chromosome-specific painting is a powerful technique in molecular cytogenetic and genome research. We developed an oligonucleotide (oligo)-based chromosome painting technique in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) that will be applicable in any plant species with a sequenced genome. Oligos specific to a single chromosome of cucumber were identified using a newly developed bioinformatic pipeline and then massively synthesized de novo in parallel. The synthesized oligos were amplified and labeled with biotin or digoxigenin for use in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We developed three different probes with each containing 23,000-27,000 oligos. These probes spanned 8.3-17 Mb of DNA on targeted cucumber chromosomes and had the densities of 1.5-3.2 oligos per kilobases. These probes produced FISH signals on a single cucumber chromosome and were used to paint homeologous chromosomes in other Cucumis species diverged from cucumber for up to 12 million years. The bulked oligo probes allowed us to track a single chromosome in early stages during meiosis. We were able to precisely map the pairing between cucumber chromosome 7 and chromosome 1 of Cucumis hystrix in a F1 hybrid. These two homeologous chromosomes paired in 71% of prophase I cells but only 25% of metaphase I cells, which may provide an explanation of the higher recombination rates compared to the chiasma frequencies between homeologous chromosomes reported in plant hybrids. PMID:25971668

  7. Final Report Construction of Whole Genome Microarrays, and Expression Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells in Metal-Reducing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    M.W. Fields; J.D. Wall; J. Keasling; J. Zhou

    2008-05-15

    We continue to utilize the oligonucleotide microarrays that were constructed through funding with this project to characterize growth responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris relevant to metal-reducing conditions. To effectively immobilize heavy metals and radionuclides via sulfate-reduction, it is important to understand the cellular responses to adverse factors observed at contaminated subsurface environments (e.g., nutrients, pH, contaminants, growth requirements and products). One of the major goals of the project is to construct whole-genome microarrays for Desulfovibrio vulgaris. First, in order to experimentally establish the criteria for designing gene-specific oligonucleotide probes, an oligonucleotide array was constructed that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes (50mers and 70mers) based upon 4 genes. The effects of probe-target identity, continuous stretch, mismatch position, and hybridization free energy on specificity were examined. Little hybridization was observed at a probe-target identity of <85% for both 50mer and 70mer probes. 33 to 48% of the PM signal intensities were detected at a probe-target identity of 94% for 50mer oligonucleotides, and 43 to 55% for 70mer probes at a probe-target identity of 96%. When the effects of sequence identity and continuous stretch were considered independently, a stretch probe (>15 bases) contributed an additional 9% of the PM signal intensity compared to a non-stretch probe (< 15 bases) at the same identity level. Cross-hybridization increased as the length of continuous stretch increased. A 35-base stretch for 50mer probes or a 50-base stretch for 70mer probes had approximately 55% of the PM signal. Mismatches should be as close to the middle position of an oligonucleotide probe as possible to minimize cross-hybridization. Little cross-hybridization was observed for probes with a minimal binding free energy greater than -30 kcal/mol for 50mer probes or -40 kcal/mol for 70mer probes. Based on the

  8. Zip nucleic acids are potent hydrolysis probes for quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Clément; Moreau, Valérie; Deglane, Gaëlle; Voirin, Emilie; Erbacher, Patrick; Lenne-Samuel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Zip nucleic acids (ZNAs) are oligonucleotides conjugated with cationic spermine units that increase affinity for their target. ZNAs were recently shown to enable specific and sensitive reactions when used as primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription. Here, we report their use as quantitative PCR hydrolysis probes. Ultraviolet duplex melting data demonstrate that attachment of cationic residues to the 3′ end of an oligonucleotide does not alter its ability to discriminate nucleotides nor the destabilization pattern relative to mismatch location in the oligonucleotide sequence. The stability increase provided by the cationic charges allows the use of short dual-labeled probes that significantly improve single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. Longer ZNA probes were shown to display reduced background fluorescence, therefore, generating greater sensitivity and signal level as compared to standard probes. ZNA probes thus provide broad flexibility in assay design and also represent an effective alternative to minor groove binder- and locked nucleic-acid-containing probes. PMID:20071749

  9. Using oligonucleotide suspension arrays for laboratory identification of bacteria responsible for bacteremia*

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiao-li; Jiang, Han-liang; Cao, Qing-yi; Zhao, Li-ying; Chang, Barbara J.; Chen, Zhi

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an oligonucleotide suspension array for rapid identification of 15 bacterial species responsible for bacteremia, particularly prevalent in Chinese hospitals. The multiplexed array, based on the QIAGEN LiquiChip Workstation, included 15 oligonucleotide probes which were covalently bound to different bead sets. PCR amplicons of a variable region of the bacterial 23S rRNA genes were hybridized to the bead-bound probes. Thirty-eight strains belonging to 15 species were correctly identified on the basis of their corresponding species-specific hybridization profiles. The results show that the suspension array, in a single assay, can differentiate isolates over a wide range of strains and species, and suggest the potential utility of suspension array system to clinical laboratory diagnosis. PMID:18381803

  10. Caged oligonucleotides for studying biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Ruble, Brittani K.; Yeldell, Sean B.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.

    2015-01-01

    Light-activated (“caged”) compounds have been widely employed for studying biological processes with high spatial and temporal control. In the past decade, several new approaches for caging the structure and function of DNA and RNA oligonucleotides have been developed. This review focuses on caged oligonucleotides that incorporate site-specifically one or two photocleavable linkers, whose photolysis yields oligonucleotides with dramatic structural and functional changes. This technique has been employed by our laboratory and others to photoregulate gene expression in cells and living organisms, typically using near UV-activated organic chromophores. To improve capabilities for in vivo studies, we harnessed the rich inorganic photochemistry of ruthenium bipyridyl complexes to synthesize Ru-caged morpholino antisense oligonucleotides that remain inactive in zebrafish embryos until uncaged with visible light. Expanding into new caged oligonucleotide applications, our lab has developed Transcriptome In Vivo Analysis (TIVA) technology, which provides the first noninvasive, unbiased method for isolating mRNA from single neurons in brain tissues. TIVA-isolated mRNA can be amplified and then analyzed using next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq). PMID:25865001

  11. A review of statistical methods for preprocessing oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijin

    2009-12-01

    Microarrays have become an indispensable tool in biomedical research. This powerful technology not only makes it possible to quantify a large number of nucleic acid molecules simultaneously, but also produces data with many sources of noise. A number of preprocessing steps are therefore necessary to convert the raw data, usually in the form of hybridisation images, to measures of biological meaning that can be used in further statistical analysis. Preprocessing of oligonucleotide arrays includes image processing, background adjustment, data normalisation/transformation and sometimes summarisation when multiple probes are used to target one genomic unit. In this article, we review the issues encountered in each preprocessing step and introduce the statistical models and methods in preprocessing.

  12. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride (“DQAsomes”) have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription–translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We

  13. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride ("DQAsomes") have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription-translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We describe

  14. Design and applications of modified oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gallo, M; Montserrat, J M; Iribarren, A M

    2003-02-01

    Oligonucleotides have a wide range of applications in fields such as biotechnology, molecular biology, diagnosis and therapy. However, the spectrum of uses can be broadened by introducing chemical modifications into their structures. The most prolific field in the search for new oligonucleotide analogs is the antisense strategy, where chemical modifications confer appropriate characteristics such as hybridization, resistance to nucleases, cellular uptake, selectivity and, basically, good pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Combinatorial technology is another research area where oligonucleotides and their analogs are extensively employed. Aptamers, new catalytic ribozymes and deoxyribozymes are RNA or DNA molecules individualized from a randomly synthesized library on the basis of a particular property. They are identified by repeated cycles of selection and amplification, using PCR technologies. Modified nucleotides can be introduced either during the amplification procedure or after selection.

  15. Optimization of an oligonucleotide microchip for microbial identification studies: a non-equilibrium dissociation approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Stahl, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    The utility of a high-density oligonucleotide microarray (microchip) for identifying strains of five closely related bacilli (Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus medusa and Bacillus subtilis) was demonstrated using an approach that compares the non-equilibrium dissociation rates ('melting curves') of all probe-target duplexes simultaneously. For this study, a hierarchical set of 30 oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA of these bacilli at multiple levels of specificity (approximate taxonomic ranks of domain, kingdom, order, genus and species) was designed and immobilized in a high-density matrix of gel pads on a glass slide. Reproducible melting curves for probes with different levels of specificity were obtained using an optimized salt concentration. Clear discrimination between perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) duplexes was achieved. By normalizing the signals to an internal standard (a universal probe), a more than twofold discrimination (> 2.4x) was achieved between PM and 1-MM duplexes at the dissociation temperature at which 50% of the probe-target duplexes remained intact. This provided excellent differentiation among representatives of different Bacillus species, both individually and in mixtures of two or three. The overall pattern of hybridization derived from this hierarchical probe set also provided a clear 'chip fingerprint' for each of these closely related Bacillus species.

  16. Development, Characterization and Experimental Validation of a Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Gene Expression Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement. PMID:23110046

  17. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement. PMID:23110046

  18. Oligonucleotide-based therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Magen, Iddo; Hornstein, Eran

    2014-10-10

    Molecular genetics insight into the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer׳s disease, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, encourages direct interference with the activity of neurotoxic genes or the molecular activation of neuroprotective pathways. Oligonucleotide-based therapies are recently emerging as an efficient strategy for drug development and these can be employed as new treatments of neurodegenerative states. Here we review advances in this field in recent years which suggest an encouraging assessment that oligonucleotide technologies for targeting of RNAs will enable the development of new therapies and will contribute to preservation of brain integrity.

  19. Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides inhibit the intrinsic tenase complex.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, J P; Lan, H C

    1998-09-01

    Systemic administration of ISIS 2302, a 20-mer antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide targeting human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 mRNA, causes prolongation of plasma clotting times in both monkey and human studies. The anticoagulant effects of ISIS 2302 were investigated with both in vitro coagulation assays in human plasma and purified enzyme systems. At high oligonucleotide plasma concentrations (>100 microgram/mL), prolongation of the prothrombin and thrombin times was observed. In a thrombin time assay using purified components, high concentrations of ISIS 2302 inhibited thrombin clotting activity both by stimulating inhibition by heparin cofactor II and directly competing with fibrinogen for binding to anion binding exosite I. In contrast, low concentrations of ISIS 2302 (<100 microgram/mL) showed a selective, linear prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time (PTT). The rate limiting effect of 50 microgram/mL ISIS 2302, which prolonged the PTT to 1.5 times control, was identified by sequential modification of the clotting assay. Delaying addition of oligonucleotide until after contact activation failed to correct prolongation of the PTT. The calcium-dependent steps of the intrinsic pathway were individually assessed by adding sufficient activated coagulation factor to correct the PTT in plasma deficient in that specific factor. Addition of factor XIa, IXa, VIIIa, or Va failed to correct the PTT in the presence of ISIS 2302. In contrast, 0.2 nmol/L factor Xa corrected prolongation of the PTT in factor X-deficient plasma with or without oligonucleotide present. ISIS 2302 (50 microgram/mL) did not prolong a modified Russel viper venom time, suggesting no significant inhibition of prothrombinase. Thus, 50 microgram/mL ISIS 2302 prolonged the PTT by selectively inhibiting intrinsic tenase activity. ISIS 2302 showed partial inhibition of intrinsic tenase activity (to approximately 35% of control) at clinically relevant oligonucleotide

  20. CD studies on ribonuclease A - oligonucleotides interactions.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Keren-Zur, M; Lapidot, Y

    1977-04-01

    The interaction of ApU, Aps4U, Aps4Up, ApAps4Up and Gps4U with RNase A was studied by CD difference spectroscopy. The use of 4-thiouridine (s4U) containing oligonucleotides enables to distinguish between the interaction of the different components of the ligand with the enzyme. The mode of binding of the oligonucleotides to the enzyme is described. From this mode of binding it is explained why Aps4U, for example, inhibits RNase A, while s4UpA serves as a substrate.

  1. Screening for oligonucleotide binding affinity by a convenient fluorescence competition assay.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J G; Liu, X; Balasubramanian, S

    1999-09-01

    A competitive homogeneous quenched fluorescence assay system is described for the high throughput screening of DNA conjugates that bind to single-stranded DNA. Fluorescence signal is generated by competitive binding of the sample molecule to a target strand labelled with a quencher probe, which is otherwise hybridised to a complementary strand containing a fluorescent probe. Thus fluorescence generated is related to the affinity of the sample. Competitive analysis of a number of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates gave data that correlated well with the corresponding UV melting data. The assay will be useful for screening of large numbers of potential single-stranded binding molecules.

  2. Oligonucleotide microarrays in constitutional genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Keren, Boris; Le Caignec, Cedric

    2011-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays such as comparative genomic hybridization arrays and SNP microarrays enable the identification of genomic imbalances - also termed copy-number variants - with increasing resolution. This article will focus on the most significant applications of high-throughput oligonucleotide microarrays, both in genetic diagnosis and research. In genetic diagnosis, the method is becoming a standard tool for investigating patients with unexplained developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and/or with multiple congenital anomalies. Oligonucleotide microarray have also been recently applied to the detection of genomic imbalances in prenatal diagnosis either to characterize a chromosomal rearrangement that has previously been identified by standard prenatal karyotyping or to detect a cryptic genomic imbalance in a fetus with ultrasound abnormalities and a normal standard prenatal karyotype. In research, oligonucleotide microarrays have been used for a wide range of applications, such as the identification of new genes responsible for monogenic disorders and the association of a copy-number variant as a predisposing factor to a common disease. Despite its widespread use, the interpretation of results is not always straightforward. We will discuss several unexpected results and ethical issues raised by these new methods.

  3. Oligonucleotides direct synthesis on porous silicon chip.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Luca; De Tommasi, Edoardo; Rea, Ilaria; Rotiroti, Lucia; Giangrande, Luca; Oliviero, Giorgia; Borbone, Nicola; Galeone, Aldo; Piccialli, Gennaro

    2008-01-01

    A solid phase oligonucleotide (ON) synthesis on porous silicon (PSi) chip is presented. The prepared Si-OH surface were analyzed by FT-IR and the OH functions were quantified by reaction with 3'-phosphoramidite nucleotide building block. Short ONs were synthesized on the chip surface and the coupling yields evaluated. PMID:18776583

  4. Liver as a target for oligonucleotide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Alfica; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Fitzgerald, Kevin

    2013-12-01

    Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are an emerging class of drugs that hold the promise for silencing "un-druggable" targets,thus creating unique opportunities for innovative medicines. As opposed to gene therapy, oligonucleotides are considered to be more akin to small molecule therapeutics because they are small,completely synthetic in origin, do not integrate into the host genome,and have a defined duration of therapeutic activity after which effects recover to baseline. They offer a high degree of specificity at the genetic level, thereby reducing off-target effects.At the same time, they provide a strategy for targeting any gene in the genome, including transcripts that produce mutated proteins.Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics include short interfering RNA (siRNA), that degrade target mRNA through RISC mediated RNAi; anti-miRs, that target miRNAs; miRNA mimics, that regulate target mRNA; antisense oligonucleotides, that may be working through RNAseH mediated mRNA decay; mRNA upregulation,by targeting long non-coding RNAs; and oligonucleotides induced alternative splicing [1]. All these approaches require some minimal degree of homology at the nucleic acid sequence level for them to be functional. The different mechanisms of action and their relevant activity are outlined in Fig. 1. Besides homology,RNA secondary structure has also been exploited in the case of ribozymes and aptamers, which act by binding to nucleic acids or proteins, respectively. While there have been many reports of gene knockdown and gene modulation in cell lines and mice with all these methods, very few have advanced to clinical stages.The main obstacle to date has been the safe and effective intracellular delivery of these compounds in higher species, including humans. Indeed, their action requires direct interaction with DNA/RNA within the target cell so even when one solves the issues of tissue and cellular access, intracellular/intranuclear location represents yet another barrier to

  5. A fully scalable online pre-processing algorithm for short oligonucleotide microarray atlases

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Leo; Torrente, Aurora; Elo, Laura L.; Brazma, Alvis; Rung, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Rapid accumulation of large and standardized microarray data collections is opening up novel opportunities for holistic characterization of genome function. The limited scalability of current preprocessing techniques has, however, formed a bottleneck for full utilization of these data resources. Although short oligonucleotide arrays constitute a major source of genome-wide profiling data, scalable probe-level techniques have been available only for few platforms based on pre-calculated probe effects from restricted reference training sets. To overcome these key limitations, we introduce a fully scalable online-learning algorithm for probe-level analysis and pre-processing of large microarray atlases involving tens of thousands of arrays. In contrast to the alternatives, our algorithm scales up linearly with respect to sample size and is applicable to all short oligonucleotide platforms. The model can use the most comprehensive data collections available to date to pinpoint individual probes affected by noise and biases, providing tools to guide array design and quality control. This is the only available algorithm that can learn probe-level parameters based on sequential hyperparameter updates at small consecutive batches of data, thus circumventing the extensive memory requirements of the standard approaches and opening up novel opportunities to take full advantage of contemporary microarray collections. PMID:23563154

  6. Construction and evaluation of a Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven David; Raman, Babu; McKeown, Catherine K; Kale, Shubhangi P; He, Zhili; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2007-04-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium that can directly convert cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Microarray technology is a powerful tool to gain insights into cellular processes by examining gene expression under various physiological states. Oligonucleotide microarray probes were designed for 96.7% of the 3163 C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 candidate protein-encoding genes and then a partial-genome microarray containing 70 C. thermocellum specific probes was constructed and evaluated. We detected a signal-to-noise ratio of three with as little as 1.0 ng of genomic DNA and only low signals from negative control probes (nonclostridial DNA), indicating the probes were sensitive and specific. In order to further test the specificity of the array we amplified and hybridized 10 C. thermocellum polymerase chain reaction products that represented different genes and found gene specific hybridization in each case. We also constructed a whole-genome microarray and prepared total cellular RNA from the same point in early-logarithmic growth phase from two technical replicates during cellobiose fermentation. The reliability of the microarray data was assessed by cohybridization of labeled complementary DNA from the cellobiose fermentation samples and the pattern of hybridization revealed a linear correlation. These results taken together suggest that our oligonucleotide probe set can be used for sensitive and specific C. thermocellum transcriptomic studies in the future.

  7. Chemosensitization by antisense oligonucleotides targeting MDM2.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2005-02-01

    The MDM2 oncogene is overexpressed in many human cancers, including sarcomas, certain hematologic malignancies, and breast, colon and prostate cancers. The p53-MDM2 interaction pathway has been suggested as a novel target for cancer therapy. To that end, several strategies have been explored, including the use of small polypeptides targeted to the MDM2-p53 binding domain, anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides, and natural agents. Different generations of anti-human-MDM2 oligonucleotides have been tested in in vitro and in vivo human cancer models, revealing specific inhibition of MDM2 expression and significant antitumor activity. Use of antisense oligos potentiated the effects of growth inhibition, p53 activation and p21 induction by several chemotherapeutic agents. Increased therapeutic effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drugs in human cancer cell lines carrying p53 mutations or deletions have shown the ability of MDM2 inhibitors to act as chemosensitizers in various types of tumors through both p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Inhibiting MDM2 appears to also have a role in radiation therapy for human cancer, regardless of p53 status, providing a rationale for the development of a new class of radiosensitizers. Moreover, MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides potentiate the effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors by affecting in vitro and in vivo proliferation, apoptosis and protein expression in hormone-refractory and hormone-dependent human prostate cancer cells. These data support the development, among other MDM2 inhibitors, of anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides as a novel class of anticancer agents, and suggest a potentially relevant role for the oligonucleotides when integrated with conventional treatments and/or other signaling inhibitors in novel therapeutic strategies.

  8. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-02-24

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  9. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1998-01-01

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods thereof based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays.

  10. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-09-29

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  11. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-07-21

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  12. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum. PMID:27427698

  13. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum.

  14. AFM and electroanalytical studies of synthetic oligonucleotide hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chiorcea Paquim, A-M; Diculescu, V C; Oretskaya, T S; Oliveira Brett, A M

    2004-11-15

    The first and most important step in the development and manufacture of a sensitive DNA-biosensor for hybridization detection is the immobilization procedure of the nucleic acid probe on the transducer surface, maintaining its mobility and conformational flexibility. MAC Mode AFM images were used to demonstrate that oligonucleotide (ODN) molecules adsorb spontaneously at the electrode surface. After adsorption, the ODN layers were formed by molecules with restricted mobility, as well as by superposed molecules, which can lead to reduced hybridization efficiency. The images also showed the existence of pores in the adsorbed ODN film that revealed large parts of the electrode surface, and enabled non-specific adsorption of other ODNs on the uncovered areas. Electrostatic immobilization onto a clean glassy carbon electrode surface was followed by hybridization with complementary sequences and by control experiments with non-complementary sequences, studied using differential pulse voltammetry. The data obtained showed that non-specific adsorption strongly influenced the results, which depended on the sequence of the ODNs. In order to reduce the contribution of non-specific adsorbed ODNs during hybridization experiments, the carbon electrode surface was modified. After modification, the AFM images showed an electrode completely covered by the ODN probe film, which prevented the undesirable binding of target ODN molecules to the electrode surface. The changes of interfacial capacitance that took place after hybridization or control experiments showed the formation of a mixed multilayer that strongly depended on the local environment of the immobilized ODN.

  15. Identification of characteristic oligonucleotides in the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA sequence dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Willson, Richard C.; Fox, George E.

    2002-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The phylogenetic structure of the bacterial world has been intensively studied by comparing sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA). This database of sequences is now widely used to design probes for the detection of specific bacteria or groups of bacteria one at a time. The success of such methods reflects the fact that there are local sequence segments that are highly characteristic of particular organisms or groups of organisms. It is not clear, however, the extent to which such signature sequences exist in the 16S rRNA dataset. A better understanding of the numbers and distribution of highly informative oligonucleotide sequences may facilitate the design of hybridization arrays that can characterize the phylogenetic position of an unknown organism or serve as the basis for the development of novel approaches for use in bacterial identification. RESULTS: A computer-based algorithm that characterizes the extent to which any individual oligonucleotide sequence in 16S rRNA is characteristic of any particular bacterial grouping was developed. A measure of signature quality, Q(s), was formulated and subsequently calculated for every individual oligonucleotide sequence in the size range of 5-11 nucleotides and for 15mers with reference to each cluster and subcluster in a 929 organism representative phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, the perfect signature sequences were compared to the full set of 7322 sequences to see how common false positives were. The work completed here establishes beyond any doubt that highly characteristic oligonucleotides exist in the bacterial 16S rRNA sequence dataset in large numbers. Over 16,000 15mers were identified that might be useful as signatures. Signature oligonucleotides are available for over 80% of the nodes in the representative tree.

  16. Probing specific DNA sequences with luminescent semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Jason R.; Nie, Shuming

    2001-06-01

    The development of new fluorescent probes has impacted many areas of research such as medical diagnostics, high-speed drug screening, and basic molecular biology. Main limitations to traditional organic fluorophores are their relatively weak intensities, short life times (eg., photobleaching), and broad emission spectra. The desire for more intense fluorescent probes with higher quality photostability and narrow emission wavelengths has led to the development and utilization of semiconductor quantum dots as a new label. In this work, we have modified semicondutor quantum dots (QD's) with synthetic oligonucleotides to probe a specific DNA target sequence both in solution as well as immobilized on a solid substrate. In the first approach, specific target sequences are detected in solution by using short oligonucleotide probes, which are covalently linked to semiconductor quantum dots. In the second approach, DNA target sequences are covalently attached to a glass substrate and detected using oligonucleotides linked to semiconductor quantum dots.

  17. Antisense oligonucleotides, microRNAs, and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, Alberto; Chroni, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    The specificity of Watson-Crick base pairing and the development of several chemical modifications to oligonucleotides have enabled the development of novel drug classes for the treatment of different human diseases. This review focuses on promising results of recent preclinical or clinical studies on targeting HDL metabolism and function by antisense oligonucleotides and miRNA-based therapies. Although many hurdles regarding basic mechanism of action, delivery, specificity, and toxicity need to be overcome, promising results from recent clinical trials and recent approval of these types of therapy to treat dyslipidemia suggest that the treatment of HDL dysfunction will benefit from these unique clinical opportunities. Moreover, an overview of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) developed for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease and currently being tested in clinical studies is provided. Initial studies have shown that these compounds are generally safe and well tolerated, but ongoing large clinical studies will assess their long-term safety and efficacy.

  18. Human papilloma virus strain detection utilising custom-designed oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Duncan; Platt, Mark; Javad, Farzad; Day, Philip J R

    2011-01-01

    Within the past 15 years, the utilisation of microarray technology for the detection of specific pathogen strains has increased rapidly. Presently, it is possible to simply purchase a pre-manufactured "off the shelf " oligonucleotide microarray bearing a wide variety of known signature DNA sequences previously identified in the organism being studied. Consequently, a hybridisation analysis may be used to pinpoint which strain/s is present in any given clinical sample. However, there exists a problem if the study necessitates the identification of novel sequences which are not represented in commercially available microarray chips. Ideally, such investigations require an in situ oligonucleotide microarray platform with the capacity to synthesise microarrays bearing probe sequences designed solely by the researcher. This chapter will focus on the employment of the Combimatrix® B3 CustomArray™ for the synthesis of reusable, bespoke microarrays for the purpose of discerning multiple Human Papilloma Virus strains. PMID:20938834

  19. In situ oligonucleotide synthesis on carbon materials: stable substrates for microarray fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Margaret F.; Lockett, Matthew R.; Rodesch, Matthew J.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Cerrina, Franco; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    Glass has become the standard substrate for the preparation of DNA arrays. Typically, glass is modified using silane chemistries to provide an appropriate functional group for nucleic acid synthesis or oligonucleotide immobilization. We have found substantial issues with the stability of these surfaces as manifested in the unwanted release of oligomers from the surface when incubated in aqueous buffers at moderate temperatures. To address this issue, we have explored the use of carbon-based substrates. Here, we demonstrate in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on carbon-based substrates using light-directed photolithographic phosphoramidite chemistry and evaluate the stabilities of the resultant DNA arrays compared to those fabricated on silanized glass slides. DNA arrays on carbon-based substrates are substantially more stable than arrays prepared on glass. This superior stability enables the use of high-density DNA arrays for applications involving high temperatures, basic conditions, or where serial hybridization and dehybridization is desired. PMID:18084027

  20. Capillary electrophoresis and fluorescence studies on molecular beacon-based variable length oligonucleotide target discrimination.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Akhilesh; Zhang, Minquan; Goad, David; Olah, Glenn; Malayer, Jerry R; El-Rassi, Ziad

    2003-01-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are oligonucleotide probes having a compact hairpin structure, with a fluorophore attached to one end and a quencher molecule attached to the other end. In its native state, the fluorophore is quenched by virtue of its proximity to the quencher molecule. Upon hybridization with its complementary oligonucleotide target, fluorescence is elicited due to a conformational change that results in separation of the fluorophore and quencher molecule. The present study describes the hybridization interaction of an MB to various complementary target sequences. The effects of temperature and length of complementary target sequences on hybridization were investigated using capillary electrophoresis and solution-based fluorescence techniques. Hybridization efficiency was dependent on the ability of the target sequences to destabilize the stem region by binding directly to the stem region. Optimal hybridization occurred between 40 and 50 degrees C for all targets tested, with the true target forming a more stable hybrid complex.

  1. The prebiotic synthesis of deoxythymidine oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen-Sherwood, E.; Odom, D. G.; Oro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Deoxythymidine 5 prime-triphosphate in the presence of deoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate, cyanamide and 4-amino-5-imidazole carboxamide polymerizes under drying conditions at moderate temperatures (60 to 90 C) to yield oligonucleotides of up to four units in length. Enzymatic analysis indicated that the majority of these oligomers contained natural 3 prime-5 prime phosphodiester bonds. This reaction offers a possible method for the formation of deoxyoligonucleotides under primitive earth conditions.

  2. One-step insertion of oligonucleotide linkers or adapters to DNA using unphosphorylated oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kang, C; Inouye, M

    1993-10-01

    A simple and efficient method was developed for insertion of oligonucleotide sequences into plasmids. In this method, an unphosphorylated oligonucleotide was ligated to the restriction-digested phagemid DNA. Only the single strand of the oligonucleotide was ligated at the 5' end of the phagemid, and this resulted in the creation of a long self-complementary single-strand overhang. These single-strand overhang-possessing phagemids were used to transform XL-1 cells. This simple ligation and transformation reaction rendered approximately 7.5 x 10(4) to 5 x 10(5) of white colonies per microgram DNA from the isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galacto-pyranoside plate. This number is almost the same or even higher than the number of blue colonies from the control reaction in which ligase was used without the oligonucleotide. By this method we could mutate one enzyme site to another or create ribozyme and substrate phagemid very easily. Fidelity of this method was checked by restriction digestion, DNA sequencing and ribozyme reaction. By DNA sequencing, we observed that 100% of the white colonies contained a single oligonucleotide sequence.

  3. Hybridization properties of long nucleic acid probes for detection of variable target sequences, and development of a hybridization prediction algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Öhrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Eriksson, Ronnie; Golbob, Sultan; Elfaitouri, Amal; Benachenhou, Farid; Strømme, Maria; Blomberg, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in nucleic acid-based techniques for detection of infectious agents, such as influenza viruses, is that of nucleic acid sequence variation. DNA probes, 70-nt long, some including the nucleotide analog deoxyribose-Inosine (dInosine), were analyzed for hybridization tolerance to different amounts and distributions of mismatching bases, e.g. synonymous mutations, in target DNA. Microsphere-linked 70-mer probes were hybridized in 3M TMAC buffer to biotinylated single-stranded (ss) DNA for subsequent analysis in a Luminex® system. When mismatches interrupted contiguous matching stretches of 6 nt or longer, it had a strong impact on hybridization. Contiguous matching stretches are more important than the same number of matching nucleotides separated by mismatches into several regions. dInosine, but not 5-nitroindole, substitutions at mismatching positions stabilized hybridization remarkably well, comparable to N (4-fold) wobbles in the same positions. In contrast to shorter probes, 70-nt probes with judiciously placed dInosine substitutions and/or wobble positions were remarkably mismatch tolerant, with preserved specificity. An algorithm, NucZip, was constructed to model the nucleation and zipping phases of hybridization, integrating both local and distant binding contributions. It predicted hybridization more exactly than previous algorithms, and has the potential to guide the design of variation-tolerant yet specific probes. PMID:20864443

  4. Kinetics of hybridization on surface oligonucleotide microchips: theory, experiment, and comparison with hybridization on gel-based microchips.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, N V; Chechetkin, V R; Pan'kov, S V; Somova, O G; Livshits, M A; Donnikov, M Y; Turygin, A Y; Barsky, V E; Zasedatelev, A S

    2006-08-01

    The optimal design of oligonucleotide microchips and efficient discrimination between perfect and mismatch duplexes strongly depend on the external transport of target DNA to the cells with immobilized probes as well as on respective association and dissociation rates at the duplex formation. In this paper we present the relevant theory for hybridization of DNA fragments with oligonucleotide probes immobilized in the cells on flat substrate. With minor modifications, our theory also is applicable to reaction-diffusion hybridization kinetics for the probes immobilized on the surface of microbeads immersed in hybridization solution. The main theoretical predictions are verified with control experiments. Besides that, we compared the characteristics of the surface and gel-based oligonucleotide microchips. The comparison was performed for the chips printed with the same pin robot, for the signals measured with the same devices and processed by the same technique, and for the same hybridization conditions. The sets of probe oligonucleotides and the concentrations of probes in respective solutions used for immobilization on each platform were identical as well. We found that, despite the slower hybridization kinetics, the fluorescence signals and mutation discrimination efficiency appeared to be higher for the gel-based microchips with respect to their surface counterparts even for the relatively short hybridization time about 0.5-1 hour. Both the divergence between signals for perfects and the difference in mutation discrimination efficiency for the counterpart platforms rapidly grow with incubation time. In particular, for hybridization during 3 h the signals for gel-based microchips surpassed their surface counterparts in 5-20 times, while the ratios of signals for perfect-mismatch pairs for gel microchips exceeded the corresponding ratios for surface microchips in 2-4 times. These effects may be attributed to the better immobilization efficiency and to the higher

  5. Penetration of oligonucleotides into mouse organism through mucosa and skin.

    PubMed

    Vlassov, V V; Karamyshev, V N; Yakubov, L A

    1993-08-01

    Benzylamide 5'-32P-oligonucleotide derivatives were shown to penetrate into mice organism when administered by various routes; intranasally, per os, intravaginally and per rectum. In all cases, the compounds are rapidly accumulated in blood and guts. Analysis of the radioactive material from blood and pancreas revealed intact oligonucleotides. Although concentrations of oligonucleotides in tissues differ considerably by the various methods of administration, the efficiency of delivery is sufficient to consider all the routes as being of therapeutic value. Dose effect on the efficiency of oligonucleotide penetration into mice suggests the transport to be a saturable process. Application of an oligonucleotide lotion on mice ear helices results in reproducible accumulation of radioactivity in the animal tissues. Effectiveness of oligonucleotide delivery into mouse through skin can be improved by using electrophoretic procedure.

  6. Template-Directed Ligation of Peptides to Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruick, Richard K.; Dawson, Philip E.; Kent, Stephen BH; Usman, Nassim; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides and peptides have enjoyed a wide range of applications in both biology and chemistry. As a consequence, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have received considerable attention, most notably in the development of antisense constructs with improved pharmacological properties. In addition, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have been used as molecular tags, in the assembly of supramolecular arrays and in the construction of encoded combinatorial libraries. To make these chimeric molecules more accessible for a broad range of investigations, we sought to develop a facile method for joining fully deprotected oligonucleotides and peptides through a stable amide bond linkage. Furthermore, we wished to make this ligation reaction addressable, enabling one to direct the ligation of specific oligonucleotide and peptide components.To confer specificity and accelerate the rate of the reaction, the ligation process was designed to be dependent on the presence of a complementary oligonucleotide template.

  7. Oligonucleotide frequencies in DNA follow a Yule distribution.

    PubMed

    Martindale, C; Konopka, A K

    1996-03-01

    We show that ranked oligonucleotide frequencies in both protein-coding and non-coding regions from several genomes fit poorly to the Zipf distribution, but that the same frequency data give excellent fit to the Yule distribution. The parameters of the Yule distribution for oligonucleotide frequencies in exons are the same (within error limits) as the parameters for introns. This precludes application of Yule or Zipf distribution of ranked oligonucleotide frequencies to annotating new genomic sequences.

  8. Comparative oligonucleotide fingerprints of three plant viroids.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, H J; Domdey, H; Sänger, H L

    1977-01-01

    5' Phosphorylation in vitro with gamma-32P-ATP and T4 phage induced polynucleotide kinase was used to obtain RNAase A and RNAase T1 fingerprints of three plant viroids: Potato spindle tuber viroid from tomato (PSTV-tom), chrysanthemum stunt viroid from cineraria (ChSV-cin) and citrus exocortis viroid from Gynura aurantiaca (CEV-gyn). These three viroids differ significantly from each other as judged from their oligonucleotide patterns. This supports the concept of individual viroid species. Images PMID:896482

  9. Distance-dependent emission from dye-labeled oligonucleotides on striped Au/Ag nanowires: effect of secondary structure and hybridization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Stoermer, Rebecca L; Keating, Christine D

    2006-10-11

    When fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides are located near metal surfaces, their emission intensity is impacted by both electromagnetic effects (i.e., quenching and/or enhancement of emission) and the structure of the nucleic acids (e.g., random coil, hairpin, or duplex). We present experiments exploring the effect of label position and secondary structure in oligonucleotide probes as a function of hybridization buffer, which impacts the percentage of double-stranded probes on the surface after exposure to complementary DNA. Nanowires containing identifiable patterns of Au and Ag segments were used as the metal substrates in this work, which enabled us to directly compare different dye positions in a single multiplexed experiment and differences in emission for probes attached to the two metals. The observed metal-dye separation dependence for unstructured surface-bound oligonucleotides is highly sensitive to hybridization efficiency, due to substantial changes in DNA extension from the surface upon hybridization. In contrast, fluorophore labeled oligonucleotides designed to form hairpin secondary structures analogous to solution-phase molecular beacon probes are relatively insensitive to hybridization efficiency, since the folded form is quenched and therefore does not appreciably impact the observed distance-dependence of the response. Differences in fluorescence patterning on Au and Ag were noted as a function of not only chromophore identity but also metal-dye separation. For example, emission intensity for TAMRA-labeled oligonucleotides changed from brighter on Ag for 24-base probes to brighter on Au for 48-base probes. We also observed fluorescence enhancement at the ends of nanowires and at surface defects where heightened electromagnetic fields affect the fluorescence.

  10. Small molecule aptamer assays based on fluorescence anisotropy signal-enhancer oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Sandrine; Bouilloud, Prisca; De Oliveira Coelho, Gisella; Henry, Mickael; Peyrin, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Herein, we design novel fluorescence anisotropy (FA) aptamer sensing platforms dedicated to small molecule detection. The assay strategy relied on enhanced fluctuations of segmental motion dynamics of the aptamer tracer mediated by an unlabelled, partially complementary oligonucleotide. The signal-enhancer oligonucleotide (SEO) essentially served as a free probe fraction revealer. By targeting specific regions of the signalling functional nucleic acid, the SEO binding to the unbound aptamer triggered perturbations of both the internal DNA flexibility and the localized dye environment upon the free probe to duplex structure transition. This potentiating effect determined increased FA variations between the duplex and target bound states of the aptameric probe. FA assay responses were obtained with both pre-structured (adenosine) and unstructured (tyrosinamide) aptamers and with dyes of different photochemical properties (fluorescein and texas red). The multiplexed analysis ability was further demonstrated through the simultaneous multicolour detection of the two small targets. The FA method appears to be especially simple, sensitive and widely applicable. PMID:27085946

  11. Attomolar Zika virus oligonucleotide detection based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification and AC susceptometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bo; Qiu, Zhen; Ma, Jing; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa; Johansson, Christer; Svedlindh, Peter; Strömberg, Mattias

    2016-12-15

    Because of the serological cross-reactivity among the flaviviruses, molecular detection methods, such as reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), play an important role in the recent Zika outbreak. However, due to the limited sensitivity, the detection window of RT-PCR for Zika viremia is only about one week after symptom onset. By combining loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and AC susceptometry, we demonstrate a rapid and homogeneous detection system for the Zika virus oligonucleotide. Streptavidin-magnetic nanoparticles (streptavidin-MNPs) are premixed with LAMP reagents including the analyte and biotinylated primers, and their hydrodynamic volumes are dramatically increased after a successful LAMP reaction. Analyzed by a portable AC susceptometer, the changes of the hydrodynamic volume are probed as Brownian relaxation frequency shifts, which can be used to quantify the Zika virus oligonucleotide. The proposed detection system can recognize 1 aM synthetic Zika virus oligonucleotide in 20% serum with a total assay time of 27min, which can hopefully widen the detection window for Zika viremia and is therefore promising in worldwide Zika fever control. PMID:27423039

  12. Oligonucleotide-based systems: DNA, microRNAs, DNA/RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Pawan; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    There are an increasing number of applications that have been developed for oligonucleotide-based biosensing systems in genetics and biomedicine. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors are those where the probe to capture the analyte is a strand of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA) or a synthetic analogue of naturally occurring nucleic acids. This review will shed light on various types of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA (particularly microRNAs), their role and their application in biosensing. It will also cover DNA/RNA aptamers, which can be used as bioreceptors for a wide range of targets such as proteins, small molecules, bacteria and even cells. It will also highlight how the invention of synthetic oligonucleotides such as peptide nucleic acid (PNA) or locked nucleic acid (LNA) has pushed the limits of molecular biology and biosensor development to new perspectives. These technologies are very promising albeit still in need of development in order to bridge the gap between the laboratory-based status and the reality of biomedical applications. PMID:27365033

  13. Sequencing by hybridization with the generic 6-mer oligonucleotide microarray : an advanced scheme for data processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Chechetkin, V. R.; Turygin, A. Y.; Proudnikov, D. Y.; Prokopenko, D. V.; Kirillov, E. V.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Russian Academy of Sciences

    2000-08-01

    DNA sequencing by hybridization was carried out with a microarray of all 4{sup 6} = 4,096 hexadeoxyribonucleotides (the generic microchip). The oligonucleotides immobilized in 100 x 100 x 20-{mu}m polyacrylamide gel pads of the generic microchip were hybridized with fluorescently labeled ssDNA, providing perfect and mismatched duplexes. Melting curves were measured in parallel for all microchip duplexes with a fluorescence microscope equipped with CCD camera. This allowed us to discriminate the perfect duplexes formed by the oligonucleotides, which are complementary to the target DNA. The DNA sequence was reconstructed by overlapping the complementary oligonucleotide probes. We developed a data processing scheme to heighten the discrimination of perfect duplexes from mismatched ones. The procedure was united with a reconstruction of the DNA sequence. The scheme includes the proper definition of a discriminant signal, preprocessing, and the variational principle for the sequence indicator function. The effectiveness of the procedure was confirmed by sequencing, proofreading, and nucleotide polymorphism (mutation) analysis of 13 DNA fragments from 31 to 70 nucleotides long.

  14. Attomolar Zika virus oligonucleotide detection based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification and AC susceptometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bo; Qiu, Zhen; Ma, Jing; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa; Johansson, Christer; Svedlindh, Peter; Strömberg, Mattias

    2016-12-15

    Because of the serological cross-reactivity among the flaviviruses, molecular detection methods, such as reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), play an important role in the recent Zika outbreak. However, due to the limited sensitivity, the detection window of RT-PCR for Zika viremia is only about one week after symptom onset. By combining loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and AC susceptometry, we demonstrate a rapid and homogeneous detection system for the Zika virus oligonucleotide. Streptavidin-magnetic nanoparticles (streptavidin-MNPs) are premixed with LAMP reagents including the analyte and biotinylated primers, and their hydrodynamic volumes are dramatically increased after a successful LAMP reaction. Analyzed by a portable AC susceptometer, the changes of the hydrodynamic volume are probed as Brownian relaxation frequency shifts, which can be used to quantify the Zika virus oligonucleotide. The proposed detection system can recognize 1 aM synthetic Zika virus oligonucleotide in 20% serum with a total assay time of 27min, which can hopefully widen the detection window for Zika viremia and is therefore promising in worldwide Zika fever control.

  15. Oligonucleotide-based systems: DNA, microRNAs, DNA/RNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Pawan; Estrela, Pedro; Ladomery, Michael

    2016-06-30

    There are an increasing number of applications that have been developed for oligonucleotide-based biosensing systems in genetics and biomedicine. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors are those where the probe to capture the analyte is a strand of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA) or a synthetic analogue of naturally occurring nucleic acids. This review will shed light on various types of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA (particularly microRNAs), their role and their application in biosensing. It will also cover DNA/RNA aptamers, which can be used as bioreceptors for a wide range of targets such as proteins, small molecules, bacteria and even cells. It will also highlight how the invention of synthetic oligonucleotides such as peptide nucleic acid (PNA) or locked nucleic acid (LNA) has pushed the limits of molecular biology and biosensor development to new perspectives. These technologies are very promising albeit still in need of development in order to bridge the gap between the laboratory-based status and the reality of biomedical applications. PMID:27365033

  16. Approaches for the detection of harmful algal blooms using oligonucleotide interactions.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Karen L; Leterme, Sophie C; Ellis, Amanda V; Lenehan, Claire E

    2015-01-01

    Blooms of microscopic algae in our waterways are becoming an increasingly important environmental concern. Many are sources of harmful biotoxins that can lead to death in humans, marine life and birds. Additionally, their biomass can cause damage to ecosystems such as oxygen depletion, displacement of species and habitat alteration. Globally, the number and frequency of harmful algal blooms has increased over the last few decades, and monitoring and detection strategies have become essential for managing these events. This review discusses developments in the use of oligonucleotide-based 'molecular probes' for the selective monitoring of algal cell numbers. Specifically, hybridisation techniques will be a focus.

  17. Direct profiling of environmental microbial populations by thermal dissociation analysis of native rRNAs hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El Fantroussi, Said; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Bernhard, Anne E.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Smidt, H.; Yershov, G. M.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile directly extracted rRNA from environmental microbial populations without PCR amplification. In our initial inspection of two distinct estuarine study sites, the hybridization patterns were reproducible and varied between estuarine sediments of differing salinities. The determination of a thermal dissociation curve (i.e., melting profile) for each probe-target duplex provided information on hybridization specificity, which is essential for confirming adequate discrimination between target and nontarget sequences.

  18. High-throughput detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria using oligonucleotide microarray with quantum dots as fluorescent labels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aihua; Qiu, Zhigang; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhaoli; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Jun-Wen

    2014-08-18

    Bacterial pathogens are mostly responsible for food-borne diseases, and there is still substantial room for improvement in the effective detection of these organisms. In the present study, we explored a new method to detect target pathogens easily and rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity. This method uses an oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots as fluorescent labels. Oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16SrRNA gene were synthesized to create an oligonucleotide microarray. The PCR products labeled with biotin were subsequently hybridized using an oligonucleotide microarray. Following incubation with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots coated with streptavidin, fluorescent signals were detected with a PerkinElmer Gx Microarray Scanner. The results clearly showed specific hybridization profiles corresponding to the bacterial species assessed. Two hundred and sixteen strains of food-borne bacterial pathogens, including standard strains and isolated strains from food samples, were used to test the specificity, stability, and sensitivity of the microarray system. We found that the oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots used as fluorescent labels can successfully discriminate the bacterial organisms at the genera or species level, with high specificity and stability as well as a sensitivity of 10 colony forming units (CFU)/mL of pure culture. We further tested 105 mock-contaminated food samples and achieved consistent results as those obtained from traditional biochemical methods. Together, these results indicate that the quantum dot-based oligonucleotide microarray has the potential to be a powerful tool in the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria in foods.

  19. A novel multifunctional oligonucleotide microarray for Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microarrays are invaluable tools for genome interrogation, SNP detection, and expression analysis, among other applications. Such broad capabilities would be of value to many pathogen research communities, although the development and use of genome-scale microarrays is often a costly undertaking. Therefore, effective methods for reducing unnecessary probes while maintaining or expanding functionality would be relevant to many investigators. Results Taking advantage of available genome sequences and annotation for Toxoplasma gondii (a pathogenic parasite responsible for illness in immunocompromised individuals) and Plasmodium falciparum (a related parasite responsible for severe human malaria), we designed a single oligonucleotide microarray capable of supporting a wide range of applications at relatively low cost, including genome-wide expression profiling for Toxoplasma, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genotyping of both T. gondii and P. falciparum. Expression profiling of the three clonotypic lineages dominating T. gondii populations in North America and Europe provides a first comprehensive view of the parasite transcriptome, revealing that ~49% of all annotated genes are expressed in parasite tachyzoites (the acutely lytic stage responsible for pathogenesis) and 26% of genes are differentially expressed among strains. A novel design utilizing few probes provided high confidence genotyping, used here to resolve recombination points in the clonal progeny of sexual crosses. Recent sequencing of additional T. gondii isolates identifies >620 K new SNPs, including ~11 K that intersect with expression profiling probes, yielding additional markers for genotyping studies, and further validating the utility of a combined expression profiling/genotyping array design. Additional applications facilitating SNP and transcript discovery, alternative statistical methods for quantifying gene expression, etc. are also pursued at pilot scale to inform

  20. An imputation approach for oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Lu, Qing; Fu, Wenjiang J

    2013-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are commonly adopted for detecting and qualifying the abundance of molecules in biological samples. Analysis of microarray data starts with recording and interpreting hybridization signals from CEL images. However, many CEL images may be blemished by noises from various sources, observed as "bright spots", "dark clouds", and "shadowy circles", etc. It is crucial that these image defects are correctly identified and properly processed. Existing approaches mainly focus on detecting defect areas and removing affected intensities. In this article, we propose to use a mixed effect model for imputing the affected intensities. The proposed imputation procedure is a single-array-based approach which does not require any biological replicate or between-array normalization. We further examine its performance by using Affymetrix high-density SNP arrays. The results show that this imputation procedure significantly reduces genotyping error rates. We also discuss the necessary adjustments for its potential extension to other oligonucleotide microarrays, such as gene expression profiling. The R source code for the implementation of approach is freely available upon request.

  1. Template switching between PNA and RNA oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohler, C.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The origin of the RNA world is not easily understood, as effective prebiotic syntheses of the components of RNA, the beta-ribofuranoside-5'-phosphates, are hard to envisage. Recognition of this difficulty has led to the proposal that other genetic systems, the components of which are more easily formed, may have preceded RNA. This raises the question of how transitions between one genetic system and another could occur. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) resembles RNA in its ability to form double-helical complexes stabilized by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between adenine and thymine and between cytosine and guanine, but has a backbone that is held together by amide rather than by phosphodiester bonds. Oligonucleotides bases on RNA are known to act as templates that catalyse the non-enzymatic synthesis of their complements from activated mononucleotides, we now show that RNA oligonucleotides facilitate the synthesis of complementary PNA strands and vice versa. This suggests that a transition between different genetic systems can occur without loss of information.

  2. BIOCONJUGATION OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDES FOR TREATING LIVER FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhaoyang; Hajj Houssein, Houssam S.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2009-01-01

    Liver fibrosis results from chronic liver injury due to hepatitis B and C, excessive alcohol ingestion, and metal ion overload. Fibrosis culminates in cirrhosis and results in liver failure. Therefore, a potent antifibrotic therapy is in urgent need to reverse scarring and eliminate progression to cirrhosis. Although activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) remains the principle cell type responsible for liver fibrosis, perivascular fibroblasts of portal and central veins as well as periductular fibroblasts are other sources of fibrogenic cells. This review will critically discuss various treatment strategies for liver fibrosis, including prevention of liver injury, reduction of inflammation, inhibition of HSC activation, degradation of scar matrix, and inhibition of aberrant collagen synthesis. Oligonucleotides (ODNs) are short, single-stranded nucleic acids, which disrupt expression of target protein by binding to complementary mRNA or forming triplex with genomic DNA. Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide an attractive strategy for treating liver fibrosis. A series of TFOs have been developed for inhibiting the transcription of α1(I) collagen gene, which opens a new area for antifibrotic drugs. There will be in depth discussion on the use of TFOs and how different bioconjugation strategies can be utilized for their site-specific delivery to HSCs or hepatocytes for enhanced antifibrotic activities. Various insights developed in individual strategy and the need for multipronged approaches will also be discussed. PMID:18154454

  3. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  4. Disulfide-linked oligonucleotide phosphorothioates - Novel analogues of nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Taifeng; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis of phosphorothioate analogs of oligonucleotides by the oxidation of deoxyadenosine 3',5'-bisphosphorothioate (3) was attempted. Cyclization of 3 is much more efficient than oligomerization under all the conditions investigated. However, a preformed oligonucleotide carrying a 5'-terminal phosphorotioate group undergoes efficient chain-extension when oxidized in the presence of 3.

  5. Enzymatic Synthesis of Single-Stranded Clonal Pure Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Ducani, Cosimo; Högberg, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides, or oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs), are very important in several fields of science such as molecular biology, diagnostics, nanotechnology, and gene therapy. They are usually chemically synthesized. Here we describe an enzymatic method which enables us to synthesize pure oligonucleotides which can be up to several hundred long bases. PMID:27671934

  6. Antisense oligonucleotides: is the glass half full or half empty?

    PubMed

    Bennett, C F

    1998-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are widely used as tools to explore the pharmacological effects of inhibiting expression of a selected gene product. In addition, they are being investigated as therapeutic agents for the treatment of viral infections, cancers, and inflammatory disorders. Proof that the pharmacological effects produced by the oligonucleotides are attributable to an antisense mechanism of action requires careful experimentation. Central to this problem is the finding that oligonucleotides are capable of interacting with and modulating function of specific proteins in both a sequence-independent and -dependent manner. Despite these undesired interactions, it has been possible to demonstrate that oligonucleotides are capable of binding to a specific RNA in cultured cells, or within tissues, resulting in selective reduction of the targeted gene product and pharmacological activity. In general, these oligonucleotides were identified after a selection process in which multiple oligonucleotides targeting different regions on the RNA were evaluated for direct inhibition of targeted gene product, resulting in the identification of a potent and selective oligonucleotide. Similar to other drug-receptor interactions, selection of the most potent inhibitor results in an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio, yielding increased confidence that activity observed is the result of a desired effect of the inhibitor. With careful selection, proper controls, and careful dose-response curves it is possible to utilize antisense oligonucleotides as effective research tools and potentially as therapeutic agents. PMID:9413924

  7. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Wassman, Christopher D; Tam, Phillip Y; Lathrop, Richard H; Weiss, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed 'cross-hybridization', as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries.

  8. Noncoding oligonucleotides: the belle of the ball in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Shum, Ka-To; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy carries the promise of cures for many diseases based on manipulating the expression of a person's genes toward the therapeutic goal. The relevance of noncoding oligonucleotides to human disease is attracting widespread attention. Noncoding oligonucleotides are not only involved in gene regulation, but can also be modified into therapeutic tools. There are many strategies that leverage noncoding oligonucleotides for gene therapy, including small interfering RNAs, antisense oligonucleotides, aptamers, ribozymes, decoys, and bacteriophage phi 29 RNAs. In this chapter, we will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of gene therapies that use noncoding oligonucleotides for disease treatment. The mechanism and development of each therapeutic will be described, with a particular focus on its clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the challenges associated with developing nucleic acid therapeutics and the prospects for future success.

  9. 2'-modified nucleosides for site-specific labeling of oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, Elizabeth S.; Miller, Jeremiah E.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    We report the synthesis of 2'-modified nucleosides designed specifically for incorporating labels into oligonucleotides. Conversion of these nucleosides to phosphoramidite and solid support-bound derivatives proceeds in good yield. Large-scale synthesis of 11-mer oligonucleotides possessing the 2'-modified nucleosides is achieved using these derivatives. Thermal denaturation studies indicate that the presence of 2'-modified nucleosides in 11-mer duplexes has minimal destabilizing effects on the duplex structure when the nucleosides are placed at the duplex termini. The powerful combination of phosphoramidite and support-bound derivatives of 2'-modified nucleosides affords the large-scale preparation of an entirely new class of oligonucleotides. The ability to synthesize oligonucleotides containing label attachment sites at 3', intervening, and 5' locations of a duplex is a significant advance in the development of oligonucleotide conjugates.

  10. Ca2+ enrichment in culture medium potentiates effect of oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Shin-ichiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Waki, Reiko; Wada, Shunsuke; Wada, Fumito; Noda, Mio; Obika, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Antisense and RNAi-related oligonucleotides have gained attention as laboratory tools and therapeutic agents based on their ability to manipulate biological events in vitro and in vivo. We show that Ca2+ enrichment of medium (CEM) potentiates the in vitro activity of multiple types of oligonucleotides, independent of their net charge and modifications, in various cells. In addition, CEM reflects in vivo silencing activity more consistently than conventional transfection methods. Microscopic analysis reveals that CEM provides a subcellular localization pattern of oligonucleotides resembling that obtained by unassisted transfection, but with quantitative improvement. Highly monodispersed nanoparticles ∼100 nm in size are found in Ca2+-enriched serum-containing medium regardless of the presence or absence of oligonucleotides. Transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals that the 100-nm particles are in fact an ensemble of much smaller nanoparticles (ϕ ∼ 15 nm). The presence of these nanoparticles is critical for the efficient uptake of various oligonucleotides. In contrast, CEM is ineffective for plasmids, which are readily transfected via the conventional calcium phosphate method. Collectively, CEM enables a more accurate prediction of the systemic activity of therapeutic oligonucleotides, while enhancing the broad usability of oligonucleotides in the laboratory. PMID:26101258

  11. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  12. Ca2+ enrichment in culture medium potentiates effect of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hori, Shin-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Waki, Reiko; Wada, Shunsuke; Wada, Fumito; Noda, Mio; Obika, Satoshi

    2015-10-30

    Antisense and RNAi-related oligonucleotides have gained attention as laboratory tools and therapeutic agents based on their ability to manipulate biological events in vitro and in vivo. We show that Ca(2+) enrichment of medium (CEM) potentiates the in vitro activity of multiple types of oligonucleotides, independent of their net charge and modifications, in various cells. In addition, CEM reflects in vivo silencing activity more consistently than conventional transfection methods. Microscopic analysis reveals that CEM provides a subcellular localization pattern of oligonucleotides resembling that obtained by unassisted transfection, but with quantitative improvement. Highly monodispersed nanoparticles ~100 nm in size are found in Ca(2+)-enriched serum-containing medium regardless of the presence or absence of oligonucleotides. Transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals that the 100-nm particles are in fact an ensemble of much smaller nanoparticles (ϕ ∼ 15 nm). The presence of these nanoparticles is critical for the efficient uptake of various oligonucleotides. In contrast, CEM is ineffective for plasmids, which are readily transfected via the conventional calcium phosphate method. Collectively, CEM enables a more accurate prediction of the systemic activity of therapeutic oligonucleotides, while enhancing the broad usability of oligonucleotides in the laboratory.

  13. Method for the preparation of size marker for synthetic oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, G.Z.; Liu, A.; Leung, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase was used for the addition of (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)dCTP to the 3'-OH termini of oligo(dT)/sub 12-18/. A collection of oligonucleotides with chain lengths ranging continuously from 13-mer to over 100-mer was generated. The reaction mixture was then mixed with oligo(dT)/sub 12-18/ labeled with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP by T/sub 4/ polynucleotide kinase. A sequence ladder with the bottom base as 12-mer was then formed. These oligonucleotides served as size marker for the purification and identification of oligonucleotides on polyacrylamide gel.

  14. Optimization of single-base-pair mismatch discrimination in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El Fantroussi, Said; Smidt, Hauke; Smoot, James C.; Tribou, Erik H.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The discrimination between perfect-match and single-base-pair-mismatched nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by using oligonucleotide DNA microarrays and nonequilibrium dissociation rates (melting profiles). DNA and RNA versions of two synthetic targets corresponding to the 16S rRNA sequences of Staphylococcus epidermidis (38 nucleotides) and Nitrosomonas eutropha (39 nucleotides) were hybridized to perfect-match probes (18-mer and 19-mer) and to a set of probes having all possible single-base-pair mismatches. The melting profiles of all probe-target duplexes were determined in parallel by using an imposed temperature step gradient. We derived an optimum wash temperature for each probe and target by using a simple formula to calculate a discrimination index for each temperature of the step gradient. This optimum corresponded to the output of an independent analysis using a customized neural network program. These results together provide an experimental and analytical framework for optimizing mismatch discrimination among all probes on a DNA microarray.

  15. Design and evaluation of oligonucleotide-microarray method for the detection of human intestinal bacteria in fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-Fu; Beggs, Marjorie L; Robertson, Latriana H; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2002-08-01

    An oligonucleotide-microarray method was developed for the detection of intestinal bacteria in fecal samples collected from human subjects. The 16S rDNA sequences of 20 predominant human intestinal bacterial species were used to design oligonucleotide probes. Three 40-mer oligonucleotides specific for each bacterial species (total 60 probes) were synthesized and applied to glass slides. Cyanine5 (CY5)-labeled 16S rDNAs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from human fecal samples or bacterial DNA using two universal primers and were hybridized to the oligo-microarray. The 20 intestinal bacterial species tested were Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides distasonis, Clostridium clostridiiforme, Clostridium leptum, Fusobacterium prausnitzii, Peptostreptococcus productus, Ruminococcus obeum, Ruminococcus bromii, Ruminococcus callidus, Ruminococcus albus, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium infantis, Eubacterium biforme, Eubacterium aerofaciens, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus faecium. The two universal primers were able to amplify full size 16S rDNA from all of the 20 bacterial species tested. The hybridization results indicated that the oligo-microarray method developed in this study is a reliable method for the detection of predominant human intestinal bacteria in the fecal samples.

  16. Preparation of electrode-immobilized, redox-modified oligonucleotides for electrochemical DNA and aptamer-based sensing.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yi; Lai, Rebecca Y; Plaxco, Kevin W

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of a number of reagentless, electrochemical sensors based on the target-induced folding or unfolding of electrode-bound oligonucleotides, with examples reported to date, including sensors for the detection of specific nucleic acids, proteins, small molecules and inorganic ions. These devices, which are often termed electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) and E-AB (electrochemical, aptamer-based) sensors, are comprised of an oligonucleotide probe modified with a redox reporter (in this protocol methylene blue) at one terminus and attached to a gold electrode via a thiol-gold bond at the other. Binding of an analyte to the oligonucleotide probe changes its structure and dynamics, which, in turn, influences the efficiency of electron transfer to the interrogating electrode. This class of sensors perform well even when challenged directly with blood serum, soil and other complex, multicomponent sample matrices. This protocol describes the fabrication of E-DNA and E-AB sensors. The protocol can be completed in 12 h.

  17. Oligonucleotide-Functionalized Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew Robert

    In this thesis, we describe the properties of oligonucleotide-functionalized gold colloids under the unique set of conditions where the particles are geometrically anisotropic and have nanometer-scale dimensions. While nearly two decades of previous work elucidated numerous unexpected and emergent phenomena arising from the combination of inorganic nanoparticles with surface-bound DNA strands, virtually nothing was known about how these properties are altered when the shape of the nanoparticle core is chosen to be non-spherical. In particular, we are interested in understanding, and ultimately controlling, the ways in which these DNA-conjugated anisotropic nanostructures interact when their attraction is governed by programmable DNA hybridization events. Chapter 1 introduces the field of DNA-based materials assembly by discussing how nanoscale building blocks which present rigid, directional interactions can be thought of as possessing artificial versions of the familiar chemical principles of "bonds" and "valency". In chapter 2 we explore the fundamental interparticle binding thermodynamics of DNA-functionalized spherical and anisotropic nanoparticles, which reveals enormous preferences for collective ligand interactions occurring between flat surfaces over those that occur between curved surfaces. Using these insights, chapter 3 demonstrates that when syntheses produce mixtures of different nanoparticle shapes, the tailorable nature of DNA-mediated interparticle association can be used to selectively crystallize and purify the desired anisotropic nanostructure products, leaving spherical impurity particles behind. Chapter 4 leverages the principle that the flat facets of anisotropic particles generate directional DNA-based hybridization interactions to assemble a variety of tailorable nanoparticle superlattices whose symmetry and dimensionality are a direct consequence of the shape of the nanoparticle building block used in their construction. Chapter 5 explores

  18. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  19. Micro- and nano-structure based oligonucleotide sensors.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, David C; Shaver, Michael P; Hands, Philip J W

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents a review of micro- and nano-structure based oligonucleotide detection and quantification techniques. The characteristics of such devices make them very attractive for Point-of-Care or On-Site-Testing biosensing applications. Their small scale means that they can be robust and portable, their compatibility with modern CMOS electronics means that they can easily be incorporated into hand-held devices and their suitability for mass production means that, out of the different approaches to oligonucleotide detection, they are the most suitable for commercialisation. This review discusses the advantages of micro- and nano-structure based sensors and covers the various oligonucleotide detection techniques that have been developed to date. These include: Bulk Acoustic Wave and Surface Acoustic Wave devices, micro- and nano-cantilever sensors, gene Field Effect Transistors, and nanowire and nanopore based sensors. Oligonucleotide immobilisation techniques are also discussed.

  20. Sequence-dependent theory of oligonucleotide hybridization kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-05-07

    A theoretical approach to the prediction of the sequence and temperature-dependent rate constants for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions has been developed based on the theory of relaxation kinetics. One-sided and two-sided melting reaction mechanisms for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions have been considered, analyzed, modified, and compared to select a physically consistent as well as robust model for prediction of the relaxation times of DNA hybridization reactions that agrees with the experimental evidence. The temperature- and sequence-dependent parameters of the proposed model have been estimated using available experimental data. The relaxation time model that we developed has been combined with the nearest neighbor model of hybridization thermodynamics to estimate the temperature- and sequence-dependent rate constants of an oligonucleotide hybridization reaction. The model-predicted rate constants are compared to experimentally determined rate constants for the same oligonucleotide hybridization reactions. Finally, we consider a few important applications of kinetically controlled DNA hybridization reactions.

  1. Molecular Selection, Modification and Development of Therapeutic Oligonucleotide Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chao; Lv, Quanxia; Li, Defang; Xu, Xuegong; Liu, Baoqin; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are the dominant agents used in inhibition of biological target molecules for disease therapeutics, but there are concerns of immunogenicity, production, cost and stability. Oligonucleotide aptamers have comparable affinity and specificity to targets with monoclonal antibodies whilst they have minimal immunogenicity, high production, low cost and high stability, thus are promising inhibitors to rival antibodies for disease therapy. In this review, we will compare the detailed advantages and disadvantages of antibodies and aptamers in therapeutic applications and summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and modification approaches. We will present therapeutic oligonucleotide aptamers in preclinical studies for skeletal diseases and further discuss oligonucleotide aptamers in different stages of clinical evaluation for various disease therapies including macular degeneration, cancer, inflammation and coagulation to highlight the bright commercial future and potential challenges of therapeutic oligonucleotide aptamers. PMID:26978355

  2. Traceback identification of plant components in commercial compound feed through an oligonucleotide microarray based on tubulin intron polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Elena; Morello, Laura; Gianì, Silvia; Breviario, Diego

    2014-11-01

    According to EU Regulations, all components of commercial compound feed need to be declared on the label. Effective protection against fraud requires severe controls based on accurate analytical methods to ascertain what is declared by the producers. The aim of this work was to develop an oligonucleotide microarray for the molecular recognition of multiple plant components in commercial feeds. We tested the potential of the highly polymorphic first intron sequences from members of the plant β-tubulin gene family as a target for plant DNA identification. 23 oligonucleotide capture probes, targeting species-specific intron sequences, were assembled within a low density microarray for the identification of 10 plant species, selected from among those most commonly used in cattle feed formulation. The ability of the array to detect specific components in complex flour blends and in compound feed was evaluated.

  3. Oligonucleotide conjugates - Candidates for gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Evans, James C; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-10-01

    The potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of oligonucleotides (ONs) have attracted great attention in recent years. The capability of ONs to selectively inhibit target genes through antisense and RNA interference mechanisms, without causing un-intended sideeffects has led them to be investigated for various biomedical applications, especially for the treatment of viral diseases and cancer. In recent years, many researchers have focused on enhancing the stability and target specificity of ONs by encapsulating/complexing them with polymers or lipid chains to formulate nanoparticles/nanocomplexes/micelles. Also, chemical modification of nucleic acids has emerged as an alternative to impart stability to ONs against nucleases and other degrading enzymes and proteins found in blood. In addition to chemically modifying the nucleic acids directly, another strategy that has emerged, involves conjugating polymers/peptide/aptamers/antibodies/proteins, preferably to the sense strand (3'end) of siRNAs. Conjugation to the siRNA not only enhances the stability and targeting specificity of the siRNA, but also allows for the development of self-administering siRNA formulations, with a much smaller size than what is usually observed for nanoparticle (∼200nm). This review concentrates mainly on approaches and studies involving ON-conjugates for biomedical applications. PMID:27521696

  4. Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E; Mariella Jr., R P; Christian, A T; Gardner, S N; Williams, J M

    2003-11-24

    This report summarizes the work done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding project, part of the Microelectronic Bioprocesses Program at DARPA. The goal of the project was to develop a process by which long (circa 10,000 base-pair) synthetic DNA molecules could be synthesized in a timely and economic manner. During construction of the long molecule, errors in DNA sequence occur during hybridization and/or the subsequent enzymatic process. The work done on this project has resulted in a novel synthesis scheme that we call the parallel pyramid synthesis protocol, the development of a suit of computational tools to minimize and quantify errors in the synthesized DNA sequence, and experimental proof of this technique. The modeling consists of three interrelated modules: the bioinformatics code which determines the specifics of parallel pyramid synthesis for a given chain of long DNA, the thermodynamics code which tracks the products of DNA hybridization and polymerase extension during the later steps in the process, and the kinetics model which examines the temporal and spatial processes during one thermocycle. Most importantly, we conducted the first successful syntheses of a gene using small starting oligomers (tetramers). The synthesized sequence, 813 base pairs long, contained a 725 base pair gene, modified green fluorescent protein (mGFP), which has been shown to be a functional gene by cloning into cells and observing its green fluorescent product.

  5. Oligonucleotide Therapies: The Past and the Present

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Karin E.; Gissberg, Olof; Smith, C.I. Edvard

    2015-01-01

    In this review we address the development of oligonucleotide (ON) medicines from a historical perspective by listing the landmark discoveries in this field. The various biological processes that have been targeted and the corresponding ON interventions found in the literature are discussed together with brief updates on some of the more recent developments. Most ON therapies act through antisense mechanisms and are directed against various RNA species, as exemplified by gapmers, steric block ONs, antagomirs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), micro-RNA mimics, and splice switching ONs. However, ONs binding to Toll-like receptors and those forming aptamers have completely different modes of action. Similar to other novel medicines, the path to success has been lined with numerous failures, where different therapeutic ONs did not stand the test of time. Since the first ON drug was approved for clinical use in 1998, the therapeutic landscape has changed considerably, but many challenges remain until the expectations for this new form of medicine are met. However, there is room for cautious optimism. PMID:26160334

  6. Oligonucleotide conjugates - Candidates for gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Evans, James C; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-10-01

    The potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of oligonucleotides (ONs) have attracted great attention in recent years. The capability of ONs to selectively inhibit target genes through antisense and RNA interference mechanisms, without causing un-intended sideeffects has led them to be investigated for various biomedical applications, especially for the treatment of viral diseases and cancer. In recent years, many researchers have focused on enhancing the stability and target specificity of ONs by encapsulating/complexing them with polymers or lipid chains to formulate nanoparticles/nanocomplexes/micelles. Also, chemical modification of nucleic acids has emerged as an alternative to impart stability to ONs against nucleases and other degrading enzymes and proteins found in blood. In addition to chemically modifying the nucleic acids directly, another strategy that has emerged, involves conjugating polymers/peptide/aptamers/antibodies/proteins, preferably to the sense strand (3'end) of siRNAs. Conjugation to the siRNA not only enhances the stability and targeting specificity of the siRNA, but also allows for the development of self-administering siRNA formulations, with a much smaller size than what is usually observed for nanoparticle (∼200nm). This review concentrates mainly on approaches and studies involving ON-conjugates for biomedical applications.

  7. Potent Antiscrapie Activities of Degenerate Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kocisko, David A.; Vaillant, Andrew; Lee, Kil Sun; Arnold, Kevin M.; Bertholet, Nadine; Race, Richard E.; Olsen, Emily A.; Juteau, Jean-Marc; Caughey, Byron

    2006-01-01

    Although transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are incurable, a key therapeutic approach is prevention of conversion of the normal, protease-sensitive form of prion protein (PrP-sen) to the disease-specific protease-resistant form of prion protein (PrP-res). Here degenerate phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS-ONs) are introduced as low-nM PrP-res conversion inhibitors with strong antiscrapie activities in vivo. Comparisons of various PS-ON analogs indicated that hydrophobicity and size were important, while base composition was only minimally influential. PS-ONs bound avidly to PrP-sen but could be displaced by sulfated glycan PrP-res inhibitors, indicating the presence of overlapping binding sites. Labeled PS-ONs also bound to PrP-sen on live cells and were internalized. This binding likely accounts for the antiscrapie activity. Prophylactic PS-ON treatments more than tripled scrapie survival periods in mice. Survival times also increased when PS-ONs were mixed with scrapie brain inoculum. With these antiscrapie activities and their much lower anticoagulant activities than that of pentosan polysulfate, degenerate PS-ONs are attractive new compounds for the treatment of TSEs. PMID:16495266

  8. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic.

  9. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion. PMID:26536353

  10. Development of the excimer probe responsible for DNA target bearing the silylated pyrenes at base moiety.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Tomohisa; Ichimura, Mayumi; Kato, Mitsuhisa; Suzuki, Kenya; Takahashi, Yuki; Shinozuka, Kazuo

    2014-09-15

    For the development of the excimer probe responsible for DNA target, the deoxyuridine phosphoramidite derivative bearing the silylated pyrene attached at the C-5 position was prepared and incorporated into oligonucleotides. The modified oligonucleotides showed the excimer emission in the absence of the target DNA, on the other hands, the excimer emission was quenched in the presence of the target DNA. For the utilization of the fluorescence behavior, the novel molecular beacon probe containing the silylated pyrene-modified nucleoside at the stem region was designed and the fluorescence property of the probe found to show the responsibility for DNA target.

  11. Design and synthesis of hairpin probe for specific mis-match discrimination.

    PubMed

    Misra, Arvind; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, K C

    2007-01-01

    A single stranded hairpin probe labeled with fluorescein at its 5'-end and terminates with deoxyguanosine nucleotide at 3'- end, as quencher, has been designed and synthesized in an automated DNA synthesizer. The system has been used as an alternative to molecular beacon. The deoxyguanosine residues have been kept at the 3'-end of the complementary arm strand to quench the fluorescence intensity of the fluorophore, making the hairpin probe behave like a conventional molecular beacon. The proposed probe has been used to find a correlation between fluorescence and thermal behaviour on hybridizing it with several mismatched target oligonucleotides. The designed probe has shown greater degree of specificity with perfectly matched target oligonucleotide, while it shows a variable degree of destabilization with mismatched (A/C) target complementary oligonucleotides.

  12. Silver and Cyanine Staining of Oligonucleotides in Polyacrylamide Gel

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    To explore why some oligonucleotides in denaturing polyacrylamide gel could not be silver-stained, 134 different oligonucleotides were analyzed using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis stained with silver and asymmetric cyanine. As a result, we found that the sensitivity of oligos (dA), (dC), (dG) and (dT) to silver staining could be ranged as (dA) > (dG) > (dC) > (dT) from high to low. It was unexpected that oligo (dT) was hard to be silver-stained. Moreover, the silver staining of an oligonucleotide containing base T could be partially or completely inhibited by base T. The inhibition of silver staining by base T was a competitive inhibition which could be affected by the amounts of the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, the cis-distance between the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, and the gel concentration. The changes of the intensity of an oligonucleotide band caused by the changes of DNA base composition were diverse and interesting. The intensity of some oligonucleotide bands would significantly change when the changes of DNA base composition accumulated to a certain extent (usually ≥ 4 nt). The sensitivity of cyanine staining of ≤ 11-nt long oligonucleotides could be enhanced about 250-fold by fixing the gels with methanol fixing solution. PMID:26650843

  13. Silver and Cyanine Staining of Oligonucleotides in Polyacrylamide Gel.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weizhong; Zhou, Huafu; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    To explore why some oligonucleotides in denaturing polyacrylamide gel could not be silver-stained, 134 different oligonucleotides were analyzed using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis stained with silver and asymmetric cyanine. As a result, we found that the sensitivity of oligos (dA), (dC), (dG) and (dT) to silver staining could be ranged as (dA) > (dG) > (dC) > (dT) from high to low. It was unexpected that oligo (dT) was hard to be silver-stained. Moreover, the silver staining of an oligonucleotide containing base T could be partially or completely inhibited by base T. The inhibition of silver staining by base T was a competitive inhibition which could be affected by the amounts of the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, the cis-distance between the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, and the gel concentration. The changes of the intensity of an oligonucleotide band caused by the changes of DNA base composition were diverse and interesting. The intensity of some oligonucleotide bands would significantly change when the changes of DNA base composition accumulated to a certain extent (usually ≥ 4 nt). The sensitivity of cyanine staining of ≤ 11-nt long oligonucleotides could be enhanced about 250-fold by fixing the gels with methanol fixing solution.

  14. Microarrays for identifying binding sites and probing structure of RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kierzek, Ryszard; Turner, Douglas H.; Kierzek, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are widely used in various biological studies. In this review, application of oligonucleotide microarrays for identifying binding sites and probing structure of RNAs is described. Deep sequencing allows fast determination of DNA and RNA sequence. High-throughput methods for determination of secondary structures of RNAs have also been developed. Those methods, however, do not reveal binding sites for oligonucleotides. In contrast, microarrays directly determine binding sites while also providing structural insights. Microarray mapping can be used over a wide range of experimental conditions, including temperature, pH, various cations at different concentrations and the presence of other molecules. Moreover, it is possible to make universal microarrays suitable for investigations of many different RNAs, and readout of results is rapid. Thus, microarrays are used to provide insight into oligonucleotide sequences potentially able to interfere with biological function. Better understanding of structure–function relationships of RNA can be facilitated by using microarrays to find RNA regions capable to bind oligonucleotides. That information is extremely important to design optimal sequences for antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA because both bind to single-stranded regions of target RNAs. PMID:25505162

  15. Simplified Paper Format for Detecting HIV Drug Resistance in Clinical Specimens by Oligonucleotide Ligation.

    PubMed

    Panpradist, Nuttada; Beck, Ingrid A; Chung, Michael H; Kiarie, James N; Frenkel, Lisa M; Lutz, Barry R

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a chronic infection that can be managed by antiretroviral treatment (ART). However, periods of suboptimal viral suppression during lifelong ART can select for HIV drug resistant (DR) variants. Transmission of drug resistant virus can lessen or abrogate ART efficacy. Therefore, testing of individuals for drug resistance prior to initiation of treatment is recommended to ensure effective ART. Sensitive and inexpensive HIV genotyping methods are needed in low-resource settings where most HIV infections occur. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is a sensitive point mutation assay for detection of drug resistance mutations in HIV pol. The current OLA involves four main steps from sample to analysis: (1) lysis and/or nucleic acid extraction, (2) amplification of HIV RNA or DNA, (3) ligation of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect single nucleotide mutations that confer HIV drug resistance, and (4) analysis via oligonucleotide surface capture, denaturation, and detection (CDD). The relative complexity of these steps has limited its adoption in resource-limited laboratories. Here we describe a simplification of the 2.5-hour plate-format CDD to a 45-minute paper-format CDD that eliminates the need for a plate reader. Analysis of mutations at four HIV-1 DR codons (K103N, Y181C, M184V, and G190A) in 26 blood specimens showed a strong correlation of the ratios of mutant signal to total signal between the paper CDD and the plate CDD. The assay described makes the OLA easier to perform in low resource laboratories. PMID:26751207

  16. Simplified Paper Format for Detecting HIV Drug Resistance in Clinical Specimens by Oligonucleotide Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Panpradist, Nuttada; Beck, Ingrid A.; Chung, Michael H.; Kiarie, James N.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Lutz, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a chronic infection that can be managed by antiretroviral treatment (ART). However, periods of suboptimal viral suppression during lifelong ART can select for HIV drug resistant (DR) variants. Transmission of drug resistant virus can lessen or abrogate ART efficacy. Therefore, testing of individuals for drug resistance prior to initiation of treatment is recommended to ensure effective ART. Sensitive and inexpensive HIV genotyping methods are needed in low-resource settings where most HIV infections occur. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is a sensitive point mutation assay for detection of drug resistance mutations in HIV pol. The current OLA involves four main steps from sample to analysis: (1) lysis and/or nucleic acid extraction, (2) amplification of HIV RNA or DNA, (3) ligation of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect single nucleotide mutations that confer HIV drug resistance, and (4) analysis via oligonucleotide surface capture, denaturation, and detection (CDD). The relative complexity of these steps has limited its adoption in resource-limited laboratories. Here we describe a simplification of the 2.5-hour plate-format CDD to a 45-minute paper-format CDD that eliminates the need for a plate reader. Analysis of mutations at four HIV-1 DR codons (K103N, Y181C, M184V, and G190A) in 26 blood specimens showed a strong correlation of the ratios of mutant signal to total signal between the paper CDD and the plate CDD. The assay described makes the OLA easier to perform in low resource laboratories. PMID:26751207

  17. One-pot synthesis of fluorescent oligonucleotide Ag nanoclusters for specific and sensitive detection of DNA.

    PubMed

    Lan, Guo-Yu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2011-01-15

    In this study, we prepared fluorescent, functional oligonucleotide-stabilized silver nanoclusters (FFDNA-Ag NCs) through one-pot synthesis and then employed them as probes for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The FFDNA-Ag NCs were obtained through the NaBH(4)-mediated reduction of AgNO(3) in the presence of a DNA strand having the sequence 5'-C(12)-CCAGATACTCACCGG-3'. The specific DNA scaffold combines a fluorescent base motif (C(12)) and a specific sequence (CCAGATACTCACCGG) that recognizes a gene for fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH). The sensing mechanism of our new probe is based on the FFDNA-Ag NCs having different stabilities (fluorescence intensities) in solutions containing 150 mM NaCl in the absence and presence of perfect match DNA (DNA(pmt)). Under the optimal conditions (150 mM NaCl, 20 mM phosphate solution, pH 7.0), the fluorescence ratios of the FFDNA-Ag NC probes in the presence and absence of DNA(pmt), plotted against the concentration of DNA(pmt), was linear over the range 25-1000 nM (R(2)=0.98), with a limit of detection (S/N=3) of 14 nM. This cost-effective and simple FFDNA-Ag NC probe is sensitive and selective for SNPs of a gene for FAH.

  18. Mechanism of oligonucleotide release from cationic liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Zelphati, O; Szoka, F C

    1996-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for oligonucleotide (ODN) release from cationic lipid complexes in cells that accounts for various observations on cationic lipid-nucleic acid-cell interactions. Fluorescent confocal microscopy of cells treated with rhodamine-labeled cationic liposome/ fluorescein-labeled ODN (F-ODN) complexes show the F-ODN separates from the lipid after internalization and enters the nucleus leaving the fluorescent lipid in cytoplasmic structures. ODN displacement from the complex was studied by fluorescent resonance energy transfer. Anionic liposome compositions (e.g., phosphatidylserine) that mimic the cytoplasmic facing monolayer of the cell membrane released ODN from the complex at about a 1:1 (-/+) charge ratio. Release was independent of ionic strength and pH. Physical separation of the F-ODN from monovalent and multivalent cationic lipids was confirmed by gel electrophoresis. Fluid but not solid phase anionic liposomes are required, whereas the physical state of the cationic lipids does not effect the release. Water soluble molecules with a high negative linear charge density, dextran sulfate, or heparin also release ODN. However, ATP, spermidine, spermine, tRNA, DNA, polyglutamic acid, polylysine, bovine serum albumin, or histone did not release ODN, even at 100-fold charge excess (-/+). Based upon these results, we propose that the complex, after internalization by endocytosis, induces flip-flop of anionic lipids from the cytoplasmic facing monolayer. Anionic lipids laterally diffuse into the complex and form a charged neutralized ion-pair with the cationic lipids. This leads to displacement of the ODN from the cationic lipid and its release into the cytoplasm. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8876163

  19. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  20. Development of a gold nanoparticle-based oligonucleotide microarray for simultaneous detection of seven swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Dang, Erle; Gao, Jinzhuai; Guo, Sen; Li, Zheng

    2013-07-01

    A gold nanoparticle (GNP) based oligonucleotide microarray assay (GNMA) that combined GNP-based multiplex asymmetric PCR with silver enhancement detection, was developed for simultaneous detection of seven important swine viruses in intensive swine production. Multiplex PCR was first performed to enable the target fragments of seven viruses containing a universal sequence, which were labeled simultaneously with GNPs by multiplex asymmetric PCR in the presence of excess GNP-conjugated primer. Target labeled products were captured by virus-specific oligonucleotide probes immobilized on microarrays, followed by silver staining for signal enhancement. Black image of microarray spots was easily detected by the naked eye or a simple flatbed scanner and quantified. The results for purified plasmid constructs indicated that the assay was highly specific for detecting the seven viruses in single or multiple infections, and as few as 6-80 copies/μl of specific viral target fragments were detected successfully. Fifty-seven archived samples were tested by this assay, and the results were 100% consistent with previous results based on real-time PCR and those obtained by conventional PCR/RT-PCR and sequencing. The assay is appropriate for the routine diagnosis of viral infections in pigs due to its simplicity, low-cost, high specificity and sensitivity.

  1. Identification of Medically Important Candida and Non-Candida Yeast Species by an Oligonucleotide Array▿

    PubMed Central

    Leaw, Shiang Ning; Chang, Hsien Chang; Barton, Richard; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of yeast infections has increased in the recent decades, with Candida albicans still being the most common cause of infections. However, infections caused by less common yeasts have been widely reported in recent years. Based on the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS 1) and ITS 2 sequences of the rRNA genes, an oligonucleotide array was developed to identify 77 species of clinically relevant yeasts belonging to 16 genera. The ITS regions were amplified by PCR with a pair of fungus-specific primers, followed by hybridization of the digoxigenin-labeled PCR product to a panel of oligonucleotide probes immobilized on a nylon membrane for species identification. A collection of 452 yeast strains (419 target and 33 nontarget strains) was tested, and a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 97% were obtained by the array. The detection limit of the array was 10 pg of yeast genomic DNA per assay. In conclusion, yeast identification by the present method is highly reliable and can be used as an alternative to the conventional identification methods. The whole procedure can be finished within 24 h, starting from isolated colonies. PMID:17507521

  2. Structure and stability of the complex formed by oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Cui; Niu, Lin; Yan, Jingjing; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; Liang, Dehai

    2012-05-28

    Polycations and cationic lipids have been widely used as non-viral vectors for the delivery of plasmid DNA, siRNA and anti-sense oligonucleotides. To demonstrate that one polycation can form a complex with several types of DNA, we conducted a comparative study on the complexation of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) with 2000 bp salmon testes DNA (dsDNA), 21 bp double-stranded oligonucleotides (ds-oligo), and 21 nt single-stranded oligonucleotides (ss-oligo) in PBS buffer. The complexes are prepared by a titration method and the process is monitored by laser light scattering. It was found that in most cases, ss-oligo and ds-oligo form complexes with higher molecular weights than the complex formed by dsDNA at the same +/- ratio immediately after mixing. More importantly, the complexes formed by oligonucleotides are not stable, the scattered intensity gradually decreases to the level of the solvent in weeks. Atomic force microscopy measurements also indicate that the freshly prepared complex is subject to environmental changes and could dissociate very quickly. The behaviour of oligonucleotides cannot be predicted by the classical polyelectrolyte theories.

  3. Characteristic archaebacterial 16S rRNA oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, T. J.; Jurka, J.; Sobieski, J. M.; Pickett, M. H.; Woese, C. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    A method of analyzing 16S rRNA catalog data has been developed in which groupings at various taxonomic levels can be characterized in terms of specific "signature" oligonucleotides. This approach provides an alternative means for evaluating higher order branching possibilities and can be used to assess the phylogenetic position of isolates that are poorly placed by the usual clustering procedures. This signature approach has been applied to forty archaebacterial catalogs and every oligonucleotide with significant signature value has been identified. Sets of specific oligonucleotides were identified for every major group on a dendrogram produced by cluster analysis procedures. Signatures that would establish between group relationships were also sought and found. In the case of the Methanobacteriaceae the clustering methods suggest a specific relationship to the Methanococcaceae. This inclusion is in fact supported by six strong signature oligonucleotides. However there are also significant numbers of signature oligonucleotides supporting a specific relationship of the Methanobacteriaceae to either the Halobacteriaceae or the Methanomicrobiaceae. Thus the placement of the Methanobacteriaceae is less certain than the usual dendrograms imply. The signature approach also was used to assess the phylogenetic position of Thermoplasma acidophilum which is found to be more closely related to the methanogen/halophile Division than to the sulfur dependent Division of the archaebacteria. This does not imply however that Thermoplasma acidophilum is properly regarded as being in the methanogen/halophile Division.

  4. Event-specific detection of seven genetically modified soybean and maizes using multiplex-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhu, Shuifang; Miao, Haizhen; Huang, Wensheng; Qiu, Minyan; Huang, Yan; Fu, Xuping; Li, Yao

    2007-07-11

    With the increasing development of genetically modified organism (GMO) detection techniques, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been the mainstay for GMO detection. An oligonucleotide microarray is a glass chip to the surface of which an array of oligonucleotides was fixed as spots, each containing numerous copies of a sequence-specific probe that is complementary to a gene of interest. So it is used to detect ten or more targets synchronously. In this research, an event-specific detection strategy based on the unique and specific integration junction sequences between the host plant genome DNA and the integrated gene is being developed for its high specificity using multiplex-PCR together with oligonucleotide microarray. A commercial GM soybean (GTS 40-3-2) and six GM maize events (MON810, MON863, Bt176, Bt11, GA21, and T25) were detected by this method. The results indicate that it is a suitable method for the identification of these GM soybean and maizes. PMID:17559227

  5. Event-specific detection of seven genetically modified soybean and maizes using multiplex-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhu, Shuifang; Miao, Haizhen; Huang, Wensheng; Qiu, Minyan; Huang, Yan; Fu, Xuping; Li, Yao

    2007-07-11

    With the increasing development of genetically modified organism (GMO) detection techniques, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been the mainstay for GMO detection. An oligonucleotide microarray is a glass chip to the surface of which an array of oligonucleotides was fixed as spots, each containing numerous copies of a sequence-specific probe that is complementary to a gene of interest. So it is used to detect ten or more targets synchronously. In this research, an event-specific detection strategy based on the unique and specific integration junction sequences between the host plant genome DNA and the integrated gene is being developed for its high specificity using multiplex-PCR together with oligonucleotide microarray. A commercial GM soybean (GTS 40-3-2) and six GM maize events (MON810, MON863, Bt176, Bt11, GA21, and T25) were detected by this method. The results indicate that it is a suitable method for the identification of these GM soybean and maizes.

  6. Synthesis of full-length oligonucleotides: cleavage of apurinic molecules on a novel support.

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, M; Nilsson, M; Landegren, U

    1996-01-01

    The synthesis of oligodeoxynucleotides is marred by several problems that contribute to the formation of defective molecules. This in turn seriously limits the usefulness of such reagents in DNA diagnostics, molecular cloning, DNA structural analysis and in antisense therapy. In particular, depurination reactions during the cyclical steps of synthesis lead to strand scission during cleavage of the completed molecules from the support. Here we present a remedy to this problem: a novel disiloxyl linkage that connects oligonucleotides to the support withstands reaction conditions that allow the removal of the 5' parts of any depurinated molecules. This ensures that all molecules that preserve the 5' protecting group when cleaved from the support will have both correct 3'- and 5'-ends. We demonstrate the application of the support for synthesis of padlock probe molecules. PMID:8972847

  7. Identification of high-stringency DNA hairpin probes by partial gene folding.

    PubMed

    Strohsahl, Christopher M; Krauss, Todd D; Miller, Benjamin L

    2007-09-30

    Hairpin DNA sequences are widely used as probes for oligonucleotides in a broad range of assays, often as "molecular beacons". A potential disadvantage of the standard methodology for molecular beacon design is the need to add several self-complementary bases to each end of the probe, since these do not correspond to the target sequence. We describe a conceptually new method of hairpin DNA probe identification, in which a secondary structure prediction algorithm is employed to identify oligonucleotide sequences within an expressed gene having the requisite hairpin structure. Intuitively, such probes should have significantly improved performance over "traditional" hairpin probes, because they are fully complementary with the target. We present experimental evidence verifying this hypothesis for a series of hairpin probes targeting the pag gene of Bacillus anthracis.

  8. Rapid and accurate synthesis of TALE genes from synthetic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenghua; Zhang, Hefei; Gao, Jingxia; Chen, Fengjiao; Chen, Sijie; Zhang, Cuizhen; Peng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Custom synthesis of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) genes has relied upon plasmid libraries of pre-fabricated TALE-repeat monomers or oligomers. Here we describe a novel synthesis method that directly incorporates annealed synthetic oligonucleotides into the TALE-repeat units. Our approach utilizes iterative sets of oligonucleotides and a translational frame check strategy to ensure the high efficiency and accuracy of TALE-gene synthesis. TALE arrays of more than 20 repeats can be constructed, and the majority of the synthesized constructs have perfect sequences. In addition, this novel oligonucleotide-based method can readily accommodate design changes to the TALE repeats. We demonstrated an increased gene targeting efficiency against a genomic site containing a potentially methylated cytosine by incorporating non-conventional repeat variable di-residue (RVD) sequences.

  9. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  10. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  11. A novel catechol-based universal support for oligonucleotide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Keith M; Jaquinod, Laurent; Jensen, Michael A; Ngo, Nam; Davis, Ronald W

    2007-12-21

    A novel universal support for deoxyribo- and ribonucleic acid synthesis has been developed. The support, constructed from 1,4-dimethoxycatechol, represents an improvement over existing universal supports because of its ability to cleave and deprotect under mild conditions in standard reagents. Because no nonvolatile additives are required for cleavage and deprotection, the synthesized oligonucleotides do not require purification prior to use in biochemical assays. Using reverse phase HPLC and electrospray mass spectroscopy, it was determined that oligonucleotides synthesized on the universal support (UL1) 3'-dephosphorylate quickly (9 h in 28-30% ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) at 55 degrees C, 2 h in 28-30% NH4OH at 80 degrees C, or <1 h in ammonium hydroxide/methylamine (1:1) (AMA) at 80 degrees C). Oligonucleotides used as primers for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay were found to perform identically to control primers, demonstrating full biological compatibility. In addition, a method was developed for sintering the universal support directly into a filter plug which can be pressure fit into the synthesis column of a commercial synthesizer. The universal support plugs allow the synthesis of high-quality oligonucleotides at least 120 nucleotides in length, with purity comparable to non-universal commercial supports and approximately 50% lower reagent consumption. The universal support plugs are routinely used to synthesize deoxyribo-, ribo-, 3'-modified, 5'-modified, and thioated oligonucleotides. The flexibility of the universal support and the efficiency of 3'-dephosphorylation are expected to increase the use of universal supports in oligonucleotide synthesis.

  12. Oligonucleotide Array for Identification and Detection of Pythium Species†

    PubMed Central

    Tambong, J. T.; de Cock, A. W. A. M.; Tinker, N. A.; Lévesque, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    A DNA array containing 172 oligonucleotides complementary to specific diagnostic regions of internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of more than 100 species was developed for identification and detection of Pythium species. All of the species studied, with the exception of Pythium ostracodes, exhibited a positive hybridization reaction with at least one corresponding species-specific oligonucleotide. Hybridization patterns were distinct for each species. The array hybridization patterns included cluster-specific oligonucleotides that facilitated the recognition of species, including new ones, belonging to groups such as those producing filamentous or globose sporangia. BLAST analyses against 500 publicly available Pythium sequences in GenBank confirmed that species-specific oligonucleotides were unique to all of the available strains of each species, of which there were numerous economically important ones. GenBank entries of newly described species that are not putative synonyms showed no homology to sequences of the spotted species-specific oligonucleotides, but most new species did match some of the cluster-specific oligonucleotides. Further verification of the specificity of the DNA array was done with 50 additional Pythium isolates obtained by soil dilution plating. The hybridization patterns obtained were consistent with the identification of these isolates based on morphology and ITS sequence analyses. In another blind test, total DNA of the same soil samples was amplified and hybridized on the array, and the results were compared to those of 130 Pythium isolates obtained by soil dilution plating and root baiting. The 13 species detected by the DNA array corresponded to the isolates obtained by a combination of soil dilution plating and baiting, except for one new species that was not represented on the array. We conclude that the reported DNA array is a reliable tool for identification and detection of the majority of Pythium species in environmental samples

  13. Evaluation of inhibition of miRNA expression induced by anti-miRNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Chae, Dong-Kyu; Ban, Eunmi; Yoo, Young Sook; Baik, Ja-Hyun; Song, Eun Joo

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNA molecules that control the expression of mRNAs associated with various biological processes. Therefore, deregulated miRNAs play an important role in the pathogenesis of diseases. Numerous studies aimed at developing novel miRNA-based drugs or determining miRNA functions have been conducted by inhibiting miRNAs using anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs), which inhibit the function by hybridizing with miRNA. To increase the binding affinity and specificity to target miRNA, AMOs with various chemical modifications have been developed. Evaluating the potency of these various types of AMOs is an essential step in their development. In this study, we developed a capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) method to evaluate the potency of AMOs by measuring changes in miRNA levels with fluorescence-labeled ssDNA probes using AMO-miR-23a, which inhibits miR-23a related to lung cancer. In order to eliminate interference by excess AMOs during hybridization of the ssDNA probe with the miR-23a, the concentration of the ssDNA probe was optimized. This newly developed method was used to compare the potency of two different modified AMOs. The data were supported by the results of a luciferase assay. This study demonstrated that CE-LIF analysis could be used to accurately evaluate AMO potency in biological samples. PMID:27178549

  14. Femtomolar oligonucleotide detection by a one-step gold nanoparticle-based assay.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Prayanka; Kaufmann, Silvan; Vörös, János; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Demkó, László

    2015-11-01

    A sequence-specific oligonucleotide detection method based on the tail-to-tail aggregation of functionalized gold nanoparticles in the presence of target analytes is presented together with its optimization and capabilities for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In this single-step method, capture probes are freely accessible for hybridization, resulting in an improved assay performance compared to substrate-based assays. The analytes bring the nanoparticles close to each other via hybridization, causing a red shift of the nanoparticle plasmon peak detected by a spectrophotometer or CCD camera coupled to a darkfield imaging system. Optimal conditions for the assay were found to be (i) use of capture probes complementary to the target without any gap, (ii) maximum possible probe density on the gold nanoparticles, and (iii) 1M ionic strength buffer. The optimized assay has a 1 fM limit of detection and fM to 10 pM dynamic range, with detection of perfect match sequences being three orders of magnitude more sensitive than targets with single nucleotide mismatches.

  15. Genome Engineering Using Targeted Oligonucleotide Libraries and Functional Selection

    PubMed Central

    Diner, Elie J.; Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The λ phage Red proteins greatly enhance homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Red-mediated recombination or “recombineering” can be used to construct targeted gene deletions as well as to introduce point mutations into the genome. Here, we describe our method for scanning mutagenesis using recombineered oligonucleotide libraries. This approach entails randomization of specific codons within a target gene, followed by functional selection to isolate mutants. Oligonucleotide library mutagenesis has generated hundreds of novel antibiotic resistance mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins, and should be applicable to other systems for which functional selections exist. PMID:21815087

  16. Mapping genomic library clones using oligonucleotide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sapolsky, R.J.; Lipshutz, R.J.

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a high-density DNA probe array and accompanying biochemical and informatic methods to order clones from genomic libraries. This approach involves a series of enzymatic steps for capturing a set of short dispersed sequence markers scattered throughout a high-molecular-weight DNA. By this process, all the ambiguous sequences lying adjacent to a given Type IIS restriction site are ligated between two DNA adaptors. These markers, once amplified and labeled by PCR, can be hybridized and detected on a high-density olligonucleotide array bearing probes complementary to all possible markers. The array is synthesized using light-directed combinatorial chemistry. For each clone in a genomic library, a characteristic set of sequence markers can be determined. On the basis of the similarity between the marker sets for each pair of clones, their relative overlap can be measured. The library can be sequentially ordered into a contig map using this overlap information. This new methodology does not require gel-based methods or prior sequence information and involves manipulations that should allow for easy adaptation to automated processing and data collection. 28 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  18. Array of nucleic acid probes on biological chips for diagnosis of HIV and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Chee, Mark; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Hubble, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.

    1999-01-19

    The invention provides an array of oligonucleotide probes immobilized on a solid support for analysis of a target sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. The array comprises at least four sets of oligonucleotide probes 9 to 21 nucleotides in length. A first probe set has a probe corresponding to each nucleotide in a reference sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. A probe is related to its corresponding nucleotide by being exactly complementary to a subsequence of the reference sequence that includes the corresponding nucleotide. Thus, each probe has a position, designated an interrogation position, that is occupied by a complementary nucleotide to the corresponding nucleotide. The three additional probe sets each have a corresponding probe for each probe in the first probe set. Thus, for each nucleotide in the reference sequence, there are four corresponding probes, one from each of the probe sets. The three corresponding probes in the three additional probe sets are identical to the corresponding probe from the first probe or a subsequence thereof that includes the interrogation position, except that the interrogation position is occupied by a different nucleotide in each of the four corresponding probes.

  19. Gene expression profiling in peanut using oligonucleotide microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently have a moderately significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for the oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate l...

  20. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed.

  1. Chromosome-specific painting in Cucumis species using bulked oligonucleotides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome-specific painting is a powerful technique in molecular cytogenetic and genome research. We developed an oligonucleotide (oligo)-based chromosome painting technique in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) that will be applicable in any plant species with a sequenced genome. Oligos specific to a sing...

  2. A highly fluorescent DNA toolkit: synthesis and properties of oligonucleotides containing new Cy3, Cy5 and Cy3B monomers.

    PubMed

    Hall, Lucy M; Gerowska, Marta; Brown, Tom

    2012-08-01

    Cy3B is an extremely bright and stable fluorescent dye, which is only available for coupling to nucleic acids post-synthetically. This severely limits its use in the fields of genomics, biology and nanotechnology. We have optimized the synthesis of Cy3B, and for the first time produced a diverse range of Cy3B monomers for use in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis. This molecular toolkit includes phosphoramidite monomers with Cy3B linked to deoxyribose, to the 5-position of thymine, and to a hexynyl linker, in addition to an oligonucleotide synthesis resin in which Cy3B is linked to deoxyribose. These monomers have been used to incorporate single and multiple Cy3B units into oligonucleotides internally and at both termini. Cy3B Taqman probes, Scorpions and HyBeacons have been synthesized and used successfully in mutation detection, and a dual Cy3B Molecular Beacon was synthesized and found to be superior to the corresponding Cy3B/DABCYL Beacon. Attachment of Cy3, Cy3B and Cy5 to the 5-position of thymidine by an ethynyl linker enabled the synthesis of an oligonucleotide FRET system. The rigid linker between the dye and nucleobase minimizes dye-dye and dye-DNA interactions and reduces fluorescence quenching. These reagents open up new future applications of Cy3B, including more sensitive single-molecule and cell-imaging studies.

  3. PNA-COMBO-FISH: From combinatorial probe design in silico to vitality compatible, specific labelling of gene targets in cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Müller, Patrick; Rößler, Jens; Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Schmitt, Eberhard; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Recently, advantages concerning targeting specificity of PCR constructed oligonucleotide FISH probes in contrast to established FISH probes, e.g. BAC clones, have been demonstrated. These techniques, however, are still using labelling protocols with DNA denaturing steps applying harsh heat treatment with or without further denaturing chemical agents. COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH) allows the design of specific oligonucleotide probe combinations in silico. Thus, being independent from primer libraries or PCR laboratory conditions, the probe sequences extracted by computer sequence data base search can also be synthesized as single stranded PNA-probes (Peptide Nucleic Acid probes). Gene targets can be specifically labelled with at least about 20 PNA-probes obtaining visibly background free specimens. By using appropriately designed triplex forming oligonucleotides, the denaturing procedures can completely be omitted. These results reveal a significant step towards oligonucleotide-FISH maintaining the 3d-nanostructure and even the viability of the cell target. The method is demonstrated with the detection of Her2/neu and GRB7 genes, which are indicators in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Electrochemical biosensor for the detection of cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S gene sequences using lead sulfide nanoparticles as oligonucleotide labels.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Zhong, Jianghua; Qin, Peng; Jiao, Kui

    2008-06-15

    Lead sulfide (PbS) nanoparticles were synthesized in aqueous solution and used as oligonucleotide labels for electrochemical detection of the 35 S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequence. The PbS nanoparticles were modified with mercaptoacetic acid and could easily be linked with CaMV 35 S oligonucleotide probe. Target DNA sequences were covalently linked on a mercaptoacetic acid self-assembled gold electrode, and DNA hybridization of target DNA with probe DNA was completed on the electrode surface. PbS nanoparticles anchored on the hybrids were dissolved in the solution by oxidation of HNO3 and detected using a sensitive differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetric method. The detection results can be used to monitor the hybridization reaction. The CaMV 35 S target sequence was satisfactorily detected with the detection limit as 4.38 x 10(-12)mol/L (3sigma). The established method extends nanoparticle-labeled electrochemical DNA analysis to specific sequences from genetically modified organisms with higher sensitivity and selectivity.

  5. Development of an oligonucleotide microarray for the detection and monitoring of marine dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Luca; Cegna, Alessandra; Casabianca, Silvia; Penna, Antonella; Saunders, Nick; Magnani, Mauro

    2011-02-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs), mainly caused by dinoflagellates and diatoms, have great economic and sanitary implications. An important contribution for the comprehension of HAB phenomena and for the identification of risks related to toxic algal species is given by the monitoring programs. In the microscopy-based monitoring methods, harmful species are distinguished through their morphological characteristics. This can be time consuming and requires great taxonomic expertise due to the existence of morphologically close-related species. The high throughput, automation possibility and specificity of microarray-based detection assay, makes this technology very promising for qualitative detection of HAB species. In this study, an oligonucleotide microarray targeted to the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA region of nine toxic dinoflagellate species/clades was designed and evaluated. Two probes (45-47 nucleotides in length) were designed for each species/clade to reduce the potential for false positives. The specificity and sensitivity of the probes were evaluated with ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 PCR amplicons obtained from 20 dinoflagellates cultured strains. Cross hybridization experiments confirmed the probe specificity; moreover, the assay showed a good sensitivity, allowing the detection of up to 2 ng of labeled PCR product. The applicability of the assay with field samples was demonstrated using net concentrated seawater samples, un-spiked or spiked with known amounts of cultured cells. Despite the general application of microarray technology for harmful algae detection is not new, a peculiar group of target species/clades has been included in this new-format assay. Moreover, novelties regarding mainly the probes and the target rDNA region have allowed sensitivity improvements in comparison to previously published studies. PMID:21138747

  6. Development of the large-scale oligonucleotide chip for the diagnosis of plant viruses and its practical use.

    PubMed

    Nam, Moon; Kim, Jeong-Seon; Lim, Seungmo; Park, Chung Youl; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Choi, Hong-Soo; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun; Lee, Su-Heon

    2014-03-01

    A large-scale oligonucleotide (LSON) chip was developed for the detection of the plant viruses with known genetic information. The LSON chip contains two sets of 3,978 probes for 538 species of targets including plant viruses, satellite RNAs and viroids. A hundred forty thousand probes, consisting of isolate-, species- and genus-specific probes respectively, are designed from 20,000 of independent nucleotide sequence of plant viruses. Based on the economic importance, the amount of genome information, and the number of strains and/or isolates, one to fifty-one probes for each target virus are selected and spotted on the chip. The standard and field samples for the analysis of the LSON chip have been prepared and tested by RT-PCR. The probe's specific and/or nonspecific reaction patterns by LSON chip allow us to diagnose the unidentified viruses. Thus, the LSON chip in this study could be highly useful for the detection of unexpected plant viruses, the monitoring of emerging viruses and the fluctuation of the population of major viruses in each plant.

  7. Direct detection of 16S rRNA in soil extracts by using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Small, J; Call, D R; Brockman, F J; Straub, T M; Chandler, D P

    2001-10-01

    We report on the development and validation of a simple microarray method for the direct detection of intact 16S rRNA from unpurified soil extracts. Total RNAs from Geobacter chapellei and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were hybridized to an oligonucleotide array consisting of universal and species-specific 16S rRNA probes. PCR-amplified products from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio were easily and specifically detected under a range of hybridization times, temperatures, and buffers. However, reproducible, specific hybridization and detection of intact rRNA could be accomplished only by using a chaperone-detector probe strategy. With this knowledge, assay conditions were developed for rRNA detection using a 2-h hybridization time at room temperature. Hybridization specificity and signal intensity were enhanced using fragmented RNA. Formamide was required in the hybridization buffer in order to achieve species-specific detection of intact rRNA. With the chaperone detection strategy, we were able to specifically hybridize and detect G. chapellei 16S rRNA directly from a total-RNA soil extract, without further purification or removal of soluble soil constituents. The detection sensitivity for G. chapellei 16S rRNA in soil extracts was at least 0.5 microg of total RNA, representing approximately 7.5 x 10(6) Geobacter cell equivalents of RNA. These results suggest that it is now possible to apply microarray technology to the direct detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, without using PCR. PMID:11571176

  8. Droplet Digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay for Absolute RNA Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Weihua; Chen, Liben; Rane, Tushar D.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-01-01

    We present a continuous-flow droplet-based digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay (droplet digital ELOHA) for sensitive detection and absolute quantification of RNA molecules. Droplet digital ELOHA incorporates direct hybridization and single enzyme reaction via the formation of single probe-RNA-probe (enzyme) complex on magnetic beads. It enables RNA detection without reverse transcription and PCR amplification processes. The magnetic beads are subsequently encapsulated into a large number of picoliter-sized droplets with enzyme substrates in a continuous-flow device. This device is capable of generating droplets at high-throughput. It also integrates in-line enzymatic incubation and detection of fluorescent products. Our droplet digital ELOHA is able to accurately quantify (differentiate 40% difference) as few as ~600 RNA molecules in a 1 mL sample (equivalent to 1 aM or lower) without molecular replication. The absolute quantification ability of droplet digital ELOHA is demonstrated with the analysis of clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA to show its potential value in real complex samples. PMID:26333806

  9. Droplet Digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay for Absolute RNA Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Weihua; Chen, Liben; Rane, Tushar D.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-09-01

    We present a continuous-flow droplet-based digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay (droplet digital ELOHA) for sensitive detection and absolute quantification of RNA molecules. Droplet digital ELOHA incorporates direct hybridization and single enzyme reaction via the formation of single probe-RNA-probe (enzyme) complex on magnetic beads. It enables RNA detection without reverse transcription and PCR amplification processes. The magnetic beads are subsequently encapsulated into a large number of picoliter-sized droplets with enzyme substrates in a continuous-flow device. This device is capable of generating droplets at high-throughput. It also integrates in-line enzymatic incubation and detection of fluorescent products. Our droplet digital ELOHA is able to accurately quantify (differentiate 40% difference) as few as ~600 RNA molecules in a 1 mL sample (equivalent to 1 aM or lower) without molecular replication. The absolute quantification ability of droplet digital ELOHA is demonstrated with the analysis of clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA to show its potential value in real complex samples.

  10. A New Oligonucleotide Microarray for Detection of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Legionella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp. PMID:25469776

  11. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp.

  12. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp. PMID:25469776

  13. Selective release of multiple DNA oligonucleotides from gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Andy; Schaffer, Stefan B; Pallares, Ivan G; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2009-01-27

    Combination therapy, or the use of multiple drugs, has been proven to be effective for complex diseases, but the differences in chemical properties and pharmacokinetics can be challenging in terms of the loading, delivering, and releasing multiple drugs. Here we demonstrate that we can load and selectively release two different DNA oligonucleotides from two different gold nanorods. DNA was loaded on the nanorods via thiol conjugation. Selective releases were induced by selective melting of gold nanorods via ultrafast laser irradiation at the nanorods' longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peaks. Excitation at one wavelength could selectively melt one type of gold nanorods and selectively release one type of DNA strand. Releases were efficient (50-80%) and externally tunable by laser fluence. Released oligonucleotides were still functional. This proof of concept is potentially a powerful method for multiple-drug delivery strategies.

  14. Mechanism of Oligonucleotide Uptake by Cells: Involvement of Specific receptors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakubov, Leonid A.; Deeva, Elena A.; Zarytova, Valentina F.; Ivanova, Eugenia M.; Ryte, Antonina S.; Yurchenko, Lyudmila V.; Vlassov, Valentin V.

    1989-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of oligonucleotides and their alkylating derivatives with mammalian cells. In experiments with L929 mouse fibroblast and Krebs 2 ascites carcinoma cells, it was found that cellular uptake of oligodeoxynucleotide derivatives is achieved by an endocytosis mechanism. Uptake is considerably more efficient at low oligomer concentration (< 1 μ M), because at this concentration a significant percentage of the total oligomer pool is absorbed on the cell surface and internalized by a more efficient absorptive endocytosis process. Two modified proteins were detected in mouse fibroblasts that were treated with the alkylating oligonucleotide derivatives. The binding of the oligomers to the proteins is inhibited by other oligodeoxynucleotides, single- and double-stranded DNA, and RNA. The polyanions heparin and chondroitin sulfates A and B do not inhibit binding. These observations suggest the involvement of specific receptor proteins in binding of oligomers to mammalian cells.

  15. Synthesis and properties of oligonucleotides containing aminodeoxythymidine units.

    PubMed Central

    Gryaznov, S M; Letsinger, R L

    1992-01-01

    Procedures are described for synthesis via solid support methodology of oligonucleotide analogues derived in part from 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine or 5'-amino-5'-deoxythymidine. Oligothymidylate decamers terminated with a 3'-amino group or containing a 3'-NHP(O)(O-)O-5' internucleoside link are found to form unusually stable complexes with poly(dA), poly(A), and oligo(dA). For related derivatives of 5'-amino-5'-deoxythymidine enhancement is less or absent, and in the case of multiple substitution destabilization of the heteroduplex may be observed. That the effect of the 3'-amino group is general for oligonucleotide derivatives is indicated by enhanced Tm values for heteroduplex complexes of the mixed-base oligomer, d(TATTCAGTCAT(NH2)), and the methyl phosphonate derivatives, TmTmTmTmTmTmTmTmTmT(NH2) and d(TmAmTmTmCmAmGmTmCmAmT(NH2)). PMID:1630911

  16. Nanomaterial building blocks based on spider silk-oligonucleotide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Humenik, Martin; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-02-25

    Self-assembling protein nanofibrils are promising structures for the "bottom-up" fabrication of bionanomaterials. Here, the recombinant protein eADF4(C16), a variant of Araneus diadematus dragline silk ADF4, which self-assembles into nanofibrils, and short oligonucleotides were modified for site-specific azide-alkyne coupling. Corresponding oligonuleotide-eADF4(C16) "click" conjugates were hybridized in linear or branched fashion according to the designed complementarities of the DNA moieties. Self-assembly properties of higher ordered structures of the spider silk-DNA conjugates were dominated by the silk component. Assembled β-sheet rich conjugate fibrils were similar in appearance to fibrils of unmodified eADF4(C16) but enabled the specific attachment of neutravidin-modified gold nanoparticles on their surface directed by complementary biotin-oligonucleotides, providing the basis for functionalization of such conjugates.

  17. Selective release of multiple DNA oligonucleotides from gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Andy; Schaffer, Stefan B; Pallares, Ivan G; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2009-01-27

    Combination therapy, or the use of multiple drugs, has been proven to be effective for complex diseases, but the differences in chemical properties and pharmacokinetics can be challenging in terms of the loading, delivering, and releasing multiple drugs. Here we demonstrate that we can load and selectively release two different DNA oligonucleotides from two different gold nanorods. DNA was loaded on the nanorods via thiol conjugation. Selective releases were induced by selective melting of gold nanorods via ultrafast laser irradiation at the nanorods' longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peaks. Excitation at one wavelength could selectively melt one type of gold nanorods and selectively release one type of DNA strand. Releases were efficient (50-80%) and externally tunable by laser fluence. Released oligonucleotides were still functional. This proof of concept is potentially a powerful method for multiple-drug delivery strategies. PMID:19206252

  18. Cationic carbosilane dendrimers and oligonucleotide binding: an energetic affair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marson, D.; Laurini, E.; Posocco, P.; Fermeglia, M.; Pricl, S.

    2015-02-01

    Generation 2 cationic carbosilane dendrimers hold great promise as internalizing agents for gene therapy as they present low toxicity and retain and internalize the genetic material as an oligonucleotide or siRNA. In this work we carried out complete in silico structural and energetical characterization of the interactions of a set of G2 carbosilane dendrimers, showing different affinity towards two single strand oligonucleotide (ODN) sequences in vitro. Our simulations predict that these four dendrimers and the relevant ODN complexes are characterized by similar size and shape, and that the molecule-specific ODN binding ability can be rationalized only by considering a critical molecular design parameter: the normalized effective binding energy ΔGbind,eff/Neff, i.e. the performance of each active individual dendrimer branch directly involved in a binding interaction.Generation 2 cationic carbosilane dendrimers hold great promise as internalizing agents for gene therapy as they present low toxicity and retain and internalize the genetic material as an oligonucleotide or siRNA. In this work we carried out complete in silico structural and energetical characterization of the interactions of a set of G2 carbosilane dendrimers, showing different affinity towards two single strand oligonucleotide (ODN) sequences in vitro. Our simulations predict that these four dendrimers and the relevant ODN complexes are characterized by similar size and shape, and that the molecule-specific ODN binding ability can be rationalized only by considering a critical molecular design parameter: the normalized effective binding energy ΔGbind,eff/Neff, i.e. the performance of each active individual dendrimer branch directly involved in a binding interaction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures and tables. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04510f

  19. Thermoplastic polymers surfaces for Dip-Pen Nanolithography of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Biella, Serena; Cesura, Federico; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    Different thermoplastic polymers were spin-coated to prepare smooth surfaces for the direct deposition of end-group modified oligonucleotides by Dip-Pen Nanolithography. A study of the diffusion process was done in order to investigate the dependence of calibration coefficient and quality of deposited features on environmental parameters (temperature, relative humidity) and ink's molecular weight and functionality. The optimization of the process parameters led to the realization of high quality and density nanoarrays on plastics.

  20. An oligonucleotide barcode for species identification in Trichoderma and Hypocrea.

    PubMed

    Druzhinina, Irina S; Kopchinskiy, Alexei G; Komoń, Monika; Bissett, John; Szakacs, George; Kubicek, Christian P

    2005-10-01

    One of the biggest obstructions to studies on Trichoderma has been the incorrect and confused application of species names to isolates used in industry, biocontrol of plant pathogens and ecological surveys, thereby making the comparison of results questionable. Here we provide a convenient, on-line method for the quick molecular identification of Hypocrea/Trichoderma at the genus and species levels based on an oligonucleotide barcode: a diagnostic combination of several oligonucleotides (hallmarks) specifically allocated within the internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2 (ITS1 and 2) sequences of the rDNA repeat. The barcode was developed on the basis of 979 sequences of 88 vouchered species which displayed in total 135 ITS1 and 2 haplotypes. Oligonucleotide sequences which are constant in all known ITS1 and 2 of Hypocrea/Trichoderma but different in closely related fungal genera, were used to define genus-specific hallmarks. The library of species-, clade- and genus-specific hallmarks is stored in the MySQL database and integrated in the TrichOKey v. 1.0 - barcode sequence identification program with the web interface located on . TrichOKey v. 1.0 identifies 75 single species, 5 species pairs and 1 species triplet. Verification of the DNA-barcode was done by a blind test on 53 unknown isolates of Trichoderma, collected in Central and South America. The obtained results were in a total agreement with phylogenetic identification based on tef1 (large intron), NCBI BLAST of vouchered records and postum morphological analysis. We conclude that oligonucleotide barcode is a powerful tool for the routine identification of Hypocrea/Trichoderma species and should be useful as a complement to traditional methods.

  1. Therapeutic antisense oligonucleotides against cancer: hurdling to the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Pêgo, Ana P.

    2014-01-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90's and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics has not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given toward a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field. PMID:25353019

  2. Gene expression profiling in peanut using high density oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Payton, Paxton; Kottapalli, Kameswara Rao; Rowland, Diane; Faircloth, Wilson; Guo, Baozhu; Burow, Mark; Puppala, Naveen; Gallo, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Background Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently has a significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate large-scale transcript responses to a variety of developmental and environmental signals, ultimately improving our understanding of plant biology. Results We have developed a high-density oligonucleotide microarray for peanut using 49,205 publicly available ESTs and tested the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues. To identify putatively tissue-specific genes and demonstrate the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues, we compared transcript levels in pod, peg, leaf, stem, and root tissues. Results from this experiment showed 108 putatively pod-specific/abundant genes, as well as transcripts whose expression was low or undetected in pod compared to peg, leaf, stem, or root. The transcripts significantly over-represented in pod include genes responsible for seed storage proteins and desiccation (e.g., late-embryogenesis abundant proteins, aquaporins, legumin B), oil production, and cellular defense. Additionally, almost half of the pod-abundant genes represent unknown genes allowing for the possibility of associating putative function to these previously uncharacterized genes. Conclusion The peanut oligonucleotide array represents the majority of publicly available peanut ESTs and can be used as a tool for expression profiling studies in diverse tissues. PMID:19523230

  3. Particle-Based Microarrays of Oligonucleotides and Oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Maerkle, Frieder; Hahn, Lothar; Foertsch, Tobias; Schillo, Sebastian; Bykovskaya, Valentina; Sedlmayr, Martyna; Weber, Laura K.; Ridder, Barbara; Soehindrijo, Miriam; Muenster, Bastian; Striffler, Jakob; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Breitling, Frank; Loeffler, Felix F.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we describe different methods of microarray fabrication based on the use of micro-particles/-beads and point out future tendencies in the development of particle-based arrays. First, we consider oligonucleotide bead arrays, where each bead is a carrier of one specific sequence of oligonucleotides. This bead-based array approach, appearing in the late 1990s, enabled high-throughput oligonucleotide analysis and had a large impact on genome research. Furthermore, we consider particle-based peptide array fabrication using combinatorial chemistry. In this approach, particles can directly participate in both the synthesis and the transfer of synthesized combinatorial molecules to a substrate. Subsequently, we describe in more detail the synthesis of peptide arrays with amino acid polymer particles, which imbed the amino acids inside their polymer matrix. By heating these particles, the polymer matrix is transformed into a highly viscous gel, and thereby, imbedded monomers are allowed to participate in the coupling reaction. Finally, we focus on combinatorial laser fusing of particles for the synthesis of high-density peptide arrays. This method combines the advantages of particles and combinatorial lithographic approaches. PMID:27600347

  4. G-Quadruplex Forming Oligonucleotides as Anti-HIV Agents.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Domenica; Riccardi, Claudia; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-09-22

    Though a variety of different non-canonical nucleic acids conformations have been recognized, G-quadruplex structures are probably the structural motifs most commonly found within known oligonucleotide-based aptamers. This could be ascribed to several factors, as their large conformational diversity, marked responsiveness of their folding/unfolding processes to external stimuli, high structural compactness and chemo-enzymatic and thermodynamic stability. A number of G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides having relevant in vitro anti-HIV activity have been discovered in the last two decades through either SELEX or rational design approaches. Improved aptamers have been obtained by chemical modifications of natural oligonucleotides, as terminal conjugations with large hydrophobic groups, replacement of phosphodiester linkages with phosphorothioate bonds or other surrogates, insertion of base-modified monomers, etc. In turn, detailed structural studies have elucidated the peculiar architectures adopted by many G-quadruplex-based aptamers and provided insight into their mechanism of action. An overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge of the relevance of putative G-quadruplex forming sequences within the viral genome and of the most studied G-quadruplex-forming aptamers, selectively targeting HIV proteins, is here presented.

  5. DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide for highly efficient gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Nishina, Kazutaka; Piao, Wenying; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Sujino, Yumiko; Nishina, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Keiko; Yoshioka, Kotaro; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Baba, Takeshi; Ono, Fumiko; Miyata, Kanjiro; Miyake, Koichi; Seth, Punit P.; Low, Audrey; Yoshida, Masayuki; Bennett, C. Frank; Kataoka, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Obika, Satoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are recognized therapeutic agents for the modulation of specific genes at the post-transcriptional level. Similar to any medical drugs, there are opportunities to improve their efficacy and safety. Here we develop a short DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide (HDO) with a structure different from double-stranded RNA used for short interfering RNA and single-stranded DNA used for ASO. A DNA/locked nucleotide acid gapmer duplex with an α-tocopherol-conjugated complementary RNA (Toc-HDO) is significantly more potent at reducing the expression of the targeted mRNA in liver compared with the parent single-stranded gapmer ASO. Toc-HDO also improves the phenotype in disease models more effectively. In addition, the high potency of Toc-HDO results in a reduction of liver dysfunction observed in the parent ASO at a similar silencing effect. HDO technology offers a novel concept of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and the development of this molecular design opens a new therapeutic field. PMID:26258894

  6. Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides against Cancer: Hurdling to the Clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Pedro; Pêgo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  7. Functionalization of silicon oxide using supercritical fluid deposition of 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane for the immobilization of amino-modified oligonucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rull, Jordi; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Costa, Guillaume; Fontelaye, Caroline; Marchi-Delapierre, Caroline; Ménage, Stéphane; Marchand, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    The functionalization of silicon oxide based substrates using silanes is generally performed through liquid phase methodologies. These processes involve a huge quantity of potentially toxic solvents and present some important disadvantages for the functionalization of microdevices or porous materials, for example the low diffusion. To overcome this drawback, solvent-free methodologies like molecular vapor deposition (MVD) or supercritical fluid deposition (SFD) have been developed. In this paper, the deposition process of 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane (EBTMOS) on silicon oxide using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a solvent is studied for the first time. The oxirane ring of epoxy silanes readily reacts with amine group and is of particular interest for the grafting of amino-modified oligonucleotides or antibodies for diagnostic application. Then the ability of this specific EBTMOS layer to react with amine functions has been evaluated using the immobilization of amino-modified oligonucleotide probes. The presence of the probes is revealed by fluorescence using hybridization with a fluorescent target oligonucleotide. The performances of SFD of EBTMOS have been optimized and then compared with the dip coating and molecular vapor deposition methods, evidencing a better grafting efficiency and homogeneity, a lower reaction time in addition to the eco-friendly properties of the supercritical carbon dioxide. The epoxysilane layers have been characterized by surface enhanced ellipsometric contrast optical technique, atomic force microscopy, multiple internal reflection infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The shelf life of the 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane coating layer has also been studied. Finally, two different strategies of NH2-oligonucleotide grafting on EBTMOS coating layer have been compared, i.e. reductive amination and nucleophilic substitution, SN2. This EBTMOS based coating layer can be used for a wide range of applications

  8. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer.

  9. MiL-FISH: Multilabeled Oligonucleotides for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Improve Visualization of Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Manuel; Wetzel, Silke; Liebeke, Manuel; Dubilier, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become a vital tool for environmental and medical microbiology and is commonly used for the identification, localization, and isolation of defined microbial taxa. However, fluorescence signal strength is often a limiting factor for targeting all members in a microbial community. Here, we present the application of a multilabeled FISH approach (MiL-FISH) that (i) enables the simultaneous targeting of up to seven microbial groups using combinatorial labeling of a single oligonucleotide probe, (ii) is applicable for the isolation of unfixed environmental microorganisms via fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and (iii) improves signal and imaging quality of tissue sections in acrylic resin for precise localization of individual microbial cells. We show the ability of MiL-FISH to distinguish between seven microbial groups using a mock community of marine organisms and its applicability for the localization of bacteria associated with animal tissue and their isolation from host tissues using FACS. To further increase the number of potential target organisms, a streamlined combinatorial labeling and spectral imaging-FISH (CLASI-FISH) concept with MiL-FISH probes is presented here. Through the combination of increased probe signal, the possibility of targeting hard-to-detect taxa and isolating these from an environmental sample, the identification and precise localization of microbiota in host tissues, and the simultaneous multilabeling of up to seven microbial groups, we show here that MiL-FISH is a multifaceted alternative to standard monolabeled FISH that can be used for a wide range of biological and medical applications. PMID:26475101

  10. Oligonucleotide-modified screen-printed gold electrodes for enzyme-amplified sensing of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Carpini, Guido; Lucarelli, Fausto; Marrazza, Giovanna; Mascini, Marco

    2004-09-15

    An electrochemical genosensor for the detection of specific sequences of DNA has been developed using disposable screen-printed gold electrodes. Screen-printed gold electrodes were firstly modified with a mixed monolayer of a 25-mer thiol-tethered DNA probe and a spacer thiol, 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH). The DNA probe sequence was internal to the sequence of the 35S promoter, which sequence is inserted in the genome of GMOs regulating the transgene expression. An enzyme-amplified detection scheme, based on the coupling of a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and biotinylated target sequences was then applied. The enzyme catalysed the hydrolysis of the electroinactive alpha-naphthyl phosphate to alpha-naphthol; this product is electroactive and has been detected by means of differential pulse voltammetry. The assay was, firstly, characterised using synthetic oligonucleotides. Relevant parameters, such as the probe concentration and the immobilisation time, the use of the MCH and different enzymatic conjugates, were investigated and optimised. The genosensor response was found to be linearly related to the target concentration between 0 and 25 nmol/L; the detection limit was 0.25 nmol/L. The analytical procedure was then applied for the detection of the 35S promoter sequence, which was amplified from the pBI121 plasmid by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Hybridisation conditions (i.e., hybridisation buffer and hybridisation time) were further optimised. The selectivity of the assay was confirmed using biotinylated non-complementary amplicons and PCR blanks. The results showed that the genosensor enabled sensitive (detection limit: 1 nmol/L) and specific detection of GMO-related sequences, thus providing a useful tool for the screening analysis of bioengineered food samples.

  11. Development of rRNA-Targeted PCR and In Situ Hybridization with Fluorescently Labelled Oligonucleotides for Detection of Yersinia Species

    PubMed Central

    Trebesius, Karlheinz; Harmsen, Dag; Rakin, Alexander; Schmelz, Jochen; Heesemann, Jürgen

    1998-01-01

    In this report, we present details of two rapid molecular detection techniques based on 16S and 23S rRNA sequence data to identify and differentiate Yersinia species from clinical and environmental sources. Near-full-length 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequences for three different Yersinia species and partial 23S rDNA sequences for three Y. pestis and three Y. pseudotuberculosis strains were determined. While 16S rDNA sequences of Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis were found to be identical, one base difference was identified within a highly variable region of 23S rDNA. The rDNA sequences were used to develop primers and fluorescently tagged oligonucleotide probes suitable for differential detection of Yersinia species by PCR and in situ hybridization, respectively. As few as 102 Yersinia cells per ml could be detected by PCR with a seminested approach. Amplification with a subgenus-specific primer pair followed by a second PCR allowed differentiation of Y. enterocolitica biogroup 1B from biogroups 2 to 5 or from other pathogenic Yersinia species. Moreover, a set of oligonucleotide probes suitable for rapid (3-h) in situ detection and differentiation of the three pathogenic Yersinia species (in particular Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis) was developed. The applicability of this technique was demonstrated by detection of Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis in spiked throat and stool samples, respectively. These probes were also capable of identifying Y. enterocolitica within cryosections of experimentally infected mouse tissue by the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:9705392

  12. Structured oligonucleotides for target indexing to allow single-vessel PCR amplification and solid support microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    Girard, Laurie D; Boissinot, Karel; Peytavi, Régis; Boissinot, Maurice; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-02-01

    The combination of molecular diagnostic technologies is increasingly used to overcome limitations on sensitivity, specificity or multiplexing capabilities, and provide efficient lab-on-chip devices. Two such techniques, PCR amplification and microarray hybridization are used serially to take advantage of the high sensitivity and specificity of the former combined with high multiplexing capacities of the latter. These methods are usually performed in different buffers and reaction chambers. However, these elaborate methods have high complexity and cost related to reagent requirements, liquid storage and the number of reaction chambers to integrate into automated devices. Furthermore, microarray hybridizations have a sequence dependent efficiency not always predictable. In this work, we have developed the concept of a structured oligonucleotide probe which is activated by cleavage from polymerase exonuclease activity. This technology is called SCISSOHR for Structured Cleavage Induced Single-Stranded Oligonucleotide Hybridization Reaction. The SCISSOHR probes enable indexing the target sequence to a tag sequence. The SCISSOHR technology also allows the combination of nucleic acid amplification and microarray hybridization in a single vessel in presence of the PCR buffer only. The SCISSOHR technology uses an amplification probe that is irreversibly modified in presence of the target, releasing a single-stranded DNA tag for microarray hybridization. Each tag is composed of a 3-nucleotide sequence-dependent segment and a unique "target sequence-independent" 14-nucleotide segment allowing for optimal hybridization with minimal cross-hybridization. We evaluated the performance of five (5) PCR buffers to support microarray hybridization, compared to a conventional hybridization buffer. Finally, as a proof of concept, we developed a multiplexed assay for the amplification, detection, and identification of three (3) DNA targets. This new technology will facilitate the design

  13. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  14. Time-Resolved Sequence Analysis on High Density Fiberoptic DNA Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Walt, D. R.; Lee, K-H

    2002-11-19

    A universal array format has been developed in which all possible n-mers of a particular oligonucleotide sequence can be represented. The ability to determine the sequence of the probes at every position in the array should enable unbiased gene expression as well as arrays for de novo sequencing.

  15. Development of the Large-Scale Oligonucleotide Chip for the Diagnosis of Plant Viruses and its Practical Use

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Moon; Kim, Jeong-Seon; Lim, Seungmo; Park, Chung Youl; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Choi, Hong-Soo; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun; Lee, Su-Heon

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale oligonucleotide (LSON) chip was developed for the detection of the plant viruses with known genetic information. The LSON chip contains two sets of 3,978 probes for 538 species of targets including plant viruses, satellite RNAs and viroids. A hundred forty thousand probes, consisting of isolate-, species- and genus-specific probes respectively, are designed from 20,000 of independent nucleotide sequence of plant viruses. Based on the economic importance, the amount of genome information, and the number of strains and/or isolates, one to fifty-one probes for each target virus are selected and spotted on the chip. The standard and field samples for the analysis of the LSON chip have been prepared and tested by RT-PCR. The probe’s specific and/or nonspecific reaction patterns by LSON chip allow us to diagnose the unidentified viruses. Thus, the LSON chip in this study could be highly useful for the detection of unexpected plant viruses, the monitoring of emerging viruses and the fluctuation of the population of major viruses in each plant. PMID:25288985

  16. Flexibility of C3h -Symmetrical Linkers in Tris-oligonucleotide-Based Tetrahedral Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, Christos; Kath-Schorr, Stephanie; von Kiedrowski, Günter

    2016-02-01

    Flexibility of tris-oligonucleotides is determined by the length of their connecting hydrocarbon chains. Tris-oligonucleotides are branched DNA building blocks with three oligonucleotide arms attached to a C3h -symmetrical linker core at these chains. Four tris-oligonucleotides hybridise into a tetrahedral nanocage by sequence-determined self-assembly. The influence of methylene, ethylene and propylene chains was studied by synthesising sets of tris-oligonucleotides and analysing the relative stability of the hybridisation products against digestion by mung bean nuclease by using gel electrophoresis. Linkers with ethylene chains showed sufficient flexibility, whereas methylene-chain linkers were too rigid. Tris-oligonucleotides based on the latter still formed tetrahedral scaffolds in intermixing experiments with linkers of higher flexibility. Thus, a new generation of versatile isocyanurate-based linkers was established.

  17. Nanoparticle-bridge assay for amplification-free electrical detection of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Manouchehr

    The aim of this research is to investigate a highly sensitive, fast, inexpensive, and field-applicable amplification-free nanoparticle-based oligonucleotide detection method which does not rely on any enzymatic or signal amplification process. In this approach, target oligonucleotide strands are detected through the formation of nanoparticle satellites which make an electrical path between two electrodes. This method enables an extremely sensitive oligonucleotide detection because even a few oligonucleotide strands can form a single nanoparticle satellite which can solely generates an electrical output signal. Results showed that this oligonucleotide detection method can detect oligonucleotide single strands at concentrations as low as 50 femtomolar without any amplification process. This detection method can be implemented in many fields such as biodefense, food safety, clinical research, and forensics.

  18. Discrimination of oligonucleotides of different lengths with a wild-type aerolysin nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chan; Ying, Yi-Lun; Hu, Zheng-Li; Liao, Dong-Fang; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Protein nanopores offer an inexpensive, label-free method of analysing single oligonucleotides. The sensitivity of the approach is largely determined by the characteristics of the pore-forming protein employed, and typically relies on nanopores that have been chemically modified or incorporate molecular motors. Effective, high-resolution discrimination of oligonucleotides using wild-type biological nanopores remains difficult to achieve. Here, we show that a wild-type aerolysin nanopore can resolve individual short oligonucleotides that are 2 to 10 bases long. The sensing capabilities are attributed to the geometry of aerolysin and the electrostatic interactions between the nanopore and the oligonucleotides. We also show that the wild-type aerolysin nanopores can distinguish individual oligonucleotides from mixtures and can monitor the stepwise cleavage of oligonucleotides by exonuclease I.

  19. Flexibility of C3h -Symmetrical Linkers in Tris-oligonucleotide-Based Tetrahedral Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, Christos; Kath-Schorr, Stephanie; von Kiedrowski, Günter

    2016-02-01

    Flexibility of tris-oligonucleotides is determined by the length of their connecting hydrocarbon chains. Tris-oligonucleotides are branched DNA building blocks with three oligonucleotide arms attached to a C3h -symmetrical linker core at these chains. Four tris-oligonucleotides hybridise into a tetrahedral nanocage by sequence-determined self-assembly. The influence of methylene, ethylene and propylene chains was studied by synthesising sets of tris-oligonucleotides and analysing the relative stability of the hybridisation products against digestion by mung bean nuclease by using gel electrophoresis. Linkers with ethylene chains showed sufficient flexibility, whereas methylene-chain linkers were too rigid. Tris-oligonucleotides based on the latter still formed tetrahedral scaffolds in intermixing experiments with linkers of higher flexibility. Thus, a new generation of versatile isocyanurate-based linkers was established. PMID:26593127

  20. A DNA minor groove binder shows high effectiveness as a quencher for FRET probes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei-Jia; Jin, Da-Zhi; Luo, Yun; Li, Hui; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Zheng; Gu, Hua; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2014-08-15

    A non-fluorescent quencher based on thiazole orange was incorporated into oligonucleotides. Fluorimetry and fluorogenic real-time polymerase chain reaction experiments demonstrated that the quencher is effective for fluorescein amidite dyes. The thiazole orange quencher also increased the melting temperature of DNA duplexes, which may facilitate the design of shorter and more discriminatory probes. The effectiveness of the quencher in TaqMan probes was also demonstrated.

  1. Hemopoiesis-stimulating activity of immobilized oligonucleotides and hyaluronidase during cytostatic-induced myelosuppression.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Skurikhin, E G; Pershina, O V; Zhdanov, V V; Khmelevskaya, A M; Andreeva, T V; Poponina, A M; Zjuzkov, G N; Udut, E V; Khrichkova, T Ju; Simanina, E V; Miroshnichenko, L A; Stavrova, L A; Tchaikovsky, A S; Markova, T S; Gurto, R V; Brjushinina, O S; Slepichev, V A

    2011-03-01

    The hemopoiesis-stimulating effect of combined treatment with immobilized oligonucleotides and hyaluronidase preparations was studied during cytostatic-induced myelosuppression caused by cyclophosphamide administration. Immobilized hyaluronidase was shown to increase the efficiency of correction of changes in the erythroid and granulocytic hemopoietic stems with immobilized oligonucleotides. This potentiation of the effect of immobilized oligonucleotides by immobilized hyaluronidase was related to an increase in functional activity of committed hemopoietic precursors.

  2. Systematic studies on the paracellular permeation of model permeants and oligonucleotides in the rat small intestine with chenodeoxycholate as enhancer.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Keiko; Li, S Kevin; Hymas, Richard V; Teng, Ching-Leou; Tillman, Lloyd G; Hardee, Gregory E; Higuchi, William I; Ho, Norman F H

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to mechanistically and quantitatively analyze chenodeoxycholate-enhanced paracellular transport of polar permeants and oligonucleotides in the rat jejunum and ileum. Micellar chenodeoxycholate solutions were used to perturbate the tight junctions. Supporting studies included assessment of the aqueous boundary layer (ABL) with ABL-controlled permeants, measurements of the permeability coefficients and fluxes of the bile acid in dilute and micellar concentrations, and determinations of pore sizes with paracellular probes (urea, mannitol, and raffinose). The paracellular permeability coefficients, P(para), of two model oligonucleotides (ON3 and ON6; 12- and 24-mers with 11 and 23 negative charges, respectively) were determined. The enhanced permeabilities paralleled the increased fluxes of micellar bile salt solutions into mesenteric blood and the opening of the tight junctions as compared to controls. As the pore radius increased from 0.7 nm to a maximum of 2.4 nm in the jejunum and ileum, the absorption of ON3 was enhanced up to sixfold in the jejunum and about 14-fold in the ileum with P(para) values between 0.5 x 10(-6) and 6 x 10(-6) cm/s, whereas ON6 was enhanced up to twofold in the jejunum and fivefold in the ileum with permeabilities between 0.3 x 10(-6) and 2 x 10(-6) cm/s. PMID:17847071

  3. Specific discrimination of three pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes by carB-based oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-01-01

    It is important to rapidly and selectively detect and analyze pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica in contaminated food to reduce the morbidity and mortality of Salmonella infection and to guarantee food safety. In the present work, we developed an oligonucleotide microarray containing duplicate specific capture probes based on the carB gene, which encodes the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase large subunit, as a competent biomarker evaluated by genetic analysis to selectively and efficiently detect and discriminate three S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes: Choleraesuis, Enteritidis, and Typhimurium. Using the developed microarray system, three serotype targets were successfully analyzed in a range as low as 1.6 to 3.1 nM and were specifically discriminated from each other without nonspecific signals. In addition, the constructed microarray did not have cross-reactivity with other common pathogenic bacteria and even enabled the clear discrimination of the target Salmonella serotype from a bacterial mixture. Therefore, these results demonstrated that our novel carB-based oligonucleotide microarray can be used as an effective and specific detection system for S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes. PMID:24185846

  4. Edesign: Primer and Enhanced Internal Probe Design Tool for Quantitative PCR Experiments and Genotyping Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Naoko; Delobel, Diane; Hanami, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuki; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Usui, Kengo; Harbers, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Analytical PCR experiments preferably use internal probes for monitoring the amplification reaction and specific detection of the amplicon. Such internal probes have to be designed in close context with the amplification primers, and may require additional considerations for the detection of genetic variations. Here we describe Edesign, a new online and stand-alone tool for designing sets of PCR primers together with an internal probe for conducting quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and genotypic experiments. Edesign can be used for selecting standard DNA oligonucleotides like for instance TaqMan probes, but has been further extended with new functions and enhanced design features for Eprobes. Eprobes, with their single thiazole orange-labelled nucleotide, allow for highly sensitive genotypic assays because of their higher DNA binding affinity as compared to standard DNA oligonucleotides. Using new thermodynamic parameters, Edesign considers unique features of Eprobes during primer and probe design for establishing qPCR experiments and genotyping by melting curve analysis. Additional functions in Edesign allow probe design for effective discrimination between wild-type sequences and genetic variations either using standard DNA oligonucleotides or Eprobes. Edesign can be freely accessed online at http://www.dnaform.com/edesign2/, and the source code is available for download. PMID:26863543

  5. 2'-O-[2-(guanidinium)ethyl]-modified oligonucleotides: stabilizing effect on duplex and triplex structures

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, T.P.; Puschl, A.; Lesnik, E.; Mohan, V.; Tereshko, V.; Egli, M.; Manoharan, M.

    2010-03-08

    Oligonucleotides with a novel 2'-O-[2-(guanidinium)ethyl] (2'-O-GE) modification have been synthesized using a novel protecting group strategy for the guanidinium group. This modification enhances the binding affinity of oligonucleotides to RNA as well as duplex DNA ({Delta}T{sub m} 3.2 C per modification). The 2'-O-GE modified oligonucleotides exhibited exceptional resistance to nuclease degradation. The crystal structure of a palindromic duplex formed by a DNA oligonucleotide with a single 2'-O-GE modification was solved at 1.16 {angstrom} resolution.

  6. Properties of amphiphilic oligonucleotide films at the air/water interface and after film transfer.

    PubMed

    Keller, R; Kwak, M; de Vries, J W; Sawaryn, C; Wang, J; Anaya, M; Müllen, K; Butt, H-J; Herrmann, A; Berger, R

    2013-11-01

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic hybrid materials containing an oligonucleotide sequence at the air/water interface was investigated by means of pressure-molecular area (Π-A) isotherms. In addition, films were transferred onto solid substrates and imaged using scanning force microscopy. We used oligonucleotide molecules with lipid tails, which consisted of a single stranded oligonucleotide 11 mer containing two hydrophobically modified 5-(dodec-1-ynyl)uracil nucleobases (dU11) at the 5'-end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The air/water interface was used as confinement for the self-assembling process of dU11. Scanning force microscopy of films transferred via Langmuir-Blodgett technique revealed mono-, bi- (Π ≥ 2 mN/m) and multilayer formation (Π ≥ 30 mN/m). The first layer was 1.6 ± 0.1 nm thick. It was oriented with the hydrophilic oligonucleotide moiety facing the hydrophilic substrate while the hydrophobic alkyl chains faced air. In the second layer the oligonucleotide moiety was found to face the air. The second layer was found to cover up to 95% of the sample area. Our measurements indicated that the rearrangement of the molecules into bi- and multiple bilayers happened already at the air/water interface. Similar results were obtained with a second type of oligonucleotide amphiphile, an oligonucleotide block copolymer, which was composed of an oligonucleotide 11 mer covalently attached at the terminus to polypropyleneoxide (PPO).

  7. Optimal probe length and target location for electrochemical detection of selected uropathogens at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Mastali, Mitra; Babbitt, Jane T; Li, Yang; Landaw, Elliot M; Gau, Vincent; Churchill, Bernard M; Haake, David A

    2008-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated the clinical validity of the rapid detection of uropathogens by use of a DNA biosensor. This assay involves the hybridization of capture and detector probe pairs with bacterial 16S rRNA target molecules to form a DNA-RNA sandwich on the sensor surface. Horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antibody binds to the detector probe to enzymatically amplify the hybridization signal. These previous studies involved the hybridization of bacterial 16S rRNA target sequences with 35-mer oligonucleotide probe pairs at 65 degrees C. Achievement of point-of-care technology will be greatly facilitated by ambient-temperature detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of probe length and target location on signal intensity using hybridization temperatures of 20 to 25 degrees C. Signal intensity was found to vary dramatically with hybridization location in the species-specific bulge region of 16S rRNA helix 18. Probe pairs of as short as 10 nucleotides in length were able to produce a significant electrochemical signal, and signal intensity was correlated with probe length for probes of 10 to 20 nucleotides in length. The sensitivity of the Escherichia coli-specific 15-mer probe pairs was approximately 330 cells. These shorter probes allowed differentiation of Klebsiella pneumoniae from Proteus mirabilis 16S rRNA target sequences differing by a single nucleotide. A panel of oligonucleotide probe pairs ranging from 11 to 23 nucleotides in length was able to distinguish among seven groups of urinary tract pathogens. In conclusion, we have developed short oligonucleotide probe pairs for the species-specific identification of uropathogens at ambient temperature by use of an electrochemical sensor.

  8. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using 16S rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotides Reveals Localization of Methanogens and Selected Uncultured Bacteria in Mesophilic and Thermophilic Sludge Granules

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yuji; Kamagata, Yoichi; Nakamura, Kazunori; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Harada, Hideki

    1999-01-01

    16S rRNA-targeted in situ hybridization combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to elucidate the spatial distribution of microbes within two types of methanogenic granular sludge, mesophilic (35°C) and thermophilic (55°C), in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors fed with sucrose-, acetate-, and propionate-based artificial wastewater. The spatial organization of the microbes was visualized in thin sections of the granules by using fluorescent oligonucleotide probes specific to several phylogenetic groups of microbes. In situ hybridization with archaeal- and bacterial-domain probes within granule sections clearly showed that both mesophilic and thermophilic granules had layered structures and that the outer layer harbored mainly bacterial cells while the inner layer consisted mainly of archaeal cells. Methanosaeta-, Methanobacterium-, Methanospirillum-, and Methanosarcina-like cells were detected with oligonucleotide probes specific for the different groups of methanogens, and they were found to be localized inside the granules, in both types of which dominant methanogens were members of the genus Methanosaeta. For specific detection of bacteria which were previously detected by whole-microbial-community 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA)-cloning analysis (Y. Sekiguchi, Y. Kamagata, K. Syutsubo, A. Ohashi, H. Harada, and K. Nakamura, Microbiology 144:2655–2665, 1998) we designed probes specific for clonal 16S rDNAs related to unidentified green nonsulfur bacteria and clones related to Syntrophobacter species. The probe designed for the cluster closely related to Syntrophobacter species hybridized with coccoid cells in the inner layer of the mesophilic granule sections. The probe for the unidentified bacteria which were clustered with the green nonsulfur bacteria detected filamentous cells in the outermost layer of the thermophilic sludge granule sections. These results revealed the spatial organizations of methanogens and uncultivated bacteria and

  9. PCR amplification on microarrays of gel immobilized oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhkov, Boris; Tillib, Sergei; Mikhailovich, Vladimir; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2003-11-04

    The invention relates two general methods for performing PCR amplification, combined with the detection and analysis of the PCR products on a microchip. In the first method, the amplification occurs both outside and within a plurality of gel pads on a microchip, with at least one oligonucleotide primer immobilized in a gel pad. In the second method, PCR amplification also takes place within gel pads on a microchip, but the pads are surrounded by a hydrophobic liquid such as that which separates the individual gel pads into environments which resemble micro-miniaturized test tubes.

  10. Oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of influenza A viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotchenko, S. A.; Vasin, A. V.; Sandybaev, N. T.; Plotnikova, M. A.; Chervyakova, O. V.; Smirnova, E. A.; Kushnareva, E. V.; Strochkov, V. M.; Taylakova, E. T.; Egorov, V. V.; Koshemetov, J. K.; Kiselev, O. I.; Sansyzbay, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Influenza is one of the most widespread respiratory viral diseases, infecting humans, horses, pigs, poultry and some other animal populations. Influenza A viruses (IAV) are classified into subtypes on the basis of the surface hemagglutinin (H1 to H16) and neuraminidase (N1 to N9) glycoproteins. The correct determination of IAV subtype is necessary for clinical and epidemiological studies. In this article we propose an oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of IAV using universal one-step multisegment RT-PCR fluorescent labeling of viral gene segments. It showed to be an advanced approach for fast detection and identification of IAV.

  11. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Electrochemiluminescent biosensor of ATP using tetrahedron structured DNA and a functional oligonucleotide for Ru(phen)3(2+) intercalation and target identification.

    PubMed

    Bu, Nan-Nan; Gao, Ai; He, Xi-Wen; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2013-05-15

    Restricted target accessibility and surface-induced perturbation of the aptamer structure are the main limitations in single-stranded DNA aptamer-based electrochemical sensors. Chemical labeling of the aptamer with a probe at the end of aptamer is inefficient and time-consuming. In this work, tetrahedron-structured DNA (ts-DNA) and a functionalized oligonucleotide (FO) were used to develop an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) aptasensor with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a model target. The ts-DNA was formed with three thiolated oligonucleotides and one oligonucleotide containing anti-ATP aptamer. The FO contained a complementary strand to the anti-ATP aptamer and an intermolecular duplex for Ru(phen)3(2+) intercalation. After the ts-DNA was immobilized on the electrode surface through gold-thiol interactions, hybridization between the anti-ATP aptamer and its complementary strand introduced the intercalated Ru(phen)3(2+) to the electrode. ECL emission from Ru(phen)3(2+) was observed with tripropylamine as a co-reactant. Once ATP reacted with its aptamer, the aptamer-complimentary strand duplex dissociated and the intermolecular duplex containing Ru(phen)3(2+) was released. The difference in emission before and after reaction with ATP was used to quantify ATP with a detection limit of 0.2nM. The ts-DNA increased the sensitivity compared to conventional methods, and the intercalation strategy avoided a complex chemical labeling procedure.

  13. Specific inhibition of lymphokine biosynthesis and autocrine growth using antisense oligonucleotides in Th1 and Th2 helper T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    T helper cells have recently been divided into two subsets. The Th1 subset secretes and responds to IL-2 in an autocrine manner. The Th2 subset upon mitogen or antigen stimulation releases IL-4. Here we describe a novel technology that allowed us to confirm this distinction. We have used synthetic oligonucleotides complementary to the 5' end of mouse IL-2 and IL-4 to specifically block the biosynthesis of IL-2 or IL-4 in two murine helper T cell clones from the Th1 or Th2 subset. We show that the antisense IL-2 oligonucleotide inhibited the proliferation of the Th1 clone and had no effect on the Th2 clone. In parallel experiments, the antisense IL-4 oligonucleotide blocked the proliferation of the Th2 clone and not the proliferation of the Th1 clone. The inhibition was significantly reversed in both cases by the addition of the relevant lymphokine (IL-2 in the case of the Th1 clone, IL-4 in the case of the Th2 clone). Northern analysis, using cDNA probes specific for the two lymphokines, showed a decrease in the steady-state level of the relevant lymphokine mRNA, suggesting the specific degradation of the mRNA by an RNase H-like enzymatic activity. This strategy, which allows the specific blockade of the biosynthesis of a lymphokine, could be useful for future studies on the role of each T helper subset in physiological immune responses. PMID:2974066

  14. Development and assessment of oligonucleotide microarrays for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Aleksei; Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Afanasyev, Sergey; Jørgensen, Sven Martin

    2011-03-01

    The cDNA microarrays have played a major role in functional genomics of fish and contributed substantially to different areas of aquaculture research. However at present these platforms are gradually substituted with oligonucleotide microarrays (ONM), which represent the most cost-efficient, flexible, powerful and accurate tool for multiple gene expression profiling, especially in species with rich genomic resources. This paper describes the development and assessment of ONM platforms for Atlantic salmon. The process started with the establishment of a bioinformatic system, selection of a low redundancy set of nucleotide sequences providing coverage of transcriptomes of several fish species, their identification by protein products and annotations. Pilot experiments were performed to address issues that are essential for development of ONM: gene composition, quality assessment, hybridization success of homologous and heterologous probes, optimum numbers of spot replicates and processing, management and mining of gene expression data. Performance of microarrays was evaluated in two experiments with Atlantic salmon. Comparison of peripheral blood leukocytes with a mixture of other tissues was conducted for characterization of the leukocyte transcriptome. Analyses of salmon infected with different viral diseases identified virus-responsive genes that can be used as markers for diagnostics of infected status of fish. Data mining with functional annotations confirmed the relevance of these findings.

  15. The role of cell surface receptors in the activation of human B cells by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Reich, C F; Pisetsky, D S; Lipsky, P E

    2000-08-01

    Phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (sODN) containing the CpG motif or TCG repeats induce T cell-independent polyclonal activation of human B cells. To elucidate the mechanism of this response, the role of cell surface receptors was investigated. Sepharose beads coated with stimulatory but not nonstimulatory sODNs induced B cell proliferation comparably with soluble sODNs. The B cell stimulatory activity of Sepharose-bound sODN did not result from free sODN released from the beads since media incubated with coated beads were inactive. Using FITC-labeled sODNs as probes, binding to human B cells could be detected by flow cytometry. Binding was rapid, saturable, initially temperature independent, but with a rapid off-rate. Competition studies indicated that both stimulatory sODNs and minimally stimulatory sODNs bound to the same receptor. By contrast, phosphodiester oligonucleotides with the same nucleotide sequence as sODNs and bacterial DNA inhibited the binding of sODNs to B cells minimally. Charge appeared to contribute to the binding of sODNs to B cells since binding of sODNs was competitively inhibited by negatively charged molecules, including fucoidan, poly I, and polyvinyl sulfate. These data indicate that human B cells bind sODNs by a receptor-mediated mechanism that is necessary but not sufficient for polyclonal activation.

  16. A Versatile Vector for Gene and Oligonucleotide Transfer into Cells in Culture and in vivo: Polyethylenimine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussif, Otmane; Lezoualc'h, Frank; Zanta, Maria Antonietta; Djavaheri Mergny, Mojgan; Scherman, Daniel; Demeneix, Barbara; Behr, Jean-Paul

    1995-08-01

    Several polycations possessing substantial buffering capacity below physiological pH, such as lipopolyamines and polyamidoamine polymers, are efficient transfection agents per se-i.e., without the addition of cell targeting or membrane-disruption agents. This observation led us to test the cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) for its genedelivery potential. Indeed, every third atom of PEI is a protonable amino nitrogen atom, which makes the polymeric network an effective "proton sponge" at virtually any pH. Luciferase reporter gene transfer with this polycation into a variety of cell lines and primary cells gave results comparable to, or even better than, lipopolyamines. Cytotoxicity was low and seen only at concentrations well above those required for optimal transfection. Delivery of oligonucleotides into embryonic neurons was followed by using a fluorescent probe. Virtually all neurons showed nuclear labeling, with no toxic effects. The optimal PEI cation/anion balance for in vitro transfection is only slightly on the cationic side, which is advantageous for in vivo delivery. Indeed, intracerebral luciferase gene transfer into newborn mice gave results comparable (for a given amount of DNA) to the in vitro transfection of primary rat brain endothelial cells or chicken embryonic neurons. Together, these properties make PEI a promising vector for gene therapy and an outstanding core for the design of more sophisticated devices. Our hypothesis is that its efficiency relies on extensive lysosome buffering that protects DNA from nuclease degradation, and consequent lysosomal swelling and rupture that provide an escape mechanism for the PEI/DNA particles.

  17. Analysis of mutations in oral poliovirus vaccine by hybridization with generic oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Kirillov, E.; Chumakov, K.; Donion, J.; Rezapkin, G.; Mirzabekov, A.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes use of a new technology of hybridization with a micro-array of immobilized oligonucleotides for detection and quantification of neurovirulent mutants in Oral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV). We used a micro-array consisting of three-dimensional gel-elements containing all possible hexamers (total of 4096 probes). Hybridization of fluorescently labelled viral cDNA samples with such microchips resulted in a pattern of spots that was registered and quantified by a computer-linked CCD camera, so that the sequence of the original cDNA could be deduced. The method could reliably identify single point mutations, since each of them affected fluorescence intensity of 12 micro-array elements. Micro-array hybridization of DNA mixtures with varying contents of point mutants demonstrated that the method can detect as little as 10% of revertants in a population of vaccine virus. This new technology should be useful for quality control of live viral vaccines, as well as for other applications requiring identification and quantification of point mutations.

  18. Biophysical and biological characterization of hairpin and molecular beacon RNase H active antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Michael E; Thomas, George; Koller, Erich; Southwell, Amber L; Hayden, Michael R; Seth, Punit P

    2015-05-15

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are single stranded, backbone modified nucleic acids, which mediate cleavage of complementary RNA by directing RNase H cleavage in cell culture and in animals. It has generally been accepted that the single stranded state in conjunction with the phosphorothioate modified backbone is necessary for cellular uptake and transport to the active compartment. Herein, we examine the effect of using hairpin structured ASOs to (1) determine if an ASO agent requires a single stranded conformation for efficient RNA knock down, (2) use a fluorophore-quencher labeled ASO to evaluate which moieties the ASO interacts with in cells and examine if cellular distribution can be determined with such probes, and (3) evaluate if self-structured ASOs can improve allele selective silencing between closely related huntingtin alleles. We show that hairpin shaped ASOs can efficiently down-regulate RNA in vitro, but potency correlates strongly negatively with increasing stability of the hairpin structure. Furthermore, self-structured ASOs can efficiently reduce huntingtin mRNA in the central nervous system of mice.

  19. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Ahmad, Haslina; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Harun, Siti Norain

    2014-09-01

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+, (bpy = 2,2'bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  20. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  1. Identification of chromosomal errors in human preimplantation embryos with oligonucleotide DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lifeng; Wang, Cassie T; Sun, Xiaofang; Liu, Lian; Li, Man; Witz, Craig; Williams, Daniel; Griffith, Jason; Skorupski, Josh; Haddad, Ghassan; Gill, Jimmy; Wang, Wei-Hua

    2013-01-01

    A previous study comparing the performance of different platforms for DNA microarray found that the oligonucleotide (oligo) microarray platform containing 385K isothermal probes had the best performance when evaluating dosage sensitivity, precision, specificity, sensitivity and copy number variations border definition. Although oligo microarray platform has been used in some research fields and clinics, it has not been used for aneuploidy screening in human embryos. The present study was designed to use this new microarray platform for preimplantation genetic screening in the human. A total of 383 blastocysts from 72 infertility patients with either advanced maternal age or with previous miscarriage were analyzed after biopsy and microarray. Euploid blastocysts were transferred to patients and clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were measured. Chromosomes in some aneuploid blastocysts were further analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to evaluate accuracy of the results. We found that most (58.1%) of the blastocysts had chromosomal abnormalities that included single or multiple gains and/or losses of chromosome(s), partial chromosome deletions and/or duplications in both euploid and aneuploid embryos. Transfer of normal euploid blastocysts in 34 cycles resulted in 58.8% clinical pregnancy and 54.4% implantation rates. Examination of abnormal blastocysts by FISH showed that all embryos had matching results comparing microarray and FISH analysis. The present study indicates that oligo microarray conducted with a higher resolution and a greater number of probes is able to detect not only aneuploidy, but also minor chromosomal abnormalities, such as partial chromosome deletion and/or duplication in human embryos. Preimplantation genetic screening of the aneuploidy by DNA microarray is an advanced technology used to select embryos for transfer and improved embryo implantation can be obtained after transfer of the screened normal embryos.

  2. Oligonucleotide Aptamers: New Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongguang; Zhu, Xun; Lu, Patrick Y; Rosato, Roberto R; Tan, Wen; Zu, Youli

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of small nucleic acid ligands that are composed of RNA or single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and have high specificity and affinity for their targets. Similar to antibodies, aptamers interact with their targets by recognizing a specific three-dimensional structure and are thus termed “chemical antibodies.” In contrast to protein antibodies, aptamers offer unique chemical and biological characteristics based on their oligonucleotide properties. Hence, they are more suitable for the development of novel clinical applications. Aptamer technology has been widely investigated in various biomedical fields for biomarker discovery, in vitro diagnosis, in vivo imaging, and targeted therapy. This review will discuss the potential applications of aptamer technology as a new tool for targeted cancer therapy with emphasis on the development of aptamers that are able to specifically target cell surface biomarkers. Additionally, we will describe several approaches for the use of aptamers in targeted therapeutics, including aptamer-drug conjugation, aptamer-nanoparticle conjugation, aptamer-mediated targeted gene therapy, aptamer-mediated immunotherapy, and aptamer-mediated biotherapy. PMID:25093706

  3. In vivo delivery of transcription factors with multifunctional oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kunwoo; Rafi, Mohammad; Wang, Xiaojian; Aran, Kiana; Feng, Xuli; Lo Sterzo, Carlo; Tang, Richard; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Murthy, Niren

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutics based on transcription factors have the potential to revolutionize medicine but have had limited clinical success as a consequence of delivery problems. The delivery of transcription factors is challenging because it requires the development of a delivery vehicle that can complex transcription factors, target cells and stimulate endosomal disruption, with minimal toxicity. Here, we present a multifunctional oligonucleotide, termed DARTs (DNA assembled recombinant transcription factors), which can deliver transcription factors with high efficiency in vivo. DARTs are composed of an oligonucleotide that contains a transcription-factor-binding sequence and hydrophobic membrane-disruptive chains that are masked by acid-cleavable galactose residues. DARTs have a unique molecular architecture, which allows them to bind transcription factors, trigger endocytosis in hepatocytes, and stimulate endosomal disruption. The DARTs have enhanced uptake in hepatocytes as a result of their galactose residues and can disrupt endosomes efficiently with minimal toxicity, because unmasking of their hydrophobic domains selectively occurs in the acidic environment of the endosome. We show that DARTs can deliver the transcription factor nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the liver, catalyse the transcription of Nrf2 downstream genes, and rescue mice from acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

  4. Molecular dynamics study on DNA oligonucleotide translocation through carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Q X; Lim, C G; Cheng, Y; Gao, Huajian

    2008-09-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the translocation of a DNA oligonucleotide in a carbon nanotube (CNT) channel consisting of CNTs of two different diameters. A strong gravitational acceleration field is applied to the DNA molecule and water solvent as an external driving force for the translocation. It is observed that both the CNT channel size and the strength of gravitational field have significant influence on the DNA translocation process. It is found that the DNA oligonucleotide is unable to pass through the (8,8) CNT even under strong gravitational fields, which extends previous finding that DNA cannot be self-inserted into a (8,8) CNT. It is shown that the DNA can pass through the (10,10)-(12,12) and (12,12)-(14,14) CNTs with stronger gravitational field resulting in faster translocation. The translocation time tau is found to follow the inverse power law relationship with the gravitational acceleration a as tau approximately a(-1.21). The energetic analysis of the translocation process shows that there is an energy barrier for DNA translocation into the (10,10) tube from the (14,14) tube, which is in contrast to previous report that DNA can be self-inserted into a (10,10) tube from outside the CNT. This difference with previous report shows that the dynamic behavior of DNA translocation inside a CNT channel is quite different from that of DNA translocation into a CNT from outside the CNT.

  5. Dendritic nanoconjugates for intracellular delivery of neutral oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Xin; Wu, Lin; Carver, Kyle; Yuan, Ahu; Min, Yuanzeng

    2015-07-01

    Dendrimer-based gene delivery has been constrained by intrinsic toxicity and suboptimal nanostructure. Conjugation of neutral morpholino oligonucleotides (ONs) with PAMAM dendrimers resulted in neutral, uniform, and ultra-small (~10 nm) nanoconjugates. The nanoconjugates dramatically enhanced cellular delivery of the ONs in cancer cells. After release from the dendrimer in the cytosol, the ONs produced potent functional activity without causing significant cytotoxicity. When carrying an apoptosis-promoting ON, the nanoconjugates produced cancer cell killing directly. Thus, the dendritic nanoconjugates may provide an effective tool for delivering ONs to tumors and other diseased tissues.Dendrimer-based gene delivery has been constrained by intrinsic toxicity and suboptimal nanostructure. Conjugation of neutral morpholino oligonucleotides (ONs) with PAMAM dendrimers resulted in neutral, uniform, and ultra-small (~10 nm) nanoconjugates. The nanoconjugates dramatically enhanced cellular delivery of the ONs in cancer cells. After release from the dendrimer in the cytosol, the ONs produced potent functional activity without causing significant cytotoxicity. When carrying an apoptosis-promoting ON, the nanoconjugates produced cancer cell killing directly. Thus, the dendritic nanoconjugates may provide an effective tool for delivering ONs to tumors and other diseased tissues. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01665g

  6. Gas-phase Dissociation of homo-DNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Silvan R.; Désiron, Camille; Nyakas, Adrien; Marti, Simon; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic modified oligonucleotides are of interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, as their biological stability, pairing selectivity, and binding strength can be considerably increased by the incorporation of unnatural structural elements. Homo-DNA is an oligonucleotide homologue based on dideoxy-hexopyranosyl sugar moieties, which follows the Watson-Crick A-T and G-C base pairing system, but does not hybridize with complementary natural DNA and RNA. Homo-DNA has found application as a bioorthogonal element in templated chemistry applications. The gas-phase dissociation of homo-DNA has been investigated by ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MS/MS, and mechanistic aspects of its gas-phase dissociation are discussed. Experiments revealed a charge state dependent preference for the loss of nucleobases, which are released either as neutrals or as anions. In contrast to DNA, nucleobase loss from homo-DNA was found to be decoupled from backbone cleavage, thus resulting in stable products. This renders an additional stage of ion activation necessary in order to generate sequence-defining fragment ions. Upon MS3 of the primary base-loss ion, homo-DNA was found to exhibit unspecific backbone dissociation resulting in a balanced distribution of all fragment ion series.

  7. A single molecular beacon probe is sufficient for the analysis of multiple nucleic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Hayson, Aaron; Ballantyne, Jack; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2010-08-16

    Molecular beacon (MB) probes are dual-labeled hairpin-shaped oligodeoxyribonucleotides that are extensively used for real-time detection of specific RNA/DNA analytes. In the MB probe, the loop fragment is complementary to the analyte: therefore, a unique probe is required for the analysis of each new analyte sequence. The conjugation of an oligonucleotide with two dyes and subsequent purification procedures add to the cost of MB probes, thus reducing their application in multiplex formats. Here we demonstrate how one MB probe can be used for the analysis of an arbitrary nucleic acid. The approach takes advantage of two oligonucleotide adaptor strands, each of which contains a fragment complementary to the analyte and a fragment complementary to an MB probe. The presence of the analyte leads to association of MB probe and the two DNA strands in quadripartite complex. The MB probe fluorescently reports the formation of this complex. In this design, the MB does not bind the analyte directly; therefore, the MB sequence is independent of the analyte. In this study one universal MB probe was used to genotype three human polymorphic sites. This approach promises to reduce the cost of multiplex real-time assays and improve the accuracy of single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping.

  8. Oligonucleotide-genotyping as a method of detecting the HLA-DR2 (DRw15)-Dw2, -DR2 (DRw15)-Dw12, -DR4-Dw15, and -DR4-D"KT2" haplotypes in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Obata, F; Ito, I; Kaneko, T; Ohkubo, M; Ishimoto, A L; Abe, A; Kashiwagi, N

    1989-05-01

    We synthesized pairs of four different oligonucleotides, F22, F29, F42, and F158, to analyse the HLA-DR2 (DRw15) and -DR4 haplotypes in the Japanese population. After enzymatically amplifying the HLA-DRB1 gene, we hybridized the oligonucleotide probes with DNA extracted from 42 donors. Hybridization was completed between F22 and the DNA of haplotype DR2 (DRw15)-Dw2, between F29 and the DNA of DR2 (DRw15)-Dw12, between F42 and the DNA of DR4-D"KT2", and between F158 and the DNA of DR4-Dw15. In keeping with the nucleotide sequences of the probes, F29 hybridized also with DNA from the DR9-Dw23 haplotype and F158 with that from some of the DRw8 haplotypes (DRw8-Dw8.3) in the Japanese population. Results of this study demonstrate that the four oligonucleotides make useful probes for detecting the haplotypes above.

  9. G-quadruplex formation between G-rich PNA and homologous sequences in oligonucleotides and supercoiled plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Gaynutdinov, Timur I; Englund, Ethan A; Appella, Daniel H; Onyshchenko, Mykola I; Neumann, Ronald D; Panyutin, Igor G

    2015-04-01

    Guanine (G)-rich DNA sequences can adopt four-stranded quadruplex conformations that may play a role in the regulation of genetic processes. To explore the possibility of targeted molecular recognition of DNA sequences with short G-rich peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and to assess the strand arrangement in such complexes, we used PNA and DNA with the Oxytricha nova telomeric sequence d(G4T4G4) as a model. PNA probes were complexed with DNA targets in the following forms: single-stranded oligonucleotides, a loop of DNA in a hairpin conformation, and as supercoiled plasmid with the (G4T4G4)/(C4A4C4) insert. Gel-shift mobility assays demonstrated formation of stable hybrid complexes between the homologous G4T4G4 PNA and DNA with multiple modes of binding. Chemical and enzymatic probing revealed sequence-specific and G-quadruplex dependent binding of G4T4G4 PNA to dsDNA. Spectroscopic and electrophoretic analysis of the complex formed between PNA and the synthetic DNA hairpin containing the G4T4G4 loop showed that the stoichiometry of a prevailing complex is three PNA strands per one DNA strand. We speculate how this new PNA-DNA complex architecture can help to design more selective, quadruplex-specific PNA probes. PMID:25650982

  10. SPR Detection and Discrimination of the Oligonucleotides Related to the Normal and the Hybrid bcr-abl Genes by Two Stringency Control Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsishin, M. J.; Ushenin, Iu. V.; Rachkov, A. E.; Solatkin, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we applied two stringency control strategies for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of DNA hybridization and discrimination of completely and partially complementary 24-mer sequences. These sequences are specific to the human normal bcr and the hybrid bcr-abl genes, protein products of which are responsible for some leukemia. SPR sensors based on resonance phenomena in nanoscale gold films are well suited for label-free, real-time investigations of the macromolecule interactions. Thermodynamic parameters obtained using the web server DINAMelt allowed supposing the possibility for realization (a) stringency control based on the ionic strength of the hybridization buffer and (b) stringency control based on the temperature elevation. The first one resulted in that the discrimination index of completely complementary and partially complementary oligonucleotides depending on the target concentration varied from 1.3 to 1.8 in 2 × SSC and from 2.0 to 2.9 in 0.5 × SSC. For implementation of the second stringency control strategy, SPR spectrometer measuring flow cell with built-in high-precision temperature control and regulation as well as corresponding software was created. It is shown that the duplexes formed by the immobilized probes mod-Ph and completely complementary oligonucleotides P1 remained without significant changes until ~50 °C, while the duplexes formed with partially complementary oligonucleotide Bcrex14 almost entirely disrupted at 40 °C. Thus, the absolutely effective thermodiscrimination of this pair of oligonucleotides was achieved in this temperature range (40-50 °C).

  11. Site selective bis-intercalation of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye in DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, J P; Pedersen, J B; Hansen, L F; Wemmer, D E

    1995-01-01

    We have used one and two dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy to characterize the binding of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye, 1,1'-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4,8-diaza-undecamethylene)-bis-4- (3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-thiazole)-2-methylidene)-quinolin ium tetraiodide (TOTO), to various double stranded DNA oligonucleotides. TOTO binds strongly to all the oligonucleotides used, but usually more than one complex is observed and exchange between different binding sites broadens the lines in the NMR spectra. Complete precipitation occurs when TOTO is bound to small oligonucleotides. Binding to larger oligonucleotides occurs by bis-intercalation. The 1:1 complex of TOTO with the oligonucleotide d(CCGACTGATGC):d (GCATCAGTCGG) gave only one complex that was shown to be a bis-intercalation in the CTGA:TCAG binding site. The binding to this site was also characterized by studying the TOTO complex with the d(CCGCTGAGC):d(GCTCAGCGG) oligonucleotide. NOE connectivities and molecular modelling were used to characterize the complex. The 1:1 complex of TOTO with the oligonucleotide d(CCGCTAGCG):d(CGCTAGCGG) containing a CTAG:CTAG binding site was similarly characterized by NMR. It was concluded that the binding of TOTO to larger oligonucleotides is site selective with CTAG:CTAG as the preferred binding site. PMID:7708489

  12. A convenient solid-phase method for synthesis of 3'-conjugates of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Stetsenko, D A; Gait, M J

    2001-01-01

    We present a new procedure for the preparation of 3'-conjugates of oligonucleotides through solid-phase synthesis. A suitable universal solid support was readily prepared using a series of peptide-like coupling reactions to incorporate first a spacer and then an L-homoserine branching unit. The N-alpha-position of the homoserine carries an Fmoc protecting group that is removed by treatment with piperidine to liberate an amino group suitable for attachment of the conjugate (e.g., small organic molecule, fluorescent group, cholesterol, biotin, amino acid, etc.) or for assembly of a short peptide. The side-chain hydroxyl group of the homoserine carries a trityl protecting group. After TFA deprotection, the hydroxyl group acts as the site for oligonucleotide assembly. An additional spacer, such as aminohexanoyl, may be incorporated easily between the conjugate molecule and the oligonucleotide. A number of examples of synthesis of 3'-conjugates of oligonucleotides and their analogues are described that involve standard automated oligonucleotide assembly and use of commercially available materials. The linkage between oligonucleotide and 3'-conjugate is chirally pure and is stable to conventional ammonia treatment used for oligonucleotide deprotection and release from the solid support. The homoserine-functionalized solid support system represents a simple and universal route to 3'-conjugates of oligonucleotides and their derivatives.

  13. Synthesis and triplex-forming properties of cyclic oligonucleotides with (G,A)-antiparallel strands.

    PubMed

    Grimau, Marta G; Aviñó, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo; Eritja, Ramon

    2005-02-01

    Cyclic oligonucleotides carrying an oligopurine Watson-Crick sequence linked to the corresponding (G,A)- and (G,T)-antiparallel strands were prepared by nonenzymatic template-assisted cyclization of phosphorylated precursors. Cyclization was attempted using 3'-phosphate and 5'-phosphate linear precursors with carbodiimide or BrCN activation. The best results were obtained with the 5'-phosphorylated precursors and carbodiimide activation. Cyclic oligonucleotides bind polypyrimidine target sequence by formation of antiparallel triplexes. We have used UV and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to analyze triplexes formed by cyclic oligonucleotides carrying G and A in the reverse-Hoogsteen strand. The relative stability of the triplexes formed by cyclic and linear oligonucleotides with a common polypyrimidine target was determined by melting experiments. The most-stable triplexes were formed by the cyclic oligonucleotide, followed by the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated oligonucleotide precursors, and, finally, the corresponding hairpin. Although the differences in binding affinity between cyclic oligonucleotides and their corresponding linear precursors are small, the use of cyclic oligonucleotides offers a clear advantage over conventional duplex recognition.

  14. Site selective bis-intercalation of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye in DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, J P; Pedersen, J B; Hansen, L F; Wemmer, D E

    1995-03-11

    We have used one and two dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy to characterize the binding of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye, 1,1'-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4,8-diaza-undecamethylene)-bis-4- (3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-thiazole)-2-methylidene)-quinolin ium tetraiodide (TOTO), to various double stranded DNA oligonucleotides. TOTO binds strongly to all the oligonucleotides used, but usually more than one complex is observed and exchange between different binding sites broadens the lines in the NMR spectra. Complete precipitation occurs when TOTO is bound to small oligonucleotides. Binding to larger oligonucleotides occurs by bis-intercalation. The 1:1 complex of TOTO with the oligonucleotide d(CCGACTGATGC):d (GCATCAGTCGG) gave only one complex that was shown to be a bis-intercalation in the CTGA:TCAG binding site. The binding to this site was also characterized by studying the TOTO complex with the d(CCGCTGAGC):d(GCTCAGCGG) oligonucleotide. NOE connectivities and molecular modelling were used to characterize the complex. The 1:1 complex of TOTO with the oligonucleotide d(CCGCTAGCG):d(CGCTAGCGG) containing a CTAG:CTAG binding site was similarly characterized by NMR. It was concluded that the binding of TOTO to larger oligonucleotides is site selective with CTAG:CTAG as the preferred binding site.

  15. Synthesis of 3'-, or 5'-, or internal methacrylamido-modified oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Golova, Julia B.; Chernov, Boris K.

    2010-04-27

    New modifiers were synthesized for incorporation of a methacrylic function in 3'-, 5'- and internal positions of oligonucleotides during solid phase synthesis. A modifier was used for synthesis of 5'-methacrylated oligonucleotides for preparation of microarrays by a co-polymerization method.

  16. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  17. Whole genome DNA copy number changes identified by high density oligonucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Changes in DNA copy number are one of the hallmarks of the genetic instability common to most human cancers. Previous micro-array-based methods have been used to identify chromosomal gains and losses; however, they are unable to genotype alleles at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here we describe a novel algorithm that uses a recently developed high-density oligonucleotide array-based SNP genotyping method, whole genome sampling analysis (WGSA), to identify genome-wide chromosomal gains and losses at high resolution. WGSA simultaneously genotypes over 10,000 SNPs by allele-specific hybridisation to perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes synthesised on a single array. The copy number algorithm jointly uses PM intensity and discrimination ratios between paired PM and MM intensity values to identify and estimate genetic copy number changes. Values from an experimental sample are compared with SNP-specific distributions derived from a reference set containing over 100 normal individuals to gain statistical power. Genomic regions with statistically significant copy number changes can be identified using both single point analysis and contiguous point analysis of SNP intensities. We identified multiple regions of amplification and deletion using a panel of human breast cancer cell lines. We verified these results using an independent method based on quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that our approach is both sensitive and specific and can tolerate samples which contain a mixture of both tumour and normal DNA. In addition, by using known allele frequencies from the reference set, statistically significant genomic intervals can be identified containing contiguous stretches of homozygous markers, potentially allowing the detection of regions undergoing loss of heterozygosity (LOH) without the need for a matched normal control sample. The coupling of LOH analysis, via SNP genotyping, with copy number estimations using a single array

  18. Affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release using nucleic acid aptamers and complementary oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Soontornworajit, Boonchoy; Zhou, Jing; Snipes, Matthew P; Battig, Mark R; Wang, Yong

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials for the precise control of protein release are important to the development of new strategies for treating human diseases. This study aimed to fundamentally understand aptamer--protein dissociation triggered by complementary oligonucleotides, and to apply this understanding to develop affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release. The results showed that the oligonucleotide tails of the aptamers played a critical role in inducing intermolecular hybridization and triggering aptamer--protein dissociation. In addition, the attachment of the oligonucleotide tails to the aptamers and the increase of hybridizing length could produce a synergistic effect on the dissociation of bound proteins from their aptamers. More importantly, pegylated complementary oligonucleotides could successfully trigger protein release from the aptamer-functionalized hydrogels at multiple time points. Based on these results, it is believed that aptamer-functionalized hydrogels and complementary oligonucleotides hold great potential of controlling the release of protein drugs to treat human diseases.

  19. Design and synthesis of polyacrylamide-based oligonucleotide supports for use in nucleic acid diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Fahy, E; Davis, G R; DiMichele, L J; Ghosh, S S

    1993-04-25

    Polyacrylamide supports, in a range of pore sizes, were investigated as nucleic acid affinity matrices for the detection of target DNA or RNA sequences using a sandwich hybridization format. Bromoacetyl and thiol oligonucleotide derivatives were covalently linked to sulfhydryl- and bromoacetyl-polyacrylamide supports with greater than 95% end-attachment efficiencies. These polyacrylamide-oligonucleotide supports were further derivatized with anionic residues to provide multi-functional supports which show low non-specific binding for non-complementary nucleic acids. While all the polyacrylamide-oligonucleotide supports capture complementary oligonucleotides with high affinity, the pore size was found to be a critical parameter in sandwich hybridization reactions. The superior hybridization characteristics of the Trisacryl support was ascribed to a combination of its macroporous nature, hydrophilicity and the terminal attachment of its capture oligonucleotides.

  20. Direct fluorescence analysis of genetic polymorphisms by hybridization with oligonucleotide arrays on glass supports.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Z; Guilfoyle, R A; Thiel, A J; Wang, R; Smith, L M

    1994-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the analysis of genetic polymorphisms has been developed using allele-specific oligonucleotide arrays bound to glass supports. Allele-specific oligonucleotides are covalently immobilized on glass slides in arrays of 3 mm spots. Genomic DNA is amplified by PCR using one fluorescently tagged primer oligonucleotide and one biotinylated primer oligonucleotide. The two complementary DNA strands are separated, the fluorescently tagged strand is hybridized to the support-bound oligonucleotide array, and the hybridization pattern is detected by fluorescence scanning. Multiple polymorphisms present in the PCR product may be detected in parallel. The effect of spacer length, surface density and hybridization conditions were evaluated, as was the relative efficacy of hybridization with single or double-stranded PCR products. The utility of the method was demonstrated in the parallel analysis of 5 point mutations from exon 4 of the human tyrosinase gene. Images PMID:7816638

  1. Development and application of small-subunit rRNA probes for assessment of selected Thiobacillus species and members of the genus Acidiphilium.

    PubMed

    Peccia, J; Marchand, E A; Silverstein, J; Hernandez, M

    2000-07-01

    Culture-dependent studies have implicated sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as the causative agents of acid mine drainage and concrete corrosion in sewers. Thiobacillus species are considered the major representatives of the acid-producing bacteria in these environments. Small-subunit rRNA genes from all of the Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species catalogued by the Ribosomal Database Project were identified and used to design oligonucleotide DNA probes. Two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized to complement variable regions of 16S rRNA in the following acidophilic bacteria: Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans (probe Thio820) and members of the genus Acidiphilium (probe Acdp821). Using (32)P radiolabels, probe specificity was characterized by hybridization dissociation temperature (T(d)) with membrane-immobilized RNA extracted from a suite of 21 strains representing three groups of bacteria. Fluorochrome-conjugated probes were evaluated for use with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the experimentally determined T(d)s. FISH was used to identify and enumerate bacteria in laboratory reactors and environmental samples. Probing of laboratory reactors inoculated with a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria validated the ability of the oligonucleotide probes to track specific cell numbers with time. Additionally, probing of sediments from an active acid mine drainage site in Colorado demonstrated the ability to identify numbers of active bacteria in natural environments that contain high concentrations of metals, associated precipitates, and other mineral debris.

  2. Development and application of small-subunit rRNA probes for assessment of selected Thiobacillus species and members of the genus Acidiphilium.

    PubMed

    Peccia, J; Marchand, E A; Silverstein, J; Hernandez, M

    2000-07-01

    Culture-dependent studies have implicated sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as the causative agents of acid mine drainage and concrete corrosion in sewers. Thiobacillus species are considered the major representatives of the acid-producing bacteria in these environments. Small-subunit rRNA genes from all of the Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species catalogued by the Ribosomal Database Project were identified and used to design oligonucleotide DNA probes. Two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized to complement variable regions of 16S rRNA in the following acidophilic bacteria: Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans (probe Thio820) and members of the genus Acidiphilium (probe Acdp821). Using (32)P radiolabels, probe specificity was characterized by hybridization dissociation temperature (T(d)) with membrane-immobilized RNA extracted from a suite of 21 strains representing three groups of bacteria. Fluorochrome-conjugated probes were evaluated for use with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the experimentally determined T(d)s. FISH was used to identify and enumerate bacteria in laboratory reactors and environmental samples. Probing of laboratory reactors inoculated with a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria validated the ability of the oligonucleotide probes to track specific cell numbers with time. Additionally, probing of sediments from an active acid mine drainage site in Colorado demonstrated the ability to identify numbers of active bacteria in natural environments that contain high concentrations of metals, associated precipitates, and other mineral debris. PMID:10877807

  3. Development and Application of Small-Subunit rRNA Probes for Assessment of Selected Thiobacillus Species and Members of the Genus Acidiphilium

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Marchand, Eric A.; Silverstein, Joann; Hernandez, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Culture-dependent studies have implicated sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as the causative agents of acid mine drainage and concrete corrosion in sewers. Thiobacillus species are considered the major representatives of the acid-producing bacteria in these environments. Small-subunit rRNA genes from all of the Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species catalogued by the Ribosomal Database Project were identified and used to design oligonucleotide DNA probes. Two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized to complement variable regions of 16S rRNA in the following acidophilic bacteria: Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans (probe Thio820) and members of the genus Acidiphilium (probe Acdp821). Using 32P radiolabels, probe specificity was characterized by hybridization dissociation temperature (Td) with membrane-immobilized RNA extracted from a suite of 21 strains representing three groups of bacteria. Fluorochrome-conjugated probes were evaluated for use with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the experimentally determined Tds. FISH was used to identify and enumerate bacteria in laboratory reactors and environmental samples. Probing of laboratory reactors inoculated with a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria validated the ability of the oligonucleotide probes to track specific cell numbers with time. Additionally, probing of sediments from an active acid mine drainage site in Colorado demonstrated the ability to identify numbers of active bacteria in natural environments that contain high concentrations of metals, associated precipitates, and other mineral debris. PMID:10877807

  4. Molecular beacon-metal nanowire interface: effect of probe sequence and surface coverage on sensor performance.

    PubMed

    Cederquist, Kristin B; Stoermer Golightly, Rebecca; Keating, Christine D

    2008-08-19

    We report the effect of surface coverage and sequence on the performance of 5' thiolated, 3' fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpin probes bound to Au/Ag striped ("barcoded") metal nanowires. Coverage was controlled by varying probe concentration, buffer ionic strength, and by addition of short hydroxy-terminated alkanethiol diluent molecules during probe assembly onto the nanowire surface. Surface dilution of the surface-bound probes with a omega-hydroxyl alkanethiol, a commonly accepted practice in the surface-bound DNA literature, did not appreciably improve sensor performance as compared to similar probe coverages without hydroxyalkanethiol diluents; this finding underscores the differences between the molecular beacon probes used here and more traditional nonfluorescent, random coil probes. We found that intermediate probe coverage of approximately 10 (12) molecules/cm (2) gave the best discrimination between presence and absence of a target sequence. Because we are interested in multiplexed assays, we also compared several beacon probe sequences having different stabilities for secondary structure formation in solution; we found that both probe surface coverage and sensor performance varied for different probe sequences. When five different molecular beacon probes, each bound to barcoded nanowires, were used in a multiplexed, wash-free assay for target oligonucleotides corresponding to viral nucleic acid sequences, these differences in probe performance did not prevent accurate target identification. We anticipate that the findings described here will also be relevant to other applications involving molecular beacons or other structured nucleic acid probes immobilized on metal surfaces.

  5. Application of rRNA-based probes for observing marine nanoplanktonic protists.

    PubMed

    Lim, E L; Amaral, L A; Caron, D A; DeLong, E F

    1993-05-01

    The use of small-subunit rRNA-based oligonucleotides as probes for detecting marine nanoplanktonic protists was examined with a ciliate (an Uronema sp.), a flagellate (a Cafeteria sp.), and mixed assemblages of protists from enrichment cultures and natural seawater samples. Flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy analyses demonstrated that hybridizations employing fluorescein-labeled, eukaryote-specific probes intensely stained logarithmically growing protists, whereas these same protist strains in late stationary growth were barely detectable. The fluorescence intensity due to probe binding was significantly enhanced by the use of probes end labeled with biotin, which were detected by fluorescein-labeled avidin. The degree of signal amplification ranged from two- to fivefold for cultured protists in both logarithmic and stationary growth phases. Mixed assemblages of heterotrophic protists from enrichment cultures were also intensely labeled by rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes by the biotin-avidin detection system. Protists in late stationary growth phase and natural assemblages of protists that were otherwise undetectable when hybridized with fluorescein-labeled probes were easily visualized by this approach. In the latter samples, hybridization with multiple, biotin-labeled probes was necessary for detection of naturally occurring marine protists by epifluorescence microscopy. The signal amplification obtained with the biotin-avidin system should increase the utility of rRNA-targeted probes for identifying protists and facilitate characterization of the population structure and distribution of protists in aquatic environments.

  6. Application of rRNA-based probes for observing marine nanoplanktonic protists.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, E L; Amaral, L A; Caron, D A; DeLong, E F

    1993-01-01

    The use of small-subunit rRNA-based oligonucleotides as probes for detecting marine nanoplanktonic protists was examined with a ciliate (an Uronema sp.), a flagellate (a Cafeteria sp.), and mixed assemblages of protists from enrichment cultures and natural seawater samples. Flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy analyses demonstrated that hybridizations employing fluorescein-labeled, eukaryote-specific probes intensely stained logarithmically growing protists, whereas these same protist strains in late stationary growth were barely detectable. The fluorescence intensity due to probe binding was significantly enhanced by the use of probes end labeled with biotin, which were detected by fluorescein-labeled avidin. The degree of signal amplification ranged from two- to fivefold for cultured protists in both logarithmic and stationary growth phases. Mixed assemblages of heterotrophic protists from enrichment cultures were also intensely labeled by rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes by the biotin-avidin detection system. Protists in late stationary growth phase and natural assemblages of protists that were otherwise undetectable when hybridized with fluorescein-labeled probes were easily visualized by this approach. In the latter samples, hybridization with multiple, biotin-labeled probes was necessary for detection of naturally occurring marine protists by epifluorescence microscopy. The signal amplification obtained with the biotin-avidin system should increase the utility of rRNA-targeted probes for identifying protists and facilitate characterization of the population structure and distribution of protists in aquatic environments. Images PMID:8517756

  7. Insights to primitive replication derived from structures of small oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. K.; Fox, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    Available information on the structure of small oligonucleotides is surveyed. It is observed that even small oligomers typically exhibit defined structures over a wide range of pH and temperature. These structures rely on a plethora of non-standard base-base interactions in addition to the traditional Watson-Crick pairings. Stable duplexes, though typically antiparallel, can be parallel or staggered and perfect complementarity is not essential. These results imply that primitive template directed reactions do not require high fidelity. Hence, the extensive use of Watson-Crick complementarity in genes rather than being a direct consequence of the primitive condensation process, may instead reflect subsequent selection based on the advantage of accuracy in maintaining the primitive genetic machinery once it arose.

  8. Efficient site-directed saturation mutagenesis using degenerate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Steffens, David L; Williams, John G K

    2007-07-01

    We describe a reliable protocol for constructing single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries consisting of all 20 naturally occurring amino acids at a specific site within a protein. Such libraries are useful for structure-function studies and directed evolution. This protocol extends the utility of Stratagene's QuikChange Site-Directed Mutagenesis Kit, which is primarily recommended for single amino acid substitutions. Two complementary primers are synthesized, containing a degenerate mixture of the four bases at the three positions of the selected codon. These primers are added to starting plasmid template and thermal cycled to produce mutant DNA molecules, which are subsequently transformed into competent bacteria. The protocol does not require purification of mutagenic oligonucleotides or PCR products. This reduces both the cost and turnaround time in high-throughput directed evolution applications. We have utilized this protocol to generate over 200 site-saturation libraries in a DNA polymerase, with a success rate of greater than 95%. PMID:17595310

  9. Oligonucleotide synthesis catalyzed by the Zn/2+/ ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawai, H.; Orgel, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results of experiments are reported in which Zn(2+) ion catalyzed the formation of oligonucleotides from nucleoside phosphorimidazolides in aqueous solution, even in the absence of a template. Specifically, the imidazolides (ImpU or ImpA) polymerized to form ImpApA, and pApA, pApApA, and pApApApA, or the analogous uracil compounds. In addition, the expected hydrolysis products of the hydrolysis of ImpA were formed (pA, imidazole). Judging from the ratio of pA(n) over pA (with and without zinc ion), this ion increased the efficiency of phosphodiester-bond formation by up to 10 times. Possible mechanisms for the reaction are tentatively proposed.

  10. Aptamer Oligonucleotides: Novel Potential Therapeutic Agents in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Weibin; Lan, Xiaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid or ribonucleic acid oligonucleotides generated in vitro based on affinity for certain target molecules by a process known as Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment. Aptamers can bind their target molecules with high specificity and selectivity by means of structure compatibility, stacking of aromatic rings, electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, and hydrogen bonding. With several advantages over monoclonal antibodies and other conventional small-molecule therapeutics, such as high specificity and affinity, negligible batch to batch variation, flexible modification and stability, lack of toxicity and low immunogenicity, aptamers are becoming promising novel diagnostic and therapeutic agents. This review focuses on the development of aptamers as potential therapeutics for autoimmune diseases, including diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:25993618

  11. Computer simulation in template-directed oligonucleotide synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Benasconi, Claude F.

    1990-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that template-directed polymerizations have played a key role in prebiotic evolution. A computer simulation that models up to 33 competing reactions was used to investigate the product distribution in a template-directed oligonucleotide synthesis as a function of time and concentration of the reactants. The study focuses on the poly(C)-directed elongation reaction of oligoguanylates, and how it is affected by the competing processes of hydrolysis and dimerization of the activated monomer, which have the potential of severely curtailing the elongation and reducing the size and yield of the synthesized polymers. The simulations show that realistic and probably prebiotically plausible conditions can be found where hydrolysis and dimerization are either negligible or where a high degree of polymerization can be attained even in the face of substantial hydrolysis and/or dimerization.

  12. DNA Oligonucleotide Fragment Ion Rearrangements Upon Collision-Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Brett; Neumann, Elizabeth K.; Solouki, Touradj

    2015-08-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of m/z-isolated w type fragment ions and an intact 5' phosphorylated DNA oligonucleotide generated rearranged product ions. Of the 21 studied w ions of various nucleotide sequences, fragment ion sizes, and charge states, 18 (~86%) generated rearranged product ions upon CID in a Synapt G2-S HDMS (Waters Corporation, Manchester, England, UK) ion mobility-mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometry (MS), ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and theoretical modeling data suggest that purine bases can attack the free 5' phosphate group in w type ions and 5' phosphorylated DNA to generate sequence permuted [phosphopurine]- fragment ions. We propose and discuss a potential mechanism for generation of rearranged [phosphopurine]- and complementary y-B type product ions.

  13. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of hepatitis C virus gene expression in transformed hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanecak, R; Brown-Driver, V; Fox, M C; Azad, R F; Furusako, S; Nozaki, C; Ford, C; Sasmor, H; Anderson, K P

    1996-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies have provided convincing evidence that the 5' noncoding region (5' NCR) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly conserved among viral isolates worldwide and that translation of HCV is directed by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) located within the 5' NCR. We have investigated inhibition of HCV gene expression using antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the 5' NCR, translation initiation codon, and core protein coding sequences. Oligonucleotides were evaluated for activity after treatment of a human hepatocyte cell line expressing the HCV 5' NCR, core protein coding sequences, and the majority of the envelope gene (E1). More than 50 oligonucleotides were evaluated for inhibition of HCV RNA and protein expression. Two oligonucleotides, ISIS 6095, targeted to a stem-loop structure within the 5' NCR known to be important for IRES function, and ISIS 6547, targeted to sequences spanning the AUG used for initiation of HCV polyprotein translation, were found to be the most effective at inhibiting HCV gene expression. ISIS 6095 and 6547 caused concentration-dependent reductions in HCV RNA and protein levels, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 0.1 to 0.2 microM. Reduction of RNA levels, and subsequently protein levels, by these phosphorothioate oligonucleotides was consistent with RNase H cleavage of RNA at the site of oligonucleotide hybridization. Chemically modified HCV antisense phosphodiester oligonucleotides were designed and evaluated for inhibition of core protein expression to identify oligonucleotides and HCV target sequences that do not require RNase H activity to inhibit expression. A uniformly modified 2'-methoxyethoxy phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotide complementary to the initiator AUG reduced HCV core protein levels as effectively as phosphorothioate oligonucleotide ISIS 6095 but without reducing HCV RNA levels. Results of our studies show that HCV gene expression is reduced by antisense oligonucleotides and

  14. Guanine modification of inhibitory oligonucleotides potentiates their suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Römmler, Franziska; Jurk, Marion; Uhlmann, Eugen; Hammel, Monika; Waldhuber, Anna; Pfeiffer, Lavinia; Wagner, Hermann; Vollmer, Jörg; Miethke, Thomas

    2013-09-15

    Inhibitory TLR7 and/or TLR9 oligonucleotides (inhibitory oligonucleotide [INH-ODN]) are characterized by a phosphorothioate backbone and a CC(T)XXX₃₋₅GGG motif, respectively. INH-ODN 2088 is a prototypic member of this class of INH-ODN and acts as a TLR7 and TLR9 antagonist. It contains a G quadruple that leads to higher order structures by the formation of G tetrads. These structures are unfavorable for the prediction of their pharmacological and immunological behavior. We show in this study that modification of Gs within the G quadruple by 7-deaza-guanine or 7-deaza-2'-O-methyl-guanine avoids higher order structures and improves their inhibitory potential. Whereas TLR9-induced TNF-α secretion of bone marrow-derived macrophages and conventional dendritic cells was equally inhibited by INH-ODN 2088 and G-modified INH-ODNs such as INH-ODN 24888, TLR7-induced TNF-α release and TLR7- and TLR9-induced IL-12p40 release were significantly more impaired by G-modified INH-ODNs. Similarly, the IL-6 release of B cells from wild-type and autoimmune MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice was more efficiently impaired by G-modified INH-ODNs. Surprisingly, INH-ODN 2088 stimulated B cells to proliferate when used in higher doses. Finally, in vivo, in wild-type and autoimmune MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice, G-modified INH-ODN 24888 was significantly more efficient than unmodified INH-ODN 2088. In summary, G modification allows the development of INH-ODNs with superior inhibitory potency for inflammatory diseases with high medical need such as systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:23966630

  15. NANOSTRUCTURED PROBES FOR IN VIVO GENE DETECTION

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Gang; Santangelo, Phillip; Nitin, Nitin; Rhee, Won Jong

    2010-01-01

    The ability to visualize in real-time the expression dynamics and localization of specific RNAs in vivo offers tremendous opportunities for biological and disease studies including cancer detection. However, quantitative methods such as real-time PCR and DNA microarrays rely on the use of cell lysates thus not able to obtain important spatial and temporal information. Fluorescence proteins and other reporter systems cannot image endogenous RNA in living cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays require washing to achieve specificity, therefore can only be used with fixed cells. Here we review the recent development of nanostructured probes for living cell RNA detection, and discuss the biological and engineering issues and challenges of quantifying gene expression in vivo. In particular, we describe methods that use oligonucleotide probes, combined with novel delivery strategies, to image the relative level, localization and dynamics of RNA in live cells. Examples of detecting endogenous mRNAs, as well as imaging their subcellular localization are given to illustrate the biological applications, and issues in probe design, delivery and target accessibility are discussed. The nanostructured probes promise to open new and exciting opportunities in sensitive gene detection for a wide range of biological and medical applications. PMID:22138717

  16. Oligonucleotides designed to inhibit TLR9 block Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection at multiple steps.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Monica M; Gauger, Joshua J L; Brandt, Curtis R

    2014-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is an important human pathogen which requires activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) during its replication cycle. The persistent nature of HSV-1 infection, and the emergence of drug-resistant strains, highlights the importance of research to develop new antiviral agents. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a prominent role during the early antiviral response by recognizing viral nucleic acid and gene products, activating NFκB, and stimulating the production of inflammatory cytokines. We demonstrate a significant effect on HSV-1 replication in ARPE-19 and Vero cells when oligonucleotides designed to inhibit TLR9 are added 2h prior to infection. A greater than 90% reduction in the yield of infectious virus was achieved at oligonucleotide concentrations of 10-20 μM. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides prevented expression of essential immediate early herpes gene products as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. TLR9 oligonucleotides also interfered with viral attachment and entry. A TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide containing five adjacent guanosine residues (G-ODN) exhibited virucidal activity and inhibited HSV-1 replication when added post-infection. The antiviral effect of the TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides did not depend on the presence of TLR9 protein, suggesting a mechanism of inhibition that is not TLR9 specific. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides also reduced NFκB activity in nuclear extracts. Studies using these TLR inhibitors in the context of viral infection should be interpreted with caution.

  17. Stereospecificity of Oligonucleotide Interactions Revisited: No Evidence for Heterochiral Hybridization and Ribozyme/DNAzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hoehlig, Kai; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for the application of RNA- or DNA-oligonucleotides in biotechnology and molecular medicine is their susceptibility to abundant nucleases. One intriguing possibility to tackle this problem is the use of mirror-image (l-)oligonucleotides. For aptamers, this concept has successfully been applied to even develop therapeutic agents, so-called Spiegelmers. However, for technologies depending on RNA/RNA or RNA/DNA hybridization, like antisense or RNA interference, it has not been possible to use mirror-image oligonucleotides because Watson-Crick base pairing of complementary strands is (thought to be) stereospecific. Many scientists consider this a general principle if not a dogma. A recent publication proposing heterochiral Watson-Crick base pairing and sequence-specific hydrolysis of natural RNA by mirror-image ribozymes or DNAzymes (and vice versa) prompted us to systematically revisit the stereospecificity of oligonucleotides hybridization and catalytic activity. Using hyperchromicity measurements we demonstrate that hybridization only occurs among homochiral anti-parallel complementary oligonucleotide strands. As expected, achiral PNA hybridizes to RNA and DNA irrespective of their chirality. In functional assays we could not confirm an alleged heterochiral hydrolytic activity of ribozymes or DNAzymes. Our results confirm a strict stereospecificity of oligonucleotide hybridization and clearly argue against the possibility to use mirror-image oligonucleotides for gene silencing or antisense applications. PMID:25679211

  18. Enzymatic synthesis of modified oligonucleotides by PEAR using Phusion and KOD DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuxiang; Zhang, Jianye; Li, Yingjia; Chen, Gang; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-02-01

    Antisense synthetic oligonucleotides have been developed as potential gene-targeted therapeutics. We previously reported polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR) for amplification of natural and 5'-O-(1-thiotriphosphate) (S)-modified oligonucleotides. Here, we extended the PEAR technique for enzymatic preparation of 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-(2'-F) and 2'-F/S double-modified oligonucleotides. The result showed that KOD and Phusion DNA polymerase could synthesize oligonucleotides with one or two modified nucleotides, and KOD DNA polymerase is more suitable than Phusion DNA polymerase for PEAR amplification of 2'-F and 2'-F/S double modified oligonucleotides. The composition of PEAR products were analyzed by electrospray ionization liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (ESI/LC/MS) detection and showed that the sequence of the PEAR products are maintained at an extremely high accuracy (>99.9%), and after digestion the area percent of full-length modified oligonucleotides reaches 89.24%. PEAR is suitable for synthesis of modified oligonucleotides efficiently and with high purity. PMID:25517220

  19. Detection and Genotyping of Arcobacter and Campylobacter Isolates from Retail Chicken Samples by Use of DNA Oligonucleotide Arrays▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Quiñones, Beatriz; Parker, Craig T.; Janda, John M.; Miller, William G.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    To explore the use of DNA microarrays for pathogen detection in food, we produced DNA oligonucleotide arrays to simultaneously determine the presence of Arcobacter and the presence of Campylobacter in retail chicken samples. Probes were selected that target housekeeping and virulence-associated genes in both Arcobacter butzleri and thermotolerant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. These microarrays showed a high level of probe specificity; the signal intensities detected for A. butzleri, C. coli, or C. jejuni probes were at least 10-fold higher than the background levels. Specific identification of A. butzleri, C. coli, and C. jejuni was achieved without the need for a PCR amplification step. By adapting an isolation method that employed membrane filtration and selective media, C. jejuni isolates were recovered from package liquid from whole chicken carcasses prior to enrichment. Increasing the time of enrichment resulted in the isolation of A. butzleri and increased the recovery of C. jejuni. C. jejuni isolates were further classified by using an additional subset of probes targeting the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) biosynthesis locus. Our results demonstrated that most of the C. jejuni isolates likely possess class B, C, or H LOS. Validation experiments demonstrated that the DNA microarray had a detection sensitivity threshold of approximately 10,000 C. jejuni cells. Interestingly, the use of C. jejuni sequence-specific primers to label genomic DNA improved the sensitivity of this DNA microarray for detection of C. jejuni in whole chicken carcass samples. C. jejuni was efficiently detected directly both in package liquid from whole chicken carcasses and in enrichment broths. PMID:17416693

  20. Detection and genotyping of Arcobacter and Campylobacter isolates from retail chicken samples by use of DNA oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, Beatriz; Parker, Craig T; Janda, John M; Miller, William G; Mandrell, Robert E

    2007-06-01

    To explore the use of DNA microarrays for pathogen detection in food, we produced DNA oligonucleotide arrays to simultaneously determine the presence of Arcobacter and the presence of Campylobacter in retail chicken samples. Probes were selected that target housekeeping and virulence-associated genes in both Arcobacter butzleri and thermotolerant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. These microarrays showed a high level of probe specificity; the signal intensities detected for A. butzleri, C. coli, or C. jejuni probes were at least 10-fold higher than the background levels. Specific identification of A. butzleri, C. coli, and C. jejuni was achieved without the need for a PCR amplification step. By adapting an isolation method that employed membrane filtration and selective media, C. jejuni isolates were recovered from package liquid from whole chicken carcasses prior to enrichment. Increasing the time of enrichment resulted in the isolation of A. butzleri and increased the recovery of C. jejuni. C. jejuni isolates were further classified by using an additional subset of probes targeting the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) biosynthesis locus. Our results demonstrated that most of the C. jejuni isolates likely possess class B, C, or H LOS. Validation experiments demonstrated that the DNA microarray had a detection sensitivity threshold of approximately 10,000 C. jejuni cells. Interestingly, the use of C. jejuni sequence-specific primers to label genomic DNA improved the sensitivity of this DNA microarray for detection of C. jejuni in whole chicken carcass samples. C. jejuni was efficiently detected directly both in package liquid from whole chicken carcasses and in enrichment broths.

  1. Effects and mechanisms of hemopoiesis-stimulating activity of immobilized oligonucleotides under conditions of cytostatic myelosuppression.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Goldberg, V E; Artamonov, A V; Bekarev, A A; Vereschagin, E I; Madonov, P G; Skurikhin, E G; Pershina, O V; Andreeva, T V; Khmelevskaya, E S; Ermakova, N N

    2012-02-01

    Hemopoiesis-stimulating activity of immobilized oligonucleotide preparation was studied on the model of cytostatic myelosuppression induced by injection of cyclophosphamide and 5-fluorouracil. Immobilized oligonucleotides stimulated regeneration of erythro- and granulocytopoiesis in the bone marrow under conditions of cytostatic treatment. The counts of neutrophilic granulocytes and platelets in the peripheral blood increased. The stimulatory effect of the drug was more manifest in animals with active behavior. The mechanism of immobilized oligonucleotide effect was based on stimulation of functional activity of erythroid and granulocytic macrophage precursors.

  2. Method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Kieleczawa, Jan; Dunn, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on a nucleic acid polymer. The nucleic acid polymer is incubated in a solution containing a single-stranded DNA-binding protein and a plurality of oligonucleotides which are perfectly complementary to distinct but adjacent regions of a predetermined contiguous nucleotide sequence in the nucleic acid polymer. The plurality of oligonucleotides anneal to the nucleic acid polymer to form a contiguous region of double stranded nucleic acid. Specific application of the methods disclosed include priming DNA synthesis and template-directed ligation.

  3. Synthesis and antibody-mediated detection of oligonucleotides containing multiple 2,4-dinitrophenyl reporter groups.

    PubMed Central

    Grzybowski, J; Will, D W; Randall, R E; Smith, C A; Brown, T

    1993-01-01

    A series of non-nucleoside-based 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) phosphoramidites have been prepared and used in the multiple labelling of oligonucleotides during solid-phase synthesis. The length of spacer arm between the DNP label and the oligonucleotide phosphate backbone, and the number of attached DNP groups have both been varied in order to determine the optimum conditions for anti-DNP antibody binding. Detection using enzyme-linked colorimetric techniques showed sensitivity equivalent to that obtainable using biotinylated oligonucleotides. Images PMID:8493087

  4. The Use of Gel Electrophoresis to Study the Reactions of Activated Amino Acids with Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zieboll, Gerhard; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used gel electrophoresis to study the primary covalent addition of amino acids to oligonu-cleotides or their analogs and the subsequent addition of further molecules of the amino acids to generate peptides covalently linked to the oligonucleotides. We have surveyed the reactions of a variety of amino acids with the phosphoramidates derived from oligonucleotide 5 inches phosphates and ethylenediamine. We find that arginine and amino acids can interact with oligonucleotidesl through stacking interactions react most efficiently. D- and L-amino acids give indistinguishable families of products.

  5. Minimum probe length for unique identification of all open reading frames in a microbial genome

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, B A; Ng, J; Fitch, J P

    2000-03-05

    In this paper, we determine the minimum hybridization probe length to uniquely identify at least 95% of the open reading frame (ORF) in an organism. We analyze the whole genome sequences of 17 species, 11 bacteria, 4 archaea, and 2 eukaryotes. We also present a mathematical model for minimum probe length based on assuming that all ORFs are random, of constant length, and contain an equal distribution of bases. The model accurately predicts the minimum probe length for all species, but it incorrectly predicts that all ORFs may be uniquely identified. However, a probe length of just 9 bases is adequate to identify over 95% of the ORFs for all 15 prokaryotic species we studied. Using a minimum probe length, while accepting that some ORFs may not be identified and that data will be lost due to hybridization error, may result in significant savings in microarray and oligonucleotide probe design.

  6. The Hydrogenase Chip: a tiling oligonucleotide DNA microarray technique for characterizing hydrogen-producing and -consuming microbes in microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Ian PG; Berggren, Dusty RV; Azizian, Mohammad F; Burow, Luke C; Semprini, Lewis; Spormann, Alfred M

    2012-01-01

    We developed a broad-ranging method for identifying key hydrogen-producing and consuming microorganisms through analysis of hydrogenase gene content and expression in complex anaerobic microbial communities. The method is based on a tiling hydrogenase gene oligonucleotide DNA microarray (Hydrogenase Chip), which implements a high number of probes per gene by tiling probe sequences across genes of interest at 1.67 × –2 × coverage. This design favors the avoidance of false positive gene identification in samples of DNA or RNA extracted from complex microbial communities. We applied this technique to interrogate interspecies hydrogen transfer in complex communities in (i) lab-scale reductive dehalogenating microcosms enabling us to delineate key H2-consuming microorganisms, and (ii) hydrogen-generating microbial mats where we found evidence for significant H2 production by cyanobacteria. Independent quantitative PCR analysis on selected hydrogenase genes showed that this Hydrogenase Chip technique is semiquantitative. We also determined that as microbial community complexity increases, specificity must be traded for sensitivity in analyzing data from tiling DNA microarrays. PMID:21993396

  7. Hydrogel-based protein and oligonucleotide microchips on metal-coated surfaces: enhancement of fluorescence and optimization of immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Zubtsova, Zh I; Zubtsov, D A; Savvateeva, E N; Stomakhin, A A; Chechetkin, V R; Zasedatelev, A S; Rubina, A Yu

    2009-10-26

    Manufacturing of hydrogel-based microchips on metal-coated substrates significantly enhances fluorescent signals upon binding of labeled target molecules. This observation holds true for both oligonucleotide and protein microchips. When Cy5 is used as fluorophore, this enhancement is 8-10-fold in hemispherical gel elements and 4-5-fold in flattened gel pads, as compared with similar microchips manufactured on uncoated glass slides. The effect also depends on the hydrophobicity of metal-coated substrate and on the presence of a layer of liquid over the gel pads. The extent of enhancement is insensitive to the nature of formed complexes and immobilized probes and remains linear within a wide range of fluorescence intensities. Manufacturing of gel-based protein microarrays on metal-coated substrates improves their sensitivity using the same incubation time for immunoassay. Sandwich immunoassay using these microchips allows shortening the incubation time without loss of sensitivity. Unlike microchips with probes immobilized directly on a surface, for which the plasmon mechanism is considered responsible for metal-enhanced fluorescence, the enhancement effect observed using hydrogel-based microchips on metal-coated substrates might be explained within the framework of geometric optics.

  8. Extensive Set of 16S rRNA-Based Probes for Detection of Bacteria in Human Feces

    PubMed Central

    Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; Raangs, Gerwin C.; He, Tao; Degener, John E.; Welling, Gjalt W.

    2002-01-01

    For the detection of six groups of anaerobic bacteria in human feces, we designed seven new 16S rRNA-based oligonucleotide probes. This set of probes extends the current set of probes and gives more data on the composition of the human gut flora. Probes were designed for Phascolarctobacterium and relatives (Phasco741), Veillonella (Veil223), Eubacterium hallii and relatives (Ehal1469), Lachnospira and relatives (Lach571), and Eubacterium cylindroides and relatives (Ecyl387), and two probes were designed for Ruminococcus and relatives (Rbro730 and Rfla729). The hybridization conditions for the new probes were optimized for fluorescent in situ hybridization, and the probes were validated against a set of reference organisms. The probes were applied to fecal samples of 11 volunteers to enumerate their target bacterial groups. The Phasco741 and Veil223 probes both detected average numbers below 1% of the total number of bacteria as determined with the bacterial kingdom-specific Bact338 probe. The Ecyl387 probe detected about 1.4%, the Lach571 and Ehal1469 probes detected 3.8 and 3.6%, respectively, and a combination of the Rbro730 and Rfla729 probes detected 10.3%. A set of 15 probes consisting of probes previously described and those presented here were evaluated in hybridization with the fecal samples of the same volunteers. Together, the group-specific probes detected 90% of the total bacterial cells. PMID:12039758

  9. Characterization of Chromosomal Inversions Using Anti-Parallel Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, F. Andrew (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method for the characterization of chromosomal inversions using anti-parallel probes is described. Reporter species are attached to oligonucleotide strands designed such that they may hybridize to portions of only one of a pair of single-stranded sister chromatids which may be prepared by the CO-FISH procedure. If an inversion has occurred, these marker probes will be detected on the second sister chromatid at the same location as the inversion on the first chromatid. Further, one or more reporter species are replaced with anti-parallel probes that hybridize at known locations along the second sister chromatid such that the position and size of the inversion may be identified/estimated.

  10. Nanostructured probes for RNA detection in living cells.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Philip; Nitin, Nitin; Bao, Gang

    2006-01-01

    The ability to visualize in real-time the expression level and localization of specific RNAs in living cells can offer tremendous opportunities for biological and disease studies. Here we review the recent development of nanostructured oligonucleotide probes for living cell RNA detection, and discuss the biological and engineering issues and challenges of quantifying gene expression in vivo. In particular, we describe methods that use dual FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) or single molecular beacons in combination with peptide-based or membrane-permeabilization-based delivery, to image the relative level, localization, and dynamics of RNA in live cells. Examples of detecting endogenous mRNAs, as well as imaging their subcellular localization and colocalization are given to illustrate the biological applications, and issues in molecular beacon design, probe delivery, and target accessibility are discussed. The nanostructured probes promise to open new and exciting opportunities in sensitive gene detection for a wide range of biological and medical applications.

  11. Luminescent Probes for Ultrasensitive Detection of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Marras, Salvatore A.E.; Kozlov, Maxim; Wirpsza, Laura; Mustaev, Arkady

    2010-01-01

    Novel amino-reactive derivatives of lanthanide-based luminescent labels of enhanced brightness and metal retention were synthesized and used for the detection of complementary DNA oligonucleotides by molecular beacons. Time-resolved acquisition of the luminescent signal that occurs upon hybridization of the probe to the target enabled the avoidance of short-lived background fluorescence, markedly enhancing the sensitivity of detection, which was less than 1 pM. This value is about 50 to 100 times more sensitive than the level achieved with conventional fluorescence-based molecular beacons, and is 10 to 60 times more sensitive than previously reported for other lanthanide-based hybridization probes. These novel luminescent labels should significantly enhance the sensitivity of all type of nucleic acid hybridization probes, and could dramatically improve the detection limit of other biopolymers and small compounds that are used in a variety of biological applications. PMID:20085336

  12. Multi-Gene Detection and Identification of Mosquito-Borne RNA Viruses Using an Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Grubaugh, Nathan D.; McMenamy, Scott S.; Turell, Michael J.; Lee, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthropod-borne viruses are important emerging pathogens world-wide. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes, such as dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, infect hundreds of millions of people and animals each year. Global surveillance of these viruses in mosquito vectors using molecular based assays is critical for prevention and control of the associated diseases. Here, we report an oligonucleotide DNA microarray design, termed ArboChip5.1, for multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses from the genera Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae), Alphavirus (Togaviridae), Orthobunyavirus (Bunyaviridae), and Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae). Methodology/Principal Findings The assay utilizes targeted PCR amplification of three genes from each virus genus for electrochemical detection on a portable, field-tested microarray platform. Fifty-two viruses propagated in cell-culture were used to evaluate the specificity of the PCR primer sets and the ArboChip5.1 microarray capture probes. The microarray detected all of the tested viruses and differentiated between many closely related viruses such as members of the dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and Semliki Forest virus clades. Laboratory infected mosquitoes were used to simulate field samples and to determine the limits of detection. Additionally, we identified dengue virus type 3, Japanese encephalitis virus, Tembusu virus, Culex flavivirus, and a Quang Binh-like virus from mosquitoes collected in Thailand in 2011 and 2012. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated that the described assay can be utilized in a comprehensive field surveillance program by the broad-range amplification and specific identification of arboviruses from infected mosquitoes. Furthermore, the microarray platform can be deployed in the field and viral RNA extraction to data analysis can occur in as little as 12 h. The information derived from the ArboChip5.1 microarray can help to establish public health

  13. Morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor impairs early skeletal development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Herberger, Amanda L; Loretz, Christopher A

    2013-11-01

    The complex vertebrate skeleton depends on regulated cell activities to lay down protein matrix and mineral components of bone. As a distinctive vertebrate characteristic, bone is a storage site for physiologically-important calcium ion. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is linked to homeostatic regulation of calcium through its expression in endocrine glands that secrete calcium homeostatic hormones, in Ca(2+)- and ion-transporting epithelia, and in skeleton. Since CaSR is restricted in its presence to the chordate-vertebrate evolutionary lineage, we propose there to be important functional ties between CaSRs and vertebrate skeleton in the context of that group's characteristic form of calcium-mineralized skeleton. Since little is known about CaSR in the skeletal biology of non-mammalian vertebrates, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were applied to adult and embryonic zebrafish to reveal CaSR transcript and protein expression in several tissues, including, among these, chondrocytes and developing bone and notochord as components in skeletal development. Morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) knockdown technique was used to probe CaSR role(s) in the zebrafish model system. By RT-PCR assessment, injection of a splice-inhibiting CaSR MO reduced normally-spliced Casr gene transcript expression measured at 2days postfertilization (dpf). Corresponding to the knockdown of normally-spliced mRNA by the CaSR MO, we observed a morphant phenotype characterized by stunted growth and disorganization of the notochord and axial skeleton by 1dpf. We conclude that, like its critically important role in normal bone development in mammals, CaSR is essential in skeletogenesis in fishes.

  14. Development of Polymer-Coated Glass Slides as Optical Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Pourjahed, Atefeh; Rabiee, Mohammad; Tahriri, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Background The microarray technology is in needed of cost-effective, low background noise and stable substrates for successful hybridization and analysis. Methods In this research, we developed a three-dimentional stable and mechanically reliable microarray substrates by coating of two polymeric layers on standard microscope glass slides. For fabrication of these substrates, a thin film of oxidized agarose was prepared on the Poly-L-Lysine (PLL) coated glass slides. Unmodified oligonucleotide probes were spotted and immobilized on these double layered thin films by adsorption on the porous structure of the agarose film. Some of the aldehyde groups of the activated agarose linked covalently to PLL amine groups; on the other side, they bound to amino groups of adsorbed tail of biomolecules. These linkages were fixed by UV irradiation at 254 nm using a CL-1000 UV. These prepared substrates were compared to only agarose-coated and PLL-coated slides Results Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) results demonstrated that agarose provided three-dimensional surface which had higher loading and bindig capacity for biomolecules than PLL-coated surface which had two-dimensional surface. The nano-indentation tests demonstrated the prepared double coating was more reliable and flexible for mechanical robotic spotting. In addition, the repeated indentation on different substrates showed uniformity of coatings. The stability of novel coating was sufficient for hybridization process. The signal-to-noise ratio in hybridization reactions performed on the agarose-PLL coated substrates increased two fold and four fold compared to agarose and PLL coated substrates, respectively. Conclusion Finally, the agarose-PLL microarrays had the highest signal (2920) and lowest background signal (205) in hybridization, suggesting that the prepared slides are suitable in analyzing wide concentration range of analytes. PMID:24285999

  15. Development of an Oligonucleotide Array for Direct Detection of Fungi in Sputum Samples from Patients with Cystic Fibrosis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bouchara, Jean-Phillippe; Hsieh, Hsin Yi; Croquefer, Sabine; Barton, Richard; Marchais, Veronique; Pihet, Marc; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common inherited genetic disease in Caucasian populations. Besides bacteria, many species of fungi may colonize the respiratory tract of these patients, sometimes leading to true respiratory infections. In this study, an oligonucleotide array capable of identifying 20 fungal species was developed to directly detect fungi in the sputum samples of CF patients. Species-specific oligonucleotide probes were designed from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the rRNA operon and immobilized on a nylon membrane. The fungal ITS regions were amplified by PCR and hybridized to the array for species identification. The array was validated by testing 182 target strains (strains which we aimed to identify) and 141 nontarget strains (135 species), and a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.2% were obtained. The validated array was then used for direct detection of fungi in 57 sputum samples from 39 CF patients, and the results were compared to those obtained by culture. For 16 sputum samples, the results obtained by the array corresponded with those obtained by culture. For 33 samples, the array detected more fungal species than culture did, while the reverse was found for eight samples. The accuracy of the array for fungal detection in sputum samples was confirmed (or partially confirmed) in some samples by cloning and resequencing the amplified ITS fragments. The present array is a useful tool for both the simultaneous detection of multiple fungal species present in the sputa of CF patients and the identification of fungi isolated from these patients. PMID:19020057

  16. Radioisotopic, Culture-Based, and Oligonucleotide Microchip Analyses of Thermophilic Microbial Communities in a Continental High-Temperature Petroleum Reservoir†

    PubMed Central

    Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L.; Lebedinsky, Alexander V.; Chernyh, Nikolai A.; Nazina, Tamara N.; Ivoilov, Valery S.; Belyaev, Sergey S.; Boulygina, Eugenia S.; Lysov, Yury P.; Perov, Alexander N.; Mirzabekov , Andrei D.; Hippe, Hans; Stackebrandt, Erko; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Jeanthon, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Activity measurements by radioisotopic methods and cultural and molecular approaches were used in parallel to investigate the microbial biodiversity and its physiological potential in formation waters of the Samotlor high-temperature oil reservoir (Western Siberia, Russia). Sulfate reduction with rates not exceeding 20 nmol of H2S liter−1 day−1 occurred at 60 and 80°C. In upper horizons (AB, A, and B), methanogenesis (lithotrophic and/or acetoclastic) was detected only in wells in which sulfate reduction did not occur. In some of the wells from deeper (J) horizons, high-temperature sulfate reduction and methanogenesis occurred simultaneously, the rate of lithotrophic methanogenesis exceeding 80 nmol of CH4 liter−1 day−1. Enrichment cultures indicated the presence of diverse physiological groups representing aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles and hyperthermophiles; fermentative organotrophs were predominant. Phylogenetic analyses of 15 isolates identified representatives of the genera Thermotoga, Thermoanaerobacter, Geobacillus, Petrotoga, Thermosipho, and Thermococcus, the latter four being represented by new species. Except for Thermosipho, the isolates were members of genera recovered earlier from similar habitats. DNA obtained from three samples was hybridized with a set of oligonucleotide probes targeting selected microbial groups encompassing key genera of thermophilic bacteria and archaea. Oligonucleotide microchip analyses confirmed the cultural data but also revealed the presence of several groups of microorganisms that escaped cultivation, among them representatives of the Aquificales/Desulfurobacterium-Thermovibrio cluster and of the genera Desulfurococcus and Thermus, up to now unknown in this habitat. The unexpected presence of these organisms suggests that their distribution may be much wider than suspected. PMID:14532074

  17. Radioisotopic, culture-based, and oligonucleotide microchip analyses of thermophilic microbial communities in a continental high-temperature petroleum reservoir.

    PubMed

    Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Chernyh, Nikolai A; Nazina, Tamara N; Ivoilov, Valery S; Belyaev, Sergey S; Boulygina, Eugenia S; Lysov, Yury P; Perov, Alexander N; Mirzabekov, Andrei D; Hippe, Hans; Stackebrandt, Erko; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Jeanthon, Christian

    2003-10-01

    Activity measurements by radioisotopic methods and cultural and molecular approaches were used in parallel to investigate the microbial biodiversity and its physiological potential in formation waters of the Samotlor high-temperature oil reservoir (Western Siberia, Russia). Sulfate reduction with rates not exceeding 20 nmol of H(2)S liter(-1) day(-1) occurred at 60 and 80 degrees C. In upper horizons (AB, A, and B), methanogenesis (lithotrophic and/or acetoclastic) was detected only in wells in which sulfate reduction did not occur. In some of the wells from deeper (J) horizons, high-temperature sulfate reduction and methanogenesis occurred simultaneously, the rate of lithotrophic methanogenesis exceeding 80 nmol of CH(4) liter(-1) day(-1). Enrichment cultures indicated the presence of diverse physiological groups representing aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles and hyperthermophiles; fermentative organotrophs were predominant. Phylogenetic analyses of 15 isolates identified representatives of the genera Thermotoga, Thermoanaerobacter, Geobacillus, Petrotoga, Thermosipho, and Thermococcus, the latter four being represented by new species. Except for Thermosipho, the isolates were members of genera recovered earlier from similar habitats. DNA obtained from three samples was hybridized with a set of oligonucleotide probes targeting selected microbial groups encompassing key genera of thermophilic bacteria and archaea. Oligonucleotide microchip analyses confirmed the cultural data but also revealed the presence of several groups of microorganisms that escaped cultivation, among them representatives of the Aquificales/Desulfurobacterium-Thermovibrio cluster and of the genera Desulfurococcus and Thermus, up to now unknown in this habitat. The unexpected presence of these organisms suggests that their distribution may be much wider than suspected. PMID:14532074

  18. Terbium fluorescence as a sensitive, inexpensive probe for UV-induced damage in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Amira F; Loppnow, Glen R

    2013-07-01

    Much effort has been focused on developing methods for detecting damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multi-step procedures, are limited, require expensive instruments, or suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay that is generally applicable to nucleic acid damage and uses the enhanced luminescence due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to terbium(III) (Tb(3+)). Single-stranded oligonucleotides greatly enhance the Tb(3+) emission, but duplex DNA does not. With the use of a DNA hairpin probe complementary to the oligonucleotide of interest, the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe is applied to detect ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage. The hairpin probe hybridizes only with the undamaged DNA. However, the damaged DNA remains single-stranded and enhances the intrinsic fluorescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This allows the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe to be used for sensitive quantification of UV-induced DNA damage. The Tb(3+)/hairpin probe showed superior selectivity to DNA damage compared to conventional molecular beacons probes (MBs) and its sensitivity is more than 2.5 times higher than MBs with a limit of detection of 4.36±1.2 nM. In addition, this probe is easier to synthesize and more than eight times cheaper than MBs, which makes its use recommended for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of DNA damage.

  19. Carboranyl Nucleosides & Oligonucleotides for Neutron Capture Therapy Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-12-01

    This proposal enabled us to synthesize and develop boron-rich nucleosides and oligonucleotide analogues for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the treatment of various malignancies. First, we determined the relationship between structure, cellular accumulation and tissue distribution of 5-o-carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine (D-CDU) and its derivatives D-ribo-CU and 5-o-carboranyluracil (CU), to potentially target brain and other solid tumors for neutron capture therapy. Synthesized carborane containing nucleoside derivatives of CDU, D- and L-enantiomers of CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU were used. We measured tissue disposition in xenografted mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors xenografts and in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma isografts in their flanks and intracranially. The accumulation of D-CDU, 1-({beta}-L-arabinosyl)-5-o-carboranyluracil, D-ribo-CU, and CU were also studied in LnCap human prostate tumor cells and their retention was measured in male nude mice bearing LnCap and 9479 human prostate tumor xenografts. D-CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU levels were measured after administration in mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors in their flanks. D-CDU achieved high cellular concentrations in LnCap cells and up to 2.5% of the total cellular compound was recovered in the 5'-monophosphorylated form. D-CDU cellular concentrations were similar in LnCap and 9479 tumor xenografts. Studies in tumor bearing animals indicated that increasing the number of hydroxyl moieties in the sugar constituent of the carboranyl nucleosides lead to increased rate and extent of renal elimination, a decrease in serum half-lives and an increased tissue specificity. Tumor/brain ratios were greatest for CDU and D-ribo-CU, while tumor/prostate ratios were greatest with CU. CDU and D-ribo-CU have potential for BNCT of brain malignancies, while CU may be further developed for prostate cancer. A method was developed for the solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides containing (ocarboran-1-yl

  20. Oligonucleotides with rapid turnover of the phosphate groups occur endogenously in eukaryotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Plesner, P.; Goodchild, J.; Kalckar, H.M.; Zamecnik, P.C.

    1987-04-01

    Endogenous oligonucleotides were found in trichloroacetic acid extracts of hamster lung fibroblasts and Tetrahymena cells. Peaks of radioactivity that eluted with retention times similar to oligonucleotide markers (5- to 50-mer) were found by HPLC in cells labeled briefly with /sup 32/Pi. Only minute amounts of UV-absorbing material were detected, consistent with a rapid turnover of phosphate groups. The /sup 32/P-labeled material also migrated as oligonucleotides on 20% polyacrylamide gels; it was not hydrolyzed by alkaline phosphatase but was digested by snake venom phosphodiesterase, S1 nuclease, and pancreatic RNase and was phosphorylated by T4 polynucleotide kinase. The /sup 32/P-labeled material isolated by HPLC was alkali labile and the hydrolyzate ran as nucleotides on paper chromatography. It is concluded that the oligonucleotides are mainly oligoribonucleotides, but it is possible that oligodeoxynucleotides are also present.

  1. Nucleoside, nucleotide and oligonucleotide based amphiphiles: a successful marriage of nucleic acids with lipids.

    PubMed

    Gissot, Arnaud; Camplo, Michel; Grinstaff, Mark W; Barthélémy, Philippe

    2008-04-21

    Amphiphilic molecules based on nucleosides, nucleotides and oligonucleotides are finding more and more biotechnological applications. This Perspective highlights their synthesis, supramolecular organization as well as their applications in the field of biotechnology.

  2. Exploiting protected maleimides to modify oligonucleotides, peptides and peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Paris, Clément; Brun, Omar; Pedroso, Enrique; Grandas, Anna

    2015-04-10

    This manuscript reviews the possibilities offered by 2,5-dimethylfuran-protected maleimides. Suitably derivatized building blocks incorporating the exo Diels-Alder cycloadduct can be introduced at any position of oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, peptides and peptoids, making use of standard solid-phase procedures. Maleimide deprotection takes place upon heating, which can be followed by either Michael-type or Diels-Alder click conjugation reactions. However, the one-pot procedure in which maleimide deprotection and conjugation are simultaneously carried out provides the target conjugate more quickly and, more importantly, in better yield. This procedure is compatible with conjugates involving oligonucleotides, peptides and peptide nucleic acids. A variety of cyclic peptides and oligonucleotides can be obtained from peptide and oligonucleotide precursors incorporating protected maleimides and thiols.

  3. Use of synthetic oligonucleotides for genomic DNA dot hybridization to split the DQw3 haplotype.

    PubMed Central

    Martell, M; Le Gall, I; Millasseau, P; Dausset, J; Cohen, D

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of two different HLA-DQ beta gene sequences from two DR4 individuals, probably corresponding to DQw3.2 (DQR4) and DQw3.1 (DQR5) specificities, has shown several nucleotide variations. Eight oligonucleotides (24 bases long), derived from these polymorphic areas, have been synthesized. Each oligonucleotide was hybridized to BamHI-digested DNA samples from eight families with HLA-DR4 individuals. Four polymorphic BamHI fragments were detected. Two of eight oligonucleotides gave a single signal (8.9 kilobases) on DQw3.2-positive haplotypes. We used one of these oligonucleotides in a genomic DNA dot hybridization and detected a hybridization signal only in DQw3.2-positive individuals. A very simple test like this allows the screening of a large population sample within a very short period. Images PMID:2895927

  4. Bis-pyrene-labeled molecular beacon: a monomer-excimer switching probe for the detection of DNA base alteration.

    PubMed

    Yamana, Kazushige; Ohshita, Yoshikazu; Fukunaga, Yudai; Nakamura, Mitsunobu; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    A new bis-pyrene-labeled oligonucleotide probe (BP-probe) has been designed for the detection of a single base mismatch in single strand (ss) DNA as a target. The sequence of BP-probe was chosen to form stem-loop structure similar to a molecular beacon (MB-probe), yielding bis-pyrene-labeled molecular beacon (BP-MB-probe). Partially double stranded (ds) BP-MB-probes were prepared by complexation with oligonucleotides whose sequences are complementary to the loop segment but not to the stem and exchangeable with the target DNA. The partially ds BP-MB-probes were shown to exhibit monomer fluorescence as major fluorescence, while the ss BP-MB-probe in the stem-loop form displays strong excimer fluorescence. The strand exchange reactions between partially ds BP-MB-probe and target ss DNA in the presence of cationic comb-type copolymer as a catalyst were monitored by the excimer fluorescence changes. The existence of a mismatched base can be determined by the slower PASE rates compared with fully matched DNA.

  5. Sheath liquid effects in capillary high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Huber, C G; Krajete, A

    2000-02-18

    Fused-silica capillary columns of 200 microm inner diameter were packed with micropellicular, octadecylated, 2.3 microm poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) particles and applied to the separation of oligonucleotides by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Oligonucleotides were eluted at 50 degrees C with gradients of 3-13% acetonitrile in 50 mM triethylammonium bicarbonate. Addition of sheath liquid to the column effluent allowed the detection of oligonucleotides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry using full-scan data acquisition with a detectability comparable to that obtained with UV detection. The signal-to-noise ratios with different sheath liquids increased in the order isopropanololigonucleotides longer than 20 nucleotide units whereas no significant effect was observed with shorter oligonucleotides. Organic acids and bases in the sheath liquid generally deteriorated the signal-to-noise ratios in the chromatograms and mass spectra mainly because of increased background noise. Only a few charge states were observed in the mass spectra of oligonucleotides because of charge state reduction due to the presence of carbonic acid in the eluent. With triethylammonium hydrogencarbonate as chromatographic eluent and acetonitrile as sheath liquid, very few cation adducts of oligonucleotides were observed in the mass spectra. However, the presence of small amounts of monopotassium adducts enabled the calculation of the charge state of multiply charged ions. With acetonitrile as sheath liquid, 710 amol of a 16-mer oligonucleotide were detected using selected ion monitoring data acquisition with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1. Finally, capillary ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was

  6. Complexes of carbon nanotubes with oligonucleotides in thin Langmuir-Blodgett films to detect electrochemically hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, A. S.; Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Veligura, A. A.; Govorov, M. I.; Shulitsky, B. G.

    2014-10-01

    Self-assembled complexes consisting of thin multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and DNA-oligonucleotides which are able to a cooperative binding to complementary oligonucleotides have been investigated. It was establised a high-performance charge transport in nanostructured Langmuir-Blodgett complexes thin MWCNTs/DNA. A method to electrochemically detect DNA hybridization on the self-organized structures has been proposed.

  7. Directly incorporating fluorochromes into DNA probes by PCR increases the efficience of fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Joy

    1996-05-01

    The object of this study was to produce a directly labeled whole chromosome probe in a Degenerative Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) that will identify chromosome breaks, deletions, inversions and translocations caused by radiation damage. In this study we amplified flow sorted chromosome 19 using DOP-PCR. The product was then subjected to a secondary DOP PCR amplification, After the secondary amplification the DOP-PCR product was directly labeled in a tertiary PCR reaction with rhodamine conjugated with dUTP (FluoroRed) to produce a DNA fluorescent probe. The probe was then hybridized to human metaphase lymphocytes on slides, washed and counterstained with 4{prime},6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The signal of the FluoroRed probe was then compared to a signal of a probe labeled with biotin and stained with avidin fluorescein isothio cynate (FITC) and anti-avidin FITC. The results show that the probe labeled with FluoroRed gave signals as bright as the probe with biotin labeling. The FluoroRed probe had less noise than the biotin labeled probe. Therefore, a directly labeled probe has been successfully produced in a DOP-PCR reaction. In future a probe labeled with FluoroRed will be produced instead of a probe labeled with biotin to increase efficiency.

  8. Integrated Microfluidic Isolation of Aptamers Using Electrophoretic Oligonucleotide Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinho; Olsen, Timothy R.; Zhu, Jing; Hilton, John P.; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Pei, Renjun; Stojanovic, Milan N.; Lin, Qiao

    2016-05-01

    We present a microfluidic approach to integrated isolation of DNA aptamers via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). The approach employs a microbead-based protocol for the processes of affinity selection and amplification of target-binding oligonucleotides, and an electrophoretic DNA manipulation scheme for the coupling of these processes, which are required to occur in different buffers. This achieves the full microfluidic integration of SELEX, thereby enabling highly efficient isolation of aptamers in drastically reduced times and with minimized consumption of biological material. The approach as such also offers broad target applicability by allowing selection of aptamers with respect to targets that are either surface-immobilized or solution-borne, potentially allowing aptamers to be developed as readily available affinity reagents for a wide range of targets. We demonstrate the utility of this approach on two different procedures, respectively for isolating aptamers against a surface-immobilized protein (immunoglobulin E) and a solution-phase small molecule (bisboronic acid in the presence of glucose). In both cases aptamer candidates were isolated in three rounds of SELEX within a total process time of approximately 10 hours.

  9. Annexin A2 facilitates endocytic trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyu; Sun, Hong; Tanowitz, Michael; Liang, Xue-hai; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) designed to mediate site-specific cleavage of RNA by RNase H1 are used as research tools and as therapeutics. ASOs modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages enter cells via endocytotic pathways. The mechanisms by which PS-ASOs are released from membrane-enclosed endocytotic organelles to reach target RNAs remain largely unknown. We recently found that annexin A2 (ANXA2) co-localizes with PS-ASOs in late endosomes (LEs) and enhances ASO activity. Here, we show that co-localization of ANXA2 with PS-ASO is not dependent on their direct interactions or mediated by ANXA2 partner protein S100A10. Instead, ANXA2 accompanies the transport of PS-ASOs to LEs, as ANXA2/PS-ASO co-localization was observed inside LEs. Although ANXA2 appears not to affect levels of PS-ASO internalization, ANXA2 reduction caused significant accumulation of ASOs in early endosomes (EEs) and reduced localization in LEs and decreased PS-ASO activity. Importantly, the kinetics of PS-ASO activity upon free uptake show that target mRNA reduction occurs at least 4 hrs after PS-ASOs exit from EEs and is coincident with release from LEs. Taken together, our results indicate that ANXA2 facilitates PS-ASO trafficking from early to late endosomes where it may also contribute to PS-ASO release. PMID:27378781

  10. Dicationic Surfactants with Glycine Counter Ions for Oligonucleotide Transportation.

    PubMed

    Pietralik, Zuzanna; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2016-08-01

    Gemini surfactants are good candidates to bind, protect, and deliver nucleic acids. Herein, the concept of amino acids (namely glycine) as counter ions of gemini surfactants for gene therapy application was explored. This study was conducted on DNA and RNA oligomers and two quaternary bis-imidazolium salts, having 2,5-dioxahexane and 2,8-dioxanonane spacer groups. The toxicity level of surfactants was assessed by an MTT assay, and their ability to bind nucleic acids was tested through electrophoresis. The nucleic acid conformation was established based on circular dichroism and infrared spectroscopic analyses. The structures of the formed complexes were characterized by small-angle scattering of synchrotron radiation. Both studied surfactants appear to be suitable for gene therapy; however, although they vary by only three methylene groups in the spacer, they differ in binding ability and toxicity. The tested oligonucleotides maintained their native conformations upon surfactant addition and the studied lipoplexes formed a variety of structures. In systems based on a 2,5-dioxahexane spacer, a hexagonal phase was observed for DNA-surfactant complexes and a micellar phase was dominant with RNA. For the surfactant with a 2,8-dioxanonane spacer group, the primitive cubic phase prevailed. PMID:27214208

  11. Elucidation of gene function using C-5 propyne antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, W M; Su, L L; Wagner, R W

    1996-09-01

    Identification of human disease-causing genes continues to be an intense area of research. While cloning of genes may lead to diagnostic tests, development of a cure requires an understanding of the gene's function in both normal and diseased cells. Thus, there exists a need for a reproducible and simple method to elucidate gene function. We evaluate C-5 propyne pyrimidine modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ONs) targeted against two human cell cycle proteins that are aberrantly expressed in breast cancer: p34cdc2 kinase and cyclin B1. Dose-dependent, sequence-specific, and gene-specific inhibition of both proteins was achieved at nanomolar concentrations of ONs in normal and breast cancer cells. Precise binding of the antisense ONs to their target RNA was absolutely required for antisense activity. Four or six base-mismatched ONs eliminated antisense activity confirming the sequence specificity of the antisense ONs. Antisense inhibition of p34cdc2 kinase resulted in a significant accumulation of cells in the Gap2/mitosis phase of the cell cycle in normal cells, but caused little effect on cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. These data demonstrate the potency, specificity, and utility of C-5 propyne modified antisense ONs as biological tools and illustrate the redundancy of cell cycle protein function that can occur in cancer cells. PMID:9631067

  12. Anti-tumor activity of splice-switching oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, John A.; Li, Shyh-Dar; Yang, Angela; Huang, Leaf; Kole, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing has emerged as an important target for molecular therapies. Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) modulate alternative splicing by hybridizing to pre-mRNA sequences involved in splicing and blocking access to the transcript by splicing factors. Recently, the efficacy of SSOs has been established in various animal disease models; however, the application of SSOs against cancer targets has been hindered by poor in vivo delivery of antisense therapeutics to tumor cells. The apoptotic regulator Bcl-x is alternatively spliced to express anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL and pro-apoptotic Bcl-xS. Bcl-xL is upregulated in many cancers and is associated with chemoresistance, distinguishing it as an important target for cancer therapy. We previously showed that redirection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing from Bcl-xL to -xS induced apoptosis in breast and prostate cancer cells. In this study, the effect of SSO-induced Bcl-x splice-switching on metastatic melanoma was assessed in cell culture and B16F10 tumor xenografts. SSOs were delivered in vivo using lipid nanoparticles. Administration of nanoparticle with Bcl-x SSO resulted in modification of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing in lung metastases and reduced tumor load, while nanoparticle alone or formulated with a control SSO had no effect. Our findings demonstrate in vivo anti-tumor activity of SSOs that modulate Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:20719743

  13. Integrated Microfluidic Isolation of Aptamers Using Electrophoretic Oligonucleotide Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; Olsen, Timothy R; Zhu, Jing; Hilton, John P; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Pei, Renjun; Stojanovic, Milan N; Lin, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    We present a microfluidic approach to integrated isolation of DNA aptamers via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). The approach employs a microbead-based protocol for the processes of affinity selection and amplification of target-binding oligonucleotides, and an electrophoretic DNA manipulation scheme for the coupling of these processes, which are required to occur in different buffers. This achieves the full microfluidic integration of SELEX, thereby enabling highly efficient isolation of aptamers in drastically reduced times and with minimized consumption of biological material. The approach as such also offers broad target applicability by allowing selection of aptamers with respect to targets that are either surface-immobilized or solution-borne, potentially allowing aptamers to be developed as readily available affinity reagents for a wide range of targets. We demonstrate the utility of this approach on two different procedures, respectively for isolating aptamers against a surface-immobilized protein (immunoglobulin E) and a solution-phase small molecule (bisboronic acid in the presence of glucose). In both cases aptamer candidates were isolated in three rounds of SELEX within a total process time of approximately 10 hours. PMID:27217242

  14. Integrated Microfluidic Isolation of Aptamers Using Electrophoretic Oligonucleotide Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; Olsen, Timothy R.; Zhu, Jing; Hilton, John P.; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Pei, Renjun; Stojanovic, Milan N.; Lin, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    We present a microfluidic approach to integrated isolation of DNA aptamers via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). The approach employs a microbead-based protocol for the processes of affinity selection and amplification of target-binding oligonucleotides, and an electrophoretic DNA manipulation scheme for the coupling of these processes, which are required to occur in different buffers. This achieves the full microfluidic integration of SELEX, thereby enabling highly efficient isolation of aptamers in drastically reduced times and with minimized consumption of biological material. The approach as such also offers broad target applicability by allowing selection of aptamers with respect to targets that are either surface-immobilized or solution-borne, potentially allowing aptamers to be developed as readily available affinity reagents for a wide range of targets. We demonstrate the utility of this approach on two different procedures, respectively for isolating aptamers against a surface-immobilized protein (immunoglobulin E) and a solution-phase small molecule (bisboronic acid in the presence of glucose). In both cases aptamer candidates were isolated in three rounds of SELEX within a total process time of approximately 10 hours. PMID:27217242

  15. Fragment-based solid-phase assembly of oligonucleotide conjugates with peptide and polyethylene glycol ligands.

    PubMed

    Dirin, Mehrdad; Urban, Ernst; Noe, Christian R; Winkler, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    Ligand conjugation to oligonucleotides is an attractive strategy for enhancing the therapeutic potential of antisense and siRNA agents by inferring properties such as improved cellular uptake or better pharmacokinetic properties. Disulfide linkages enable dissociation of ligands and oligonucleotides in reducing environments found in endosomal compartments after cellular uptake. Solution-phase fragment coupling procedures for producing oligonucleotide conjugates are often tedious, produce moderate yields and reaction byproducts are frequently difficult to remove. We have developed an improved method for solid-phase coupling of ligands to oligonucleotides via disulfides directly after solid-phase synthesis. A 2'-thiol introduced using a modified nucleotide building block was orthogonally deprotected on the controlled pore glass solid support with N-butylphosphine. Oligolysine peptides and a short monodisperse ethylene glycol chain were successfully coupled to the deprotected thiol. Cleavage from the resin and full removal of oligonucleotide protection groups were achieved using methanolic ammonia. After standard desalting, and without further purification, homogenous conjugates were obtained as demonstrated by HPLC, gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. The attachment of both amphiphilic and cationic ligands proves the versatility of the conjugation procedure. An antisense oligonucleotide conjugate with hexalysine showed pronounced gene silencing in a cell culture tumor model in the absence of a transfection reagent and the corresponding ethylene glycol conjugate resulted in down regulation of the target gene to nearly 50% after naked application. PMID:27236069

  16. New aspects of the fragmentation mechanisms of unmodified and methylphosphonate-modified oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Monn, Selina T M; Schürch, Stefan

    2007-06-01

    A set of pentanucleotides was investigated by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with the focus on the fragmentation mechanism. Results reveal new aspects of the fragmentation mechanism of modified and unmodified oligonucleotides and demonstrate the influence of the nucleobases on the decomposition of oligonucleotides. Adenine-rich oligonucleotides fragment easily resulting in abundant peaks corresponding to the DNA-typical a-B- and w-ions. On the other hand, thymine was found to have a stabilizing effect, which is reflected by the preferred formation of the w(4)-ions and the relatively low abundance of shorter w-ions upon dissociation of pentanucleotides. Data from investigation of the formation of w(4)-ions support a beta-elimination mechanism. Results obtained by investigation of oligonucleotides with an abasic site confirm this mechanism, which is independent of nucleobase loss. Experiments with methylphosphonate oligonucleotides show a remarkable change in the fragmentation pattern due to the modification. It was found that charges are located on the nucleobases and initiate the fragmentation mechanism. The stability of the oligonucleotide is reduced and no a-B-fragment ions are formed wherever there is a methylphosphonate group within the backbone. This fact also demonstrates that fragmentation is locally controlled.

  17. Intracerebroventricular Administration of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antisense Oligonucleotides Attenuates Salt Appetite in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Ma; Itharat; Fluharty; Sakai

    1997-10-01

    The anterior ventral third ventricle (AV3V) region of the brain contains high concentrations of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) that are important in the maintenance of body fluid and electrolyte balance as well as other physiological processes. Daily intracerebroventricular pulse injections of MR antisense oligonucleotides significantly suppressed deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) induced salt appetite in a dose-related manner. Similar administration of GR antisense or scrambled/sense oligonucleotide into the third ventricle failed to inhibit salt appetite. Salt appetite aroused after adrenalectomy was not suppressed by MR antisense oligonucleotide treatments but was suppressed by an antisense oligonucleotide directed against the angiotensin II AT1 receptor subtype. Receptor binding analysis demonstrated that MR and GR oligonucleotide treatments each reduced their respective receptor subtypes. Finally, although GR antisense oligonucleotide treatment was ineffective in suppressing DOCA-induced salt appetite, this treatment did increase stress induced corticosterone release as well as delayed the recovery of corticosterone to basal levels after stress. PMID:9787254

  18. Porous silicon-cell penetrating peptide hybrid nanocarrier for intracellular delivery of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Rytkönen, Jussi; Arukuusk, Piret; Xu, Wujun; Kurrikoff, Kaido; Langel, Ulo; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Närvänen, Ale

    2014-02-01

    The largest obstacle to the use of oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents is the delivery of these large and negatively charged biomolecules through cell membranes into intracellular space. Mesoporous silicon (PSi) is widely recognized as a potential material for drug delivery purposes due to its several beneficial features like large surface area and pore volume, high loading capacity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. In the present study, PSi nanoparticles stabilized by thermal oxidation or thermal carbonization and subsequently modified by grafting aminosilanes on the surface are utilized as an oligonucleotide carrier. Splice correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs), a model oligonucleotide drug, were loaded into the positively charged PSi nanoparticles with a loading degree as high as 14.3% (w/w). Rapid loading was achieved by electrostatic interactions, with the loading efficiencies reaching 100% within 5 min. The nanoparticles were shown to deliver and release SCOs, in its biologically active form, inside cells when formulated together with cell penetrating peptides (CPP). The biological effect was monitored with splice correction assay and confocal microscopy utilizing HeLa pLuc 705 cells. Furthermore, the use of PSi carrier platform in oligonucleotide delivery did not reduce the cell viability. Additionally, the SCO-CPP complexes formed in the pores of the carrier were stabilized against proteolytic digestion. The advantageous properties of protecting and releasing the cargo and the possibility to further functionalize the carrier surface make the hybrid nanoparticles a potential system for oligonucleotide delivery.

  19. Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides Via Conjugation With Small Molecule Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Osamu; Ming, Xin; Huang, Leaf; Juliano, Rudolph L.

    2010-01-01

    Selective delivery of antisense or siRNA oligonucleotides to cells and tissues via receptor-mediated endocytosis is becoming an important approach for oligonucleotide-based pharmacology. In most cases receptor targeting has been attained using antibodies or peptide-type ligands. Thus there are few examples of delivering oligonucleotides using the plethora of small-molecule receptor-specific ligands that currently exist. In this report we describe a facile approach to the generation of mono- and multi-valent conjugates of oligonucleotides with small molecule ligands. Using the sigma receptor ligand anisamide as an example, we describe conversion of the ligand to a phosphoramidite and direct incorporation of this moiety into the oligonucleotide by solid phase DNA synthesis. We generated mono- and tri-valent conjugates of anisamide with a splice switching antisense oligonucleotide (SSO) and tested their ability to modify splicing of a reporter gene (luciferase) in tumor cells in culture. The tri-valent anisamide-SSO conjugate displayed enhanced cellular uptake and was markedly more effective than an unconjugated SSO or the mono-valent conjugate in modifying splicing of the reporter. Significant biological effects were attained in the sub-100 nM concentration range. PMID:20550198

  20. New approaches to targeting RNA with oligonucleotides: inhibition of group I intron self-splicing.

    PubMed

    Disney, Matthew D; Childs, Jessica L; Turner, Douglas H

    2004-01-01

    RNA is one class of relatively unexplored drug targets. Since RNAs play a myriad of essential roles, it is likely that new drugs can be developed that target RNA. There are several factors that make targeting RNA particularly attractive. First, the amount of information about the roles of RNA in essential biological processes is currently being expanded. Second, sequence information about targetable RNA is pouring out of genome sequencing efforts at unprecedented levels. Third, designing and screening potential oligonucleotide therapeutics to target RNA is relatively simple. The use of oligonucleotides in cell culture, however, presents several challenges such as oligonucleotide uptake and stability, and selective targeting of genes of interest. Here, we review investigations aimed at targeting RNA with oligonucleotides that can circumvent several of these potential problems. The hallmark of the strategies discussed is the use of short oligonucleotides, which may have the advantage of higher cellular uptake and improved binding selectivity compared to longer oligonucleotides. These strategies have been applied to Group I introns from the mammalian pathogens Pneumocystis carinii and Candida albicans. Both are examples of fungal infections that are increasing in number and prevalence. PMID:14691946

  1. A Locked Nucleic Acid Probe Based on Selective Salt-Induced Effect Detects Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Huizhe; Chen, Qiuchen; Zhao, Pengfei; Zhao, Haishan; Yao, Weifan; Wei, Minjie

    2015-01-01

    Detection of single based genetic mutation by using oligonucleotide probes is one of the common methods of detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms at known loci. In this paper, we demonstrated a hybridization system which included a buffer solution that produced selective salt-induced effect and a locked nucleic acid modified 12 nt oligonucleotide probe. The hybridization system is suitable for hybridization under room temperature. By using magnetic nanoparticles as carriers for PCR products, the SNPs (MDR1 C3435T/A) from 45 volunteers were analyzed, and the results were consistent with the results from pyrophosphoric acid sequencing. The method presented in this paper differs from the traditional method of using molecular beacons to detect SNPs in that it is suitable for research institutions lacking real-time quantitative PCR detecting systems, to detect PCR products at room temperature. PMID:26347880

  2. Simultaneous direct detection of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains by optical biosensing with oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintela, Irwin A.; de Los Reyes, Benildo G.; Lin, Chih-Sheng; Wu, Vivian C. H.

    2015-01-01

    A simultaneous direct detection of Shiga-toxin producing strains of E. coli (STEC; ``Big Six'' - O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) as well as O157 strains by optical biosensing with oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. Initially, conserved regions of stx genes were amplified by asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (asPCR). Pairs of single stranded thiol-modified oligonucleotides (30-mer) were immobilized onto AuNPs and used as probes to capture regions of stx1 (119-bp) and/or stx2 (104-bp) genes from STEC strains. DNA samples from pure cultures and food samples were sandwich hybridized with AuNP-oligo probes at optimal conditions (50 °C, 30 min). A complex was formed from the hybridization of AuNP-probes and target DNA fragments that retained the initial red color of the reaction solutions. For non-target DNA, a color change from red to purplish-blue was observed following an increase in salt concentration, thus providing the basis of simultaneous direct colorimetric detection of target DNA in the samples. Enrichment and pooling systems were incorporated to efficiently process a large number of food samples (ground beef and blueberries) and detection of live targets. The detection limit was <1 log CFU g-1, requiring less than 1 h to complete after DNA sample preparation with 100% specificity. Gel electrophoresis verified AuNP-DNA hybridization while spectrophotometric data and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images supported color discrimination based on the occurrence of molecular aggregation. In conclusion, the significant features of this approach took advantage of the unique colorimetric properties of AuNPs as a low-cost and simple approach yet with high specificity for simultaneous detection of STEC strains.A simultaneous direct detection of Shiga-toxin producing strains of E. coli (STEC; ``Big Six'' - O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) as well as O157 strains by optical biosensing with oligonucleotide

  3. Molecular-beacon-based tricomponent probe for SNP analysis in folded nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Camha; Grimes, Jeffrey; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2011-11-11

    Hybridization probes are often inefficient in the analysis of single-stranded DNA or RNA that are folded in stable secondary structures. A molecular beacon (MB) probe is a short DNA hairpin with a fluorophore and a quencher attached to opposite sides of the oligonucleotide. The probe is widely used in real-time analysis of specific DNA and RNA sequences. This study demonstrates how a conventional MB probe can be used for the analysis of nucleic acids that form very stable (T(m) > 80 °C) hairpin structures. Here we demonstrate that the MB probe is not efficient in direct analysis of secondary structure-folded analytes, whereas a MB-based tricomponent probe is suitable for these purposes. The tricomponent probe takes advantage of two oligonucleotide adaptor strands f and m. Each adaptor strand contains a fragment complementary to the analyte and a fragment complementary to a MB probe. In the presence of a specific analyte, the two adaptor strands hybridize to the analyte and the MB probe, thus forming a quadripartite complex. DNA strand f binds to the analyte with high affinity and unwinds its secondary structure. Strand m forms a stable complex only with the fully complementary analyte. The MB probe fluorescently reports the formation of the quadripartite associate. It was demonstrated that the DNA analytes folded in hairpin structures with stems containing 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, or 13 base pairs can be detected in real time with the limit of detection (LOD) lying in the nanomolar range. The stability of the stem region in the DNA analyte did not affect the LOD. Analytes containing single base substitutions in the stem or in the loop positions were discriminated from the fully complementary DNA at room temperature. The tricomponent probe promises to simplify nucleic acid analysis at ambient temperatures in such applications as in vivo RNA monitoring, detection of pathogens, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping by DNA microarrays.

  4. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas. PMID:26972953

  5. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas.

  6. Simultaneous direct detection of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains by optical biosensing with oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Irwin A; de los Reyes, Benildo G; Lin, Chih-Sheng; Wu, Vivian C H

    2015-02-14

    A simultaneous direct detection of Shiga-toxin producing strains of E. coli (STEC; "Big Six" - O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) as well as O157 strains by optical biosensing with oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. Initially, conserved regions of stx genes were amplified by asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (asPCR). Pairs of single stranded thiol-modified oligonucleotides (30-mer) were immobilized onto AuNPs and used as probes to capture regions of stx1 (119-bp) and/or stx2 (104-bp) genes from STEC strains. DNA samples from pure cultures and food samples were sandwich hybridized with AuNP-oligo probes at optimal conditions (50 °C, 30 min). A complex was formed from the hybridization of AuNP-probes and target DNA fragments that retained the initial red color of the reaction solutions. For non-target DNA, a color change from red to purplish-blue was observed following an increase in salt concentration, thus providing the basis of simultaneous direct colorimetric detection of target DNA in the samples. Enrichment and pooling systems were incorporated to efficiently process a large number of food samples (ground beef and blueberries) and detection of live targets. The detection limit was <1 log CFU g(-1), requiring less than 1 h to complete after DNA sample preparation with 100% specificity. Gel electrophoresis verified AuNP-DNA hybridization while spectrophotometric data and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images supported color discrimination based on the occurrence of molecular aggregation. In conclusion, the significant features of this approach took advantage of the unique colorimetric properties of AuNPs as a low-cost and simple approach yet with high specificity for simultaneous detection of STEC strains. PMID:25563863

  7. Simultaneous direct detection of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains by optical biosensing with oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Irwin A; de los Reyes, Benildo G; Lin, Chih-Sheng; Wu, Vivian C H

    2015-02-14

    A simultaneous direct detection of Shiga-toxin producing strains of E. coli (STEC; "Big Six" - O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) as well as O157 strains by optical biosensing with oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. Initially, conserved regions of stx genes were amplified by asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (asPCR). Pairs of single stranded thiol-modified oligonucleotides (30-mer) were immobilized onto AuNPs and used as probes to capture regions of stx1 (119-bp) and/or stx2 (104-bp) genes from STEC strains. DNA samples from pure cultures and food samples were sandwich hybridized with AuNP-oligo probes at optimal conditions (50 °C, 30 min). A complex was formed from the hybridization of AuNP-probes and target DNA fragments that retained the initial red color of the reaction solutions. For non-target DNA, a color change from red to purplish-blue was observed following an increase in salt concentration, thus providing the basis of simultaneous direct colorimetric detection of target DNA in the samples. Enrichment and pooling systems were incorporated to efficiently process a large number of food samples (ground beef and blueberries) and detection of live targets. The detection limit was <1 log CFU g(-1), requiring less than 1 h to complete after DNA sample preparation with 100% specificity. Gel electrophoresis verified AuNP-DNA hybridization while spectrophotometric data and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images supported color discrimination based on the occurrence of molecular aggregation. In conclusion, the significant features of this approach took advantage of the unique colorimetric properties of AuNPs as a low-cost and simple approach yet with high specificity for simultaneous detection of STEC strains.

  8. DNA sequence analysis by hybridization with oligonucleotide microchips : MALDI mass spectrometry identification of 5mers contiguously stacked to microchip oligonucleotides.

    SciTech Connect

    Stomakhin, A. A.; Vasiliskov, V. A.; Timofeev, E.; Schulga, D.; Cotter, R. J.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology; Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry Lab.; Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine

    2000-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) has been applied to increase the informational output from DNA sequence analysis. It has been used to analyze DNA by hybridization with microarrays of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides extended with stacked 5mers. In model experiments, a 28 nt long DNA fragment was hybridized with 10 immobilized, overlapping 8mers. Then, in a second round of hybridization DNA-8mer duplexes were hybridized with a mixture of 10 5mers. The stability of the 5mer complex with DNA was increased to raise the melting temperature of the duplex by 10-15{sup o}C as a result of stacking interaction with 8mers. Contiguous 13 bp duplexes containing an internal break were formed. MALDI MS identified one or, in some cases, two 5mers contiguously stacked to each DNA-8mer duplex formed on the microchip. Incorporating a mass label into 5mers optimized MALDI MS monitoring. This procedure enabled us to reconstitute the sequence of a model DNA fragment and identify polymorphic nucleotides. The application of MALDI MS identification of contiguously stacked 5mers to increase the length of DNA for sequence analysis is discussed.

  9. 2-O-[2-(Methylthio)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide: An Analog of 2-O-[2-(Methoxy)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide with Improved Protein Binding Properties and High Binding Affinity to Target RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, T.P.; Manoharan, M.; Fraser, A.S.; Kawasaki, A.M.; Lesnik, E.; Sioufi, N.; Leeds, J.M.; Teplova, M.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    A novel 2'-modification, 2'-O-[2-(methylthio)ethyl] or 2'-O-MTE, has been incorporated into oligonucleotides and evaluated for properties relevant to antisense activity. The results were compared with the previously characterized 2'-O-[2-(methoxy)ethyl] 2'-O-MOE modification. As expected, the 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides exhibited improved binding to human serum albumin compared to the 2'-O-MOE modified oligonucleotides. The 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides maintained high binding affinity to target RNA. Nuclease digestion of 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides showed that they have limited resistance to exonuclease degradation. We analyzed the crystal structure of a decamer DNA duplex containing the 2'-O-MTE modifcation. Analysis of the crystal structure provides insight into the improved RNA binding affinity, protein binding affinity and limited resistance of 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides to exonuclease degradation.

  10. Fingerprinting Closely Related Xanthomonas Pathovars with Random Nonamer Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, Mark T.; Straub, Tim M.; Call, Douglas R.; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2002-12-01

    Current bacterial DNA typing methods are typically based upon gel-based fingerprinting methods. As such, they access a limited complement of genetic information and many independent restriction enzymes or probes is required to achieve statistical rigor and confidence in the resulting pattern of DNA fragments.

  11. A nanogold-quenched fluorescence duplex probe for homogeneous DNA detection based on strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Mo, Z-H; Yang, X-C; Guo, K-P; Wen, Z-Y

    2007-09-01

    A nanogold-quenched fluorescence duplex probe has been developed for lighting up homogenous hybridization assays. This novel probe is constructed from two strands of different lengths, and labeled by nanogold and a fluorophore at the long-strand 5'-end and the short-strand 3'-end, respectively. The two tags are in close contact, resulting in complete quenching of the probe fluorescence. If perfectly complemented to the nanogold-labeled strand, a long target oligonucleotide would displace the short fluorophore-labeled strand, and as a result, restore the fluorescence. By using nanogold in the probe, an extremely high quenching efficiency (99.1%) and removal of free fluorophore-labeled strand is achieved. The signal-to-noise ratio and the detection limit (50 pmol L(-1)) of homogenous assays are therefore improved significantly, in comparison with similar probes using organic acceptors. Moreover, the probe has a great inhibition effect on hybridization to a mismatched oligonucleotide. This effect provides the assay with a high specificity, and particularly the assay has great potential in applications for discriminating variations in sequences. The assay sensitivity could be markedly enhanced by using fluorescent materials in the signal strand that are brighter and not quenched by nucleobases.

  12. Invader probes: Harnessing the energy of intercalation to facilitate recognition of chromosomal DNA for diagnostic applications†

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Dale C.; Anderson, Grace H.; Karmakar, Saswata; Anderson, Brooke A.; Didion, Bradley A.; Guo, Wei; Verstegen, John P.; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Development of probes capable of recognizing specific regions of chromosomal DNA has been a long-standing goal for chemical biologists. Current strategies such as PNA, triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and polyamides are subject to target choice limitations and/or necessitate non-physiological conditions, leaving a need for alternative approaches. Toward this end, we have recently introduced double-stranded oligonucleotide probes that are energetically activated for DNA recognition through modification with +1 interstrand zippers of intercalator-functionalized nucleotide monomers. Here, probes with different chemistries and architectures – varying in the position, number, and distance between the intercalator zippers – are studied with respect to hybridization energetics and DNA-targeting properties. Experiments with model DNA targets demonstrate that optimized probes enable efficient (C50 < 1 μM), fast (t50 < 3h), kinetically stable (> 24h), and single nucleotide specific recognition of DNA targets at physiologically relevant ionic strengths. Optimized probes were used in non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments for detection of gender-specific mixed-sequence chromosomal DNA target regions. These probes present themselves as a promising strategy for recognition of chromosomal DNA, which will enable development of new tools for applications in molecular biology, genomic engineering and nanotechnology. PMID:26240741

  13. Development of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of the HER2 Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young K.; Evangelista, Jennifer; Aschenbach, Konrad; Johansson, Peter; Wen, Xinyu; Chen, Qingrong; Lee, Albert; Hempel, Heidi; Gheeya, Jinesh S.; Getty, Stephanie; Gomez, Romel; Khan, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have gained much interest as molecular recognition tools in biology, medicine and chemistry. This is due to high hybridization efficiency to complimentary oligonucleotides and stability of the duplexes with RNA or DNA. We have synthesized 15/16-mer PNA probes to detect the HER2 mRNA. The performance of these probes to detect the HER2 target was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and fluorescence bead assays. The PNA probes have sufficiently discriminated between the wild type HER2 target and the mutant target with single base mismatches. Furthermore, the probes exhibited excellent linear concentration dependence between 0.4 to 400 fmol for the target gene. The results demonstrate potential application of PNAs as diagnostic probes with high specificity for quantitative measurements of amplifications or over-expressions of oncogenes. PMID:23593123

  14. A comparative hybridization analysis of yeast DNA with Paramecium parafusin- and different phosphoglucomutase-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Satir, B H

    2000-01-01

    Molecular probes designed for the parafusin (PFUS), the Paramecium exocytic-sensitive phosphoglycoprotein, gave distinct hybridization patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic DNA when compared with different phosphoglucomutase specific probes. These include two probes identical to segments of yeast phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genes 1 and 2. Neither of the PGM probes revealed the 7.4 and 5.9 kb fragments in Bgl II-cut yeast DNA digest detected with the 1.6 kb cloned PFUS cDNA and oligonucleotide constructed to the PFUS region (insertion 3--I-3) not found in other species. PCR amplification with PFUS-specific primers generated yeast DNA-species of the predicted molecular size which hybridized to the I-3 probe. A search of the yeast genome database produced an unassigned nucleotide sequence that showed 55% identity to parafusin gene and 37% identity to PGM2 (the major isoform of yeast phosphoglucomutase) within the amplified region.

  15. Detection of the mature, but not precursor, RNA using a fluorescent DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Paiboonskuwong, Kittiphong; Kato, Yoshio

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes have been widely used in biotechnology and diagnostic field. We improved the molecular beacon probe to detect the mature, but not precursor, RNA selectively. Based on the principle that a kind of fluorophore can be quenched by adjacent guanine base, therefore, the noise fluorescence caused by the false targets can be avoided. As an example, we designed the probe for the selective detection of a mature microRNA (miRNA). We demonstrate that the probe detects mature miRNA with high specificity. Since the probe itself does not fluoresce but becomes fluorescent upon hybridization to the mature target RNA, it provides a quick and selective way for detection of various forms of RNAs.

  16. Dynamics of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides in normal and laser photocoagulated retina

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W.; Garrett, K.; da Cruz, L.; Constable, I.; Rakoczy, P.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate the distribution, persistence, and stability of fluorescently labelled phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS-ODNs) in normal and laser photocoagulated retina following intravitreal injection in the rat.
METHODS—Fluorescently labelled PS-ODNs were injected intravitreally into pigmented eyes at doses of 0.5-10.0 nmol in 2.0 µl solution. The dynamics of PS-ODNs was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy of cryosections and flat mounted retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid-sclera. Genescan analysis was used to assess the integrity of PS-ODNs in the retina after injection. The dynamics of PS-ODNs was also evaluated in the retina following krypton laser photocoagulation with a protocol producing choroidal neovascularisation (CNV).
RESULTS—Following intravitreal injection the PS-ODNs demonstrated dose and time dependent distribution and persistence in the retina, where they accessed all neural layers. However, they preferentially accumulated in the RPE layer, demonstrated as bright granules in the cytoplasm of the cells. Injections of 5.0 and 7.5 nmol of PS-ODNs exhibited strong fluorescence in the retina for 6 weeks after injection. Genescan analysis demonstrated that the PS-ODNs remained almost completely intact for at least 12 weeks. Following laser treatment, the PS-ODNs were concentrated in the regions of laser photocoagulation and retained high intensity for at least 8 weeks after injection, particularly localised to macrophages, RPE, and the local choroidal tissue.
CONCLUSIONS—These results indicate that PS-ODNs are stable and accessible to most neural layers of the retina, and they preferentially accumulate in the RPE layer following intravitreal injection. The successful delivery of PS-ODNs into normal and laser photocoagulated retina suggests that PS-ODNs may have potential in the development of therapy for attenuating retinal degenerations and CNV.

 PMID:10381674

  17. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing. PMID:26553470

  18. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  19. Oligonucleotide facilitators may inhibit or activate a hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, E; Schwenzer, B

    1996-01-01

    Facilitators are oligonucleotides capable of affecting hammerhead ribozyme activity by interacting with the substrate at the termini of the ribozyme. Facilitator effects were determined in vitro using a system consisting of a ribozyme with 7 nucleotides in every stem sequence and two substrates with inverted facilitator binding sequences. The effects of 9mer and 12mer RNA as well as DNA facilitators which bind either adjacent to the 3'- or 5'-end of the ribozyme were investigated. A kinetic model was developed which allows determination of the apparent dissociation constant of the ribozyme-substrate complex from single turnover reactions. We observed a decreased dissociation constant of the ribozyme-substrate complex due to facilitator addition corresponding to an additional stabilization energy of delta delta G=-1.7 kcal/mol with 3'-end facilitators. The cleavage rate constant was increased by 3'-end facilitators and decreased by 5'-end facilitators. Values for Km were slightly lowered by all facilitators and kcat was increased by 3'-end facilitators and decreased by 5'-end facilitators in our system. Generally the facilitator effects increased with the length of the facilitators and RNA provided greater effects than DNA of the same sequence. Results suggest facilitator influences on several steps of the hammerhead reaction, substrate association, cleavage and dissociation of products. Moreover, these effects are dependent in different manners on ribozyme and substrate concentration. This leads to the conclusion that there is a concentration dependence whether activation or inhibition is caused by facilitators. Conclusions are drawn with regard to the design of hammerhead ribozyme facilitator systems. PMID:8602353

  20. Application of heteronuclear couplings to conformational analysis of oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, G.; Live, D.; Bax, A.

    1994-12-01

    The value of vicinal coupling constants extracted from NMR spectra in deducing torsion angles for conformational analysis is well recognized. Due to the abundance of protons, their couplings have been mostly widely used. In many instances, couplings between protons and other nuclei may be a valuable complement to proton-proton couplings or, in some instances, may be the only coupling available to characterize the torsion angle about a bond. Recently, heteronuclear couplings have been used to great benefit in studies of isotopically enriched proteins, and this general approach has been extended to peptides at natural abundance. The possibility of using this approach to study oligonucleotides is also attractive but has not as yet been widely exploited. With the development of strategies for labeling such molecules, particularly RNAs, this may become an important component in conformational analysis. For DNA, labeling is less accessible, but sufficient quantities of unlabeled material are readily available for measuring these couplings at natural abundance. We chose several DNA systems to explore the usefulness of heteronuclear couplings in addressing the sugar conformation and the glycosidic torsion angle. Intensities of cross peaks in long-range HMQC experiments can be related to the couplings. Crosspeaks involving H1{prime} and C1{prime} atoms have been emphasized because of the superior shift dispersion at these positions between sugar protons and carbon atoms. Results will be shown for the self-complementary Dickerson duplex dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) and for d(GGTCGG), which dimerizes to form a G-tetrad structure incorporating both syn and anti base orientations. The couplings provide a clear discrimination between presence of C3{prime}-endo and C2{prime}-endo conformations of the sugars and syn and anti bases arrangements.

  1. Detection of toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Sun, Bo; Zheng, Guo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a microscopic parasite that may infect humans, so there is an increasing concern on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. We currently report a rapid and sensitive method for Toxoplasma gondii based on molecular beacon (MB) probe. The probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with a stem-loop DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with CdTe/ZnS quantum dots (energy donor) at 5' end and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) at 3' end, respectively. The probe was synthesized in PBS buffer at pH 8.2, room temperature for 24 h. Then target DNA was injected under the condition of 37°C, hybridization for 2 h, in Tris-HCl buffer. The data from fluorescence spectrum (FS) showed that ca 65% of emitted fluorescence was quenched, and about 50% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed after adding target DNA, which indicated that the target DNA was successfully detected by MB probe. The detecting limitation was determined as ca 5 nM. Moreover, specificity of the probe was investigated by adding target DNA with one-base-pair mismatch, the low fluorescence recovery indicated the high specificity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  2. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Safiye; Faridbod, Farnoush; Norouzi, Parviz; Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh; Ajloo, Davood; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10(-15) to 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL(-1) with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization.

  3. Effect of non-specific species competition from total RNA on the static mode hybridization response of nanomechanical assays of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohit; Hegner, Martin

    2014-06-01

    We investigate here the nanomechanical response of microcantilever sensors in real-time for detecting a range of ultra-low concentrations of oligonucleotides in a complex background of total cellular RNA extracts from cell lines without labeling or amplification. Cantilever sensor arrays were functionalized with probe single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and reference ssDNA to obtain a differential signal. They were then exposed to complementary target ssDNA strands that were spiked in a fragmented total cellular RNA background in biologically relevant concentrations so as to provide clinically significant analysis. We present a model for prediction of the sensor behavior in competitive backgrounds with parameters that are indicators of the change in nanomechanical response with variation in the target and background concentration. For nanomechanical assays to compete with current technologies it is essential to comprehend such responses with eventual impact on areas like understanding non-coding RNA pharmacokinetics, nucleic acid biomarker assays and miRNA quantification for disease monitoring and diagnosis to mention a few. Additionally, we also achieved a femtomolar sensitivity limit for online oligonucleotide detection in a non-competitive environment with these sensors.

  4. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Safiye; Faridbod, Farnoush; Norouzi, Parviz; Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh; Ajloo, Davood; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10(-15) to 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL(-1) with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization. PMID:26454462

  5. Development of a single probe for documentation of chimerism following bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Yam, P; Petz, L D; Ali, S; Stock, A D; Wallace, R B

    1987-01-01

    Although numerous genetic markers are available for studying chimerism after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), there remains a need for a practical and highly informative method that is applicable in the early posttransplantation period. Using DNA restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms (RFLPs), we have evaluated the feasibility of developing a single synthetic oligonucleotide probe to study post-BMT chimerism. We have thus tested three candidate probes, termed O-3315-32, O-3315-80, and O-AY-29, that are homologous to tandemly repetitive sequences. Our results demonstrated donor-specific and recipient-specific fragments in 11 of 11 HLA-matched sibling pairs tested using probes O-3315-32 and O-3315-80. When probe O-AY-29 was used, 14 of 17 sibling pairs showed both donor and recipient markers, one had only a recipient marker, and two were identical. We showed that each of the three synthetic probes was effective in documenting donor marrow engraftment, mixed hematopoietic chimerism, the patient's pre-BMT phenotype (by using cultured skin fibroblasts obtained after BMT), and the origin of the malignant hematopoietic cells (i.e., of donor or recipient origin) in patients who developed recurrent hematologic malignancy following BMT. Compared with the use of cloned genomic probes, there are several important advantages to the use of synthetic oligonucleotide probes in studying post-BMT chimerism. Synthetic probes have absolute hybridization specificity and can be designed to suit the purposes of an individual study, since they have adjustable specificity that can be altered by changes in the length of the probe and by changes in the hybridization temperature. A single synthetic probe analogous to several highly polymorphic loci can have a polymorphism information content sufficiently high so that all but a small percentage of BMT patients could be followed easily; for example, if a probe were complementary to three highly polymorphic unlinked loci, it would

  6. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  7. Efficient gene silencing by delivery of locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides, unassisted by transfection reagents.

    PubMed

    Stein, C A; Hansen, J Bo; Lai, Johnathan; Wu, SiJian; Voskresenskiy, Anatoliy; Høg, Anja; Worm, Jesper; Hedtjärn, Maj; Souleimanian, Naira; Miller, Paul; Soifer, Harris S; Castanotto, Daniella; Benimetskaya, Luba; Ørum, Henrik; Koch, Troels

    2010-01-01

    For the past 15-20 years, the intracellular delivery and silencing activity of oligodeoxynucleotides have been essentially completely dependent on the use of a delivery technology (e.g. lipofection). We have developed a method (called 'gymnosis') that does not require the use of any transfection reagent or any additives to serum whatsoever, but rather takes advantage of the normal growth properties of cells in tissue culture in order to promote productive oligonucleotide uptake. This robust method permits the sequence-specific silencing of multiple targets in a large number of cell types in tissue culture, both at the protein and mRNA level, at concentrations in the low micromolar range. Optimum results were obtained with locked nucleic acid (LNA) phosphorothioate gap-mers. By appropriate manipulation of oligonucleotide dosing, this silencing can be continuously maintained with little or no toxicity for >240 days. High levels of oligonucleotide in the cell nucleus are not a requirement for gene silencing, contrary to long accepted dogma. In addition, gymnotic delivery can efficiently deliver oligonucleotides to suspension cells that are known to be very difficult to transfect. Finally, the pattern of gene silencing of in vitro gymnotically delivered oligonucleotides correlates particularly well with in vivo silencing. The establishment of this link is of particular significance to those in the academic research and drug discovery and development communities.

  8. Design and Application of an Easy to Use Oligonucleotide Mass Calculation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiong; Leopold, Peter; Helmy, Roy; Parish, Craig; Arvary, Becky; Mao, Bing; Meng, Fanyu

    2013-08-01

    With the development of new synthesis procedures, an ever increasing number of chemical modifications can now be incorporated into synthetic oligonucleotides, representing new challenges for analytical chemists to efficiently identify and characterize such molecules. While conventional mass spectrometry (MS) has proven to be a powerful tool to study nucleic acids, new and improved methods and software are now needed to address this emerging challenge. In this report, we describe a simple yet powerful program that affords great flexibility in the calculation of theoretical masses for conventional as well as modified oligonucleotide molecules. This easy to use program can accept input oligonucleotide sequences and then calculate the theoretical mass values for full length products, process impurities, potential metabolites, and gas phase fragments. We intentionally designed this software so that modified nucleotide residues can be incorporated into oligonucleotide sequences, and corresponding mass values can be rapidly calculated. To test the utility of this program, two oligonucleotides that contain a large number of chemical modifications were synthesized. We have analyzed these samples using a Q-TOF mass spectrometer and compared the calculated masses to the observed ones. We found that all of the data matched very well with less than 30 ppm mass errors, well within the expectation for our instrument operated in its current mode. These data confirmed the validity of calculations performed with this new software.

  9. Oligonucleotide-induced alternative splicing of serotonin 2C receptor reduces food intake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaiyi; Shen, Manli; Gresch, Paul J; Ghamari-Langroudi, Masoud; Rabchevsky, Alexander G; Emeson, Ronald B; Stamm, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The serotonin 2C receptor regulates food uptake, and its activity is regulated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Alternative exon skipping is predicted to generate a truncated receptor protein isoform, whose existence was confirmed with a new antiserum. The truncated receptor sequesters the full-length receptor in intracellular membranes. We developed an oligonucleotide that promotes exon inclusion, which increases the ratio of the full-length to truncated receptor protein. Decreasing the amount of truncated receptor results in the accumulation of full-length, constitutively active receptor at the cell surface. After injection into the third ventricle of mice, the oligonucleotide accumulates in the arcuate nucleus, where it changes alternative splicing of the serotonin 2C receptor and increases pro-opiomelanocortin expression. Oligonucleotide injection reduced food intake in both wild-type and ob/ob mice. Unexpectedly, the oligonucleotide crossed the blood-brain barrier and its systemic delivery reduced food intake in wild-type mice. The physiological effect of the oligonucleotide suggests that a truncated splice variant regulates the activity of the serotonin 2C receptor, indicating that therapies aimed to change pre-mRNA processing could be useful to treat hyperphagia, characteristic for disorders like Prader-Willi syndrome. PMID:27406820

  10. Systemic peptide-mediated oligonucleotide therapy improves long-term survival in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Suzan M; Hazell, Gareth; Shabanpoor, Fazel; Saleh, Amer F; Bowerman, Melissa; Sleigh, James N; Meijboom, Katharina E; Zhou, Haiyan; Muntoni, Francesco; Talbot, Kevin; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2016-09-27

    The development of antisense oligonucleotide therapy is an important advance in the identification of corrective therapy for neuromuscular diseases, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Because of difficulties of delivering single-stranded oligonucleotides to the CNS, current approaches have been restricted to using invasive intrathecal single-stranded oligonucleotide delivery. Here, we report an advanced peptide-oligonucleotide, Pip6a-morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomer (PMO), which demonstrates potent efficacy in both the CNS and peripheral tissues in severe SMA mice following systemic administration. SMA results from reduced levels of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein because of loss-of-function mutations in the SMN1 gene. Therapeutic splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) modulate exon 7 splicing of the nearly identical SMN2 gene to generate functional SMN protein. Pip6a-PMO yields SMN expression at high efficiency in peripheral and CNS tissues, resulting in profound phenotypic correction at doses an order-of-magnitude lower than required by standard naked SSOs. Survival is dramatically extended from 12 d to a mean of 456 d, with improvement in neuromuscular junction morphology, down-regulation of transcripts related to programmed cell death in the spinal cord, and normalization of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. The potent systemic efficacy of Pip6a-PMO, targeting both peripheral as well as CNS tissues, demonstrates the high clinical potential of peptide-PMO therapy for SMA. PMID:27621445

  11. High-quality gene assembly directly from unpurified mixtures of microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Borovkov, Alex Y.; Loskutov, Andrey V.; Robida, Mark D.; Day, Kristen M.; Cano, Jose A.; Le Olson, Tien; Patel, Hetal; Brown, Kevin; Hunter, Preston D.; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    To meet the growing demand for synthetic genes more robust, scalable and inexpensive gene assembly technologies must be developed. Here, we present a protocol for high-quality gene assembly directly from low-cost marginal-quality microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides. Significantly, we eliminated the time- and money-consuming oligonucleotide purification steps through the use of hybridization-based selection embedded in the assembly process. The protocol was tested on mixtures of up to 2000 oligonucleotides eluted directly from microarrays obtained from three different chip manufacturers. These mixtures containing <5% perfect oligos, and were used directly for assembly of 27 test genes of different sizes. Gene quality was assessed by sequencing, and their activity was tested in coupled in vitro transcription/translation reactions. Genes assembled from the microarray-eluted material using the new protocol matched the quality of the genes assembled from >95% pure column-synthesized oligonucleotides by the standard protocol. Both averaged only 2.7 errors/kb, and genes assembled from microarray-eluted material without clonal selection produced only 30% less protein than sequence-confirmed clones. This report represents the first demonstration of cost-efficient gene assembly from microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides. The overall cost of assembly by this method approaches 5¢ per base, making gene synthesis more affordable than traditional cloning. PMID:20693531

  12. Modified nucleotides in T1 RNase oligonucleotides of 18S ribosomal RNA of the Novikoff hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y C; Busch, H

    1978-06-27

    The primary structure of 18S rRNA of the Novikoff hepatoma cells was investigated. Regardless of whether the primary sequence of 18S rRNA is finally determined by RNA sequencing methods or DNA sequencing methods, it is important to identify numbers and types of the modified nucleotides and accordingly the present study was designed to localize the modified regions in T1 RNase derived oligonucleotide. Modified nucleotides found in 66 different oligonucleotide sequences included 2 m62A, 1 m6A, 1 m7G, 1m1cap3psi, 7 Cm, 13 Am, 9 Gm, 11 Um, and 38 psi residues. A number of these modified nucleotides are now placed in defined sequences of T1 RNase oligonucleotides which are now being searched for in larger fragments derived from partial T1 RNase digests of 18S rRNA. Improved homochromatography fingerprinting (Choi et al. (1976) Cancer Res. 36, 4301) of T1 RNase derived oligonucleotides provided a distinctive pattern for 18S rRNA of Novikoff hepatoma ascites cells. The 116 spots obtained by homochromatography contain 176 oligonucleotide sequences. PMID:209819

  13. Systemic peptide-mediated oligonucleotide therapy improves long-term survival in spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hazell, Gareth; Shabanpoor, Fazel; Saleh, Amer F.; Bowerman, Melissa; Meijboom, Katharina E.; Zhou, Haiyan; Muntoni, Francesco; Talbot, Kevin; Gait, Michael J.; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of antisense oligonucleotide therapy is an important advance in the identification of corrective therapy for neuromuscular diseases, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Because of difficulties of delivering single-stranded oligonucleotides to the CNS, current approaches have been restricted to using invasive intrathecal single-stranded oligonucleotide delivery. Here, we report an advanced peptide-oligonucleotide, Pip6a-morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomer (PMO), which demonstrates potent efficacy in both the CNS and peripheral tissues in severe SMA mice following systemic administration. SMA results from reduced levels of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein because of loss-of-function mutations in the SMN1 gene. Therapeutic splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) modulate exon 7 splicing of the nearly identical SMN2 gene to generate functional SMN protein. Pip6a-PMO yields SMN expression at high efficiency in peripheral and CNS tissues, resulting in profound phenotypic correction at doses an order-of-magnitude lower than required by standard naked SSOs. Survival is dramatically extended from 12 d to a mean of 456 d, with improvement in neuromuscular junction morphology, down-regulation of transcripts related to programmed cell death in the spinal cord, and normalization of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. The potent systemic efficacy of Pip6a-PMO, targeting both peripheral as well as CNS tissues, demonstrates the high clinical potential of peptide-PMO therapy for SMA. PMID:27621445

  14. Using probe secondary structure information to enhance Affymetrix GeneChip background estimates

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Fodor, Anthony A.; Gibas, Cynthia J.

    2007-01-01

    High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are a primary research tool for assessing global gene expression. Background noise on microarrays comprises a significant portion of the measured raw data. A number of statistical techniques have been developed to correct for this background noise. Here, we demonstrate that probe minimum folding energy and structure can be used to enhance a previously existing model for background noise correction. We estimate that probe secondary structure accounts for up to 3% of all variation on Affymetrix microarrays. PMID:17387043

  15. Using Amino-Labeled Nucleotide Probes for Simultaneous Single Molecule RNA-DNA FISH

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Shao, Fangwei; Zhang, Li-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Using amino-labeled oligonucleotide probes, we established a simple, robust and low-noise method for simultaneous detection of RNA and DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization, a highly useful tool to study the large pool of long non-coding RNAs being identified in the current research. With probes either chemically or biologically synthesized, we demonstrate that the method can be applied to study a wide range of RNA and DNA targets at the single-cell and single-molecule level in cellular contexts. PMID:25226542

  16. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotide to the cornea by iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Berdugo, M; Valamanesh, F; Andrieu, C; Klein, C; Benezra, D; Courtois, Y; Behar-Cohen, F

    2003-04-01

    We wished to evaluate the potential of iontophoresis to promote the delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (ODN) directed at the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-R2 receptor (KDR/Flk) to the cornea of the rat eye. Fluorescence (CY5)-labeled ODNs in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (20 microM) were locally administered to rat eyes, and their fate within the anterior segment was studied. Thirty-four male, 5-week-old Wistar rats were used for all experiments. The rats were divided in four groups. In group I (12 rats, 12 eyes), the ODNs (20 microM) were delivered by iontophoresis (300 microA for 5 minutes) using a specially designed corneal applicator. In group II (12 rats, 12 eyes), the ODNs (20 microM) were delivered using the same applicator, but no electrical current was applied. In group III (6 rats, 6 eyes), a corneal neovascular reaction was induced prior to the application of ODNs (20 microM), and iontophoresis electrical current was delivered as for group I rats. Group IV (4 rats, 4 eyes) received ODN (60 microM) iontophoresis application (300 microA for 5 minutes) and were used for ODN integrity studies. The animals were killed 5 minutes, 90 minutes, and 24 hours after a single ODN application and studied. Topically applied ODNs using the same iontophoresis applicator but without current do not penetrate the cornea and remain confined to the superficial epithelial layer. ODNs delivered with transcorneoscleral iontophoresis penetrate into all corneal layers and are also detected in the iris. In corneas with neovascularization, ODNs were particularly localized within the vascular endothelial cells of the stroma. ODNs extracted from eye tissues 24 hours after iontophoresis remained unaltered. The iontophoresis current did not cause any detectable ocular damage under these conditions. Iontophoresis promotes the delivery of ODNs to the anterior segment of the eye, including all corneal layers. Iontophoresis of ODNs directed at VEGF-R2 may be used for the

  17. Detection of genomic deletions in rice using oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Myron; Hess, Ann; Bai, Jianfa; Mauleon, Ramil; Diaz, M Genaleen; Sugiyama, Nobuko; Bordeos, Alicia; Wang, Guo-Liang; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E

    2009-01-01

    Background The induction of genomic deletions by physical- or chemical- agents is an easy and inexpensive means to generate a genome-saturating collection of mutations. Different mutagens can be selected to ensure a mutant collection with a range of deletion sizes. This would allow identification of mutations in single genes or, alternatively, a deleted group of genes that might collectively govern a trait (e.g., quantitative trait loci, QTL). However, deletion mutants have not been widely used in functional genomics, because the mutated genes are not tagged and therefore, difficult to identify. Here, we present a microarray-based approach to identify deleted genomic regions in rice mutants selected from a large collection generated by gamma ray or fast neutron treatment. Our study focuses not only on the utility of this method for forward genetics, but also its potential as a reverse genetics tool through accumulation of hybridization data for a collection of deletion mutants harboring multiple genetic lesions. Results We demonstrate that hybridization of labeled genomic DNA directly onto the Affymetrix Rice GeneChip® allows rapid localization of deleted regions in rice mutants. Deletions ranged in size from one gene model to ~500 kb and were predicted on all 12 rice chromosomes. The utility of the technique as a tool in forward genetics was demonstrated in combination with an allelic series of mutants to rapidly narrow the genomic region, and eventually identify a candidate gene responsible for a lesion mimic phenotype. Finally, the positions of mutations in 14 mutants were aligned onto the rice pseudomolecules in a user-friendly genome browser to allow for rapid identification of untagged mutations . Conclusion We demonstrate the utility of oligonucleotide arrays to discover deleted genes in rice. The density and distribution of deletions suggests the feasibility of a database saturated with deletions across the rice genome. This community resource can continue

  18. Animal Viruses Probe dataset (AVPDS) for microarray-based diagnosis and identification of viruses.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Vasishtha, Dinesh P; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2014-03-01

    AVPDS (Animal Viruses Probe dataset) is a dataset of virus-specific and conserve oligonucleotides for identification and diagnosis of viruses infecting animals. The current dataset contain 20,619 virus specific probes for 833 viruses and their subtypes and 3,988 conserved probes for 146 viral genera. Dataset of virus specific probe has been divided into two fields namely virus name and probe sequence. Similarly conserved probes for virus genera table have genus, and subgroup within genus name and probe sequence. The subgroup within genus is artificially divided subgroups with no taxonomic significance and contains probes which identifies viruses in that specific subgroup of the genus. Using this dataset we have successfully diagnosed the first case of Newcastle disease virus in sheep and reported a mixed infection of Bovine viral diarrhea and Bovine herpesvirus in cattle. These dataset also contains probes which cross reacts across species experimentally though computationally they meet specifications. These probes have been marked. We hope that this dataset will be useful in microarray-based detection of viruses. The dataset can be accessed through the link https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/94060831/avpds/HOME.html.

  19. Multiplex Detection of Bacteria in Complex Clinical and Environmental Samples using Oligonucleotide-coupled Fluorescent Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Dumonceaux, Tim J.; Town, Jennifer R.; Hill, Janet E.; Chaban, Bonnie L.; Hemmingsen, Sean M.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a recurring polymicrobial syndrome that is characterized by a change in the "normal" microbiota from Lactobacillus-dominated to a microbiota dominated by a number of bacterial species, including Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, and others1-3. This condition is associated with a range of negative health outcomes, including HIV acquisition4, and it can be difficult to manage clinically5. Furthermore, diagnosis of BV has relied on the use of Gram stains of vaginal swab smears that are scored on various numerical criteria6,7. While this diagnostic is simple, inexpensive, and well suited to resource-limited settings, it can suffer from problems related to subjective interpretations and it does not give a detailed profile of the composition of the vaginal microbiota8. Recent deep sequencing efforts have revealed a rich, diverse vaginal microbiota with clear differences between samples taken from individuals that are diagnosed with BV compared to those individuals that are considered normal9,10, which has resulted in the identification of a number of potential targets for molecular diagnosis of BV11,12. These studies have provided a wealth of useful information, but deep sequencing is not yet practical as a diagnostic method in a clinical setting. We have recently described a method for rapidly profiling the vaginal microbiota in a multiplex format using oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent beads with detection on a Luminex platform13. This method, like current Gram stain-based methods, is rapid and simple but adds the additional advantage of exploiting molecular knowledge arising from sequencing studies in probe design. This method therefore provides a way to profile the major microorganisms that are present in a vaginal swab that can be used to diagnose BV with high specificity and sensitivity compared to Gram stain while providing additional information on species presence and abundance in a semi-quantitative and rapid manner. This

  20. Guidelines for Optimisation of a Multiplex Oligonucleotide Ligation-PCR for Characterisation of Microbial Pathogens in a Microsphere Suspension Array

    PubMed Central

    Wuyts, Véronique; Roosens, Nancy H. C.; Marchal, Kathleen; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.

    2015-01-01

    With multiplex oligonucleotide ligation-PCR (MOL-PCR) different molecular markers can be simultaneously analysed in a single assay and high levels of multiplexing can be achieved in high-throughput format. As such, MOL-PCR is a convenient solution for microbial detection and identification assays where many markers should be analysed, including for routine further characterisation of an identified microbial pathogenic isolate. For an assay aimed at routine use, optimisation in terms of differentiation between positive and negative results and of cost and effort is indispensable. As MOL-PCR includes a multiplex ligation step, followed by a singleplex PCR and analysis with microspheres on a Luminex device, several parameters are accessible for optimisation. Although MOL-PCR performance may be influenced by the markers used in the assay and the targeted bacterial species, evaluation of the method of DNA isolation, the probe concentration, the amount of microspheres, and the concentration of reporter dye is advisable in the development of any MOL-PCR assay. Therefore, we here describe our observations made during the optimisation of a 20-plex MOL-PCR assay for subtyping of Salmonella Typhimurium with the aim to provide a possible workflow as guidance for the development and optimisation of a MOL-PCR assay for the characterisation of other microbial pathogens. PMID:25705689

  1. Cassava (Manihot esculenta) transcriptome analysis in response to infection by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides using an oligonucleotide-DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Maho; Kurotani, Atsushi; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Mochida, Keiichi; Matsui, Akihiro; Ishitani, Manabu; Sraphet, Supajit; Whankaew, Sukhuman; Asvarak, Thipa; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-07-01

    Cassava anthracnose disease (CAD), caused by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. Manihotis, is a serious disease of cassava (Manihot esculenta) worldwide. In this study, we established a cassava oligonucleotide-DNA microarray representing 59,079 probes corresponding to approximately 30,000 genes based on original expressed sequence tags and RNA-seq information from cassava, and applied it to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resistance to fungal infection using two cassava cultivars, Huay Bong 60 (HB60, resistant to CAD) and Hanatee (HN, sensitive to CAD). Based on quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and expression profiling by the microarray, we showed that the expressions of various plant defense-related genes, such as pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, cell wall-related genes, detoxification enzyme, genes related to the response to bacterium, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), genes related to salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene pathways were higher in HB60 compared with HN. Our results indicated that the induction of PR genes in HB60 by fungal infection and the higher expressions of defense response-related genes in HB60 compared with HN are likely responsible for the fungal resistance in HB60. We also showed that the use of our cassava oligo microarray could improve our understanding of cassava molecular mechanisms related to environmental responses and development, and advance the molecular breeding of useful cassava plants. PMID:27138000

  2. Cassava (Manihot esculenta) transcriptome analysis in response to infection by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides using an oligonucleotide-DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Maho; Kurotani, Atsushi; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Mochida, Keiichi; Matsui, Akihiro; Ishitani, Manabu; Sraphet, Supajit; Whankaew, Sukhuman; Asvarak, Thipa; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-07-01

    Cassava anthracnose disease (CAD), caused by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. Manihotis, is a serious disease of cassava (Manihot esculenta) worldwide. In this study, we established a cassava oligonucleotide-DNA microarray representing 59,079 probes corresponding to approximately 30,000 genes based on original expressed sequence tags and RNA-seq information from cassava, and applied it to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resistance to fungal infection using two cassava cultivars, Huay Bong 60 (HB60, resistant to CAD) and Hanatee (HN, sensitive to CAD). Based on quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and expression profiling by the microarray, we showed that the expressions of various plant defense-related genes, such as pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, cell wall-related genes, detoxification enzyme, genes related to the response to bacterium, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), genes related to salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene pathways were higher in HB60 compared with HN. Our results indicated that the induction of PR genes in HB60 by fungal infection and the higher expressions of defense response-related genes in HB60 compared with HN are likely responsible for the fungal resistance in HB60. We also showed that the use of our cassava oligo microarray could improve our understanding of cassava molecular mechanisms related to environmental responses and development, and advance the molecular breeding of useful cassava plants.

  3. Development of bis-locked nucleic acid (bisLNA) oligonucleotides for efficient invasion of supercoiled duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Geny, Sylvain; Pabon, Y. Vladimir; Bergquist, Helen; Zaghloul, Eman M.; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Oprea, Iulian I.; Bestas, Burcu; Andaloussi, Samir EL; Jørgensen, Per T.; Pedersen, Erik B.; Lundin, Karin E.; Zain, Rula; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the many developments in synthetic oligonucleotide (ON) chemistry and design, invasion into double-stranded DNA (DSI) under physiological salt and pH conditions remains a challenge. In this work, we provide a new ON tool based on locked nucleic acids (LNAs), designed for strand invasion into duplex DNA (DSI). We thus report on the development of a clamp type of LNA ON—bisLNA—with capacity to bind and invade into supercoiled double-stranded DNA. The bisLNA links a triplex-forming, Hoogsteen-binding, targeting arm with a strand-invading Watson–Crick binding arm. Optimization was carried out by varying the number and location of LNA nucleotides and the length of the triplex-forming versus strand-invading arms. Single-strand regions in target duplex DNA were mapped using chemical probing. By combining design and increase in LNA content, it was possible to achieve a 100-fold increase in potency with 30% DSI at 450 nM using a bisLNA to plasmid ratio of only 21:1. Although this first conceptual report does not address the utility of bisLNA for the targeting of DNA in a chromosomal context, it shows bisLNA as a promising candidate for interfering also with cellular genes. PMID:23345620

  4. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    SciTech Connect

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Ahmad, Haslina; Harun, Siti Norain

    2014-09-03

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+}, (bpy = 2,2′bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  5. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  6. Conjugation of γ-Fe 2O 3 nanoparticles with single strand oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. W.; Huang, K. T.; Wei, P. K.; Yao, Y. D.

    2006-09-01

    Following the thermodecomposition synthetic route, water soluble γ-Fe 2O 3 nanoparticles have been successfully prepared, with average size 8.8±1.3 nm. Based on the process we developed, the magnetic particles have carboxyl group on their surfaces. By using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimrthylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride [EDC] as a liker reagent, we successfully modified a protein, streptavidin, on the surface of γ-Fe 2O 3 nanoparticles. With the strong affinity between biotin with streptavidin, we could use the streptavidin-modified magnetic nanoparticles to separate the rare biotin functionalized molecules from the mixed solution. On the other hand, streptavidin functionalized Fe 2O 3 can catch a biotin labeled single strand oligonucleotides through the strong affinity between streptavidin and biotin. The oligonucleotides functionalized magnetic nanoparticle would separate a specific oligonucleotide from a mixture. This design may be used to create a technique to detect diseases in the future.

  7. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastiani, F.; Comez, L.; Sacchetti, F.; Orecchini, A.; Petrillo, C.; Paciaroni, A.; De Francesco, A.; Teixeira, S. C. M.

    2015-07-07

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG{sub 3}(T{sub 2}AG{sub 3}){sub 3} has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  8. Cellular uptake of antisense oligonucleotides after complexing or conjugation with cell-penetrating model peptides.

    PubMed

    Oehlke, J; Birth, P; Klauschenz, E; Wiesner, B; Beyermann, M; Oksche, A; Bienert, M

    2002-08-01

    The uptake by mammalian cells of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides was compared with that of their respective complexes or conjugates with cationic, cell-penetrating model peptides of varying helix-forming propensity and amphipathicity. An HPLC-based protocol for the synthesis and purification of disulfide bridged conjugates in the 10-100 nmol range was developed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with gel-capillary electrophoresis and laser induced fluorescence detection (GCE-LIF) revealed cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulationin all cases. The uptake differences between naked oligonucleotides and their respective peptide complexes or conjugates were generally confined to one order of magnitude. No significant influence of the structural properties of the peptide components upon cellular uptake was found. Our results question the common belief that the increased biological activity of oligonucleotides after derivatization with membrane permeable peptides may be primarily due to improved membrane translocation.

  9. Quantitative analysis of the interaction between l-methionine derivative and oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Mota, Élia; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A; Cruz, Carla

    2015-04-01

    This study explores the use of l-methionine derivative as a potential affinity ligand for nucleic acids purification. The l-methionine derivative is synthesized by activation of the carboxylic acid group with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide follow by immobilization on amine sensor surface, previously activated and treated with ethylenediamine. Their affinity towards oligonucleotides has been determined by surface plasmon resonance biosensor. The highest affinity is found for cytosine and thymine, followed by adenine, whereas the lowest affinity is found for guanine. For hetero-oligonucleotides the affinity order is CCCTTT > CCCAAA ≈ AAATTT > GGGTTT, showing that nucleotides with cytosine have the highest affinity, and the presence of guanine reduces the affinity, corroborating with the results obtained with homo-oligonucleotides.

  10. Dynamics of human telomerase RNA structure revealed by antisense oligonucleotide technique.

    PubMed

    Vasilkova, Daria V; Azhibek, Dulat M; Zatsepin, Timofei S; Naraikina, Yulia V; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Zvereva, Maria I; Rubtsova, Maria P

    2013-12-01

    Telomeres are the nucleoprotein complexes that cap the linear chromosome ends. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains telomere length in stem, embryonic and cancer cells. Somatic cells don't contain active telomerase and telomere function as mitotic clock and telomere length determines the number of cell divisions. Telomerase RNA (TER) contains the template for telomere synthesis and serves as a structural scaffold for holoenzyme assembly. We compared different oligonucleotide based methods for telomerase RNA inhibition, such as antisense oligonucleotides, knockdown by transient siRNA transfection and silencing by miRNA derived from short expressed RNA hairpin in HEK293 cells. All of these methods were applied to different TER regions. Our results revealed that CR2/CR3 domain of TER is accessible in vitro and in vivo and could serve as an optimal site for oligonucleotide-based telomerase silencing.

  11. Myelin Basic Protein and a Multiple Sclerosis-related MBP-peptide Bind to Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, Guido Tomás; Kaufman, Tomás; Vitullo, Alfredo Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Aptamer ligands for myelin basic protein (MBP) were obtained using the systematic evolution of ligand by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method. Two clones were isolated from a pool of oligonucleotides and tested for MBP targeting. Using purified MBP, we demonstrated the binding activity of the aptamers and we also showed the affinity of MBP for oligonucleotides of specific length. Moreover, one selected aptamer competitively inhibited the binding of an MBP-specific antibody to MBP and the aptamer was found more sensitive than a commercial antibody. In addition, we showed the ability of the aptamer to detect myelin-rich regions in paraffin-embedded mouse brain tissue. Therefore, the MBP-binding activity of the selected oligonucleotide may prove useful as a tool for life science and medical research for myelin detection and might be a good lead for testing it in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:25202925

  12. Dipentafluorophenyl carbonate--a reagent for the synthesis of oligonucleotides and their conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Efimov, V A; Kalinkina, A L; Chakhmakhcheva, O G

    1993-01-01

    Dipentafluorophenyl carbonate has been successfully used as condensing agent for the internucleotide bond formation in the synthesis of oligonucleotides via H-phosphonate approach. The mechanism of a nucleotide component activation with this reagent has been investigated with the help of 31P NMR spectroscopy. It was shown that preactivation of deoxynucleoside H-phosphonate with dipentafluorophenyl carbonate has no influence on the efficiency of the synthesis. This reagent is highly reactive, nonhygroscopic and stable on storage at room temperature. The effectiveness of dipentafluorophenyl carbonate in the oligonucleotide chemistry has been demonstrated in the solid-phase synthesis of 10-50-mers on 0.2, 1 and 10 mumol scales. The use of this reagent for the derivatisation of polymer supports as well as for the synthesis of oligonucleotide conjugates with polyethylene glycol and a lipid is described. Images PMID:8265346

  13. Effect of molecular crowding and ionic strength on the isothermal hybridization of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Markarian, Marie Z; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2010-08-19

    The isothermal hybridization of complementary oligonucleotides, 15-mer, 25-mer, 35-mer, and a molecular beacon, was investigated under varying conditions of molecular crowding and ionic strength, using hypochromicity to follow strand pairing and polyethylene glycol as a crowding agent. Thermodynamic analysis of the results revealed the addition of counterions to the oligonucleotide backbones, DeltaPsi, to be dependent on the strand GC content and the molecular crowding. A decrease in DeltaPsi was observed, with both increasing GC% and solution PEG content. In contrast, the number of bound water molecules depended on the activity of Na(+), where two regimes were observed. At a(Na(+)) < 0.05 and increasing molecular crowding, water molecules were released into the DNA solutions, and oligonucleotide pairing was favored with both increasing hydrophobic forces, whereas at a(Na(+)) >or= 0.05, water molecules were bound to the strands, and the extent of double strand formation decreased with increasing PEG wt %.

  14. Inhibition of pancreatic ribonuclease by 2'-5' and 3'-5' oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bauer, S; Lapidot, Y

    1977-09-01

    Forty different oligonucleotides were investigated as possible inhibitors of the depolymerizing activity of RNase A. The strongest inhibitors among the diribonucleoside 2'-5' mono- phosphates were: G2'-5'G, C2'-5'G and U2'-5'G, and among the diribonucleoside 3'-5' monophosphates: ApU, ApC and GpU. Of the eight trinucleotides investigated, ApApUp, ApApCp and ApGpUp were the strongest inhibitors. All four dinucleotides studied (ApUp, ApCp, GpUp and GpCp) were very strong inhibitors, ApUp being the strongest one. The results show that the nature of the various bases in the oligonucleotide has an effect on the degree of inhibition, and that the 3' phosphomonoester group increases the binding of the oligonucleotide to RNase A. These inhibitors can be used in physicochemical and biochemical studies of ribonuclease.

  15. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, F.; Longo, M.; Orecchini, A.; Comez, L.; De Francesco, A.; Muthmann, M.; Teixeira, S. C. M.; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.; Paciaroni, A.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG3(T2AG3)3 has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  16. Comparative study of Trichoderma gene expression in interactions with tomato plants using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rubio, M Belén; Domínguez, Sara; Monte, Enrique; Hermosa, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are widely used as biopesticides and biofertilizers to control diseases and to promote positive physiological responses in plants. In vitro and in vivo assays with Trichoderma harzianum CECT 2413 (T34), Trichoderma virens Gv29-8 (T87) and Trichoderma hamatum IMI 224801 (T7) revealed that these strains affected the growth and development of lateral roots in tomato plants in different ways. The early expression profiles of these Trichoderma strains were studied after 20 h of incubation in the presence of tomato plants, using a high-density oligonucleotide (HDO) microarray, and compared to the profiles in the absence of plants. Out of the total 34 138 Trichoderma probe sets deposited on the microarray, 1077 (3.15 %) showed a significant change of at least 2-fold in expression in the presence of tomato plants. The numbers of probe sets identified in the individual Trichoderma strains were 593 in T. harzianum T34, 336 in T. virens T87 and 94 in T. hamatum T7. Carbohydrate metabolism - the chitin degradation enzymes N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate deacetylase, glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase and chitinase - was the most significantly overrepresented process commonly observed in the three Trichoderma strains in early interactions with tomato plants. Strains T7 and T34, which had similar positive effects on plant development in biological assays, showed a significantly overrepresented hexokinase activity in interaction with tomato. In addition, genes encoding a 40S ribosomal protein and a P23 tumour protein were altered in both these strains.

  17. Single-mismatch detection using gold-quenched fluorescent oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dubertret, B; Calame, M; Libchaber, A J

    2001-04-01

    Here we describe a hybrid material composed of a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecule, a 1.4 nm diameter gold nanoparticle, and a fluorophore that is highly quenched by the nanoparticle through a distance-dependent process. The fluorescence of this hybrid molecule increases by a factor of as much as several thousand as it binds to a complementary ssDNA. We show that this composite molecule is a different type of molecular beacon with a sensitivity enhanced up to 100-fold. In competitive hybridization assays, the ability to detect single mismatch is eightfold greater with this probe than with other molecular beacons.

  18. Sedimentation analysis of novel DNA structures formed by homo-oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hatters, D M; Wilson, L; Atcliffe, B W; Mulhern, T D; Guzzo-Pernell, N; Howlett, G J

    2001-07-01

    Sedimentation velocity analysis has been used to examine the base-specific structural conformations and unusual hydrogen bonding patterns of model oligonucleotides. Homo-oligonucleotides composed of 8-28 residues of dA, dT, or dC nucleotides in 100 mM sodium phosphate, pH 7.4, at 20 degrees C behave as extended monomers. Comparison of experimentally determined sedimentation coefficients with theoretical values calculated for assumed helical structures show that dT and dC oligonucleotides are more compact than dA oligonucleotides. For dA oligonucleotides, the average width (1.7 nm), assuming a cylindrical model, is smaller than for control duplex DNA whereas the average rise per base (0.34 nm) is similar to that of B-DNA. For dC and dT oligonucleotides, there is an increase in the average widths (1.8 nm and 2.1 nm, respectively) whereas the average rise per base is smaller (0.28 nm and 0.23 nm, respectively). A significant shape change is observed for oligo dC(28) at lower temperatures (10 degrees C), corresponding to a fourfold decrease in axial ratio. Optical density, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry data confirm this shape change, attributable from nuclear magnetic resonance analysis to i-motif formation. Sedimentation equilibrium studies of oligo dG(8) and dG(16) reveal extensive self-association and the formation of G-quadruplexes. Continuous distribution analysis of sedimentation velocity data for oligo dG(16) identifies the presence of discrete dimers, tetramers, and dodecamers. These studies distinguish the conformational and colligative properties of the individual bases in DNA and their inherent capacity to promote specific folding pathways.

  19. Mapping of RNA accessible sites by extension of random oligonucleotide libraries with reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Allawi, H T; Dong, F; Ip, H S; Neri, B P; Lyamichev, V I

    2001-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for determining accessible sites in RNA that is independent of the length of target RNA and does not require RNA labeling is described. In this method, target RNA is allowed to hybridize with sequence-randomized libraries of DNA oligonucleotides linked to a common tag sequence at their 5'-end. Annealed oligonucleotides are extended with reverse transcriptase and the extended products are then amplified by using PCR with a primer corresponding to the tag sequence and a second primer specific to the target RNA sequence. We used the combination of both the lengths of the RT-PCR products and the location of the binding site of the RNA-specific primer to determine which regions of the RNA molecules were RNA extendible sites, that is, sites available for oligonucleotide binding and extension. We then employed this reverse transcription with the random oligonucleotide libraries (RT-ROL) method to determine the accessible sites on four mRNA targets, human activated ras (ha-ras), human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), rabbit beta-globin, and human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Our results were concordant with those of other researchers who had used RNase H cleavage or hybridization with arrays of oligonucleotides to identify accessible sites on some of these targets. Further, we found good correlation between sites when we compared the location of extendible sites identified by RT-ROL with hybridization sites of effective antisense oligonucleotides on ICAM-1 mRNA in antisense inhibition studies. Finally, we discuss the relationship between RNA extendible sites and RNA accessibility. PMID:11233988

  20. A highly sensitive and selective viral protein detection method based on RNA oligonucleotide nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Changhyun; Lee, Ho-Young; Kim, Sang-Eun; Jo, Sung-Kee

    2010-01-01

    Globally, approximately 170 million people (representing approximately 3% of the population worldwide), are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and at risk of serious liver disease, including chronic hepatitis. We propose a new quantum dots (QDs)-supported RNA oligonucleotide approach for the specific and sensitive detection of viral protein using a biochip. This method was developed by immobilizing a HCV nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) on the surface of a glass chip via the formation of a covalent bond between an amine protein group and a ProLinker™ glass chip. The QDs-supported RNA oligonucleotide was conjugated via an amide formation reaction from coupling of a 5′-end-amine-modified RNA oligonucleotide on the surface of QDs displaying carboxyl groups via standard EDC coupling. The QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide was interacted to immobilized viral protein NS5B on the biochip. The detection is based on the variation of signal of QDs-supported RNA oligonucleotide bound on an immobilized biochip. It was demonstrated that the value of the signal has a linear relationship with concentrations of the HCV NS5B viral protein in the 1 μg mL−1 to 1 ng mL−1 range with a detection limit of 1 ng mL−1. The major advantages of this RNA-oligonucleotide nanoparticle assay are its good specificity, ease of performance, and ability to perform one-spot monitoring. The proposed method could be used as a general method of HCV detection and is expected to be applicable to other types of diseases as well. PMID:20517476

  1. Optimization of the Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay, a Rapid and Inexpensive Test for Detection of HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations, for Non-North American Variants

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Ingrid A.; Crowell, Claudia; Kittoe, Robin; Bredell, Helba; Machaba, Molefe; Willamson, Carolyn; Janssens, Wouter; Jallow, Sabelle; van der Groen, Guido; Shao, Yiming; Jacob, Mini; Samuel, N. M.; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Cassol, Sharon; Alemnji, George; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the feasibility of the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA), a specific, sensitive, and economical ligase-based point mutation assay designed to detect HIV-1 drug–resistance mutations at 12 codons of HIV-1 subtype B pol, for potential use in resource-poor settings. Methods Specimens from HIV-1–infected individuals collected by 7 international laboratories, including subtypes A, B, C, D, F, G, J, and recombinants AE and AG, were tested by the OLA developed for HIV-1 subtype B. Common polymorphisms that interfered with reactivity of the OLA were identified and modified probes designed and evaluated. Results 92.5% (2410) of 2604 codons in specimens from 217 individuals were successfully genotyped by the subtype B OLA. A high rate (range 8.3%–31.2%) of indeterminate results (negative OLA reaction for both mutant and wild type) was observed for 5 codons. Modified probes at reverse transcriptase codons 151 and 184 and protease codon 90 increased the rate of valid OLA to 96.1%. Conclusions The OLA designed for HIV-1 subtype B genotyped most pol codons in non-B subtypes from Asia and Africa but was improved by addition of several modified probes. International laboratories experienced in molecular techniques were able to perform the OLA. PMID:18614915

  2. Tissue Microdissection and Degenerate Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) Is an Effective Method to Analyze Genetic Aberrations in Invasive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Yuichi; Aldape, Kenneth; Takahashi, Michelle; Berger, Mitchel S.; Feuerstein, Burt G.

    2001-01-01

    We amplified various amounts of DNA derived from frozen SF210 and U251NCI human glioblastoma cells, carried out comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) using degenerate oligonucleotide primed-PCR (DOP-PCR) products as test probes, and compared results to analyses performed with probes prepared by standard nick translation. Next we extracted DNA from hematoxylin-eosin (HE)- and methyl green (MG)-stained, microdissected sections of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded U251NCI cells, amplified and labeled it by DOP-PCR, and subjected it to CGH. Finally, we used the same methods in multiple samples from a single human mixed glioma tissue. DOP-PCR products from 50 pg to 250 ng of DNA were equally effective in generating the same CGH profiles as the standard method. DOP-PCR products from microdissected pieces of MG-stained cells were effective probes for CGH, but HE-stained samples were not desirable. As the proportion of HE-stained sample increased, CGH profiles deteriorated. DOP-PCR products from microdissected pieces of MG-stained paraffin sections of glioma tissue produced CGH profiles compatible with their histological features. CGH performed with DOP-PCR products from microdissected paraffin blocks allows for the accurate investigation of the cytogenetic characteristics from invasive tumors and of cytogenetic heterogeneity within neoplastic tissue. PMID:11333301

  3. Active probes and microfluidic ink delivery for Dip Pen Nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Bjoern; Duenas, Terrisa; Banerjee, Debjyoti; Shile, Roger; Amro, Nabil; Rendlen, Jeff

    2004-03-01

    Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPNTM) is a scanning probe technique for nanoscale lithography: A sharp tip is coated with a functional molecule (the "ink") and then brought into contact with a surface where it deposits ink via a water meniscus. The DPN process is a direct-write pattern transfer technique with nanometer resolution and is inherently general with respect to usable inks and substrates including biomolecules such as proteins and oligonucleotides. We present functional extensions of the basic DPN process by showing actuated multi-probes as well as microfluidic ink delivery. We present the fabrication process and characterization of such active probes that use the bimorph effect to induce deflection of individual cantilevers as well as the integration of these probes. We also developed the capability to write with multiple inks on the probe array permitting the fabrication of multi-component nanodevices in one writing session. For this purpose, we fabricate passive microfluidic devices and present microfluidic behavior and ink loading performance of these components.

  4. Towards nanowriting on plastics: dip-pen nanolithography of acrylamido-functionalized oligonucleotides on polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Turri, Stefano; Torlaj, Luca; Levi, Marinella

    2010-08-01

    Model high density DNA arrays have been realized by direct deposition with Dip-Pen Nanolithography of acrylamido-functionalized oligonucleotides (23-mer) on spin-coated, flat polystyrene surfaces. A highly specific interaction between the acrylamide end functionality and polystyrene was found. The surface morphology of the model array was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Spots are clearly seen both in topography and demodulation modes. The array withstands the hybridization process with label free, complementary oligonucleotides and the following cleaning procedures. The final AFM characterization showed significant changes especially in demodulation images which may be an indication that molecular recognition between complementary oligos has occurred.

  5. Immobilization of DNA via oligonucleotides containing an aldehyde or carboxylic acid group at the 5' terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Kremsky, J N; Wooters, J L; Dougherty, J P; Meyers, R E; Collins, M; Brown, E L

    1987-01-01

    A general method for the immobilization of DNA through its 5'-end has been developed. A synthetic oligonucleotide, modified at its 5'-end with an aldehyde or carboxylic acid, was attached to latex microspheres containing hydrazide residues. Using T4 polynucleotide ligase and an oligonucleotide splint, a single stranded 98mer was efficiently joined to the immobilized synthetic fragment. After impregnation of the latex microspheres with the fluorescent dye, Nile Red and attachment of an aldehyde 16mer, 5 X 10(5) bead-DNA conjugates could be detected with a conventional fluorimeter. Images PMID:3562241

  6. Sequence selective naked-eye detection of DNA harnessing extension of oligonucleotide-modified nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Verga, Daniela; Welter, Moritz; Marx, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    DNA polymerases can efficiently and sequence selectively incorporate oligonucleotide (ODN)-modified nucleotides and the incorporated oligonucleotide strand can be employed as primer in rolling circle amplification (RCA). The effective amplification of the DNA primer by Φ29 DNA polymerase allows the sequence-selective hybridisation of the amplified strand with a G-quadruplex DNA sequence that has horse radish peroxidase-like activity. Based on these findings we develop a system that allows DNA detection with single-base resolution by naked eye.

  7. Customized oligonucleotide microchips that convert multiple genetic information to simple patterns, are portable and reusable

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei; Guschin, Dmitry Y.; Chik, Valentine; Drobyshev, Aleksei; Fotin, Alexander; Yershov, Gennadiy; Lysov, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to using customized oligonucleotide microchips as biosensors for the detection and identification of nucleic acids specific for different genes, organisms and/or individuals in the environment, in food and in biological samples. The microchips are designed to convert multiple bits of genetic information into simpler patterns of signals that are interpreted as a unit. Because of an improved method of hybridizing oligonucleotides from samples to microchips, microchips are reusable and transportable. For field study, portable laser or bar code scanners are suitable.

  8. Sequence selective naked-eye detection of DNA harnessing extension of oligonucleotide-modified nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Verga, Daniela; Welter, Moritz; Marx, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    DNA polymerases can efficiently and sequence selectively incorporate oligonucleotide (ODN)-modified nucleotides and the incorporated oligonucleotide strand can be employed as primer in rolling circle amplification (RCA). The effective amplification of the DNA primer by Φ29 DNA polymerase allows the sequence-selective hybridisation of the amplified strand with a G-quadruplex DNA sequence that has horse radish peroxidase-like activity. Based on these findings we develop a system that allows DNA detection with single-base resolution by naked eye. PMID:26774580

  9. Mixed backbone antisense oligonucleotides: design, biochemical and biological properties of oligonucleotides containing 2'-5'-ribo- and 3'-5'-deoxyribonucleotide segments.

    PubMed Central

    Kandimalla, E R; Manning, A; Zhao, Q; Shaw, D R; Byrn, R A; Sasisekharan, V; Agrawal, S

    1997-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized mixed backbone oligonucleotides (MBOs) containing 2'-5'-ribo- and 3'-5'-deoxyribonucleotide segments. Thermal melting studies of the phosphodiester MBOs (three 2'-5'linkages at each end) with the complementary 3'-5'-DNA and -RNA target strands suggest that 2'-5'-ribonucleoside incorporation into 3'-5'-oligodeoxyribonucleotides reduces binding to the target strands compared with an all 3'-5'-oligodeoxyribonucleotide of the same sequence and length. Increasing the number of 2'-5'linkages (from six to nine) further reduces binding to the DNA target strand more than the RNA target strand [Kandimalla,E.R. and Agrawal,S. (1996)Nucleic Acids Symp. Ser., 35, 125-126]. Phosphorothioate (PS) analogs of MBOs destabilize the duplex with the DNA target strand more than the duplex with the RNA target strand. Circular dichroism studies indicate that the duplexes of MBOs with the DNA and RNA target strands have spectral characteristics of both A- and B-type conformations. Compared with the control oligonucleotide, MBOs exhibit moderately higher stability against snake venom phosphodiesterase, S1 nuclease and in fetal calf serum. Although 2'-5'modification does not evoke RNase H activity, this modification does not effect the RNase H activation property of the 3'-5'-deoxyribonucleotide segment adjacent to the modification. In vitro studies with MBOs suggest that they have lesser effects on cell proliferation, clotting prolongation and hemolytic complement lysis than do control PS oligodeoxyribonucleotides. PS analogs of MBOs show HIV-1 inhibition comparable with that of a control PS oligodeoxyribonucleotide with all 3'-5'linkages. The current results suggest that a limited number of 2'-5'linkages could be used in conjunction with PS oligonucleotides to further modulate the properties of antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents. PMID:9016567

  10. Resonance energy-transfer studies of the conformational change on the adsorption of oligonucleotides to a silica interface.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Colin A; Millar, David P; Gee, Michelle L; Smith, Trevor A

    2011-05-19

    Time-resolved evanescent wave-induced fluorescence studies have been carried out on a series of fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide sequences adsorbed to a silica surface from solution. The fluorescence decay profiles of a fluorescent energy donor group undergoing resonance energy transfer to a nonemissive energy-acceptor molecule have been analyzed in terms of a distribution of donor-acceptor distances to reveal the conformational changes that occur in these oligonucleotides upon adsorption. Evanescent wave-induced time-resolved Förster resonance energy-transfer (EW-TRFRET) measurements indicate that at a high electrolyte concentration, there is localized separation of the oligonucleotide strands, and the helical structure adopts an "unraveled" conformation as a result of adsorption. This is attributed to the flexibility within the oligonucleotide at high electrolyte concentration allowing multiple segments of the oligonucleotide to have direct surface interaction. In contrast, the EW-TRFRET measurements at a lower electrolyte concentration reveal that the oligonucleotide retains its helical conformation in a localized extended state. This behavior implies that the rigidity of the oligonucleotide at this electrolyte concentration restricts direct interaction with the silica to a few segments, which correspondingly introduces kinks in the double helix conformation and results in significant oligonucleotide segmental extension into solution.

  11. A reusable sensor for the label-free detection of specific oligonucleotides by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nöll, Gilbert; Su, Qiang; Heidel, Björn; Yu, Yaming

    2014-01-01

    The development of a reusable molecular beacon (MB)-based sensor for the label-free detection of specific oligonucleotides using surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) as the readout method is described. The MBs are chemisorbed at planar gold surfaces serving as fluorescence quenching units. Target oligonucleotides of 24 bases can be detected within a few minutes at high single-mismatch discrimination rates.

  12. Detection of Alu sequences and mtDNA in comets using padlock probes.

    PubMed

    Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Larsson, Chatarina; Henriksson, Sara; Collins, Andrew; Nilsson, Mats

    2006-07-01

    Single cell gel electrophoresis, or the comet assay, is widely used to measure DNA damage and repair. However, the behaviour of the DNA under the conditions used for the comet assay is not fully understood. In developing a method for studying specific gene sequences within comets, using 'padlock probes' (circularizable oligonucleotide probes), we have first applied probes that hybridize to Alu repetitive elements and to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). During the sequence of stages in the comet assay, mtDNA progressively disperses into the surrounding agarose gel, showing no tendency to remain with nuclear DNA in the comets. In contrast, Alu probes remain associated with both tail and head DNA. PMID:16940044

  13. Dual isotope labeling: conjugation of 32P-oligonucleotides with 18F-aryltrifluoroborate via copper(I) catalyzed cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Schaffer, Paul; Perrin, David M

    2013-12-01

    A one-pot-two-step labeling of an oligonucleotide with an (18)F-ArBF3(-)(aryltrifluoroborate) radioprosthetic is reported herein. In order to characterize labeling in terms of radiochemistry, phosphorus-32 was also introduced to the 5'-terminus of the oligonucleotide via enzymatic phosphorylation. A pendant azide group was subsequently conjugated to the 5'-phosphate of the oligonucleotide. Copper(I) catalyzed [2+3] cycloaddition was undertaken to conjugate an alkyne-bearing(18)F-ArBF3(-) to the oligonucleotide. Following polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, this doubly-labeled bioconjugate exhibited decay properties of both the phosphorus-32 and fluorine-18, that were confirmed by autoradiography at selected lengths of time, which in turn provided concrete evidence of successful conjugation. These results are corroborated by HPLC analysis of the labeled material. Taken together this work demonstrates viable use of (18)F-ArBF3(-) prosthetics for labeling oligonucleotides for use in PET imaging. PMID:24144852

  14. The Preparation of Magnetic Silica Nanospheres and Incorporation of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-DNA Probe.

    PubMed

    Do, Youngjin; Kim, Jongsung

    2016-03-01

    Silica nanospheres containing magnetic particles were prepared, and CdSe/ZnS QDs functionalized with carboxyl group were incorporated into the silica nanospheres by EDC/NHS coupling reaction. The silica nanospheres were prepared by a co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric solutions followed by the sol-gel reaction of TEOS (tetraethoxysilane) and APTES (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane) using base catalyst. The size of magnetic silica nanospheres was confirmed by Transmission electron microscope (TEM). Thiol group modified single stranded oligonucleotides were immobilized on the surface of QDs and fluorescence quenching by intercalation dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization with target oligonucleotide was observed. The fluorescence from QDs could be quenched by intercalating dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization of target DNA to probe DNA. This shows that the magnetic silica-QD-DNA probe can be used to detect specific DNA. PMID:27455659

  15. The Preparation of Magnetic Silica Nanospheres and Incorporation of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-DNA Probe.

    PubMed

    Do, Youngjin; Kim, Jongsung

    2016-03-01

    Silica nanospheres containing magnetic particles were prepared, and CdSe/ZnS QDs functionalized with carboxyl group were incorporated into the silica nanospheres by EDC/NHS coupling reaction. The silica nanospheres were prepared by a co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric solutions followed by the sol-gel reaction of TEOS (tetraethoxysilane) and APTES (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane) using base catalyst. The size of magnetic silica nanospheres was confirmed by Transmission electron microscope (TEM). Thiol group modified single stranded oligonucleotides were immobilized on the surface of QDs and fluorescence quenching by intercalation dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization with target oligonucleotide was observed. The fluorescence from QDs could be quenched by intercalating dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization of target DNA to probe DNA. This shows that the magnetic silica-QD-DNA probe can be used to detect specific DNA.

  16. Colorimetric DNA detection of transgenic plants using gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourisaeid, Elham; Mousavi, Amir; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a DNA colorimetric detection system based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes was prepared and evaluated. We investigated the hybridization efficiency of the L-shaped probes and studied the effect of nanoparticle size and the L-shaped DNA probe length on the performance of the as-prepared system. Probes were attached to the surface of gold nanoparticles using an adenine sequence. An optimal sequence of 35S rRNA gene promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus, which is frequently used in the development of transgenic plants, and the two complementary ends of this gene were employed as model target strands and probe molecules, respectively. The spectrophotometric properties of the as-prepared systems indicated that the large NPs show better changes in the absorption spectrum and consequently present a better performance. The results of this study revealed that the probe/Au-NPs prepared using a vertical spacer containing 5 thymine oligonucleotides exhibited a stronger spectrophotometric response in comparison to that of larger probes. These results in general indicate the suitable performance of the L-shaped DNA probe-functionalized Au-NPs, and in particular emphasize the important role of the gold nanoparticle size and length of the DNA probes in enhancing the performance of such a system.

  17. Thermodynamically modulated partially double-stranded linear DNA probe design for homogeneous real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shihai; Salituro, John; Tang, Ning; Luk, Ka-Cheung; Hackett, John; Swanson, Priscilla; Cloherty, Gavin; Mak, Wai-Bing; Robinson, John; Abravaya, Klara

    2007-01-01

    Real-time PCR assays have recently been developed for diagnostic and research purposes. Signal generation in real-time PCR is achieved with probe designs that usually depend on exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase (e.g. TaqMan probe) or oligonucleotide hybridization (e.g. molecular beacon). Probe design often needs to be specifically tailored either to tolerate or to differentiate between sequence variations. The conventional probe technologies offer limited flexibility to meet these diverse requirements. Here, we introduce a novel partially double-stranded linear DNA probe design. It consists of a hybridization probe 5'-labeled with a fluorophore and a shorter quencher oligo of complementary sequence 3'-labeled with a quencher. Fluorescent signal is generated when the hybridization probe preferentially binds to amplified targets during PCR. This novel class of probe can be thermodynamically modulated by adjusting (i) the length of hybridization probe, (ii) the length of quencher oligo, (iii) the molar ratio between the two strands and (iv) signal detection temperature. As a result, pre-amplification signal, signal gain and the extent of mismatch discrimination can be reliably controlled and optimized. The applicability of this design strategy was demonstrated in the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay.

  18. Quantitative Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Salmonella enterica isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Straub, Tim M.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Small, Jack A.; Call, Douglas R.; Daly, Don S.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2004-03-22

    We report on a genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using nucleic acid microarrays for microbial forensics and epidemiology applications. We demonstrate that the microarray method provides high-resolution differentiation between closely related microorganisms using Salmonella enterica strains. In replicate trials we used a simple 192-probe nonamer array to construct a fingerprint library of 25 closely related Salmonella isolates. Controlling false discovery rate for multiple testing at alpha =.05, at least 295 of 300 pairs of S. enterica isolate fingerprints were found to be statistically distinct using a modified Hotelling Tsquared test. Although we find most pairs of Salmonella fingerprints to be distinct, forensic applications will also require a protocol for library construction and reliable microbial classification against a fingerprint library. We outline additional steps required to produce a protocol for library construction and reliable classification of unknown organisms.

  19. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem, in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligo...

  20. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RIBOSOMAL RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluroescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligonu...