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Sample records for 70-y integral effective

  1. Shearing Effectiveness of Integral Stiffening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Robert F; Libove, Charles

    1955-01-01

    Values of coefficients for defining the effectiveness of integral stiffeners in resisting shear deformations of the plate of which they are an integral part are presented for a variety of proportions of rectangular stiffeners with circular fillets. Formulas are given in which these coefficients may be employed to calculate the elastic constants associated with the twisting and shearing of integrally stiffened plates. The size of fillet radius is shown to contribute appreciably to the degree of penetration of the stresses from the skin into the stiffener.

  2. Effective String Theory and Integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen, Ali

    In this dissertation several applications are collected were one deduces properties of UV complete string theories by examining low energy interactions on the world sheet of effective strings. As a first application, a UV complete asymptotically fragile theory is presented, which provides a very special theory in regards to the standard connection between causality and analyticity, and positivity conditions. Continuing with this approach, and exploiting the interplay between hidden symmetries and integrability, a no go theorem for the bosonic string is proved and the connection between double softness of branon amplitudes and integrability is elucidated. This theorem suggests considering supersymmetric strings and more generally Lorentz invariant fermionic strings. Analyzing the integrability of the former at tree level singles out critical dimensions where kappa-symmetry can exist, and unveils a hidden supersymmetry for GS-like actions. Whereas the analysis of the latter necessitates the use of the CCWZ machinery and results in the complete classification of Lorentz invariant fermionic strings, including among unexplored possibilities the GS, RNS and Heterotic superstrings in D=10. Finally, Zamolodchikov's method of integrable deformations of fixed point CFTs is applied for the bosonic string, which provides higher spin currents perturbatively and singles out the critical dimension in yet another paradigm.

  3. Impact of Treatment Integrity on Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryling, Mitch J.; Wallace, Michele D.; Yassine, Jordan N.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity has cogent implications for intervention effectiveness. Understanding these implications is an important, but often neglected, undertaking in behavior analysis. This paper reviews current research on treatment integrity in applied behavior analysis. Specifically, we review research evaluating the relation between integrity…

  4. On the integral Joule-Thomson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytal, B.-Z.; Shavit, A.

    In this paper, the integral inversion curve concept is developed, involving the locus of all points with a vanishing integral Joule-Thomson (J-T) effect ΔTh and isothermal enthalpy change. The structure of the ΔhT surface over the plane of ( pr,T r) is explored. The maximum isothermal J-T effect ΔhT is related to the normal boiling temperature of the gas. The correlation of the integral effect based on real gas data with a low acentric factor is compared with Van der Waals' equation of state closed form predictions. The maximum integral isenthalpic J-T effect ΔTh which does not undergo a phase change during the expansion, is studied via Van der Waals' equation of state.

  5. Dopamine effects on evidence gathering and integration

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Christina; Schneider, Brooke C.; Braun, Vivien; Kolbeck, Katharina; Gallinat, Jürgen; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Background Disturbances in evidence gathering and disconfirmatory evidence integration have been associated with the presence of or propensity for delusions. Previous evidence suggests that these 2 types of reasoning bias might be differentially affected by antipsychotic medication. We aimed to investigate the effects of a dopaminergic agonist (L-dopa) and a dopaminergic antagonist (haloperidol) on evidence gathering and disconfirmatory evidence integration after single-dose administration in healthy individuals. Methods The study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-way crossover design. Participants were healthy individuals aged 18–40 years. We administered a new data-gathering task designed to increase sensitivity to change compared with traditional tasks. The Bias Against Disconfirmatory Evidence (BADE) task was used as a measure of disconfirmatory evidence integration. Results We included 30 individuals in our study. In the data-gathering task, dopaminergic modulation had no significant effect on the amount of evidence gathered before reaching a decision. In contrast, the ability of participants to integrate disconfirmatory evidence showed a significant linear dopaminergic modulation pattern (highest with haloperidol, intermediate with placebo, lowest with L-dopa), with the difference between haloperidol and L-dopa marginally reaching significance. Limitations Although the doses used for haloperidol and L-dopa were similar to those used in previous studies, drug plasma level measurements would have added to the validity of findings. Conclusion Evidence gathering and disconfirmatory evidence integration might be differentially influenced by dopaminergic agents. Our findings are in support of a dual-disturbance account of delusions and provide a plausible neurobiological basis for the use of interventions targeted at improving reasoning biases as an adjunctive treatment in patients with psychotic disorders. PMID:26197302

  6. Lithium ionic mobility study in xLi2CO3-yLiI (x = 95-70, y = 5-30 wt.%) solid electrolyte by impedance spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Mohd Khari; Ahmad, Azizah Hanom

    2015-08-01

    A detailed systematic study on the effects of different amount (wt.%) of LiI addition on the electrical conductivity and dielectric behavior of the xLi2CO3-xLiI (x = 95-70, y = 5-30 wt.%) electrolyte system was carried out. The samples with different compositions were prepared and ground by mechanical milling method. The electrical and dielectric properties of the samples over a range of frequency (50Hz - 1MHz) were investigated by deploying electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique in a series of temperature set (298-373K). Normally, Li2CO3 itself shows a very low electrical conductivity (10-5 Scm-1). However, the electrical conductivity of the system was found to be increased (10-3 Scm-1) as the lithium salt (LiI) were introduced to the system. The dielectric analysis displayed that the activation energy was inversely proportional to the increment of LiI (wt.%). As the electrical conductivity reached their maximum value (4.63 × 10-3 Scm-1) at the 20 wt.% of LiI, the activation energy was dropped to the minimum (0.1 eV). The electrical conductivity increases with the temperature (298 - 373K) indicate that the system obeys Arrhenius law.

  7. Lithium ionic mobility study in xLi{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-yLiI (x = 95-70, y = 5-30 wt.%) solid electrolyte by impedance spectroscopy technique

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, Mohd Khari; Ahmad, Azizah Hanom

    2015-08-28

    A detailed systematic study on the effects of different amount (wt.%) of LiI addition on the electrical conductivity and dielectric behavior of the xLi{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-xLiI (x = 95-70, y = 5-30 wt.%) electrolyte system was carried out. The samples with different compositions were prepared and ground by mechanical milling method. The electrical and dielectric properties of the samples over a range of frequency (50Hz – 1MHz) were investigated by deploying electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique in a series of temperature set (298–373K). Normally, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} itself shows a very low electrical conductivity (10{sup −5} Scm{sup −1}). However, the electrical conductivity of the system was found to be increased (10{sup −3} Scm{sup −1}) as the lithium salt (LiI) were introduced to the system. The dielectric analysis displayed that the activation energy was inversely proportional to the increment of LiI (wt.%). As the electrical conductivity reached their maximum value (4.63 × 10{sup −3} Scm{sup −1}) at the 20 wt.% of LiI, the activation energy was dropped to the minimum (0.1 eV). The electrical conductivity increases with the temperature (298 – 373K) indicate that the system obeys Arrhenius law.

  8. Vertically Integrated Multiple Nanowire Field Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Ho; Ahn, Dae-Chul; Park, Jun-Young; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Hur, Jae; Lee, Dongil; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-12-09

    A vertically integrated multiple channel-based field-effect transistor (FET) with the highest number of nanowires reported ever is demonstrated on a bulk silicon substrate without use of wet etching. The driving current is increased by 5-fold due to the inherent vertically stacked five-level nanowires, thus showing good feasibility of three-dimensional integration-based high performance transistor. The developed fabrication process, which is simple and reproducible, is used to create multiple stiction-free and uniformly sized nanowires with the aid of the one-route all-dry etching process (ORADEP). Furthermore, the proposed FET is revamped to create nonvolatile memory with the adoption of a charge trapping layer for enhanced practicality. Thus, this research suggests an ultimate design for the end-of-the-roadmap devices to overcome the limits of scaling.

  9. Post irradiation effects (PIE) in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, D. C.; Lowry, L.; Barnes, C.; Zakharia, M.; Agarwal, S.; Rax, B.

    1991-01-01

    Post-irradiation effects (PIE) ranging from normal recovery to catastrophic failure have been observed in integrated circuits during the PIE period. Data presented show failure due to rebound after a 10 krad(Si) dose. In particular, five device types are investigated with varying PIE response. Special attention has been given to the HI1-507A analog multiplexer because its PIE response is extreme. X-ray diffraction has been uniquely employed to measure physical stress in the HI1-507A metallization. An attempt has been made to show a relationship between stress relaxation and radiation effects. All data presented support the current MIL-STD Method 1019.4 but demonstrate the importance of performing PIE measurements, even when mission doses are as low as 10 krad(Si).

  10. Special Effects Techniques for Integral Holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, Sharon

    1986-08-01

    Integral holography is the integration of multiple exposures of motion picture film that have been translated into holographic form. Because integral holograms are formed from motion picture film, there are no limits on the subject matter. All of the cinema and video techniques known today can be utilized to record and mix imagery.

  11. Measuring the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupé, F.-X.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.; Fadili, M. J.

    2011-10-01

    Context. One of the main challenges of modern cosmology is to understand the nature of the mysterious dark energy that causes the cosmic acceleration. The integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is sensitive to dark energy, and if detected in a universe where modified gravity and curvature are excluded, presents an independent signature of dark energy. The ISW effect occurs on large scales where cosmic variance is high and where owing to the Galactic confusion we lack large amounts of data in the CMB as well as large-scale structure maps. Moreover, existing methods in the literature often make strong assumptions about the statistics of the underlying fields or estimators. Together these effects can severely limit signal extraction. Aims: We aim to define an optimal statistical method for detecting the ISW effect that can handle large areas of missing data and minimise the number of underlying assumptions made about the data and estimators. Methods: We first review current detections (and non-detections) of the ISW effect, comparing statistical subtleties between existing methods, and identifying several limitations. We propose a novel method to detect and measure the ISW signal. This method assumes only that the primordial CMB field is Gaussian. It is based on a sparse inpainting method to reconstruct missing data and uses a bootstrap technique to avoid assumptions about the statistics of the estimator. It is a complete method, which uses three complementary statistical methods. Results: We apply our method to Euclid-like simulations and show we can expect a ~7σ model-independent detection of the ISW signal with WMAP7-like data, even when considering missing data. Other tests return ~5σ detection levels for a Euclid-like survey. We find that detection levels are independent from whether the galaxy field is normally or lognormally distributed. We apply our method to the 2 Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and WMAP7 CMB data and find detections in the 1.0-1.2σ range, as

  12. Integrating Technology: The Principals' Role and Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Lucas J.; Chung, Chia-Jung

    2015-01-01

    There are many factors that influence technology integration in the classroom such as teacher willingness, availability of hardware, and professional development of staff. Taking into account these elements, this paper describes research on technology integration with a focus on principals' attitudes. The role of the principal in classroom…

  13. Test Diagnostics of RF Effects in Integrated Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    RADC-TR-89-355 Final Technical Report February 1990AD-A219 737 TEST DIAGNOSTICS OF RF EFFECTS IN INTEGRATED CIRCUITS Martin Marietta Space Systems...DIAGNOSTICS OF RF EFFECTS IN INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) David D. Wilson, Stan Epshtein, Mark G. Rossi, Christine L. Proffitt 13a. TYPE...presents "he results of an effort to measure the RF upset susceptibilities of CMOS and low power Schottky integrated circuits and to demonstrate a

  14. Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Victor C. X.

    2010-01-01

    As adult learners and educators pioneer the use of technology in the new century, attention has been focused on developing strategic approaches to effectively integrate adult learning and technology in different learning environments. "Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches" provides innovative…

  15. Effects of Integrating Peace Education in the Nigeria Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olowo, Oluwatoyin Olusegun

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempted to investigate the effects of integrating Peace Education into Nigeria educational system. Four research questions were designed for the study. The researcher designed an instrument tagged: Questionnaire on effect of Integrating Peace Education (QEIPE). The entire population of two hundred respondents spread across Secondary…

  16. Challenge of Effective Technology Integration into Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramorola, M. Z.

    2013-01-01

    South African teachers are faced with challenges in integrating technology effectively into a coherent framework at school level. There seems to be little evidence of technology integration into classroom activities such as systematic planning and implementation of lessons that require learners to think critically, work collaboratively, and use…

  17. Integrating Participatory Elements into an Effectiveness Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Tanner LeBaron

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an effectiveness evaluation of an intensive case management intervention coordinated by a non-profit organization in a midsize Midwest City. As an effectiveness evaluation, the primary evaluation question was causal in nature; the key task of the evaluative study was to establish and probe connections between the…

  18. The Effects of Maple Integrated Strategy on Engineering Technology Students' Understanding of Integral Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salleh, Tuan Salwani; Zakaria, Effandi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the effectiveness of a learning strategy using Maple in integral calculus. This research was conducted using a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group design. One hundred engineering technology students at a technical university were chosen at random. The effectiveness of the learning…

  19. The Dilution Effect and Information Integration in Perceptual Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, Jared M; Cohen, Andrew L; Shiffrin, Richard M; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2015-01-01

    In cognitive science there is a seeming paradox: On the one hand, studies of human judgment and decision making have repeatedly shown that people systematically violate optimal behavior when integrating information from multiple sources. On the other hand, optimal models, often Bayesian, have been successful at accounting for information integration in fields such as categorization, memory, and perception. This apparent conflict could be due, in part, to different materials and designs that lead to differences in the nature of processing. Stimuli that require controlled integration of information, such as the quantitative or linguistic information (commonly found in judgment studies), may lead to suboptimal performance. In contrast, perceptual stimuli may lend themselves to automatic processing, resulting in integration that is closer to optimal. We tested this hypothesis with an experiment in which participants categorized faces based on resemblance to a family patriarch. The amount of evidence contained in the top and bottom halves of each test face was independently manipulated. These data allow us to investigate a canonical example of sub-optimal information integration from the judgment and decision making literature, the dilution effect. Splitting the top and bottom halves of a face, a manipulation meant to encourage controlled integration of information, produced farther from optimal behavior and larger dilution effects. The Multi-component Information Accumulation model, a hybrid optimal/averaging model of information integration, successfully accounts for key accuracy, response time, and dilution effects.

  20. Integrating Technology: Effective Tools for Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glandon, Shan

    This book uses planning forms and examples to help media specialists and teachers focus on ways to effectively and purposefully add technology. The 22 collaborations connect with standards-based education in language arts, math, science, and social studies. Ideas for whole-class projects are also included. Each unit example begins with a completed…

  1. INTEGRATED SACHS-WOLFE EFFECT FOR GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna, Pablo; Larson, Shane L.; Spergel, David; Yunes, Nicolas

    2010-05-20

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are messengers carrying valuable information about their sources. For sources at cosmological distances, the waves will also contain the imprint left by the intervening matter. The situation is in close analogy with cosmic microwave photons, for which the large-scale structures the photons traverse contribute to the observed temperature anisotropies, in a process known as the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We derive the GW counterpart of this effect for waves propagating on a Friedman-Robertson-Walker background with scalar perturbations. We find that the phase, frequency, and amplitude of the GWs experience Sachs-Wolfe-type integrated effects, in addition to the magnification effects on the amplitude from gravitational lensing. We show that for supermassive black hole binaries, the integrated effects could account for measurable changes on the frequency, chirp mass, and luminosity distance of the binary, thus unveiling the presence of inhomogeneities, and potentially dark energy, in the universe.

  2. The joint Simon effect: a review and theoretical integration

    PubMed Central

    Dolk, Thomas; Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone; Prinz, Wolfgang; Liepelt, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The social or joint Simon effect has been developed to investigate how and to what extent people mentally represent their own and other persons' action/task and how these cognitive representations influence an individual's own behavior when interacting with another person. Here, we provide a review of the available evidence and theoretical frameworks. Based on this review, we suggest a comprehensive theory that integrates aspects of earlier approaches–the Referential Coding Account. This account provides an alternative to the social interpretation of the (joint) go-nogo Simon effect (aka the social Simon effect) and is able to integrate seemingly opposite findings on joint action. PMID:25249991

  3. The Effects of Space Radiation on Linear Integrated Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A.

    2000-01-01

    Permanent and transient effects are discussed that are induced in linear integrated circuits by space radiation. Recent developments include enhanced damage at low dose rate, increased damage from protons due to displacement effects, and transients in digital comparators that can cause circuit malfunctions.

  4. Size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics: an integrated computational study.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Aono, H

    2009-03-01

    Hovering is a miracle of insects that is observed for all sizes of flying insects. Sizing effect in insect hovering on flapping-wing aerodynamics is of interest to both the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community and also of importance to comparative morphologists. In this study, we present an integrated computational study of such size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics, which is performed using a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator that integrates the modelling of realistic wing-body morphology, the modelling of flapping-wing and body kinematics and an in-house Navier-Stokes solver. Results of four typical insect hovering flights including a hawkmoth, a honeybee, a fruit fly and a thrips, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from O(10(4)) to O(10(1)) are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the present integrated computational methods in quantitatively modelling and evaluating the unsteady aerodynamics in insect flapping flight. Our results based on realistically modelling of insect hovering therefore offer an integrated understanding of the near-field vortex dynamics, the far-field wake and downwash structures, and their correlation with the force production in terms of sizing and Reynolds number as well as wing kinematics. Our results not only give an integrated interpretation on the similarity and discrepancy of the near- and far-field vortex structures in insect hovering but also demonstrate that our methods can be an effective tool in the MAVs design.

  5. Creep and shrinkage effects on integral abutment bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munuswamy, Sivakumar

    Integral abutment bridges provide bridge engineers an economical design alternative to traditional bridges with expansion joints owing to the benefits, arising from elimination of expensive joints installation and reduced maintenance cost. The superstructure for integral abutment bridges is cast integrally with abutments. Time-dependent effects of creep, shrinkage of concrete, relaxation of prestressing steel, temperature gradient, restraints provided by abutment foundation and backfill and statical indeterminacy of the structure introduce time-dependent variations in the redundant forces. An analytical model and numerical procedure to predict instantaneous linear behavior and non-linear time dependent long-term behavior of continuous composite superstructure are developed in which the redundant forces in the integral abutment bridges are derived considering the time-dependent effects. The redistributions of moments due to time-dependent effects have been considered in the analysis. The analysis includes nonlinearity due to cracking of the concrete, as well as the time-dependent deformations. American Concrete Institute (ACI) and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) models for creep and shrinkage are considered in modeling the time dependent material behavior. The variations in the material property of the cross-section corresponding to the constituent materials are incorporated and age-adjusted effective modulus method with relaxation procedure is followed to include the creep behavior of concrete. The partial restraint provided by the abutment-pile-soil system is modeled using discrete spring stiffness as translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Numerical simulation of the behavior is carried out on continuous composite integral abutment bridges and the deformations and stresses due to time-dependent effects due to typical sustained loads are computed. The results from the analytical model are compared with the

  6. Assessing the effectiveness of integrated interventions: terminology and approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graeme; Clarke, David

    2006-07-01

    Integrated care is a term that embraces several concepts, all of which imply that the target patients have complex or chronic illness. There is an assumption that such patients require integrated care and benefit from it. Attempts to test this hypothesis have produced evidence of only modest benefit, and much of the evidence is conflicting. Demonstration of effectiveness of integrated interventions in the clinical setting has been less convincing. Often, interventions are introduced uncritically and without adequate follow-up of their effectiveness. More rigorous research is required on definitions, theoretic constructs,outcome measures, the science of data synthesis, and translation to the clinical setting. Recent developments in theoretic constructs in these areas give promise of better answers to the question, "What works for whom in what context?". Qualitative methodology should form part of this research.

  7. Information Technology Integrated into Classroom Teaching and Its Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Chao-Chi; Chang, Dian-Fu; Chang, Li-Yun

    2011-01-01

    IT (information technology) has grown in popularity from increased use in different areas in the world. However, school teaching has usually been found to be a little late in following this step. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of IT when integrated into classroom teaching at primary and secondary schools in Taiwan. The data…

  8. An Integrated Model for Effective Knowledge Management in Chinese Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Xiaomi; Deng, Hepu; Wang, Yiwen; Chao, Lemen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide organizations in the Chinese cultural context with a conceptual model for an integrated adoption of existing knowledge management (KM) methods and to improve the effectiveness of their KM activities. Design/methodology/approaches: A comparative analysis is conducted between China and the western…

  9. Integrating Professional Development across the Curriculum: An Effectiveness Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciarocco, Natalie J.; Dinella, Lisa M.; Hatchard, Christine J.; Valosin, Jayde

    2016-01-01

    The current study empirically tested the effectiveness of a modular approach to integrating professional development across an undergraduate psychology curriculum. Researchers conducted a two-group, between-subjects experiment on 269 undergraduate psychology students assessing perceptions of professional preparedness and learning. Analysis…

  10. Effects of Spatial and Selective Attention on Basic Multisensory Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gondan, Matthias; Blurton, Steven P.; Hughes, Flavia; Greenlee, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    When participants respond to auditory and visual stimuli, responses to audiovisual stimuli are substantially faster than to unimodal stimuli (redundant signals effect, RSE). In such tasks, the RSE is usually higher than probability summation predicts, suggestive of specific integration mechanisms underlying the RSE. We investigated the role of…

  11. The Effect of Integrated Movement Activities on Children's FMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Shu-Chu; Lin, Shu-Jung; Hsu, Li-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of an integrated movement course on the FMSs of preschool children. Purposive sampling was used to select two classes at a public preschool in Chiayi City, Taiwan. The experimental group consisted of 9 boys and 12 girls, and the control group consisted of 11 boys and 8 girls. Both were…

  12. Motor and cognitive integration: effect of bilateral behaviors on judgment.

    PubMed

    Cretenet, Joël; Mullet, Etienne; Dru, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Performing approach vs. avoidance behaviors (arm flexion vs. arm extension) on the one hand, and lateralized peripheral activations (left side vs. right side) of the motivational systems of approach vs. avoidance, on the other hand, have been shown to impact on cognitive functioning (Cretenet, & Dru, 2009), mainly in judgment tasks. When a unilateral motor congruent behavior; that is, a behavior that activates the same motivational system (e.g., flexion of the right arm) was performed during a judgment task, participants' use of complex, interactive information integration rules was facilitated. No effect was, however, found when simpler, additive rules were involved (Mullet, Cretenet, & Dru, 2014). Three experiments are reported here that examined the effect of bilateral motor behaviors (e.g., flexion of the right arm and extension of the left arm) on the implementation of information integration rules. In Studies 1 and 2, two judgment tasks similar to the ones used by Mullet et al. (2014) were used: (a) a complex task in which participants judged a person's attractiveness from personality information, and (b) a simpler task in which they attributed blame according to bad deeds. It was found that similar motor behaviors performed by the two arms (e.g., flexion of both arms), in contrast to dissimilar ones, facilitated the use of complex, interactive information integration rules. No effect was found in the case of simpler integration rules. In Study 3, these results were replicated in a judgment task in which the complexity of the integration rule varied depending on the instructions given. Overall, when bilateral motor behaviors were performed during judgment, facilitation in the use of complex integration rules no longer depended on motivational congruence as in the case of unilateral motor behavior. It depended on symmetry/similarity of behaviors.

  13. Radiation Effects in 3D Integrated SOl SRAM Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-23

    Comparing Neutrons and Protons Data Monoenergetic neutrons and protons are used to characterize single event effects in electronics circuits, and are...for proton irradiation with energies between 4.8 and 500 MeV. Results are compared with 14-MeV neutron irradiation. Single event upset cross-section...fabricating circuits for space applications. singIe event effects, SOl, fully depleted, 3D integration, neutron , protons, upset cross-section U U U U SAR

  14. Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyn, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Integrated learning is an exciting adventure for both teachers and students. It is not uncommon to observe the integration of academic subjects such as math, science, and language arts. However, educators need to recognize that movement experiences in physical education also can be linked to academic curricula and, may even lead the…

  15. Impact of the Non-Contributory Social Pension Program 70 y más on Older Adults’ Mental Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Rodríguez, Aarón; Torres-Pereda, Ma. Del Pilar; Manrique-Espinoza, Betty; Moreno-Tamayo, Karla; Téllez-Rojo Solís, Martha María

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2007, a non-contributory pension program was launched in rural areas of Mexico. The program consisted in a non-conditional cash transfer of US$40 monthly to all older adults (OA) aged 70 and over. We evaluate the effect of the program on mental well-being of its beneficiaries. Methods and Findings Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. For the quantitative component, we used the selection criteria established by the program (age and locality size) to form the Intervention (OA aged 70–74 residing in rural localities, <2500 inhabitants) and Control groups (OA aged 70–74, in localities with 2501–2700 inhabitants). Baseline data collection was conducted in 2007 where 5,465 OA were interviewed. The follow-up survey was conducted in 2008, and it was possible to interview 5,270 OA, with a response rate of 96%. A difference-in-difference linear probability model with individual fixed effect was used to estimate the impact of the program on mental well-being indicators. In 2009 a qualitative component was designed to explore possible causal pathways of such effect. Results After a year of exposure, the program had a significant effect on reduction of depressive symptoms (β = −0.06, CI95% −0.12; −0.01) and an increase in empowerment indicators: OA participated in important household decisions (β = 0.09, CI95% 0.03;0.15); and OA participated in household decisions pertaining to expenses (β = 0.11, CI95% 0.05;0.18). Qualitative analysis found a strong trend showing a reduction of sadness, and feeling of increasing empowerment. Conclusions These results suggest that a non-conditional transfer in older ages have an impact beyond the economic sphere, impacting even the mental well-being. This effect could be explained because the pension produces feelings of safety and welfare. It is recommendable that governments should invest efforts towards universalizing the non-contributory pension programs in order to ensure a basic income

  16. Integrating Individual-Based Indices of Contaminant Effects

    DOE PAGES

    Rowe, Christopher L.; Hopkins, William A.; Congdon, Justin D.

    2001-01-01

    Habitat contamination can alter numerous biological processes in individual organisms. Examining multiple individual-level responses in an integrative fashion is necessary to understand how individual health or fitness reflects environmental contamination. Here we provide an example of such an integrated perspective based upon recent studies of an amphibian (the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana) that experiences several, disparate changes when larval development occurs in a trace element�contaminated habitat. First, we present an overview of studies focused on specific responses of individuals collected from, or transplanted into, a habitat contaminated by coal combustion residues (CCR). These studies have reported morphological, behavioral, and physiological modificationsmore » to individuals chronically interacting with sediments in the CCR-contaminated site. Morphological abnormalities in the oral and tail regions in contaminant-exposed individuals influenced other properties such as grazing, growth, and swimming performance. Behavioral changes in swimming activities and responses to stimuli appear to influence predation risk in the contaminant-exposed population. Significant changes in bioenergetics in the contaminated habitat, evident as abnormally high energetic expenditures for survival (maintenance) costs, may ultimately influence production pathways (growth, energy storage) in individuals. We then present a conceptual model to examine how interactions among the affected systems (morphological, behavioral, physiological) may ultimately bring about more severe effects than would be predicted if the responses were considered in isolation. A complex interplay among simultaneously occurring biological changes emerges in which multiple, sublethal effects ultimately can translate into reductions in larval or juvenile survival, and thus reduced recruitment of juveniles into the population. In systems where individuals are exposed to low concentrations of

  17. Measurement of the thermo-optical effect of integrated waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremmel, Johannes; Lamprecht, Tobias; Michler, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Thermo-optical switches are widely used in integrated optics and various types of integrated optical structures have been reported in literature. These structures include, but are not limited to Mach-Zehnder-Interferometer (MZI) switches and digital optical switches. The thermo-optical effect depends on the refractive index, the polarizability and the density of a material. The polarizability effect can often be neglected and the change of refractive index is dominated by a density change due to the thermal expansion of the material. We report herein a new method to measure the thermo-optical effect of waveguides directly, using integrated MZIs fabricated in polymer waveguide technology. Common methods rely on macroscopic samples, but the properties can differ significantly for micro-structured waveguides. Using a floodlight halogen rod lamp and metal-shields, we realized a radiation heater with a trapezoidal-shaped heating pattern. While the heating occurred from the bottom side, a thermocouple was placed on top of the sample. By dynamically measuring the temperature and the corresponding output-power of the MZI, the temperature difference between constructive and destructive interference can be determined. Multiple measurements of different sample MZIs exhibit an average thermo-optical coefficient (TOC) of 1.6 ∗ 10-4 1/K .

  18. Practice Policy Statement: Integrating Effective Weight Management Into Practice.

    PubMed

    Edshteyn, Ingrid; Uduhiri, Kelechi A; Morgan, Toyosi O; Rhodes, Katrina L; Sherin, Kevin M

    2016-10-01

    The American College of Preventive Medicine Prevention Practice Committee contributes to policy guidelines and recommendations on preventive health topics for clinicians and public health decision makers. As an update to a previously published statement on weight management counseling of overweight adults, the College is providing a consensus-based recommendation designed to more effectively integrate weight management strategies into clinical practice and to incorporate referrals to effective evidence-based community and commercial weight management programs. The goal is to empower providers to include lifestyle interventions as part of the foundation of clinical practice.

  19. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in time varying vacuum model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. T.; Gui, Y. X.; Xu, L. X.; Lu, J. B.

    2010-04-15

    The integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is an important implication for dark energy. In this paper, we have calculated the power spectrum of the ISW effect in the time varying vacuum cosmological model, where the model parameter {beta}=4.407 is obtained by the observational constraint of the growth rate. It is found that the source of the ISW effect is not only affected by the different evolutions of the Hubble function H(a) and the dimensionless matter density {Omega}{sub m}(a), but also by the different growth function D{sub +}(a), all of which are changed due to the presence of a matter production term in the time varying vacuum model. However, the difference of the ISW effect in the {Lambda}(t)CDM model and the {Lambda}CDM model is lessened to a certain extent because of the integration from the time of last scattering to the present. It is implied that the observations of the galaxies with high redshift are required to distinguish the two models.

  20. Ethanol fermentation integrated with PDMS composite membrane: An effective process.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chaohui; Cai, Di; Hu, Song; Miao, Qi; Wang, Yong; Qin, Peiyong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-01-01

    The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane, prepared in water phase, was investigated in separation ethanol from model ethanol/water mixture and fermentation-pervaporation integrated process. Results showed that the PDMS membrane could effectively separate ethanol from model solution. When integrated with batch ethanol fermentation, the ethanol productivity was enhanced compared with conventional process. Fed-batch and continuous ethanol fermentation with pervaporation were also performed and studied. 396.2-663.7g/m(2)h and 332.4-548.1g/m(2)h of total flux with separation factor of 8.6-11.7 and 8-11.6, were generated in the fed-batch and continuous fermentation with pervaporation scenario, respectively. At the same time, high titre ethanol production of ∼417.2g/L and ∼446.3g/L were also achieved on the permeate side of membrane in the two scenarios, respectively. The integrated process was environmental friendly and energy saving, and has a promising perspective in long-terms operation.

  1. Effective Technology Integration Shows New Frontiers in Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, Franco; Carlucci, Lisa Marie

    2007-11-01

    In this ever-changing world, technology is affecting how people view learning and the overall educational process. For an educator, the successful implementation of technology can be one of the most effective tools in the classroom. The introduction of virtual simulations of real life situations into what was once considered a teacher-centered classroom, allows the educator to meet the complex differentiated needs of a multi-faced student population. In this modified classroom, the focus naturally shifts on the students and their interaction with the rest of the class and beyond. Effective integration of technology literally opens a window onto the outside world providing students with increased motivation and with the necessary expertise to enter the workforce or successfully pursue higher education. This work analyzes the impact of technology, the methodologies currently in use, advantages and disadvantages, providing examples on how to successfully implement effective programs under budgetary constraints.

  2. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in interacting dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, German; Pavon, Diego; Atrio-Barandela, Fernando

    2008-05-15

    Models with dark energy decaying into dark matter have been proposed in cosmology to solve the coincidence problem. We study the effect of such coupling on the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. The interaction changes the rate of evolution of the metric potentials and the growth rate of matter density perturbations and modifies the integrated Sachs-Wolfe component of cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies, enhancing the effect. Cross correlation of galaxy catalogs with cosmic microwave background maps provides a model-independent test to constrain the interaction. We particularize our analysis for a specific interacting model and show that galaxy catalogs with median redshifts z{sub m}=0.1-0.9 can rule out models with an interaction parameter strength of c{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.1 better than 99.95% confidence level. Values of c{sup 2}{<=}0.01 are compatible with the data and may account for the possible discrepancy between the fraction of dark energy derived from Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe 3 yr data and the fraction obtained from the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Measuring the fraction of dark energy by these two methods could provide evidence of an interaction.

  3. Effects of Integrated Health Management Intervention on Overweight and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yiting; Ma, Chung Wah; Yang, Yide; Wang, Xiaoling; Lin, Xiaoliang; Fu, Lianguo; Wang, Shuo; Yang, Zhongping; Wang, Zhenghe; Meng, Xiangkun; Ma, Dongmei; Ma, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Overweight or obese adults aged 20~55 years and living in Beijing more than one year were randomly divided into different management groups. A one-year integrated health management intervention was applied in the health management groups. The physical indicators and metabolic indicators changed after one-year intervention on the overweight and obese adults. The annual reduction of the physical indicators was significant in all groups (p < 0.05) except the weight loss in the placebo + general management group. The health management and the dietary supplement have statistically significant (p < 0.001, p < 0.001) effects on the annual reduction of these indicators and interactive effect between them was found on some of these indicators such as bodyweight, body mass index (BMI), body fat ratio (BFR), and hipline (p < 0.05). The dietary supplement + health management group had the best annual reduction effects for the indicators among the groups. Integrated health management interventions including both dietary supplements intervention and health management could improve metabolic indicators in overweight and obese adults together with the physical indicators, suggesting the intermediated role of metabolic indictors in controlling obesity. PMID:28115972

  4. Effects of Aging in Multisensory Integration: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    de Dieuleveult, Alix L.; Siemonsma, Petra C.; van Erp, Jan B. F.; Brouwer, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Multisensory integration (MSI) is the integration by the brain of environmental information acquired through more than one sense. Accurate MSI has been shown to be a key component of successful aging and to be crucial for processes underlying activities of daily living (ADLs). Problems in MSI could prevent older adults (OA) to age in place and live independently. However, there is a need to know how to assess changes in MSI in individuals. This systematic review provides an overview of tests assessing the effect of age on MSI in the healthy elderly population (aged 60 years and older). A literature search was done in Scopus. Articles from the earliest records available to January 20, 2016, were eligible for inclusion if assessing effects of aging on MSI in the healthy elderly population compared to younger adults (YA). These articles were rated for risk of bias with the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment. Out of 307 identified research articles, 49 articles were included for final review, describing 69 tests. The review indicated that OA maximize the use of multiple sources of information in comparison to YA (20 studies). In tasks that require more cognitive function, or when participants need to adapt rapidly to a situation, or when a dual task is added to the experiment, OA have problems selecting and integrating information properly as compared to YA (19 studies). Additionally, irrelevant or wrong information (i.e., distractors) has a greater impact on OA than on YA (21 studies). OA failing to weigh sensory information properly, has not been described in previous reviews. Anatomical changes (i.e., reduction of brain volume and differences of brain areas’ recruitment) and information processing changes (i.e., general cognitive slowing, inverse effectiveness, larger time window of integration, deficits in attentional control and increased noise at baseline) can only partly explain the differences between OA and YA regarding MSI. Since we have an interest in

  5. Work environments and organizational effectiveness: A call for integration

    SciTech Connect

    Heerwagen, J.H.; Heubach, J.G.; Brown, B.W.; Sanchez, J.A.; Montgomery, J.C.; Weimer, W.C.

    1994-07-01

    In response to a request from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Analytical Chemistry Upgrades Program, a team was formed to (1) review work environment and productivity research, (2) report the research in a manner usable to organizational decision-makers, (3) identify Hanford Site facilities examples of the work environment principles and research, and (4) publish the review results in a referred journal. This report summarizes the work environment-organizational effectiveness research reviewed, provides the foundation for a publishable article, and outlines the integration of work environment research and organizational effectiveness in continuing improvement programs and strategic planning. The research cited in this review shows that the physical work environment offers a valuable tool that, used wisely, can contribute significantly to the performance of an organization, its bottom-line economics, and the well-being of all of its employees. This finding leads to one central recommendation: to derive the maximum benefit to the corporation, managers and designers must integrate organizational goals and programs with work environment design. While much of the research cited focuses on office environments, the results and design principles and practices are relevant to a full range of settings: laboratories, schools, hospitals, and factories. The major findings of the research reviewed are summarized below in four areas: (1) performance, (2) well-being, (3) image, and (4) turnover and recruitment.

  6. Integrating Multiscale Modeling with Drug Effects for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangfang L.; Oduola, Wasiu O.; Qian, Lijun; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review multiscale modeling for cancer treatment with the incorporation of drug effects from an applied system’s pharmacology perspective. Both the classical pharmacology and systems biology are inherently quantitative; however, systems biology focuses more on networks and multi factorial controls over biological processes rather than on drugs and targets in isolation, whereas systems pharmacology has a strong focus on studying drugs with regard to the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) relations accompanying drug interactions with multiscale physiology as well as the prediction of dosage-exposure responses and economic potentials of drugs. Thus, it requires multiscale methods to address the need for integrating models from the molecular levels to the cellular, tissue, and organism levels. It is a common belief that tumorigenesis and tumor growth can be best understood and tackled by employing and integrating a multifaceted approach that includes in vivo and in vitro experiments, in silico models, multiscale tumor modeling, continuous/discrete modeling, agent-based modeling, and multiscale modeling with PK/PD drug effect inputs. We provide an example application of multiscale modeling employing stochastic hybrid system for a colon cancer cell line HCT-116 with the application of Lapatinib drug. It is observed that the simulation results are similar to those observed from the setup of the wet-lab experiments at the Translational Genomics Research Institute. PMID:26792977

  7. A cellular mechanism for inverse effectiveness in multisensory integration

    PubMed Central

    Truszkowski, Torrey LS; Carrillo, Oscar A; Bleier, Julia; Ramirez-Vizcarrondo, Carolina M; Felch, Daniel L; McQuillan, Molly; Truszkowski, Christopher P; Khakhalin, Arseny S; Aizenman, Carlos D

    2017-01-01

    To build a coherent view of the external world, an organism needs to integrate multiple types of sensory information from different sources, a process known as multisensory integration (MSI). Previously, we showed that the temporal dependence of MSI in the optic tectum of Xenopus laevis tadpoles is mediated by the network dynamics of the recruitment of local inhibition by sensory input (Felch et al., 2016). This was one of the first cellular-level mechanisms described for MSI. Here, we expand this cellular level view of MSI by focusing on the principle of inverse effectiveness, another central feature of MSI stating that the amount of multisensory enhancement observed inversely depends on the size of unisensory responses. We show that non-linear summation of crossmodal synaptic responses, mediated by NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDARs) activation, form the cellular basis for inverse effectiveness, both at the cellular and behavioral levels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25392.001 PMID:28315524

  8. Effects of spatial and selective attention on basic multisensory integration.

    PubMed

    Gondan, Matthias; Blurton, Steven P; Hughes, Flavia; Greenlee, Mark W

    2011-12-01

    When participants respond to auditory and visual stimuli, responses to audiovisual stimuli are substantially faster than to unimodal stimuli (redundant signals effect, RSE). In such tasks, the RSE is usually higher than probability summation predicts, suggestive of specific integration mechanisms underlying the RSE. We investigated the role of spatial and selective attention on the RSE in audiovisual redundant signals tasks. In Experiment 1, stimuli were presented either centrally (narrow attentional focus) or at 1 of 3 unpredictable locations (wide focus). The RSE was accurately described by a coactivation model assuming linear superposition of modality-specific activation. Effects of spatial attention were explained by a shift of the evidence criterion. In Experiment 2, stimuli were presented at 3 locations; participants had to respond either to all signals regardless of location (simple response task) or to central stimuli only (selective attention task). The RSE was consistent with task-specific coactivation models; accumulation of evidence, however, differed between the 2 tasks.

  9. The effect of sediment trap poisons on particulate phosphorus integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truesdale, K.; Benitez-Nelson, C. R.; Styles, R.; Tappa, E.

    2004-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus (P) in marine systems has been complicated by a lack of information regarding the flux of particulate P from surface waters to the seafloor. This is because one of the most common ways to collect sinking particles is through the use of sediment traps where poisons are often added to reduce post depositional biological processing. Although few in number, several studies have suggested that these poisons may also affect sample integrity, particularly with respect to P. In this study, we examined the effects of three preservatives (mercuric chloride, formalin, and sodium azide) on P concentrations in marine sediments collected from a range of coastal and open ocean environments: the Black Sea (BS), Cariaco Basin (CB), Gulf of Mexico (GoM), and Winyah Bay (WB). Duplicate samples with controls were exposed to each preservative, and the loss of P to the supernatant was monitored over a period of six months. P losses to the supernatant happened rapidly, with most of the P loss occurring within the first 2 - 5 days of exposure. Formalin was consistently the least effective in preserving P sample integrity, with ~ 5 % of the initial P found in the supernatant for sediments of the BS, ~12 % from the GoM, ~ 20 % in CB, and as much as 40 % in WB. Mercuric chloride was the second least effective preservative, with P losses of 20 % in WB and < 5 % in the other sediments. In contrast, sodium azide, appeared to be the most effective trap solution, with P losses never exceeding more than 5 % of the total P measured in the sediment. In most of our experiments with formalin and sodium azide, the dominant form of P found in the supernatant occurred as soluble reactive P. However, mercuric chloride consistently had dissolved organic P concentrations greater than 50 % of the total P measured in the supernatant, confirming earlier studies that mercuric chloride releases ATP during preservation. Our results suggest that P losses in sediment traps

  10. Isotope effects in ice Ih: a path-integral simulation.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Carlos P; Ramírez, Rafael

    2011-03-07

    Ice Ih has been studied by path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, using the effective q-TIP4P/F potential model for flexible water. This has allowed us to analyze finite-temperature quantum effects in this solid phase from 25 to 300 K at ambient pressure. Among these effects we find a negative thermal expansion of ice at low temperatures, which does not appear in classical molecular dynamics simulations. The compressibility derived from volume fluctuations gives results in line with experimental data. We have analyzed isotope effects in ice Ih by considering normal, heavy, and tritiated water. In particular, we studied the effect of changing the isotopic mass of hydrogen on the kinetic energy and atomic delocalization in the crystal as well as on structural properties such as interatomic distances and molar volume. For D(2)O ice Ih at 100 K we obtained a decrease in molar volume and intramolecular O-H distance of 0.6% and 0.4%, respectively, as compared to H(2)O ice.

  11. Effects of Spatial Frequency Similarity and Dissimilarity on Contour Integration

    PubMed Central

    Persike, Malte; Meinhardt, Günter

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of spatial frequency similarity and dissimilarity on human contour integration under various conditions of uncertainty. Participants performed a temporal 2AFC contour detection task. Spatial frequency jitter up to 3.0 octaves was applied either to background elements, or to contour and background elements, or to none of both. Results converge on four major findings. (1) Contours defined by spatial frequency similarity alone are only scarcely visible, suggesting the absence of specialized cortical routines for shape detection based on spatial frequency similarity. (2) When orientation collinearity and spatial frequency similarity are combined along a contour, performance amplifies far beyond probability summation when compared to the fully heterogenous condition but only to a margin compatible with probability summation when compared to the fully homogenous case. (3) Psychometric functions are steeper but not shifted for homogenous contours in heterogenous backgrounds indicating an advantageous signal-to-noise ratio. The additional similarity cue therefore not so much improves contour detection performance but primarily reduces observer uncertainty about whether a potential candidate is a contour or just a false positive. (4) Contour integration is a broadband mechanism which is only moderately impaired by spatial frequency dissimilarity. PMID:26057620

  12. Effects of Spatial Frequency Similarity and Dissimilarity on Contour Integration.

    PubMed

    Persike, Malte; Meinhardt, Günter

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of spatial frequency similarity and dissimilarity on human contour integration under various conditions of uncertainty. Participants performed a temporal 2AFC contour detection task. Spatial frequency jitter up to 3.0 octaves was applied either to background elements, or to contour and background elements, or to none of both. Results converge on four major findings. (1) Contours defined by spatial frequency similarity alone are only scarcely visible, suggesting the absence of specialized cortical routines for shape detection based on spatial frequency similarity. (2) When orientation collinearity and spatial frequency similarity are combined along a contour, performance amplifies far beyond probability summation when compared to the fully heterogenous condition but only to a margin compatible with probability summation when compared to the fully homogenous case. (3) Psychometric functions are steeper but not shifted for homogenous contours in heterogenous backgrounds indicating an advantageous signal-to-noise ratio. The additional similarity cue therefore not so much improves contour detection performance but primarily reduces observer uncertainty about whether a potential candidate is a contour or just a false positive. (4) Contour integration is a broadband mechanism which is only moderately impaired by spatial frequency dissimilarity.

  13. Integrated design of castings: effect of porosity on mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, R. A.; Beckermann, C.

    2012-07-01

    Porosity can significantly reduce the strength and durability of castings in service. An integrated design approach has been developed where casting simulation is combined with mechanical performance simulations. Predictions of the porosity distribution from the casting process simulation are transferred to and used in stress and fatigue life simulations. Thus, the effect of casting quality on service performance can be evaluated. Results of a study are presented where the measured porosity distribution in cast steel specimens is transferred to an elasto-plastic finite-element stress analysis model. Methods are developed to locally reduce the mechanical properties according to the porosity present, without having to resolve individual pores. Plastic deformation is modeled using porous metal plasticity theory. The predictions are compared to tensile measurements performed on the specimens. The complex deformations and the reductions in the ductility of the specimens due to porosity are predicted well. The predicted stresses are transferred to a fatigue analysis code that takes the porosity distribution into account as well. The measured and predicted fatigue lives are also in good agreement. Finally, the results of a case study are presented that illustrate the utility of the present integrated approach in optimizing the design of a steel casting.

  14. Quantum effects in graphene monolayers: Path-integral simulations.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Carlos P; Ramírez, Rafael

    2016-12-14

    Path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations have been carried out to study the influence of quantum dynamics of carbon atoms on the properties of a single graphene layer. Finite-temperature properties were analyzed in the range from 12 to 2000 K, by using the LCBOPII effective potential. To assess the magnitude of quantum effects in structural and thermodynamic properties of graphene, classical molecular dynamics simulations have been also performed. Particular emphasis has been laid on the atomic vibrations along the out-of-plane direction. Even though quantum effects are present in these vibrational modes, we show that at any finite temperature classical-like motion dominates over quantum delocalization, provided that the system size is large enough. Vibrational modes display an appreciable anharmonicity, as derived from a comparison between kinetic and potential energies of the carbon atoms. Nuclear quantum effects are found to be appreciable in the interatomic distance and layer area at finite temperatures. The thermal expansion coefficient resulting from PIMD simulations vanishes in the zero-temperature limit, in agreement with the third law of thermodynamics.

  15. Quantum effects in graphene monolayers: Path-integral simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, Carlos P.; Ramírez, Rafael

    2016-12-01

    Path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations have been carried out to study the influence of quantum dynamics of carbon atoms on the properties of a single graphene layer. Finite-temperature properties were analyzed in the range from 12 to 2000 K, by using the LCBOPII effective potential. To assess the magnitude of quantum effects in structural and thermodynamic properties of graphene, classical molecular dynamics simulations have been also performed. Particular emphasis has been laid on the atomic vibrations along the out-of-plane direction. Even though quantum effects are present in these vibrational modes, we show that at any finite temperature classical-like motion dominates over quantum delocalization, provided that the system size is large enough. Vibrational modes display an appreciable anharmonicity, as derived from a comparison between kinetic and potential energies of the carbon atoms. Nuclear quantum effects are found to be appreciable in the interatomic distance and layer area at finite temperatures. The thermal expansion coefficient resulting from PIMD simulations vanishes in the zero-temperature limit, in agreement with the third law of thermodynamics.

  16. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enander, Jonas; Akrami, Yashar; Mörtsell, Edvard; Renneby, Malin; Solomon, Adam R.

    2015-04-01

    We study the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in ghost-free, massive bigravity. We focus on the infinite-branch bigravity (IBB) model which exhibits viable cosmic expansion histories and stable linear perturbations, while the cosmological constant is set to zero and the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe is due solely to the gravitational interaction terms. The ISW contribution to the CMB auto-correlation power spectrum is predicted, as well as the cross-correlation between the CMB temperature anisotropies and large-scale structure. We use ISW amplitudes as inferred from the WMAP 9-year temperature data together with galaxy and AGN data provided by the WISE mission in order to compare the theoretical predictions to the observations. The ISW amplitudes in IBB are found to be larger than the corresponding ones in the standard Λ CDM model by roughly a factor of 1.5, but are still consistent with the observations.

  17. Acute effects of muscle vibration on sensorimotor integration.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Tindel, Jérémy

    2015-02-05

    Projections from the somesthetic cortex are believed to be involved in the modulation of motor cortical excitability by muscle vibration. The aim of the present pilot study was to analyse the effects of a vibration intervention on short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI), long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI), and afferent facilitation (AF), three intracortical mechanisms reflecting sensorimotor integration. Abductor pollicis brevis (APB) SAI, AF and LAI were investigated on 10 subjects by conditioning test transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses with median nerve electrical stimulation at inter-stimuli intervals in the range 15-25 ms, 25-60 ms, and 100-200 ms, respectively. Test motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were compared to unconditioned MEPs. Measurements were performed before and just after 15 min of vibration applied to the muscle belly of APB at a frequency of 80 Hz. SAI and LAI responses were significantly reduced compared to unconditioned test MEPs (P=0.039 and P<0.001, respectively). AF MEP amplitude was greater than SAI and LAI one (P=0.009 and P=0.004, respectively), but not different from test MEP (P=0.511). There was no significant main effect of vibration (P=0.905). However, 4 subjects were clearly identified as responders. Their mean vibration-induced increase was 324 ± 195% in APB SAI MEP amplitude, and 158 ± 53% and 319 ± 80% in AF and LAI, respectively. Significant differences in SAI, AF and LAI vibration-induced changes were found for responders when compared to non-responders (P=0.019, P=0.038, and P=0.01, respectively). A single session of APB vibration may increase sensorimotor integration, via decreased inhibition and increased facilitation. However, such results were not observed for all subjects, suggesting that other factors (such as attention to the sensory inputs) may have played a role.

  18. Context-specific effects of musical expertise on audiovisual integration.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Laura; Goebl, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Ensemble musicians exchange auditory and visual signals that can facilitate interpersonal synchronization. Musical expertise improves how precisely auditory and visual signals are perceptually integrated and increases sensitivity to asynchrony between them. Whether expertise improves sensitivity to audiovisual asynchrony in all instrumental contexts or only in those using sound-producing gestures that are within an observer's own motor repertoire is unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that musicians are more sensitive to audiovisual asynchrony in performances featuring their own instrument than in performances featuring other instruments. Short clips were extracted from audio-video recordings of clarinet, piano, and violin performances and presented to highly-skilled clarinetists, pianists, and violinists. Clips either maintained the audiovisual synchrony present in the original recording or were modified so that the video led or lagged behind the audio. Participants indicated whether the audio and video channels in each clip were synchronized. The range of asynchronies most often endorsed as synchronized was assessed as a measure of participants' sensitivities to audiovisual asynchrony. A positive relationship was observed between musical training and sensitivity, with data pooled across stimuli. While participants across expertise groups detected asynchronies most readily in piano stimuli and least readily in violin stimuli, pianists showed significantly better performance for piano stimuli than for either clarinet or violin. These findings suggest that, to an extent, the effects of expertise on audiovisual integration can be instrument-specific; however, the nature of the sound-producing gestures that are observed has a substantial effect on how readily asynchrony is detected as well.

  19. Context-specific effects of musical expertise on audiovisual integration

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Laura; Goebl, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Ensemble musicians exchange auditory and visual signals that can facilitate interpersonal synchronization. Musical expertise improves how precisely auditory and visual signals are perceptually integrated and increases sensitivity to asynchrony between them. Whether expertise improves sensitivity to audiovisual asynchrony in all instrumental contexts or only in those using sound-producing gestures that are within an observer's own motor repertoire is unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that musicians are more sensitive to audiovisual asynchrony in performances featuring their own instrument than in performances featuring other instruments. Short clips were extracted from audio-video recordings of clarinet, piano, and violin performances and presented to highly-skilled clarinetists, pianists, and violinists. Clips either maintained the audiovisual synchrony present in the original recording or were modified so that the video led or lagged behind the audio. Participants indicated whether the audio and video channels in each clip were synchronized. The range of asynchronies most often endorsed as synchronized was assessed as a measure of participants' sensitivities to audiovisual asynchrony. A positive relationship was observed between musical training and sensitivity, with data pooled across stimuli. While participants across expertise groups detected asynchronies most readily in piano stimuli and least readily in violin stimuli, pianists showed significantly better performance for piano stimuli than for either clarinet or violin. These findings suggest that, to an extent, the effects of expertise on audiovisual integration can be instrument-specific; however, the nature of the sound-producing gestures that are observed has a substantial effect on how readily asynchrony is detected as well. PMID:25324819

  20. Sensory Integration and Its Effects on Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Judy

    This paper provides an overview of the literature on sensory integration in young children. First it explains the importance of "sensory integration" in child development and normal functioning. It goes on to note signs of a sensory integration dysfunction (such as hyper-or hypo-sensitivity to touch, poor coordination, and poor behavioral…

  1. The Effect of Integrated Hearing Protection Surround Levels on Sound Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    The effect of integrated hearing protection surround levels on sound localization Sharon M. Abel, Craig Burrell, Douglas...The effect of integrated hearing protection surround levels on sound localization Sharon M. Abel, Craig...injurious noise. This experiment assessed horizontal plane sound localization with three communication devices with integrated hearing protection that

  2. Integrating Hydrological Effects of Wildland Fire into Strategic Landscape Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, S. P.; Lee, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the United States faces growing risks from wildfire. Collectively and individually, these wildfires can profoundly affect water flow and quality both within and downstream of the areas burned. Given their extent and tendency to have large severe patch sizes, megafires can have substantial watershed effects that include areas with slow or improbable recovery. Management efforts to engineer community resilience through restoring fire or other broad scale fuels treatments can also affect flow regimes. Restoration efforts often include thinning uncharacteristically high stand densities, creating heterogeneous structural patterns, or shifting species composition towards more fire-tolerant and often more drought-tolerant species. The strategic intent is to increase landscape resilience even as wildfire or climate regimes worsen. Prioritization efforts that affect how landscapes are managed also balance the needs of human communities, including municipal water supplies, while reducing the societal costs of wildfire response. Thus, the overall effects of wildfire represent a combined, synergistic interaction of the wildfires and management actions taken to mitigate their potential effects. Strategic plans such as the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy and individual State Forest Action Plans provide forums for assessing system-wide interactions of fire and water, but implementation is challenging. This talk presents the strategic thinking behind existing efforts, outlines how water-associated tradeoffs can be integrated, and illustrates the utility of existing hydrological, climate and vegetation datasets and models to establish scenarios and directional likelihoods that illuminate planning options.

  3. Testing Gravity Against Early Time Integrated Sachs-Wolfe Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengjie; /Shanghai, Astron. Observ. /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    A generic prediction of general relativity is that the cosmological linear density growth factor D is scale independent. But in general, modified gravities do not preserve this signature. A scale dependent D can cause time variation in gravitational potential at high redshifts and provides a new cosmological test of gravity, through early time integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect-large scale structure (LSS) cross correlation. We demonstrate the power of this test for a class of f(R) gravity, with the form f(R) = {lambda}{sub 1}H{sub 0}{sup 2} exp(-R/{lambda}{sub 2}H{sub 0}{sup 2}). Such f(R) gravity, even with degenerate expansion history to {Lambda}CDM, can produce detectable ISW effect at z {approx}> 3 and l {approx}> 20. Null-detection of such effect would constrain {lambda}{sub 2} to be {lambda}{sub 2} > 1000 at > 95% confidence level. On the other hand, robust detection of ISW-LSS cross correlation at high z will severely challenge general relativity.

  4. Stress effects on memory: an update and integration.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Lars; Joëls, Marian; Roozendaal, Benno; Wolf, Oliver T; Oitzl, Melly S

    2012-08-01

    It is well known that stressful experiences may affect learning and memory processes. Less clear is the exact nature of these stress effects on memory: both enhancing and impairing effects have been reported. These opposite effects may be explained if the different time courses of stress hormone, in particular catecholamine and glucocorticoid, actions are taken into account. Integrating two popular models, we argue here that rapid catecholamine and non-genomic glucocorticoid actions interact in the basolateral amygdala to shift the organism into a 'memory formation mode' that facilitates the consolidation of stressful experiences into long-term memory. The undisturbed consolidation of these experiences is then promoted by genomic glucocorticoid actions that induce a 'memory storage mode', which suppresses competing cognitive processes and thus reduces interference by unrelated material. Highlighting some current trends in the field, we further argue that stress affects learning and memory processes beyond the basolateral amygdala and hippocampus and that stress may pre-program subsequent memory performance when it is experienced during critical periods of brain development.

  5. Microelectrodes integrated cell-chip for drug effects study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Cui, Hui-Fang; Ye, Jian-Shan; Chong, Ser-Choong; Lim, Tit-Meng; Sheu, Fwu-Shan; Cheong, Hui-Wing

    2006-01-01

    Silicon-based microelectrode chips are useful tools for temporal recording of neurotransmitter releasing from neural cells. Both invasive and non-invasive methods are targeted by different group researchers to perform electrical stimulating on neural cells. A microfabricated microelectrodes integrated biochip will be presented in this paper, which describes the dopaminergic cells growing on the chip directly. The dopamine exocytosis can be detected non-invasively from drug incubated dopaminergic cells growing on the chip. The abovementioned silicon-based electrochemical sensor chip has been designed with an electrode array located on the bottom of reaction chamber and each electrode is individually electrical controlled. MN9D, a mouse mesencephalic dopaminergic cell line, has been grown on the surface of the biochip chamber directly. Dopamine exocytosis from the chip-grown MN9D cells was detected using amperometry technology. The amperometric detection limit of dopamine of the biochip microelectrodes was found from 0.06μM to 0.21μM (S/N=3) statistically for the electrode diameters from 10 μm to 90 μm, the level of dopamine exocytosis from MN9D cells was undetectable whithout drug incubation. In contrast, after MN9D cells were incubated with L-dopa, a dopamine precursor, K+ induced dopamine extocytosis was temporally detected. The microelectrodes integrated biochip provides a non-invasive, temporal detection of dopamine exocytosis from dopaminergic cells, and holds the potential for applications in studying the mechanisms of dopamine exocytosis, and drug screening. It also provides a tool for pharmaceutical research and drug screening on dopaminergic cells, extendably to be used for other cell culture and drug effects study.

  6. Integrated psychological therapy (IPT) for schizophrenia: is it effective?

    PubMed

    Roder, Volker; Mueller, Daniel R; Mueser, Kim T; Brenner, Hans D

    2006-10-01

    Against the background of evidence-based treatments for schizophrenia, nowadays the implementation of specific cognitive and behavioral interventions becomes more important in the standard care of these patients. Over the past 25 years, research groups in 9 countries have carried out 30 independent evaluations of Integrated Psychological Therapy (IPT), a group program that combines neurocognitive and social cognitive interventions with social skills approaches for schizophrenic patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of IPT under varying treatment and research conditions in academic and nonacademic sites. In a first step, all 30 published IPT studies with the participation of 1393 schizophrenic patients were included in the meta-analysis. In a second step, only high-quality studies (HQS) (7 studies including 362 patients) were selected and analyzed to check whether they confirmed the results of the first step. Positive mean effect sizes favoring IPT over control groups (placebo-attention conditions, standard care) were found for all dependent variables, including symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and neurocognition. Moreover, the superiority of IPT continued to increase during an average follow-up period of 8.1 months. IPT obtained similarly favorable effects across the different outcome domains, assessment formats (expert ratings, self-reports, and psychological tests), settings (inpatient vs outpatient and academic vs nonacademic), and phases of treatment (acute vs chronic). The HQS confirmed the results of the complete sample. The analysis indicates that IPT is an effective rehabilitation approach for schizophrenia that is robust across a wide range of patients and treatment conditions.

  7. Exploring Command and Control Concepts for an Integrated Effect Coordination Cell using an Enhanced Tabletop Experimentation Approach: Report on the Integrated Effects Coordination Cell Exploratory Experiment (IECCEX)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    various Integrated Effects Coordination Cell (IECC) manning, process flow and control models in order to facilitate the identification of an...Integrated Effects Coordination Cell (IECC) manning, process flow and control models in order to facilitate the identification of an appropriate model that...commonalities are: Parallel Processing and Collaboration - It was observed that the IECC team was able to plan a delivery of effect more efficiently

  8. Comparative Effectiveness Topics from a Large, Integrated Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Danforth, Kim N; Patnode, Carrie D; Kapka, Tanya J; Butler, Melissa G; Collins, Bernadette; Compton-Phillips, Amy; Baxter, Raymond J; Weissberg, Jed; McGlynn, Elizabeth A; Whitlock, Evelyn P

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify high-priority comparative effectiveness questions directly relevant to care delivery in a large, US integrated health care system. Methods: In 2010, a total of 792 clinical and operational leaders in Kaiser Permanente were sent an electronic survey requesting nominations of comparative effectiveness research questions; most recipients (83%) had direct clinical roles. Nominated questions were divided into 18 surveys of related topics that included 9 to 23 questions for prioritization. The next year, 648 recipients were electronically sent 1 of the 18 surveys to prioritize nominated questions. Surveys were assigned to recipients on the basis of their nominations or specialty. High-priority questions were identified by comparing the frequency a question was selected to an “expected” frequency, calculated to account for the varying number of questions and respondents across prioritization surveys. High-priority questions were those selected more frequently than expected. Results: More than 320 research questions were nominated from 181 individuals. Questions most frequently addressed cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease; obesity, diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolic disorders; or service delivery and systems-level questions. Ninety-five high-priority research questions were identified, encompassing a wide range of health questions that ranged from prevention and screening to treatment and quality of life. Many were complex questions from a systems perspective regarding how to deliver the best care. Conclusions: The 95 questions identified and prioritized by leaders on the front lines of health care delivery may inform the national discussion regarding comparative effectiveness research. Additionally, our experience provides insight in engaging real-world stakeholders in setting a health care research agenda. PMID:24361013

  9. Integrating kinetic effects in fluid models for magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang

    The integration of kinetic effects in global fluid models is a grand challenge in space plasma physics, and has implication for our ability to model space weather in collisionless plasma environments such as the Earth's magnetosphere. We propose an extensible multi-fluid moment model, with focus on the physics of magnetic reconnection. This model evolves the full Maxwell equations, and simultaneously moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equation for each species in the plasma. Effects like the Hall effect, the electron inertia, and the pressure gradient are self-consistently embedded in the resulting multi-fluid moment equations, without the need to explicitly solving a generalized Ohm's law. Two limits of the multi-fluid moment model are discussed, namely, the five-moment limit that evolves a scalar pressures for each species, and the ten-moment limit that evolves the full anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure tensor. Particularly, the five-moment model reduces to the widely used Hall Magnetohydrodynamics (Hall MHD) model under the assumptions of vanishing electron inertia, infinite speed of light, and quasi-neutrality. In this thesis, we first numerically confirm the reduction of five-moment to Hall MHD under the limit of vanishing electron inertia. Then, we compare ten-moment and fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of a large scale Harris sheet reconnection problem, where the ten-moment equations are closed with a local linear collisionless approximation for the heat flux. The ten-moment simulation gives reasonable agreement with the PIC results, regarding the structures and magnitudes of the electron flows, the polarities and magnitudes of elements of the electron pressure tensor, and the decomposition of the generalized Ohm's law. Possible ways to improve the simple closure towards a non-local, fully three-dimensional description are also discussed.

  10. Integrating kinetic effects in fluid models for magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Hakim, A.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2014-12-01

    The integration of kinetic effects in global fluid models is a grand challenge in space plasma physics, and has implication for our ability to model space weather in collisionless plasma environments such as the Earth's magnetosphere. We propose an extensible multi-fluid moment model, with focus on the physics of magnetic reconnection. This model evolves the full Maxwell equations, and simultaneously moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equation for each species in the plasma. Effects like the Hall effect, the electron inertia, and the pressure gradient are self-consistently embedded in the resulting multi-fluid moment equations, without the need to explicitly solving a generalized Ohm's law. Two limits of the multi-fluid moment model are discussed, namely, the five-moment limit that evolves a scalar pressure for each species, and the ten-moment limit that evolves the full anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure tensor. Particularly, the five-moment model reduces to the widely used Hall Magnetohydrodynamics (Hall MHD) model under the assumptions of vanishing electron inertia, infinite speed of light, and quasi-neutrality. In this presentation, we first compare ten-moment and fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of a large scale Harris sheet reconnection problem, where the ten-moment equations are closed with a local linear collisionless approximation for the heat flux. The ten-moment simulation gives reasonable agreement with the PIC results, regarding the structures and magnitudes of the electron flows, the polarities and magnitudes of elements of the electron pressure tensor, and the decomposition of the generalized Ohm's law. Preliminary results of application of the multi-fluid moment model to Ganymede are also discussed.

  11. Effectively Integrating an International Field Study into the EMBA Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotner, John; Jones, Raymond; Kashlak, Roger

    2003-01-01

    An international field study (IFS) is an integral part of the EMBA program because of the various critical roles it plays. This international travel experience is a value-added activity not only as "stand alone" vehicle for understanding macro-level environments and firm-level strategic initiatives, but also as a tool that integrates other pieces…

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarisation via the integrated solid effect I: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henstra, A.; Wenckebach, W. Th.

    2014-07-01

    In the hyperpolarisation method known as dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP), a small amount of unpaired electron spins is added to the sample containing the nuclear spins and the polarisation of these unpaired electron spins is transferred to the nuclear spins by means of a microwave field. Traditional DNP uses weak continuous wave (CW) microwave fields, so perturbation methods can be used to calculate the polarisation transfer. A much faster transfer of the electron spin polarisation is obtained with the integrated solid effect (ISE) which uses strong pulsed microwave fields. As in nuclear orientation via electron spin locking, the polarisation transfer is coherent, similar to the coherence transfer between nuclear spins. This paper presents a theoretical approach to calculate this polarisation transfer. ISE is successfully used for a fast polarisation transfer from short-lived photo-excited triplet states to the surrounding nuclear spins in molecular crystals. These triplet states are strongly aligned in the photo-excitation process and do not require the low temperatures and strong magnetic fields needed to polarise the electron spins in traditional DNP. In the following paper, the theory is applied to the system naphthalene-h8 doped with pentacene-d14 which provides the photo-excited triplet states, and compared with experimental results.

  13. Initial Integration of Noise Prediction Tools for Acoustic Scattering Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Burley, Casey L.; Tinetti, Ana; Rawls, John W.

    2008-01-01

    This effort provides an initial glimpse at NASA capabilities available in predicting the scattering of fan noise from a non-conventional aircraft configuration. The Aircraft NOise Prediction Program, Fast Scattering Code, and the Rotorcraft Noise Model were coupled to provide increased fidelity models of scattering effects on engine fan noise sources. The integration of these codes led to the identification of several keys issues entailed in applying such multi-fidelity approaches. In particular, for prediction at noise certification points, the inclusion of distributed sources leads to complications with the source semi-sphere approach. Computational resource requirements limit the use of the higher fidelity scattering code to predict radiated sound pressure levels for full scale configurations at relevant frequencies. And, the ability to more accurately represent complex shielding surfaces in current lower fidelity models is necessary for general application to scattering predictions. This initial step in determining the potential benefits/costs of these new methods over the existing capabilities illustrates a number of the issues that must be addressed in the development of next generation aircraft system noise prediction tools.

  14. Bolometric effect in a waveguide-integrated graphene photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yubing; Yin, Weihong; Han, Qin; Yang, Xiaohong; Ye, Han; Lv, Qianqian; Yin, Dongdong

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is an alternative material for photodetectors owing to its unique properties. These include its uniform absorption of light from ultraviolet to infrared and its ultrahigh mobility for both electrons and holes. Unfortunately, due to the low absorption of light, the photoresponsivity of graphene-based photodetectors is usually low, only a few milliamps per watt. In this letter, we fabricate a waveguide-integrated graphene photodetector. A photoresponsivity exceeding 0.11 A·W-1 is obtained which enables most optoelectronic applications. The dominating mechanism of photoresponse is investigated and is attributed to the photo-induced bolometric effect. Theoretical calculation shows that the bolometric photoresponsivity is 4.6 A·W-1. The absorption coefficient of the device is estimated to be 0.27 dB·μm-1. Project supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2016YFB0402204), the High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013AA031401, 2015AA016902, and 2015AA016904), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61674136, 61176053, 61274069, and 61435002).

  15. The Relative Effectiveness of Integrated Reading Study Strategy and Conceptual Physics Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taslidere, Erdal; Eryilmaz, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the combined and partial effects of the Integrated Reading/Study Strategy and Conceptual Physics Approach on ninth grade private high school students' achievement in and attitudes toward optics. The Integrated Reading/Study Strategy is a new strategy which was developed by integrating previously…

  16. Are Socioeconomically Integrated Schools Equally Effective for Advantaged and Disadvantaged Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montt, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Socioeconomic integration in schools has been shown to bring positive academic and nonacademic outcomes to disadvantaged students attending them. The academic benefits of integration on advantaged students are, by contrast, less evident. Effective integrated schools are those that promote disadvantaged students' outcomes yet advantaged students do…

  17. Planck 2015 results. XXI. The integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casaponsa, B.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a study of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect from the Planck 2015 temperature and polarization data release. This secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy caused by the large-scale time-evolving gravitational potential is probed from different perspectives. The CMB is cross-correlated with different large-scale structure (LSS) tracers: radio sources from the NVSS catalogue; galaxies from the optical SDSS and the infrared WISE surveys; and the Planck 2015 convergence lensing map. The joint cross-correlation of the CMB with the tracers yields a detection at 4σ where most of the signal-to-noise is due to the Planck lensing and the NVSS radio catalogue. In fact, the ISW effect is detected from the Planck data only at ≈3σ (through the ISW-lensing bispectrum), which is similar to the detection level achieved by combining the cross-correlation signal coming from all the galaxy catalogues mentioned above. We study the ability of the ISW effect to place constraints on the dark-energy parameters; in particular, we show that ΩΛ is detected at more than 3σ. This cross-correlation analysis is performed only with the Planck temperature data, since the polarization scales available in the 2015 release do not permit significant improvement of the CMB-LSS cross-correlation detectability. Nevertheless, the Planck polarization data are used to study the anomalously large ISW signal previously reported through the aperture photometry on stacked CMB features at the locations of known superclusters and supervoids, which is in conflict with ΛCDM expectations. We find that the current Planck polarization data do not exclude that this signal could be caused by the ISW effect. In addition, the stacking of the Planck lensing map on the locations of superstructures exhibits a positive cross-correlation with these large-scale structures. Finally, we have improved our previous reconstruction of the ISW temperature fluctuations by combining the

  18. Relational integrativity of prime-target pairs moderates congruity effects in evaluative priming.

    PubMed

    Ihmels, Max; Freytag, Peter; Fiedler, Klaus; Alexopoulos, Theodore

    2016-05-01

    In evaluative priming, positive or negative primes facilitate reactions to targets that share the same valence. While this effect is commonly explained as reflecting invariant structures in semantic long-term memory or in the sensorimotor system, the present research highlights the role of integrativity in evaluative priming. Integrativity refers to the ease of integrating two concepts into a new meaningful compound representation. In extended material tests using paired comparisons from two pools of positive and negative words, we show that evaluative congruity is highly correlated with integrativity. Therefore, in most priming studies, congruity and integrativity are strongly confounded. When both aspects are disentangled by manipulating congruity and integrativity orthogonally, three priming experiments show that evaluative-priming effects were confined to integrative prime-target pairs. No facilitation of prime-congruent targets was obtained for non-integrative stimuli. These findings are discussed from a broader perspective on priming conceived as flexible, context-dependent, and serving a generative adaptation function.

  19. Application of integrative information system improves the quality and effectiveness of cancer case management.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Yi; Chang, Tsue-Rung

    2015-01-01

    Cancer case management provides consecutive care during the entire process through diagnosis to treatment and follow-up. We established an integrative information system with integration of the health information system. This integrative information system shortened the time spent on case screening, follow-up data management, and monthly data summarization of case managers. It also promoted the case follow-up rate. This integrative information system may improve the quality and effectiveness for cancer case management, one important part of cancer nursing.

  20. Effects of photooxidation on membrane integrity in Salix nigra seeds

    PubMed Central

    Roqueiro, Gonzalo; Facorro, Graciela B.; Huarte, Mónica G.; Rubín de Celis, Emilio; García, Fernando; Maldonado, Sara; Maroder, Horacio

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Salix nigra seeds are desiccation-tolerant, as are orthodox seeds, although in contrast to other orthodox seeds they lose viability in a few weeks at room temperature. They also differ in that the chloroplasts of the embryo tissues conserve their chlorophyll and endomembranes. The aim of this paper was to investigate the role of chlorophyll in seed deterioration. Methods Seeds were aged at different light intensities and atmospheric conditions. Mean germination time and normal and total germination were evaluated. The formation of free radicals was assessed using electronic spin resonance spectroscopy, and changes in the fatty acid composition from phospholipids, galactolipids and triglycerides using gas–liquid chromatography. Membrane integrity was studied with electronic spin resonance spin probe techniques, electrolyte leakage and transmission electron microscopy. Key Results Light and oxygen played an important role in free-radical generation, causing a decrease in normal germination and an increase in mean germination time. Both indices were associated with a decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from membrane lipids as phospholipids and galactolipids. The detection of damage in thylakoid membranes and an increase in plasmalemma permeability were consistent with the decrease in both types of lipids. Triglycerides remained unchanged. Light-induced damage began in outermost tissues and spread inwards, decreasing normal germination. Conclusions Salix nigra seeds were very susceptible to photooxidation. The thylakoid membranes appeared to be the first target of the photooxidative process since there were large decreases in galactolipids and both these lipids and the activated chlorophyll are contiguous in the structure of that membrane. Changes in normal germination and mean germination time could be explained by the deteriorative effects of oxidation. PMID:20338949

  1. The Effect of Cooperative Integrated Reading and Composition Technique on Students' Reading Descriptive Text Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zainuddin

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at finding out the effectiveness of applying Cooperative Integrated Reading and Composition (CIRC) Technique on Students' Reading Descriptive Text Achievement. In other words, the objective of this study was to find out if there was a significant effect of applying Cooperative Integrated Reading and Composition (CIRC)…

  2. Effects of Treatment Integrity Failures during Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior: A Translational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipkin, Claire St. Peter; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Sloman, Kimberly N.

    2010-01-01

    Differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) is used frequently as a treatment for problem behavior. Previous studies on treatment integrity failures during DRA suggest that the intervention is robust, but research has not yet investigated the effects of different types of integrity failures. We examined the effects of two types of…

  3. The effect of shoulder manipulation on rotator cuff integrity.

    PubMed

    Atoun, Ehud; Funk, Lennard; Copland, Stephen A; Even, Tirtza; Levy, Ofer; Rath, Ehud

    2013-06-01

    The use of shoulder manipulation in the treatment of frozen shoulder remains controversial. Humeral fractures and neurological damage are the risks associated with the procedure. A concern of causing a rotator cuff tear exists but the incidence of iatrogenic rotator cuff tears is not reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of shoulder manipulation for frozen shoulder on the integrity of the rotator cuff. In a prospective study, 32 consecutive patients (33 shoulders) with the diagnosis of frozen shoulder underwent manipulation of the shoulder under anaesthesia (MUA), 18 female and 15 males with mean age at manipulation of 503 years (range: 42-63). The average duration of symptoms before treatment was 6.2 months (range: 2-18 months). The patients were examined prior to the manipulation and at follow-up for combined shoulder range of motion, external and internal rotation and strength. All patients had an ultrasound assessment of the rotator cuff before and at 3 weeks after manipulation of the shoulder. Mean time between manipulation and last follow-up was 133 weeks. None of the patients had ultrasound findings of a rotator cuff tear, prior to the manipulation. In all patients the rotator cuff remained undamaged on ultrasound examination at 3 weeks after the procedure. The mean improvement in motion was 81.2 degrees (from 933 degrees pre-op to 174.5 degrees at last follow-up) for forward flexion; 102.6 degrees (from 68.8 degrees pre-op to 171.4 degrees at last follow-up) for abduction, 49.4 degrees (from 8.8 degrees pre-op to 58.2 degrees at last follow-up) for external rotation and 3.5 levels of internal rotation (range: 2 to 5 levels). These gains in motion were all highly significant (p < 0.0001). No fractures, dislocations or nerve palsies were observed. In this study, manipulation of the shoulder has not been associated with rotator cuff tears. If done properly the procedure appeared to be safe and to result in a marked improvement of range

  4. Integrating Effective Writing Skills in the Accounting Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Gordon S.; Arevalo, Claire

    1983-01-01

    The J. M. Tull School of Accounting at the University of Georgia has developed a program that integrates the teaching of writing skills with the regular accounting courses. Students in a three-course sequence write a total of eight papers--technical, memos, or reports--in assignments that resemble writing tasks encountered by professional…

  5. The Effects of Integrated Transformational Leadership on Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boberg, John Eric; Bourgeois, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Greater understanding about how variables mediate the relationship between leadership and achievement is essential to the success of reform efforts that hold leaders accountable for student learning. The purpose of this paper is to test a model of integrated transformational leadership including three important school mediators.…

  6. The Effect of Integrating Interactive Whiteboards on Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sheila Denise

    2012-01-01

    While it is known that instructional technology improves academic achievement, there is little research about the integration of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) during Success For All (SFA) reading instruction. The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine whether there was a significant difference in reading achievement between third…

  7. Components of Intercultural Identity: Towards an Effective Integration Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kislev, Elyakim

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on a group of religious students who integrated into a nonreligious school in order to understand the characteristics of their intercultural identity. I suggest a new perspective in which intercultural identity is analyzed by itself rather than analyzing acculturation strategies taken by the individual. Using an in-depth…

  8. Advertising Can Be an Effective Integrated Marketing Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauer, Larry D.

    2007-01-01

    Advertising will not undermine the critical thinking of consumers when it is combined with other communication media, and when it is truthful. In fact, it can provide clarity about the competitive advantage of individual institutions and aid an individual's ability to choose wisely. Advertising is just one of the tools in the integrated marketing…

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management System 2010 Effectiveness Review and Declaration Report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas J. Haney

    2010-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory completes an annual Integrated Safety Management System effectiveness review per 48 CFR 970.5223-1 “Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Work Planning and Execution.” The annual review assesses ISMS effectiveness, provides feedback to maintain system integrity, and helps identify target areas for focused improvements and assessments for the following year. Using one of the three Department of Energy (DOE) descriptors in DOE M 450.4-1 regarding the state of ISMS effectiveness during Fiscal Year (FY) 2010, the information presented in this review shows that INL achieved “Effective Performance.”

  10. Total Dose Effects on Bipolar Integrated Circuits at Low Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.; Swimm, R. T.; Thorbourn, D. O.

    2012-01-01

    Total dose damage in bipolar integrated circuits is investigated at low temperature, along with the temperature dependence of the electrical parameters of internal transistors. Bandgap narrowing causes the gain of npn transistors to decrease far more at low temperature compared to pnp transistors, due to the large difference in emitter doping concentration. When irradiations are done at temperatures of -140 deg C, no damage occurs until devices are warmed to temperatures above -50 deg C. After warm-up, subsequent cooling shows that damage is then present at low temperature. This can be explained by the very strong temperature dependence of dispersive transport in the continuous-time-random-walk model for hole transport. For linear integrated circuits, low temperature operation is affected by the strong temperature dependence of npn transistors along with the higher sensitivity of lateral and substrate pnp transistors to radiation damage.

  11. Integrated modelling for the evaluation of infiltration effects.

    PubMed

    Schulz, N; Baur, R; Krebs, P

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study is the estimation of the potential benefits of sewer pipe rehabilitation for the performance of the drainage system and the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) as well as for the receiving water quality. The relation of sewer system status and the infiltration rate is assessed based on statistical analysis of 470 km of CCTV (Closed Circuit Television) inspected sewers of the city of Dresden. The potential reduction of infiltration rates and the consequent performance improvements of the urban wastewater system are simulated as a function of rehabilitation activities in the network. The integrated model is applied to an artificial system with input from a real sewer network. In this paper, the general design of the integrated model and its data requirements are presented. For an exemplary study, the consequences of the simulations are discussed with respect to the prioritisation of rehabilitation activities in the network.

  12. Improving Integration Effectiveness of ID Mapping Based Biological Record Linkage.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Hasan M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, biological objects such as genes, proteins, and pathways are represented by a convenient identifier, or ID, which is then used to cross reference, link and describe objects in biological databases. Relationships among the objects are often established using non-trivial and computationally complex ID mapping systems or converters, and are stored in authoritative databases such as UniGene, GeneCards, PIR and BioMart. Despite best efforts, such mappings are largely incomplete and riddled with false negatives. Consequently, data integration using record linkage that relies on these mappings produces poor quality of data, inadvertently leading to erroneous conclusions. In this paper, we discuss this largely ignored dimension of data integration, examine how the ubiquitous use of identifiers in biological databases is a significant barrier to knowledge fusion using distributed computational pipelines, and propose two algorithms for ad hoc and restriction free ID mapping of arbitrary types using online resources. We also propose two declarative statements for ID conversion and data integration based on ID mapping on-the-fly.

  13. Radiation and annealing effects on integrated bipolar Operational Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaf, J.

    2017-02-01

    Integrated bipolar Operational Amplifier (op-amp) type μA 741 was irradiated with neutrons and gamma rays. The radiation on gain factors, slew rate, and power supply current have been evaluated. The experimental results show a decrease of these parameter values after exposing to the radiation. The advantage of the increase of the voltage power supplies and the thermal annealing treatment on the damaged parameters was also explored. The relationship among different frequency response parameters is also studied leading to an analytical formula for the above degraded parameters.

  14. On impulsive integrated pest management models with stochastic effects

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Olcay; Comar, Timothy D.; Hrozencik, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We extend existing impulsive differential equation models for integrated pest management (IPM) by including stage structure for both predator and prey as well as by adding stochastic elements in the birth rate of the prey. Based on our model, we propose an approach that incorporates various competing stochastic components. This approach enables us to select a model with optimally determined weights for maximum accuracy and precision in parameter estimation. This is significant in the case of IPM because the proposed model accommodates varying unknown environmental and climatic conditions, which affect the resources needed for pest eradication. PMID:25954144

  15. On impulsive integrated pest management models with stochastic effects.

    PubMed

    Akman, Olcay; Comar, Timothy D; Hrozencik, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We extend existing impulsive differential equation models for integrated pest management (IPM) by including stage structure for both predator and prey as well as by adding stochastic elements in the birth rate of the prey. Based on our model, we propose an approach that incorporates various competing stochastic components. This approach enables us to select a model with optimally determined weights for maximum accuracy and precision in parameter estimation. This is significant in the case of IPM because the proposed model accommodates varying unknown environmental and climatic conditions, which affect the resources needed for pest eradication.

  16. Characterization of the Effect of thermal Cycling on the Signal Integrity of Interconnect Structures used in 3D Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Binayak

    2012-03-01

    The performance and reliability of the microelectronic devices are significantly influenced by the condition of interconnects in Integrated Circuits (IC). These interconnects serve primarily as signal transmission pathways in IC. Good interconnects enable free flow of electrical signals with low impedance. However, microelectronic devices are continuously subjected to fluctuating temperature conditions during their lifetime, which affect the signal integrity of interconnects. Therefore, this project takes a look at the effect of repeated temperature cycling on the reliability and performance of interconnects. Two types of interconnects: Back-End-of-Line (BEOL) and Through-Si-Via (TSV) were studied. We simulate the real world conditions by applying repeated temperature cycling, and use an RF network analyzer to extract the reflection and transmission signal characteristics of the interconnects. The mean-time-to-failure is determined upon their breakdown which is followed by the failure analysis to determine the root cause of failure.

  17. Testing the Effectiveness of Professional Development for Integrating Technology in an Urban Iowa Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative one-group pretest-posttest design study was to test the effectiveness of professional development for integrating technology in the curriculum of an urban Iowa middle school. Iowa middle school teachers are expected to integrate technology, to comply with Iowa Core Curriculum standards, by 2014. The participants…

  18. Effective Teaching in the Information Era: Fostering an ICT-Based Integrated Learning Environment in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kar Tin

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the implementation of a project for fostering information and communication technology (ICT)-based integrated learning environments in Hong Kong schools. Overall, effective ICT integration requires substantial thinking about curricular practice and appropriate teacher training. ICT must provide students with varied experiences and…

  19. The Effects of Arts Integration on Long-Term Retention of Academic Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardiman, Mariale; Rinne, Luke; Yarmolinskaya, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Previous correlational and quasi-experimental studies of arts integration--the pedagogical practice of "teaching through the arts"--suggest its value for enhancing cognitive, academic, and social skills. This study reports the results of a small, preliminary classroom-based experiment that tested effects of arts integration on long-term…

  20. Integrating Evaluation into a Program for Increased Utility and Cost-Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    1988-01-01

    An approach toward integrating evaluation into a program at its inception is presented as a way to increase utility and cost-effectiveness. Examples illustrate that such integration, combining internal and external evaluation, is preferable to independent and separate evaluation in terms of the cost to stakeholders. (SLD)

  1. The Structure and Effectiveness of Health Systems: Exploring the Impact of System Integration in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Birch, Stephen; Ma, Huifen; Zhu, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Facing the challenges of aging populations, increasing chronic diseases prevalence and health system fragmentation, there have been several pilots of integrated health systems in China. But little is known about their structure, mechanism and effectiveness. The aim of this paper is to analyze health system integration and develop recommendations for achieving integration. Method: Huangzhong and Hualong counties in Qinghai province were studied as study sites, with only Huangzhong having implemented health system integration. Questionnaires, interviews, and health insurance records were sources of data. Social network analysis was employed to analyze integration, through structure measurement and effectiveness evaluation. Results: Health system integration in Huangzhong is higher than in Hualong, so is system effectiveness. The patient referral network in Hualong has more “leapfrog” referrals. The information sharing networks in both counties are larger than the other types of networks. The average distance in the joint training network of Huangzhong is less than in Hualong. Meanwhile, there are deficiencies common to both systems. Conclusion: Both county health systems have strengths and limitations regarding system integration. The use of medical consortia in Huangzhong has contributed to system effectiveness. Future research might consider alternative more context specific models of health system integration. PMID:28316541

  2. Analyzing the Effect of Web-Based Instruction Applications to School Culture within Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakiroglu, Unal; Akkan, Yasar; Guven, Bulent

    2012-01-01

    Determining the reflections of technology integration applications that are to be performed in our schools is important to light the way of first steps of integration. In this research, the effect of a web-based instruction environment used by 31 different teachers in a high school to school culture is set forth. The school culture is analyzed…

  3. Application of integrative information system improves the quality and effectiveness of cancer case management

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei-Yi; Chang, Tsue-Rung

    2015-01-01

    Cancer case management provides consecutive care during the entire process through diagnosis to treatment and follow-up. We established an integrative information system with integration of the health information system. This integrative information system shortened the time spent on case screening, follow-up data management, and monthly data summarization of case managers. It also promoted the case follow-up rate. This integrative information system may improve the quality and effectiveness for cancer case management, one important part of cancer nursing. PMID:26089680

  4. Effects of Blackboard's Discussion Boards, Blogs and Wikis on Effective Integration and Development of Literacy Skills in EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alharbi, Majed

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of the online course tools, specifically discussion boards, blogs and wikis, the built-in facilities of Blackboard as computer-mediated communication integrated in e-learning environments on improving integrated reading and writing and on the attitudes of EFL college students towards literacy skills in…

  5. Hall-Effect Current Sensors For Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1989-01-01

    Built-in devices measure direct or alternating currents. Hall-effect sensors placed near constriction in conductor strip. Differential configuration reduces effects of stray magnetic fields, nonlinearities, and changes in temperature. Preliminary design studies and experiments with macroscopic commercial Hall-effect sensors conducted to assess feasibility, limitations, and need for further research and development of this concept. Potential applications include programmable power supplies and protective circuitry.

  6. Examining the Effects of Integrated Science, Engineering, and Nonfiction Literature on Student Learning in Elementary Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, Kristina Maruyama

    In recent years there has been an increasing emphasis on the integration of multiple disciplines in order to help prepare more students to better address the complex challenges they will face in the 21st century. Exposing students to an integrated and multidisciplinary approach will help them to better understand the connections between subjects instead of as individual and separate subjects. Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Integration has been suggested as an approach that would model a multidisciplinary approach while also offering authentic and meaningful learning experiences to students. However, there is limited research on STEM integration in the elementary classroom and additional research is needed to better define and explore the effects of this integration for both students and science educators. With the recent recommendations for teaching both science and engineering in elementary classrooms (NRC, 2012), two common models include teaching science through inquiry and teaching science through engineering-design pedagogies. This study will explore both of these models as it seeks to better understand one piece of the larger issue of STEM and STEM integration by examining how the integration of science, engineering, and nonfiction literature affects students learning in elementary classrooms. This study employed an embedded mixed methods design to measure the effects of this integration on student learning in four fifth grade classrooms from the same elementary school. The findings revealed that the students who participated in the nonfiction reading instruction that was integrated with their science instruction showed a greater increase in all measures of student learning in both science and reading when compared to the control students. The findings from the integrated science, engineering and nonfiction literature revealed similar findings with the treatment students showing a greater increase in the measures of student learning

  7. Prefrontal Cortex Organization: Dissociating Effects of Temporal Abstraction, Relational Abstraction, and Integration with fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Nee, Derek Evan; Jahn, Andrew; Brown, Joshua W.

    2014-01-01

    The functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) underlie higher-level cognition. Varying proposals suggest that the PFC is organized along a rostral-caudal gradient of abstraction with more abstract representations/processes associated with more rostral areas. However, the operational definition of abstraction is unclear. Here, we contrasted 2 prominent theories of abstraction—temporal and relational—using fMRI. We further examined whether integrating abstract rules—a function common to each theory—recruited the PFC independently of other abstraction effects. While robust effects of relational abstraction were present in the PFC, temporal abstraction effects were absent. Instead, we found activations specific to the integration of relational rules in areas previously shown to be associated with temporal abstraction. We suggest that previous effects of temporal abstraction were due to confounds with integration demands. We propose an integration framework to understand the functions of the PFC that resolves discrepancies in prior data. PMID:23563962

  8. Simulated effect on the compressive and shear mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates.

    PubMed

    He, Chenglin; Chen, Jinxiang; Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan; Zu, Qiao; Lu, Yun

    2015-05-01

    Honeycomb plates can be applied in many fields, including furniture manufacturing, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, transportation and aerospace. In the present study, we discuss the simulated effect on the mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates by investigating the compressive and shear failure modes and the mechanical properties of trabeculae reinforced by long or short fibers. The results indicate that the simulated effect represents approximately 80% and 70% of the compressive and shear strengths, respectively. Compared with existing bionic samples, the mass-specific strength was significantly improved. Therefore, this integrated honeycomb technology remains the most effective method for the trial manufacturing of bionic integrated honeycomb plates. The simulated effect of the compressive rigidity is approximately 85%. The short-fiber trabeculae have an advantage over the long-fiber trabeculae in terms of shear rigidity, which provides new evidence for the application of integrated bionic honeycomb plates.

  9. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL BIOMARKERS AS INTEGRATORS OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANT EXPOSURE AND EFFECTS IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Histopathology can be an extremely useful tool for assessing effects of chemical exposure in fish at the level of the individual. Although somewhat qualitative, the histopathological approach is especially valuable because observed lesions represent an integration of cumulative e...

  10. Preliminary analytical results using surface current integration for predicting effects of surface pillows on RF performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, C. E.; Strange, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the fast integral RF evaluation (FIRE) program is presented. This program uses surface current integration to evaluate RF performance of antenna systems. It requires modeling of surfaces in X, Y, Z coordinates along equally spaced X and Y grids with Z in the focal directon. The far field contribution of each surface point includes the effects of the Z-component of surface current which is not included in the aperture integration technique. Because of this, surface current integration is the most effective and inclusive technique for predicting RF performance on non-ideal reflectors. Results obtained from use of the FIRE program and an aperture integration program to predict RF performance of a LSS antenna concept are presented.

  11. Integrating Podcast Technology Effectively into Student Learning: A Reflexive Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jennifer; Nelson, Amanda; France, Derek; Woodland, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines undergraduate student perceptions of the learning utility of video podcasts. The perceived and actual effectiveness of the technology was assessed by written questionnaire, focus groups and assessment results. The podcasts were perceived as effective in supporting learning, largely by offering a flexible and visual learning…

  12. Gauge-invariant treatment of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect on general spherically symmetric spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Kenji

    2010-03-15

    On the basis of the Gerlach-Sengupta theory of gauge-invariant perturbations, a formula of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect for a central observer is derived on general spherically symmetric spacetimes. It will be useful for comparative studies of theoretical and observational aspects of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi cosmological models which have been noticed by explaining the apparent acceleration without cosmological constant.

  13. Space Radiation Effects and Hardness Assurance for Linear Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.

    2000-01-01

    New effects that complicate the application of linear devices in space are discussed, including enhanced damage at low dose rate and proton damage, which cause permanent degradation. Transients produced by protons and heavy ions are also discussed.

  14. Effects of Integrated Physical Exercises and Gestures on Preschool Children's Foreign Language Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavilidi, Myrto-Foteini; Okely, Anthony D.; Chandler, Paul; Cliff, Dylan P.; Paas, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that integrating human movement into a cognitive learning task can be effective for learning due to its cognitive and physiological effects. In this study, the learning effects of enacting words through whole-body movements (i.e., physical exercise) and part-body movements (i.e., gestures) were investigated in a foreign language…

  15. Osmotic tolerance limits and effects of cryoprotectants on the motility, plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity of rat sperm.

    PubMed

    Si, Wei; Benson, James D; Men, Hongsheng; Critser, John K

    2006-12-01

    Osmotic stress is an important factor that can result in cell damage during cryopreservation. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) isosmotic sperm cell volume; (2) osmotically inactive volume; (3) osmotic tolerance limits of rat sperm; and (4) the effects of addition and removal of glycerol (Gly), ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG) or dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) on rat sperm function. Sperm from Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. An electronic particle counter was used to measure the cell volume of rat sperm. Computer-assisted sperm motility analysis and flow-cytometric analysis were used to assess sperm motility, plasma membrane and acrosomal integrity. The isosmotic sperm cell volumes of the two strains were 37.0+/-0.1 and 36.2+/-0.2 microm(3), respectively. Rat sperm behaved as linear osmometers from 260 to 450 mOsm, and the osmotically inactive sperm volumes of the two strains were 79.8+/-1.5% and 81.4+/-2.2%, respectively. Rat sperm have very limited osmotic tolerances. The sperm motility and the sperm plasma membranes of both strains were sensitive to anisosmotic treatments, but the acrosomes of both strains were more sensitive to hyposmotic than hyperosmotic conditions. The one-step addition and removal of Me(2)SO showed the most deleterious effect on rat sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, and acrosomal integrity among the four cryoprotectants. These data characterizing rat sperm osmotic behavior, osmotic and cryoprotectant tolerance will be used to design cryopreservation protocols for rat sperm.

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management System 2011 Effectiveness Review and Declaration Report

    SciTech Connect

    Farren Hunt

    2011-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed an annual Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) effectiveness review per 48 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 970.5223-1, 'Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Work Planning and Execution.' The annual review assessed Integrated Safety Management (ISM) effectiveness, provided feedback to maintain system integrity, and helped identify target areas for focused improvements and assessments for fiscal year (FY) 2012. The information presented in this review of FY 2011 shows that the INL has performed many corrective actions and improvement activities, which are starting to show some of the desired results. These corrective actions and improvement activities will continue to help change culture that will lead to better implementation of defined programs, resulting in moving the Laboratory's performance from the categorization of 'Needs Improvement' to the desired results of 'Effective Performance.'

  17. The Effects of an Integrated Reading Comprehension Strategy: A Culturally Responsive Teaching Approach for Fifth-Grade Students' Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Yvonne N.; Fagan, Yvette M.

    2013-01-01

    The study evaluated the effects of the Integrated Reading Comprehension Strategy on two levels. The Integrated Reading Comprehension Strategy integrated story grammar instruction and story maps, prior knowledge and prediction method, and word webs through a culturally responsive teaching framework; the Integrated Reading Comprehension Strategy…

  18. Intra- and intermodal integration of discrepant visual and proprioceptive action effects.

    PubMed

    Ladwig, Stefan; Sutter, Christine; Müsseler, Jochen

    2013-12-01

    Integration of discrepant visual and proprioceptive action effects puts high demands on the human information processing system. The present study aimed to examine the integration mechanisms for the motor (Exp. 1) and visual modality (Exp. 2). According to theories of common coding, we assumed that visual as well as proprioceptive information is represented within the same cognitive domain and is therefore likely to affect each other (multisensory cross talk). Thus, apart from the often-confirmed visual dominance in multisensory integration, we asked about intra- and intermodal recall of either proprioceptive or visual information and whether there were any differences between the motor and visual modality. In a replication paradigm, we perturbed the relation between hand movements and cursor movements. The task required the (intra- vs. intermodal) replication of an initially performed (seen) hand (cursor) movement in a subsequent motor (visual) replication phase. First, mechanisms of integration were found to be dependent on the output modality. Visual action effects interfered the motor modality, but proprioceptive action effects did not have any effects on the visual modality. Second, however, intermodal integration was more susceptible to interference, and this was found to be independent from the output modality. Third, for the motor modality, the locus of perturbation (perturbation of cursor amplitude or perturbation of hand amplitude) was irrelevant, but for the visual modality, perturbation of hand amplitudes reduced the cross talk. Tool use is one field of application of these kinds of results, since the optimized integration of conflicting action effects is a precondition for using tools successfully.

  19. Analyzing the effect of integrating riser/mooring line design

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, P.; Chandwani, R.; Larsen, I.

    1996-12-31

    The design of riser and mooring systems for a floating production system usually assumes uncoupled behavior of the two systems, and each system is analyzed for the effects of the vessel response given as input. In certain situations, such as for a floating production system, the presence of the risers can affect natural periods, damping, and slow drift response of the vessel thereby influencing the system design. This paper discusses a method for analyzing the coupled riser/mooring system with emphasis on the effect of the risers on the total system behavior.

  20. Cost-effective monolithic and hybrid integration for metro and long-haul applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Rick; Carter, Andy; Betty, Ian; Simmons, Timothy

    2003-12-01

    Today's telecommunication market is characterized by conservative business practices: tight management of costs, low risk investing and incremental upgrades, rather than the more freewheeling approach taken a few years ago. Optimizing optical components for the current and near term market involves substantial integration, but within particular bounds. The emphasis on evolution, in particular, has led to increased standardization of functions and so created extensive opportunities for integrated product offerings. The same standardization that enables commercially successful integrated functions also changes the competitive environment, and changes the emphasis for component development; shifting the innovation priority from raw performance to delivering the most effective integrated products. This paper will discuss, with specific examples from our transmitter, receiver and passives product families, our understanding of the issues based on extensive experience in delivering high end integrated products to the market, and the direction it drives optical components.

  1. Effects of solar cell environment on contact integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1993-01-01

    The III-V semiconductors react extremely rapidly with most commonly used contact metallizations. This precludes the use of elevated temperatures in the contact formation process for solar cells and other shallow junction devices. These devices must rely upon contact metallizations that are sufficiently conductive in their 'as-fabricated' state. However, while there are a number of non-sintered metallizations that have acceptable characteristics, the lack of a sintering step makes them vulnerable to a variety of environmentally induced degradation processes. The degrading effects resulting from the exposure of unsintered devices to a humid environment and to a vacuum (space) environment are described. It is shown, further, that these effects are magnified by the presence of mechanical damage in the contact metallization. The means to avoid or prevent these degrading interactions are presented.

  2. Polymer integrated waveguide optical biosensor by using spectral splitting effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaonan; Han, Xiuyou; Shao, Yuchen; Wu, Zhenlin; Liang, Yuxin; Teng, Jie; Bo, Shuhui; Morthier, Geert; Zhao, Mingshan

    2017-02-01

    The polymer waveguide optical biosensor based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) by using spectral splitting effect is investigated. The MZI based biosensor has two unequal width sensing arms. With the different mode dispersion responses of the two-arm waveguides to the cladding refractive index change, the spectral splitting effect of the output interference spectrum is obtained, inducing a very high sensitivity. The influence of the different mode dispersions between the two-arm waveguides on the spectral splitting characteristic is analyzed. By choosing different lengths of the two unequal width sensing arms, the initial dip wavelength of the interference spectrum and the spectral splitting range can be controlled flexibly. The polymer waveguide optical biosensor is designed, and its sensing property is analyzed. The results show that the sensitivity of the polymer waveguide optical biosensor by using spectral splitting effect is as high as 104 nm/RIU, with an improvement of 2-3 orders of magnitude compared with the slot waveguide based microring biosensor.

  3. Design of a novel integrated position sensor based on Hall effects for linear oscillating actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyi; Yan, Liang; Jiao, Zongxia

    2015-07-01

    Linear oscillating actuator provides linear reciprocate motion directly without other auxiliary components, which is suitable for high integration applications in aerospace industry. Accurate position control is essential for linear oscillating motor and relies on concise measurement of mover position. However, most position measurements are dependent on external complicated sensors, which hinders further integration of linear oscillating actuation system. In this paper, a novel position sensing system for linear oscillating actuator based on Hall effects is proposed to achieve accurate and high integration measurement simultaneously. Axial sensing magnetic field with approximately linear relationship with position is created for direct and convenient measurement. Analytical model of sensing magnetic field is set up for optimization and validated by finite element method and experimental results. Finally, sensing magnets are integrated into motor prototype for experiments. Dynamic position results are tested in experiments and prove to be effective and accurate for position sensing with short-stroke.

  4. Design of a novel integrated position sensor based on Hall effects for linear oscillating actuator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyi; Yan, Liang; Jiao, Zongxia

    2015-07-01

    Linear oscillating actuator provides linear reciprocate motion directly without other auxiliary components, which is suitable for high integration applications in aerospace industry. Accurate position control is essential for linear oscillating motor and relies on concise measurement of mover position. However, most position measurements are dependent on external complicated sensors, which hinders further integration of linear oscillating actuation system. In this paper, a novel position sensing system for linear oscillating actuator based on Hall effects is proposed to achieve accurate and high integration measurement simultaneously. Axial sensing magnetic field with approximately linear relationship with position is created for direct and convenient measurement. Analytical model of sensing magnetic field is set up for optimization and validated by finite element method and experimental results. Finally, sensing magnets are integrated into motor prototype for experiments. Dynamic position results are tested in experiments and prove to be effective and accurate for position sensing with short-stroke.

  5. Broad knowledge of information technologies: a prerequisite for the effective management of the integrated information system

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, H.B.

    1980-09-01

    There is a trend towards the bringing together of various information technologies into integrated information systems. The managers of these total systems therefore must be familiar with each of the component technologies and how they may be combined into a total information system. To accomplish this, the effective manager should first define the overall system as an integrated flow of information with each step identified; then, the alternate technologies applicable to each step may be selected. Methods of becoming technologically aware are suggested and examples of integrated systems are discussed.

  6. One-dimensional ultracold atomic gases: Impact of the effective range on integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Tom; Pricoupenko, Ludovic

    2016-02-01

    Three identical bosons or fermions are considered in the limit of zero-range interactions and finite effective range. By using a two-channel model, we show that these systems are not integrable and that the wave function verifies specific continuity conditions at the contact of three particles. This last feature permits us to solve a contradiction brought by the contact model which can lead to an opposite result concerning the integrability issue. For fermions, the vicinity of integrability is characterized by large deviations with respect to the predictions of the Bethe ansatz.

  7. Integration of the Equations of Classical Electrode-Effect Theory with Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, A. V.; Leont'ev, N. V.; Terent'ev, A. M.; Umnikov, E. D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is devoted to an analytical study of the one-dimensional stationary system of equations for modeling of the electrode effect in the Earth's atmospheric layer with aerosols. New integrals of the system are derived. Using these integrals, the expressions for solutions of the system and estimates of the electrode layer's thickness as a function of the aerosol concentration are obtained for numerical parameters close to real.

  8. Goal setting: an integral component of effective diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Miller, Carla K; Bauman, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Goal setting is a widely used behavior change tool in diabetes education and training. Prior research found specific relatively difficult but attainable goals set within a specific timeframe improved performance in sports and at the workplace. However, the impact of goal setting in diabetes self-care has not received extensive attention. This review examined the mechanisms underlying behavioral change according to goal setting theory and evaluated the impact of goal setting in diabetes intervention studies. Eight studies were identified, which incorporated goal setting as the primary strategy to promote behavioral change in individual, group-based, and primary care settings among patients with type 2 diabetes. Improvements in diabetes-related self-efficacy, dietary intake, physical activity, and A1c were observed in some but not all studies. More systematic research is needed to determine the conditions and behaviors for which goal setting is most effective. Initial recommendations for using goal setting in diabetes patient encounters are offered.

  9. The welfare effects of integrating renewable energy into electricity markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamadrid, Alberto J.

    The challenges of deploying more renewable energy sources on an electric grid are caused largely by their inherent variability. In this context, energy storage can help make the electric delivery system more reliable by mitigating this variability. This thesis analyzes a series of models for procuring electricity and ancillary services for both individuals and social planners with high penetrations of stochastic wind energy. The results obtained for an individual decision maker using stochastic optimization are ambiguous, with closed form solutions dependent on technological parameters, and no consideration of the system reliability. The social planner models correctly reflect the effect of system reliability, and in the case of a Stochastic, Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow (S-SC-OPF or SuperOPF), determine reserve capacity endogenously so that system reliability is maintained. A single-period SuperOPF shows that including ramping costs in the objective function leads to more wind spilling and increased capacity requirements for reliability. However, this model does not reflect the inter temporal tradeoffs of using Energy Storage Systems (ESS) to improve reliability and mitigate wind variability. The results with the multiperiod SuperOPF determine the optimum use of storage for a typical day, and compare the effects of collocating ESS at wind sites with the same amount of storage (deferrable demand) located at demand centers. The collocated ESS has slightly lower operating costs and spills less wind generation compared to deferrable demand, but the total amount of conventional generating capacity needed for system adequacy is higher. In terms of the total system costs, that include the capital cost of conventional generating capacity, the costs with deferrable demand is substantially lower because the daily demand profile is flattened and less conventional generation capacity is then needed for reliability purposes. The analysis also demonstrates that the

  10. Wage differentials in Jordan: effects on integrated labour market.

    PubMed

    Share, M A

    1987-06-01

    The emigration of Jordanian workers has benefited the country by reducing the scale of unemployment that existed in the 1960s and early 1970s. In addition, workers' remittances have had a favorable effect on the Jordanian balance of payments and contributed to increases in wage rates and demands for labor. Any shortages of labor resulting from the emigration flow appear to have been offset by the importation of workers from neighboring countries. A sample survey encompassing 495 foreign workers in Jordan and 518 Jordanian workers indicates that immigrant workers' wages are below those of Jordanian workers and considerably below the wages that Jordanian workers earn abroad. The average monthly wage for the Jordanians in the sample was JD 193.03 compared to JD 132.93 for the immigrants--a 45% difference. Over half of the immigrants surveyed earned under JD 99/month, while only 26% of the Jordanian workers were in this low income category. In part this wage differential is caused by the high proportions of immigrant workers employed in the clerical and unskilled occupational groups, where they are paid only half the wages earned by Jordanians engaged in the same occupations. A similar differential was observed in the average amount of monthly remittances to home countries: in 1982, Jordanians working abroad remitted an average of JD 77.5/worker compared with JD 59/worker remitted by foreign workers employed in Jordan. On balance, it appears that Jordan is a net gainer from the process of labor import and export.

  11. Skylab program payload integration. Skylab film environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The effects of the Skylab environments on the 22 types of film used for data recording on Skylab were evaluated. Environmental histories and sensitometric curves for 114 rolls of film used for this evaluation are presented. Photographic parameters evaluated in detail were film fogging of black and white films, changes in maximum density of color film, latent image fading, and changes in film sensitivity. Other photographic and film physical anomalies such as electrostatic exposure, emulsion cracking, and reciprocity failure were also documented. Results based upon comparison of film sensitometric data for flight film with ground control film and ground test film are presented independently for each film type. The study showed that photographic film fulfilled the requirements of the Skylab applications in which it was used. Environmental film degradation, although present on almost every roll, did not preclude recording sufficient data to meet experiment requirements for all film, except film type SC-5. Specific conclusions are provided in the areas of further analyses, tests, and developments.

  12. An Integrated Process Model of Stereotype Threat Effects on Performance

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Michael; Forbes, Chad

    2008-01-01

    Research showing that activation of negative stereotypes can impair the performance of stigmatized individuals on a wide variety of tasks has proliferated. However, a complete understanding of the processes underlying these stereotype threat effects on behavior is still lacking. The authors examine stereotype threat in the context of research on stress arousal, vigilance, working memory, and self-regulation to develop a process model of how negative stereotypes impair performance on cognitive and social tasks that require controlled processing, as well as sensorimotor tasks that require automatic processing. The authors argue that stereotype threat disrupts performance via 3 distinct, yet interrelated, mechanisms: (a) a physiological stress response that directly impairs prefrontal processing, (b) a tendency to actively monitor performance, and (c) efforts to suppress negative thoughts and emotions in the service of self-regulation. These mechanisms combine to consume executive resources needed to perform well on cognitive and social tasks. The active monitoring mechanism disrupts performance on sensorimotor tasks directly. Empirical evidence for these assertions is reviewed, and implications for interventions designed to alleviate stereotype threat are discussed. PMID:18426293

  13. HIV, tuberculosis, and noncommunicable diseases: what is known about the costs, effects, and cost-effectiveness of integrated care?

    PubMed

    Hyle, Emily P; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Su, Amanda E; El-Sadr, Wafaa M; Freedberg, Kenneth A

    2014-09-01

    Unprecedented investments in health systems in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have resulted in more than 8 million individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Such individuals experience dramatically increased survival but are increasingly at risk of developing common noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Integrating clinical care for HIV, other infectious diseases, and NCDs could make health services more effective and provide greater value. Cost-effectiveness analysis is a method to evaluate the clinical benefits and costs associated with different health care interventions and offers guidance for prioritization of investments and scale-up, especially as resources are increasingly constrained. We first examine tuberculosis and HIV as 1 example of integrated care already successfully implemented in several LMICs; we then review the published literature regarding cervical cancer and depression as 2 examples of NCDs for which integrating care with HIV services could offer excellent value. Direct evidence of the benefits of integrated services generally remains scarce; however, data suggest that improved effectiveness and reduced costs may be attained by integrating additional services with existing HIV clinical care. Further investigation into clinical outcomes and costs of care for NCDs among people living with HIV in LMICs will help to prioritize specific health care services by contributing to an understanding of the affordability and implementation of an integrated approach.

  14. Effects of coffee management on deforestation rates and forest integrity.

    PubMed

    Hylander, Kristoffer; Nemomissa, Sileshi; Delrue, Josefien; Enkosa, Woldeyohannes

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge about how forest margins are utilized can be crucial for a general understanding of changes in forest cover, forest structure, and biodiversity across landscapes. We studied forest-agriculture transitions in southwestern Ethiopia and hypothesized that the presence of coffee (Coffea arabica)decreases deforestation rates because of coffee's importance to local economies and its widespread occurrence in forests and forest margins. Using satellite images and elevation data, we compared changes in forest cover over 37 years (1973-2010) across elevations in 2 forest-agriculture mosaic landscapes (1100 km(2) around Bonga and 3000 km(2) in Goma-Gera). In the field in the Bonga area, we determined coffee cover and forest structure in 40 forest margins that differed in time since deforestation. Both the absolute and relative deforestation rates were lower at coffee-growing elevations compared with at higher elevations (-10/20% vs. -40/50% comparing relative rates at 1800 m asl and 2300-2500 m asl, respectively). Within the coffee-growing elevation, the proportion of sites with high coffee cover (>20%) was significantly higher in stable margins (42% of sites that had been in the same location for the entire period) than in recently changed margins (0% of sites where expansion of annual crops had changed the margin). Disturbance level and forest structure did not differ between sites with 30% or 3% coffee. However, a growing body of literature on gradients of coffee management in Ethiopia reports coffee's negative effects on abundances of forest-specialist species. Even if the presence of coffee slows down the conversion of forest to annual-crop agriculture, there is a risk that an intensification of coffee management will still threaten forest biodiversity, including the genetic diversity of wild coffee. Conservation policy for Ethiopian forests thus needs to develop strategies that acknowledge that forests without coffee production may have higher deforestation

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management System FY 2012 Effectiveness Review and Declaration Report

    SciTech Connect

    Farren Hunt

    2012-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed an Annual Effectiveness Review of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), per 48 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 970.5223 1, “Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Work Planning and Execution.” The annual review assessed Integrated Safety Management (ISM) effectiveness, provided feedback to maintain system integrity, and identified target areas for focused improvements and assessments for fiscal year (FY) 2013. Results of the FY 2012 annual effectiveness review demonstrated that the INL’s ISMS program was significantly strengthened. Actions implemented by the INL demonstrate that the overall Integrated Safety Management System is sound and ensures safe and successful performance of work while protecting workers, the public, and environment. This report also provides several opportunities for improvement that will help further strengthen the ISM Program and the pursuit of safety excellence. Demonstrated leadership and commitment, continued surveillance, and dedicated resources have been instrumental in maturing a sound ISMS program. Based upon interviews with personnel, reviews of assurance activities, and analysis of ISMS process implementation, this effectiveness review concludes that ISM is institutionalized and is “Effective”.

  16. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from Path-Integral Free Energy Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Gao, J

    2016-01-01

    Path-integral free energy perturbation (PI-FEP) theory is presented to directly determine the ratio of quantum mechanical partition functions of different isotopologs in a single simulation. Furthermore, a double averaging strategy is used to carry out the practical simulation, separating the quantum mechanical path integral exactly into two separate calculations, one corresponding to a classical molecular dynamics simulation of the centroid coordinates, and another involving free-particle path-integral sampling over the classical, centroid positions. An integrated centroid path-integral free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM, or simply, PI-FEP) method along with bisection sampling was summarized, which provides an accurate and fast convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. The PI-FEP method is illustrated by a number of applications, to highlight the computational precision and accuracy, the rule of geometrical mean in kinetic isotope effects, enhanced nuclear quantum effects in enzyme catalysis, and protein dynamics on temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects.

  17. Effective descriptions of complex quantum systems: path integrals and operator ordering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckern, U.; Gruber, M. J.; Schwab, P.

    2005-09-01

    [Dedicated to Bernhard Mühlschlegel on the occasion ofhis 80th birthday]We study certain aspects of the effective, occasionally called collective, description of complex quantum systems within the framework of the path integral formalism, in which the environment is integrated out. Generalising the standard Feynman-Vernon Caldeira-Leggett model to include a non-linear coupling between particle and environment, and considering a particular spectral density of the coupling, a coordinate-dependent mass (or velocity-dependent potential) is obtained. The related effective quantum theory, which depends on the proper discretisation of the path integral, is derived and discussed. As a result, we find that in general a simple effective low-energy Hamiltonian, in which only the coordinate-dependent mass enters, cannot be formulated. The quantum theory of weakly coupled superconductors and the quantum dynamics of vortices in Josephson junction arrays are physical examples where these considerations, in principle, are of relevance.

  18. [Sensory integration: benefits and effectiveness of therapeutic management in sensory processing disorders].

    PubMed

    Tudela-Torras, M; Abad-Mas, L; Tudela-Torras, E

    2017-02-24

    Today, the fact that sensory integration difficulties with a neurological basis exist and that they seriously condition the development of those individuals who suffer from them is widely accepted and acknowledged as being obvious by the vast majority of professionals working in the field of community healthcare. However, less is known and there is more controversy about effective treatments that can be applied to them. This is because many professionals criticise the fact that there is not enough scientific evidence to prove, both quantitatively and empirically, the outcomes of the interventions implemented as alternatives to pharmacological therapy. Consequently, when the symptoms and repercussions on the quality of life deriving from a distorted sensory integration are really disabling for the person, pharmacological treatment is used as the only possible approach, with the side effects that this entails. The reason for this is largely the fact that little is known about other effective therapeutic approaches, such as occupational therapy based on sensory integration.

  19. Semantic Integration and Age of Acquisition Effects in Code-Blend Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Emmorey, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Semantic and lexical decision tasks were used to investigate the mechanisms underlying code-blend facilitation: the finding that hearing bimodal bilinguals comprehend signs in American Sign Language (ASL) and spoken English words more quickly when they are presented together simultaneously than when each is presented alone. More robust facilitation effects were observed for semantic decision than for lexical decision, suggesting that lexical integration of signs and words within a code-blend occurs primarily at the semantic level, rather than at the level of form. Early bilinguals exhibited greater facilitation effects than late bilinguals for English (the dominant language) in the semantic decision task, possibly because early bilinguals are better able to process early visual cues from ASL signs and use these to constrain English word recognition. Comprehension facilitation via semantic integration of words and signs is consistent with co-speech gesture research demonstrating facilitative effects of gesture integration on language comprehension. PMID:26657077

  20. Integral eigenmode analysis of shear flow effects on the ion temperature gradient mode

    SciTech Connect

    Artun, M.; Reynders, J.V.M.; Tang, W.M.

    1993-07-01

    Previous numerical and analytic kinetic studies have investigated the influence of velocity shear on the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode. These studies relied on a differential approximation to study mode structures with k{sub {perpendicular}}{rho}{sub i} {much_lt} 1. A recently developed gyrokinetic integral code is here used to explore the effects of sheared flows on the ITG mode for arbitrary values of k{sub {perpendicular}}{rho}{sub i}. It is found that both the mode structure and eigenfrequencies predicted by the integral code can differ from the results obtained by the differential approach, even in the k{sub y}{rho}{sub i} {much_lt} 1 limit. Although some trends predicted by the differential approximation are recovered by the integral approach, there are some significant differences. For example, the slight destabilizing effect observed for small values of the perpendicular velocity shear at k{sub {perpendicular}}{rho}{sub i} {much_lt} 1 is amplified when the integral approach is applied. In dealing with the higher radial eigenmodes, which can often exhibit the largest growth rates, it is emphasized that their finer radial structure usually dictates that the integral equation analysis is required. Results from the integral code are presented together with comparisons with results from the differential approach.

  1. Effect of repeated sequential ejaculation on sperm DNA integrity in subfertile males with asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Hussein, T M; Elariny, A F; Elabd, M M; Elgarem, Y F; Elsawy, M M

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the possible beneficial effect of repeated sequential ejaculation on sperm DNA integrity in subfertile males and its possible implementation in assisted reproduction. The study included 20 infertile males with idiopathic asthenozoospermia or oligoasthenozoospermia. They underwent detailed history taking, complete clinical assessment and hormonal assessment. Patients were asked to bring two semen samples (taken within 1-3 h). Two consecutive samples were assessed with regard to semen volume, sperm count, motility grading, and morphology and sperm DNA integrity using the comet assay. There was a significant improvement in the sperm motility pattern and DNA integrity in the second sample in comparison with the first sample. Therefore, it is concluded that due to its positive impact on sperm motility and DNA integrity, repeated sequential ejaculation is recommended in subfertile males with idiopathic asthenozoospermia who pursue assisted reproduction.

  2. Integral formula for the effective diffusion coefficient in two-dimensional channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinay, Pavol

    2016-07-01

    The effective one-dimensional description of diffusion in two-dimensional channels of varying cross section is revisited. The effective diffusion coefficient D (x ) , extending Fick-Jacobs equation, depending on the longitudinal coordinate x , is derived here without use of scaling of the transverse coordinates. The result of the presented method is an integral formula for D (x ) , calculating its value at x as an integral of contributions from the neighboring positions x' depending on h (x') , a function shaping the channel. Unlike the standard formulas based on the scaling, the new proposed formula also describes D (x ) correctly near the cusps, or in wider channels.

  3. Integrated cost-effectiveness analysis of agri-environmental measures for water quality.

    PubMed

    Balana, Bedru B; Jackson-Blake, Leah; Martin-Ortega, Julia; Dunn, Sarah

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents an application of integrated methodological approach for identifying cost-effective combinations of agri-environmental measures to achieve water quality targets. The methodological approach involves linking hydro-chemical modelling with economic costs of mitigation measures. The utility of the approach was explored for the River Dee catchment in North East Scotland, examining the cost-effectiveness of mitigation measures for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) pollutants. In-stream nitrate concentration was modelled using the STREAM-N and phosphorus using INCA-P model. Both models were first run for baseline conditions and then their effectiveness for changes in land management was simulated. Costs were based on farm income foregone, capital and operational expenditures. The costs and effects data were integrated using 'Risk Solver Platform' optimization in excel to produce the most cost-effective combination of measures by which target nutrient reductions could be attained at a minimum economic cost. The analysis identified different combination of measures as most cost-effective for the two pollutants. An important aspect of this paper is integration of model-based effectiveness estimates with economic cost of measures for cost-effectiveness analysis of land and water management options. The methodological approach developed is not limited to the two pollutants and the selected agri-environmental measures considered in the paper; the approach can be adapted to the cost-effectiveness analysis of any catchment-scale environmental management options.

  4. Longitudinal and Integrative Tests of Family Stress Model Effects on Mexican-Origin Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    White, Rebecca M. B.; Liu, Yu; Nair, Rajni L.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The family stress model represents a common framework through which to examine the effects of environmental stressors on adolescent adjustment. The model suggests that economic and neighborhood stressors influence youth adjustment via disruptions to parenting. Incorporating integrative developmental theory, we examined the degree to which parents’ cultural value orientations mitigated the effects of stressors on parenting disruptions and the degree to which environmental adversity qualified the effect of parenting on adolescent adjustment. We tested the hypothesized Integrative Family Stress Model longitudinally in a sample of mother-youth dyads (N = 749) and father-youth dyads (N = 467) from Mexican origin families, across three times points spanning early to middle adolescence. Providing the first longitudinal evidence of family stress mediated effects, mothers’ perceptions of economic pressure were associated with increases in adolescent externalizing symptoms five years later via intermediate increases in harsh parenting. The remaining findings supported the notion that integrative developmental theory can inform family stress model hypothesis testing that is culturally and contextually relevant for wide range of diverse families and youth. For example, fathers’ perceptions of economic pressure and neighborhood danger had important implications for adolescent internalizing, via reductions in paternal warmth, but only at certain levels of neighborhood adversity. Mothers’ familism value orientations mitigated the effects of economic pressure on maternal warmth, protecting their adolescents from experiencing developmental costs associated with environmental stressors. Results are discussed in terms of identifying how integrative developmental theory intersects with the family stress model to set diverse youth on different developmental pathways. PMID:25751100

  5. Longitudinal and integrative tests of family stress model effects on Mexican origin adolescents.

    PubMed

    White, Rebecca M B; Liu, Yu; Nair, Rajni L; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2015-05-01

    The family stress model represents a common framework through which to examine the effects of environmental stressors on adolescent adjustment. The model suggests that economic and neighborhood stressors influence youth adjustment via disruptions to parenting. Incorporating integrative developmental theory, we examined the degree to which parents' cultural value orientations mitigated the effects of stressors on parenting disruptions and the degree to which environmental adversity qualified the effect of parenting on adolescent adjustment. We tested the hypothesized integrative family stress model longitudinally in a sample of mother-youth dyads (N = 749) and father-youth dyads (N = 467) from Mexican origin families, across 3 times points spanning early to middle adolescence. Providing the first longitudinal evidence of family stress mediated effects, mothers' perceptions of economic pressure were associated with increases in adolescent externalizing symptoms 5 years later via intermediate increases in harsh parenting. The remaining findings supported the notion that integrative developmental theory can inform family stress model hypothesis testing that is culturally and contextually relevant for a wide range of diverse families and youth. For example, fathers' perceptions of economic pressure and neighborhood danger had important implications for adolescent internalizing, via reductions in paternal warmth, but only at certain levels of neighborhood adversity. Mothers' familism value orientations mitigated the effects of economic pressure on maternal warmth, protecting their adolescents from experiencing developmental costs associated with environmental stressors. Results are discussed in terms of identifying how integrative developmental theory intersects with the family stress model to set diverse youth on different developmental pathways.

  6. The integrated blast effects sensor suite: a rapidly developed, complex, system of systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Brian; Medda, Alessio; Woods, Douglas; Phelps, Shean; Fain, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Spurned by the increasing concern and consciousness of traumatic brain injuries in deployed U.S. service members, the U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force sought help from the Georgia Tech Research Institute to rapidly develop and deploy a system capable of gathering relevant soldier-centric data-the Integrated Blast Effects Sensor Suite. To meet aggressive program milestones and requirements, Georgia Tech Research Institute engaged in rapid systems engineering efforts focused on leveraging iterative development and test methodologies. Ultimately, an integrated system of systems composed of vehicle systems, soldier-worn headset and torso systems, and data retrieval systems was deployed to troops in Afghanistan for an operational assessment. The Integrated Blast Effects Sensor Suite development process and parallel efforts investigating injury dosimetry methodologies have yielded unique findings and lessons learned, which should be incorporated into future evolutions of similar systems.

  7. Integrated effects of air pollution and climate change on forests: a northern hemisphere perspective.

    PubMed

    Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Omasa, Kenji; Paoletti, Elena

    2007-06-01

    Many air pollutants and greenhouse gases have common sources, contribute to radiative balance, interact in the atmosphere, and affect ecosystems. The impacts on forest ecosystems have been traditionally treated separately for air pollution and climate change. However, the combined effects may significantly differ from a sum of separate effects. We review the links between air pollution and climate change and their interactive effects on northern hemisphere forests. A simultaneous addressing of the air pollution and climate change effects on forests may result in more effective research, management and monitoring as well as better integration of local, national and global environmental policies.

  8. On Integral Invariants for Effective 3-D Motion Trajectory Matching and Recognition.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhanpeng; Li, Youfu

    2016-02-01

    Motion trajectories tracked from the motions of human, robots, and moving objects can provide an important clue for motion analysis, classification, and recognition. This paper defines some new integral invariants for a 3-D motion trajectory. Based on two typical kernel functions, we design two integral invariants, the distance and area integral invariants. The area integral invariants are estimated based on the blurred segment of noisy discrete curve to avoid the computation of high-order derivatives. Such integral invariants for a motion trajectory enjoy some desirable properties, such as computational locality, uniqueness of representation, and noise insensitivity. Moreover, our formulation allows the analysis of motion trajectories at a range of scales by varying the scale of kernel function. The features of motion trajectories can thus be perceived at multiscale levels in a coarse-to-fine manner. Finally, we define a distance function to measure the trajectory similarity to find similar trajectories. Through the experiments, we examine the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed integral invariants and find that they can capture the motion cues in trajectory matching and sign recognition satisfactorily.

  9. Integration of a waveguide self-electrooptic effect device and a vertically coupled interconnect waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2008-02-26

    A self-electrooptic effect device ("SEED") is integrated with waveguide interconnects through the use of vertical directional couplers. Light initially propagating in the interconnect waveguide is vertically coupled to the active waveguide layer of the SEED and, if the SEED is in the transparent state, the light is coupled back to the interconnect waveguide.

  10. Grasping the Dynamic Complexity of Team Learning: An Integrative Model for Effective Team Learning in Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decuyper, Stefan; Dochy, Filip; Van den Bossche, Piet

    2010-01-01

    In this article we present an integrative model of team learning. Literature shows that effective team learning requires the establishment of a dialogical space amongst team members, in which communicative behaviours such as "sharing", "co-construction" and "constructive conflict" are balanced. However, finding this balance is not enough.…

  11. The Effect of Auditory Integration Training on the Working Memory of Adults with Different Learning Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Tamara E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of auditory integration training (AIT) on a component of the executive function of working memory; specifically, to determine if learning preferences might have an interaction with AIT to increase the outcome for some learners. The question asked by this quantitative pretest posttest design is…

  12. Effectiveness of an Integrated Phonological Awareness Approach for Children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, Brigid C.; Gillon, Gail T.; Dodd, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of an integrated phonological awareness approach for children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Change in speech, phonological awareness, letter knowledge, word decoding, and spelling skills were examined. A controlled multiple single-subject design was employed. Twelve children aged 4-7 years with…

  13. Effective Teaching of the Physical Design of Integrated Circuits Using Educational Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Sicard, Etienne; Ben Dhia, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the strategies used for effective teaching and skill development in integrated circuit (IC) design using project-based learning (PBL) methodologies. It presents the contexts in which these strategies are applied to IC design courses at the University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia, and the National Institute of Applied…

  14. An Integrative Model of Scholastic Judgments: Pupils' Characteristics, Class Context, Halo Effect and Internal Attributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dompnier, Benoit; Pansu, Pascal; Bressoux, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes a model that integrates some of the determinants of scholastic judgment. The model is based on the assumption that a teacher's judgment in a particular discipline is influenced by different variables: the pupil's actual performance in the discipline, his/her actual performance in other disciplines (halo effect), the average…

  15. Innovation and Integration: Case Studies of Effective Teacher Practices in the Use of Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Raymond Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Previous research conducted on the use of handheld computers in K-12 education has focused on how handheld computer use affects student motivation, engagement, and productivity. These four case studies sought to identify effective teacher practices in the integration of handhelds into the curriculum and the factors that affect those practices. The…

  16. Effects of Various Types of Situps on Integrated MAP's of the Abdominal Musculature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Larry

    The electrical activity of the abdominal muscles was tested during situps to determine the effect upon integrated muscle action potential (MAP). The following types of situps were used in testing 18 college males: (1) trunk curls; (2) AAHPER situp; (3) YMCA situp; (4) modified AAHPER situp; and (5) modified YMCA situp. All situps were performed…

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF DATA VARIABILITY AND UNCERTAINTY: HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENTS IN THE INTEGRATED RISK INFORMATION SYSTEM (IRIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to a Congressional directive contained in HR 106-379 regarding EPA's appropriations for FY2000, EPA has undertaken an evaluation of the characterization of data variability and uncertainty in its Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health effects information dat...

  18. Effects of the Integrated Online Advance Organizer Teaching Materials on Students' Science Achievement and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korur, Fikret; Toker, Sacip; Eryilmaz, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This two-group quasi-experimental study investigated the effects of the Online Advance Organizer Concept Teaching Material (ONACOM) integrated with inquiry teaching and expository teaching methods. Grade 7 students' posttest performances on the light unit achievement and light unit attitude tests controlled for gender, previous semester science…

  19. Effect of Music-Integrated Instruction on First Graders' Reading Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Kerry G.

    2012-01-01

    The study examined music-integrated (MI) instruction, framed by automatic information processing theory and elements of prosody. A quasi-experimental, pre- and posttest design was utilized to ascertain the effect of MI instruction on reading fluency among first grade students. Subjects were students in two public elementary schools in Georgia. To…

  20. An empirical investigation of the efficiency effects of integrated care models in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Oliver; Rapold, Roland; Flatscher-Thöni, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This study investigates the efficiency gains of integrated care models in Switzerland, since these models are regarded as cost containment options in national social health insurance. These plans generate much lower average health care expenditure than the basic insurance plan. The question is, however, to what extent these total savings are due to the effects of selection and efficiency. Methods The empirical analysis is based on data from 399,274 Swiss residents that constantly had compulsory health insurance with the Helsana Group, the largest health insurer in Switzerland, covering the years 2006–2009. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the different integrated care models, we apply an econometric approach with a mixed-effects model. Results Our estimations indicate that the efficiency effects of integrated care models on health care expenditure are significant. However, the different insurance plans vary, revealing the following efficiency gains per model: contracted capitated model 21.2%, contracted non-capitated model 15.5% and telemedicine model 3.7%. The remaining 8.5%, 5.6% and 22.5%, respectively, of the variation in total health care expenditure can be attributed to the effects of selection. Conclusions Integrated care models have the potential to improve care for patients with chronic diseases and concurrently have a positive impact on health care expenditure. We suggest policy-makers improve the incentives for patients with chronic diseases within the existing regulations providing further potential for cost-efficiency of medical care. PMID:22371691

  1. Effectiveness of Word Solving: Integrating Morphological Problem-Solving within Comprehension Instruction for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Amanda P.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the effectiveness of integrating morphological instruction within comprehension strategy instruction. Participants were 203 students (N = 117 fifth-grade; 86 sixth-grade) from four urban schools who were randomly assigned to the intervention (N = 110; morphological problem-solving within comprehension strategy instruction) or…

  2. Translational researches require effective protocols for knowledge and technology transfer and integration.

    PubMed

    Omidi, Yadollah

    2011-01-01

    Integration of several disciplines (nonclinical, preclinical and clinical researches) during drug discovery and development through learning and confirmation process needs a dynamic process; "translational medicine" (TM) to give a holistic understanding of the entire process. To achieve the highest impacts, however, effective standard protocols need to be performed.

  3. Tiered Models of Integrated Academic and Behavioral Support: Effect of Implementation Level on Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noltemeyer, Amity; Sansosti, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study examined (a) Integrated Systems Model (ISM) implementation levels, and (b) the effect of implementation of the academic and behavioral components of ISM on student academic outcomes. Participants included 2,660 students attending six suburban elementary schools. Hierarchical linear regression was conducted using a control…

  4. Elementary Teachers Integrate Music Activities into Regular Mathematics Lessons: Effects on Students' Mathematical Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Song; Capraro, Mary Margaret; Tillman, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents exploratory research investigating the way teachers integrate music into their regular mathematics lessons as well as the effects of music-mathematics interdisciplinary lessons on elementary school students' mathematical abilities of modeling, strategy and application. Two teachers and two classes of first grade and third…

  5. Integrating a Statewide Effectiveness Model with Quality Improvement Methods at Western Wisconsin Technical College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Daniel C.; And Others

    Since 1988, Western Wisconsin Technical College (WWTC) has taken a leadership role in integrating institutional effectiveness activities within the Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS). In December 1992, the WTCS Administrators Association and the WTCS State Board agreed to work with the University of Michigan's Community College Consortium…

  6. The Effectiveness of Lecture-Integrated, Web-Supported Case Studies in Large Group Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzawi, May; Dawson, Maureen M.

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of lecture-integrated and web-supported case studies in supporting a large and academically diverse group of undergraduate students was evaluated in the present study. Case studies and resource (web)-based learning were incorporated as two complementary interactive learning strategies into the traditional curriculum. A truncated…

  7. An Effective Model for Rapid Skills Acquisition through a Simulation-Based Integrated Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Aimee M.; Jackson, Melinda L.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the effectiveness of a theoretical-based integrated learning environment (ILE) for training non-traditional learners to perform the skills required to be successful in entry-level jobs. The ILE places instruction in a real-world, workplace context with realistic settings, characters, and storylines. The multimedia interface…

  8. Demonstrating the Effectiveness of an Integrated and Intensive Research Methods and Statistics Course Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pliske, Rebecca M.; Caldwell, Tracy L.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.; Taylor-Ritzler, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We developed a two-semester series of intensive (six-contact hours per week) behavioral research methods courses with an integrated statistics curriculum. Our approach includes the use of team-based learning, authentic projects, and Excel and SPSS. We assessed the effectiveness of our approach by examining our students' content area scores on the…

  9. Effects of Bloom-Forming Algae on Fouling of Integrated Membrane Systems in Seawater Desalination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladner, David Allen

    2009-01-01

    Combining low- and high-pressure membranes into an integrated membrane system is an effective treatment strategy for seawater desalination. Low-pressure microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes remove particulate material, colloids, and high-molecular-weight organics leaving a relatively foulant-free salt solution for treatment by…

  10. The Effect of Sensory Integration Treatment on Children with Multiple Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Din, Feng S.; Lodato, Donna M.

    Six children with multiple disabilities (ages 5 to 8) participated in this evaluation of the effect of sensory integration treatment on sensorimotor function and academic learning. The children had cognitive abilities ranging from sub-average to significantly sub-average, three were non-ambulatory, one had severe behavioral problems, and each…

  11. Isolated and Integrated Form-Focused Instruction: Effects on Different Types of L2 Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spada, Nina; Jessop, Lorena; Tomita, Yasuyo; Suzuki, Wataru; Valeo, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    In this study we compared the effects of two types of form-focused instruction (FFI) on second language (L2) learning and their potential contributions to the development of different types of L2 knowledge. Both types of instruction were pre-emptive in nature, that is planned and teacher generated. In Integrated FFI attention to form was embedded…

  12. Effect of Knowledge Integration Activities on Students' Perception of the Earth's Crust as a Cyclic System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kali, Yael; Orion, Nir; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2003-01-01

    Characterizes students' understanding of the rock cycle system. Examines effects of a knowledge integration activity on their system thinking. Interprets answers to an open-ended test using a systems thinking continuum ranging from a completely static view of the system to an understanding of the system's cyclic nature. Reports meaningful…

  13. Resin Composite Restorations: Effect of Energy Density on Properties and Marginal Integrity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    dissolving effect on gingival margin integrity at very low degrees of conversion. Gingival marginal defects were maximized at 25% of maximum...recommended lower limit of gingival margin acceptability in a bulk-filled resin composite restoration was created by 80% of maximum conversion, 73% of maximum...hardness and approximately 70% of maximum flexural strength and modulus in the gingival marginal area.

  14. The Integration of Literacy and Geography: The Arizona GeoLiteracy Program's Effect on Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinde, Elizabeth R.; Osborn Popp, Sharon E.; Dorn, Ronald I.; Ekiss, Gale Olp; Mater, Martha; Smith, Carl B.; Libbee, Michael

    2007-01-01

    To provide the first interstate quasi-experimental assessment on the power of content integration in building reading skills, the authors studied the effects on reading comprehension of GeoLiteracy--a K-8 package of 85 lessons that teaches geography in the context of practicing reading and writing skills. Ninety-six third through eighth grade…

  15. Data-Driven Decision Making in Community Colleges: An Integrative Model for Institutional Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callery, Claude Adam

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study identified the best practices utilized by community colleges to achieve systemic and cultural agreement in support of the integration of institutional effectiveness measures (key performance indicators) to inform decision making. In addition, the study identifies the relevant motives, organizational structure, and processes…

  16. Longitudinal and Integrative Tests of Family Stress Model Effects on Mexican Origin Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca M. B.; Liu, Yu; Nair, Rajni L.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The family stress model represents a common framework through which to examine the effects of environmental stressors on adolescent adjustment. The model suggests that economic and neighborhood stressors influence youth adjustment via disruptions to parenting. Incorporating integrative developmental theory, we examined the degree to which parents'…

  17. Effectiveness of Integrating Riddles in Teaching Mathematics among VIII Standard Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiyagu, K.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics is considered as dry subject and students do not find anything interesting in it. This impression about Mathematics can be reversed with the help of recreational activities in Mathematics. The present study tries to find out the effectiveness of integrating riddles in teaching mathematics among eighth standard students. Two equivalent…

  18. Effects of Integrated or Segregated Sport Participation on the Physical Self for Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ninot, G.; Bilard, J.; Delignieres, D.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The purpose was to examine the effects of the type of athletic programme (integrated vs. segregated) on the athletic domain of perceived competence and on general self-worth. Methods: Participants were 32 adolescent females with intellectual disabilities (ID), divided equally into four groups: (1) segregated swimming; (2) integrated…

  19. Effect of integrating straw into agricultural soils on soil infiltration and evaporation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiansheng; Liu, Changming; Zhang, Wanjun; Guo, Yunlong

    2012-01-01

    Soil water movement is a critical consideration for crop yield in straw-integrated fields. This study used an indoor soil column experiment to determine soil infiltration and evaporation characteristics in three forms of direct straw-integrated soils (straw mulching, straw mixing and straw inter-layering). Straw mulching is covering the land surface with straw. Straw mixing is mixing straw with the top 10 cm surface soil. Then straw inter-layering is placing straw at the 20 cm soil depth. There are generally good correlations among the mulch integration methods at p < 0.05, and with average errors/biases <10%. Straw mixing exhibited the best effect in terms of soil infiltration, followed by straw mulching. Due to over-burden weight-compaction effect, straw inter-layering somehow retarded soil infiltration. In terms of soil water evaporation, straw mulching exhibited the best effect. This was followed by straw mixing and then straw inter-layering. Straw inter-layering could have a long-lasting positive effect on soil evaporation as it limited the evaporative consumption of deep soil water. The responses of the direct straw integration modes to soil infiltration and evaporation could lay the basis for developing efficient water-conservation strategies. This is especially useful for water-scarce agricultural regions such as the arid/semi-arid regions of China.

  20. Effects of Varied Levels of Treatment Integrity on Appropriate Toy Manipulation in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groskreutz, Nicole C.; Groskreutz, Mark P.; Higbee, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the effects of varying the treatment integrity of a prompting procedure on appropriate toy manipulation in two preschool-aged children with autism. Following an assessment to identify toys with high levels of inappropriate toy manipulation, each of three toys was associated with implementation of the prompting procedure at a different…

  1. Effect of Topography on Learning Military Tactics - Integration of Generalized Intelligent Framework for Tutoring (GIFT) and Augmented REality Sandtable (ARES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    ARL-TR-7792 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Effect of Topography on Learning Military Tactics – Integration of...Laboratory Effect of Topography on Learning Military Tactics – Integration of Generalized Intelligent Framework for Tutoring (GIFT) and Augmented...DATES COVERED (From - To) February 2015–February 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effect of Topography on Learning Military Tactics – Integration of

  2. Facilitation of multisensory integration by the "unity effect" reveals that speech is special.

    PubMed

    Vatakis, Argiro; Ghazanfar, Asif A; Spence, Charles

    2008-07-29

    Whenever two or more sensory inputs are highly consistent in one or more dimension(s), observers will be more likely to perceive them as a single multisensory event rather than as separate unimodal events. For audiovisual speech, but not for other noncommunicative events, participants exhibit a "unity effect," whereby they are less sensitive to temporal asynchrony (i.e., that are more likely to bind the multisensory signals together) for matched (than for mismatched) speech events. This finding suggests that the modulation of multisensory integration by the unity effect in humans may be specific to speech. To test this hypothesis directly, we investigated whether the unity effect would also influence the multisensory integration of vocalizations from another primate species, the rhesus monkey. Human participants made temporal order judgments for both matched and mismatched audiovisual stimuli presented at a range of stimulus-onset asynchronies. The unity effect was examined with (1) a single call-type across two different monkeys, (2) two different call-types from the same monkey, (3) human versus monkey "cooing," and (4) speech sounds produced by a male and a female human. The results show that the unity effect only influenced participants' performance for the speech stimuli; no effect was observed for monkey vocalizations or for the human imitations of monkey calls. These findings suggest that the facilitation of multisensory integration by the unity effect is specific to human speech signals.

  3. Effects of using a posteriori methods for the conservation of integral invariants. [for weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takacs, Lawrence L.

    1988-01-01

    The nature and effect of using a posteriori adjustments to nonconservative finite-difference schemes to enforce integral invariants of the corresponding analytic system are examined. The method of a posteriori integral constraint restoration is analyzed for the case of linear advection, and the harmonic response associated with the a posteriori adjustments is examined in detail. The conservative properties of the shallow water system are reviewed, and the constraint restoration algorithm applied to the shallow water equations are described. A comparison is made between forecasts obtained using implicit and a posteriori methods for the conservation of mass, energy, and potential enstrophy in the complete nonlinear shallow-water system.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management System FY 2013 Effectiveness Review and Declaration Report

    SciTech Connect

    Farren Hunt

    2013-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed an Annual Effectiveness Review of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), per 48 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 970.5223 1, “Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Work Planning and Execution.” The annual review assessed Integrated Safety Management (ISM) effectiveness, provided feedback to maintain system integrity, and identified target areas for focused improvements and assessments for Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Results of the FY 2013 annual effectiveness review demonstrate that the INL’s ISMS program is “Effective” and continually improving and shows signs of being significantly strengthened. Although there have been unacceptable serious events in the past, there has also been significant attention, dedication, and resources focused on improvement, lessons learned and future prevention. BEA’s strategy of focusing on these improvements includes extensive action and improvement plans that include PLN 4030, “INL Sustained Operational Improvement Plan, PLN 4058, “MFC Strategic Excellence Plan,” PLN 4141, “ATR Sustained Excellence Plan,” and PLN 4145, “Radiological Control Road to Excellence,” and the development of LWP 20000, “Conduct of Research.” As a result of these action plans, coupled with other assurance activities and metrics, significant improvement in operational performance, organizational competence, management oversight and a reduction in the number of operational events is being realized. In short, the realization of the fifth core function of ISMS (feedback and continuous improvement) and the associated benefits are apparent.

  5. Asymptotic Effectiveness of the Event-Based Sampling according to the Integral Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Miskowicz, Marek

    2007-01-01

    A rapid progress in intelligent sensing technology creates new interest in a development of analysis and design of non-conventional sampling schemes. The investigation of the event-based sampling according to the integral criterion is presented in this paper. The investigated sampling scheme is an extension of the pure linear send-on-delta/level-crossing algorithm utilized for reporting the state of objects monitored by intelligent sensors. The motivation of using the event-based integral sampling is outlined. The related works in adaptive sampling are summarized. The analytical closed-form formulas for the evaluation of the mean rate of event-based traffic, and the asymptotic integral sampling effectiveness, are derived. The simulation results verifying the analytical formulas are reported. The effectiveness of the integral sampling is compared with the related linear send-on-delta/level-crossing scheme. The calculation of the asymptotic effectiveness for common signals, which model the state evolution of dynamic systems in time, is exemplified.

  6. Research on effects of baffle position in an integrating sphere on the luminous flux measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fangsheng; Li, Tiecheng; Yin, Dejin; Lai, Lei; Xia, Ming

    2016-09-01

    In the field of optical metrology, luminous flux is an important index to characterize the quality of electric light source. Currently, the majority of luminous flux measurement is based on the integrating sphere method, so measurement accuracy of integrating sphere is the key factor. There are plenty of factors affecting the measurement accuracy, such as coating, power and the position of light source. However, the baffle which is a key part of integrating sphere has important effects on the measurement results. The paper analyzes in detail the principle of an ideal integrating sphere. We use moving rail to change the relative position of baffle and light source inside the sphere. By experiments, measured luminous flux values at different distances between the light source and baffle are obtained, which we used to take analysis of the effects of different baffle position on the measurement. By theoretical calculation, computer simulation and experiment, we obtain the optimum position of baffle for luminous flux measurements. Based on the whole luminous flux measurement error analysis, we develop the methods and apparatus to improve the luminous flux measurement accuracy and reliability. It makes our unifying and transferring work of the luminous flux more accurate in East China and provides effective protection for our traceability system.

  7. Effects of an integrated problem-based learning and simulation course for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Sang Suk; Kim, Sung Hee

    2014-03-01

    The adaptability of high-fidelity simulations to multiple learning strategies is an essential feature of their effective use, however, little is known about the effects of integration simulations with problem-based learning. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of an integrated course with problem-based learning and simulation by evaluating college-based stress, student perceptions on their competence and small group learning, and comparing stress and student perceptions level by grade point average. One group post-test only design was employed with a cohort of 185 second year nursing students who were enrolled in a seven-block integrated circulo-respiratory course with problem-based learning and simulation. Nursing students evaluated their stress as moderate with the academic subdomain as the highest stressor. The students reported favorable student perceptions on competence and small group learning. Nursing students view problem-based learning with simulations-based learning favorably irrespective of their course grade. The results of this study indicate that integration of problem-based learning with simulation should be considered for broader application in nursing education.

  8. Vehicle integration effects on hypersonic waveriders. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles Edward, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The integration of a class of hypersonic high-lift configurations known as waveriders into hypersonic cruise vehicles was evaluated. Waveriders offer advantages in aerodynamic performance and propulsion/airframe integration (PAI) characteristics over conventional hypersonic shapes. A wind-tunnel model was developed which integrates realistic vehicle components with two waverider shapes, referred to as the 'straight-wing' and 'cranked-wing' shapes. Both shapes were conical-flow-derived waveriders at a design Mach number of 4.0. The cranked-wing shape was designed to provide advantages in subsonic performance and directional stability over conventional waveriders. Experimental data and limited computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions were obtained over a Mach number range of 2.3 to 4.63 at a Reynolds number of 2.0x10(exp 6) per foot. The CFD predictions and flow visualization data confirmed the shock attachment characteristics of the baseline waverider shapes and illustrated the waverider flow-field properties. Both CFD predictions and experimental data showed that no significant performance degradations occur at off-design Mach numbers for the waverider shapes and the integrated configurations. The experimental data showed that the effects of adding a realistic canopy were minimal. The effects of adding engine components were to increase the drag and thus degrade the aerodynamic performance of the configuration. A significant degradation in aerodynamic performance was observed when 0 degree control surfaces were added to close the blunt base of the waverider to a sharp trailing edge. A comparison of the fully-integrated waverider models to the baseline shapes showed that the performance was significantly degraded when all of the components were added to the waveriders. The fully-integrated configurations studied here do not offer significant performance advantages over conventional hypersonic vehicles, but still offer advantages in air-breathing propulsion

  9. Effects of midterm integration on state and trait anxiety in black and white elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D

    1979-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of stress associated with school integration on state and trait anxiety for 637 Black and White fourth- fifth- and sixth-grade children. A court-ordered integration plan resulted in the transfer of children from all-White and all-Black schools into integrated schools 2 months before the end of the school year. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC) was administered 1 week prior to the transfer and 6 weeks following transfer. Females who were transferred had higher state anxiety scores than nontransferred females, but there were no differences for males. Transferred Black and White children did not differ in state anxiety, but transferred Blacks were higher in trait anxiety than transferred Whites.

  10. Effect of shortening kraft pulping integrated with extended oxygen delignification on biorefinery process performance of eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Chunyun; Hu, Huichao; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the impact of shortening kraft pulping (KP) process integrated with extended oxygen delignification (OD) on the biorefinery process performance of eucalyptus. Data showed that using kraft pulps with high kappa number could improve the delignification efficiency of OD, reduce hexenuronic acid formation in kraft pulps. Pulp viscosity for a target kappa number of ∼10 was comparable to that obtained from conventional KP and OD process. The energy and alkali consumption in the integrated biorefinery process could be optimized when using a KP pulp with kappa number of ∼27. The process could minimize the overall methanol formation, but greater amounts of carbonate and oxalate were formed. The information from this study will be helpful to the future implementation of short-time KP integrated with extended OD process in actual pulp mill applications for biorefinery, aiming at further improvement in the biorefinery effectiveness of hardwood.

  11. Automated Code Engine for Graphical Processing Units: Application to the Effective Core Potential Integrals and Gradients.

    PubMed

    Song, Chenchen; Wang, Lee-Ping; Martínez, Todd J

    2016-01-12

    We present an automated code engine (ACE) that automatically generates optimized kernels for computing integrals in electronic structure theory on a given graphical processing unit (GPU) computing platform. The code generator in ACE creates multiple code variants with different memory and floating point operation trade-offs. A graph representation is created as the foundation of the code generation, which allows the code generator to be extended to various types of integrals. The code optimizer in ACE determines the optimal code variant and GPU configurations for a given GPU computing platform by scanning over all possible code candidates and then choosing the best-performing code candidate for each kernel. We apply ACE to the optimization of effective core potential integrals and gradients. It is observed that the best code candidate varies with differing angular momentum, floating point precision, and type of GPU being used, which shows that the ACE may be a powerful tool in adapting to fast evolving GPU architectures.

  12. Effect of Integrated Yoga Module on Selected Psychological Variables among Women with Anxiety Problem.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, S; Jaiganesh, K; Duraisamy

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of yogic practices has proven benefits in both organic and psychological diseases. Forty-five women with anxiety selected by a random sampling method were divided into three groups. Experimental group I was subjected to asanas, relaxation and pranayama while Experimental group II was subjected to an integrated yoga module. The control group did not receive any intervention. Anxiety was measured by Taylor's Manifest Anxiety Scale before and after treatment. Frustration was measured through Reaction to Frustration Scale. All data were spread in an Excel sheet to be analysed with SPSS 16 software using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Selected yoga and asanas decreased anxiety and frustration scores but treatment with an integrated yoga module resulted in significant reduction of anxiety and frustration. To conclude, the practice of asanas and yoga decreased anxiety in women, and yoga as an integrated module significantly improved anxiety scores in young women with proven anxiety without any ill effects.

  13. Effect of cryogenic burnishing on surface integrity modifications of Co-Cr-Mo biomedical alloy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu; Dillon, Oscar W; Puleo, David A; Jawahir, Ibrahim S

    2013-01-01

    Severe plastic deformation (SPD) processes have been used to modify the surface integrity properties of many materials by generating ultrafine or even nanometer-sized grains in the surface and subsurface region. These fine grained materials created by SPD and dynamic recrystallization in a thin layer near the surface usually have higher hardness and frequently exhibit enhanced mechanical properties (wear resistance, corrosion resistance, fatigue life, etc.). Cryogenic burnishing, a SPD process, was used to improve several surface integrity parameters of a Co-Cr-Mo biomedical alloy. Application of liquid nitrogen during the burnishing process significantly suppressed the temperature rise within and outside the nitrogen application zone. Better surface finish, high hardness value, thick burnishing-influenced surface layer, and significant grain refinement were simultaneously achieved with the application of cryogenic cooling. Current results show that cryogenic burnishing can be an effective processing method for modifying the studied surface integrity properties of Co-Cr-Mo biomedical alloy.

  14. Effect of powdered activated carbon on integrated submerged membrane bioreactor-nanofiltration process for wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Woo, Yun Chul; Lee, Jeong Jun; Shim, Wang-Geun; Shon, Ho Kyong; Tijing, Leonard D; Yao, Minwei; Kim, Han-Seung

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of powdered activated carbon (PAC) on the overall performance of a submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) system integrated with nanofiltration (NF) for wastewater reclamation. It was found that the trans-membrane pressure of SMBR increased continuously while that of the SMBR with PAC was more stable, mainly because water could still pass through the PACs and membrane even though foulants adhered on the PAC surface. The presence of PAC was able to mitigate fouling in SMBR as well as in NF. SMBR-NF with PAC obtained a higher flux of 8.1 LMH compared to that without PAC (6.6 LMH). In addition, better permeate quality was obtained with SMBR-NF integrated process added with PAC. The present results suggest that the addition of PAC in integrated SMBR-NF process could possibly lead to satisfying water quality and can be operated for a long-term duration.

  15. Sensor Technology Integration for Efficient and Cost-Effective D&D

    SciTech Connect

    Varona, J. M.; Lagos, L. E.

    2002-02-25

    The deactivation and decommissioning of radiologically contaminated facilities require the use of a multitude of technologies to perform characterization, decontamination, dismantlement, and waste management. Current baseline technologies do not provide adequate tools to perform this work in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Examples of such tasks that can be modified to enhance the D&D work include: floor and wall decontamination, pipe decontamination, and surveillance and monitoring. FIU-HCET's Technology Development, Integration and Deployment (TDID) group aims to enhance the D&D process by integrating sensor technology to existing decontamination and remote surveillance tools. These integrated systems have been demonstrated throughout the DOE Complex and commercial nuclear facilities undergoing decommissioning. Finding new ways of integrating technologies utilized in the decommissioning and surveillance & monitoring process has been a goal of this group during the past several years. Current and previous integration projects include: Mobile Integrated Piping Decontamination and Characterization System, On-Line Decontamination and Characterization System, In-Situ Pipe Decontamination and Unplugging System, Remote Hazardous Environment Surveyor (RHES), and the Online Handheld grit blasting decontamination system As a result of integrating sensors with D&D tools, the resulting technologies have removed the downtime currently found in baseline processes by allowing operators and project managers to have real-time contamination data during the specified D&D process. This added component allows project managers to verify that full decontamination and surveillance has been conducted. Through successful demonstration and deployments of the TDID-developed technologies, FIU-HCET has provided tools that can impact the cost, schedule and health and safety of D&D operations in a positive way, leading to shorter downtimes and significant cost-savings. This paper will

  16. Physiological integration ameliorates negative effects of drought stress in the clonal herb Fragaria orientalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunchun; Zhang, Qiaoying; Sammul, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Clonal growth allows plants to spread horizontally and to establish ramets in sites of contrasting resource status. If ramets remain physiologically integrated, clones in heterogeneous environments can act as cooperative systems--effects of stress on one ramet can be ameliorated by another connected ramet inhabiting benign conditions. But little is known about the effects of patch contrast on physiological integration of clonal plants and no study has addressed its effects on physiological traits like osmolytes, reactive oxygen intermediates and antioxidant enzymes. We examined the effect of physiological integration on survival, growth and stress indicators such as osmolytes, reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and antioxidant enzymes in a clonal plant, Fragaria orientalis, growing in homogenous and heterogeneous environments differing in patch contrast of water availability (1 homogeneous (no contrast) group; 2 low contrast group; 3 high contrast group). Drought stress markedly reduced the survival and growth of the severed ramets of F. orientalis, especially in high contrast treatments. Support from a ramet growing in benign patch considerably reduced drought stress and enhanced growth of ramets in dry patches. The larger the contrast between water availability, the larger the amount of support the depending ramet received from the supporting one. This support strongly affected the growth of the supporting ramet, but not to an extent to cause increase in stress indicators. We also found indication of costs related to maintenance of physiological connection between ramets. Thus, the net benefit of physiological integration depends on the environment and integration between ramets of F. orientalis could be advantageous only in heterogeneous conditions with a high contrast.

  17. Physiological Integration Ameliorates Negative Effects of Drought Stress in the Clonal Herb Fragaria orientalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunchun; Zhang, Qiaoying; Sammul, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Clonal growth allows plants to spread horizontally and to establish ramets in sites of contrasting resource status. If ramets remain physiologically integrated, clones in heterogeneous environments can act as cooperative systems – effects of stress on one ramet can be ameliorated by another connected ramet inhabiting benign conditions. But little is known about the effects of patch contrast on physiological integration of clonal plants and no study has addressed its effects on physiological traits like osmolytes, reactive oxygen intermediates and antioxidant enzymes. We examined the effect of physiological integration on survival, growth and stress indicators such as osmolytes, reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and antioxidant enzymes in a clonal plant, Fragaria orientalis, growing in homogenous and heterogeneous environments differing in patch contrast of water availability (1 homogeneous (no contrast) group; 2 low contrast group; 3 high contrast group). Drought stress markedly reduced the survival and growth of the severed ramets of F. orientalis, especially in high contrast treatments. Support from a ramet growing in benign patch considerably reduced drought stress and enhanced growth of ramets in dry patches. The larger the contrast between water availability, the larger the amount of support the depending ramet received from the supporting one. This support strongly affected the growth of the supporting ramet, but not to an extent to cause increase in stress indicators. We also found indication of costs related to maintenance of physiological connection between ramets. Thus, the net benefit of physiological integration depends on the environment and integration between ramets of F. orientalis could be advantageous only in heterogeneous conditions with a high contrast. PMID:22957054

  18. In-plane tunnelling field-effect transistor integrated on Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Fina, Ignasi; Apachitei, Geanina; Preziosi, Daniele; Deniz, Hakan; Kriegner, Dominik; Marti, Xavier; Alexe, Marin

    2015-01-01

    Silicon has persevered as the primary substrate of microelectronics during last decades. During last years, it has been gradually embracing the integration of ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism. The successful incorporation of these two functionalities to silicon has delivered the desired non-volatility via charge-effects and giant magneto-resistance. On the other hand, there has been a numerous demonstrations of the so-called magnetoelectric effect (coupling between ferroelectric and ferromagnetic order) using nearly-perfect heterostructures. However, the scrutiny of the ingredients that lead to magnetoelectric coupling, namely magnetic moment and a conducting channel, does not necessarily require structural perfection. In this work, we circumvent the stringent requirements for epilayers while preserving the magnetoelectric functionality in a silicon-integrated device. Additionally, we have identified an in-plane tunnelling mechanism which responds to a vertical electric field. This genuine electroresistance effect is distinct from known resistive-switching or tunnel electro resistance. PMID:26403693

  19. Multi-disciplinary coupling effects for integrated design of propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Effective computational simulation procedures are described for modeling the inherent multi-disciplinary interactions which govern the accurate response of propulsion systems. Results are presented for propulsion system responses including multi-disciplinary coupling effects using coupled multi-discipline thermal, structural, and acoustic tailoring; an integrated system of multi-disciplinary simulators; coupled material behavior/fabrication process tailoring; sensitivities using a probabilistic simulator; and coupled materials, structures, fracture, and probabilistic behavior simulator. The results demonstrate that superior designs can be achieved if the analysis/tailoring methods account for the multi-disciplinary coupling effects. The coupling across disciplines can be used to develop an integrated coupled multi-discipline numerical propulsion system simulator.

  20. A Conceptual Framework for More Effectively Integrating Combat Support Capabilities and Constraints into Contingency Planning and Execution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY ■ C O R P O R A T I O N A Conceptual Framework for More Effectively Integrating Combat Support Capabilities and Constraints into...impact of these capabilities or constraints on operational plans. This report describes a conceptual framework for better integrating CS capabilities...DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Conceptual Framework for More Effectively Integrating Combat Support Capabilities and

  1. Audiovisual integration in near and far space: effects of changes in distance and stimulus effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Van der Stoep, N; Van der Stigchel, S; Nijboer, T C W; Van der Smagt, M J

    2016-05-01

    A factor that is often not considered in multisensory research is the distance from which information is presented. Interestingly, various studies have shown that the distance at which information is presented can modulate the strength of multisensory interactions. In addition, our everyday multisensory experience in near and far space is rather asymmetrical in terms of retinal image size and stimulus intensity. This asymmetry is the result of the relation between the stimulus-observer distance and its retinal image size and intensity: an object that is further away is generally smaller on the retina as compared to the same object when it is presented nearer. Similarly, auditory intensity decreases as the distance from the observer increases. We investigated how each of these factors alone, and their combination, affected audiovisual integration. Unimodal and bimodal stimuli were presented in near and far space, with and without controlling for distance-dependent changes in retinal image size and intensity. Audiovisual integration was enhanced for stimuli that were presented in far space as compared to near space, but only when the stimuli were not corrected for visual angle and intensity. The same decrease in intensity and retinal size in near space did not enhance audiovisual integration, indicating that these results cannot be explained by changes in stimulus efficacy or an increase in distance alone, but rather by an interaction between these factors. The results are discussed in the context of multisensory experience and spatial uncertainty, and underline the importance of studying multisensory integration in the depth space.

  2. [Effects of light intensity contrast on clonal integration of Spartina anglica].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xing-Xing; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Luo, Fang-Li; Zhu, Rui; Xu, Xi-Yi; Li, Hong-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2014-10-01

    We conducted a greenhouse experiment to test how clonal integration affected the growth responses of Spartina anglica to light intensity heterogeneity in light availability and whether such effects depended on contrast light intensity. The experiment had three homogeneous treatments and two heterogeneous treatments. In the homogeneous treatments, both ramets of a connected ramet pair were unshaded (high light intensity), moderately shaded (medium light intensity, 70% of the high light intensity) and deeply shaded (low light intensity, 30% of the high light intensity). In the heterogeneous treatments, one ramet of a pair was unshaded, but its connected ramet was either moderately shaded (low light intensity contrast) or deeply shaded (high light intensity contrast). In the homogeneous treatments, biomass of S. anglica was significantly higher in the high light intensity treatment than in the medium and low light intensity treatments. Number of leaves, root length, and total biomass were significantly higher in the shaded ramet in the heterogeneous treatment with low light intensity contrast than in the ramet in the homogeneous treatment with medium light intensity. Final size and mass were not significantly different between the unshaded ramet in the heterogeneous treatment with low light intensity contrast and the ramets in the homogeneous high light intensity treatment. These results suggested that clonal integration benefitted a shaded ramet with little cost to an unshaded ramet when contrast in light intensity was low. However, effects of clonal integration were not significant when contrast was high. It therefore appeared that effects of clonal integration on the growth of S. anglica did not increase with increasing light intensity contrast. In natural habitats, clonal integration might improve growth of S. anglica when its ramets are moderately shaded by other plants but not when they are deeply shaded.

  3. Optical probing of electric fields with an electro-acoustic effect toward integrated circuit diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ru-Long; Yang, Han; Zhao, Di; Chen, Qi-Dai; Yan, Zhao-Xu; Yi, Mao-Bin; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2010-02-15

    Electro-optic probing of electric fields has been considered as a promising approach for integrated circuit diagnosis. However, the method is subject to relatively weak voltage sensitivity. In this Letter, we solve the problems with electro-acoustic effect. In contrast to the general electro-optic effect, the light phase modulation induced by the acoustic effect is 2 orders of magnitude stronger at its resonant frequency, as we observed in a GaAs thin film probe. Furthermore, this what we believe to be a novel method shows a highly reproducible linearity between the detected signals and the input voltages, which facilitates the voltage calibration.

  4. Effectiveness of integrated psychological therapy (IPT) for schizophrenia patients: a research update.

    PubMed

    Roder, Volker; Mueller, Daniel R; Schmidt, Stefanie J

    2011-09-01

    Standardized recovery criteria go beyond symptom remission and put special emphasis on personal and social functioning in residence, work, and leisure. Against this background, evidence-based integrated approaches combining cognitive remediation with social skills therapy show promise for improving functional recovery of schizophrenia patients. Over the past 30 years, research groups in 12 countries have evaluated integrated psychological therapy (IPT) in 36 independent studies. IPT is a group therapy program for schizophrenia patients. It combines neurocognitive and social cognitive interventions with social skills and problem-solving approaches. The aim of the present study was to update and integrate the growing amount of research data on the effectiveness of IPT. We quantitatively reviewed the results of these 36 studies, including 1601 schizophrenia patients, by means of a meta-analytic procedure. Patients undergoing IPT showed significantly greater improvement in all outcome variables (neurocognition, social cognition, psychosocial functioning, and negative symptoms) than those in the control groups (placebo-attention conditions and standard care). IPT patients maintained their mean positive effects during an average follow-up period of 8.1 months. They showed better effects on distal outcome measures when all 5 subprograms were integrated. This analysis summarizes the broad empirical evidence indicating that IPT is an effective rehabilitation approach for schizophrenia patients and is robust across a wide range of sample characteristics as well as treatment conditions. Moreover, the cognitive and social subprograms of IPT may work in a synergistic manner, thereby enhancing the transfer of therapy effects over time and improving functional recovery.

  5. The Effect of Cultural Integration on the Development of Listening Comprehension among Iranian Upper-Intermediate EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, Mohammad Ali; Montazerinia, Fatemeh; Shirazian, Sharifeh; Atarodi, Maliheh

    2014-01-01

    Cultural integration can be used as an effective learning practice in contexts of English as Foreign Language (EFL) classrooms. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of cultural integration on the development of Iranian EFL upper-intermediate learners' listening comprehension. To this end, fifty-two upper-intermediate EFL learners…

  6. The large-scale integration of high-performance silicon nanowire field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiliang; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Yang; Ioannou, Dimitris E; Xiong, Hao D; Kwon, Doo-Won; Suehle, John S; Richter, Curt A

    2009-10-14

    In this work we present a CMOS-compatible self-aligning process for the large-scale-integration of high-performance nanowire field effect transistors with well-saturated drain currents, steep subthreshold slopes at low drain voltage and a large on/off current ratio (>10(7)). The subthreshold swing is as small as 45 mV/dec, which is substantially beyond the thermodynamic limit (60 mV/dec) of conventional planar MOSFETs. These excellent device characteristics are achieved by using a clean integration process and a device structure that allows effective gate-channel-source coupling to tune the source/drain Schottky barriers at the nanoscale.

  7. Effects of PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers on phospholipid membrane integrity under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Yu; Chin, Jaemin; Marks, Jeremy D; Lee, Ka Yee C

    2010-08-03

    The effects of PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers, mainly Poloxamer 188, on phospholipid membrane integrity under osmotic gradients were explored using giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Fluorescence leakage assays showed two opposing effects of P188 on the structural integrity of GUVs depending on the duration of their incubation time. A two-state transition mechanism of interaction between the triblock copolymers and the phospholipid membrane is proposed: an adsorption (I) and an insertion (II) state. While the triblock copolymer in state I acts to moderately retard the leakage, their insertion in state II perturbs the lipid packing, thus increasing the membrane permeability. Our results suggest that the biomedical application of PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers, either as cell membrane resealing agents or as accelerators for drug delivery, is directed by the delicate balance between these two states.

  8. Integrated Model to Assess Cloud Deployment Effectiveness When Developing an IT-strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razumnikov, S.; Prankevich, D.

    2016-04-01

    Developing an IT-strategy of cloud deployment is a complex issue since even the stage of its formation necessitates revealing what applications will be the best possible to meet the requirements of a company business-strategy, evaluate reliability and safety of cloud providers and analyze staff satisfaction. A system of criteria, as well an integrated model to assess cloud deployment effectiveness is offered. The model makes it possible to identify what applications being at the disposal of a company, as well as new tools to be deployed are reliable and safe enough for implementation in the cloud environment. The data on practical use of the procedure to assess cloud deployment effectiveness by a provider of telecommunication services is presented. The model was used to calculate values of integral indexes of services to be assessed, then, ones, meeting the criteria and answering the business-strategy of a company, were selected.

  9. Effect of biocompatible polymers on the structural integrity of lipid bilayers under external stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia-Yu; Kausik, Ravinath; Chen, Chi-Yuan; Han, Song-I.; Marks, Jeremy; Lee, Ka Yee

    2010-03-01

    Cell membrane dysfunction due to loss of structural integrity is the pathology of tissue death in trauma and common diseases. It is now established that certain biocompatible polymers, such as Poloxamer 188, Poloxamine 1107 and polyethylene glycol (PEG), are effective in sealing of injured cell membranes, and able to prevent acute necrosis. Despite these broad applications of these polymers for human health, the fundamental mechanisms by which these polymers interact with cell membranes are still under debate. Here, the effects of a group of biocompatible polymers on phospholipid membrane integrity under osmotic and oxidative stress were explored using giant unilamellar vesicles as model cell membranes. Our results suggest that the adsorption of the polymers on the membrane surface is responsible for the cell membrane resealing process due to its capability of slowing down the surface hydration dynamics.

  10. The effect of manipulability and religion on the multisensory integration of objects in peripersonal space.

    PubMed

    van Elk, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    In this study participants were required to respond to vibrotactile stimuli applied to the hand while ignoring visual distractors superimposed on pictures representing Christian, Hindu, or profane objects that were categorized as manipulable or non-manipulable. Overall, participants responded slower when the visual distractor appeared at an incongruent location with respect to the vibrotactile stimulus, which is known as the crossmodal congruency effect (i.e., CCE). The CCE was modulated by the type of object involved (i.e., Christian, Hindu, or Profane), the object manipulability (i.e., manipulable vs. non-manipulable) and the religious background of the participant (i.e., Christian, Hindu, or non-religious). The finding that both object manipulability, the religious significance of the object, and the religious background of the participant have a combined effect on multisensory integration suggests important interactions between low-level body-object integration and the symbolic extension of the self.

  11. Effects Of Milling On Surface Integrity Of Low-Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Alessandro Roger; Matsumoto, Hidekasu; Yamakami, Wyser Jose; Tokimatsu, Ruis Camargo; Menezes, Miguel Angelo; Suyama, Daniel Iwao; Norcino, Adriana Bruno; Vendrame, Saimon

    2011-01-17

    This work measured the effect of milling parameters on the surface integrity of low-carbon alloy steel. The Variance Analysis showed that only depth of cut did not influence on the workpiece roughness and the Pearson's Coefficient indicated that cutting speed was more influent than tool feed. All cutting parameters introduced tensile residual stress in workpiece surface. The chip formation mechanism depended specially on cutting speed and influenced on the roughness and residual stress of workpiece.

  12. Basic Mechanisms of Radiation Effects on Electronic Materials, Devices, and Integrated Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    such changes on de’ ice properties. To gain detailed insight regarding the effects that occur when an integrated circuit is placed in a radiation...the interaction produces energetic free elec- trons. The energy range in which photoelectr~ ic collisions dominate depends on the atomic number Z of...neutron energy dependent, as discussed in Sec- ticn 3.0, this makes it difficult to compare directly results obtained by workers using different radiation

  13. Systematic Approach to the Development, Evolution, and Effectiveness of Integrated Product Development Teams (IPDTs)

    SciTech Connect

    Margie Jeffs; R. Douglas Hamelin

    2011-06-01

    Integrated Product Development Teams (IPDT) are a key component of any systems engineering (SE) application, but since they are formed primarily from technical considerations, many IPDTs are far less productive than they otherwise could be. By recognizing specific personality types and skill sets, a random group of 'technical' individuals can be structured to become a highly effective team capable of delivering much more than the sum of its members.

  14. The effects of a three-year integrated Olympic education programme on adolescents' prosocial behaviours.

    PubMed

    Sukys, Saulius; Majauskiene, Daiva; Dumciene, Audrone

    2017-04-01

    The concept of Olympic education and its use of moral education to shape the development of personality have received insufficient empirical support. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an integrated Olympic education programme on the development of prosocial behaviour in adolescents. A natural experimental research design was applied in this study. The pre-test sample included 411 adolescents (aged 13-14) who were randomly selected from schools that had begun to apply an integrated Olympic education programme, along with 430 adolescents from schools without an Olympic education programme. The post-test sample included 381 students from schools implementing the Olympic education programme and 402 students from schools without an Olympic education programme. The revised prosocial tendencies measure was administered to the participants at pre- and post-test time points to assess changes in prosocial behaviour and specifically on six types of prosocial behaviour: public, anonymous, dire, emotional, compliant, and altruistic. The analyses showed significant improvements in prosocial behaviour in adolescents from schools that had implemented an integrated Olympic education programme. Changes in prosocial behaviour following the implementation of an integrated Olympic education programme were observed for the compliant, altruistic, and dire types of prosocial behaviour. In conclusion, these findings suggest that an integrated Olympic education programme effectively encourages prosocial behaviour in adolescents. This study expands our understanding of the efficiency of implementing an Olympic education programme in schools. We suggest that future research should investigate the behavioural changes in students of different ages from perspective of both teachers and students.

  15. Determination of cloud effective particle size from the multiple-scattering effect on lidar integration-method temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Jens; Reichardt, Susanne

    2006-04-20

    A method is presented that permits the determination of the cloud effective particle size from Raman- or Rayleigh-integration temperature measurements that exploits the dependence of the multiple-scattering contributions to the lidar signals from heights above the cloud on the particle size of the cloud. Independent temperature information is needed for the determination of size. By use of Raman-integration temperatures, the technique is applied to cirrus measurements. The magnitude of the multiple-scattering effect and the above-cloud lidar signal strength limit the method's range of applicability to cirrus optical depths from 0.1 to 0.5. Our work implies that records of stratosphere temperature obtained with lidar may be affected by multiple scattering in clouds up to heights of 30 km and beyond.

  16. Integrated radiologist's workstation enabling the radiologist as an effective clinical consultant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnery, Kevin W.; Suitor, Charles T.; Hildebrand, Stan; Downs, Rebecca; Thompson, Stephen K.; Shepard, S. Jeff

    2002-05-01

    Since February 2000, radiologists at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have accessed clinical information through an internally developed radiologist's clinical interpretation workstation called RadStation. This project provides a fully integrated digital dictation workstation with clinical data review. RadStation enables the radiologist as an effective clinical consultant with access to pertinent sources of clinical information at the time of dictation. Data sources not only include prior radiology reports from the radiology information system (RIS) but access to pathology data, laboratory data, history and physicals, clinic notes, and operative reports. With integrated clinical information access, a radiologists's interpretation not only comments on morphologic findings but also can enable evaluation of study findings in the context of pertinent clinical presentation and history. Image access is enabled through the integration of an enterprise image archive (Stentor, San Francisco). Database integration is achieved by a combination of real time HL7 messaging and queries to SQL-based legacy databases. A three-tier system architecture accommodates expanding access to additional databases including real-time patient schedule as well as patient medications and allergies.

  17. Impact of late radiation effects on cancer survivor children: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Coura, Cibeli Fernandes; Modesto, Patrícia Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify the late effects of radiation exposure in pediatric cancer survivors. An integrated literature review was performed in the databases MEDLINE and LILACS and SciELO. Included were articles in Portuguese and English, published over the past 10 years, using the following keywords: "neoplasias/neoplasms" AND "radioterapia/radiotherapy" AND "radiação/radiation". After analysis, 14 articles - published in nine well-known journals - met the inclusion criteria. The publications were divided into two categories: "Late endocrine effects" and "Late non-endocrine effects". Considering the increased survival rates in children who had cancer, the impact of late effects of exposure to radiation during radiological examinations for diagnosis and treatment was analyzed. Childhood cancer survivors were exposed to several late effects and should be early and regularly followed up, even when exposed to low radiation doses.

  18. Geometric isotope effects on small chloride ion water clusters with path integral molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Suzuki, Kimichi; Nagashima, Umpei; Tachikawa, Masanori; Yan, Shiwei

    2013-11-01

    The geometric isotope effects on the structures of hydrated chloride ionic hydrogen bonded clusters are explored by carrying out path integral molecular dynamics simulations. First, an outer shell coordinate is selected to display the rearrangement of single and multi hydration shell cluster structures. Next, to show the competition of intramolecular and intermolecular nuclear quantum effects, the intramolecular OH∗ stretching and intermolecular ion-water wagging motions are studied for single and multi shell structures, respectively. The results indicate that the intermolecular nuclear quantum effects stabilize the ionic hydrogen bonds in single shell structures, while they are destabilized through the competition with intramolecular nuclear quantum effects in multi shell structures. In addition, the correlations between ion-water stretching motion and other cluster vibrational coordinates are discussed. The results indicate that the intermolecular nuclear quantum effects on the cluster structures are strongly related to the cooperation of the water-water hydrogen bond interactions.

  19. Amplitudes for spacetime regions and the quantum Zeno effect: pitfalls of standard path integral constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliwell, J. J.; Yearsley, J. M.

    2013-06-01

    Path integrals appear to offer natural and intuitively appealing methods for defining quantum-mechanical amplitudes for questions involving spacetime regions. For example, the amplitude for entering a spatial region during a given time interval is typically defined by summing over all paths between given initial and final points but restricting them to pass through the region at any time. We argue that there is, however, under very general conditions, a significant complication in such constructions. This is the fact that the concrete implementation of the restrictions on paths over an interval of time corresponds, in an operator language, to sharp monitoring at every moment of time in the given time interval. Such processes suffer from the quantum Zeno effect - the continual monitoring of a quantum system in a Hilbert subspace prevents its state from leaving that subspace. As a consequence, path integral amplitudes defined in this seemingly obvious way have physically and intuitively unreasonable properties and in particular, no sensible classical limit. In this paper we describe this frequently-occurring but little-appreciated phenomenon in some detail, showing clearly the connection with the quantum Zeno effect. We then show that it may be avoided by implementing the restriction on paths in the path integral in a "softer" way. The resulting amplitudes then involve a new coarse graining parameter, which may be taken to be a timescale epsilon, describing the softening of the restrictions on the paths. We argue that the complications arising from the Zeno effect are then negligible as long as epsilon >> 1/E, where E is the energy scale of the incoming state. Our criticisms of path integral constructions largely apply to approaches to quantum theory such as the decoherent histories approach or quantum measure theory, which do not specifically involve measurements. We address some criticisms of our approach by Sokolovksi, concerning the relevance of our results to

  20. Path-integral methods for analyzing the effects of fluctuations in stochastic hybrid neural networks.

    PubMed

    Bressloff, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    We consider applications of path-integral methods to the analysis of a stochastic hybrid model representing a network of synaptically coupled spiking neuronal populations. The state of each local population is described in terms of two stochastic variables, a continuous synaptic variable and a discrete activity variable. The synaptic variables evolve according to piecewise-deterministic dynamics describing, at the population level, synapses driven by spiking activity. The dynamical equations for the synaptic currents are only valid between jumps in spiking activity, and the latter are described by a jump Markov process whose transition rates depend on the synaptic variables. We assume a separation of time scales between fast spiking dynamics with time constant [Formula: see text] and slower synaptic dynamics with time constant τ. This naturally introduces a small positive parameter [Formula: see text], which can be used to develop various asymptotic expansions of the corresponding path-integral representation of the stochastic dynamics. First, we derive a variational principle for maximum-likelihood paths of escape from a metastable state (large deviations in the small noise limit [Formula: see text]). We then show how the path integral provides an efficient method for obtaining a diffusion approximation of the hybrid system for small ϵ. The resulting Langevin equation can be used to analyze the effects of fluctuations within the basin of attraction of a metastable state, that is, ignoring the effects of large deviations. We illustrate this by using the Langevin approximation to analyze the effects of intrinsic noise on pattern formation in a spatially structured hybrid network. In particular, we show how noise enlarges the parameter regime over which patterns occur, in an analogous fashion to PDEs. Finally, we carry out a [Formula: see text]-loop expansion of the path integral, and use this to derive corrections to voltage-based mean-field equations, analogous

  1. Clinical Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Sensory Integrative and Perceptual Motor Therapy in Improving Sensory Integrative Function in Children with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Thomas W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    After 72 sessions for 3 hours per week, significantly more children aged 5-9 receiving sensory integration (SI) therapy (n=35) and perceptual motor training (n=35) showed improvement in SI functioning compared to 33 receiving no treatment. Similar effects were found for subgroups with vestibular dysfunction only (n=11, 13, and 11 respectively).…

  2. What Can Comparative Effectiveness Research Contribute to Integrative Health in International Perspective?

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty Withers, Shelly; Grant, Suzanne; Lauer, Michael S.; Tunis, Sean; Berman, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The interest in Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) in the international community is growing. A panel titled “What Can Comparative Effectiveness Research Contribute to Integrative Health in International Perspective?” took place at the 3rd International Research Congress on Integrative Medicine and Health in Portland, Oregon, in 2012. The presentations at this panel highlighted different perspectives on CER, including the funders' and the stakeholders' perspectives from the United States, as well as experiences with economic evaluations from Australia and pragmatic trials in Europe. The funders' perspective emphasized the need for innovation and controlling costs in large-scale studies. The stakeholder's perspective stressed the need to gather the input of stakeholders in shaping the framework for more informative, more decision-maker-driven research. Several examples of cost-effectiveness analyses were offered from Australia. The importance of balancing rigor and pragmatism was also discussed in a presentation of the efficacy–effectiveness continuum. A wide-ranging discussion explored additional questions concerning the translation of evidence into practice; the effect of pragmatic trials on funding or policy; evidentiary distinctions between and among pragmatic trials and traditional randomized clinical trials; and the multiple roles of stakeholders, particularly in generating new information and knowledge. The presentations and discussions showed that more development of methods is needed. This includes developments on study design and statistical approaches, as well as methods for stakeholder involvement and mechanisms to bring these results into practice. PMID:25372702

  3. Effects of dopaminergic modulation on the integrative properties of the ventral striatal medium spiny neuron.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Jason T; Wolf, John A; Finkel, Leif H

    2007-12-01

    Dopaminergic modulation produces a variety of functional changes in the principal cell of the striatum, the medium spiny neuron (MSN). Using a 189-compartment computational model of a ventral striatal MSN, we simulated whole cell D1- and D2-receptor-mediated modulation of both intrinsic (sodium, calcium, and potassium) and synaptic currents (AMPA and NMDA). Dopamine (DA) modulations in the model were based on a review of published experiments in both ventral and dorsal striatum. To objectively assess the net effects of DA modulation, we combined reported individual channel modulations into either D1- or D2-receptor modulation conditions and studied them separately. Contrary to previous suggestions, we found that D1 modulation had no effect on MSN nonlinearity and could not induce bistability. In agreement with previous suggestions, we found that dopaminergic modulation leads to changes in input filtering and neuronal excitability. Importantly, the changes in neuronal excitability agree with the classical model of basal ganglia function. We also found that DA modulation can alter the integration time window of the MSN. Interestingly, the effects of DA modulation of synaptic properties opposed the effects of DA modulation of intrinsic properties, with the synaptic modulations generally dominating the net effect. We interpret this lack of synergy to suggest that the regulation of whole cell integrative properties is not the primary functional purpose of DA. We suggest that D1 modulation might instead primarily regulate calcium influx to dendritic spines through NMDA and L-type calcium channels, by both direct and indirect mechanisms.

  4. Effects of repeated use and resterilization on structural and functional integrity of microwave ablation antennas.

    PubMed

    Finck, Cyrielle A; Zur Linden, Alex R; Singh, Ameet; Foster, Robert A; Nykamp, Stephanie G; Sears, William C

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of repeated use and resterilization on structural and functional integrity of microwave ablation (MWA) antennas. SAMPLE 17 cooled-shaft MWA antennas (3 groups of 5 antennas/group and 2 control antennas). PROCEDURES 1, 2, and 3 ablations in the livers of bovine cadavers were performed at the maximum recommended settings. Antennas were cleaned and sterilized in hydrogen peroxide plasma, and the process was repeated (reprocessing cycle; n = 6). Control antennas were only sterilized (6 times). Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures were performed, and antennas were microscopically assessed for damage. RESULTS 6 cycles were completed. Thirteen of 15 MWA antennas remained functional for up to 4 cycles, 10 were functional after 5 cycles, and only 7 were functional after 6 cycles. Progressive tearing of the silicone coating of the antennas was observed, with a negative effect of the number of cycles for silicone tearing. Size of the ablation zone decreased mildly over time after cycles 5 and 6; however, this was not considered clinically relevant. No significant changes in the shape of ablation zones were detected. All cultures yielded negative results, except for an isolated case, which was considered a contaminant. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Structural and functional integrity of the microwave antennas remained acceptable during repeated use and reprocessing for up to 4 cycles. However, there was a decrease in functional integrity at cycles 5 and 6. We suggest that these microwave antennas be subjected to > 3 reprocessing cycles. Antennas should be carefully examined before reuse.

  5. Efficient implementation of effective core potential integrals and gradients on graphical processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chenchen; Wang, Lee-Ping; Sachse, Torsten; Preiß, Julia; Presselt, Martin; Martínez, Todd J.

    2015-07-01

    Effective core potential integral and gradient evaluations are accelerated via implementation on graphical processing units (GPUs). Two simple formulas are proposed to estimate the upper bounds of the integrals, and these are used for screening. A sorting strategy is designed to balance the workload between GPU threads properly. Significant improvements in performance and reduced scaling with system size are observed when combining the screening and sorting methods, and the calculations are highly efficient for systems containing up to 10 000 basis functions. The GPU implementation preserves the precision of the calculation; the ground state Hartree-Fock energy achieves good accuracy for CdSe and ZnTe nanocrystals, and energy is well conserved in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. WHITE MATTER INTEGRITY IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: EFFECTS OF PERMISSIBLE FIBER TURNING ANGLE

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Emily L.; Jin, Yan; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Asarnow, Robert F.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) methods have been shown to be especially sensitive to white matter abnormalities in TBI. We used our newly developed autoMATE algorithm (automated multi-atlas tract extraction) to map altered WM integrity in TBI. Even so, tractography methods include a free parameter that limits the maximum permissible turning angles for extracted fibers, with little investigation of how this may affect statistical group comparisons. Here, we examined WM integrity calculated over a range of fiber turning angles to determine to what extent this parameter affects our ability to detect group differences. Fiber turning angle threshold has a subtle, but sometimes significant, effect on the differences we were able to detect between TBI and healthy children. PMID:26413206

  7. [Effects of straw returning on the integrated soil fertility and crop yield in southern China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Dong, Yan; Xu, Ming-Gang; Bao, Yao-Xian

    2012-11-01

    Based on the data from 94 experiments of straw returning in Anhui, Jiangxi, Hunan, Hubei, Guangxi, Sichuan, and Chongqing, and by using mathematic modeling approach, this paper evaluated the effects of straw returning on the soil fertility and crop yield in southern China. Obvious regional differences were observed in the soil fertility index (SFI) and crop yield response. In study area, the croplands with the SFI of Grade III and Grade IV were predominant, occupying 69.1% and 21.3% of the total, respectively. Averagely, straw returning increased the SFI and crop yield by 6.8% and 4.4%, respectively, as compared with the control (no straw returning). The SFI was significantly linearly correlated with rice yield, and could well reflect the integrated soil fertility in study area. At present, straw returning with decomposing agent added is one of the most important measures to improve the integrated soil fertility in southern China, which should be widely popularized.

  8. The effects of hyperbaric air and hyperbaric oxygen on blood-brain barrier integrity in rats.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Nihal Gunes; Orhan, Nurcan; Yilmaz, Canan Ugur; Arican, Nadir; Ahishali, Bulent; Kucuk, Mutlu; Kaya, Mehmet; Toklu, Akin Savas

    2013-09-19

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment yields conflicting results on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity under various pathological conditions and the effects of HBO on healthy brain is poorly understood. In this experimental study, the effects of HBO on BBB integrity were investigated in comparison with hyperbaric air (HBA) in intact rats. Four sessions of HBA or HBO were applied to intact rats in 24h. BBB integrity was functionally and structurally evaluated by determining extravasation of Evans blue (EB) dye and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracers. In immunohistochemical evaluation, relative staining intensity for occludin, a tight junction (TJ) protein, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a water-channel protein, was detected in the barrier type of microvessels of brain by image analysis. BBB permeability to EB dye significantly increased in animals in HBO treatment group compared to those in HBA and control groups (p<0.05). The immunoreactivity of occludin, a tight junction protein, remained essentially unaltered in capillaries of hippocampus in all groups. In animals exposed to HBO, AQP4 immunoreactivity significantly increased in parietal cortex compared to those in HBA and control groups (p<0.01). Ultrastructurally, frequent vesicles containing HRP reaction products were observed in capillary endothelial cells in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to both HBA and HBO. Our results indicate that the HBO administration to intact rats increased BBB permeability to both EB and HRP while HBA increased only HRP extravasation in these animals. The results of this study suggest that HBA also impairs the BBB integrity in intact rats as well as HBO.

  9. The effect of CT technical factors on quantification of lung fissure integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, D.; Brown, M. S.; Ochs, R.; Abtin, F.; Brown, M.; Ordookhani, A.; Shaw, G.; Kim, H. J.; Gjertson, D.; Goldin, J. G.

    2009-02-01

    A new emphysema treatment uses endobronchial valves to perform lobar volume reduction. The degree of fissure completeness may predict treatment efficacy. This study investigated the behavior of a semiautomated algorithm for quantifying lung fissure integrity in CT with respect to reconstruction kernel and dose. Raw CT data was obtained for six asymptomatic patients from a high-risk population for lung cancer. The patients were scanned on either a Siemens Sensation 16 or 64, using a low-dose protocol of 120 kVp, 25 mAs. Images were reconstructed using kernels ranging from smooth to sharp (B10f, B30f, B50f, B70f). Research software was used to simulate an even lower-dose acquisition of 15 mAs, and images were generated at the same kernels resulting in 8 series per patient. The left major fissure was manually contoured axially at regular intervals, yielding 37 contours across all patients. These contours were read into an image analysis and pattern classification system which computed a Fissure Integrity Score (FIS) for each kernel and dose. FIS values were analyzed using a mixed-effects model with kernel and dose as fixed effects and patient as random effect to test for difference due to kernel and dose. Analysis revealed no difference in FIS between the smooth kernels (B10f, B30f) nor between sharp kernels (B50f, B70f), but there was a significant difference between the sharp and smooth groups (p = 0.020). There was no significant difference in FIS between the two low-dose reconstructions (p = 0.882). Using a cutoff of 90%, the number of incomplete fissures increased from 5 to 10 when the imaging protocol changed from B50f to B30f. Reconstruction kernel has a significant effect on quantification of fissure integrity in CT. This has potential implications when selecting patients for endobronchial valve therapy.

  10. Integrating Cost-effective Rollover Protective Structure Installation in High School Agricultural Mechanics: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Joan; Vincent, Stacy; Watson, Jennifer; Westneat, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This study with three Appalachian county agricultural education programs examined the feasibility, effectiveness, and impact of integrating a cost-effective rollover protective structure (CROPS) project into high school agricultural mechanics classes. The project aimed to (1) reduce the exposure to tractor overturn hazards in three rural counties through the installation of CROPS on seven tractors within the Cumberland Plateau in the east region; (2) increase awareness in the targeted rural communities of cost-effective ROPS designs developed by the National Institution for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to encourage ROPS installations that decrease the costs of a retrofit; (3) test the feasibility of integration of CROPS construction and installations procedures into the required agricultural mechanics classes in these agricultural education programs; and (4) explore barriers to the implementation of this project in high school agricultural education programs. Eighty-two rural students and three agricultural educators participated in assembly and installation instruction. Data included hazard exposure demographic data, knowledge and awareness of CROPS plans, and pre-post knowledge of construction and assessment of final CROPS installation. Findings demonstrated the feasibility and utility of a CROPS education program in a professionally supervised secondary educational setting. The project promoted farm safety and awareness of availability and interest in the NIOSH Cost-effective ROPS plans. Seven CROPS were constructed and installed. New curriculum and knowledge measures also resulted from the work. Lessons learned and recommendations for a phase 2 implementation and further research are included.

  11. The Role of Lexical Properties and Cohesive Devices in Text Integration and Their Effect on Human Ratings of Speaking Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Scott; Clevinger, Amanda; Kim, YouJin

    2014-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in the use of integrated tasks in the field of second language testing to enhance the authenticity of language tests. However, the role of text integration in test takers' performance has not been widely investigated. The purpose of the current study is to examine the effects of text-based relational (i.e.,…

  12. An Experimental Study on Effectiveness of Integrated Curriculum Model (ICM) in Social Studies Education for Gifted and Talented Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atalay, Özlem; Kahveci, Nihat Gürel

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study examines the effects of Integrated Curriculum Model (ICM) on 4th grade elementary gifted and talented students' academic achievement, creativity and critical thinking (Control Group N= 10, Experimental Group N= 11) in the social studies classroom context, in Istanbul, Turkey. Integrated Curriculum Model was utilized to…

  13. The Effect of the Integration of Corpora in Reading Comprehension Classrooms on English as a Foreign Language Learners' Vocabulary Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordani, Yahya

    2013-01-01

    This study used a randomized pretest-posttest control group design to examine the effect of the integration of corpora in general English courses on the students' vocabulary development. To enhance the learners' lexical repertoire and thereby improve their reading comprehension, an online corpus-based approach was integrated into 42 hours of…

  14. Effects of Delays on 6-Year-Old Children's Self-Generation and Retention of Knowledge through Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varga, Nicole L.; Bauer, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    The current research was an investigation of the effect of delay on self-generation and retention of knowledge derived through integration by 6-year-old children. Children were presented with novel facts from passages read aloud to them (i.e., "stem" facts) and tested for self-generation of new knowledge through integration of the facts. In…

  15. Effects of Race and Social Class on Preschool Performance on the Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Roy; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The visual-motor integration of preschool children who varied in terms of race, sex, and socioeconomic status was assessed using the Beery Buktenica Test of Visual-Motor Integration (VMI). An analysis of covariance revealed that there were significant main effects for race, sex, and socioeconomic status. (Author)

  16. Integrating School Indicators, School Effectiveness, and School Improvement Research: The Louisiana School Effectiveness Pilot (SEAP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    Six papers discuss the Louisiana School Effectiveness and Assistance Pilot (SEAP) program, an ongoing 3-year research project associated with a legislatively mandated school and district accountability program. In three phases, the project joins school indicators, school effectiveness, and school improvement initiatives. The following papers are…

  17. Integrated digital holography for measuring the photothermal effect induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linwei; Sun, Meiyu; Chen, Jiannong; Yu, Junjie; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    Thermal lens (TL) and thermal mirror (TM) effects have been widely used for measuring the thermo-optical properties in materials. However, most previous research is not a direct two-dimensional measurement of the phase difference induced by photothermal effects, and the TL and TM effects cannot be measured simultaneously. We present an integrated digital holography (IDH) for measuring photothermal effects induced by femtosecond laser pulses with the laser excitation fluence below the ablation threshold. The photothermal effects of a metal sample induced by femtosecond laser pulses are studied. Our theoretical analysis reveals that when the energy of the femtosecond laser is below the ablation threshold, the theory of heat conduction and thermoelasticity can be used to explain the TL and TM effects caused by the laser-induced nonuniform temperature distribution. The experimental results show that both the nanoscale surface deformation of the TM effect and the refraction index change of the TL effect can be measured simultaneously by using the IDH. This IDH setup could be suitable for measuring the optical and thermal properties of materials.

  18. The effectiveness of an integrated conceptual approach to teaching middle school science: A mixed methods investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Susan K.

    This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of using traditional and integrated instructional strategies to increase student understanding of the core concepts of energy. There are mixed messages in the literature as to the success of using an integrated approach to teach science content, despite suggestions its use improves student achievement and attitudes toward science. This study used a mixed-method approach. The quantitative portion was a quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design, and the qualitative portion included teacher journals, teacher interviews and student journals. There were three teacher participants, two in the treatment group from a district in Sussex County, Delaware. The third teacher participant, from a different district in Sussex County, Delaware was in the control group. The treatment group consisted of 180 students and the control group consisted of 124 students. The results of this study show that the treatment group had significantly less anxiety in science following the treatment, than students in the control group. The F value of 10.89 was significant at p = 0.001. Students in the treatment group also had more enjoyment of and motivation in science than did students in the control group. The F value of 25.025 was significant at a p = 0.000 for the subscale enjoyment of science. The F value of 14.1 was significant at a p = 0.000 for the subscale of motivation in science. Students in the treatment group performed significantly better on the achievement tests, the Integrated Summative Energy Assessment (ISEA) and the science portion of the Delaware State Testing Program (DSTP). The treatment group performed significantly better on the ISEA than did the control group, with an F value of 407.7 significant at p = 0.000. The treatment group performed significantly better on the science DSTP than the control group, with an F value of 65.81 which was significant at p = 0.000. The use of an integrated approach to science

  19. Topological measure locating the effective crossover between segregation and integration in a modular network.

    PubMed

    Adjari Rad, A; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Papo, D; Zanin, M; Buldú, J M; del Pozo, F; Boccaletti, S

    2012-06-01

    We introduce an easily computable topological measure which locates the effective crossover between segregation and integration in a modular network. Segregation corresponds to the degree of network modularity, while integration is expressed in terms of the algebraic connectivity of an associated hypergraph. The rigorous treatment of the simplified case of cliques of equal size that are gradually rewired until they become completely merged, allows us to show that this topological crossover can be made to coincide with a dynamical crossover from cluster to global synchronization of a system of coupled phase oscillators. The dynamical crossover is signaled by a peak in the product of the measures of intracluster and global synchronization, which we propose as a dynamical measure of complexity. This quantity is much easier to compute than the entropy (of the average frequencies of the oscillators), and displays a behavior which closely mimics that of the dynamical complexity index based on the latter. The proposed topological measure simultaneously provides information on the dynamical behavior, sheds light on the interplay between modularity and total integration, and shows how this affects the capability of the network to perform both local and distributed dynamical tasks.

  20. Health-Promoting Effects of Serial vs. Integrated Combined Strength and Aerobic Training.

    PubMed

    Karatrantou, K; Gerodimos, V; Häkkinen, K; Zafeiridis, A

    2017-01-01

    Combined strength and aerobic training programs are widely used for improving markers of physical fitness and health. We compared the efficiency of a serial and an integrated combined training program on health and overall fitness in middle-aged females. 54 females (46.7±4.5yrs) were assigned to a serial (SCG) or an integrated (ICG) combined training group or to a control group (CG). The SCG and ICG performed a 3-month training combining aerobic dance and calisthenics. The 2 training programs differ in the sequence of aerobic and strength exercises. SCG performed the strength exercises prior to aerobic; in ICG, the aerobic and strength exercises were altered in a predetermined order. Body composition/circumferences, blood pressure, respiratory function, flexibility, balance, muscle strength/endurance, power and aerobic capacity were measured before and after training. SCG and ICG significantly increased muscle strength and endurance, power, aerobic capacity, flexibility, balance, fat-free mass and respiratory function (p<0.001-0.05), while significant reductions were observed for blood pressure, heart rate and body fat/circumferences (p<0.001-0.05). However, there were no significant differences between SCG and ICG after training. Serial and integrated combined training programs confer analogous adaptations and can be used interchangeably for counteracting the detrimental effects of sedentary lifestyle on indices of physical fitness and health.

  1. Effects of DBS in parkinsonian patients depend on the structural integrity of frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Deuschl, Günther; Koirala, Nabin; Riedel, Christian; Volkmann, Jens; Groppa, Sergiu

    2017-01-01

    While deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) has evolved to an evidence-based standard treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD), the targeted cerebral networks are poorly described and no objective predictors for the postoperative clinical response exist. To elucidate the systemic mechanisms of DBS, we analysed cerebral grey matter properties using cortical thickness measurements and addressed the dependence of structural integrity on clinical outcome. Thirty one patients with idiopathic PD without dementia (23 males, age: 63.4 ± 9.3, Hoehn and Yahr: 3.5 ± 0.8) were selected for DBS treatment. The patients underwent whole-brain preoperative T1 MR-Imaging at 3 T. Grey matter integrity was assessed by cortical thickness measurements with FreeSurfer. The clinical motor outcome markedly improved after STN-DBS in comparison to the preoperative condition. The cortical thickness of the frontal lobe (paracentral area and superior frontal region) predicted the clinical improvement after STN-DBS. Moreover, in patients with cortical atrophy of these areas a higher stimulation voltage was needed for an optimal clinical response. Our data suggest that the effects of STN-DBS in PD directly depend on frontal lobe grey matter integrity. Cortical atrophy of this region might represent a distinct predictor of a poor motor outcome after STN-DBS in PD patients. PMID:28262813

  2. The effect of context in rural mental health care: Understanding integrated services in a small town.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Scott J; Perkins, David; Luland, Teresa; Brown, Dale; Corvan, Eamonn

    2017-03-10

    Unequal health care outcomes for those with mental illness mean that access to integrated models is critical to supporting good physical and mental health care. This is especially so in rural areas where geographic and structural issues constrain the provision of health services. Guided by a conceptual framework about rural and remote health, this study draws on interviews with health providers and other staff and examines the dynamics of integrated primary and community-based specialist care for people with severe and persistent mental illnesses living in rural Australia. Findings show that the facilitation of sustainable linkages between general practice and community mental health requires the skilful exercise of power, knowledge, and resources by partners in order to address the social and structural factors that influence local health situations. These findings suggest that incremental processes of integration that are responsive to patients' and stakeholders' needs and that build on success and increased trust may be more effective than those imposed from the 'top down' that pay insufficient attention to local contexts.

  3. Effect of chlorine dioxide on cyanobacterial cell integrity, toxin degradation and disinfection by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqing; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Li, Lei; Deng, Jing; Zhu, Mingqiu; Zhu, Shumin

    2014-06-01

    Bench scale tests were conducted to study the effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) oxidation on cell integrity, toxin degradation and disinfection by-product formation of Microcystis aeruginosa. The simulated cyanobacterial suspension was prepared at a concentration of 1.0×10(6)cells/mL and the cell integrity was measured with flow cytometry. Results indicated that ClO2 can inhibit the photosynthetic capacity of M. aeruginosa cells and almost no integral cells were left after oxidation at a ClO2 dose of 1.0mg/L. The total toxin was degraded more rapidly with the ClO2 dosage increasing from 0.1mg/L to 1.0mg/L. Moreover, the damage on cell structure after oxidation resulted in released intracellular organic matter, which contributed to the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) as disinfection by-products. Therefore, the use of ClO2 as an oxidant for treating algal-rich water should be carefully considered.

  4. Effect of knowledge integration activities on students' perception of the earth's crust as a cyclic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kali, Yael; Orion, Nir; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2003-08-01

    Systems thinking is regarded as a high-order thinking skill required in scientific, technological, and everyday domains. However, little is known about systems thinking in the context of science education. In the current research, students' understanding of the rock cycle system after a learning program was characterized, and the effect of a concluding knowledge integration activity on their systems thinking was studied. Answers to an open-ended test were interpreted using a systems thinking continuum, ranging from a completely static view of the system to an understanding of the system's cyclic nature. A meaningful improvement in students' views of the rock cycle toward the higher side of the systems thinking continuum was found after the knowledge integration activity. Students became more aware of the dynamic and cyclic nature of the rock cycle, and their ability to construct sequences of processes representing material transformation in relatively large chunks significantly improved. Success of the knowledge integration activity stresses the importance of postknowledge acquisition activities, which engage students in a dual process of differentiation of their knowledge and reintegration in a systems context. We suggest including such activities in curricula involving systems-based contents, particularly in earth science, in which systems thinking can bring about environmental literacy.

  5. Effect of thyme essential oil and selenium on intestine integrity and antioxidant status of broilers.

    PubMed

    Placha, I; Takacova, J; Ryzner, M; Cobanova, K; Laukova, A; Strompfova, V; Venglovska, K; Faix, S

    2014-02-01

    1. This study evaluated the duodenal wall integrity, antioxidant status as well as some immunological parameters of broiler chickens supplemented with 0.5 g Thymus vulgaris essential oil (EO)/kg diet and 0.4 mg Se/kg DM (dry matter) derived from sodium selenite. 2. A total of 192 one-d-old randomly divided chickens of both sexes (Ross 308 hybrid broilers) were divided into 4 treatment groups of 48 birds each. 3. The first group was fed on a nutritionally balanced basal diet (BD). The other three groups received BD supplemented with 0.5 g/kg thyme oil, or 0.4 mg Se/kg DM, or both feed additives together. 4. The results for the evaluated feed additives were (1) thyme oil - decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration in duodenal mucosa and kidney, increased immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentration in duodenal mucosa, stimulated phagocytic activity in blood, improved intestinal barrier integrity (2) selenium - increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in blood and liver as well as thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity in duodenal mucosa, liver and in the kidney, (3) EO with selenium - increased thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity in duodenal mucosa. 5. These results demonstrated that thyme oil alone showed more effective potential to improve intestinal barrier integrity and antioxidant status as well as evoking an immune response in chickens, than if diets were supplemented with both thyme oil and selenium.

  6. The effect of integrated health management model on the satisfaction among Chinese elderly.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jianqian; Xie, Wenyuan; Yang, Yingchun; Liu, Heng; Jiang, Lili; Liu, Pei

    2013-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate the effect of integrated health management model on the satisfaction among Chinese elderly. Using a randomized controlled trial, 600 people who are 60 and over have signed the informed consent in China were randomly assigned into management and control group. The management group received care integrated individual health management with community health management model in the follow-up 6 months. The individual health management included establishing health record, performing health evaluation, giving individual instruction, carrying out telephone consultation and follow-up. The community health management includes lectures on health knowledge, distribution of health education materials and physical fitness exercise kit. Factor analysis, t-test, χ(2)-test and logistic regression models were used. The average satisfaction scores of baseline and final of management or control group were calculated through factor analysis. The management group has shown a significant improvement in satisfaction score, no difference in control group. Logistic regression analysis of influencing factors of the elderly satisfaction showed that the satisfaction score of male, individuals without chronic disease and management group was higher. These results suggest that integrated health management model can improve the elderly satisfaction in China through realizing good communication between the elderly and medical staff in community.

  7. Fast Response, Open-Celled Porous, Shape Memory Effect Actuators with Integrated Attachments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Andrew Peter (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates to the exploitation of porous foam articles exhibiting the Shape Memory Effect as actuators. Each foam article is composed of a plurality of geometric shapes, such that some geometric shapes can fit snugly into or around rigid mating connectors that attach the Shape Memory foam article intimately into the load path between a static structure and a moveable structure. The foam is open-celled, composed of a plurality of interconnected struts whose mean diameter can vary from approximately 50 to 500 microns. Gases and fluids flowing through the foam transfer heat rapidly with the struts, providing rapid Shape Memory Effect transformations. Embodiments of porous foam articles as torsional actuators and approximately planar structures are disposed. Simple, integral connection systems exploiting the ability to supply large loads to a structure, and that can also supply hot and cold gases and fluids to effect rapid actuation are also disposed.

  8. Effects of the Integrated Online Advance Organizer Teaching Materials on Students' Science Achievement and Attitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korur, Fikret; Toker, Sacip; Eryılmaz, Ali

    2016-08-01

    This two-group quasi-experimental study investigated the effects of the Online Advance Organizer Concept Teaching Material (ONACOM) integrated with inquiry teaching and expository teaching methods. Grade 7 students' posttest performances on the light unit achievement and light unit attitude tests controlled for gender, previous semester science grade, and pretest scores were analyzed. No significant treatment effects were found between the inquiry and expository approaches. However, both groups demonstrated significant pretest-posttest gains in achievement and attitude. Independent from the method used, ONACOM was judged effective in both groups as students demonstrated increased achievement and attitude scores. ONACOM has a social and semantic network-aided infrastructure that can be adapted to both methods to increase students' achievement and improve their attitude.

  9. The power of integrating kinetic isotope effects into the formalism of the Michaelis-Menten equation.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2014-01-01

    The final arbiter of enzyme mechanism is the ability to establish and test a kinetic mechanism. Isotope effects play a major role in expanding the scope and insight derived from the Michaelis-Menten equation. The integration of isotope effects into the formalism of the Michaelis-Menten equation began in the 1970s and has continued until the present. This review discusses a family of eukaryotic copper proteins, including dopamine β-monooxygenase, tyramine β-monooxygenase and peptidylglycine α-amidating enzyme, which are responsible for the synthesis of neuroactive compounds, norepinephrine, octopamine and C-terminally carboxamidated peptides, respectively. The review highlights the results of studies showing how combining kinetic isotope effects with initial rate parameters permits the evaluation of: (a) the order of substrate binding to multisubstrate enzymes; (b) the magnitude of individual rate constants in complex, multistep reactions; (c) the identification of chemical intermediates; and (d) the role of nonclassical (tunnelling) behaviour in C-H activation.

  10. Motor Imagery and Its Effect on Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Nélio Silva; Martins, Ana Carolina Gomes; Bastos, Victor Hugo do Vale; Leite, Marco Antônio A.; Teixeira, Silmar; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Bittencourt, Juliana; Matta, André Palma da Cunha; Filho, Pedro Moreira

    2015-01-01

    The motor imagery (MI) has been proposed as a treatment in the complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1), since it seems to promote a brain reorganization effect on sensory-motor areas of pain perception. The aim of this paper is to investigate, through an integrative critical review, the influence of MI on the CRPS-1, correlating their evidence to clinical practice. Research in PEDro, Medline, Bireme and Google Scholar databases was conducted. Nine randomized controlled trials (level 2), 1 non-controlled clinical study (level 3), 1 case study (level 4), 1 systematic review (level 1), 2 review articles and 1 comment (level 5) were found. We can conclude that MI has shown effect in reducing pain and functionality that remains after 6 months of treatment. However, the difference between the MI strategies for CRPS-1 is unknown as well as the intensity of mental stress influences the painful response or effect of MI or other peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26788264

  11. Impact of late radiation effects on cancer survivor children: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Coura, Cibeli Fernandes; Modesto, Patrícia Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We aimed to identify the late effects of radiation exposure in pediatric cancer survivors. An integrated literature review was performed in the databases MEDLINE and LILACS and SciELO. Included were articles in Portuguese and English, published over the past 10 years, using the following keywords: “neoplasias/neoplasms” AND “radioterapia/radiotherapy” AND “radiação/radiation”. After analysis, 14 articles - published in nine well-known journals - met the inclusion criteria. The publications were divided into two categories: “Late endocrine effects” and “Late non-endocrine effects”. Considering the increased survival rates in children who had cancer, the impact of late effects of exposure to radiation during radiological examinations for diagnosis and treatment was analyzed. Childhood cancer survivors were exposed to several late effects and should be early and regularly followed up, even when exposed to low radiation doses. PMID:26313432

  12. Does temperature nudging overwhelm aerosol radiative effects in regional integrated climate models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian; Glotfelty, Timothy; Yahya, Khairunnisa; Alapaty, Kiran; Yu, Shaocai

    2017-04-01

    Nudging (data assimilation) is used in many regional integrated meteorology-air quality models to reduce biases in simulated climatology. However, in such modeling systems, temperature changes due to nudging could compete with temperature changes induced by radiatively active and hygroscopic short-lived tracers leading to two interesting dilemmas: when nudging is continuously applied, what are the relative sizes of these two radiative forces at regional and local scales? How do these two forces present in the free atmosphere differ from those present at the surface? This work studies these two issues by converting temperature changes due to nudging into pseudo radiative effects (PRE) at the surface (PRE_sfc), in troposphere (PRE_atm), and at the top of atmosphere (PRE_toa), and comparing PRE with the reported aerosol radiative effects (ARE). Results show that the domain-averaged PRE_sfc is smaller than ARE_sfc estimated in previous studies and this work, but could be significantly larger than ARE_sfc at local scales. PRE_atm is also much smaller than ARE_atm. These results indicate that appropriate nudging methodology could be applied to the integrated models to study aerosol radiative effects at continental/regional scales, but it should be treated with caution for local scale applications.

  13. Geometry and layering effects on the operating characteristics of integrated spiral inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Eran J.

    The integration of some passive devices directly into electronic substrates has met with a considerable amount of success. Inductors, however, have encountered some difficulties with integration due to high resistance, low inductance, low quality factor and modeling issues. An experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of geometry and layering on the operating characteristics (i.e. inductance, capacitance, resistance, maximum quality factor, and frequency of maximum quality factor). In this study, a novel approach to multi-layer inductors was proposed and explored. This approach deviates from conventional multi-layer inductors by placing the second winding in parallel with the first. This has the effect of lowering the overall coil resistance and, thus, increasing the maximum quality factor. Empirical models were developed to calculate inductance of one and two layer inductors. Analytical models were developed to calculate do resistances of one and two layer inductors. A semi-empirical model was developed to determine parasitic capacitances of one and two layer inductors. The effects of ground plane encroachment were also examined.

  14. Effect of integral membrane proteins on the lateral mobility of plastoquinone in phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Mary F.; Whitmarsh, John

    1990-01-01

    Pyrene fluorescence quenching by plastoquinone was used to estimate the rate of plastoquinone lateral diffusion in soybean phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes containing the following integral membrane proteins: gramicidin D, spinach cytochrome bf complex, spinach cytochrome f, reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome bc1, and beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase. The measured plastoquinone lateral diffusion coefficient varied between 1 and 3 · 10-7 cm2 s-1 in control liposomes that lacked protein. When proteins were added, these values decreased: a 10-fold decrease was observed when 16-26% of the membrane surface area was occupied by protein for all the proteins but gramicidin. The larger protein complexes (cytochrome bf, Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers, cytochrome bc1, and cytochrome oxidase), whose hydrophobic volumes were 15-20 times as large as that of cytochrome f and the gramicidin transmembrane dimer, were 15-20 times as effective in decreasing the lateral-diffusion coefficient over the range of concentrations studied. These proteins had a much stronger effect than that observed for bacteriorhodopsin in fluorescence photobleaching recovery measurements. The effect of high-protein concentrations in gramicidin proteoliposomes was in close agreement with fluorescence photobleaching measurements. The results are compared with the predictions of several theoretical models of lateral mobility as a function of integral membrane concentration. PMID:19431774

  15. Ethylhexylglycerin Impairs Membrane Integrity and Enhances the Lethal Effect of Phenoxyethanol

    PubMed Central

    Langsrud, Solveig; Steinhauer, Katrin; Lüthje, Sonja; Weber, Klaus; Goroncy-Bermes, Peter; Holck, Askild L.

    2016-01-01

    Preservatives are added to cosmetics to protect the consumers from infections and prevent product spoilage. The concentration of preservatives should be kept as low as possible and this can be achieved by adding potentiating agents. The aim of the study was to investigate the mechanisms behind potentiation of the bactericidal effect of a commonly used preservative, 2-phenoxyethanol (PE), by the potentiating agent ethylhexylglycerin (EHG). Sub-lethal concentrations of EHG (0.075%) and PE (0.675%) in combination led to rapid killing of E. coli (> 5 log reduction of cfu after 30 min), leakage of cellular constituents, disruption of the energy metabolism, morphological deformities of cells and condensation of DNA. Used alone, EHG disrupted the membrane integrity even at low concentrations. In conclusion, sub-lethal concentrations of EHG potentiate the effect of PE through damage of the cell membrane integrity. Thus, adding EHG to PE in a 1:9 ratio has a similar effect on membrane damage and bacterial viability as doubling the concentration of PE. This study provides insight about the mechanism of action of a strong potentiating agent, EHG, which is commonly used in cosmetics together with PE. PMID:27783695

  16. The effect of thermal stresses on the integrity of three built-up aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    A Mach 6 flight was simulated in order to examine heating effects on three frame/skin specimens. The specimens included: a titanium truss frame with a lockalloy skin; a stainless steel z-frame with a lockalloy skin; and a titanium z-frame with a lockalloy skin. Thermal stresses and temperature were measured on these specimens for the purpose of examining their efficiency, performance, and integrity. Measured thermal stresses were examined with respect to material yield strengths, buckling criteria, structural weight, and geometric locations. Principal thermal stresses were studied from the standpoint of uniaxial stress assumptions. Measured thermal stresses were compared to predicted values.

  17. Path-integral calculation of the second virial coefficient including intramolecular flexibility effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garberoglio, Giovanni; Jankowski, Piotr; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Harvey, Allan H.

    2014-07-01

    We present a path-integral Monte Carlo procedure for the fully quantum calculation of the second molecular virial coefficient accounting for intramolecular flexibility. This method is applied to molecular hydrogen (H2) and deuterium (D2) in the temperature range 15-2000 K, showing that the effect of molecular flexibility is not negligible. Our results are in good agreement with experimental data, as well as with virials given by recent empirical equations of state, although some discrepancies are observed for H2 between 100 and 200 K.

  18. Path-integral calculation of the second virial coefficient including intramolecular flexibility effects.

    PubMed

    Garberoglio, Giovanni; Jankowski, Piotr; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Harvey, Allan H

    2014-07-28

    We present a path-integral Monte Carlo procedure for the fully quantum calculation of the second molecular virial coefficient accounting for intramolecular flexibility. This method is applied to molecular hydrogen (H2) and deuterium (D2) in the temperature range 15-2000 K, showing that the effect of molecular flexibility is not negligible. Our results are in good agreement with experimental data, as well as with virials given by recent empirical equations of state, although some discrepancies are observed for H2 between 100 and 200 K.

  19. Effect of accidental steam entry on gas-cooled fast reactor integral neutronics parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Morman, J.A.; Bucher, R.G.; Smith, D.M.; Robinson, W.R.; Bennett, E.F.

    1980-10-01

    A possible accident scenario in a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) is the leakage of secondary steam into the core. A full-scale experimental study of the physics effects of such an accidental condition has been performed on the zero power reactor (ZPR)-9 critical facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The results of integral neutronics measurements performed on the simulated steam-flooded GCFR core are reported, and comparisons with corresponding results for the reference GCFR core presented. Results of calculations of these parameters with ENDF/B-IV nuclear data and standard design methods are also presented. 26 refs.

  20. Integrated materials design of organic semiconductors for field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jianguo; Diao, Ying; Appleton, Anthony L; Fang, Lei; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-05-08

    The past couple of years have witnessed a remarkable burst in the development of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), with a number of organic semiconductors surpassing the benchmark mobility of 10 cm(2)/(V s). In this perspective, we highlight some of the major milestones along the way to provide a historical view of OFET development, introduce the integrated molecular design concepts and process engineering approaches that lead to the current success, and identify the challenges ahead to make OFETs applicable in real applications.

  1. Detectability of a phantom-like braneworld model with the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    SciTech Connect

    Giannantonio, Tommaso; Song, Yong-Seon; Koyama, Kazuya

    2008-08-15

    We study a braneworld model in which a phantom-like behavior occurs with only cold dark matter and a cosmological constant, due to a large distance modification of gravity. With the addition of curvature, the geometrical tests are not strict enough to rule out models in which gravity is modified significantly on large scales. We show that this degeneracy in the parameter space is broken by the structure formation tests, such as the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, which can probe general relativity on large scales.

  2. Annual Report of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program: Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Terraqua, Inc.

    2009-07-20

    This document was created as an annual report detailing the accomplishments of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) in the Upper Columbia Basin in fiscal year 2008. The report consists of sub-chapters that reflect the various components of the program. Chapter 1 presents a report on programmatic coordination and accomplishments, and Chapters 2 through 4 provide a review of how ISEMP has progressed during the 2008 fiscal year in each of the pilot project subbasins: the John Day (Chapter 2), Wenatchee/Entiat (Chapter 3) and Salmon River (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 presents a report on the data management accomplishments in 2008.

  3. Effect of corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking on pipe integrity and remaining life

    SciTech Connect

    Jaske, C.E.; Beavers, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Process piping is often exposed to corrosive fluids. During service, such exposure may cause localized corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking that affects structural integrity. This paper presents a model that quantifies the effect of localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking on pipe failure stress. The model is an extension of those that have been developed for oil and gas pipelines. It accounts for both axial and hoop stress. Cracks are modeled using inelastic fracture mechanics. Both flow-stress and fracture-toughness dependent failure modes are addressed. Corrosion and crack-growth rates are used to predict remaining service life.

  4. Path-integral calculation of the second virial coefficient including intramolecular flexibility effects

    SciTech Connect

    Garberoglio, Giovanni; Jankowski, Piotr; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Harvey, Allan H.

    2014-07-28

    We present a path-integral Monte Carlo procedure for the fully quantum calculation of the second molecular virial coefficient accounting for intramolecular flexibility. This method is applied to molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and deuterium (D{sub 2}) in the temperature range 15–2000 K, showing that the effect of molecular flexibility is not negligible. Our results are in good agreement with experimental data, as well as with virials given by recent empirical equations of state, although some discrepancies are observed for H{sub 2} between 100 and 200 K.

  5. The effect of 1 to 5 keV electrons on the reproductive integrity of microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, J. B.; Brady, J.

    1977-01-01

    Microorganisms were exposed to simulated space environment in order to assess the effect of electrons in the energy range 1 to 5 keV on their colony-forming ability. The test system consisted of an electron gun and power supply, a dosimetry subsystem, and a vacuum subsystem. The system was capable of current densities ranging from 0.1 nA/sq cm to 5 micro A/sq cm on a 25 sq on target and an ultimate vacuum of 0.0006 N/sq m (0.000004 torr). The results of the experimental program show a significant reduction in microbial reproductive integrity.

  6. Reprogrammable field programmable gate array with integrated system for mitigating effects of single event upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Tak-kwong (Inventor); Herath, Jeffrey A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An integrated system mitigates the effects of a single event upset (SEU) on a reprogrammable field programmable gate array (RFPGA). The system includes (i) a RFPGA having an internal configuration memory, and (ii) a memory for storing a configuration associated with the RFPGA. Logic circuitry programmed into the RFPGA and coupled to the memory reloads a portion of the configuration from the memory into the RFPGA's internal configuration memory at predetermined times. Additional SEU mitigation can be provided by logic circuitry on the RFPGA that monitors and maintains synchronized operation of the RFPGA's digital clock managers.

  7. The single-event effect evaluation technology for nano integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongchao, Zheng; Yuanfu, Zhao; Suge, Yue; Long, Fan; Shougang, Du; Maoxin, Chen; Chunqing, Yu

    2015-11-01

    Single-event effects of nano scale integrated circuits are investigated. Evaluation methods for single-event transients, single-event upsets, and single-event functional interrupts in nano circuits are summarized and classified in detail. The difficulties in SEE testing are discussed as well as the development direction of test technology, with emphasis placed on the experimental evaluation of a nano circuit under heavy ion, proton, and laser irradiation. The conclusions in this paper are based on many years of testing at accelerator facilities and our present understanding of the mechanisms for SEEs, which have been well verified experimentally.

  8. Research on the effects of integrated resorts in Korea on gambling addiction

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chan-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This research discusses the effects of the integrated resorts centered around casinos being implemented in Korea. It particularly focuses on the symptoms and most recent definitions of gambling addiction such as physiological or psychological dependence from excessive gambling. This paper suggests that there is a high prevalence rate of pathological gambling in Korea. It provides an argument for prevention, early detection, and lastly, active and voluntary treatment. Furthermore, the study addresses the physiological pathway of gambling addiction and the physiological factors of gambling addicts to suggest exercise rehabilitation that are currently limited to psychological treatments. PMID:26331132

  9. Spin-up behavior and effects of initial conditions for an integrated hydrologic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seck, Alimatou; Welty, Claire; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2015-04-01

    Initial conditions have been shown to have a strong effect on outputs of surface water models, but their impact on integrated hydrologic models is not well documented. We investigated the effects of initial conditions on an integrated hydrologic model of a 5632 km2 domain in the northeastern U.S. Simulations were run for the year 1980 using four initial conditions spanning a range of average depth to water table, including 1 m ("wet"), 3m, 5m, and 7 m ("dry") below land surface. Model outputs showed significant effects of initial conditions on basin-averaged variables such as subsurface storage, surface storage, and surface runoff, with the greatest impact observed on surface storage and runoff. Effects of initial conditions were related to meteorological conditions, with precipitation reducing the effects of initial conditions on surface storage and runoff. Additionally, feedbacks between soil moisture and land-energy fluxes affected the impacts of initial conditions: higher temperatures magnified the differences in storage, recharge, and discharge among the four initial-condition scenarios. Ten year recursive runs were conducted for the wet and dry scenarios. Spin-up times varied by model components and were considerably smaller for land-surface states and fluxes. Spin-up for dry initial conditions was slower than for wet initial conditions, indicating longer system memory for dry initial conditions. These variations in persistence of initial conditions should be taken into consideration when designing model initialization approaches. More broadly, this behavior is indicative of increased persistence of the effects of dry years as opposed to wet years in hydrologic systems.

  10. Contour integration and aging: the effects of element spacing, orientation alignment and stimulus duration.

    PubMed

    Roudaia, Eugenie; Bennett, Patrick J; Sekuler, Allison B

    2013-01-01

    The ability to extract contours in cluttered visual scenes, which is a crucial step in visual processing, declines with healthy aging, but the reasons for this decline are not well understood. In three experiments, we examined how the effect of aging on contour discrimination varies as a function of contour and distracter inter-element spacing, collinearity, and stimulus duration. Spiral-shaped contours composed of Gabors were embedded within a field of distracter Gabors of uniform density. In a four alternative forced-choice task, younger and older subjects were required to report the global orientation of the contour. In Experiment 1, the absolute contour element spacing varied from two to eight times the Gabor wavelength and contour element collinearity was disrupted with five levels of orientation jitter. Contour discrimination accuracy was lower in older subjects, but the effect of aging did not vary with contour spacing or orientation jitter. Experiment 2 found that decreasing stimulus durations from 0.8 to 0.04 s had a greater effect on older subjects' performance, but only for less salient contours. Experiment 3 examined the effect of the background on contour discrimination by varying the spacing and orientation of the distracter elements for contours with small and large absolute spacing. As in Experiment, the effect of aging did not vary with absolute contour spacing. Decreasing the distracter spacing, however, had a greater detrimental effect on accuracy in older subjects compared to younger subjects. Finally, both groups showed equally high accuracy when all distracters were iso-oriented. In sum, these findings suggest that aging does not affect the sensitivity of contour integration to proximity or collinearity. However, contour integration in older adults is slower and is especially vulnerable when distracters are denser than contour elements.

  11. β-adrenergic effects on cardiac myofilaments and contraction in an integrated rabbit ventricular myocyte model

    PubMed Central

    Negroni, Jorge A.; Morotti, Stefano; Lascano, Elena C.; Gomes, Aldrin V.; Grandi, Eleonora; Puglisi, José L; Bers, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    A five-state model of myofilament contraction was integrated into a well-established rabbit ventricular myocyte model of ion channels, Ca2+ transporters and kinase signaling to analyze the relative contribution of different phosphorylation targets to the overall mechanical response driven by β-adrenergic stimulation (β-AS). β-AS effect on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ handling, Ca2+, K+ and Cl− currents, and Na+/K+-ATPase properties were included based on experimental data. The inotropic effect on the myofilaments was represented as reduced myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity (XBCa) and titin stiffness, and increased cross-bridge (XB) cycling rate (XBcy). Assuming independent roles of XBCa and XBcy, the model reproduced experimental β-AS responses on action potentials and Ca2+ transient amplitude and kinetics. It also replicated the behavior of force-Ca2+, release-restretch, length-step, stiffness-frequency and force-velocity relationships, and increased force and shortening in isometric and isotonic twitch contractions. The β-AS effect was then switched off from individual targets to analyze their relative impact on contractility. Preventing β-AS effects on L-type Ca2+ channels or phospholamban limited Ca2+ transients and contractile responses in parallel, while blocking phospholemman and K+ channel (IKs) effects enhanced Ca2+ and inotropy. Removal of β-AS effects from XBCa enhanced contractile force while decreasing peak Ca2+ (due to greater Ca2+ buffering), but had less effect on shortening. Conversely, preventing β-AS effects on XBcy preserved Ca2+ transient effects, but blunted inotropy (both isometric force and especially shortening). Removal of titin effects had little impact on contraction. Finally, exclusion of β-AS from XBCa and XBcy while preserving effects on other targets resulted in preserved peak isometric force response (with slower kinetics) but nearly abolished enhanced shortening. β-AS effects on XBCa vs. XBcy have greater impact on isometric

  12. β-adrenergic effects on cardiac myofilaments and contraction in an integrated rabbit ventricular myocyte model.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Jorge A; Morotti, Stefano; Lascano, Elena C; Gomes, Aldrin V; Grandi, Eleonora; Puglisi, José L; Bers, Donald M

    2015-04-01

    A five-state model of myofilament contraction was integrated into a well-established rabbit ventricular myocyte model of ion channels, Ca(2+) transporters and kinase signaling to analyze the relative contribution of different phosphorylation targets to the overall mechanical response driven by β-adrenergic stimulation (β-AS). β-AS effect on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) handling, Ca(2+), K(+) and Cl(-) currents, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase properties was included based on experimental data. The inotropic effect on the myofilaments was represented as reduced myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity (XBCa) and titin stiffness, and increased cross-bridge (XB) cycling rate (XBcy). Assuming independent roles of XBCa and XBcy, the model reproduced experimental β-AS responses on action potentials and Ca(2+) transient amplitude and kinetics. It also replicated the behavior of force-Ca(2+), release-restretch, length-step, stiffness-frequency and force-velocity relationships, and increased force and shortening in isometric and isotonic twitch contractions. The β-AS effect was then switched off from individual targets to analyze their relative impact on contractility. Preventing β-AS effects on L-type Ca(2+) channels or phospholamban limited Ca(2+) transients and contractile responses in parallel, while blocking phospholemman and K(+) channel (IKs) effects enhanced Ca(2+) and inotropy. Removal of β-AS effects from XBCa enhanced contractile force while decreasing peak Ca(2+) (due to greater Ca(2+) buffering), but had less effect on shortening. Conversely, preventing β-AS effects on XBcy preserved Ca(2+) transient effects, but blunted inotropy (both isometric force and especially shortening). Removal of titin effects had little impact on contraction. Finally, exclusion of β-AS from XBCa and XBcy while preserving effects on other targets resulted in preserved peak isometric force response (with slower kinetics) but nearly abolished enhanced shortening. β-AS effects on XBCa and XBcy

  13. Invited article: An integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument.

    PubMed

    Kühne, P; Herzinger, C M; Schubert, M; Woollam, J A; Hofmann, T

    2014-07-01

    We report on the development of the first integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, covering an ultra wide spectral range from 3 cm(-1) to 7000 cm(-1) (0.1-210 THz or 0.4-870 meV). The instrument comprises four sub-systems, where the magneto-cryostat-transfer sub-system enables the usage of the magneto-cryostat sub-system with the mid-infrared ellipsometer sub-system, and the far-infrared/terahertz ellipsometer sub-system. Both ellipsometer sub-systems can be used as variable angle-of-incidence spectroscopic ellipsometers in reflection or transmission mode, and are equipped with multiple light sources and detectors. The ellipsometer sub-systems are operated in polarizer-sample-rotating-analyzer configuration granting access to the upper left 3 × 3 block of the normalized 4 × 4 Mueller matrix. The closed cycle magneto-cryostat sub-system provides sample temperatures between room temperature and 1.4 K and magnetic fields up to 8 T, enabling the detection of transverse and longitudinal magnetic field-induced birefringence. We discuss theoretical background and practical realization of the integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, as well as acquisition of optical Hall effect data and the corresponding model analysis procedures. Exemplarily, epitaxial graphene grown on 6H-SiC, a tellurium doped bulk GaAs sample and an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure are investigated. The selected experimental datasets display the full spectral, magnetic field and temperature range of the instrument and demonstrate data analysis strategies. Effects from free charge carriers in two dimensional confinement and in a volume material, as well as quantum mechanical effects (inter-Landau-level transitions) are observed and discussed exemplarily.

  14. Invited Article: An integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Kühne, P. Schubert, M. Hofmann, T.; Herzinger, C. M. Woollam, J. A.

    2014-07-15

    We report on the development of the first integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, covering an ultra wide spectral range from 3 cm{sup −1} to 7000 cm{sup −1} (0.1–210 THz or 0.4–870 meV). The instrument comprises four sub-systems, where the magneto-cryostat-transfer sub-system enables the usage of the magneto-cryostat sub-system with the mid-infrared ellipsometer sub-system, and the far-infrared/terahertz ellipsometer sub-system. Both ellipsometer sub-systems can be used as variable angle-of-incidence spectroscopic ellipsometers in reflection or transmission mode, and are equipped with multiple light sources and detectors. The ellipsometer sub-systems are operated in polarizer-sample-rotating-analyzer configuration granting access to the upper left 3 × 3 block of the normalized 4 × 4 Mueller matrix. The closed cycle magneto-cryostat sub-system provides sample temperatures between room temperature and 1.4 K and magnetic fields up to 8 T, enabling the detection of transverse and longitudinal magnetic field-induced birefringence. We discuss theoretical background and practical realization of the integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, as well as acquisition of optical Hall effect data and the corresponding model analysis procedures. Exemplarily, epitaxial graphene grown on 6H-SiC, a tellurium doped bulk GaAs sample and an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure are investigated. The selected experimental datasets display the full spectral, magnetic field and temperature range of the instrument and demonstrate data analysis strategies. Effects from free charge carriers in two dimensional confinement and in a volume material, as well as quantum mechanical effects (inter-Landau-level transitions) are observed and discussed exemplarily.

  15. Radiation effects in power converters: Design of a radiation hardened integrated switching DC/DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adell, Philippe

    When electronic devices are used in space and military systems, they may be exposed to various types of radiation, including photons, electrons, protons, neutrons, and heavy ions. The effects of radiation on the semiconductor devices within the systems range from gradual degradation to catastrophic failure. In order to design and produce reliable systems for space or military applications, it is necessary to understand the device-level effects of radiation and develop appropriate strategies for reducing system susceptibility. This research focuses on understanding radiation effects in power converters for space and military applications. We show that power converters are very sensitive to radiation (total-dose, single event effects and displacement damage) and that their radiation response is dependent on input bias conditions and load conditions. We compared the radiation hardness of various power converter topologies using experiments and simulations. Evaluation of these designs under different modes of operation is demonstrated to be critical for determining radiation hardness. We emphasize the correlation between radiation effects and the role of the dynamic response of these topologies. For instance, total dose exposure has been found to degrade loop gain and affect regulation in some converters. We propose several radiation-hardening solutions to improve the radiation response of these designs. For instance, we demonstrate the design of a digitally controlled boost converter suitable for space applications based on an SRAM FPGA. A design hardening solution has been developed and successfully applied through VHDL simulations and experiments to assure the continuous operation of the converter in the presence of SEES (more precisely SEFIs). This research led to the design of a digitally controlled radiation hardened integrated switching buck converter. The proposed design is suitable for micro-satellite applications and is based on a high-voltage/CMOS process

  16. Effects of verb meaning on lexical integration in agrammatic aphasia: Evidence from eyetracking

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Jennifer E.; Ji, Woohyuk; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2013-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the time course of access to the lexical representations of verbs in agrammatic aphasia and its effects on the prediction and integration of the verb’s arguments. The present study used visual-world eyetracking to test whether verb meaning can be used by agrammatic aphasic individuals to predict and facilitate the integration of a subsequent noun argument. Nine adults with agrammatic aphasia and ten age-matched controls participated in the study. In Experiment 1, participants viewed arrays of four objects (e.g., jar, plate, stick, pencil) while listening to sentences containing either a restrictive verb that was semantically compatible only with the target object or an unrestrictive verb compatible with all four objects (e.g., Susan will open/break the jar). For both participant groups, the restrictive condition elicited more fixations to the target object immediately after the verb. Experiment 2 differed from Experiment 1 in that the auditory sentences presented were incomplete (e.g., Susan will open/break the…). For controls, restrictive verbs elicited more target fixations immediately after the verb; however, the effects of verb type were noted downstream from the verb for the aphasic listeners. The results suggest that individuals with agrammatic aphasia have preserved ability to use verb information to facilitate integration of overt arguments, but prediction of upcoming arguments is impaired. Impaired lexical-semantic prediction processes may be caused by damage to the left inferior frontal gyrus, which has been argued to support higher-level lexical processes. PMID:24092952

  17. The sound-induced flash illusion reveals dissociable age-related effects in multisensory integration

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, David P.; Roudaia, Eugenie; Stapleton, John; McGinnity, T. Martin; Newell, Fiona N.

    2014-01-01

    While aging can lead to significant declines in perceptual and cognitive function, the effects of age on multisensory integration, the process in which the brain combines information across the senses, are less clear. Recent reports suggest that older adults are susceptible to the sound-induced flash illusion (Shams et al., 2000) across a much wider range of temporal asynchronies than younger adults (Setti et al., 2011). To assess whether this cost for multisensory integration is a general phenomenon of combining asynchronous audiovisual input, we compared the time courses of two variants of the sound-induced flash illusion in young and older adults: the fission illusion, where one flash accompanied by two beeps appears as two flashes, and the fusion illusion, where two flashes accompanied by one beep appear as one flash. Twenty-five younger (18–30 years) and older (65+ years) adults were required to report whether they perceived one or two flashes, whilst ignoring irrelevant auditory beeps, in bimodal trials where auditory and visual stimuli were separated by one of six stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). There was a marked difference in the pattern of results for the two variants of the illusion. In conditions known to produce the fission illusion, older adults were significantly more susceptible to the illusion at longer SOAs compared to younger participants. In contrast, the performance of the younger and older groups was almost identical in conditions known to produce the fusion illusion. This surprising difference between sound-induced fission and fusion in older adults suggests dissociable age-related effects in multisensory integration, consistent with the idea that these illusions are mediated by distinct neural mechanisms. PMID:25309430

  18. Effectiveness of Integrative Modalities for Pain and Anxiety in Children and Adolescents with Cancer: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Thrane, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the trajectory of the cancer experience, children and adolescents will likely face pain and anxiety in a variety of circumstances. Integrative therapies may be used either alone or as an adjunct to standard analgesics. Children are often very receptive to integrative therapies such as music, art, guided imagery, massage, therapeutic play, distraction, and other modalities (Doellman, 2003). The effect of integrative modalities on pain and anxiety in children with cancer has not been systematically examined across the entire cancer experience. An in-depth search of PubMed, CINAHL, MedLine, PsychInfo, and Web of Science, integrative medicine journals, and the reference lists of review articles using the search terms pain, anxiety, pediatric, child*, oncology, cancer, neoplasm, complementary, integrative, non-conventional, and unconventional yielded 164 articles. Of these, 25 warranted full-text review. Cohen’s d calculations show medium (d=.70) to extremely large (8.57) effect sizes indicating that integrative interventions may be very effective for pain and anxiety in children undergoing cancer treatment. Integrative modalities warrant further study with larger sample sizes to better determine their effectiveness in this population. PMID:24371260

  19. Effectiveness of integrative modalities for pain and anxiety in children and adolescents with cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Thrane, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the trajectory of the cancer experience, children and adolescents will likely face pain and anxiety in a variety of circumstances. Integrative therapies may be used either alone or as an adjunct to standard analgesics. Children are often very receptive to integrative therapies such as music, art, guided imagery, massage, therapeutic play, distraction, and other modalities. The effect of integrative modalities on pain and anxiety in children with cancer has not been systematically examined across the entire cancer experience. An in-depth search of PubMed, CINAHL, MedLine, PsychInfo, and Web of Science, integrative medicine journals, and the reference lists of review articles using the search terms pain, anxiety, pediatric, child*, oncology, cancer, neoplasm, complementary, integrative, nonconventional, and unconventional yielded 164 articles. Of these, 25 warranted full-text review. Cohen's d calculations show medium (d = 0.70) to extremely large (8.57) effect sizes indicating that integrative interventions may be very effective for pain and anxiety in children undergoing cancer treatment. Integrative modalities warrant further study with larger sample sizes to better determine their effectiveness in this population.

  20. Measurement of the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe Effect Using the AllWISE Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajib, Anowar J.; Wright, Edward L.

    2016-08-01

    One of the physical features of a dark-energy-dominated universe is the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, which gives us a direct observational window to detect and study dark energy. The AllWISE data release of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has a large number of point sources which span a wide redshift range, including where the ISW effect is maximized. AllWISE data are thus very well-suited for the ISW effect studies. In this study, we cross-correlate AllWISE galaxy and active galactic nucleus (AGN) overdensities with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe CMB temperature maps to detect the ISW effect signal. We calibrate the biases for galaxies and AGNs by cross-correlating the galaxy and AGN overdensities with the Planck lensing convergence map. We measure the ISW effect signal amplitudes relative to the ΛCDM expectation of A = 1 to be A=1.18+/- 0.36 for galaxies and A=0.64+/- 0.74 for AGNs. The detection significances for the ISW effect signal are 3.3σ and 0.9σ for galaxies and AGNs, respectively, providing a combined significance of 3.4σ . Our result is in agreement with the ΛCDM model.

  1. Follicle stimulating hormone receptor in mesenchymal stem cells integrates effects of glycoprotein reproductive hormones.

    PubMed

    Tourkova, Irina L; Witt, Michelle R; Li, La; Larrouture, Quitterie; Liu, Li; Luo, Jianhua; Robinson, Lisa J; Blair, Harry C

    2015-01-01

    Previously we reported that follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) affects bone degradation in human cells and in follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R) null mice. Here we describe a FSH-R knockout bone-formation phenotype. We used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblast precursors that express FSH-R, to determine whether FSH regulates bone formation. FSH stimulates MSC cell adhesion 1-3 h and proliferation at 24 h after addition. On the basis of phylogenetic and clinical precedents, we also examined effects of pregnant levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on MSCs. We found effects similar to those of FSH, and RNAi knockdown of FSH-R abrogated both FSH and hCG effects on MSCs. In contrast to effects on MSCs, neither FSH nor hCG had significant effects on osteoblast maturation. Also in MSCs, short-term treatment by FSH and hCG altered signaling pathways for proliferation, including Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Our results show augmentation of MSC proliferation by either FSH at menopausal levels or hCG at normal pregnant levels. We conclude that FSH-R participates in regulation of MSC precursor pools in response to either FSH or hCG, integrating the effects of these two glycoprotein hormones.

  2. Follicle stimulating hormone receptor in mesenchymal stem cells integrates effects of glycoprotein reproductive hormones

    PubMed Central

    Tourkova, Irina L.; Witt, Michelle R.; Li, La; Larrouture, Quitterie; Liu, Li; Luo, Jianhua; Robinson, Lisa J.; Blair, Harry C.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported that follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) affects bone degradation in human cells and in FSH-R null mice. Here we describe a FSH-R knockout bone formation phenotype. We used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblast precursors that express follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R), to determine whether FSH regulates bone formation. FSH stimulates MSC cell adhesion 1–3 h and proliferation at 24 h after addition. On the basis of phylogenetic and clinical precedents, we also examined effects of pregnant levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on MSCs. We found effects similar to those of FSH, and RNAi knockdown of FSH-R abrogated both FSH and hCG effects on MSCs. In contrast to effects on MSCs, neither FSH nor hCG had significant effects on osteoblast maturation. Also in MSCs, short term treatment by FSH and hCG altered signaling pathways for proliferation, including Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Our results show augmentation of MSC proliferation by either FSH at menopausal levels or hCG at normal pregnant levels. We conclude that FSH-R participates in regulation of MSC precursor pools in response to either FSH or hCG, integrating the effects of these two glycoprotein hormones. PMID:25118101

  3. Effects of patch contrast and arrangement on benefits of clonal integration in a rhizomatous clonal plant

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Shi, Xue-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Meng, Xue-Feng; Wang, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Zhi-Xiang; Luo, Fang-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2016-01-01

    The availabilities of light and soil water resources usually spatially co-vary in natural habitats, and the spatial pattern of such co-variation may affect the benefits of physiological integration between connected ramets of clonal plants. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew connected or disconnected ramet pairs [consisting of a proximal (relatively old) and a distal (relative young) ramet] of a rhizomatous herb Iris japonica in four heterogeneous environments differing in patch arrangement (reciprocal vs. parallel patchiness of light and soil water) and patch contrast (high vs. low contrast of light and water). Biomass of the proximal part, distal part and clonal fragment of I. japonica were all significantly greater in the intact than in the severed treatment, in the parallel than in the reciprocal patchiness treatment and in the high than in the low contrast treatment, but the effect of severing the connection between ramet pairs did not depend on patch arrangement or contrast. Severing the connection decreased number of ramets of the distal part and the clonal fragment in the parallel patchiness arrangement, but not in the reciprocal patchiness arrangement. Therefore, the spatial arrangement of resource patches can alter the effects of clonal integration on asexual reproduction in I. japonica. PMID:27759040

  4. A simple, effective media access protocol system for integrated, high data rate networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, K.; Overstreet, C. M.; Khanna, S.; Zhang, L.

    1992-01-01

    The operation and performance of a dual media access protocol for integrated, gigabit networks are described. Unlike other dual protocols, each protocol supports a different class of traffic. The Carrier Sensed Multiple Access-Ring Network (CSMA/RN) protocol and the Circulating Reservation Packet (CRP) protocol support asynchronous and synchronous traffic, respectively. The two protocols operate with minimal impact upon each other. Performance information demonstrates that they support a complete range of integrated traffic loads, do not require call setup/termination or a special node for synchronous traffic control, and provide effective pre-use and recovery. The CRP also provides guaranteed access and fairness control for the asynchronous system. The paper demonstrates that the CSMA-CRP system fulfills many of the requirements for gigabit LAN-MAN networks most effectively and simply. To accomplish this, CSMA-CRP features are compared against similar ring and bus systems, such as Cambridge Fast Ring, Metaring, Cyclic Reservation Multiple Access, and Distributed Dual Queue Data Bus (DQDB).

  5. Cost-Effective Integration of Efficient Low-Lift Base Load Cooling Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Wei; Winiarski, David W.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Armstrong, Peter R.

    2008-01-14

    The long-term goal of DOE’s Commercial Buildings Integration subprogram is to develop cost-effective technologies and building practices that will enable the design and construction of net Zero Energy Buildings — commercial buildings that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis — by 2025. To support this long-term goal, DOE further called for — as part of its FY07 Statement of Needs — the development by 2010 of “five cost-effective design technology option sets using highly efficient component technologies, integrated controls, improved construction practices, streamlined commissioning, maintenance and operating procedures that will make new and existing commercial buildings durable, healthy and safe for occupants.” In response, PNNL proposed and DOE funded a scoping study investigation of one such technology option set, low-lift cooling, that offers potentially exemplary HVAC energy performance relative to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The primary purpose of the scoping study was to estimate the national technical energy savings potential of this TOS.

  6. ac Josephson effects in Nb/InAs/Nb junctions with integrated resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, K.; Chrestin, A.; Matsuyama, T.; Merkt, U.

    2001-04-01

    Investigations of the ac Josephson effect in Nb/p-type InAs/Nb junctions are presented. Two distinguished features of these devices are an integrated resonator formed by the overlap of two Nb electrodes with an intermediate anodic oxide and their high characteristic voltages IcRN of about 1 mV. Under radio-frequency irradiation, we observe Shapiro steps whose widths follow Bessel functions for high irradiated power. Because of the integrated resonator, self-resonances of the ac Josephson effect can be studied in the current-voltage characteristics. Using a modified resistively shunted junction model which accounts for the presence of the resonator and a nonuniform lateral current distribution, we can describe the magnetic-field dependence of the resonance amplitude. A resonance is also observed when the Josephson frequency is exactly half the lowest resonance frequency, which is beyond the simple model. A possible explanation is provided by a nonsinusoidal current-phase relation established under nonequilibrium conditions.

  7. The effect of discourse structure on depth of semantic integration in reading.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Lijing; Yang, Yufang

    2014-02-01

    A coherent discourse exhibits certain structures in that subunits of discourses are related to one another in various ways and in that subunits that contribute to the same discourse purpose are joined to create a larger unit so as to produce an effect on the reader. To date, this crucial aspect of discourse has been largely neglected in the psycholinguistic literature. In two experiments, we examined whether semantic integration in discourse context was influenced by the difference of discourse structure. Readers read discourses in which the last sentence was locally congruent but either semantically congruent or incongruent when interpreted with the preceding sentence. Furthermore, the last sentence was either in the same discourse unit or not in the same discourse unit as the preceding sentence, depending on whether they shared the same discourse purpose. Results from self-paced reading (Experiment 1) and eye tracking (Experiment 2) showed that discourse-incongruous words were read longer than discourse-congruous words only when the critical sentence and the preceding sentence were in the same discourse unit, but not when they belonged to different discourse units. These results establish discourse structure as a new factor in semantic integration and suggest that discourse effects depend both on the content of what is being said and on the way that the contents are organized.

  8. Path integral calculation of free energies: quantum effects on the melting temperature of neon.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, R; Herrero, C P; Antonelli, A; Hernández, E R

    2008-08-14

    The path integral formulation has been combined with several methods to determine free energies of quantum many-body systems, such as adiabatic switching and reversible scaling. These techniques are alternatives to the standard thermodynamic integration method. A quantum Einstein crystal is used as a model to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of these free energy methods in quantum simulations. Our main interest focuses on the calculation of the melting temperature of Ne at ambient pressure, taking into account quantum effects in the atomic dynamics. The free energy of the solid was calculated by considering a quantum Einstein crystal as reference state, while for the liquid, the reference state was defined by the classical limit of the fluid. Our findings indicate that, while quantum effects in the melting temperature of this system are small, they still amount to about 6% of the melting temperature, and are therefore not negligible. The particle density as well as the melting enthalpy and entropy of the solid and liquid phases at coexistence is compared to results obtained in the classical limit and also to available experimental data.

  9. Identification of integrated airframe: Propulsion effects on an F-15 aircraft for application to drag minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.

    1993-01-01

    The application of an adaptive real-time measurement-based performance optimization technique is being explored for a future flight research program. The key technical challenge of the approach is parameter identification, which uses a perturbation-search technique to identify changes in performance caused by forced oscillations of the controls. The controls on the NASA F-15 highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) aircraft were perturbed using inlet cowl rotation steps at various subsonic and supersonic flight conditions to determine the effect on aircraft performance. The feasibility of the perturbation-search technique for identifying integrated airframe-propulsion system performance effects was successfully shown through flight experiments and postflight data analysis. Aircraft response and control data were analyzed postflight to identify gradients and to determine the minimum drag point. Changes in longitudinal acceleration as small as 0.004 g were measured, and absolute resolution was estimated to be 0.002 g or approximately 50 lbf of drag. Two techniques for identifying performance gradients were compared: a least-squares estimation algorithm and a modified maximum likelihood estimator algorithm. A complementary filter algorithm was used with the least squares estimator.

  10. Effect of shape and coating of a subretinal prosthesis on its integration with the retina.

    PubMed

    Butterwick, A; Huie, P; Jones, B W; Marc, R E; Marmor, M; Palanker, D

    2009-01-01

    Retinal stimulation with high spatial resolution requires close proximity of electrodes to target cells. This study examines the effects of material coatings and 3-dimensional geometries of subretinal prostheses on their integration with the retina. A trans-scleral implantation technique was developed to place microfabricated structures in the subretinal space of RCS rats. The effect of three coatings (silicon oxide, iridium oxide and parylene) and three geometries (flat, pillars and chambers) on the retinal integration was compared using passive implants. Retinal morphology was evaluated histologically 6 weeks after implantation. For 3-dimensional implants the retinal cell phenotype was also evaluated using Computational Molecular Phenotyping. Flat implants coated with parylene and iridium oxide were generally well tolerated in the subretinal space, inducing only a mild gliotic response. However, silicon-oxide coatings induced the formation of a significant fibrotic seal around the implants. Glial proliferation was observed at the base of the pillar electrode arrays and inside the chambers. The non-traumatic penetration of pillar tips into the retina provided uniform and stable proximity to the inner nuclear layer. Retinal cells migrated into chambers with apertures larger than 10 mum. Both pillars and chambers achieved better proximity to the inner retinal cells than flat implants. However, isolation of retinal cells inside the chamber arrays is likely to affect their long-term viability. Pillars demonstrated minimal alteration of the inner retinal architecture, and thus appear to be the most promising approach for maintaining close proximity between the retinal prosthetic electrodes and target neurons.

  11. Integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective biosolids management at a large Canadian wastewater treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, R J; Allain, C J; Laughton, P J; Henry, J G

    2004-01-01

    The Greater Moncton Sewerage Commission's 115,000 m3/d advanced, chemically assisted primary wastewater treatment facility located in New Brunswick, Canada, has developed an integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective programme for the management and beneficial utilization of biosolids from lime stabilized raw sludge. The paper overviews biosolids production, lime stabilization, conveyance, and odour control followed by an indepth discussion of the wastewater sludge as a resource programme, namely: composting, mine site reclamation, landfill cover, land application for agricultural use, tree farming, sod farm base as a soil enrichment, topsoil manufacturing. The paper also addresses the issues of metals, pathogens, organic compounds, the quality control program along with the regulatory requirements. Biosolids capital and operating costs are presented. Research results on removal of metals from primary sludge using a unique biological process known as BIOSOL as developed by the University of Toronto, Canada to remove metals and destroy pathogens are presented. The paper also discusses an ongoing cooperative research project with the Université de Moncton where various mixtures of plant biosolids are composted with low quality soil. Integration, approach to sustainability and "cumulative effects" as part of the overall biosolids management strategy are also discussed.

  12. Measurement-Based Investigation of Inter- and Intra-Area Effects of Wind Power Plant Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Alicia J.; Singh, Mohit; Muljadi, Eduard; Santoso, Surya

    2016-12-01

    This paper has a two pronged objective: the first objective is to analyze the general effects of wind power plant (WPP) integration and the resulting displacement of conventional power plant (CPP) inertia on power system stability and the second is to demonstrate the efficacy of PMU data in power system stability analyses, specifically when knowledge of the network is incomplete. Traditionally modal analysis applies small signal stability analysis based on Eigenvalues and the assumption of complete knowledge of the network and all of its components. The analysis presented here differs because it is a measurement-based investigation and employs simulated measurement data. Even if knowledge of the network were incomplete, this methodology would allow for monitoring and analysis of modes. This allows non-utility entities and study of power system stability. To generate inter- and intra-area modes, Kundur's well-known two-area four-generator system is modeled in PSCAD/EMTDC. A doubly-fed induction generator based WPP model, based on the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) standard model, is included to analyze the effects of wind power on system modes. The two-area system and WPP are connected in various configurations with respect to WPP placement, CPP inertia and WPP penetration level. Analysis is performed on the data generated by the simulations. For each simulation run, a different configuration is chosen and a large disturbance is applied. The sampling frequency is set to resemble the sampling frequency at which data is available from phasor measurement units (PMUs). The estimate of power spectral density of these signals is made using the Yule-Walker algorithm. The resulting analysis shows that the presence of a WPP does not, of itself, lead to the introduction of new modes. The analysis also shows however that displacement of inertia may lead to introduction of new modes. The effects of location of inertia displacement (i.e. the effects on modes if

  13. Delineating the Effect of Semantic Congruency on Episodic Memory: The Role of Integration and Relatedness

    PubMed Central

    Bein, Oded; Livneh, Neta; Reggev, Niv; Gilead, Michael; Goshen-Gottstein, Yonatan; Maril, Anat

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in the study of learning and memory is to understand the role of existing knowledge in the encoding and retrieval of new episodic information. The importance of prior knowledge in memory is demonstrated in the congruency effect—the robust finding wherein participants display better memory for items that are compatible, rather than incompatible, with their pre-existing semantic knowledge. Despite its robustness, the mechanism underlying this effect is not well understood. In four studies, we provide evidence that demonstrates the privileged explanatory power of the elaboration-integration account over alternative hypotheses. Furthermore, we question the implicit assumption that the congruency effect pertains to the truthfulness/sensibility of a subject-predicate proposition, and show that congruency is a function of semantic relatedness between item and context words. PMID:25695759

  14. Parallel Computation of Integrated Electromagnetic, Thermal and Structural Effects for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V.; Candel, A.E.; Kabel, A.C.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    The successful operation of accelerator cavities has to satisfy both rf and mechanical requirements. It is highly desirable that electromagnetic, thermal and structural effects such as cavity wall heating and Lorentz force detuning in superconducting rf cavities can be addressed in an integrated analysis. Based on the SLAC parallel finite-element code infrastructure for electromagnetic modeling, a novel multi-physics analysis tool has been developed to include additional thermal and mechanical effects. The parallel computation enables virtual prototyping of accelerator cavities on computers, which would substantially reduce the cost and time of a design cycle. The multi-physics tool is applied to the LCLS rf gun for electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses.

  15. Integral-geometry characterization of photobiomodulation effects on retinal vessel morphology

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Marconi; Natoli, Riccardo; Valter, Kriztina; Provis, Jan; Maddess, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The morphological characterization of quasi-planar structures represented by gray-scale images is challenging when object identification is sub-optimal due to registration artifacts. We propose two alternative procedures that enhances object identification in the integral-geometry morphological image analysis (MIA) framework. The first variant streamlines the framework by introducing an active contours segmentation process whose time step is recycled as a multi-scale parameter. In the second variant, we used the refined object identification produced in the first variant to perform the standard MIA with exact dilation radius as multi-scale parameter. Using this enhanced MIA we quantify the extent of vaso-obliteration in oxygen-induced retinopathic vascular growth, the preventative effect (by photobiomodulation) of exposure during tissue development to near-infrared light (NIR, 670 nm), and the lack of adverse effects due to exposure to NIR light. PMID:25071966

  16. Grounding positions of superconducting layer for effective magnetic isolation in Josephson integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, Yoshinao; Kashiwa, Ryuta; Moriya, Masataka; Usami, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Tadayuki

    2007-06-01

    Mutual inductances between two superconducting strip lines coupled through a grounded shield layer are evaluated by both experiments and numerical calculation. A conventional superconducting quantum interference device method on a Nb Josephson integrated circuit chip is employed for experiments. Four test circuits are designed to investigate the effects of ground contacts. Grounding the shield layer at one point or at two points located perpendicular to the line direction does not improve the shielding effect, whereas grounding at two points located parallel to the line direction reduced the mutual inductance by 67%. Mutual inductances calculated using an inductance extraction program, FASTHENRY, agree with the experimental results. Numerical results of current distributions in the shield layers demonstrate that the enhanced shielding current improves the magnetic isolation.

  17. Integrated Pest Management in a Predator-Prey System with Allee Effects.

    PubMed

    Costa, M I S; dos Anjos, L

    2015-08-01

    A commonly used biocontrol strategy to control invasive pests with Allee effects consists of the deliberate introduction of natural enemies. To enhance the effectiveness of this strategy, several tactics of control of invasive species (e.g., mass-trapping, manual removal of individuals, and pesticide spraying) are combined so as to impair pest outbreaks. This combination of strategies to control pest species dynamics are usually named integrated pest management (IPM). In this work, we devise a predator-prey dynamical model in order to assess the influence of the intensity of chemical killing on the success of an IPM. The biological and mathematical framework presented in this study can also be analyzed in the light of species conservation and food web dynamics theory.

  18. Wollaston's effect in infants: Do infants integrate eye and head information in gaze perception?

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yumiko; Ichikawa, Hiroko; Clifford, Colin W G; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined infants' sensitivity to Wollaston's effect: When identical eyes are placed in differently angled faces, the perceived gaze direction shifts toward the orientation of the face such that physically, the direct gaze is perceived as averted toward the orientation of the face. Consistent with Wollaston's effect, we found that looking toward direct and averted gaze by 4- to 5- and 7- to 8-month-olds (n = 40) was affected by the head orientation context. These results demonstrate that infants aged 4 to 5 and 7 to 8 months integrate eye and head information to perceive another's gaze direction. In light of recent psychophysical findings, the current results suggest that the visual function supporting constant gaze perception across head rotation is already at work by 4 to 5 months of age.

  19. Strategies for Effectively Visualizing a 3D Flow Using Volume Line Integral Convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses strategies for effectively portraying 3D flow using volume line integral convolution. Issues include defining an appropriate input texture, clarifying the distinct identities and relative depths of the advected texture elements, and selectively highlighting regions of interest in both the input and output volumes. Apart from offering insights into the greater potential of 3D LIC as a method for effectively representing flow in a volume, a principal contribution of this work is the suggestion of a technique for generating and rendering 3D visibility-impeding 'halos' that can help to intuitively indicate the presence of depth discontinuities between contiguous elements in a projection and thereby clarify the 3D spatial organization of elements in the flow. The proposed techniques are applied to the visualization of a hot, supersonic, laminar jet exiting into a colder, subsonic coflow.

  20. What Works in Gifted Education: Documenting the Effects of an Integrated Curricular/Instructional Model for Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Carolyn M.; Moon, Tonya R.; Oh, Sarah; Azano, Amy P.; Hailey, Emily P.

    2015-01-01

    The heart of effective programming for gifted students lies in the integration of advanced curricula with effective instructional strategies to develop leaning activities that will enhance student learning outcomes. However, empirical evidence of the effectiveness of units based on such curricular and instructional interventions from large-scale…

  1. A functional–structural kiwifruit vine model integrating architecture, carbon dynamics and effects of the environment

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Mikolaj; Seleznyova, Alla N.; Hanan, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Functional–structural modelling can be used to increase our understanding of how different aspects of plant structure and function interact, identify knowledge gaps and guide priorities for future experimentation. By integrating existing knowledge of the different aspects of the kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) vine's architecture and physiology, our aim is to develop conceptual and mathematical hypotheses on several of the vine's features: (a) plasticity of the vine's architecture; (b) effects of organ position within the canopy on its size; (c) effects of environment and horticultural management on shoot growth, light distribution and organ size; and (d) role of carbon reserves in early shoot growth. Methods Using the L-system modelling platform, a functional–structural plant model of a kiwifruit vine was created that integrates architectural development, mechanistic modelling of carbon transport and allocation, and environmental and management effects on vine and fruit growth. The branching pattern was captured at the individual shoot level by modelling axillary shoot development using a discrete-time Markov chain. An existing carbon transport resistance model was extended to account for several source/sink components of individual plant elements. A quasi-Monte Carlo path-tracing algorithm was used to estimate the absorbed irradiance of each leaf. Key Results Several simulations were performed to illustrate the model's potential to reproduce the major features of the vine's behaviour. The model simulated vine growth responses that were qualitatively similar to those observed in experiments, including the plastic response of shoot growth to local carbon supply, the branching patterns of two Actinidia species, the effect of carbon limitation and topological distance on fruit size and the complex behaviour of sink competition for carbon. Conclusions The model is able to reproduce differences in vine and fruit growth arising from various

  2. Modest additive effects of integrated vector control measures on malaria prevalence and transmission in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of integrating vector larval intervention on malaria transmission is unknown when insecticide-treated bed-net (ITN) coverage is very high, and the optimal indicator for intervention evaluation needs to be determined when transmission is low. Methods A post hoc assignment of intervention-control cluster design was used to assess the added effect of both indoor residual spraying (IRS) and Bacillus-based larvicides (Bti) in addition to ITN in the western Kenyan highlands in 2010 and 2011. Cross-sectional, mass parasite screenings, adult vector populations, and cohort of active case surveillance (ACS) were conducted before and after the intervention in three study sites with two- to three-paired intervention-control clusters at each site each year. The effect of larviciding, IRS, ITNs and other determinants of malaria risk was assessed by means of mixed estimating methods. Results Average ITN coverage increased from 41% in 2010 to 92% in 2011 in the study sites. IRS intervention had significant added impact on reducing vector density in 2010 but the impact was modest in 2011. The effect of IRS on reducing parasite prevalence was significant in 2011 but was seasonal specific in 2010. ITN was significantly associated with parasite densities in 2010 but IRS application was significantly correlated with reduced gametocyte density in 2011. IRS application reduced about half of the clinical malaria cases in 2010 and about one-third in 2011 compare to non-intervention areas. Conclusion Compared with a similar study conducted in 2005, the efficacy of the current integrated vector control with ITN, IRS, and Bti reduced three- to five-fold despite high ITN coverage, reflecting a modest added impact on malaria transmission. Additional strategies need to be developed to further reduce malaria transmission. PMID:23870708

  3. Probing violation of the Copernican principle via the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Kenji; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2009-05-15

    Recent observational data of supernovae point to {lambda}-dominated flat cosmological models. However, an alternative model in which we happen to live in an underdense region requires no dark energy or modification of gravity. This challenges the Copernican principle. We show that the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is an excellent discriminator between anti-Copernican inhomogeneous models and the standard Copernican models. As a reference model, we consider an anti-Copernican inhomogeneous model that consists of two inner negatively curved underdense regions and an outer flat Einstein-de Sitter region. We assume that these regions are connected by two thin walls at redshifts z=0.067 and z=0.45. In the inner two regions, the first-order ISW effect is dominant and comparable to that in the concordant flat-{lambda} models. In the outer Einstein-de Sitter region, the first-order ISW effect vanishes but the second-order ISW effect plays a dominant role, while the first-order ISW effect is dominant in the flat-{lambda} models at moderate redshifts. This difference can discriminate the anti-Copernican models from the concordant flat-{lambda} model. At high redshifts, the second-order ISW effect is dominant both in our inhomogeneous model and in the concordant model. In the outer region, moreover, the ISW effect due to large-scale density perturbations with a present matter density contrast {epsilon}{sub m0}<<0.37 is negligible, while the effect due to small-scale density perturbations (such as clusters of galaxies, superclusters, and voids) with {epsilon}{sub m0}>>0.37 would generate anisotropies which are larger than those generated by the ISW effect in the concordant model.

  4. Using epidemiological information to develop effective integrated virus disease management strategies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Roger A C

    2004-03-01

    Virus diseases cause serious losses in yield and quality of cultivated plants worldwide. These losses and the resulting financial damage can be limited by controlling epidemics using measures that minimise virus infection sources or suppress virus spread. For each combination of virus, cultivated plant and production system, there is an 'economic threshold' above which the financial damage is sufficient to justify using such measures. However, individual measures used alone may bring only small benefits and they may become ineffective, especially over the long term. When diverse control measures that act in different ways are combined and used together, their effects are complementary resulting in far more effective overall control. Such experiences have led to the development of integrated management concepts for virus diseases that combine available host resistance, cultural, chemical and biological control measures. Selecting the ideal mix of measures for each pathosystem and production situation requires detailed knowledge of the epidemiology of the causal virus and the mode of action of each individual control measure so that diverse responses can be devised to meet the unique features of each of the different scenarios considered. The strategies developed must be robust and necessitate minimal extra expense, labour demands and disruption to standard practices. Examples of how epidemiological information can be used to develop effective integrated disease management (IDM) strategies for diverse situations are described. They involve circumstances where virus transmission from plant-to-plant occurs in four different ways: by contact, non-persistently or persistently by insect vectors, and by root-infecting fungi. The examples are: Subterranean clover mottle virus (SCMoV) (contact-transmitted) and Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) (non-persistently aphid-transmitted) in annually self-regenerating clover pasture; three seed-borne viruses (all non-persistently aphid

  5. Nanocarbon-based membrane filtration integrated with electric field driving for effective membrane fouling mitigation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinfei; Zhao, Huimin; Quan, Xie; Liu, Yanming; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Membrane filtration provides an effective solution for removing pollutants from water but is limited by serious membrane fouling. In this work, an effective approach was used to mitigate membrane fouling by integrating membrane filtration with electropolarization using an electroconductive nanocarbon-based membrane. The electropolarized membrane (EM) by alternating square-wave potentials between +1.0 V and -1.0 V with a pulse width of 60 s exhibited a permeate flux 8.1 times as high as that without electropolarization for filtering feed water containing bacteria, which confirms the ability of the EM to achieve biofouling mitigation. Moreover, the permeate flux of EM was 1.5 times as high as that without electropolarization when filtrating natural organic matter (NOM) from water, and demonstrated good performance in organic fouling mitigation with EM. Furthermore, the EM was also effective for complex fouling mitigation in filtering water containing coexisting bacteria and NOM, and presented an increased flux rate 1.9 times as high as that without electropolarization. The superior fouling mitigation performance of EM was attributed to the synergistic effects of electrostatic repulsion, electrochemical oxidation and electrokinetic behaviors. This work opens an effective avenue for membrane fouling mitigation of water-treatment membrane filtration systems.

  6. Threshold conditions for integrated pest management models with pesticides that have residual effects.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sanyi; Liang, Juhua; Tan, Yuanshun; Cheke, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Impulsive differential equations (hybrid dynamical systems) can provide a natural description of pulse-like actions such as when a pesticide kills a pest instantly. However, pesticides may have long-term residual effects, with some remaining active against pests for several weeks, months or years. Therefore, a more realistic method for modelling chemical control in such cases is to use continuous or piecewise-continuous periodic functions which affect growth rates. How to evaluate the effects of the duration of the pesticide residual effectiveness on successful pest control is key to the implementation of integrated pest management (IPM) in practice. To address these questions in detail, we have modelled IPM including residual effects of pesticides in terms of fixed pulse-type actions. The stability threshold conditions for pest eradication are given. Moreover, effects of the killing efficiency rate and the decay rate of the pesticide on the pest and on its natural enemies, the duration of residual effectiveness, the number of pesticide applications and the number of natural enemy releases on the threshold conditions are investigated with regard to the extent of depression or resurgence resulting from pulses of pesticide applications and predator releases. Latin Hypercube Sampling/Partial Rank Correlation uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques are employed to investigate the key control parameters which are most significantly related to threshold values. The findings combined with Volterra's principle confirm that when the pesticide has a strong effect on the natural enemies, repeated use of the same pesticide can result in target pest resurgence. The results also indicate that there exists an optimal number of pesticide applications which can suppress the pest most effectively, and this may help in the design of an optimal control strategy.

  7. Effect of different methods of cryopreservation on the cytoskeletal integrity of dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) embryos.

    PubMed

    Skidmore, J A; Schoevers, E; Stout, T A E

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the effect of different methods of cryopreservation on the cytoskeletal integrity of camel embryos. A total of 32 embryos were recovered on Days 6 and 7 after ovulation and measured before being frozen using either a conventional slow-cooling technique (n=12: six Day 6 and six Day 7 embryos) or vitrification (n=12: four Day 6 and eight Day 7). The remaining 8 'control' embryos (four Day 6 and four Day 7) were not cryopreserved but instead incubated in holding medium for 30 min. After thawing, warming or incubation, the embryos were stained with 4,6-diamino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) to identify dead cells. Subsequently, the embryos were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde, permeabilized and labelled with Alexa Fluor 488-Phalloidin to enable assessment of cytoskeleton integrity. Vitrified-warmed embryos contained a significantly higher percentage of dead cells than either conventionally frozen embryos or controls (P<0.05). Although the proportion of dead cells in conventionally frozen embryos tended to be higher than in controls, the difference was not significant (P> or =0.07). Whereas embryo size did not affect the number of dead cells in conventionally frozen embryos, vitrified-warmed embryos >300 microm in diameter had a significantly higher percentage of dead cells than embryos < or =300 microm (P=0.01). Cytoskeleton integrity was also affected by both freezing method and embryo diameter. All 8 control embryos had a Grade I cytoskeleton, compared with only 2/24 (8.3%) frozen or vitrified embryos. Of the 8 slow-frozen or vitrified embryos with a Grade III cytoskeleton post-thaw, 7 had been vitrified and 6 were larger (Day 7) embryos. These results indicate that while both slow-freezing and vitrification of camel embryos lead to cytoskeleton disruption and cell death, embryo quality is better preserved by slow-freezing.

  8. Integrating Problem-Based Learning and Simulation: Effects on Student Motivation and Life Skills.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Sang Suk

    2015-07-01

    Previous research has suggested that a teaching strategy integrating problem-based learning and simulation may be superior to traditional lecture. The purpose of this study was to assess learner motivation and life skills before and after taking a course involving problem-based learning and simulation. The design used repeated measures with a convenience sample of 83 second-year nursing students who completed the integrated course. Data from a self-administered questionnaire measuring learner motivation and life skills were collected at pretest, post-problem-based learning, and post-simulation time points. Repeated-measures analysis of variance determined that the mean scores for total learner motivation (F=6.62, P=.003), communication (F=8.27, P<.001), problem solving (F=6.91, P=.001), and self-directed learning (F=4.45, P=.016) differed significantly between time points. Post hoc tests using the Bonferroni correction revealed that total learner motivation and total life skills significantly increased both from pretest to postsimulation and from post-problem-based learning test to postsimulation test. Subscales of learner motivation and life skills, intrinsic goal orientation, self-efficacy for learning and performance, problem-solving skills, and self-directed learning skills significantly increased both from pretest to postsimulation test and from post-problem-based learning test to post-simulation test. The results demonstrate that an integrating problem-based learning and simulation course elicits significant improvement in learner motivation and life skills. Simulation plus problem-based learning is more effective than problem-based learning alone at increasing intrinsic goal orientation, task value, self-efficacy for learning and performance, problem solving, and self-directed learning.

  9. Efficiency and effectiveness of an innovative RIS function for patient information reconciliation directly integrated with PACS.

    PubMed

    Nitrosi, Andrea; Bertolini, Marco; Notari, Pietro; Botti, Andrea; Ginocchi, Vladimiro; Tondelli, Giulio; Iori, Mauro; Pattacini, Pierpaolo

    2013-06-01

    In RIS-PACS systems, potential errors occurring during the execution of a radiologic examination can amplify the clinical risks of the patient during subsequent treatments, e.g., of oncologic patients or of those who must do additional treatments based on the initial diagnosis. In Reggio Emilia Province Diagnostic Imaging Department (REDID) we experienced different strategies to reduce clinical risks due to patient reconciliation errors. In 2010, we developed a procedure directly integrated in our RIS-PACS that uses Health Level 7 (HL7) standard messaging, which generates an overlay with the text "under investigation" on the images of the study to be corrected. All the healthcare staff is informed of the meaning of that overlay, and only the radiologist and the emergency services staff can consult these images on PACS. The elimination of image overlay and of any access limitation to PACS was triggered to confirm of the right correction made by RIS-PACS system administrator (SA). The RIS-PACS integrated tool described in this paper allows technologists and radiologists to efficiently highlight patient exam errors and to inform all the users to minimize the overall clinical risks, with a significant savings in costs. Over the years, we have observed a steady decrease in the percentage of reconciled studies. Error reconciliation requires an effective and efficient mechanism. The RIS-PACS integrated tool described in this paper enables technologists and radiologists to quickly and efficiently highlight patient exam errors and inform all the users. Next generation of RIS-PACS could be equipped with similar reconciliation tools.

  10. Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Snorkel Surveys and Rotary Screw Trap, 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelle, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office conducted snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2006 survey periods as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. A total of 37,938 fish from 15 species/genera and an unknown category were enumerated. Chinook salmon were the overall most common fish observed and comprised 15% of fish enumerated followed by rainbow trout (10%) and mountain whitefish (7%). Day surveys were conducted during the summer period 2007 (August), while night surveys were conducted during the fall 2007 (October) surveys. The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) program from August through November of 2007. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 999 wild Oncorhynchus mykiss and 5,107 wild run O. tshawytscha were PIT tagged during the study period. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 22.3% for juvenile O. tshawytscha and 9.0% for juvenile O. mykiss. Rotary screw traps operated 7 days a week and remote capture operations were conducted when flow and temperature regimes permitted. This is third annual progress report to Bonneville Power Administration for the snorkel surveys conducted in the Entiat River as related to long-term effectiveness monitoring of restoration programs in this watershed. The objective of this study is to monitor the fish habitat utilization of planned in-stream restoration efforts in the Entiat River by conducting pre- and post-construction snorkel surveys at selected treatment and control sites.

  11. Contributions to understanding the high speed machining effects on aeronautic part surface integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, Walid

    To remain competitive, the aeronautic industry has increasing requirements for mechanical components and parts with high functional performance and longer in-service life. The improvement of the in-service life of components can be achieved by mastering and optimizing the surface integrity of the manufactured parts. Thus, the present study attempted to investigate, experimentally and theoretically, the tool/work material interactions on part surface integrity during the machining of aluminium alloys and hardened materials (low alloy steels) using orthogonal machining tests data. The studied materials are two aluminum alloys (6061-T6 and 7075-T651) and AISI 4340 steel. The AISI 4340 steel was machined after been induction heat treated to 58-60 HRC. These materials were selected in an attempt to provide a comprehensive study for the machining of metals with different behaviours (ductile and hard material). The proposed approach is built on three steps. First, we proposed a design of experiment (DOE) to analyse, experimentally, the chip formation and the resulting surface integrity during the high speed machining under dry condition. The orthogonal cutting mode, adopted in these experiments, allowed to explore, theoretically, the effects of technological (cutting speed and feed) and physical (cutting forces, temperature, shear angle, friction angle, and length Contact tool/chip) parameters on the chip formation mechanisms and the machined surface characteristics (residual stress, plastic deformation, phase transformation, etc.). The cutting conditions were chosen while maintaining a central composite design (CCD) with two factors (cutting speed and feed per revolution). For the aluminum 7075-T651, the results showed that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles are the main causes of the machined surface damage. The BUE formation increases with the cutting feed while the increase of the cutting speed

  12. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in a quintessence cosmological model: Including anisotropic stress of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. T.; Xu, L. X.; Gui, Y. X.

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the quintessence cold dark matter model with constant equation of state and constant speed of sound in dark energy rest frame, including dark energy perturbation and its anisotropic stress. Comparing with the {Lambda}CDM model, we find that the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW)-power spectrums are affected by different background evolutions and dark energy perturbation. As we change the speed of sound from 1 to 0 in the quintessence cold dark matter model with given state parameters, it is found that the inclusion of dark energy anisotropic stress makes the variation of magnitude of the ISW source uncertain due to the anticorrelation between the speed of sound and the ratio of dark energy density perturbation contrast to dark matter density perturbation contrast in the ISW-source term. Thus, the magnitude of the ISW-source term is governed by the competition between the alterant multiple of (1+3/2xc-circumflex{sub s}{sup 2}) and that of {delta}{sub de}/{delta}{sub m} with the variation of c-circumflex{sub s}{sup 2}.

  13. Graphene field-effect transistor array with integrated electrolytic gates scaled to 200 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, N. C. S.; Borme, J.; Machado, G., Jr.; Cerqueira, F.; Freitas, P. P.; Zucolotto, V.; Peres, N. M. R.; Alpuim, P.

    2016-03-01

    Ten years have passed since the beginning of graphene research. In this period we have witnessed breakthroughs both in fundamental and applied research. However, the development of graphene devices for mass production has not yet reached the same level of progress. The architecture of graphene field-effect transistors (FET) has not significantly changed, and the integration of devices at the wafer scale has generally not been sought. Currently, whenever an electrolyte-gated FET (EGFET) is used, an external, cumbersome, out-of-plane gate electrode is required. Here, an alternative architecture for graphene EGFET is presented. In this architecture, source, drain, and gate are in the same plane, eliminating the need for an external gate electrode and the use of an additional reservoir to confine the electrolyte inside the transistor active zone. This planar structure with an integrated gate allows for wafer-scale fabrication of high-performance graphene EGFETs, with carrier mobility up to 1800 cm2 V-1 s-1. As a proof-of principle, a chemical sensor was achieved. It is shown that the sensor can discriminate between saline solutions of different concentrations. The proposed architecture will facilitate the mass production of graphene sensors, materializing the potential of previous achievements in fundamental and applied graphene research.

  14. Mass Transport Effects in Suspended Waveguide Biosensors Integrated in Microfluidic Channels

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Chaitanya R.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2012-01-01

    Label-free optical biosensors based on integrated photonic devices have demonstrated sensitive and selective detection of biological analytes. Integrating these sensor platforms into microfluidic devices reduces the required sample volume and enables rapid delivery of sample to the sensor surface, thereby improving response times. Conventionally, these devices are embedded in or adjacent to the substrate; therefore, the effective sensing area lies within the slow-flow region at the floor of the channel, reducing the efficiency of sample delivery. Recently, a suspended waveguide sensor was developed in which the device is elevated off of the substrate and the sensing region does not rest on the substrate. This geometry places the sensing region in the middle of the parabolic velocity profile, reduces the distance that a particle must travel by diffusion to be detected, and allows binding to both surfaces of the sensor. We use a finite element model to simulate advection, diffusion, and specific binding of interleukin 6, a signaling protein, to this waveguide-based biosensor at a range of elevations within a microfluidic channel. We compare the transient performance of these suspended waveguide sensors with that of traditional planar devices, studying both the detection threshold response time and the time to reach equilibrium. We also develop a theoretical framework for predicting the behavior of these suspended sensors. These simulation and theoretical results provide a roadmap for improving sensor performance and minimizing the amount of sample required to make measurements. PMID:23202163

  15. Integrating across scales: Effectively applying science for the successful conservation of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mather, M. E.; Parrish, D.L.; Folt, C.L.; DeGraaf, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) is an excellent species on which to focus synthetic, integrative investigations because it is an economically important species that captures the public imagination, is heavily impacted by humans, uses several ecosystems over its life, and is the subject of a large body of extant literature. The following 24 papers were solicited to provide the biological basis for effective and innovative approaches that biologists, managers, and social scientists can use to develop policies that sustain Atlantic salmon and related species. Together these papers highlight the need for and benefits of (a) synthesizing within populations, (b) choosing the appropriate scale, (c) comparing across populations using rigorous, focused, question-oriented methods, (d) integrating across disciplines, (e) incorporating the human perspective, (f) linking multiple ecosystems, and (g) applied problem solving. To show how Atlantic salmon can guide research and conservation efforts for other species in other systems, we review the justification for the supplement and summarize the defining concepts that emerge from the volume.

  16. Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund Program Opens New Avenues for Effective Technology Integration into Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, Franco; Carlucci, Lisa Marie

    2006-04-01

    Technology is increasingly playing a major role in today's education often integrated into instruction to become one of the teacher's most effective and often indispensable tools used in the classroom. It can be said that the use of technology at the beginning of this new millennium is affecting the instructional process and it is changing some of its basic connotations. The presented work analyzes the impact of various technologies on education emphasizing the advantages provided by a successful integration, the obstacles encountered along the way, and the methodologies currently used in the process. ``Educational exchange can turn nations into people, contributing as no other form of communication can to the humanizing of international relations'' (Senator J.M. Fulbright). Technology of this modern era is providing the indispensable tool to achieve this superior level of communication overcoming historical, cultural, and language barriers. In the context of the Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund (JFMF) Teacher Program, we analyze the impact of technology on educational cross-cultural exchanges to raise awareness and interest of the scientific/educational community on the need of establishing stronger international relations promoting world peace and global prosperity.

  17. Integrating Genomics and Proteomics Data to Predict Drug Effects Using Binary Linear Programming

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhiwei; Su, Jing; Liu, Chenglin; Wang, Hongyan; Huang, Deshuang; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    The Library of Integrated Network-Based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) project aims to create a network-based understanding of biology by cataloging changes in gene expression and signal transduction that occur when cells are exposed to a variety of perturbations. It is helpful for understanding cell pathways and facilitating drug discovery. Here, we developed a novel approach to infer cell-specific pathways and identify a compound's effects using gene expression and phosphoproteomics data under treatments with different compounds. Gene expression data were employed to infer potential targets of compounds and create a generic pathway map. Binary linear programming (BLP) was then developed to optimize the generic pathway topology based on the mid-stage signaling response of phosphorylation. To demonstrate effectiveness of this approach, we built a generic pathway map for the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and inferred the cell-specific pathways by BLP. The first group of 11 compounds was utilized to optimize the generic pathways, and then 4 compounds were used to identify effects based on the inferred cell-specific pathways. Cross-validation indicated that the cell-specific pathways reliably predicted a compound's effects. Finally, we applied BLP to re-optimize the cell-specific pathways to predict the effects of 4 compounds (trichostatin A, MS-275, staurosporine, and digoxigenin) according to compound-induced topological alterations. Trichostatin A and MS-275 (both HDAC inhibitors) inhibited the downstream pathway of HDAC1 and caused cell growth arrest via activation of p53 and p21; the effects of digoxigenin were totally opposite. Staurosporine blocked the cell cycle via p53 and p21, but also promoted cell growth via activated HDAC1 and its downstream pathway. Our approach was also applied to the PC3 prostate cancer cell line, and the cross-validation analysis showed very good accuracy in predicting effects of 4 compounds. In summary, our computational model can be

  18. Integrating genomics and proteomics data to predict drug effects using binary linear programming.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiwei; Su, Jing; Liu, Chenglin; Wang, Hongyan; Huang, Deshuang; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    The Library of Integrated Network-Based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) project aims to create a network-based understanding of biology by cataloging changes in gene expression and signal transduction that occur when cells are exposed to a variety of perturbations. It is helpful for understanding cell pathways and facilitating drug discovery. Here, we developed a novel approach to infer cell-specific pathways and identify a compound's effects using gene expression and phosphoproteomics data under treatments with different compounds. Gene expression data were employed to infer potential targets of compounds and create a generic pathway map. Binary linear programming (BLP) was then developed to optimize the generic pathway topology based on the mid-stage signaling response of phosphorylation. To demonstrate effectiveness of this approach, we built a generic pathway map for the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and inferred the cell-specific pathways by BLP. The first group of 11 compounds was utilized to optimize the generic pathways, and then 4 compounds were used to identify effects based on the inferred cell-specific pathways. Cross-validation indicated that the cell-specific pathways reliably predicted a compound's effects. Finally, we applied BLP to re-optimize the cell-specific pathways to predict the effects of 4 compounds (trichostatin A, MS-275, staurosporine, and digoxigenin) according to compound-induced topological alterations. Trichostatin A and MS-275 (both HDAC inhibitors) inhibited the downstream pathway of HDAC1 and caused cell growth arrest via activation of p53 and p21; the effects of digoxigenin were totally opposite. Staurosporine blocked the cell cycle via p53 and p21, but also promoted cell growth via activated HDAC1 and its downstream pathway. Our approach was also applied to the PC3 prostate cancer cell line, and the cross-validation analysis showed very good accuracy in predicting effects of 4 compounds. In summary, our computational model can be

  19. Local and nonlocal optically induced transparency effects in graphene-silicon hybrid nanophotonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Longhai; Zheng, Jiajiu; Xu, Yang; Dai, Daoxin; He, Sailing

    2014-11-25

    Graphene is well-known as a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms arrayed in a honeycomb structure. It has some unique and fascinating properties, which are useful for realizing many optoelectronic devices and applications, including transistors, photodetectors, solar cells, and modulators. To enhance light-graphene interactions and take advantage of its properties, a promising approach is to combine a graphene sheet with optical waveguides, such as silicon nanophotonic wires considered in this paper. Here we report local and nonlocal optically induced transparency (OIT) effects in graphene-silicon hybrid nanophotonic integrated circuits. A low-power, continuous-wave laser is used as the pump light, and the power required for producing the OIT effect is as low as ∼0.1 mW. The corresponding power density is several orders lower than that needed for the previously reported saturated absorption effect in graphene, which implies a mechanism involving light absorption by the silicon and photocarrier transport through the silicon-graphene junction. The present OIT effect enables low power, all-optical, broadband control and sensing, modulation and switching locally and nonlocally.

  20. Integrating arm movement into bridge exercise: Effect on EMG activity of selected trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moung-Jin; Oh, Duck-Won; Park, Hyun-Ju

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether incorporating arm movement into bridge exercise changes the electromyographic (EMG) activity of selected trunk muscles. Twenty healthy young men were recruited for this study. EMG data were collected for the rectus abdominis (RA), internal oblique (IO), erector spinae (ES), and multifidus (MF) muscles of the dominant side. During bridging, an experimental procedure was performed with two options: an intervention factor (with and without arm movement) and a bridging factor (on the floor and on a therapeutic ball). There were significant main effects for the intervention factor in the IO and ES and for the bridging factor in the IO. The RA and IO showed significant interaction between the intervention and bridge factors. Furthermore, IO/RA ratio during bridging on the floor (without arm movement, 2.05±2.61; with arm movement, 3.24±3.42) and bridging on the ball (without arm movement: 2.95±3.87; with arm movement: 5.77±4.85) showed significant main effects for, and significant interaction between the intervention and bridge factors. However, no significant main effects or interaction were found for the MF/ES ratio. These findings suggest that integrating arm movements during bridge exercises may be used to provide preferential loading to certain trunk muscle groups and that these effects may be better derived by performing bridge exercises on a therapeutic ball.

  1. Integrated mask and optics simulations for mask corner rounding effect in OPC modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jing; Deng, Zhijie; Koo, Kyoil; Shiely, James; Lee, Sooryong; Zhang, Yunqiang; Fan, Yongfa; Schmoeller, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a novel mask corner rounding (MCR) modeling approach based on Synopsys' Integrated Mask and Optics (IMO) modeling framework. The point spread functions of single, double, and elliptical Gaussians are applied to the IMO mask kernels to simulate MCR effects. The simulation results on two dimensional patterns indicate that the aerial image intensity variation is proportional to the MCR induced effective area variations for single type corners. The relationship may be reversed when multiple types of corners exist, where the corners close to the maximum intensity region have a greater influence than others. The CD variations due to MCR can be estimated by the effective area variation ratio and the image slope around the threshold. The good fitting results on line-end patterns indicate that the ΔCD is the quadratic function of the Gaussian standard deviations. OPC modeling on 28nm-node contacts shows that MCR has significant impact on model fitting results and process window controls. By considering the real mask geometry effects and allowing in-line calibration of model parameters, the IMO simulation framework significantly improves the OPC model accuracy, and maintains the calibration speed at a good level.

  2. Integrating mindfulness with parent training: effects of the Mindfulness-Enhanced Strengthening Families Program.

    PubMed

    Coatsworth, J Douglas; Duncan, Larissa G; Nix, Robert L; Greenberg, Mark T; Gayles, Jochebed G; Bamberger, Katharine T; Berrena, Elaine; Demi, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    There is growing support for the efficacy of mindfulness training with parents as an intervention technique to improve parenting skills and reduce risk for youth problem behaviors. The evidence, however, has been limited to small scale studies, many with methodological shortcomings. This study sought to integrate mindfulness training with parents into the Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10-14 (SFP 10-14), an empirically-validated family-based preventive intervention. It used a randomized-controlled comparative effectiveness study design (N = 432 families, 31% racial/ethnic minority) to test the efficacy of the Mindfulness-Enhanced Strengthening Families Program (MSFP), compared to standard SFP 10-14 and a minimal-treatment home study control condition. Results indicated that, in general, MSFP was as effective as SFP 10-14 in improving multiple dimensions of parenting, including interpersonal mindfulness in parenting, parent-youth relationship quality, youth behavior management, and parent well-being, according to both parent and youth reports at both postintervention and 1-year follow-up. This study also found that in some areas MSFP boosted and better sustained the effects of SFP 10-14, especially for fathers. Although the pattern of effects was not as uniform as hypothesized, this study provides intriguing evidence for the unique contribution of mindfulness activities to standard parent training.

  3. Effects of supplemental zinc amino acid complex on gut integrity in heat-stressed growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Sanz Fernandez, M V; Pearce, S C; Gabler, N K; Patience, J F; Wilson, M E; Socha, M T; Torrison, J L; Rhoads, R P; Baumgard, L H

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress (HS) jeopardizes livestock health and productivity and both may in part be mediated by reduced intestinal integrity. Dietary zinc improves a variety of bowel diseases, which are characterized by increased intestinal permeability. Study objectives were to evaluate the effects of supplemental zinc amino acid complex (ZnAA) on intestinal integrity in heat-stressed growing pigs. Crossbred gilts (43±6 kg BW) were ad libitum fed one of three diets: (1) control (ZnC; 120 ppm Zn as ZnSO4; n=13), (2) control+100 ppm Zn as ZnAA (Zn220; containing a total of 220 ppm Zn; n=14), and (3) control+200 ppm Zn as ZnAA (Zn320; containing a total of 320 ppm Zn; n=16). After 25 days on their respective diets, all pigs were exposed to constant HS conditions (36°C, ∼50% humidity) for either 1 or 7 days. At the end of the environmental exposure, pigs were euthanized and blood and intestinal tissues were harvested immediately after sacrifice. As expected, HS increased rectal temperature (P⩽0.01; 40.23°C v. 38.93°C) and respiratory rate (P⩽0.01; 113 v. 36 bpm). Pigs receiving ZnAA tended to have increased rectal temperature (P=0.07; +0.27°C) compared with ZnC-fed pigs. HS markedly reduced feed intake (FI; P⩽0.01; 59%) and caused BW loss (2.10 kg), but neither variable was affected by dietary treatment. Fresh intestinal segments were assessed ex vivo for intestinal integrity. As HS progressed from days 1 to 7, both ileal and colonic transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) decreased (P⩽0.05; 34% and 22%, respectively). This was mirrored by an increase in ileal and colonic permeability to the macromolecule dextran (P⩽0.01; 13- and 56-fold, respectively), and increased colonic lipopolysaccharide permeability (P⩽0.05; threefold) with time. There was a quadratic response (P⩽0.05) to increasing ZnAA on ileal TER, as it was improved (P⩽0.05; 56%) in Zn220-fed pigs compared with ZnC. This study demonstrates that HS progressively compromises the intestinal

  4. Effective use of metadata in the integration and analysis of multi-dimensional optical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, G. Z.; Gamon, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    DAX (Data Acquisition to eXchange) Web-based tool uses a flexible metadata representation model and takes advantage of multi-dimensional data structures to translate metadata types into data dimensions, effectively reshaping data sets according to available metadata. With that, metadata is tightly integrated into the acquisition-to-exchange cycle, allowing for more focused exploration of data sets while also increasing the value of, and incentives for, keeping good metadata. The tool is being developed and tested with optical data collected in different settings, including laboratory, field, airborne, and satellite platforms.

  5. Effects of social integration on depressive symptoms in Korea: analysis from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (2006?12).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Yunhwan; Jang, Sung-In

    2016-07-15

    Objectives The effects of a range of types of social integration and patterns of change in social integration over time were examined directly in relation to depressive symptoms in a large sample of the Korean population aged ≥45 years.Methods Data from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA) between 2006 and 2012 were assessed using longitudinal data analysis. We included 10242 research subjects at baseline (2006) and based the primary analysis on generalised linear mixed models to examine association between social integration and depressive symptom.Results The odds ratio (OR) for depressive symptoms in individuals at the lowest level of social integration was 1.539-fold higher (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.360-1.742) that that for those at highest level of social integration. Results of subgroup analysis according to gender revealed a similar trend. A five-class linear solution fit the data best; Class 1 (lowest constant social integration level, 10.5% of the sample) was significantly associated with the highest risk of depressive symptoms (OR 1.933, 95% CI 1.706-2.190).Conclusions The results of the present study provide a scientific basis for the specific association between the level of social integration and changes in social integration pattern with the risk of depressive symptoms in current practice. Therefore, interventions to provide emotional support for older adults via social integration may be important to protect against depressive symptoms.What is known about the topic? Although there has been considerable discussion about social integration among old adults, few studies related to effect of social integration on depression have been conducted.What does this paper add? The findings of the present study indicate that a high level of social integration is inversely related to depressive symptoms and is also associated with a substantial positive effect on depressive symptoms among individuals aged ≥45 years.What are the implications for

  6. NLTE Effects in Globular Cluster Integrated Light Spectra and Photometric Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Mitchell; Short, C. Ian

    2017-01-01

    Our overall goal is to investigate the effect that modelling the atmospheres and spectra of Galactic globular cluster (GGCs) members in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) has on the integrated light (IL) spectrum, and the derivation of GGC ages and metallicities ([Fe/H] values) from IL photometric color and spectrum fitting. We create synthetic GGC populations and associated colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) using the Kroupa initial mass function (Kroupa, P., 2001, MNRAS, 322, 231-246) and the Teramo isochrones (Pietrinferni, A. et al, 2004, ApJ, 612, 168-190) with ages ranging from 9 to 15 Gyr, and [Fe/H] = -1.49 to -0.66 with α = +0.4. We investigate the dependence of predicted LTE and NLTE colors on the method and resolution of CMD discretization, and on the definition of representative stellar parameters in a discretized CMD.

  7. Study of heat sources interacting in integrated circuits by laser mirage effect

    SciTech Connect

    Perpiñà, X.; Jordà, X.; Vellvehi, M.; Altet, J.

    2014-08-25

    This work exploits the mirage effect to analyze multiple heat sources thermally interacting in an integrated circuit (IC) by means of a probe IR laser beam, which strikes on the die lateral walls and passes through the die substrate. Under such conditions, the criteria for locating such hot spots, as well as their relative power dissipation, are discussed on the basis of a theoretical model inferred in this work. Finally, the technique feasibility is shown in a real application scenario, obtaining 5-μm spatial lateral resolution and an error in power dissipation measurements below 5%. This method may become a practical alternative to usual off-chip techniques for inspecting hot spots in ICs and to experimentally characterize heat flow in the semiconductor substrate.

  8. Effect of sinus membrane perforation on dental implant integration: a retrospective study on 128 patients.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eric; Kraut, Richard A

    2011-02-01

    A common complication of sinus augmentation is perforation of the sinus membrane during augmentation and/or implant placement. This retrospective study examines the effect of sinus membrane perforation with regard to graft survival and implant integration. A total of 175 sinuses were augmented with 115 of the membranes being reported intact at the time of surgery. A total of three infections occurred in patients who sustained perforated sinuses and one infection occurred in a patient who had an intact sinus. All four infections resolved after culture sensitivity and placement of the patient on an appropriate antibiotic for 10 days. Of 438 dental implants placed in the augmented sinuses, five implants failed, four of which were associated with perforated sinuses and and which was not associated with a perforated grafted sinus.

  9. Study of heat sources interacting in integrated circuits by laser mirage effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perpiñà, X.; Jordà, X.; Vellvehi, M.; Altet, J.

    2014-08-01

    This work exploits the mirage effect to analyze multiple heat sources thermally interacting in an integrated circuit (IC) by means of a probe IR laser beam, which strikes on the die lateral walls and passes through the die substrate. Under such conditions, the criteria for locating such hot spots, as well as their relative power dissipation, are discussed on the basis of a theoretical model inferred in this work. Finally, the technique feasibility is shown in a real application scenario, obtaining 5-μm spatial lateral resolution and an error in power dissipation measurements below 5%. This method may become a practical alternative to usual off-chip techniques for inspecting hot spots in ICs and to experimentally characterize heat flow in the semiconductor substrate.

  10. Beamwidth effects on Z-R relations and area-integrated rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Atlas, David; Wolff, David B.; Amitai, Eyal

    1992-01-01

    The effective radar reflectivity Ze measured by a radar is the convolution of the actual distribution of reflectivity with the beam radiation pattern. Because of the nonlinearity between Z and rain rate R, Ze gives a biased estimator of R whenever the reflectivity field is nonuniform. In the presence of sharp horizontal reflectivity gradients, the measured pattern of Ze extends beyond the actual precipitation boundaries to produce false precipitation echoes. When integrated across the radar image of the storm, the false echo areas contribute to the sum to produce overestimates of the areal rainfall. As the range or beamwidth increases, the ratio of measured to actual rainfall increases. Beyond some range, the normal decrease of reflectivity with height dominates and the measured rainfall underestimates the actual amount.

  11. Aging Effects of Environmentally-Friendly Cleaners on Adhesive Bond Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegert, L. L.; Anderson, G. L.; Evans, K. B.; Olsen, B. D.; Weber, B. L.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Because of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment many chlorinated solvents are being phased out of use in manufacturing industries. Replacement of the ODC (ozone- depleting chemicals) with less volatile, non-ozone depleting cleaners has been extensively studied over the past nine years at Thiokol Propulsion, Cordant Technologies. Many of the non-ODC cleaners contain compounds that can potentially degrade over time under conditions of high temperature, humidity and exposure to light. The chemical composition of environmentally conditioned cleaners and the subsequent effect on aluminum/amine-cured epoxy bond integrity as measured by Tapered Double Cantilever Beam were evaluated. From this study it is observed that moisture content increases for those cleaners containing polar compounds. Non-volatile residue content increases as stabilizers are depleted and the chemical compound limonene is oxidized. A change in aluminum/ amine-cured epoxy bond fracture toughness is observed as some of these cleaners age with increases in moisture and NVR content.

  12. Effect of Piezoelectric Implant on the Structural Integrity of Composite Laminates Subjected to Tensile Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masmoudi, Sahir; El Mahi, Abderrahim; Turki, Saïd

    2016-07-01

    The embedment of sensors within composite structures gives the opportunity to develop smart materials for health and usage monitoring systems. This study investigates the use of acoustic emission monitoring with embedded piezoelectric sensor during mechanical tests in order to identify the effects of introducing the sensor into the composite materials. The composite specimen with and without embedded sensor were subject to tensile static and fatigue loading. The analysis and observation of AE signals show that the integration of a sensor presents advantage of the detection of the acoustic events and also show the presence of three or four types of damage during tests. The incorporation of piezoelectric sensor has a negligible influence on the mechanical properties of materials.

  13. Effects of Dissolving Solutions on the Accuracy of an Electronic Apex Locator-Integrated Endodontic Handpiece

    PubMed Central

    Ustun, Yakup; Uzun, Ozgur; Er, Ozgur; Maden, Murat; Yalpı, Fatma; Canakci, Burhan Can

    2013-01-01

    The effects of three dissolving agents on the accuracy of an electronic apex locator- (EAL-) integrated endodontic handpiece during retreatment procedures were evaluated. The true lengths (TLs) of 56 extracted incisor teeth were determined visually. Twenty teeth were filled with gutta-percha and a resin-based sealer (group A), 20 with gutta-percha and a zinc oxide/eugenol-based sealer (group B), and 16 roots were used as the control group (group C). All roots were prepared to TL. Guttasolv, Resosolv, and Endosolv E were used as the dissolving solutions. Two evaluations of the handpiece were performed: the apical accuracy during the auto reverse function (ARL) and the apex locator function (EL) alone. The ARL function of the handpiece gave acceptable results. There were significant differences between the EL mode measurements and the TL (P < 0.05). In these comparisons, Tri Auto ZX EL mode measurements were significantly shorter than those of the TL. PMID:24379743

  14. Excitonic effects in two-dimensional semiconductors: Path integral Monte Carlo approach

    SciTech Connect

    Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Saxena, Avadh

    2015-11-01

    The most striking features of novel two-dimensional semiconductors (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers or phosphorene) is a strong Coulomb interaction between charge carriers resulting in large excitonic effects. In particular, this leads to the formation of multicarrier bound states upon photoexcitation (e.g., excitons, trions, and biexcitons), which could remain stable at near-room temperatures and contribute significantly to the optical properties of such materials. In our work we have used the path integral Monte Carlo methodology to numerically study properties of multicarrier bound states in two-dimensional semiconductors. Specifically, we have accurately investigated and tabulated the dependence of single-exciton, trion, and biexciton binding energies on the strength of dielectric screening, including the limiting cases of very strong and very weak screening. Our results of this work are potentially useful in the analysis of experimental data and benchmarking of theoretical and computational models.

  15. Excitonic effects in two-dimensional semiconductors: Path integral Monte Carlo approach

    DOE PAGES

    Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Saxena, Avadh

    2015-11-01

    The most striking features of novel two-dimensional semiconductors (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers or phosphorene) is a strong Coulomb interaction between charge carriers resulting in large excitonic effects. In particular, this leads to the formation of multicarrier bound states upon photoexcitation (e.g., excitons, trions, and biexcitons), which could remain stable at near-room temperatures and contribute significantly to the optical properties of such materials. In our work we have used the path integral Monte Carlo methodology to numerically study properties of multicarrier bound states in two-dimensional semiconductors. Specifically, we have accurately investigated and tabulated the dependence of single-exciton, trion, and biexcitonmore » binding energies on the strength of dielectric screening, including the limiting cases of very strong and very weak screening. Our results of this work are potentially useful in the analysis of experimental data and benchmarking of theoretical and computational models.« less

  16. Effect of Piezoelectric Implant on the Structural Integrity of Composite Laminates Subjected to Tensile Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masmoudi, Sahir; El Mahi, Abderrahim; Turki, Saïd

    2017-02-01

    The embedment of sensors within composite structures gives the opportunity to develop smart materials for health and usage monitoring systems. This study investigates the use of acoustic emission monitoring with embedded piezoelectric sensor during mechanical tests in order to identify the effects of introducing the sensor into the composite materials. The composite specimen with and without embedded sensor were subject to tensile static and fatigue loading. The analysis and observation of AE signals show that the integration of a sensor presents advantage of the detection of the acoustic events and also show the presence of three or four types of damage during tests. The incorporation of piezoelectric sensor has a negligible influence on the mechanical properties of materials.

  17. A prediction technique for single-event effects on complex integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanfu, Zhao; Chunqing, Yu; Long, Fan; Suge, Yue; Maoxin, Chen; Shougang, Du; Hongchao, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    The sensitivity of complex integrated circuits to single-event effects is investigated. Sensitivity depends not only on the cross section of physical modules but also on the behavior of data patterns running on the system. A method dividing the main functional modules is proposed. The intrinsic cross section and the duty cycles of different sensitive modules are obtained during the execution of data patterns. A method for extracting the duty cycle is presented and a set of test patterns with different duty cycles are implemented experimentally. By combining the intrinsic cross section and the duty cycle of different sensitive modules, a universal method to predict SEE sensitivities of different test patterns is proposed, which is verified by experiments based on the target circuit of a microprocessor. Experimental results show that the deviation between prediction and experiment is less than 20%.

  18. Effectiveness of sensory integration interventions in children with autism spectrum disorders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Beth A; Koenig, Kristie; Kinnealey, Moya; Sheppard, Megan; Henderson, Lorrie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to establish a model for randomized controlled trial research, identify appropriate outcome measures, and address the effectiveness of sensory integration (SI) interventions in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Children ages 6-12 with ASD were randomly assigned to a fine motor or SI treatment group. Pretests and posttests measured social responsiveness, sensory processing, functional motor skills, and social-emotional factors. Results identified significant positive changes in Goal Attainment Scaling scores for both groups; more significant changes occurred in the SI group, and a significant decrease in autistic mannerisms occurred in the SI group. No other results were significant. The study discusses considerations for designing future outcome studies for children with ASD.

  19. High-performance integrated field-effect transistor-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Adzhri, R; Md Arshad, M K; Gopinath, Subash C B; Ruslinda, A R; Fathil, M F M; Ayub, R M; Nor, M Nuzaihan Mohd; Voon, C H

    2016-04-21

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) have succeeded in modern electronics in an era of computers and hand-held applications. Currently, considerable attention has been paid to direct electrical measurements, which work by monitoring changes in intrinsic electrical properties. Further, FET-based sensing systems drastically reduce cost, are compatible with CMOS technology, and ease down-stream applications. Current technologies for sensing applications rely on time-consuming strategies and processes and can only be performed under recommended conditions. To overcome these obstacles, an overview is presented here in which we specifically focus on high-performance FET-based sensor integration with nano-sized materials, which requires understanding the interaction of surface materials with the surrounding environment. Therefore, we present strategies, material depositions, device structures and other characteristics involved in FET-based devices. Special attention was given to silicon and polyaniline nanowires and graphene, which have attracted much interest due to their remarkable properties in sensing applications.

  20. Isotope effects in water as investigated by neutron diffraction and path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, Anita; Salmon, Philip S.; Fischer, Henry E.; Neuefeind, Jörg C.; Simonson, J. Mike; Markland, Thomas E.

    2012-07-01

    The structures of heavy and light water at 300 K were investigated by using a joint approach in which the method of neutron diffraction with oxygen isotope substitution was complemented by path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The diffraction results, which give intra-molecular O-D and O-H bond distances of 0.985(5) and 0.990(5) Å, were found to be in best agreement with those obtained by using the flexible anharmonic TTM3-F water model. Both techniques show a difference of ≃ 0.5% between the O-D and O-H intra-molecular bond lengths, and the results support a competing quantum effects model for water in which its structural and dynamical properties are governed by an offset between intra-molecular and inter-molecular quantum contributions. Further consideration of the O-O correlations is needed in order to improve agreement with experiment.

  1. Effect of the cluster integrals on three particles on the calculated electron density of a hydrogen plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, R. G.; Bruce, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of the calculation of the cluster integrals on three particles is analyzed and evaluated for a hydrogen plasma where a pairwise-additive hard sphere-Coulomb potential is assumed. The Mayer cluster integral method was used to calculate the Helmholtz free energy which was then applied to the calculation of the electron number density through an iterative technique using a corrected Saha equation. It is seen that the three particle integrals provide a substantial correction to the calculations in the low energy-high density region of the hydrogen plasma.

  2. The effects of self-monitoring on the procedural integrity of a behavioral intervention for young children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Plavnick, Joshua B; Ferreri, Summer J; Maupin, Angela N

    2010-01-01

    The effects of self-monitoring on the procedural integrity of token economy implementation by 3 staff in a special education classroom were evaluated. The subsequent changes in academic readiness behaviors of 2 students with low-incidence disabilities were measured. Multiple baselines across staff and students showed that procedural integrity increased when staff used monitoring checklists, and students' academic readiness behavior also increased. Results are discussed with respect to the use of self-monitoring and the importance of procedural integrity in public school settings.

  3. The Effectiveness of Support Groups in Asian Breast Cancer Patients: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Fang-Yu; Lee-Lin, Frances; Kuang, Lily Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer support group has been studied as an intervention to improve patient psychosocial well-being. The effectiveness of support groups among Asian breast cancer (BC) patients has been unclear and received limited attention to the evidence of its effectiveness. The social-cognitive processing theory underlies the principles of support groups and advocates that a positive, supportive social environment can improve cognitive processing. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrative review of research evidence on the effectiveness of cancer support groups with Asian BC patients. Empirical studies related to support group among Asian and Asian American BC patients published between 1982 and April 2014 are reviewed. There are 15 studies selected (12 from the Asian-Pacific region and 3 from Western countries). The review includes 1 qualitative study, 3 descriptive studies, 1 mixed method design, and 10 experimental or quasi-experimental studies. The support group intervention activities include psycho-educational program such as health education, problem-solving, and stress management. These studies support the effectiveness of support group in alleviating psychological distress and supporting quality of life of Asian BC women. Overall, there is limited research on the use and effectiveness of support groups with Asians cancer patients in Asia and in Western countries. Without accounting for Asian immigrants overseas, the Asian population is expected to grow from 4.3 to 5.3 billion by 2050. As cancer patients become more diverse due to global emigration, more rigorous studies examining the effectiveness of psychosocial intervention among transcultural cancer patients are needed. PMID:27981154

  4. The Effectiveness of Support Groups in Asian Breast Cancer Patients: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Chou, Fang-Yu; Lee-Lin, Frances; Kuang, Lily Y

    2016-01-01

    Cancer support group has been studied as an intervention to improve patient psychosocial well-being. The effectiveness of support groups among Asian breast cancer (BC) patients has been unclear and received limited attention to the evidence of its effectiveness. The social-cognitive processing theory underlies the principles of support groups and advocates that a positive, supportive social environment can improve cognitive processing. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrative review of research evidence on the effectiveness of cancer support groups with Asian BC patients. Empirical studies related to support group among Asian and Asian American BC patients published between 1982 and April 2014 are reviewed. There are 15 studies selected (12 from the Asian-Pacific region and 3 from Western countries). The review includes 1 qualitative study, 3 descriptive studies, 1 mixed method design, and 10 experimental or quasi-experimental studies. The support group intervention activities include psycho-educational program such as health education, problem-solving, and stress management. These studies support the effectiveness of support group in alleviating psychological distress and supporting quality of life of Asian BC women. Overall, there is limited research on the use and effectiveness of support groups with Asians cancer patients in Asia and in Western countries. Without accounting for Asian immigrants overseas, the Asian population is expected to grow from 4.3 to 5.3 billion by 2050. As cancer patients become more diverse due to global emigration, more rigorous studies examining the effectiveness of psychosocial intervention among transcultural cancer patients are needed.

  5. An Instrumental Case Study of Effective Science Integration in a Traditional Agricultural Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Marshall A.; Bunch, J. C.; Kelsey, Kathleen D.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of science and agriculture has been discussed since the inception of agricultural education. However, the standards-based focus in public secondary education and changing climate of agriculture has brought science integration back to the forefront. Though research has indicated that the integration of science into agricultural…

  6. Integration in Italian Schools: Teachers' Perceptions Regarding Day-to-Day Practice and Its Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ianes, Dario; Demo, Heidrun; Zambotti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Italy is famous for having the highest percentage of students with disabilities attending "the school for all" (integration). However, in recent studies, the reality of integration seems to be more complex. Integration has reached some important goals (e.g. longer school careers), but while the Italian school system envisages the full…

  7. The Joint Force Air Component Commander and the Integration of Offensive Cyberspace Effects: Power Projection through Cyberspace

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    Air & Space Power Journal The Joint Force Air Component Commander and the Integration of Offensive Cyberspace Effects Power Projection through...and Space Power Journal requests a courtesy line. Cyberspace can provide great opportunities to assist the joint force air compo-nent commander (JFACC...integration of offensive cyberspace operations is best understood by examining forces presented in the cyberspace domain as a peer component to the

  8. Development of tools for integrated monitoring and assessment of hazardous substances and their biological effects in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Kari K; Sundelin, Brita; Lang, Thomas; Strand, Jakob

    2014-02-01

    The need to develop biological effects monitoring to facilitate a reliable assessment of hazardous substances has been emphasized in the Baltic Sea Action Plan of the Helsinki Commission. An integrated chemical-biological approach is vitally important for the understanding and proper assessment of anthropogenic pressures and their effects on the Baltic Sea. Such an approach is also necessary for prudent management aiming at safeguarding the sustainable use of ecosystem goods and Services. The BEAST project (Biological Effects of Anthropogenic Chemical Stress: Tools for the Assessment of Ecosystem Health) set out to address this topic within the BONUS Programme. BEAST generated a large amount of quality-assured data on several biological effects parameters (biomarkers) in various marine species in different sub-regions of the Baltic Sea. New indicators (biological response measurement methods) and management tools (integrated indices) with regard to the integrated monitoring approach were suggested.

  9. Integration and scaling of UV-B radiation effects on plants: from DNA to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Suchar, Vasile Alexandru; Robberecht, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    A process-based model integrating the effects of UV-B radiation through epidermis, cellular DNA, and its consequences to the leaf expansion was developed from key parameters in the published literature. Enhanced UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly delayed cell division, resulting in significant reductions in leaf growth and development. Ambient UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly reduced the leaf growth of species with high relative epidermal absorbance at longer wavelengths and average/low pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers (CPD) photorepair rates. Leaf expansion was highly dependent on the number of CPD present in the DNA, as a result of UV-B radiation dose, quantitative and qualitative absorptive properties of epidermal pigments, and repair mechanisms. Formation of pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts (6-4PP) has no effect on the leaf expansion. Repair mechanisms could not solely prevent the UV-B radiation interference with the cell division. Avoidance or effective shielding by increased or modified qualitative epidermal absorptance was required. Sustained increased UV-B radiation levels are more detrimental than short, high doses of UV-B radiation. The combination of low temperature and increased UV-B radiation was more significant in the level of UV-B radiation-induced damage than UV-B radiation alone. Slow-growing leaves were more affected by increased UV-B radiation than fast-growing leaves. PMID:26257869

  10. Detecting the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect with high-redshift 21-cm surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Kovetz, Ely; Dai, Liang; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect by cross-correlating 21-cm surveys at high redshifts with galaxies in a way similar to the usual CMB-galaxy cross-correlation. The high-redshift 21-cm signal is dominated by CMB photons that travel freely without interacting with the intervening matter, and hence its late-time ISW signature should correlate extremely well with that of the CMB at its peak frequencies. Using the 21-cm temperature brightness instead of the CMB would thus be a further check of the detection of the ISW effect, measured by different instruments at different frequencies and suffering from different systematics. We also study the ISW effect on the photons that are scattered by HI clouds. We show that a detection of the unscattered photons is achievable with planned radio arrays, while one using scattered photons will require advanced radio interferometers, either an extended version of the planned Square Kilometre Array or futuristic experiments such as a lunar radio array.

  11. Analysis of lifespan-promoting effect of garlic extract by an integrated metabolo-proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Hao; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Wu, Yuan-Heng; Zhong, Linda; Tseng, Mu-Yun; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chiou, Shyh-Horng

    2015-08-01

    The beneficial effects of garlic (Allium sativum) consumption in treating human diseases have been reported worldwide over a long period of human history. The strong antioxidant effect of garlic extract (GE) has also recently been claimed to prevent cancer, thrombus formation, cardiovascular disease and some age-related maladies. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism, aqueous GE was herein shown to increase the expression of longevity-related FOXO transcription factor daf-16 and extend lifespan by 20%. By employing microarray and proteomics analysis on C. elegans treated with aqueous GE, we have systematically mapped 229 genes and 46 proteins with differential expression profiles, which included many metabolic enzymes and yolky egg vitellogenins. To investigate the garlic components functionally involved in longevity, an integrated metabolo-proteomics approach was employed to identify metabolites and protein components associated with treatment of aqueous GE. Among potential lifespan-promoting substances, mannose-binding lectin and N-acetylcysteine were found to increase daf-16 expression. Our study points to the fact that the lifespan-promoting effect of aqueous GE may entail the DAF-16-mediated signaling pathway. The result also highlights the utility of metabolo-proteomics for unraveling the complexity and intricacy involved in the metabolism of natural products in vivo.

  12. Effective field theory and integrability in two-dimensional Mott transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bottesi, Federico L.; Zemba, Guillermo R.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Mott transition in 2d lattice fermion model. > 3D integrability out of 2D. > Effective field theory for Mott transition in 2d. > Double Chern-Simons. > d-Density waves. - Abstract: We study the Mott transition in a two-dimensional lattice spinless fermion model with nearest neighbors density-density interactions. By means of a two-dimensional Jordan-Wigner transformation, the model is mapped onto the lattice XXZ spin model, which is shown to possess a quantum group symmetry as a consequence of a recently found solution of the Zamolodchikov tetrahedron equation. A projection (from three to two space-time dimensions) property of the solution is used to identify the symmetry of the model at the Mott critical point as U{sub q}(sl(2)-circumflex)xU{sub q}(sl(2)-circumflex), with deformation parameter q = -1. Based on this result, the low-energy effective field theory for the model is obtained and shown to be a lattice double Chern-Simons theory with coupling constant k = 1 (with the standard normalization). By further employing the effective filed theory methods, we show that the Mott transition that arises is of topological nature, with vortices in an antiferromagnetic array and matter currents characterized by a d-density wave order parameter. We also analyze the behavior of the system upon weak coupling, and conclude that it undergoes a quantum gas-liquid transition which belongs to the Ising universality class.

  13. Integration and scaling of UV-B radiation effects on plants: from DNA to leaf.

    PubMed

    Suchar, Vasile Alexandru; Robberecht, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    A process-based model integrating the effects of UV-B radiation through epidermis, cellular DNA, and its consequences to the leaf expansion was developed from key parameters in the published literature. Enhanced UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly delayed cell division, resulting in significant reductions in leaf growth and development. Ambient UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly reduced the leaf growth of species with high relative epidermal absorbance at longer wavelengths and average/low pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers (CPD) photorepair rates. Leaf expansion was highly dependent on the number of CPD present in the DNA, as a result of UV-B radiation dose, quantitative and qualitative absorptive properties of epidermal pigments, and repair mechanisms. Formation of pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts (6-4PP) has no effect on the leaf expansion. Repair mechanisms could not solely prevent the UV-B radiation interference with the cell division. Avoidance or effective shielding by increased or modified qualitative epidermal absorptance was required. Sustained increased UV-B radiation levels are more detrimental than short, high doses of UV-B radiation. The combination of low temperature and increased UV-B radiation was more significant in the level of UV-B radiation-induced damage than UV-B radiation alone. Slow-growing leaves were more affected by increased UV-B radiation than fast-growing leaves.

  14. Building a strategic framework for comparative effectiveness research in complementary and integrative medicine.

    PubMed

    Witt, Claudia M; Chesney, Margaret; Gliklich, Richard; Green, Lawrence; Lewith, George; Luce, Bryan; McCaffrey, Anne; Rafferty Withers, Shelly; Sox, Harold C; Tunis, Sean; Berman, Brian M

    2012-01-01

    The increasing burden of chronic diseases presents not only challenges to the knowledge and expertise of the professional medical community, but also highlights the need to improve the quality and relevance of clinical research in this domain. Many patients now turn to complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) to treat their chronic illnesses; however, there is very little evidence to guide their decision-making in usual care. The following research recommendations were derived from a CIM Stakeholder Symposium on Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER): (1) CER studies should be made a priority in this field; (2) stakeholders should be engaged at every stage of the research; (3) CER study designs should highlight effectiveness over efficacy; (4) research questions should be well defined to enable the selection of an appropriate CER study design; (5) the CIM community should cultivate widely shared understandings, discourse, tools, and technologies to support the use and validity of CER methods; (6) Effectiveness Guidance Documents on methodological standards should be developed to shape future CER studies. CER is an emerging field and its development and impact must be reflected in future research strategies within CIM. This stakeholder symposium was a first step in providing systematic guidance for future CER in this field.

  15. Path-integral simulation of ice VII: Pressure and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, Carlos P.; Ramírez, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    The effects of pressure and temperature on structural and thermodynamic properties of ice VII have been studied by using path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations. Temperatures between 25 and 450 K, as well as pressures up to 12 GPa were considered. Interatomic interactions were modeled by using the effective q-TIP4P/F potential for flexible water. We analyze the pressure dependence of the molar volume, bulk modulus, interatomic distances, kinetic energy, and atomic delocalization at various temperatures. Results of PIMD simulations are compared with those derived from a quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) of vibrational modes, which helps to assess the importance of anharmonic effects, as well as the influence of the different modes on the properties of ice VII. The accuracy of the QHA for describing this high-pressure phase decreases for rising temperature, but this approximation becomes more reliable as pressure grows, since anharmonicity becomes less relevant. Comparisons with low-pressure cubic ice are presented.

  16. Integrating environmental and genetic effects to predict responses of tree populations to climate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tongli; O'Neill, Gregory A; Aitken, Sally N

    2010-01-01

    Climate is a major environmental factor affecting the phenotype of trees and is also a critical agent of natural selection that has molded among-population genetic variation. Population response functions describe the environmental effect of planting site climates on the performance of a single population, whereas transfer functions describe among-population genetic variation molded by natural selection for climate. Although these approaches are widely used to predict the responses of trees to climate change, both have limitations. We present a novel approach that integrates both genetic and environmental effects into a single "universal response function" (URF) to better predict the influence of climate on phenotypes. Using a large lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) field transplant experiment composed of 140 populations planted on 62 sites to demonstrate the methodology, we show that the URF makes full use of data from provenance trials to: (1) improve predictions of climate change impacts on phenotypes; (2) reduce the size and cost of future provenance trials without compromising predictive power; (3) more fully exploit existing, less comprehensive provenance tests; (4) quantify and compare environmental and genetic effects of climate on population performance; and (5) predict the performance of any population growing in any climate. Finally, we discuss how the last attribute allows the URF to be used as a mechanistic model to predict population and species ranges for the future and to guide assisted migration of seed for reforestation, restoration, or afforestation and genetic conservation in a changing climate.

  17. Assessing water deprivation at the sub-river basin scale in LCA integrating downstream cascade effects.

    PubMed

    Loubet, Philippe; Roux, Philippe; Núñez, Montserrat; Belaud, Gilles; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2013-12-17

    Physical water deprivation at the midpoint level is assessed in water-related LCIA methods using water scarcity indicators (e.g., withdrawal-to-availability and consumption-to-availability) at the river basin scale. Although these indicators represent a great step forward in the assessment of water-use-related impacts in LCA, significant challenges still remain in improving their accuracy and relevance. This paper presents a methodology that can be used to derive midpoint characterization factors for water deprivation taking into account downstream cascade effects within a single river basin. This effect is considered at a finer scale because a river basin must be split into different subunits. The proposed framework is based on a two-step approach. First, water scarcity is defined at the sub-river basin scale with the consumption-to-availability (CTA) ratio, and second, characterization factors for water deprivation (CFWD) are calculated, integrating the effects on downstream sub-river basins. The sub-river basin CTA and CFWD were computed based on runoff data, water consumption data and a water balance for two different river basins. The results show significant differences between the CFWD in a given river basin, depending on the upstream or downstream position. Finally, an illustrative example is presented, in which different land planning scenarios, taking into account additional water consumption in a city, are assessed. Our work demonstrates how crucial it is to localize the withdrawal and release positions within a river basin.

  18. Theoretical study on isotope and temperature effect in hydronium ion using ab initio path integral simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Masanori; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2004-09-01

    We have applied the ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulation to study hydronium ion and its isotopes, which are the simplest systems for hydrated proton and deuteron. In this simulation, all the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom are treated fully quantum mechanically, while the potential energies of the respective atomic configurations are calculated "on the fly" using ab initio quantum chemical approach. With the careful treatment of the ab initio electronic structure calculation by relevant choices in electron correlation level and basis set, this scheme is theoretically quite rigorous except for Born-Oppenheimer approximation. This accurate calculation allows a close insight into the structural shifts for the isotopes of hydronium ion by taking account of both quantum mechanical and thermal effects. In fact, the calculation is shown to be successful to quantitatively extract the geometrical isotope effect with respect to the Walden inversion. It is also shown that this leads to the isotope effect on the electronic structure as well as the thermochemical properties.

  19. Cumulative health risk assessment: integrated approaches for multiple contaminants, exposures, and effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Glenn; Teuschler, Linda; MacDonel, Margaret; Butler, Jim; Finster, Molly; Hertzberg, Rick; Harou, Lynne

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: As information about environmental contamination has increased in recent years, so has public interest in the combined effects of multiple contaminants. This interest has been highlighted by recent tragedies such as the World Trade Center disaster and hurricane Katrina. In fact, assessing multiple contaminants, exposures, and effects has long been an issue for contaminated sites, including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites. Local citizens have explicitly asked the federal government to account for cumulative risks, with contaminants moving offsite via groundwater flow, surface runoff, and air dispersal being a common emphasis. Multiple exposures range from ingestion and inhalation to dermal absorption and external gamma irradiation. Three types of concerns can lead to cumulative assessments: (1) specific sources or releases - e.g., industrial facilities or accidental discharges; (2) contaminant levels - in environmental media or human tissues; and (3) elevated rates of disease - e.g., asthma or cancer. The specific initiator frames the assessment strategy, including a determination of appropriate models to be used. Approaches are being developed to better integrate a variety of data, extending from environmental to internal co-location of contaminants and combined effects, to support more practical assessments of cumulative health risks. (authors)

  20. The Effects of ICT Environment on Teachers' Attitudes and Technology Integration in Japan and the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusano, Kodai; Frederiksen, Sarah; Jones, LeAnne; Kobayashi, Michiko; Mukoyama, Yui; Yamagishi, Taku; Sadaki, Kengo; Ishizuka, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    The present study analyzes the effects of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) environment on teachers' attitude toward technology integration in Japanese and U.S. elementary schools. Teacher's attitude plays an important role in influencing the effectiveness of ICT education from a variety of perspectives. A number of studies have been…

  1. An Evaluation of the Effect of DC's Voucher Program on Public School Achievement and Racial Integration after One Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.; Winters, Marcus A.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the initial effect of Washington, DC's Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) on the academic performance of public schools and its effects on the opportunities that District students have to attend integrated schools. The OSP is a federally sponsored school voucher program that provides vouchers worth up to $7,500 for an…

  2. Academic Effectiveness of Podcasting: A Comparative Study of Integrated versus Supplemental Use of Podcasting in Second Language Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdous, M'hammed; Facer, Betty Rose; Yen, Cherng-Jyh

    2012-01-01

    With podcasting gaining more mainstream adoption in higher education, it's critical to examine its effectiveness in improving the student learning experience. To this end, this paper examines the effectiveness of podcasts integrated into the curriculum (PIC) versus podcasts as supplemental material (PSM). Considering recent empirical work on the…

  3. Effects of Mathematics Integration in a Teaching Methods Course on Mathematics Ability of Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating mathematics teaching and integration strategies (MTIS) in a teaching methods course on preservice agricultural teachers' mathematics ability. The research design was quasi-experimental and utilized a nonequivalent control group. The MTIS treatment had a positive effect on the…

  4. Integrating Communities of Practice in E-Portfolio Assessment: Effects and Experiences of Mutual Assessment in an Online Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ling

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects and experiences of a mutual assessment framework (CoPf) in an online graduate course at a mid-west university. CoPf was integrated into the course structure as an innovative application of the standard e-portfolio assessment tool. Using a mixed method, the study first explored the effects of CoPf compared to the…

  5. Integrated experimental and computational approach to understand the effects of heavy ion radiation on skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    von Neubeck, Claere; Shankaran, Harish; Geniza, Matthew J; Kauer, Paula M; Robinson, R Joe; Chrisler, William B; Sowa, Marianne B

    2013-10-01

    The effects of low dose high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on human health are of concern for space, occupational, and clinical exposures. As epidemiological data for such radiation exposures are scarce for making relevant predictions, we need to understand the mechanism of response especially in normal tissues. Our objective here is to understand the effects of heavy ion radiation on tissue homeostasis in a realistic model system. Towards this end, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional skin equivalent to low fluences of neon (Ne) ions (300 MeV u(-1)), and determined the differentiation profile as a function of time following exposure using immunohistochemistry. We found that Ne ion exposures resulted in transient increases in the tissue regions expressing the differentiation markers keratin 10, and filaggrin, and more subtle time-dependent effects on the number of basal cells in the epidermis. We analyzed the data using a mathematical model of the skin equivalent, to quantify the effect of radiation on cell proliferation and differentiation. The agent-based mathematical model for the epidermal layer treats the epidermis as a collection of heterogeneous cell types with different proliferation-differentiation properties. We obtained model parameters from the literature where available, and calibrated the unknown parameters to match the observed properties in unirradiated skin. We then used the model to rigorously examine alternate hypotheses regarding the effects of high LET radiation on the tissue. Our analysis indicates that Ne ion exposures induce rapid, but transient, changes in cell division, differentiation and proliferation. We have validated the modeling results by histology and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The integrated approach presented here can be used as a general framework to understand the responses of multicellular systems, and can be adapted to other epithelial tissues.

  6. Integrated Experimental and Computational Approach to Understand the Effects of Heavy Ion Radiation on Skin Homeostasis.

    SciTech Connect

    von Neubeck, Claere; Shankaran, Harish; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, Robert J.; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2013-08-08

    The effects of low dose high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on human health are of concern for both space and clinical exposures. As epidemiological data for such radiation exposures are scarce for making relevant predictions, we need to understand the mechanism of response especially in normal tissues. Our objective here is to understand the effects of heavy ion radiation on tissue homeostasis in a realistic model system. Towards this end, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional skin equivalent to low fluences of Neon (Ne) ions (300 MeV/u), and determined the differentiation profile as a function of time following exposure using immunohistochemistry. We found that Ne ion exposures resulted in transient increases in the tissue regions expressing the differentiation markers keratin 10, and filaggrin, and more subtle time-dependent effects on the number of basal cells in the epidermis. We analyzed the data using a mathematical model of the skin equivalent, to quantify the effect of radiation on cell proliferation and differentiation. The agent-based mathematical model for the epidermal layer treats the epidermis as a collection of heterogeneous cell types with different proliferation/differentiation properties. We obtained model parameters from the literature where available, and calibrated the unknown parameters to match the observed properties in unirradiated skin. We then used the model to rigorously examine alternate hypotheses regarding the effects of high LET radiation on the tissue. Our analysis indicates that Ne ion exposures induce rapid, but transient, changes in cell division, differentiation and proliferation. We have validated the modeling results by histology and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The integrated approach presented here can be used as a general framework to understand the responses of multicellular systems, and can be adapted to other epithelial tissues.

  7. Effective in-service training design and delivery: evidence from an integrative literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In-service training represents a significant financial investment for supporting continued competence of the health care workforce. An integrative review of the education and training literature was conducted to identify effective training approaches for health worker continuing professional education (CPE) and what evidence exists of outcomes derived from CPE. Methods A literature review was conducted from multiple databases including PubMed, the Cochrane Library and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) between May and June 2011. The initial review of titles and abstracts produced 244 results. Articles selected for analysis after two quality reviews consisted of systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and programme evaluations published in peer-reviewed journals from 2000 to 2011 in the English language. The articles analysed included 37 systematic reviews and 32 RCTs. The research questions focused on the evidence supporting educational techniques, frequency, setting and media used to deliver instruction for continuing health professional education. Results The evidence suggests the use of multiple techniques that allow for interaction and enable learners to process and apply information. Case-based learning, clinical simulations, practice and feedback are identified as effective educational techniques. Didactic techniques that involve passive instruction, such as reading or lecture, have been found to have little or no impact on learning outcomes. Repetitive interventions, rather than single interventions, were shown to be superior for learning outcomes. Settings similar to the workplace improved skill acquisition and performance. Computer-based learning can be equally or more effective than live instruction and more cost efficient if effective techniques are used. Effective techniques can lead to improvements in knowledge and skill outcomes and clinical practice behaviours, but there is less evidence

  8. Effects of delays on 6-year-old children's self-generation and retention of knowledge through integration.

    PubMed

    Varga, Nicole L; Bauer, Patricia J

    2013-06-01

    The current research was an investigation of the effect of delay on self-generation and retention of knowledge derived through integration by 6-year-old children. Children were presented with novel facts from passages read aloud to them (i.e., "stem" facts) and tested for self-generation of new knowledge through integration of the facts. In Experiment 1, children integrated the stem facts at Session 1 and retained the self-generated memory traces over 1 week. In Experiment 2, 1-week delays were imposed either between the to-be-integrated facts (between-stem delay) or after the stem facts but before the test (before-test delay). Integration performance was diminished in both conditions. Moreover, memory for individual stem facts was lower in Experiment 2 than in Experiment 1, suggesting that self-generation through integration promoted memory for explicitly taught information. The results indicate the importance of tests for promoting self-generation through integration as well as for retaining newly self-generated and explicitly taught information.

  9. Developmental Effects of ±3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine on Spatial Versus Path Integration Learning: Effects of Dose Distribution

    PubMed Central

    VORHEES, CHARLES V.; SCHAEFER, TORI L.; WILLIAMS, MICHAEL T.

    2010-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that postnatal day 11–20 ±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) exposure reduces locomotor activity and impairs path integration and spatial learning independent of the effects on activity. The effects were seen when the drug was administered twice per day, but the optimal dosing regimen is unknown. We tested whether the same total daily dose of MDMA administered in different patterns would equally affect later behavior. A split-litter design (15 litters) was used with one male/female pair per litter receiving one of four treatment regimens. All offspring received four injections per day on P11–20 as follows: 40 × 1 (40 mg/kg MDMA × 1 + saline × 3), 20 × 2 (20 mg/kg MDMA × 2 + saline × 2), 10 × 4 (10 mg/kg MDMA × 4), or Saline (saline × 4). Does were spaced 2 h apart. Group 40 × 1 received MDMA as the first daily dose followed by three saline doses; group 20 × 2 received MDMA as the first and last dose and saline for the middle two doses; group 10 × 4 received MDMA for all four doses; and the saline group received saline for all four doses. Regardless of dose schedule, all groups treated with MDMA exhibited reduced locomotor activity. No MDMA effects were found on swimming ability in a straight channel. Modest MDMA effects were found on Barnes maze performance. The major findings were that the 40 × 1 and 20 × 2 MDMA groups showed impaired Cincinnati multiple T-water-maze learning and the 10 × 4 and 20 × 2 MDMA groups showed impaired Morris water maze learning. The results suggest that MDMA dose distribution has a long-term differential effect on different types of learning. Dose distribution warrants greater attention in the design of developmental drug studies along with the standard considerations of dose and age. PMID:17415794

  10. Simulating Local and Intercontinental Pollutant Effects of Biomass Burning: Integration of Several Remotely Sensed Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Vastano, John A.; Guild, Liane; Hlavka, Christine; Brass, James A.; Russell, Philip B. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Burning to clear land for crops and to destroy pests is an integral and largely unavoidable part of tropical agriculture. It is easy to note but difficult to quantify using remote sensing. This report describes our efforts to integrate remotely sensed data into our computer model of tropical chemical trace-gas emissions, weather, and reaction chemistry (using the MM5 mesoscale model and our own Global-Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Simulator). The effects of burning over the continents of Africa and South America have been noticed in observations from several satellites. Smoke plumes hundreds of kilometers long may be seen individually, or may merge into a large smoke pall over thousands of kilometers of these continents. These features are related to intense pollution in the much more confined regions with heavy burning. These emissions also translocate nitrogen thousands of kilometers in the tropical ecosystems, with large fixed-nitrogen losses balanced partially by locally intense fertilization downwind, where nitric acid is rained out. At a much larger scale, various satellite measurements have indicated the escape of carbon monoxide and ozone into large filaments which extend across the Tropical and Southern Atlantic Ocean. Our work relates the source emissions, estimated in part from remote sensing, in part from conventional surface reports, to the concentrations of these gases over these intercontinental regions. We will mention work in progress to use meteorological satellite data (AVHRR, GOES, and Meteosat) to estimate the surface temperature and extent and height of clouds, and explain why these uses are so important in our computer simulations of global biogeochemistry. We will compare our simulations and interpretation of remote observations to the international cooperation involving Brazil, South Africa, and the USA in the TRACE-A (Transport and Atmospheric Chemistry near the Equator - Atlantic) and SAFARI (Southern Africa Fire Atmosphere Research

  11. Suppression of Frost Nucleation Achieved Using the Nanoengineered Integral Humidity Sink Effect.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoda; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2017-01-24

    Inhibition of frost formation is important for increasing efficiency of refrigeration systems and heat exchangers, as well as for preventing the rapid icing over of water-repellant coatings that are designed to prevent accumulation of rime and glaze. From a thermodynamic point of view, this task can be achieved by either increasing hydrophobicity of the surface or decreasing the concentration of water vapor above it. The first approach has been studied in depth, but so far has not yielded a robust solution to the problem of frost formation. In this work, we systematically explore how frost growth can be inhibited by controlling water vapor concentration using bilayer coatings with a porous exterior covering a hygroscopic liquid-infused layer. We lay the theoretical foundation and provide experimental validation of the mass transport mechanism that governs the integral humidity sink effect based on this coating platform as well as reveal intriguing sizing effects about this system. We show that the concentration profile above periodically spaced pores is governed by the sink and source concentrations and two geometrical parameters: the nondimensional pore size and the ratio of the pore spacing to the boundary layer thickness. We demonstrate that when the ratio of the pore spacing to the boundary layer thickness vanishes, as for the nanoporous bilayer coatings, the entire surface concentration becomes uniform and equal to the concentration set by the hygroscopic liquid. In other words, the surface concentration becomes completely independent of the nanopore size. We identified the threshold geometrical parameters for this condition and show that it can lead to a 65 K decrease in the nucleation onset surface temperature below the dew point. With this fundamental insight, we use bilayer coatings to nanoengineer the integral humidity sink effect to provide extreme antifrosting performance with up to a 2 h delay in nucleation onset at 263 K. The nanoporous bilayer

  12. Beneficial effects of an Integrated Psychostimulation Program in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ibarria, Marta; Alegret, Montserrat; Valero, Sergi; Morera, Amèrica; Guitart, Marina; Cañabate, Pilar; Moreno, Mariola; Lara, Susana; Diego, Susana; Hernández, Joan; Tantinyà, Natàlia; Vera, Maribel; Hernández, Isabel; Becker, James T.; Ruíz, Agustín; Boada, Mercè; Tárraga, Lluís

    2016-01-01

    Background The existing pharmacological treatments for Alzheimer disease (AD) can only slow the progression of symptoms or delay admission to long-term care facilities. The beneficial effects of non-drug treatments are poorly studied. Objective To describe the effects of an Integrated Psychostimulation Program (IPP) in patients with mild-moderate AD treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors; and to identify factors related to greater benefit of the IPP. Methods 206 patients (mean age= 75.9 years; MMSE= 19.6) were evaluated before starting the IPP and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months later. Measures included: Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Cognitive Subscale of Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-Cog), Rapid Disability Rating Scale (RDRS-2) and Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (NPI-Q). Results Patients remained cognitively stable (MMSE/ADAS-Cog) for more than 6 months and significantly worsened at 9-month and 12-month follow-ups, without clinically significant functional changes (RDRS-2) or psychiatric symptoms (NPI-Q). The mean annual change on MMSE and ADAS-Cog were 2.06 and 3.56 points, respectively, lower than the annual decline demonstrated previously in similar patients (2.4 and 4.5, respectively). 42.7% of patients maintained or improved global cognitive scores between baseline and 12-month follow-up. The patients who maintained cognitive functions were older than those who did not (77.5 vs. 74.7 years). Conclusions The IPP may be an effective treatment to maintain cognition, functionality and psychiatric symptoms in AD patients pharmacologically treated, and older age seems to increase beneficial effects of IPP. PMID:26757182

  13. Multisensory integration and internal models for sensing gravity effects in primates.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Bosco, Gianfranco; Gravano, Silvio; Indovina, Iole; La Scaleia, Barbara; Maffei, Vincenzo; Zago, Myrka

    2014-01-01

    Gravity is crucial for spatial perception, postural equilibrium, and movement generation. The vestibular apparatus is the main sensory system involved in monitoring gravity. Hair cells in the vestibular maculae respond to gravitoinertial forces, but they cannot distinguish between linear accelerations and changes of head orientation relative to gravity. The brain deals with this sensory ambiguity (which can cause some lethal airplane accidents) by combining several cues with the otolith signals: angular velocity signals provided by the semicircular canals, proprioceptive signals from muscles and tendons, visceral signals related to gravity, and visual signals. In particular, vision provides both static and dynamic signals about body orientation relative to the vertical, but it poorly discriminates arbitrary accelerations of moving objects. However, we are able to visually detect the specific acceleration of gravity since early infancy. This ability depends on the fact that gravity effects are stored in brain regions which integrate visual, vestibular, and neck proprioceptive signals and combine this information with an internal model of gravity effects.

  14. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in cross-correlation: The observer's manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshordi, Niayesh

    2004-10-01

    The Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is a direct signature of the presence of dark energy in the universe, in the absence of spatial curvature. A powerful method for observing the ISW effect is through cross-correlation of the cosmic microwave background with a tracer of the matter in the low redshift universe. In this paper, we describe the dependence of the obtained cross-correlation signal on the geometry and other properties of a survey of the low redshift universe. We show that an all-sky survey with about 10×106 galaxies, almost uniformly distributed within 0

  15. Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Snorkel Surveys, 2006-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelle, R.D.

    2007-10-01

    The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office conducted snorkel surveys at 11 sites during the summer 2006 survey period and at 15 sites during fall 2006 and winter 2007 survey periods as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. A total of 39,898 fish from 14 species/genera and an unknown category were enumerated. Chinook salmon were the overall most common fish observed and comprised 19% of fish enumerated followed by mountain whitefish (18%) and rainbow trout (14%). Day and night surveys were conducted during the summer 2006 period (August), while night surveys were conducted during the fall 2006 (October) and winter 2007 (February/March) surveys. This is second annual progress report to Bonneville Power Administration for the snorkel surveys conducted in the Entiat River as related to long-term effectiveness monitoring of restoration programs in this watershed. The objective of this study is to monitor the fish habitat utilization of planned in-stream restoration efforts in the Entiat River by conducting pre- and post-construction snorkel surveys at selected treatment and control sites.

  16. The Effect of Computer-Assisted Learning Integrated with Metacognitive Prompts on Students' Affective Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, Nilgün; Akpınar, Ercan; Feyzioğlu, Eylem Yıldız

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of computer-assisted learning integrated with metacognitive prompts on elementary students' affective skills on the subject of electricity. The researchers developed educational software to enable students to easily and comprehensively learn the concepts in the subject of electricity. A case study method was used. Eighteen students from the seventh grade (12-13 years) participated in the study. Students' views on their performances while using educational software and the impact of the software on their affective skills towards the subject of electricity were examined. Data were collected by open-ended questions in the educational software. According to the research results, there were students who had negative attitudes and perceptions before starting to learn about the subject of electricity. Interactive activities, animations, and visual experiments in the educational software were effective in overcoming the students' negative attitudes and perceptions about the subject. Besides, students who assessed their own performances during the learning process believed themselves to be more successful over time. In the light of the research results, some suggestions are made for future studies.

  17. Integrated digital inverters based on two-dimensional anisotropic ReS₂ field-effect transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Erfu; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Yaojia; ...

    2015-05-07

    Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are emerging as top candidates for post-silicon electronics. While most of them exhibit isotropic behaviour, lowering the lattice symmetry could induce anisotropic properties, which are both scientifically interesting and potentially useful. Here we present atomically thin rhenium disulfide (ReS₂) flakes with unique distorted 1T structure, which exhibit in-plane anisotropic properties. We fabricated monolayer and few-layer ReS₂ field-effect transistors, which exhibit competitive performance with large current on/off ratios (~10⁷) and low subthreshold swings (100 mV per decade). The observed anisotropic ratio along two principle axes reaches 3.1, which is the highest among all known two-dimensional semiconductingmore » materials. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated an integrated digital inverter with good performance by utilizing two ReS₂ anisotropic field-effect transistors, suggesting the promising implementation of large-scale two-dimensional logic circuits. Our results underscore the unique properties of two-dimensional semiconducting materials with low crystal symmetry for future electronic applications.« less

  18. Effect of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) on health worker performance in Northeast-Brazil.

    PubMed

    Amaral, João; Gouws, Eleanor; Bryce, Jennifer; Leite, Alvaro Jorge Madeiro; Cunha, Antonio Ledo Alves da; Victora, Cesar G

    2004-01-01

    A multi-country evaluation is being carried out in Brazil and four other countries to determine the effectiveness, cost, and impact of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI). We examine the effect of IMCI on the quality of health care provided to children under five visiting health facilities. A health facility survey was conducted at 24 facilities (12 with IMCI) in each of four States in the Northeast. We assessed the quality of care provided to children between 2 months and 5 years attending the facilities. Health workers trained in IMCI provided significantly better care than those not trained. Significant differences between health workers who were trained or not trained in IMCI were found in the assessment of the child, disease classification, treatment, and caretaker communication. Nurses trained in IMCI performed as well as, and sometimes better than, medical officers trained in IMCI. We conclude that while there is room for further improvement, IMCI case management training significantly improves health worker performance, and that parts of Brazil that have not yet introduced IMCI should be encouraged to do so.

  19. An integrated view of gamma radiation effects on marine fauna: from molecules to ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Ji; Dahms, Hans-U; Kumar, K Suresh; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-11-01

    Accidental release of nuclides into the ocean is causing health risks to marine organisms and humans. All life forms are susceptible to gamma radiation with a high variation, depending on various physical factors such as dose, mode, and time of exposure and various biological factors such as species, vitality, age, and gender. Differences in sensitivity of gamma radiation are also associated with different efficiencies of mechanisms related to protection and repair systems. Gamma radiation may also affect various other integration levels: from gene, protein, cells and organs, population, and communities, disturbing the energy flow of food webs that will ultimately affect the structure and functioning of ecosystems. Depending on exposure levels, gamma radiation induces damages on growth and reproduction in various organisms such as zooplankton, benthos, and fish in aquatic ecosystems. In this paper, harmful effects of gamma-irradiated aquatic organisms are described and the potential of marine copepods in assessing the risk of gamma radiation is discussed with respect to physiological adverse effects that even affect the ecosystem level.

  20. Effect of Recombinant Prophenin 2 on the Integrity and Viability of Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Flores, J. L.; Rodriguez, M. C.; Gastelum Arellanez, A.; Alvarez-Morales, A.; Avila, E. E.

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis, which is associated with preterm child delivery, low birth weight, and an increased risk of infection by human papilloma virus and human immunodeficiency virus following exposure. Several reports have established increasing numbers of trichomoniasis cases resistant to metronidazole, the agent used for treatment, and it is therefore important to identify new therapeutic alternatives. Previously, our group reported the effect of tritrpticin, a synthetic peptide derived from porcine prophenin, on T. vaginalis; however, the hemolytic activity of this small peptide complicates its possible use as a therapeutic agent. In this study, we report that the propeptide and the processed peptide of prophenin 2 (cleaved with hydroxylamine) affected the integrity and growth of T. vaginalis and that pro-prophenin 2 displays some resistance to proteolysis by T. vaginalis proteinases at 1 h. Its effect on T. vaginalis as well as its low hemolytic activity and short-time stability to parasite proteinases makes prophenin 2 an interesting candidate for synergistic or alternative treatment against T. vaginalis. PMID:25815316

  1. Experimental Investigation into the Effect of Ball End Milling Parameters on Surface Integrity of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhopale, Nandkumar N.; Joshi, Suhas S.; Pawade, Raju S.

    2015-02-01

    In machining of Inconel 718, various difficulties such as increased tool wear and poor machined surface quality are frequently encountered due to its high temperature strength and poor thermal properties. This work considers the effect of number of passes and the machining environment on the machined surface quality in ball end milling of Inconel 718, which hitherto has not been adequately understood. To this effect, extensive experimentation has been carried out to analyze machined surface quality and integrity in terms of surface roughness, surface damage, and microhardness variation in the machined surfaces. The machined surfaces show formation of distinct bands as a function of instantaneous machining parameters along the periphery of cutting tool edge. A distinct variation is also observed in the measured values of surface roughness and microhardness in these regions. The minimum surface roughness is obtained in the stable cutting zone and it increases toward the periphery of the cutter on band #2 and band #3. Microhardness of depth beneath the machined surface shows that the machining affected zone varies from 60 to 100 µm in ball end milling under various machining conditions.

  2. Effect of strong electric field on the conformational integrity of insulin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianwei; Li, Yongxiu; He, Xiao; Chen, Shude; Zhang, John Z H

    2014-10-02

    A series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations up to 1 μs for bovine insulin monomer in different external electric fields were carried out to study the effect of external electric field on conformational integrity of insulin. Our results show that the secondary structure of insulin is kept intact under the external electric field strength below 0.15 V/nm, but disruption of secondary structure is observed at 0.25 V/nm or higher electric field strength. Although the starting time of secondary structure disruption of insulin is not clearly correlated with the strength of the external electric field ranging between 0.15 and 0.60 V/nm, long time MD simulations demonstrate that the cumulative effect of exposure time under the electric field is a major cause for the damage of insulin's secondary structure. In addition, the strength of the external electric field has a significant impact on the lifetime of hydrogen bonds when it is higher than 0.60 V/nm. The fast evolution of some hydrogen bonds of bovine insulin in the presence of the 1.0 V/nm electric field shows that different microwaves could either speed up protein folding or destroy the secondary structure of globular proteins deponding on the intensity of the external electric field.

  3. Integrated digital inverters based on two-dimensional anisotropic ReS₂ field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Erfu; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Yaojia; Feng, Yanqing; Liu, Huimei; Wan, Xiangang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Baigeng; Shao, Lubin; Ho, Ching -Hwa; Huang, Ying -Sheng; Cao, Zhengyi; Wang, Laiguo; Li, Aidong; Zeng, Junwen; Song, Fengqi; Wang, Xinran; Shi, Yi; Yuan, Hongtao; Hwang, Harold Y.; Cui, Yi; Miao, Feng; Xing, Dingyu

    2015-05-07

    Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are emerging as top candidates for post-silicon electronics. While most of them exhibit isotropic behaviour, lowering the lattice symmetry could induce anisotropic properties, which are both scientifically interesting and potentially useful. Here we present atomically thin rhenium disulfide (ReS₂) flakes with unique distorted 1T structure, which exhibit in-plane anisotropic properties. We fabricated monolayer and few-layer ReS₂ field-effect transistors, which exhibit competitive performance with large current on/off ratios (~10⁷) and low subthreshold swings (100 mV per decade). The observed anisotropic ratio along two principle axes reaches 3.1, which is the highest among all known two-dimensional semiconducting materials. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated an integrated digital inverter with good performance by utilizing two ReS₂ anisotropic field-effect transistors, suggesting the promising implementation of large-scale two-dimensional logic circuits. Our results underscore the unique properties of two-dimensional semiconducting materials with low crystal symmetry for future electronic applications.

  4. Effective communication about the use of complementary and integrative medicine in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) is becoming an increasingly popular and visible component of oncology care. Many patients affected by cancer and their family members are looking for informed advice and desire communication with their physicians about CIM use. Patients affected by cancer come to discuss CIM use with intense emotions and are experiencing an existential crisis that cannot be ignored. Effective communication is crucial in establishing trust with these patients and their families. Communication is now recognized as a core clinical skill in medicine, including cancer care, and is important to the delivery of high-quality care. The quality of communication affects patient satisfaction, decision-making, patient distress and well-being, compliance, and even malpractice litigation. The communication process about CIM use requires a very sensitive approach that depends on effective communication skills, such as experience in listening, encouraging hope, and ability to convey empathy and compassion. This process can be divided into two parts: the "how" and the "what". The "how" relates to the change in clinician attitude, the process of gathering information, addressing patients' unmet needs and emotions, and dealing with uncertainty. The "what" relates to the process of information exchange while assisting patients in decisions about CIM use by using reliable information sources, leading to informed decision-making.

  5. Assessing airborne pollution effects on bryophytes: lessons learned through long-term integrated monitoring in Austria.

    PubMed

    Zechmeister, H G; Dirnböck, T; Hülber, K; Mirtl, M

    2007-06-01

    The study uses measured and calculated data on airborne pollutants, particularly nitrogen (ranges between 28 to 43kgN*ha(-1)*yr(-1)) and sulphur (10 to 18kgSO(4)-S*ha(-1)*yr(-1)), in order to assess their long-term (1992 to 2005) effects on bryophytes at the UN-ECE Integrated Monitoring site 'Zöbelboden' in Austria. Bryophytes were used as reaction indicators on 20 epiphytic plots using the IM monitoring method and on 14 terrestrial plots using standardised photography. The plots were recorded in the years 1992, 1993, 1998, and 2004/2005. Most species remained stable in terms of their overall population size during the observed period, even though there were rapid turnover rates of a large percentage of species on all investigated plots. Only a few bryophytes (Hypnum cupressiforme, Leucodon sciuroides) responded unambiguously to N and S deposition. Nitrogen deposition had a weak but significant effect on the distribution of bryophyte communities. However, the time shifts in bryophyte communities did not depend on total deposition of N and S.

  6. Modelling of lane-changing behaviour integrating with merging effect before a city road bottleneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wei; Song, Wei-guo; Fang, Zhi-ming; Ma, Jian

    2013-10-01

    Merging behaviour is a compulsive action in a discretionary lane-changing traffic system, especially in a system with a bottleneck. This paper aims to investigate the generic lane-changing behaviour considering the merging effect before a city road bottleneck. Thus firstly the merging behaviour is distinguished from other generic lane-changing behaviour. Combining discretionary lane-changing and compulsive merging, we developed an integrative traffic model, in which a method to calculate the lane-changing probability and the merging probability was proposed. A simulation scenario derived from real life was conducted to validate the proposed programming algorithm. Finally, a discussion on the simulation findings shows that the merging influence can be expanded and the merging behaviour can increase the probability of local traffic jamming in its affected area of the adjacent lane. The distribution of the merging distance provides fundamental insights for actual traffic management. The result of the clearance time implies the position of the incident point has a significant effect on the clearing time and it is important to ensure the end (exit) of the road is unimpeded in traffic evacuation.

  7. The effect of creosote on growth and membrane integrity of the aquatic macrophyte, Myriophyllum sp.

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, J.; Day, K.; Solomon, K.; Greenberg, B.

    1995-12-31

    Creosote is a coal-tar distillate used as a wood preservative on railway ties and dock pilings. Its use in aquatic systems indicates a possible risk to the aquatic community through leaching of creosote components into the water column or sediment. A study has been initiated at the University of Guelph (Ontario, Canada) to determine bioindicators of exposure and effects of creosote on freshwater systems. A laboratory study was conducted to determine the effects of creosote exposure on the rooted, aquatic macrophyte Myriophyllum sp. Using an aseptic culture of Myriophyllum and 3 cm buds grown from single nodes, a growth assay was conducted during which Myriophyllum were exposed for 14 days to concentrations ranging from 0.16 mg/L to 200 mg/L creosote. Growth measurements included: shoot length; number of nodes, buds and roots; total shoot and root length; and growth curves over the exposure period. From the information gathered from the growth assay, 5 creosote concentrations were chosen and used for membrane integrity studies. Myriophyllum were exposed to creosote for either 4 or 12 day periods, after which membrane fluidity was determined by fluorescence depolarization, and electrolyte and K+ leakage were determined by conductivity and atomic absorption spectrophotometry, respectively. The results of both the growth and membrane assays will be discussed.

  8. Effect of recombinant prophenin 2 on the integrity and viability of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Flores, J L; Rodriguez, M C; Gastelum Arellanez, A; Alvarez-Morales, A; Avila, E E

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis, which is associated with preterm child delivery, low birth weight, and an increased risk of infection by human papilloma virus and human immunodeficiency virus following exposure. Several reports have established increasing numbers of trichomoniasis cases resistant to metronidazole, the agent used for treatment, and it is therefore important to identify new therapeutic alternatives. Previously, our group reported the effect of tritrpticin, a synthetic peptide derived from porcine prophenin, on T. vaginalis; however, the hemolytic activity of this small peptide complicates its possible use as a therapeutic agent. In this study, we report that the propeptide and the processed peptide of prophenin 2 (cleaved with hydroxylamine) affected the integrity and growth of T. vaginalis and that pro-prophenin 2 displays some resistance to proteolysis by T. vaginalis proteinases at 1 h. Its effect on T. vaginalis as well as its low hemolytic activity and short-time stability to parasite proteinases makes prophenin 2 an interesting candidate for synergistic or alternative treatment against T. vaginalis.

  9. Integrative effects of zinc and temperature on germination in Dimorphandra wilsonii rizz.: Implications of climate changes.

    PubMed

    Bicalho, Elisa Monteze; Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Rodrigues-Junior, Ailton Gonçalves; Oliveira, Túlio Gabriel Soares; de Almeida Gonçalves, Cintia; Fonseca, Marcia Bacelar; Garcia, Queila Souza

    2017-01-04

    The integrative effects of zinc (Zn; 0 mg L(-1) , 75 mg L(-1) , 150 mg L(-1) , and 200 mg L(-1) ) and temperature (25 °C, 30 °C, and 35 °C) on seed germination of the threatened Brazilian species Dimorphandra wilsonii were evaluated. Zinc effects on seed germination were only observed at 30 °C and 35 °C. By stimulating respiration rates, rising temperatures accentuate hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) formation in germinating seeds in the presence of Zn. Seed Zn tolerance was related to the activation of enzymatic antioxidants, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity had a central role in H2 O2 scavenging under the highest temperatures tested. Increased APX activity allowed successful germination, whereas decreasing APX activity was accompanied by decreasing germination rates in Zn-treated seeds at 35 °C. Within a scenario of future climate change, it will be extremely important to avoid increasing Zn concentrations in natural habitats that would threaten conservation efforts directed toward this endangered plant species. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-7. © 2017 SETAC.

  10. Multisensory Integration and Internal Models for Sensing Gravity Effects in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; La Scaleia, Barbara; Maffei, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Gravity is crucial for spatial perception, postural equilibrium, and movement generation. The vestibular apparatus is the main sensory system involved in monitoring gravity. Hair cells in the vestibular maculae respond to gravitoinertial forces, but they cannot distinguish between linear accelerations and changes of head orientation relative to gravity. The brain deals with this sensory ambiguity (which can cause some lethal airplane accidents) by combining several cues with the otolith signals: angular velocity signals provided by the semicircular canals, proprioceptive signals from muscles and tendons, visceral signals related to gravity, and visual signals. In particular, vision provides both static and dynamic signals about body orientation relative to the vertical, but it poorly discriminates arbitrary accelerations of moving objects. However, we are able to visually detect the specific acceleration of gravity since early infancy. This ability depends on the fact that gravity effects are stored in brain regions which integrate visual, vestibular, and neck proprioceptive signals and combine this information with an internal model of gravity effects. PMID:25061610

  11. Inhibitory effect of hesperetin on α-glucosidase: Molecular dynamics simulation integrating inhibition kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yan; Qin, Xiu-Yuan; Zhai, Yuan-Yuan; Hao, Hao; Lee, Jinhyuk; Park, Yong-Doo

    2017-03-18

    The α-glucosidase inhibitor is of interest to researchers due to its association with type-2 diabetes treatment. Hesperetin is a flavonoid with natural antioxidant properties. This paper presents an evaluation on the effects of hesperetin on α-glucosidase via inhibitory kinetics using a Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation integration method. Due to the antioxidant properties of hesperetin, it reversibly inhibits α-glucosidase in a slope-parabolic mixed-type manner (IC50=0.38±0.05mM; Kslope=0.23±0.01mM), accompanied by tertiary structural changes. Based on computational MD and docking simulations, two hesperetin rings interact with several residues near the active site on the α-glucosidase, such as Lys155, Asn241, Glu304, Pro309, Phe311 and Arg312. This study provides insight into the inhibition of α-glucosidase by binding hesperetin onto active site residues and accompanying structural changes. Hesperetin presents as a potential agent for treating α-glucosidase-associated type-2 diabetes based on its α-glucosidase-inhibiting effect and its potential as a natural antioxidant.

  12. The Effectiveness of a Geospatial Technologies-Integrated Curriculum to Promote Climate Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasio, D. J.; Bodzin, A. M.; Peffer, T.; Sahagian, D. L.; Cirucci, L.

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a geospatial technologies - integrated climate change curriculum (http://www.ei.lehigh.edu/eli/cc/) to promote climate literacy in an urban school district. Five 8th grade Earth and Space Science classes in an urban middle school (Bethlehem, Pennsylvania) consisting of three different ability level tracks participated in the study. Data gathering methods included pre/posttest assessments, daily classroom observations, daily teacher meetings, and examination of student produced artifacts. Data was gathered using a climate change literacy assessment instrument designed to measure students' climate change content knowledge. The items included distractors that address misunderstandings and knowledge deficits about climate change from the existing literature. Paired-sample t-test analyses were conducted to compare the pre- and post-test assessment results. The results of these analyses were used to compare overall gains as well as ability level track groups. Overall results regarding the use of the climate change curriculum showed significant improvement in urban middle school students' understanding of climate change concepts. Effect sizes were large (ES>0.8) and significant (p<0.001) for the entire assessment and for each ability level subgroup. Findings from classroom observations, assessments embedded in the curriculum, and the examination of all student artifacts revealed that the use of geospatial technologies enable middle school students to improve their knowledge of climate change and improve their spatial thinking and reasoning skills.

  13. [The development and effectiveness of telecare from an integrated technological, humanistic and management perspective].

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Hung; Chuang, Bi-Kun; Lan, Yu-Li

    2010-08-01

    A decreasing birthrate coupled with a growing elderly population has lead to an increased focus on elderly-centric issues such as long-term care and senior healthcare. Recent advances in information, communication and biomedical technologies have combined to allow the development of various types of telemedicine technology designed to enhance or expand patient services and care. To date, most telecare studies have focused on the development of underlying technologies rather than on patient (customer) perceptions regarding service mechanisms. The lack of the latter makes obtaining an effective understanding of the actual needs and problems of the elderly population difficult, and limits the potential for clinical implementation of study findings and further knowledge development. This article reviews important articles in the literature on telecare and evaluates the effectiveness of telecare-related technologies. Three key aspects associated with eight sub-indictors were identified. These included the aspects of technology (system quality); humanism (institutional trust and privacy risk); and management (service quality, cost benefit, satisfaction, use intention, and influence on health). An integrated perspective combining social and technological aspects is needed to facilitate increasing utilization of and satisfaction with telecare. Simply implementing new systems built around this innovative technology is not sufficient, and may be counterproductive. This article was written to help stimulate deeper exploration and insights into academic theory and clinical practice in order to help shape and create a better vision of aging in place.

  14. Integrating species composition and leaf nitrogen content to indicate effects of nitrogen deposition.

    PubMed

    Du, Enzai

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition has been increasing globally and has arisen concerns of its impacts on terrestrial ecosystems. Ecological indicators play an important role in ecosystem monitoring, assessment and management in the context of an anthropogenic transformation of the global N cycle. By integrating species composition and leaf N stoichiometry, a new community N indicator was defined and validated in the understory plots of an N enrichment (as NH4NO3) experiment in an old-growth boreal forest in Northeast China. Three-year N additions showed no significant effect on the understory species richness, but an obvious shift in species composition occurred. The response of leaf N content to N additions was generally positive but varied by species. Overall, the community N indicator increased significantly with higher N addition level and soil available N content, being in the shape of a non-linear saturation response curve. The results suggest that the community N indicator could be an effective tool to indicate changes in ecosystem N availability. Critical values of the community N indicator for specific vegetation type could potentially provide useful information for nature conservation managers and policy makers.

  15. Living up to safety values in health care: the effect of leader behavioral integrity on occupational safety.

    PubMed

    Halbesleben, Jonathon R B; Leroy, Hannes; Dierynck, Bart; Simons, Tony; Savage, Grant T; McCaughey, Deirdre; Leon, Matthew R

    2013-10-01

    While previous research has identified that leaders' safety expectations and safety actions are important in fostering occupational safety, research has yet to demonstrate the importance of leader alignment between safety expectations and actions for improving occupational safety. We build on safety climate literature and theory on behavioral integrity to better understand the relationship between the leader's behavioral integrity regarding safety and work-related injuries. In a time-lagged study of 658 nurses, we find that behavioral integrity for high safety values is positively associated with greater reporting of fewer and less severe occupational injuries. The effects of behavioral integrity regarding safety can be better understood through the mediating mechanisms of safety compliance and psychological safety toward one's supervisor. We discuss the implications of our findings for future research on safety climate.

  16. Monolithic integration of GaN-based light-emitting diodes and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ya-Ju; Yang, Zu-Po; Chen, Pin-Guang; Hsieh, Yung-An; Yao, Yung-Chi; Liao, Ming-Han; Lee, Min-Hung; Wang, Mei-Tan; Hwang, Jung-Min

    2014-10-20

    In this study, we report a novel monolithically integrated GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Without additionally introducing complicated epitaxial structures for transistors, the MOSFET is directly fabricated on the exposed n-type GaN layer of the LED after dry etching, and serially connected to the LED through standard semiconductor-manufacturing technologies. Such monolithically integrated LED/MOSFET device is able to circumvent undesirable issues that might be faced by other kinds of integration schemes by growing a transistor on an LED or vice versa. For the performances of resulting device, our monolithically integrated LED/MOSFET device exhibits good characteristics in the modulation of gate voltage and good capability of driving injected current, which are essential for the important applications such as smart lighting, interconnection, and optical communication.

  17. Effective use of integrated hydrological models in basin-scale water resources management: surrogate modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Wu, B.; Wu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Integrated hydrological models (IHMs) consider surface water and subsurface water as a unified system, and have been widely adopted in basin-scale water resources studies. However, due to IHMs' mathematical complexity and high computational cost, it is difficult to implement them in an iterative model evaluation process (e.g., Monte Carlo Simulation, simulation-optimization analysis, etc.), which diminishes their applicability for supporting decision-making in real-world situations. Our studies investigated how to effectively use complex IHMs to address real-world water issues via surrogate modeling. Three surrogate modeling approaches were considered, including 1) DYCORS (DYnamic COordinate search using Response Surface models), a well-established response surface-based optimization algorithm; 2) SOIM (Surrogate-based Optimization for Integrated surface water-groundwater Modeling), a response surface-based optimization algorithm that we developed specifically for IHMs; and 3) Probabilistic Collocation Method (PCM), a stochastic response surface approach. Our investigation was based on a modeling case study in the Heihe River Basin (HRB), China's second largest endorheic river basin. The GSFLOW (Coupled Ground-Water and Surface-Water Flow Model) model was employed. Two decision problems were discussed. One is to optimize, both in time and in space, the conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater for agricultural irrigation in the middle HRB region; and the other is to cost-effectively collect hydrological data based on a data-worth evaluation. Overall, our study results highlight the value of incorporating an IHM in making decisions of water resources management and hydrological data collection. An IHM like GSFLOW can provide great flexibility to formulating proper objective functions and constraints for various optimization problems. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that surrogate modeling approaches can pave the path for such incorporation in real

  18. Effects of energetic particle phase space modifications by instabilities on integrated modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; White, R. B.

    2016-11-01

    Tokamak plasmas can feature a large population of energetic particles (EP) from neutral beam injection or fusion reactions. In turn, energetic particles can drive instabilities, which affect the driving EP population leading to a distortion of the original EP distribution function and of quantities that depend on it. The latter include, for example, neutral beam (NB) current drive and plasma heating through EP thermalization. Those effects must be taken into account to enable reliable and quantitative simulations of discharges for present devices as well as predictions for future burning plasmas. Reduced models for EP transport are emerging as an effective tool for long time-scale integrated simulations of tokamak plasmas, possibly including the effects of instabilities on EP dynamics. Available models differ in how EP distribution properties are modified by instabilities, e.g. in terms of gradients in real or phase space. It is therefore crucial to assess to what extent different assumptions in the transport models affect predicted quantities such as EP profile, energy distribution, NB driven current and energy/momentum transfer to the thermal populations. A newly developed kick model, which includes modifications of the EP distribution by instabilities in both real and velocity space, is used in this work to investigate these issues. Coupled to TRANSP simulations, the kick model is used to analyze NB-heated NSTX and DIII-D discharges featuring unstable Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). Results show that instabilities can strongly affect the EP distribution function, and modifications propagate to macroscopic quantities such as NB-driven current profile and NB power transferred to the thermal plasma species. Those important aspects are only qualitatively captured by simpler fast ion transport models that are based on radial diffusion of energetic ions only.

  19. Implementation and effectiveness of integrated trauma and addiction treatment for incarcerated men.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Nancy; Huening, Jessica; Shi, Jing; Frueh, B Christopher; Hoover, Donald R; McHugo, Gregory

    2015-03-01

    A controlled trial of Seeking Safety (SS) and Male-Trauma Recovery Empowerment Model (M-TREM) examined implementation and effectiveness of integrated group therapy for comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD) on PTSD and mental health symptoms plus self-esteem and efficacy for incarcerated men. The study sample (n=230) was male inmates 18 years or older who were primarily non-white, high school graduates or equivalents, had childhood trauma histories, committed violent crimes, had serious mental illnesses, and resided in a maximum security prison. Incarcerated men, who screened positive for PTSD and SUD, were assigned randomly (n=142) or by preference (n=88) to receive SS or M-TREM, with a waitlist group of (n=93). Manualized interventions were group-administered for 14 weeks. Primary outcomes were PTSD and other mental health symptoms. Secondary outcomes were self-esteem, coping, and self-efficacy. SUD outcomes cannot be measured in a correctional setting. Implementation feasibility was exhibited by the ability to recruit, screen, assign, and retain participants. Effectiveness findings depended on sample, design, and method for analysis. Using a waitlist control group and no follow-up period, we found no aggregate effect of treatment on PTSD symptoms, although, when disaggregated, M-TREM was found to improve PTSD severity and SS improved general mental health symptoms and psychological functioning. Using intent-to-treat and completer analyses, no significant differences were found in the relative performance between SS and M-TREM on primary or secondary outcomes. When longitudinal data were maximized and modeled in ways that reflect the hierarchical nature of the data, we found that SS and M-TREM performed better than no treatment on PTSD severity and secondary outcomes, and that treatment benefits endured. Findings cautiously support implementing either Seeking Safety or M-TREM to treat incarcerated men with co-morbid PTSD

  20. Effect of an integrated care system on utilization for CSHCN in Florida.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Mircea I; Knapp, Caprice A; Madden, Vanessa L; Wang, Hua; Kaufmann, Meggen; Sloyer, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, Florida began a pilot program under a federal Medicaid waiver to reform its Medicaid program in Broward and Duval counties. The Children's Medical Services Network, a subcontracted health care delivery system for Florida's children with special health care needs (CSHCN) enrolled in public insurance programs, participated in Medicaid reform through an Integrated Care System (ICS) for its enrollees. The ICS constitutes a significant departure from the subcontracted fee-for-service system used to deliver care to CSHCN in the non-reform counties, and limited information exists about its impact. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of the ICS on Medicaid utilization among CSHCN in Broward and Duval. Administrative data from 3,947 CSHCN in Broward and Duval, and two control counties, enrolled in Florida's Medicaid program between 2006 and 2008 were used for analyses. Fixed effects negative binomial models were used to estimate the impact of the ICS on inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department utilization. Results show the number of outpatient visits decreased by 9 % in Broward and 16 % in Duval. The number of inpatient stays decreased in Duval by 35 %. Emergency room utilization increased slightly in Broward, although the estimate was not significant. Results suggest that managed care under the ICS has impacted utilization, most significantly for inpatient care. The ICS presents a viable model of managed care for CSHCN that could result in cost savings. Results should be interpreted with care because the full effects of the ICS implementation may take more time to materialize.

  1. Effects of energetic particle phase space modifications by instabilities on integrated modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; White, R. B.

    2016-07-22

    Tokamak plasmas can feature a large population of energetic particles (EP) from neutral beam injection or fusion reactions. In turn, energetic particles can drive instabilities, which affect the driving EP population leading to a distortion of the original EP distribution function and of quantities that depend on it. The latter include, for example, neutral beam (NB) current drive and plasma heating through EP thermalization. Those effects must be taken into account to enable reliable and quantitative simulations of discharges for present devices as well as predictions for future burning plasmas. Reduced models for EP transport are emerging as an effective tool for long time-scale integrated simulations of tokamak plasmas, possibly including the effects of instabilities on EP dynamics. Available models differ in how EP distribution properties are modified by instabilities, e.g. in terms of gradients in real or phase space. It is therefore crucial to assess to what extent different assumptions in the transport models affect predicted quantities such as EP profile, energy distribution, NB driven current and energy/momentum transfer to the thermal populations. A newly developed kick model, which includes modifications of the EP distribution by instabilities in both real and velocity space, is used in this work to investigate these issues. Coupled to TRANSP simulations, the kick model is used to analyze NB-heated NSTX and DIII-D discharges featuring unstable Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). Results show that instabilities can strongly affect the EP distribution function, and modifications propagate to macroscopic quantities such as NB-driven current profile and NB power transferred to the thermal plasma species. Furthermore, those important aspects are only qualitatively captured by simpler fast ion transport models that are based on radial diffusion of energetic ions only.

  2. Implementation and effectiveness of integrated trauma and addiction treatment for incarcerated men

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Nancy; Huening, Jessica; Shi, Jing; Frueh, B. Christopher; Hoover, Donald R.; McHugo, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    A controlled trial of Seeking Safety (SS) and Male-Trauma Recovery Empowerment Model (M-TREM) examined implementation and effectiveness of integrated group therapy for comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD) on PTSD and mental health symptoms plus self-esteem and efficacy for incarcerated men. The study sample (n = 230) was male inmates 18 years or older who were primarily non-white, high school graduates or equivalents, had childhood trauma histories, committed violent crimes, had serious mental illnesses, and resided in a maximum security prison. Incarcerated men, who screened positive for PTSD and SUD, were assigned randomly (n = 142) or by preference (n = 88) to receive SS or M-TREM, with a waitlist group of (n = 93). Manualized interventions were group-administered for 14 weeks. Primary outcomes were PTSD and other mental health symptoms. Secondary outcomes were self-esteem, coping, and self-efficacy. SUD outcomes cannot be measured in a correctional setting. Implementation feasibility was exhibited by the ability to recruit, screen, assign, and retain participants. Effectiveness findings depended on sample, design, and method for analysis. Using a waitlist control group and no follow-up period, we found no aggregate effect of treatment on PTSD symptoms, although, when disaggregated, M-TREM was found to improve PTSD severity and SS improved general mental health symptoms and psychological functioning. Using intent-to-treat and completer analyses, no significant differences were found in the relative performance between SS and M-TREM on primary or secondary outcomes. When longitudinal data were maximized and modeled in ways that reflect the hierarchical nature of the data, we found that SS and M-TREM performed better than no treatment on PTSD severity and secondary outcomes, and that treatment benefits endured. Findings cautiously support implementing either Seeking Safety or M-TREM to treat incarcerated men with co

  3. Missouri River Scaphirhynchus albus (pallid sturgeon) effects analysis—Integrative report 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Annis, Mandy L.; Colvin, Michael E.; James, Daniel A.; Welker, Timothy L.; Parsley, Michael J.

    2016-07-15

    scenarios.Consideration of lines of evidence for each of the 21 hypotheses includes a discussion of how the degree of uncertainty and risk associated with each hypothesis may guide science and implementation strategies. Implementation strategies include full implementation in the field, limited implementations as field-scale experiments, or (in the case of greatest uncertainty) implementation as learning actions, including research and opportunistic experiments or field-based gradient studies. Given the substantive uncertainties associated with pallid sturgeon population dynamics and the need to continually assimilate and assess new information, we proposed that an Effects Analysis-like process should be considered an integral part of ongoing Missouri River adaptive management.

  4. HIV, Tuberculosis, and Non-Communicable Diseases: What is known about the costs, effects, and cost-effectiveness of integrated care?

    PubMed Central

    Hyle, Emily P.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Su, Amanda E.; El-Sadr, Wafaa M.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Unprecedented investments in health systems low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have resulted in more than eight million individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Such individuals experience dramatically increased survival, but are increasingly at risk of developing common non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Integrating clinical care for HIV, other infectious diseases, and NCDs could make health services more effective and provide greater value. Cost-effectiveness analysis is a method to evaluate the clinical benefits and costs associated with different healthcare interventions and offers guidance for prioritization of investments and scale-up, especially as resources are increasingly constrained. We first examine tuberculosis and HIV as one example of integrated care already successfully implemented in several LMICs; we then review the published literature regarding cervical cancer and depression as two examples of NCDs for which integrating care with HIV services could offer excellent value. Direct evidence of the benefits of integrated services generally remains scarce; however, data suggest that improved effectiveness and reduced costs may be attained by integrating additional services with existing HIV clinical care. Further investigation into clinical outcomes and costs of care for NCDs among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in LMICs will help to prioritize specific healthcare services by contributing to an understanding of the affordability and implementation of an integrated approach. PMID:25117965

  5. Differential School Contextual Effects for Math and English: Integrating the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect and the Internal/External Frame of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Philip D.; Marsh, Herbert W.; Ludtke, Oliver; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The internal/external frame of reference and the big-fish-little-pond effect are two major models of academic self-concept formation which have considerable theoretical and empirical support. Integrating the domain specific and compensatory processes of the internal/external frame of reference model with the big-fish-little-pond effect suggests a…

  6. ESIF Plugs Utility-Scale Hardware into Simulated Grids to Assess Integration Effects (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    At NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), integrated, megawatt-scale power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) capability allows researchers and manufacturers to test new energy technologies at full power in real-time simulations - safely evaluating component and system performance and reliability before going to market.

  7. Determinants of International Students' Adaptation: Examining Effects of Integrative Motivation, Instrumental Motivation and Second Language Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Baohua; Downing, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of integrative motivation, instrumental motivation and second language (L2) proficiency on socio-cultural/academic adaptation in a sample of two groups of international students studying Chinese in China. Results revealed that the non-Asian student group reported higher levels of integrative motivation,…

  8. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Integrated Learning Systems on Urban Middle School Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Yamilette

    2012-01-01

    Many school districts have chosen to invest their federal funds in computer-based integrated learning systems that focus on literacy to increase high-stakes test scores and academic gains (Becker, 1994). Buly and Velencia (2002) supported the belief that a student's reading ability can improve substantially when instruction is integrated with…

  9. An Evaluation of the Observer Effect on Treatment Integrity in a Day Treatment Center for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Monica R.; Burke, Raymond V.; Allen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity is an important concern in treatment centers but is often overlooked. Performance feedback is a well-established approach to improving treatment integrity, but is underused and undervalued. One way to increase its value to treatment centers may be to expose unrealized benefits on the observer who collects the performance…

  10. Comparing the Effects of Test Anxiety on Independent and Integrated Speaking Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Heng-Tsung Danny; Hung, Shao-Ting Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrated speaking test tasks (integrated tasks) offer textual and/or aural input for test takers on which to base their subsequent oral responses. This path-analytic study modeled the relationship between test anxiety and the performance of such tasks and explored whether test anxiety would differentially affect the performance of independent…

  11. Grounded Tech Integration: An Effective Approach Based on Content, Pedagogy, and Teacher Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Judi; Hofer, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Successful technology integration must focus on standards-based, curriculum-related learning outcomes rather than on the technologies themselves. In the first installment of a seven-part series, we offer a grounded approach to technology integration based on content, pedagogy, and how teachers plan instruction.

  12. A Study of the Effectiveness of Sensory Integration Therapy on Neuro-Physiological Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Christopher; Reynolds, Kathleen Sheena

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sensory integration theory proposes that because there is plasticity within the central nervous system (the brain is moldable) and because the brain consists of systems that are hierarchically organised, it is possible to stimulate and improve neuro-physiological processing and integration and thereby increase learning capacity.…

  13. Schemes for Integrating Text and Image in the Science Textbook: Effects on Comprehension and Situational Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Matthew O.

    2016-01-01

    Science education researchers have turned their attention to the use of images in textbooks, both because pages are heavily illustrated and because visual literacy is an important aptitude for science students. Text-image integration in the textbook is described here as composition schemes in increasing degrees of integration: prose primary (PP),…

  14. Review of computer simulations of isotope effects on biochemical reactions: From the Bigeleisen equation to Feynman's path integral.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Xu, Yuqing; Xu, Liang

    2015-11-01

    Enzymatic reactions are integral components in many biological functions and malfunctions. The iconic structure of each reaction path for elucidating the reaction mechanism in details is the molecular structure of the rate-limiting transition state (RLTS). But RLTS is very hard to get caught or to get visualized by experimentalists. In spite of the lack of explicit molecular structure of the RLTS in experiment, we still can trace out the RLTS unique "fingerprints" by measuring the isotope effects on the reaction rate. This set of "fingerprints" is considered as a most direct probe of RLTS. By contrast, for computer simulations, oftentimes molecular structures of a number of TS can be precisely visualized on computer screen, however, theoreticians are not sure which TS is the actual rate-limiting one. As a result, this is an excellent stage setting for a perfect "marriage" between experiment and theory for determining the structure of RLTS, along with the reaction mechanism, i.e., experimentalists are responsible for "fingerprinting", whereas theoreticians are responsible for providing candidates that match the "fingerprints". In this Review, the origin of isotope effects on a chemical reaction is discussed from the perspectives of classical and quantum worlds, respectively (e.g., the origins of the inverse kinetic isotope effects and all the equilibrium isotope effects are purely from quantum). The conventional Bigeleisen equation for isotope effect calculations, as well as its refined version in the framework of Feynman's path integral and Kleinert's variational perturbation (KP) theory for systematically incorporating anharmonicity and (non-parabolic) quantum tunneling, are also presented. In addition, the outstanding interplay between theory and experiment for successfully deducing the RLTS structures and the reaction mechanisms is demonstrated by applications on biochemical reactions, namely models of bacterial squalene-to-hopene polycyclization and RNA 2'-O

  15. Effects of Outlets on Cracking Risk and Integral Stability of Super-High Arch Dams

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, case study on outlet cracking is first conducted for the Goupitan and Xiaowan arch dams. A nonlinear FEM method is then implemented to study effects of the outlets on integral stability of the Xiluodu arch dam under two loading conditions, i.e., normal loading and overloading conditions. On the basis of the case study and the numerical modelling, the outlet cracking mechanism, risk, and corresponding reinforcement measures are discussed. Furthermore, the numerical simulation reveals that (1) under the normal loading conditions, the optimal distribution of the outlets will contribute to the tensile stress release in the local zone of the dam stream surface and decrease the outlet cracking risk during the operation period. (2) Under the overloading conditions, the cracks initiate around the outlets, then propagate along the horizontal direction, and finally coalesce with those in adjacent outlets, where the yield zone of the dam has a shape of butterfly. Throughout this study, a dam outlet cracking risk control and reinforcement principle is proposed to optimize the outlet design, select the appropriate concrete material, strengthen the temperature control during construction period, design reasonable impounding scheme, and repair the cracks according to their classification. PMID:25152907

  16. Integrated modeling/analyses of thermal-shock effects in SNS targets

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Haines, J.

    1996-06-01

    In a spallation neutron source (SNS), extremely rapid energy pulses are introduced in target materials such as mercury, lead, tungsten, uranium, etc. Shock phenomena in such systems may possibly lead to structural material damage beyond the design basis. As expected, the progression of shock waves and interaction with surrounding materials for liquid targets can be quite different from that in solid targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe ORNL`s modeling framework for `integrated` assessment of thermal-shock issues in liquid and solid target designs. This modeling framework is being developed based upon expertise developed from past reactor safety studies, especially those related to the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Unlike previous separate-effects modeling approaches employed (for evaluating target behavior when subjected to thermal shocks), the present approach treats the overall problem in a coupled manner using state-of-the-art equations of state for materials of interest (viz., mercury, tungsten and uranium). That is, the modeling framework simultaneously accounts for localized (and distributed) compression pressure pulse generation due to transient heat deposition, the transport of this shock wave outwards, interaction with surrounding boundaries, feedback to mercury from structures, multi-dimensional reflection patterns & stress induced (possible) breakup or fracture.

  17. Integrated Analysis of Environment-driven Operational Effects in Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Alfred J; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2007-07-01

    There is a rapidly growing need to evaluate sensor network functionality and performance in the context of the larger environment of infrastructure and applications in which the sensor network is organically embedded. This need, which is motivated by complex applications related to national security operations, leads to a paradigm fundamentally different from that of traditional data networks. In the sensor networks of interest to us, the network dynamics depend strongly on sensor activity, which in turn is triggered by events in the environment. Because the behavior of sensor networks is sensitive to these driving phenomena, the integrity of the sensed observations, measurements and resource usage by the network can widely vary. It is therefore imperative to accurately capture the environmental phenomena, and drive the simulation of the sensor network operation by accounting fully for the environment effects. In this paper, we illustrate the strong, intimate coupling between the sensor network operation and the driving phenomena in their applications with an example sensor network designed to detect and track gaseous plumes.

  18. Radiation effects on bipolar junction transistors and integrated circuits produced by different energy Br ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingji; Geng, Hongbin; Liu, Chaoming; Zhao, Zhiming; Lan, Mujie; Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu

    2009-12-01

    The radiation responses of the NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and the TTL bipolar integrated circuits (ICs) have been examined using 20, 40 and 60 MeV Br ions. Key electric parameter was measured and compared after each energy irradiation. Experimental results demonstrate that the degradation in electric parameters caused by the Br ions shows a common feature for the NPN BJTs and TTL ICs, in which the degradation is strengthened with decreasing the Br ions energy. The ionizing dose ( D i) and displacement dose ( D d) as a function of the chip depth in the bipolar devices were calculated using the SRIM code, in order to analyze the radiation effects on the NPN BJTs and the Bipolar ICs. From the experiment and calculation results, it could be deduced that the Br ions mainly cause displacement damage to both the NPN BJTs and the TTL ICs, and the higher the ratio of D d/( D d+D i), the larger the degradation in electric parameters at a given total dose.

  19. Effects of zinc-substituted nano-hydroxyapatite coatings on bone integration with implant surfaces*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shi-fang; Dong, Wen-jing; Jiang, Qiao-hong; He, Fu-ming; Wang, Xiao-xiang; Yang, Guo-li

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a zinc-substituted nano-hydroxyapatite (Zn-HA) coating, applied by an electrochemical process, on implant osseointegraton in a rabbit model. Methods: A Zn-HA coating or an HA coating was deposited using an electrochemical process. Surface morphology was examined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The crystal structure and chemical composition of the coatings were examined using an X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A total of 78 implants were inserted into femurs and tibias of rabbits. After two, four, and eight weeks, femurs and tibias were retrieved and prepared for histomorphometric evaluation and removal torque (RTQ) tests. Results: Rod-like HA crystals appeared on both implant surfaces. The dimensions of the Zn-HA crystals seemed to be smaller than those of HA. XRD patterns showed that the peaks of both coatings matched well with standard HA patterns. FTIR spectra showed that both coatings consisted of HA crystals. The Zn-HA coating significantly improved the bone area within all threads after four and eight weeks (P<0.05), the bone to implant contact (BIC) at four weeks (P<0.05), and RTQ values after four and eight weeks (P<0.05). Conclusions: The study showed that an electrochemically deposited Zn-HA coating has potential for improving bone integration with an implant surface. PMID:23733429

  20. Automatic Reconstruction of Building Roofs Through Effective Integration of LIDAR and Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awrangjeb, M.; Zhang, C.; Fraser, C. S.

    2012-07-01

    Automatic 3D reconstruction of building roofs from remotely sensed data is important for many applications including city modeling. This paper proposes a new method for automatic 3D roof reconstruction through an effective integration of LIDAR data and multispectral imagery. Using the ground height from a DEM, the raw LIDAR points are separated into two groups. The first group contains the ground points that are exploited to constitute a 'ground mask'. The second group contains the non-ground points that are used to generate initial roof planes. The structural lines are extracted from the grey-scale version of the orthoimage and they are classified into several classes such as 'ground', 'tree', 'roof edge' and 'roof ridge' using the ground mask, the NDVI image (Normalised Difference Vegetation Index from the multi-band orthoimage) and the entropy image (from the grey-scale orthoimage). The lines from the later two classes are primarily used to fit initial planes to the neighbouring LIDAR points. Other image lines within the vicinity of an initial plane are selected to fit the boundary of the plane. Once the proper image lines are selected and others are discarded, the final plane is reconstructed using the selected lines. Experimental results show that the proposed method can handle irregular and large registration errors between the LIDAR data and orthoimagery.

  1. DUET: a server for predicting effects of mutations on protein stability using an integrated computational approach.

    PubMed

    Pires, Douglas E V; Ascher, David B; Blundell, Tom L

    2014-07-01

    Cancer genome and other sequencing initiatives are generating extensive data on non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in human and other genomes. In order to understand the impacts of nsSNPs on the structure and function of the proteome, as well as to guide protein engineering, accurate in silicomethodologies are required to study and predict their effects on protein stability. Despite the diversity of available computational methods in the literature, none has proven accurate and dependable on its own under all scenarios where mutation analysis is required. Here we present DUET, a web server for an integrated computational approach to study missense mutations in proteins. DUET consolidates two complementary approaches (mCSM and SDM) in a consensus prediction, obtained by combining the results of the separate methods in an optimized predictor using Support Vector Machines (SVM). We demonstrate that the proposed method improves overall accuracy of the predictions in comparison with either method individually and performs as well as or better than similar methods. The DUET web server is freely and openly available at http://structure.bioc.cam.ac.uk/duet.

  2. Storage Effects on Sample Integrity of Environmental Surface Sampling Specimens with Bacillus anthracis Spores.

    PubMed

    Perry, K Allison; O'Connell, Heather A; Rose, Laura J; Noble-Wang, Judith A; Arduino, Matthew J

    The effect of packaging, shipping temperatures and storage times on recovery of Bacillus anthracis. Sterne spores from swabs was investigated. Macrofoam swabs were pre-moistened, inoculated with Bacillus anthracis spores, and packaged in primary containment or secondary containment before storage at -15°C, 5°C, 21°C, or 35°C for 0-7 days. Swabs were processed according to validated Centers for Disease Control/Laboratory Response Network culture protocols, and the percent recovery relative to a reference sample (T0) was determined for each variable. No differences were observed in recovery between swabs held at -15° and 5°C, (p ≥ 0.23). These two temperatures provided significantly better recovery than swabs held at 21°C or 35°C (all 7 days pooled, p ≤ 0.04). The percent recovery at 5°C was not significantly different if processed on days 1, 2 or 4, but was significantly lower on day 7 (day 2 vs. 7, 5°C, 10(2), p=0.03). Secondary containment provided significantly better percent recovery than primary containment, regardless of storage time (5°C data, p ≤ 0.008). The integrity of environmental swab samples containing Bacillus anthracis spores shipped in secondary containment was maintained when stored at -15°C or 5°C and processed within 4 days to yield the optimum percent recovery of spores.

  3. Effective Thermo-Capillary Mixing in Droplet Microfluidics Integrated with a Microwave Heater.

    PubMed

    Yesiloz, Gurkan; Boybay, Muhammed S; Ren, Carolyn L

    2017-02-07

    In this study, we present a microwave-based microfluidic mixer that allows rapid mixing within individual droplets efficiently. The designed microwave mixer is a coplanar design with a small footprint, which is fabricated on a glass substrate and integrated with a microfluidic chip. The mixer works essentially as a resonator that accumulates an intensive electromagnetic field into a spiral capacitive gap (around 200 μm), which provides sufficient energy to heat-up droplets that pass through the capacitive gap. This microwave actuation induces nonuniform Marangoni stresses on the interface, which results in three-dimensional motion inside the droplet and thus fast mixing. In order to evaluate the performance of the microwave mixer, droplets with highly viscous fluid, 75% (w/w) glycerol solution, were generated, half of which were seeded with fluorescent dye for imaging purposes. The relative importance of different driving forces for mixing was evaluated qualitatively using magnitude analysis, and the effect of the applied power on mixing performance was also investigated. Mixing efficiency was quantified using the mixing index, which shows as high as 97% mixing efficiency was achieved within the range of milliseconds. This work demonstrates a very unique approach of utilizing microwave technology to facilitate mixing in droplet microfluidics systems, which can potentially open up areas for biochemical synthesis applications.

  4. The cross-correlation between 3D cosmic shear and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieser, Britta; Merkel, Philipp M.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first calculation of the cross-correlation between 3D cosmic shear and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (iSW) effect. Both signals are combined in a single formalism, which permits the computation of the full covariance matrix. In order to avoid the uncertainties presented by the non-linear evolution of the matter power spectrum and intrinsic alignments of galaxies, our analysis is restricted to large scales, i.e. multipoles below ℓ = 1000. We demonstrate in a Fisher analysis that this reduction compared to other studies of 3D weak lensing extending to smaller scales is compensated by the information that is gained if the additional iSW signal and in particular its cross-correlation with lensing data are considered. Given the observational standards of upcoming weak-lensing surveys like Euclid, marginal errors on cosmological parameters decrease by 10 per cent compared to a cosmic shear experiment if both types of information are combined without a cosmic wave background (CMB) prior. Once the constraining power of CMB data is added, the improvement becomes marginal.

  5. Disaster Preparedness among Health Professionals and Support Staff: What is Effective? An Integrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Gowing, Jeremy R; Walker, Kim N; Elmer, Shandell L; Cummings, Elizabeth A

    2017-03-16

    Introduction It is important that health professionals and support staff are prepared for disasters to safeguard themselves and the community during disasters. There has been a significantly heightened focus on disasters since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 in New York (USA); however, despite this, it is evident that health professionals and support staff may not be adequately prepared for disasters. Report An integrative literature review was performed based on a keyword search of the major health databases for primary research evaluating preparedness of health professionals and support staff. The literature was quality appraised using a mixed-methods appraisal tool (MMAT), and a thematic analysis was completed to identify current knowledge and gaps. Discussion The main themes identified were: health professionals and support staff may not be fully prepared for disasters; the most effective content and methods for disaster preparedness is unknown; and the willingness of health professionals and support staff to attend work and perform during disasters needs further evaluation. Gaps were identified to guide further research and the creation of new knowledge to best prepare for disasters. These included the need for: high-quality research to evaluate the best content and methods of disaster preparedness; inclusion of the multi-disciplinary health care team as participants; preparation for internal disasters; the development of validated competencies for preparedness; validated tools for measurement; and the importance of performance in actual disasters to evaluate preparation.

  6. Effects of a phase transition on HBT correlations in an integrated Boltzmann + hydrodynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingfeng; Steinheimer, Jan; Petersen, Hannah; Bleicher, Marcus; Stöcker, Horst

    2009-04-01

    A systematic study of HBT radii of pions, produced in heavy ion collisions in the intermediate energy regime (SPS), from an integrated (3 + 1)d Boltzmann + hydrodynamics approach is presented. The calculations in this hybrid approach, incorporating an hydrodynamic stage into the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics transport model, allow for a comparison of different equations of state retaining the same initial conditions and final freeze-out. The results are also compared to the pure cascade transport model calculations in the context of the available data. Furthermore, the effect of different treatments of the hydrodynamic freeze-out procedure on the HBT radii are investigated. It is found that the HBT radii are essentially insensitive to the details of the freeze-out prescription as long as the final hadronic interactions in the cascade are taken into account. The HBT radii RL and RO and the RO /RS ratio are sensitive to the EoS that is employed during the hydrodynamic evolution. We conclude that the increased lifetime in case of a phase transition to a QGP (via a Bag Model equation of state) is not supported by the available data.

  7. Effects of walking in deep venous thrombosis: a new integrated solid and fluid mechanics model.

    PubMed

    López, Josep M; Fortuny, Gerard; Puigjaner, Dolors; Herrero, Joan; Marimon, Francesc; Garcia-Bennett, Josep

    2016-08-09

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common disease. Large thrombi in venous vessels cause bad blood circulation and pain; and when a blood clot detaches from a vein wall, it causes an embolism whose consequences range from mild to fatal. Walking is recommended to DVT patients as a therapeutical complement. In this study the mechanical effects of walking on a specific patient of DVT were simulated by means of an unprecedented integration of 3 elements: a real geometry, a biomechanical model of body tissues, and a computational fluid dynamics study. A set of computed tomography images of a patient's leg with a thrombus in the popliteal vein was employed to reconstruct a geometry model. Then a biomechanical model was used to compute the new deformed geometry of the vein as a function of the fiber stretch level of the semimembranosus muscle. Finally, a computational fluid dynamics study was performed to compute the blood flow and the wall shear stress (WSS) at the vein and thrombus walls. Calculations showed that either a lengthening or shortening of the semimembranosus muscle led to a decrease of WSS levels up to 10%. Notwithstanding, changes in blood viscosity properties or blood flow rate may easily have a greater impact in WSS.

  8. Effects of mercuric chloride on antioxidant system and DNA integrity of the crab Charybdis japonica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Pan, Luqing; Miao, Jingjing; Xu, Chaoqun

    2009-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the commonly encountered heavy metals, which is widespread in inshore sediments of China. In order to investigate the toxicity of Hg on marine invertebrates, we studied the effects of the divalent mercuricion (Hg2+) (at two final concentrations of 0.0025 and 0.0050 mg L-1, prepared with HgCl2) on metallothionein (MT) content, DNA integrity (DNA strand breaks) and catalase (CAT) in the gills and hepatopancreas, antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), in the hemolymph, gills and hepatopancreas of the portunid crab Charybdis japonica for an experiment period up to 15 d. The results indicated that MT was significantly induced after 3 d, with a positive correlation with Hg2+ dose and time in the hepatopancreas and a negative correlation with Hg2+ dose and time in the gills. While CAT in the hemolymph was not detected, it increased in the hepatopancreas during the entire experiment; SOD and GPx in the three tissues were stimulated after 12 h, both attained peak value and then reduced during the experimental period. Meanwhile, DNA strand breaks were all induced significantly after 12 h. These results suggested the detoxification strategies against Hg2+ in three tissues of C. japonica.

  9. An Augmented Two-Layer Model Captures Nonlinear Analog Spatial Integration Effects in Pyramidal Neuron Dendrites.

    PubMed

    Jadi, Monika P; Behabadi, Bardia F; Poleg-Polsky, Alon; Schiller, Jackie; Mel, Bartlett W

    2014-05-01

    In pursuit of the goal to understand and eventually reproduce the diverse functions of the brain, a key challenge lies in reverse engineering the peculiar biology-based "technology" that underlies the brain's remarkable ability to process and store information. The basic building block of the nervous system is the nerve cell, or "neuron," yet after more than 100 years of neurophysiological study and 60 years of modeling, the information processing functions of individual neurons, and the parameters that allow them to engage in so many different types of computation (sensory, motor, mnemonic, executive, etc.) remain poorly understood. In this paper, we review both historical and recent findings that have led to our current understanding of the analog spatial processing capabilities of dendrites, the major input structures of neurons, with a focus on the principal cell type of the neocortex and hippocampus, the pyramidal neuron (PN). We encapsulate our current understanding of PN dendritic integration in an abstract layered model whose spatially sensitive branch-subunits compute multidimensional sigmoidal functions. Unlike the 1-D sigmoids found in conventional neural network models, multidimensional sigmoids allow the cell to implement a rich spectrum of nonlinear modulation effects directly within their dendritic trees.

  10. Effects of integrated watershed management on livestock water productivity in water scarce areas in Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descheemaeker, Katrien; Mapedza, Everisto; Amede, Tilahun; Ayalneh, Wagnew

    In the water scarce Lenche Dima watershed in the northern Ethiopian highlands community based integrated watershed management was implemented to fight land degradation, raise agricultural productivity and improve farmers’ livelihoods. The effects of two interventions, namely exclosures and water harvesting structures, were assessed based on data from farmers’ interviews, measurements of feed biomass production, and estimates of energy production and requirements. Water used for livestock feed production was obtained through simple soil water balance modelling. By protecting 40% of the rangelands, the water productivity of the feed increased by about 20%. This indicated that exclosure establishment could lead to similar improvements in livestock water productivity (LWP, defined as the ratio of livestock benefits over the water used in producing these). Water harvesting structures ensured year-round water availability in the homestead, which resulted in less energy used for walking to drinking points. A considerable amount of energy was thus saved, which could be used for livestock production and improved animal health without additional water use. Besides restoring regulating and supporting ecosystem services, both interventions led to a more efficient use of the scarce water resources for biomass and livestock production.

  11. Effect of Weaving Direction of Conductive Yarns on Electromagnetic Performance of 3D Integrated Microstrip Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fujun; Yao, Lan; Zhao, Da; Jiang, Muwen; Qiu, Yipping

    2013-10-01

    A three-dimensionally integrated microstrip antenna (3DIMA) is a microstrip antenna woven into the three-dimensional woven composite for load bearing while functioning as an antenna. In this study, the effect of weaving direction of conductive yarns on electromagnetic performance of 3DIMAs are investigated by designing, simulating and experimental testing of two microstrip antennas with different weaving directions of conductive yarns: one has the conductive yarns along the antenna feeding direction (3DIMA-Exp1) and the other has the conductive yarns perpendicular the antenna feeding direction (3DIMA-Exp2). The measured voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) of 3DIMA-Exp1 was 1.4 at the resonant frequencies of 1.39 GHz; while that of 3DIMA-Exp2 was 1.2 at the resonant frequencies of 1.35 GHz. In addition, the measured radiation pattern of the 3DIMA-Exp1 has smaller back lobe and higher gain value than those of the 3DIMA-Exp2. This result indicates that the waving direction of conductive yarns may have a significant impact on electromagnetic performance of textile structural antennas.

  12. Solvation effects on chemical shifts by embedded cluster integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M

    2014-12-11

    The accurate computational prediction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters like chemical shifts represents a challenge if the species studied is immersed in strongly polarizing environments such as water. Common approaches to treating a solvent in the form of, e.g., the polarizable continuum model (PCM) ignore strong directional interactions such as H-bonds to the solvent which can have substantial impact on magnetic shieldings. We here present a computational methodology that accounts for atomic-level solvent effects on NMR parameters by extending the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) integral equation theory to the prediction of chemical shifts of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in aqueous solution. We examine the influence of various so-called closure approximations of the underlying three-dimensional RISM theory as well as the impact of basis set size and different treatment of electrostatic solute-solvent interactions. We find considerable and systematic improvement over reference PCM and gas phase calculations. A smaller basis set in combination with a simple point charge model already yields good performance which can be further improved by employing exact electrostatic quantum-mechanical solute-solvent interaction energies. A larger basis set benefits more significantly from exact over point charge electrostatics, which can be related to differences of the solvent's charge distribution.

  13. [Establishment and application effect appraisement of community chronic obstructive pulmonary disease integrated management system].

    PubMed

    Zhao, D X; Chen, S Y; Zhou, Y M; Li, X C; Zou, W F; Chen, X M; Ran, P X

    2017-02-12

    Objective: To establish the COPD community integrated management system suitable for our national situation and assess its effects in the prevention and treatment for COPD. Methods: The COPD community integrated management system based on the electronic management system was established, including the functional modules of preliminary screening for COPD, electronic health record, grading management and dual referral system, ect. Two townships were randomly selected from the rural areas in north Guangdong as Observational Community and Control Community, respectively. Resident families were randomly selected from the two communities. One resident aged 40 or higher who was selected randomly from each family was enrolled in the trial and followed up for 2 years.Of a total of 460 participants from the Observational Community, 340 participants accomplished the two-years the follow-up, among whom there were 45 COPD patients, 117 high risk population, 178 common population. Of a total of 380 participants from the Control Community, 212 participants accomplished the follow-up, among whom there were 39 COPD patients, 68 high risk population, 105 common population.According to the COPD community integrated management system, the health cares including preliminary screening for COPD, grading management and dual referral, ect. were implemented in the Observational Community. Essential diagnosis and treatment services were performed in the Control Community. The effects of the system were appraised by comparisons of the pulmonary function change, acute exacerbation, quality of life and change of risk factors, ect. between the two communities. Results: After the intervention, the follow-up rate, smoking-quitting rate, the proportions of decline in current smoking, passive smoking and switching to clean energy for cooking in the Observational Community were significantly greater than those in the Control Community(73.9% vs. 55.8%, 70.8% vs. 9.1%, 24.2% vs. 7.1%, 32.6% vs. 3

  14. Length of residence and social integration: The contingent effects of neighborhood poverty

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Danya; Bader, Michael; Ailshire, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Given the well-established benefits of social integration for physical and mental health, studies have begun to explore how access to social ties and social support may be shaped by the residential context in which people live. As a critical health exposure, social integration may be one important mechanism by which places affect health. This paper brings together research on two previously studied contextual determinants of social integration. Specifically, we use multi-level data from the Chicago Community Adult Health Survey to investigate the relationships between an individual’s length of residence and measures of social integration. We then investigate the extent to which these relationships are moderated by neighborhood poverty. We find that the relationship between length of residence and some measures of social integration are stronger in poor neighborhoods than in more affluent ones. PMID:23501379

  15. Effectiveness of the World Health Organization cancer pain relief guidelines: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate cancer pain relief has been documented extensively across historical records. In response, in 1986, the World Health Organization (WHO) developed guidelines for cancer pain treatment. The purpose of this paper is to disseminate the results of a comprehensive, integrative review of studies that evaluate the effectiveness of the WHO guidelines. Studies were included if they: 1) identified patients treated with the guidelines, 2) evaluated self-reported pain, 3) identified instruments used, 4) provided data documenting pain relief, and 5) were written in English. Studies were coded for duration of treatment, definition of pain relief, instruments used, findings related to pain intensity or relief, and whether measures were used other than the WHO analgesic ladder. Twenty-five studies published since 1987 met the inclusion criteria. Evidence indicates 20%-100% of patients with cancer pain can be provided pain relief with the use of the WHO guidelines - while considering their status of treatment or end-of-life care. Due to multiple limitations in included studies, analysis was limited to descriptions. Future research to examine the effectiveness of the WHO guidelines needs to consider recommendations to facilitate study comparisons by standardizing outcome measures. Recent studies have reported that patients with cancer experience pain at moderate or greater levels. The WHO guidelines reflect the knowledge and effectual methods to relieve most cancer pain, but the guidelines are not being adequately employed. Part of the explanation for the lack of adoption of the WHO guidelines is that they may be considered outdated by many because they are not specific to the pharmacological and interventional options used in contemporary pain management practices. The conundrum of updating the WHO guidelines is to encompass the latest pharmacological and interventional innovations while maintaining its original simplicity.

  16. Effectiveness of the World Health Organization cancer pain relief guidelines: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate cancer pain relief has been documented extensively across historical records. In response, in 1986, the World Health Organization (WHO) developed guidelines for cancer pain treatment. The purpose of this paper is to disseminate the results of a comprehensive, integrative review of studies that evaluate the effectiveness of the WHO guidelines. Studies were included if they: 1) identified patients treated with the guidelines, 2) evaluated self-reported pain, 3) identified instruments used, 4) provided data documenting pain relief, and 5) were written in English. Studies were coded for duration of treatment, definition of pain relief, instruments used, findings related to pain intensity or relief, and whether measures were used other than the WHO analgesic ladder. Twenty-five studies published since 1987 met the inclusion criteria. Evidence indicates 20%–100% of patients with cancer pain can be provided pain relief with the use of the WHO guidelines – while considering their status of treatment or end-of-life care. Due to multiple limitations in included studies, analysis was limited to descriptions. Future research to examine the effectiveness of the WHO guidelines needs to consider recommendations to facilitate study comparisons by standardizing outcome measures. Recent studies have reported that patients with cancer experience pain at moderate or greater levels. The WHO guidelines reflect the knowledge and effectual methods to relieve most cancer pain, but the guidelines are not being adequately employed. Part of the explanation for the lack of adoption of the WHO guidelines is that they may be considered outdated by many because they are not specific to the pharmacological and interventional options used in contemporary pain management practices. The conundrum of updating the WHO guidelines is to encompass the latest pharmacological and interventional innovations while maintaining its original simplicity. PMID:27524918

  17. Effectiveness of community-based integrated care in frail COPD patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Carme; Alonso, Albert; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Serra, Ignasi; Marti, Dolors; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Narsavage, Georgia; Carmen Gomez, Maria; Roca, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) generates a high burden on health care, and hospital admissions represent a substantial proportion of the overall costs of the disease. Integrated care (IC) has shown efficacy to reduce hospitalisations in COPD patients at a pilot level. Deployment strategies for IC services require assessment of effectiveness at the health care system level. Aims: The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of a community-based IC service in preventing hospitalisations and emergency department (ED) visits in stable frail COPD patients. Methods: From April to December 2005, 155 frail community-dwelling COPD patients were randomly allocated either to IC (n=76, age 73 (8) years, forced expiratory volume during the first second, FEV1 41(19) % predicted) or usual care (n=84, age 75(9) years, FEV1 44 (20) % predicted) and followed up for 12 months. The IC intervention consisted of the following: (a) patient’s empowerment for self-management; (b) an individualised care plan; (c) access to a call centre; and (d) coordination between the levels of care. Thereafter, hospital admissions, ED visits and mortality were monitored for 6 years. Results: IC enhanced self-management (P=0.02), reduced anxiety–depression (P=0.001) and improved health-related quality of life (P=0.02). IC reduced both ED visits (P=0.02) and mortality (P=0.03) but not hospital admission. No differences between the two groups were seen after 6 years. Conclusion: The intervention improved clinical outcomes including survival and decreased the ED visits, but it did not reduce hospital admissions. The study facilitated the identification of two key requirements for adoption of IC services in the community: appropriate risk stratification of patients, and preparation of the community-based work force. PMID:25856791

  18. An Integrated Assessment of Water Scarcity Effects on Energy and Land Use Decisions and Mitigation Policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazi, M. I.; Kim, S. H.; Liu, L.; Liu, Y.; Calvin, K. V.; Leon, C.; Edmonds, J.; Kyle, P.; Patel, P.; Wise, M. A.; Davies, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Water is essential for the world's food supply, for energy production, including bioenergy and hydroelectric power, and for power system cooling. Water is already scarce in many regions and could present a critical constraint as society attempts simultaneously to mitigate climate forcing and adapt to climate change, and to provide food for an increasing population. We use the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), where interactions between population, economic growth, energy, land and water resources interact simultaneously in a dynamically evolving system, to investigate how water scarcity affects energy and land use decisions as well as mitigation policies. In GCAM, competing claims on water resources from all claimants—energy, land, and economy—are reconciled with water resource availability—from renewable water, non-renewable groundwater sources and desalinated water—across 235 major river basins. Limits to hydrologic systems have significant effects on energy and land use induced emissions via constraints on decisions of their use. We explore these effects and how they evolve under climate change mitigation policies, which can significantly alter land use patterns, both by limiting land use change emissions and by increasing bioenergy production. The study also explores the mitigation scenarios in the context of the shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs). We find that previous estimates of global water withdrawal projections are overestimated, as our simulations show that it is more economical in some basins to alter agricultural and energy activities rather than utilize non-renewable groundwater or desalinated water. This study highlights the fact that water is a binding factor in agriculture, energy and land use decisions in integrated assessment models (IAMs), and stresses the crucial role of water in regulating agricultural commodities trade and land-use and energy decisions.

  19. EMBEDDED LENSING TIME DELAYS, THE FERMAT POTENTIAL, AND THE INTEGRATED SACHS–WOLFE EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu

    2015-05-01

    We derive the Fermat potential for a spherically symmetric lens embedded in a Friedman–Lemaître–Robertson–Walker cosmology and use it to investigate the late-time integrated Sachs–Wolfe (ISW) effect, i.e., secondary temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) caused by individual large-scale clusters and voids. We present a simple analytical expression for the temperature fluctuation in the CMB across such a lens as a derivative of the lens’ Fermat potential. This formalism is applicable to both linear and nonlinear density evolution scenarios, to arbitrarily large density contrasts, and to all open and closed background cosmologies. It is much simpler to use and makes the same predictions as conventional approaches. In this approach the total temperature fluctuation can be split into a time-delay part and an evolutionary part. Both parts must be included for cosmic structures that evolve and both can be equally important. We present very simple ISW models for cosmic voids and galaxy clusters to illustrate the ease of use of our formalism. We use the Fermat potentials of simple cosmic void models to compare predicted ISW effects with those recently extracted from WMAP and Planck data by stacking large cosmic voids using the aperture photometry method. If voids in the local universe with large density contrasts are no longer evolving we find that the time delay contribution alone predicts values consistent with the measurements. However, we find that for voids still evolving linearly, the evolutionary contribution cancels a significant part of the time delay contribution and results in predicted signals that are much smaller than recently observed.

  20. Effects of energetic particle phase space modifications by instabilities on integrated modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Podesta, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Fredrickson, E. D.; ...

    2016-07-22

    Tokamak plasmas can feature a large population of energetic particles (EP) from neutral beam injection or fusion reactions. In turn, energetic particles can drive instabilities, which affect the driving EP population leading to a distortion of the original EP distribution function and of quantities that depend on it. The latter include, for example, neutral beam (NB) current drive and plasma heating through EP thermalization. Those effects must be taken into account to enable reliable and quantitative simulations of discharges for present devices as well as predictions for future burning plasmas. Reduced models for EP transport are emerging as an effectivemore » tool for long time-scale integrated simulations of tokamak plasmas, possibly including the effects of instabilities on EP dynamics. Available models differ in how EP distribution properties are modified by instabilities, e.g. in terms of gradients in real or phase space. It is therefore crucial to assess to what extent different assumptions in the transport models affect predicted quantities such as EP profile, energy distribution, NB driven current and energy/momentum transfer to the thermal populations. A newly developed kick model, which includes modifications of the EP distribution by instabilities in both real and velocity space, is used in this work to investigate these issues. Coupled to TRANSP simulations, the kick model is used to analyze NB-heated NSTX and DIII-D discharges featuring unstable Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). Results show that instabilities can strongly affect the EP distribution function, and modifications propagate to macroscopic quantities such as NB-driven current profile and NB power transferred to the thermal plasma species. Furthermore, those important aspects are only qualitatively captured by simpler fast ion transport models that are based on radial diffusion of energetic ions only.« less

  1. HERMES: towards an integrated toolbox to characterize functional and effective brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Niso, Guiomar; Bruña, Ricardo; Pereda, Ernesto; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Bajo, Ricardo; Maestú, Fernando; del-Pozo, Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The analysis of the interdependence between time series has become an important field of research in the last years, mainly as a result of advances in the characterization of dynamical systems from the signals they produce, the introduction of concepts such as generalized and phase synchronization and the application of information theory to time series analysis. In neurophysiology, different analytical tools stemming from these concepts have added to the 'traditional' set of linear methods, which includes the cross-correlation and the coherency function in the time and frequency domain, respectively, or more elaborated tools such as Granger Causality.This increase in the number of approaches to tackle the existence of functional (FC) or effective connectivity (EC) between two (or among many) neural networks, along with the mathematical complexity of the corresponding time series analysis tools, makes it desirable to arrange them into a unified-easy-to-use software package. The goal is to allow neuroscientists, neurophysiologists and researchers from related fields to easily access and make use of these analysis methods from a single integrated toolbox.Here we present HERMES ( http://hermes.ctb.upm.es ), a toolbox for the Matlab® environment (The Mathworks, Inc), which is designed to study functional and effective brain connectivity from neurophysiological data such as multivariate EEG and/or MEG records. It includes also visualization tools and statistical methods to address the problem of multiple comparisons. We believe that this toolbox will be very helpful to all the researchers working in the emerging field of brain connectivity analysis.

  2. Effects of Integrative Medicine on Pain and Anxiety Among Oncology Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Crespin, Daniel J.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Finch, Michael D.; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the effectiveness of integrative medicine (IM) therapies on pain and anxiety among oncology inpatients. Methods Retrospective data obtained from electronic medical records identified patients with an oncology International Classification of Diseases-9 code who were admitted to a large Midwestern hospital between July 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012. Outcomes were change in patient-reported pain and anxiety, rated before and after individual IM treatment sessions, using a numeric scale (0–10). Results Of 10948 hospital admissions over the study period, 1833 (17%) included IM therapy. Older patients had reduced odds of receiving any IM therapy (odds ratio [OR]: 0.97, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.96 to 0.98) and females had 63% (OR: 1.63, 95% CI = 1.38 to 1.92) higher odds of receiving any IM therapy compared with males. Moderate (OR: 1.97, 95% CI = 1.61 to 2.41), major (OR: 3.54, 95% CI = 2.88 to 4.35), and extreme (OR: 5.96, 95% CI = 4.71 to 7.56) illness severity were significantly associated with higher odds of receiving IM therapy compared with admissions of minor illness severity. After receiving IM therapy, patients averaged a 46.9% (95% CI = 45.1% to 48.6%, P <.001) reduction in pain and a 56.1% (95% CI = 54.3% to 58.0%, P <.001) reduction in anxiety. Bodywork and traditional Chinese Medicine therapies were most effective for reducing pain, while no significant differences among therapies for reducing anxiety were observed. Conclusions IM services to oncology inpatients resulted in substantial decreases in pain and anxiety. Observational studies using electronic medical records provide unique information about real-world utilization of IM. Future studies are warranted and should explore potential synergy of opioid analgesics and IM therapy for pain control. PMID:25749600

  3. The effectiveness of an integrated pain management program for older persons and staff in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Vong, Sinfia Kuan Sin; Ho, Suki S K

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an 8-week integrated pain management program (IPMP) on enhancing the knowledge and attitude toward pain management among staff; and improving the pain, quality of life, physical and psychosocial functions, and use of non-drug therapies for the elderly in nursing homes. Nursing home staff (N=147) and residents (N=535) were recruited from ten nursing homes. Nursing homes were randomly assigned into an experimental group (N=296) with IPMP or control group (N=239) without IPMP. The IPMP consisted of pain education for staff and physical exercise and multisensory stimulation art and craft therapy for residents. Data were collected before and after the IPMP. The staff demonstrated a significant improvement in knowledge and attitude to pain management, with the survey score increasing from 8.46±3.74 to 19.43±4.07 (p<0.001). Among the residents, 74% had experienced pain within the previous 6 months, with pain intensity of 4.10±2.20. Those in the experimental group showed a significantly better reduction in pain scores than the control group, from 4.19±2.25 to 2.67±2.08 (p<0.001). Group differences were also found in psychological well-being, including happiness, loneliness, life satisfaction and depression (p<0.05), and the use of non-drug methods (p<0.05). These results suggested that IPMP is beneficial for staff, and is effective in reducing geriatric pain and negative impacts. Management support and staff involvement in the program are important for its long-term continuation.

  4. Integrated analysis of water quality parameters for cost-effective faecal pollution management in river catchments.

    PubMed

    Nnane, Daniel Ekane; Ebdon, James Edward; Taylor, Huw David

    2011-03-01

    In many parts of the world, microbial contamination of surface waters used for drinking, recreation, and shellfishery remains a pervasive risk to human health, especially in Less Economically Developed Countries (LEDC). However, the capacity to provide effective management strategies to break the waterborne route to human infection is often thwarted by our inability to identify the source of microbial contamination. Microbial Source Tracking (MST) has potential to improve water quality management in complex river catchments that are either routinely, or intermittently contaminated by faecal material from one or more sources, by attributing faecal loads to their human or non-human sources, and thereby supporting more rational approaches to microbial risk assessment. The River Ouse catchment in southeast England (U.K.) was used as a model with which to investigate the integration and application of a novel and simple MST approach to monitor microbial water quality over one calendar year, thereby encompassing a range of meteorological conditions. A key objective of the work was to develop simple low-cost protocols that could be easily replicated. Bacteriophages (viruses) capable of infecting a human specific strain of Bacteroides GB-124, and their correlation with presumptive Escherichia coli, were used to distinguish sources of faecal pollution. The results reported here suggest that in this river catchment the principal source of faecal pollution in most instances was non-human in origin. During storm events, presumptive E. coli and presumptive intestinal enterococci levels were 1.1-1.2 logs higher than during dry weather conditions, and levels of the faecal indicator organisms (FIOs) were closely associated with increased turbidity levels (presumptive E. coli and turbidity, r = 0.43). Spatio-temporal variation in microbial water quality parameters was accounted for by three principal components (67.6%). Cluster Analysis, reduced the fourteen monitoring sites to six

  5. Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise: Advancing coastal management through integrated research and engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Rising sea level represents a significant threat to coastal communities and ecosystems through land loss, altered habitats, and increased vulnerability to coastal storms and inundation. This threat is exemplified in the northern Gulf of Mexico where low topography, expansive marshes, and a prevalence of tropical storms have already resulted in extensive coastal impacts. The development of robust predictive capabilities that incorporate complex biological processes with physical dynamics are critical for informed planning and restoration efforts for coastal ecosystems. Looking to build upon existing predictive modeling capabilities and allow for use of multiple model (i.e., ensemble) approaches, NOAA initiated the Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise program in 2010 to advance physical/biological integrative modeling capabilities in the region with a goal to provide user friendly predictive tools for coastal ecosystem management. Focused on the northern Gulf of Mexico, this multi-disciplinary project led by the University of Central Florida will use in situ field studies to parameterize physical and biological models. These field studies will also result in a predictive capability for overland sediment delivery and transport that will further enhance marsh, oyster, and submerged aquatic vegetation models. Results from this integrated modeling effort are envisioned to inform management strategies for reducing risk, restoration and breakwater guidelines, and resource sustainability for project planning, among other uses. In addition to the science components, this project incorporates significant engagement of the management community through a management applications principle investigator and an advisory management committee. Routine engagement between the science team and the management committee, including annual workshops, are focused on ensuring the development of applicable, relevant, and useable products and tools at the conclusion of this project. Particular

  6. An integrated approach for prospectively investigating a mode-of-action for rodent liver effects

    SciTech Connect

    LeBaron, Matthew J.; Geter, David R.; Rasoulpour, Reza J.; Gollapudi, B. Bhaskar; Thomas, Johnson; Murray, Jennifer; Kan, H. Lynn; Wood, Amanda J.; Elcombe, Cliff; Vardy, Audrey; McEwan, Jillian; Terry, Claire; Billington, Richard

    2013-07-15

    Registration of new plant protection products (e.g., herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide) requires comprehensive mammalian toxicity evaluation including carcinogenicity studies in two species. The outcome of the carcinogenicity testing has a significant bearing on the overall human health risk assessment of the substance and, consequently, approved uses for different crops across geographies. In order to understand the relevance of a specific tumor finding to human health, a systematic, transparent, and hypothesis-driven mode of action (MoA) investigation is, appropriately, an expectation by the regulatory agencies. Here, we describe a novel approach of prospectively generating the MoA data by implementing additional end points to the standard guideline toxicity studies with sulfoxaflor, a molecule in development. This proactive MoA approach results in a more robust integration of molecular with apical end points while minimizing animal use. Sulfoxaflor, a molecule targeting sap-feeding insects, induced liver effects (increased liver weight due to hepatocellular hypertrophy) in an initial palatability probe study for selecting doses for subsequent repeat-dose dietary studies. This finding triggered the inclusion of dose-response investigations of the potential key events for rodent liver carcinogenesis, concurrent with the hazard assessment studies. As predicted, sulfoxaflor induced liver tumors in rats and mice in the bioassays. The MoA data available by the time of the carcinogenicity finding supported the conclusion that the carcinogenic potential of sulfoxaflor was due to CAR/PXR nuclear receptor activation with subsequent hepatocellular proliferation. This MoA was not considered to be relevant to humans as sulfoxaflor is unlikely to induce hepatocellular proliferation in humans and therefore would not be a human liver carcinogen. - Highlights: • We prospectively generated MoA data into standard guideline toxicity studies. • A proactive MoA approach

  7. Fast Growing Plantations for Wood Production – Integration of Ecological Effects and Economic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bredemeier, Michael; Busch, Gerald; Hartmann, Linda; Jansen, Martin; Richter, Falk; Lamersdorf, Norbert P.

    2015-01-01

    Biomass crops are perceived as a feasible means to substitute sizeable amounts of fossil fuel in the future. A prospect of CO2 reduction (resp. CO2 neutrality) is credited to biomass fuels, and thus a potential contribution to mitigate climate change. Short rotation coppices (SRCs) with fast growing poplar and willow trees are an option for producing high yields of woody biomass, which is suitable for both energetic and material use. One negative effect that comes along with the establishment of SRC may be a decrease in groundwater recharge, because high rates of transpiration and interception are anticipated. Therefore, it is important to measure, analyze, and model the effects of SRC-planting on landscape water budgets. To analyze the effects on the water budget, a poplar SRC plot was studied by measuring hydrological parameters to be used in the hydrological model WaSim. Results reveal very low or even missing ground water recharge for SRC compared to agricultural land use or grassland, especially succeeding dry years. However, this strong effect on plot level is moderated on the larger spatial scale of catchment level, for which the modeling was also performed. In addition to water, nutrient fluxes and budgets were studied. Nitrogen is still a crucial issue in today’s agriculture. Intensive fertilization or increased applications of manure from concentrated livestock breeding are often leading to high loads of nitrate leaching, or enhanced N2O emissions to the atmosphere on arable crop fields. SRC or agroforestry systems on former crop land may offer an option to decrease such N losses, while simultaneously producing woody biomass. This is mainly due to the generally smaller N requirements of woody vegetation, which usually entail no need for any fertilization. The trees supply deep and permanent rooting systems, which can be regarded as a “safety net” to prevent nutrient leaching. Thus, SRC altogether can help to diminish N eutrophication. It is

  8. Fast Growing Plantations for Wood Production - Integration of Ecological Effects and Economic Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bredemeier, Michael; Busch, Gerald; Hartmann, Linda; Jansen, Martin; Richter, Falk; Lamersdorf, Norbert P

    2015-01-01

    Biomass crops are perceived as a feasible means to substitute sizeable amounts of fossil fuel in the future. A prospect of CO2 reduction (resp. CO2 neutrality) is credited to biomass fuels, and thus a potential contribution to mitigate climate change. Short rotation coppices (SRCs) with fast growing poplar and willow trees are an option for producing high yields of woody biomass, which is suitable for both energetic and material use. One negative effect that comes along with the establishment of SRC may be a decrease in groundwater recharge, because high rates of transpiration and interception are anticipated. Therefore, it is important to measure, analyze, and model the effects of SRC-planting on landscape water budgets. To analyze the effects on the water budget, a poplar SRC plot was studied by measuring hydrological parameters to be used in the hydrological model WaSim. Results reveal very low or even missing ground water recharge for SRC compared to agricultural land use or grassland, especially succeeding dry years. However, this strong effect on plot level is moderated on the larger spatial scale of catchment level, for which the modeling was also performed. In addition to water, nutrient fluxes and budgets were studied. Nitrogen is still a crucial issue in today's agriculture. Intensive fertilization or increased applications of manure from concentrated livestock breeding are often leading to high loads of nitrate leaching, or enhanced N2O emissions to the atmosphere on arable crop fields. SRC or agroforestry systems on former crop land may offer an option to decrease such N losses, while simultaneously producing woody biomass. This is mainly due to the generally smaller N requirements of woody vegetation, which usually entail no need for any fertilization. The trees supply deep and permanent rooting systems, which can be regarded as a "safety net" to prevent nutrient leaching. Thus, SRC altogether can help to diminish N eutrophication. It is important to

  9. Integrated Methods for Pupils To Reinforce Occupational and Verbal Effectiveness (Project IMPROVE). Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guadalupe, Deana R.

    Integrated Methods for Pupils to Reinforce Occupational and Vocational Effectiveness (Project IMPROVE) was a federally funded project in its second year of operation in two Manhattan (New York) high schools in 1992-93. It served limited-English-proficient students, 186 Latino and 13 Asian-American, in grades 9-12. Students received instruction in…

  10. The Effect of Gender, Socio-Economic Status and School Location on Students Performance in Nigerian Integrated Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okoye, N. S.

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the effects of gender, socio-economic status and school location, on Nigerian students performance in Integrated Science. The method used for the study was a three variable analysis of variance experimental design consisting of three independent variables at two levels each and one dependent variable. Six hundred junior…

  11. An Integrative Model of Organizational Learning and Social Capital on Effective Knowledge Transfer and Perceived Organizational Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Jo; Lok, Peter; Hung, Richard Yu-Yuan; Fang, Shih-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to set out to examine the relationships of organizational learning, social capital and the effectiveness of knowledge transfer and perceived organisational performance. Integrating organizational learning capability with social capital networks to shape a holistic knowledge sharing and management enterprise…

  12. Quasi-Experimental Study of the Effectiveness of an Integrated Service Delivery Network for the Frail Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourigny, Andre; Durand, Pierre J.; Bonin, Lucie; Hebert, Rejean; Rochette, Louis

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a new, integrated service delivery (ISD) network of health and social services for frail elderly living in a semi-urban community. A quasi-experimental study was conducted from 1997 to 2000, with measures taken before implementation (T0) and every 12 months after implementation for a 3-year…

  13. Curriculum and Implementation Effects on High School Students' Mathematics Learning from Curricula Representing Subject-Specific and Integrated Content Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grouws, Douglas A.; Tarr, James E.; Chavez, Oscar; Sears, Ruthmae; Soria, Victor M.; Taylan, Rukiye D.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 2 types of mathematics content organization on high school students' mathematics learning while taking account of curriculum implementation and student prior achievement. Hierarchical linear modeling with 3 levels showed that students who studied from the integrated curriculum were significantly advantaged over…

  14. The Effect of Computer-Assisted Learning Integrated with Metacognitive Prompts on Students' Affective Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Nilgün; Akpinar, Ercan; Feyzioglu, Eylem Yildiz

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of computer-assisted learning integrated with metacognitive prompts on elementary students' affective skills on the subject of electricity. The researchers developed educational software to enable students to easily and comprehensively learn the concepts in the subject of electricity. A…

  15. The Effect of Concept Mapping-Guided Discovery Integrated Teaching Approach on Chemistry Students' Achievement and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatokun, K. V. F.; Eniayeju, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of Concept Mapping-Guided Discovery Integrated Teaching Approach on the achievement and retention of chemistry students. The sample comprised 162 Senior Secondary two (SS 2) students drawn from two Science Schools in Nasarawa State, Central Nigeria with equivalent mean scores of 9.68 and 9.49 in their pre-test.…

  16. EFFECT OF IMPACT LIMITER MATERIAL DEGRATION ON STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY OF 9975 PACKAGE SUBJECTED TO TWO FORKLIFT TRUCK IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T

    2007-07-09

    This paper evaluates the effect of the impact limiter material degradation on the structural integrity of the 9975 package containment vessel during a postulated accident event of forklift truck collision. The analytical results show that the primary and secondary containment vessels remain structurally intact for Celotex material degraded to 20% of the baseline value.

  17. Effects of Mathematics Integration in a Teaching Methods Course on Self-Efficacy of Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2013-01-01

    Teachers who are efficacious persevere through challenges in the learning environment and put forth more effort in designing learning activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mathematics teaching and integration strategies (MTIS) on preservice agricultural teachers' personal mathematics efficacy, mathematics teaching…

  18. Ambitions Fulfilled? The Effects of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Goal Attainment on Older Adults' Ego-Integrity and Death Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hiel, Alain; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    The present research examined the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic goal attainment on older adults' ego-integrity, psychological well-being, and death attitudes. Hypotheses were derived from Self-Determination Theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 2000; Vansteenkiste, Ryan, & Deci, in press). Study 1 (N = 202, Mean age = 68.2 years) indicated that, after…

  19. The Effects of Varying Levels of Treatment Integrity on Child Compliance during Treatment with a Three-Step Prompting Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, David A.; Atwell, Julie; Wine, Byron

    2006-01-01

    The effects of three levels of treatment integrity (100%, 50%, and 0%) on child compliance were evaluated in the context of the implementation of a three-step prompting procedure. Two typically developing preschool children participated in the study. After baseline data on compliance to one of three common demands were collected, a therapist…

  20. Errors of Omission and Commission during Alternative Reinforcement of Compliance: The Effects of Varying Levels of Treatment Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Yanerys; Wilder, David A.; Majdalany, Lina; Myers, Kristin; Saini, Valdeep

    2014-01-01

    We conducted two experiments to evaluate the effects of errors of omission and commission during alternative reinforcement of compliance in young children. In Experiment 1, we evaluated errors of omission by examining two levels of integrity during alternative reinforcement (20 and 60%) for child compliance following no treatment (baseline) versus…

  1. The Effects of Applying Game-Based Learning to Webcam Motion Sensor Games for Autistic Students' Sensory Integration Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Kun-Hsien; Lou, Shi-Jer; Tsai, Huei-Yin; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of applying game-based learning to webcam motion sensor games for autistic students' sensory integration training for autistic students. The research participants were three autistic students aged from six to ten. Webcam camera as the research tool wad connected internet games to engage in motion sensor…

  2. Effects of an Integrated Science and Societal Implication Intervention on Promoting Adolescents' Positive Thinking and Emotional Perceptions in Learning Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Zuway R.; Lin, Huann-Shyang; Lawrenz, Frances P.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to test the effectiveness of integrating science and societal implication on adolescents' positive thinking and emotional perceptions about learning science. Twenty-five eighth-grade Taiwanese adolescents (9 boys and 16 girls) volunteered to participate in a 12-week intervention and formed the experimental group.…

  3. The Effect of Student Teaching Experience on Preservice Elementary Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs for Technology Integration in the UAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Awidi, Hamed Mubarak; Alghazo, Iman Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect of the student teaching experience on preservice elementary teachers' self-efficacy beliefs and the sources of their beliefs about technology integration in teaching in the UAE. The participants were 62 pre-service elementary teachers at the United Arab Emirates University. Pre- and post-survey was administered to…

  4. Effects of Summary Writing on Oral Proficiency Performance within a Computer-Based Test for Integrated Listening-Speaking Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Zhihong; Wang, Yanfei

    2014-01-01

    The effective design of test items within a computer-based language test (CBLT) for developing English as a foreign language (EFL) learners' listening and speaking skills has become an increasingly challenging task for both test users and test designers compared with that of pencil-and-paper tests in the past. It needs to fit integrated oral…

  5. A Cost-Effective Strategy for Integrating Technology into the Advanced and Remedial Mathematics Curriculum in the Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marvin L.

    Technology can be an effective educational device if it is part of a well-conceived plan blending together other factors that also positively influence achievement. The body of research documenting the benefits of integrating technology into academic programs grows each day, particularly concerning the use of calculators and computers in the…

  6. The Effects of Self-Monitoring on the Procedural Integrity of a Behavioral Intervention for Young Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plavnick, Joshua B.; Ferreri, Summer J.; Maupin, Angela N.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of self-monitoring on procedural integrity of token economy implementation by 3 staff in a special education classroom were evaluated. The subsequent changes in academic readiness behaviors of 2 students with low-incidence disabilities were measured. Multiple baselines across staff and students showed that procedural integrity…

  7. Molecular and Integrative Physiological Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia: The Paradigm of Cardiovascular Studies in Rodents using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Christakis; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    To-this-date, the exact molecular, cellular, and integrative physiological mechanisms of anesthesia remain largely unknown. Published evidence indicates that anesthetic effects are multifocal and occur in a time-dependent and coordinated manner, mediated via central, local, and peripheral pathways. Their effects can be modulated by a range of variables, and their elicited end-effect on the integrative physiological response is highly variable. This review summarizes the major cellular and molecular sites of anesthetic action with a focus on the paradigm of isoflurane (ISO) – the most commonly used anesthetic nowadays – and its use in prolonged in vivo rodent studies using imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It also presents established evidence for normal ranges of global and regional physiological cardiac function under ISO, proposes optimal, practical methodologies relevant to the use of anesthetic protocols for MRI and outlines the beneficial effects of nitrous oxide supplementation. PMID:27525256

  8. Path integration: effect of curved path complexity and sensory system on blindfolded walking.

    PubMed

    Koutakis, Panagiotis; Mukherjee, Mukul; Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Blanke, Daniel J; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2013-02-01

    Path integration refers to the ability to integrate continuous information of the direction and distance traveled by the system relative to the origin. Previous studies have investigated path integration through blindfolded walking along simple paths such as straight line and triangles. However, limited knowledge exists regarding the role of path complexity in path integration. Moreover, little is known about how information from different sensory input systems (like vision and proprioception) contributes to accurate path integration. The purpose of the current study was to investigate how sensory information and curved path complexity affect path integration. Forty blindfolded participants had to accurately reproduce a curved path and return to the origin. They were divided into four groups that differed in the curved path, circle (simple) or figure-eight (complex), and received either visual (previously seen) or proprioceptive (previously guided) information about the path before they reproduced it. The dependent variables used were average trajectory error, walking speed, and distance traveled. The results indicated that (a) both groups that walked on a circular path and both groups that received visual information produced greater accuracy in reproducing the path. Moreover, the performance of the group that received proprioceptive information and later walked on a figure-eight path was less accurate than their corresponding circular group. The groups that had the visual information also walked faster compared to the group that had proprioceptive information. Results of the current study highlight the roles of different sensory inputs while performing blindfolded walking for path integration.

  9. Heterogeneity in the spatial receptive field architecture of multisensory neurons of the superior colliculus and its effects on multisensory integration.

    PubMed

    Ghose, D; Wallace, M T

    2014-01-03

    Multisensory integration has been widely studied in neurons of the mammalian superior colliculus (SC). This has led to the description of various determinants of multisensory integration, including those based on stimulus- and neuron-specific factors. The most widely characterized of these illustrate the importance of the spatial and temporal relationships of the paired stimuli as well as their relative effectiveness in eliciting a response in determining the final integrated output. Although these stimulus-specific factors have generally been considered in isolation (i.e., manipulating stimulus location while holding all other factors constant), they have an intrinsic interdependency that has yet to be fully elucidated. For example, changes in stimulus location will likely also impact both the temporal profile of response and the effectiveness of the stimulus. The importance of better describing this interdependency is further reinforced by the fact that SC neurons have large receptive fields, and that responses at different locations within these receptive fields are far from equivalent. To address these issues, the current study was designed to examine the interdependency between the stimulus factors of space and effectiveness in dictating the multisensory responses of SC neurons. The results show that neuronal responsiveness changes dramatically with changes in stimulus location - highlighting a marked heterogeneity in the spatial receptive fields of SC neurons. More importantly, this receptive field heterogeneity played a major role in the integrative product exhibited by stimulus pairings, such that pairings at weakly responsive locations of the receptive fields resulted in the largest multisensory interactions. Together these results provide greater insight into the interrelationship of the factors underlying multisensory integration in SC neurons, and may have important mechanistic implications for multisensory integration and the role it plays in shaping

  10. Method of predictive studies of the effectiveness of spacecraft modifications with integrated subsystem replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, Yu. A.; Lamzin, V. A.; Lamzin, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    The article reviews application features of the method of bilevel coordinated optimization of spacecraft modification parameters during integrated replacement of subsystems. The algorithm for problem solution is presented in the article. It is shown that in the case of implementation of a balanced bilevel schematic of optimization search, the agreement of project solutions for spacecraft modification is provided by integrated replacement of subsystems. Project models are shown for the problem solution of optimization parameters for spacecraft modification with the integrated replacement of subsystems of the payload equipment module and a unified space platform.

  11. Effects of the Integrated Behavioral Health Project's Efforts to Promote Integrated Care Under Funding from the California Mental Health Services Authority

    PubMed Central

    Cerully, Jennifer L.; Collins, Rebecca L.; Wong, Eunice C.; Seelam, Rachana; Roth, Elizabeth; Yu, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Describes the methods and results of a RAND evaluation of the Integrated Behavioral Health Project's efforts to promote the integration of mental and physical health care among various health care stakeholders in California. PMID:28083420

  12. Processing effects for integrated PZT: Residual stress, thickness, and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Ryan Jason

    This dissertation focuses on the integration of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) films on Pt/Ti/SiO2//Si, and the effect of on properties. Direct deposition of PZT on Si will lead to on-chip power capacitors, non-volatile memory cells, and vibration sensors. However, previous research indicates that the dielectric, ferroelectric and piezoelectric response characteristics for the devices are often inferior to bulk specimens. Property variations have been attributed to changes in several major variables including, chemical composition, phase content, grain size, crystallographic orientation, film thickness, and stress, each of which, in turn, can depend on processing. The first goal of this work was to design a sol-gel processing methodology to control all major variables except film thickness and stress, thus isolating their respective effects on properties. All specimens were verified to be of the Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47)O3 composition, in the perovskite structure, with a constant grain size of 110nm, and with (111) fiber texture. PZT film thickness was varied from 95nm to 500nm and residual stress was measured to be either 150 or 180MPa, biaxial tensile, depending on thickness. These specimens allowed for new insights into the fundamental differences between bulk materials and thin films. A series-capacitor model accounted for the observed dilution in room-temperature K from >900 to ˜600 as film thickness decreased, but could not account for the absence of the expected dielectric anomaly at high temperatures. Instead, a stress-induced distributed phase transformation related to the polycrystalline nature of the film was proposed to account for the observed behavior. Residual stress reduced the spontaneous polarization values in these specimens to 32muC/cm 2 from the predicted stress-free value of 50muC/cm2. An increase in coercive field was attributed to interfacial capacitance and residual stress, whereas a decrease of 30MPa tensile stress resulted in an increase of d33

  13. Using the Earth as an Effective Model for Integrating Space Science Into Education Outreach Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Allen, J.; Galindo, C.; McKay, G.; Obot, V.; Reiff, P.

    2005-05-01

    Our methods of teaching Earth and space science as two disciplines do not represent the spirit of earlier scientists such as Aristotle, da Vinci, and Galileo. We need to re-evaluate these methods and take advantage of the excitement created in the general public over the recent space science exploration programs. The information that we are obtaining from both the Mars missions and Cassini-Huygens focuses on interpreting geomorphology, mineral compositions and gas identification based on Earth as a baseline for data evaluation. This type of evaluation is an extension of Hutton's 18th century principle of Uniformitarianism, the present is the key to the past, or Earth is the key for understanding extraterrestrial bodies. Geomorphological examples are volcanic activity, meteoritic impacts, and evidence of water altering surface features. The Hawaiian, or shield, type volcanoes are analogues for Olympus Mons and the other volcanoes on Mars. Other examples include comparing sand dunes on Earth with possible Martian dunes, known stream patterns on Earth with potential stream patterns on Mars, and even comparing meteoritic impact features on Mars, the Earth, Moon and Mercury. All of these comparisons have been developed into inquiry-based activities and are available through NASA publications. Each of these activities is easily adapted to emphasize either Earth science or space science or both. Beyond geomorphology, solar storms are an excellent topic for integrating Earth and space science. Solar storms are traditionally part of space science studies, but most students do not understand their effect on Earth or the intense effects they could have on humans, whether traveling through space or exploring the surfaces of the Moon or Mars. Effects are not only limited to space travel and other planetary surfaces but also include Earth's magnetosphere, which in turn, affect radio transmission and potentially climate. Like geomorphology courses, there are extensive NASA

  14. Major results from safety-related integral effect tests with VISTA-ITL for the SMART design

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H. S.; Min, B. Y.; Shin, Y. C.; Yi, S. J.

    2012-07-01

    A series of integral effect tests (IETs) was performed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (KAERI) using the VISTA integral test loop (VISTA-ITL) as a small-scale IET program. Among them this paper presents major results acquired from the safety-related IETs with the VISTA-ITL facility for the SMART design. Three small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) tests of safety injection system (SIS) line break, shutdown cooling system (SCS) line break and pressurizer safety valve (PSV) line break were successfully performed and the transient characteristics of a complete loss of flowrate (CLOF) was simulated properly with the VISTA-ITL facility. (authors)

  15. Cost-effectiveness of integrated analysis/design systems /IPAD/ An executive summary. II. [for aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. E., Jr.; Hansen, S. D.; Redhed, D. D.; Southall, J. W.; Kawaguchi, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    Evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of integrated analysis/design systems with particular attention to Integrated Program for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD) project. An analysis of all the ingredients of IPAD indicates the feasibility of a significant cost and flowtime reduction in the product design process involved. It is also concluded that an IPAD-supported design process will provide a framework for configuration control, whereby the engineering costs for design, analysis and testing can be controlled during the air vehicle development cycle.

  16. The channeling effect of Al and N ion implantation in 4H-SiC during JFET integrated device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, M.; Laariedh, F.; Cremillieu, P.; Planson, D.; Leclercq, J.-L.

    2015-12-01

    A strong channeling effect is observed for the ions of Al and N implanted in 4H-SiC due to its crystalline structure. This effect causes difficulties in subsequent accurate estimation of the depth of junctions formed by multiple ion implantation steps. A variety of lateral JFET transistors integrated on the same 4H-SiC wafer have been fabricated. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry measurements and Monte-Carlo simulations were performed in order to quantify and control the channeling effect of the implanted ions. A technological process was established enabling to obtain devices working with the presence of the channeling effect.

  17. Nuclear quantum effect on intramolecular hydrogen bond of hydrogen maleate anion: An ab initio path integral molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yukio; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2013-05-01

    Ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulation was performed to understand the nuclear quantum effect on the hydrogen bond of hydrogen malonate anion. Static calculation predicted the proton transfer barrier as 0.12 kcal/mol. Conventional ab initio molecular dynamics simulation at 300 K found proton distribution with a double peak on the proton transfer coordinate. Inclusion of thermal effect alone elongates the hydrogen bond length, which increases the barrier height. Inclusion of nuclear quantum effect washes out this barrier, and distributes a single broad peak in the center. H/D isotope effect on the proton transfer is also discussed.

  18. An introduction and integration of cross-classified, multiple membership, and dynamic group random-effects models.

    PubMed

    Cafri, Guy; Hedeker, Donald; Aarons, Gregory A

    2015-12-01

    In longitudinal studies, time-varying group membership and group effects are important issues that need to be addressed. In this article we describe use of cross-classified and multiple membership random-effects models to address time-varying group membership, and dynamic group random-effects models to address time-varying group effects. We propose new models that integrate features of existing models, evaluate these models through simulation, provide guidance on how to fit these models, and apply the models in 2 real data examples. The discussion focuses on challenges in the application of these models.

  19. Coherent-state path integral versus coarse-grained effective stochastic equation of motion: From reaction diffusion to stochastic sandpiles.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2016-04-01

    We derive and study two different formalisms used for nonequilibrium processes: the coherent-state path integral, and an effective, coarse-grained stochastic equation of motion. We first study the coherent-state path integral and the corresponding field theory, using the annihilation process A+A→A as an example. The field theory contains counterintuitive quartic vertices. We show how they can be interpreted in terms of a first-passage problem. Reformulating the coherent-state path integral as a stochastic equation of motion, the noise generically becomes imaginary. This renders it not only difficult to interpret, but leads to convergence problems at finite times. We then show how alternatively an effective coarse-grained stochastic equation of motion with real noise can be constructed. The procedure is similar in spirit to the derivation of the mean-field approximation for the Ising model, and the ensuing construction of its effective field theory. We finally apply our findings to stochastic Manna sandpiles. We show that the coherent-state path integral is inappropriate, or at least inconvenient. As an alternative, we derive and solve its mean-field approximation, which we then use to construct a coarse-grained stochastic equation of motion with real noise.

  20. Time Series Analyses of Integrated Terminal Weather System Effects on System Airport Efficiency Ratings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    provide a suite of weather informational products for improving air terminal planning, capacity, and safety” (evans & Ducot , 1994, p . 449) . in...intervention is the integrated Terminal Weather System (iTWS) . evans and Ducot (1994) described iTWS as being designed to “provide a suite of...and Aerospace Meteorology. hyannis, MA . evans, J .e . & Ducot , e .r . (1994) . The integrated termi- nal weather system (iTWS) . The Lincoln

  1. The Effect of Dietary Adaption on Cranial Morphological Integration in Capuchins (Order Primates, Genus Cebus)

    PubMed Central

    Makedonska, Jana; Wright, Barth W.; Strait, David S.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental challenge of morphology is to identify the underlying evolutionary and developmental mechanisms leading to correlated phenotypic characters. Patterns and magnitudes of morphological integration and their association with environmental variables are essential for understanding the evolution of complex phenotypes, yet the nature of the relevant selective pressures remains poorly understood. In this study, the adaptive significance of morphological integration was evaluated through the association between feeding mechanics, ingestive behavior and craniofacial variation. Five capuchin species were examined, Cebus apella sensu stricto, Cebus libidinosus, Cebus nigritus, Cebus olivaceus and Cebus albifrons. Twenty three-dimensional landmarks were chosen to sample facial regions experiencing high strains during feeding, characteristics affecting muscular mechanical advantage and basicranial regions. Integration structure and magnitude between and within the oral and zygomatic subunits, between and within blocks maximizing modularity and within the face, the basicranium and the cranium were examined using partial-least squares, eigenvalue variance, integration indices compared inter-specifically at a common level of sampled population variance and cluster analyses. Results are consistent with previous findings reporting a relative constancy of facial and cranial correlation patterns across mammals, while covariance magnitudes vary. Results further suggest that food material properties structure integration among functionally-linked facial elements and possibly integration between the face and the basicranium. Hard-object-feeding capuchins, especially C.apella s.s., whose faces experience particularly high biomechanical loads are characterized by higher facial and cranial integration especially compared to C.albifrons, likely because morphotypes compromising feeding performance are selected against in species relying on obdurate fallback foods. This is the

  2. Effect of integral yoga on psychological and health variables and their correlations

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Sushil S; Ramarao, Nagendra Hongasandra; Hankey, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Certain psychological and health variables are commonly measured in India. This study evaluates the effects of integral yoga practices on these variables and also the consistency of correlations observed between them. Materials and Methods: The study was a pre-post intervention study. The variables were measured at the beginning and the end of a one-month yoga course. There was no control group.The study was carried out at Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana (S-VYASA) University, in its rural campus south of Bangalore. Based on health criteria, 108 subjects were selected out of 198 volunteers to form the experimental yoga group. Ages ranged from 17 to 63 years. The yogasanas (postures), pranayama (breathing exercises), relaxation techniques, meditation, chanting and lectures were the components of yoga intervention. The variables measured were sustained attention, emotional intelligence – EQ, general health – GHQ, guna personality – sattva, rajas and tamas. Results: Significant pre-post changes were found in all variables. Significant correlations were found between the following pairs: The two sustained attention variables; emotional intelligence and general health; GHQ and tamas; sattva and tamas; and rajas and tamas. Conclusion: The study shows that there were significant changes in all variables (P< 0.001) except in sattva. It also confirms that EQ and general health variables correlate significantly with each other and negatively with tamas. EQ and tamas form positive and negative predictors of health respectively. Sattva correlates positively with EQ suggesting that a sattvic personality indicates better self-control. This suggests that, by improving guna personality, long-term yoga practice may stabilize EQ. PMID:22022128

  3. Cochrane corner: is integrated disease management for patients with COPD effective?

    PubMed

    Kruis, Annemarije L; Smidt, Nynke; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Boland, Melinde R S; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen; Chavannes, Niels H

    2014-11-01

    Patients with COPD experience respiratory symptoms, impairments of daily living and recurrent exacerbations. The aim of integrated disease management (IDM) is to establish a programme of different components of care (ie, self-management, exercise, nutrition) in which several healthcare providers (ie, nurses, general practitioners, physiotherapists, pulmonologists) collaborate to provide efficient and good quality of care. The aim of this Cochrane systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of IDM on quality of life, exercise tolerance and exacerbation related outcomes. Searches for all available evidence were carried out in various databases. Included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) consisted of interventions with multidisciplinary (≥2 healthcare providers) and multitreatment (≥2 components) IDM interventions with duration of at least 3 months. Two reviewers independently searched, assessed and extracted data of all RCTs. A total of 26 RCTs were included, involving 2997 patients from 11 different countries with a follow-up varying from 3 to 24 months. In all 68% of the patients were men, with a mean age of 68 years and a mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) predicted value of 44.3%. Patients treated with an IDM programme improved significantly on quality of life scores and reported a clinically relevant improvement of 44 m on 6 min walking distance, compared to controls. Furthermore, the number of patients with ≥1 respiratory related hospital admission reduced from 27 to 20 per 100 patients. Duration of hospitalisation decreased significantly by nearly 4 days.

  4. Effective integration of systems biology, biomarkers, biosimulation and modelling in streamlining drug development.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajesh; Schaefer, Hans Guenter; Bjerrum, Ole J

    2007-05-01

    The European Federation of Pharmaceutical Sciences (EUFEPS) has long established itself as leaders in the field of interdisciplinary meetings to discuss issues that face drug development. It's ever popular and well attended "Optimizing Drug Development" series has tackled numerous issues, most recent of which have been drug interactions, getting the dose right, candidate selection, and biomarkers (Lesko et al., 2000; Rolan et al., 2003; Stanski et al., 2005; Tucker et al., 2001). Over a course of 3 productive days, the meeting on "Effective Integration of Systems Biology, Biomarkers, Biosimulation and Modelling in Streamlining Drug Development", held in Basel, Switzerland was jointly sponsored by EUFEPS, European Biosimulation Network of Excellence (BioSim), American College of Clinical Pharmacology (ACCP), European Centre of Pharmaceutical Medicine (ECPM), and Swiss Society of Pharmaceutical Sciences (SGRW). The meeting was focused on emerging aspects related to the quantitative understanding of underlying pathways in drug discovery and clinical development, i.e. moving from an empirical to a model-based, quantitative drug development process. The objectives of the meeting were: (1) to highlight the current state of the art on biomarkers (as they relate to quantitative fingerprinting of disease), systems biology, modelling and simulation; (2) to illustrate the applications of these emerging tools in increasing the efficiency and productivity of new drug development by case examples; (3) to understand the gaps in the technology and organizational implementations in governance, and (4) allow an opportunity for cross-disciplinary interaction, i.e., scientists with more theoretical and technical modelling and simulation expertise of the BioSim network and researchers experienced in applying modelling and simulation techniques in day-to-day drug development were drawn together. This report summarizes the outcome from this meeting.

  5. Causes and consequences of genetic background effects illuminated by integrative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Christopher H; Chari, Sudarshan; Tack, David; Dworkin, Ian

    2014-04-01

    The phenotypic consequences of individual mutations are modulated by the wild-type genetic background in which they occur. Although such background dependence is widely observed, we do not know whether general patterns across species and traits exist or about the mechanisms underlying it. We also lack knowledge on how mutations interact with genetic background to influence gene expression and how this in turn mediates mutant phenotypes. Furthermore, how genetic background influences patterns of epistasis remains unclear. To investigate the genetic basis and genomic consequences of genetic background dependence of the scalloped(E3) allele on the Drosophila melanogaster wing, we generated multiple novel genome-level datasets from a mapping-by-introgression experiment and a tagged RNA gene expression dataset. In addition we used whole genome resequencing of the parental lines-two commonly used laboratory strains-to predict polymorphic transcription factor binding sites for SD. We integrated these data with previously published genomic datasets from expression microarrays and a modifier mutation screen. By searching for genes showing a congruent signal across multiple datasets, we were able to identify a robust set of candidate loci contributing to the background-dependent effects of mutations in sd. We also show that the majority of background-dependent modifiers previously reported are caused by higher-order epistasis, not quantitative noncomplementation. These findings provide a useful foundation for more detailed investigations of genetic background dependence in this system, and this approach is likely to prove useful in exploring the genetic basis of other traits as well.

  6. Environmental Stress, Bottom-up Effects, and Community Dynamics: Integrating Molecular-Physiological and Ecological Approaches.

    PubMed

    Menge, Bruce A; Olson, Annette M; Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P

    2002-08-01

    Environmental stress and nutrient/productivity models predict the responses of community structure along gradients of physical conditions and bottom-up effects. Although both models have succeeded in helping to understand variation in ecological communities, most tests have been qualitative. Until recently, two roadblocks to more quantitative tests in marine environments have been a lack of (1) inexpensive, field-deployable technology for quantifying (e.g.) temperature, light, salinity, chlorophyll, and productivity, and (2) methods of quantifying the sub-organismal mechanisms linking environmental conditions to their ecological expression. The advent of inexpensive remote-sensing technology, adoption of molecular techniques such as quantification of heat-shock proteins and RNA:DNA ratios, and the formation of interdisciplinary alliances between ecologists and physiologists has begun to overcome these roadblocks. An integrated eco-physiological approach focuses on the determinants of: distributional limits among microhabitat patches and along (local-scale) environmental gradients (e.g., zonation); among-site (mesoscale) differences in community pattern; and geographic (macroscale) differences in ecosystem structure. These approaches promise new insights into the physiological mechanisms underlying variation in processes such as species interactions, physical disturbance, survival and growth. Here, we review two classes of models for community dynamics, and present examples of ecological studies of these models in consumer-prey systems. We illustrate the power of new molecular tools to characterize the sub-organismal responses of some of the same consumers and prey to thermal stress and food concentration. Ecological and physiological evidence tends to be consistent with model predictions, supporting our argument that we are poised to make major advances in the mechanistic understanding of community dynamics along key environmental gradients.

  7. Structurally Integrated, Damage Tolerant Thermal Spray Coatings: Processing Effects on Surface and System Functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackel, Andrew

    Thermal Spray (TS) coatings have seen extensive application as protective surfaces to enhance the service life of substrates prone to damage in their operating environment (wear, corrosion, heat etc.). With the advent of high velocity TS processes, the ability to deposit highly dense (>99%) metallic and cermet coatings has further enhanced the protective ability of these coatings. In addition to surface functionality, the influence of the coating application on the mechanical performance of a coated component is of great concern when such a component will experience either static or cyclic loading during service. Using a process mapping methodology, the processing-property interplay between coating materials meant to provide damage tolerant surface or for structural restoration are explored in terms of relevant mechanical properties. Most importantly, the residual stresses inherent in TS deposited coatings are shown to play a significant role in the integrated mechanical performance of these coatings. Unique to high velocity TS processes is the ability to produce compressive stresses within the deposit from the cold working induced by the high kinetic energy particles upon impact. The extent of these formation stresses are explored with different coating materials, as well as processing influence. The ability of dense TS coatings to carry significant structural load and synergistically strengthen coated tensile specimens is demonstrated as a function of coating material, processing, and thickness. The sharing of load between the substrate and otherwise brittle coating enables higher loads before yield for the bi-material specimens, offering a methodology to improve the tensile performance of coated components for structural repair or multi-functionality (surface and structure). The concern of cyclic fatigue damage in coated components is explored, since the majority of service application are designed for loading to be well below the yield point. The role of

  8. An integrated approach for prospectively investigating a mode-of-action for rodent liver effects.

    PubMed

    LeBaron, Matthew J; Geter, David R; Rasoulpour, Reza J; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Thomas, Johnson; Murray, Jennifer; Kan, H Lynn; Wood, Amanda J; Elcombe, Cliff; Vardy, Audrey; McEwan, Jillian; Terry, Claire; Billington, Richard

    2013-07-15

    Registration of new plant protection products (e.g., herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide) requires comprehensive mammalian toxicity evaluation including carcinogenicity studies in two species. The outcome of the carcinogenicity testing has a significant bearing on the overall human health risk assessment of the substance and, consequently, approved uses for different crops across geographies. In order to understand the relevance of a specific tumor finding to human health, a systematic, transparent, and hypothesis-driven mode of action (MoA) investigation is, appropriately, an expectation by the regulatory agencies. Here, we describe a novel approach of prospectively generating the MoA data by implementing additional end points to the standard guideline toxicity studies with sulfoxaflor, a molecule in development. This proactive MoA approach results in a more robust integration of molecular with apical end points while minimizing animal use. Sulfoxaflor, a molecule targeting sap-feeding insects, induced liver effects (increased liver weight due to hepatocellular hypertrophy) in an initial palatability probe study for selecting doses for subsequent repeat-dose dietary studies. This finding triggered the inclusion of dose-response investigations of the potential key events for rodent liver carcinogenesis, concurrent with the hazard assessment studies. As predicted, sulfoxaflor induced liver tumors in rats and mice in the bioassays. The MoA data available by the time of the carcinogenicity finding supported the conclusion that the carcinogenic potential of sulfoxaflor was due to CAR/PXR nuclear receptor activation with subsequent hepatocellular proliferation. This MoA was not considered to be relevant to humans as sulfoxaflor is unlikely to induce hepatocellular proliferation in humans and therefore would not be a human liver carcinogen.

  9. Effect of external tank nose shape on the Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle 3, integrated configuration (IA37B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    Tests of several tank nose shapes were conducted as a part of the investigation of configuration changes to reduce drag for the integrated vehicle. The effect on the integrated vehicle aerodynamic characteristics of several tank nose shapes was investigated. The tank nose shapes investigated were the 600 inch (baseline) and 1204 inch radius ogives, and the 600 inch ogive plus a spike 360 inches long and 12.0 inches in diameter. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.6 through 4.96 and for angles-of-attack and sideslip from -10 through +10 degrees. The model used was the 0.004-scale integrated vehicle model number 34-OTS.

  10. Effects of glycerol and sugar mixing temperature on the morphologic and functional integrity of cryopreserved ram sperm.

    PubMed

    Pelufo, V; López Armengol, M F; Malcotti, V; Venturino, A; Aisen, E G

    2015-01-01

    Sperm deep freezing procedures for ram semen have considerable variations regarding the steps being employed for cooling, freezing, and addition of cryoprotectants. In this work, we evaluated the effects of the addition of glycerol and/or the disaccharides sucrose and trehalose to hypertonic diluents either before or after cooling from 30 °C to 5 °C in Merino Australian ram semen cryopreservation. Using optical and transmission electron microscopy techniques, we assessed that glycerol was beneficial to the cooling process independently of its addition at 30 °C or 5 °C in terms of sperm membrane integrity in different regions of the plasma membrane (acrosomal region, 14.5% higher integrity; postacrosomal region, 8.0% higher integrity [P < 0.01]; hypoosmotic swelling test [HOST], 10.8% higher integrity [P < 0.001]). Disaccharides were necessary for a better cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen, and the best procedure was their addition after cooling at 5 °C (12% higher sperm motility [P < 0.001]; 8% higher acrosome integrity, [P < 0.05]; 9.5% higher plasma membrane integrity assessed by HOST [P < 0.001]). Trehalose showed a greater preservation cryoprotectant capacity than sucrose, as indicated by sperm motility after thawing (8.1% greater [P < 0.01]) and by the integrity of the intermediate piece (20% greater [P < 0.05]). From these results, we conclude that the best procedure for ram semen cryopreservation in hypertonic disaccharide-containing diluents is the addition of glycerol and trehalose after the cooling process, at 5 °C.

  11. 'Junction-Level' Heterogeneous Integration of III-V Materials with Si CMOS for Novel Asymmetric Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yoon Jung

    Driven by Moore's law, semiconductor chips have become faster, denser and cheaper through aggressive dimension scaling. The continued scaling not only led to dramatic performance improvements in digital logic applications but also in mixed-mode and/or communication applications. Moreover, size/weight/power (SWAP) restrictions on all high-performance system components have resulted in multi-functional integration of multiple integrated circuits (ICs)/dies in 3D packages/ICs by various system-level approaches. However, these approaches still possess shortcomings and in order to truly benefit from the most advanced digital technologies, the future high-speed/high power devices for communication applications need to be fully integrated into a single CMOS chip. Due to limitations in Si device performance in high-frequency/power applications as well as expensive III-V compound semiconductor devices with low integration density, heterogeneous integration of compound semiconductor materials/devices with Si CMOS platform has emerged as a viable solution to low-cost high-performance ICs. In this study, we first discuss on channel and drain engineering approaches in the state-of-the-art multiple-gate field-effect transistor to integrate III-V compound semiconductor materials with Si CMOS for improved device performance in mixed-mode and/or communication applications. Then, growth, characterization and electrical analysis on small-area (diameter < 100nm) complete selective-area epitaxy of GaAs/GaN will be demonstrated for achieving 'dislocation-free' III-V compound semiconductor film on a Si(001) substrate. Based on a success in dislocation-free heterogeneous III-V film growth, we propose a novel ultra-scaled 'junction-level' heterogeneous integration onto mainstream Si CMOS platform. Device architecture and its key features to overcome aforementioned challenges will be given to demonstrate the potential to improve the overall system performance with diverse functionality.

  12. Those are Your Legs: The Effect of Visuo-Spatial Viewpoint on Visuo-Tactile Integration and Body Ownership

    PubMed Central

    Pozeg, Polona; Galli, Giulia; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Experiencing a body part as one’s own, i.e., body ownership, depends on the integration of multisensory bodily signals (including visual, tactile, and proprioceptive information) with the visual top-down signals from peripersonal space. Although it has been shown that the visuo-spatial viewpoint from where the body is seen is an important visual top-down factor for body ownership, different studies have reported diverging results. Furthermore, the role of visuo-spatial viewpoint (sometime also called first-person perspective) has only been studied for hands or the whole body, but not for the lower limbs. We thus investigated whether and how leg visuo-tactile integration and leg ownership depended on the visuo-spatial viewpoint from which the legs were seen and the anatomical similarity of the visual leg stimuli. Using a virtual leg illusion, we tested the strength of visuo-tactile integration of leg stimuli using the crossmodal congruency effect (CCE) as well as the subjective sense of leg ownership (assessed by a questionnaire). Fifteen participants viewed virtual legs or non-corporeal control objects, presented either from their habitual first-person viewpoint or from a viewpoint that was rotated by 90°(third-person viewpoint), while applying visuo-tactile stroking between the participants legs and the virtual legs shown on a head-mounted display. The data show that the first-person visuo-spatial viewpoint significantly boosts the visuo-tactile integration as well as the sense of leg ownership. Moreover, the viewpoint-dependent increment of the visuo-tactile integration was only found in the conditions when participants viewed the virtual legs (absent for control objects). These results confirm the importance of first person visuo-spatial viewpoint for the integration of visuo-tactile stimuli and extend findings from the upper extremity and the trunk to visuo-tactile integration and ownership for the legs. PMID:26635663

  13. The effects of integrated mathematics/science curriculum and instruction on mathematics achievement and student attitudes in grade six

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Mary Denise

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether integrating mathematics and science curriculum and teaching practices significantly improves achievement in mathematics and attitudes towards mathematics among sixth grade students in South Texas. The study was conducted during the 2001--2002 school year. A causal-comparative ex post facto research design was used to explore the effects of integrated mathematics and science classrooms compared to classrooms of traditional, isolated mathematics and science teaching practices on student achievement and student attitudes. Achievement was based on the Spring 2002 Mathematics portion of the standardized Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) Texas Learning Index (TLI) scores and individual student's mathematics Grade Point Average (GPA). Measurement of student attitudes was based on the results of the Integrated Mathematics Attitudinal Survey (IMAS), created by the researcher for this study. The sample population included 349 Grade 6 mathematics students attending one middle school involved in a pilot program utilizing integrated mathematics/science curriculum and teaching practices in a South Texas urban school district. The research involved 337 of the 349 sixth grade students to study the effects of mathematics/science curriculum and teaching practices on achievement and 207 of the 349 sixth grade students to study the effects of mathematics/science curriculum on attitudes concerning mathematics. The data were analyzed using chi square analyses, independent samples t-tests, and the analysis of variance (ANOVA). Statistical significance was determined at the .05 level of significance. Significant relationships were found when analyzing the proficiency of mathematics skills and individual growth of mathematics achievement. Chi square analyses indicated that the students in the integrated mathematics/science classrooms were more likely to exhibit individual growth and proficiency of mathematics skills based on the

  14. Integrating the Principles of Effective Intervention into Batterer Intervention Programming: The Case for Moving Toward More Evidence-Based Programming.

    PubMed

    Radatz, Dana L; Wright, Emily M

    2016-01-01

    The majority of batterer intervention program (BIP) evaluations have indicated they are marginally effective in reducing domestic violence recidivism. Meanwhile, correctional programs used to treat a variety of offenders (e.g., substance users, violent offenders, and so forth) that adhere to the "principles of effective intervention" (PEI) have reported significant reductions in recidivism. This article introduces the PEI-the principles on which evidence-based practices in correctional rehabilitation are based-and identifies the degree to which they are currently integrated into BIPs. The case is made that batterer programs could be more effective if they incorporate the PEI. Recommendations for further integration of the principles into BIPs are also provided.

  15. Photonic Integrated Circuit (PIC) Device Structures: Background, Fabrication Ecosystem, Relevance to Space Systems Applications, and Discussion of Related Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alt, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Electronic integrated circuits are considered one of the most significant technological advances of the 20th century, with demonstrated impact in their ability to incorporate successively higher numbers transistors and construct electronic devices onto a single CMOS chip. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) exist as the optical analog to integrated circuits; however, in place of transistors, PICs consist of numerous scaled optical components, including such "building-block" structures as waveguides, MMIs, lasers, and optical ring resonators. The ability to construct electronic and photonic components on a single microsystems platform offers transformative potential for the development of technologies in fields including communications, biomedical device development, autonomous navigation, and chemical and atmospheric sensing. Developing on-chip systems that provide new avenues for integration and replacement of bulk optical and electro-optic components also reduces size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) limitations, which are important in the selection of instrumentation for specific flight projects. The number of applications currently emerging for complex photonics systems-particularly in data communications-warrants additional investigations when considering reliability for space systems development. This Body of Knowledge document seeks to provide an overview of existing integrated photonics architectures; the current state of design, development, and fabrication ecosystems in the United States and Europe; and potential space applications, with emphasis given to associated radiation effects and reliability.

  16. A study of the effect of physical and chemical stressors on biological integrity within the San Diego hydrologic region.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kristofor A; Pohlman, Alex; Viswanathan, Shekar; Gibson, David; Purohit, Joe

    2012-03-01

    Environmental agencies across the United States have searched for adequate methods to assess anthropogenic impacts on the environment. Biological assessments, which compare the taxonomic composition of an aquatic assemblage to relevant biocriteria, have surfaced as an effective method to assess the ecological integrity of US waterbodies. In this study, bioassessment data were collected and analyzed in conjunction with physical habitat and chemical stressor data for streams and rivers within the San Diego basin from 1998 through 2005. Physical stressors such as sediment loading, riparian destruction, and in-stream habitat homogenization affect many locations in the region. However, physical habitat measures alone were found to frequently overestimate the biological integrity of streams in the region. Many sites within the San Diego Basin, although unaffected by physical stressors, continue to exhibit low biological integrity scores. Sites with low biological integrity tend to possess higher specific conductance and salinity compared to sites with high biological integrity. We suggest that one possible reason for these differences is the source water used for municipal purposes.

  17. Alternative and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side Effects & their ... Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side Effects & their ...

  18. The Effect of Social Integration on Outcomes after Major Lower Extremity Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Alexander T.; Pallangyo, Anthony J.; Herman, Ayesiga M.; Schaumeier, Maria J.; Smith, Ann D.; Hevelone, Nathanael D.; Crandell, David M.; Nguyen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Objective Major lower extremity amputation is a common procedure that results in a profound change in a patient's life. We sought to determine the association between social support and outcomes after amputation. We hypothesized that patients with greater social support will have better post amputation outcomes. Methods From November 2011 to May 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional, observational, multicenter study. Social integration was measured by the social integration subset of the Short Form (Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique (CHART). Systemic social support was assessed by comparing a US and Tanzanian population. Walking function was measured using the 6MWT and quality of life (QoL) was measured using the EQ-5D. Results 102 major lower extremity amputees were recruited. 63 patients were enrolled in the US with a mean age of 58.0. Forty-two (67%) were male. Patients with low social integration were more likely to be unable to ambulate (no walk 39% vs. slow walk 23% vs. fast walk 10%; P=.01) and those with high social integration were more likely to be fast walkers (no walk 10% vs. slow walk 59% vs. fast walk 74%; P=.01). This relationship persisted in a multivariable analysis. Increasing social integration scores were also positively associated with increasing quality of life scores in a multivariable analysis (β .002; SE .0008; P = .02). In comparing the US population with the Tanzanian cohort (39 subjects), there were no significant differences between functional or quality of life outcomes in the systemic social support analysis. Conclusions In the US population, increased social integration is associated with both improved function and quality of life outcomes among major lower extremity amputees. Systemic social support, as measured by comparing the US population with a Tanzanian population, was not associated with improved function or quality of life outcomes. In the US, steps should be taken to identify and aid amputees with poor

  19. Effect of thyme oil on small intestine integrity and antioxidant status, phagocytic activity and gastrointestinal microbiota in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Placha, Iveta; Chrastinova, Lubica; Laukova, Andrea; Cobanova, Klaudia; Takacova, Jana; Strompfova, Viola; Chrenkova, Maria; Formelova, Zuzana; Faix, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The effects of 0.5 g thyme oil per kg dry matter (DM) of diet on duodenal tissue integrity, antioxidant status, phagocytic activity and selected microbiota in the caecum and faeces of rabbits were studied. Twenty-four rabbits were divided into two groups and were fed a commercial granulated diet for growing rabbits (CD) with access to water ad libitum. The first group was fed the CD, while to the CD of the second group thyme oil was added. Intestinal integrity was tested by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Thyme oil significantly increased the value of total antioxidant status (TAS) in the blood plasma and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the liver, and it decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration in the duodenal tissue. Thyme oil resulted in strengthened intestinal integrity, as the essential oil supplementation significantly increased TEER values in the experiment. The faecal microbiota of rabbits was almost completely balanced in both groups, and only a slight decrease was found in the microbial population at day 42 of the trial. In both groups, the bacterial counts were generally lower in the caecum than in the faecal samples. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with 0.5 g/kg DM thyme oil may improve intestinal integrity, and it may have an antioxidant effect. A tendency was also found for thyme oil to stimulate the abundance of some microbes beneficial in the rabbit gut.

  20. Protective effect of black tea on integral membrane proteins in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Szachowicz-Petelska, Barbara; Skrzydlewska, Elżbieta; Figaszewski, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol intoxication is accompanied by oxidative stress formation. Consequently, it leads to disturbances in cellular metabolism that can alter the structure and function of cell membrane components. Black tea displays antioxidant properties, protects membrane phospholipids and may protect integral membrane proteins. In the present study, we examined whether black tea induces changes in the liver integral membrane proteins of 12-months old rats chronically intoxicated with ethanol. To estimate qualitatively and quantitatively the levels of the liver integral membrane proteins, the proteins were selectively hydrolyzed by trypsin, the obtained peptides were resolved by HPLC and the levels of specific amino acids within the individual peptides were determined. All of the obtained peptides contained phenylalanine (Phe), cysteine (Cys) and lysine (Lys). Compared to the control group, rats in the ethanol intoxication group showed decreased liver levels of integral membrane proteins as well as fewer trypsin-hydrolyzed peptides and amino acids in the hydrolyzed peptides. Administration of black tea to ethanol-intoxicated rats partially protected proteins against the structural changes caused by ethanol. Black tea prevented decreases in the levels of cysteine (in about 90% of cases), lysine (in about 60% of cases), phenylalanine (in about 70% of cases) and examined peptides (in about 60% of cases). The liver protein level was higher (by about 18%) in rats who received black tea and ethanol than in those who received ethanol alone. In conclusion, black tea partially protects the composition and level of rat liver cell integral membrane proteins against changes caused by ethanol intoxication.