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Sample records for 71b pilot trainer

  1. SR-71B - Mach 3 Trainer in Flight at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    An SR-71B Blackbird aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is seen here silhouetted against the golden colors of a sunset sky on a 1995 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  2. SR-71B - Mach 3 Trainer in Flight at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The setting sun peeks beneath a SR-71B Blackbird, silhouetted against the orange hues of the western sky on a 1995 flight from at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  3. SR-71B - Mach 3 Trainer in Flight at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The setting sun peeks beneath a SR-71B Blackbird, silhouetted against the orange hues of the western sky on a 1995 flight from at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  4. SR-71B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photo shows NASA's SR-71B, one of three triple-sonic SR-71s initially loaned to NASA by the Air Force, cruises over the California desert en route to NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, from Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, CA, July 25, 1991. The aircraft, two SR-71As and the SR-71B, were loaned to NASA for high-speed, high -altitude testbeds for research in such areas as aerodynamics, propulsion structures, thermal protection materials, and instrumentation. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which

  5. AN EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF A GROUND PILOT TRAINER IN GENERAL AVIATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHAPMAN, G. COURTNEY

    THREE GROUPS OF SUBJECTS WERE TRAINED TO PRIVATE PILOT PROFICIENCY, USING A GROUND PILOT TRAINER, TO FIND HOW MANY HOURS OF GROUND TRAINING CAN BE SUBSTITUTED FOR AIRCRAFT DUAL INSTRUCTION. TRAINING TIME REQUIRED WAS COMPARED BETWEEN GROUPS AND WITH THAT OF A CONTROL GROUP NOT USING A TRAINER. THE GROUP THAT USED THE TRAINER MOST NEEDED…

  6. The Virtual Flier: The Link Trainer, Flight Simulation, and Pilot Identity.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chihyung

    2015-01-01

    The Link Trainer is often described as the first successful attempt at what we now recognize as flight simulation and even virtual reality. Instead of asking how well the device simulated flight conditions, this article shows that what the Link Trainer simulated was not the conditions of the air, but rather the conditions of the cockpit that was gradually filled with flight instruments. The article also considers the Link Trainer as a cultural space in which shifting ideas about what it meant to be a pilot were manifested. A pilot in the Link Trainer was trained into a new category of flier-the virtual flier-who was an avid reader of instruments and an attentive listener to signals. This article suggests that, by situating the pilot within new spaces, protocols, and relationships, technologies of simulation have constituted the identity of the modern pilot and other operators of machines.

  7. The Virtual Flier: The Link Trainer, Flight Simulation, and Pilot Identity.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chihyung

    2015-01-01

    The Link Trainer is often described as the first successful attempt at what we now recognize as flight simulation and even virtual reality. Instead of asking how well the device simulated flight conditions, this article shows that what the Link Trainer simulated was not the conditions of the air, but rather the conditions of the cockpit that was gradually filled with flight instruments. The article also considers the Link Trainer as a cultural space in which shifting ideas about what it meant to be a pilot were manifested. A pilot in the Link Trainer was trained into a new category of flier-the virtual flier-who was an avid reader of instruments and an attentive listener to signals. This article suggests that, by situating the pilot within new spaces, protocols, and relationships, technologies of simulation have constituted the identity of the modern pilot and other operators of machines. PMID:26334696

  8. Astronaut John H. Casper uses Portable In-flight Landing Operations Trainer (PILOT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut John H. Casper, mission commander, participates in an experiment that measures the effects of space flight on pilot proficiency. Astronauts Casper and Andrew M. Allen, pilot, continued the testing of the Portable In-flight Landing Operations Trainer (PILOT), which first flew onboard Columbia in October of 1993.

  9. AN EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF A GROUND PILOT TRAINER IN GENERAL AVIATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BUTLER, E. DEAN; LANIER, H. MILLER

    AN EXPERIMENT WAS CONDUCTED BY MIDDLE TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY TO ASSESS THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A GROUND PILOT TRAINER USED TO DEVELOP PRIMARY AND INSTRUMENT FLIGHT PROFICIENCIES. THE STUDY REQUIRED DIFFERENTIAL USE OF THE DEVICE WITH THREE GROUPS OF CANDIDATES, AND COMPARISON OF TRAINING PROGRESS AND ATTAINED PROFICIENCY VERSUS THAT OF GROUP OF…

  10. People with a Learning Disability as Trainers: Evaluation of a Values Based Pilot Training Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Lesley-Ann; Roberts, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an independent evaluation of a pilot project in Northern Ireland called "Telling it like it is!" (TILII) conducted over a 2 year timeframe (2005-2007). Seven people with a learning disability were recruited and trained as TILII trainers. With the help of a project facilitator, they designed and presented a…

  11. STS-26 Pilot Covey during egress training at JSC's MAIL full fuselage trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), slides to safety using the new crew escape system (CES) inflated slide during an emergency egress training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Technicians stand on either side of the slide ready to help Covey to his feet once he reaches the bottom. The CES pole extends out the open side hatch of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT). During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (LESs) and checked out CES slide and other CES configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  12. Measuring moment-to-moment pilot workload using synchronous presentations of secondary tasks in a motion-base trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortolussi, Michael R.; Hart, Sandra G.; Shively, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    A simulation was conducted to determine whether the sensitivity of secondary task measures of pilot workload could be improved by synchronizing their presentation to the occurrence of specific events or pilot actions. This synchronous method of presentation was compared to the more typical asynchronous method, where secondary task presentations are independent of pilot's flight-related activities. Twelve pilots flew low- and high-difficulty scenarios in a motion-base trainer with and without concurrent secondary tasks (e.g., choice reaction time and time production). The difficulty of each scenario was manipulated by the addition of 21 flight-related tasks superimposed on a standard approach and landing sequence. The insertion of the secondary tasks did not affect primary flight performance. However, secondary task performance did reflect workload differences between scenarios and among flight segments within scenarios, replicating the results of an earlier study in which the secondary tasks were presented asynchronously (Bortolussi et al., 1986).

  13. AN EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF A GROUND PILOT TRAINER IN GENERAL AVIATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PHILLIPS, C.R., JR.

    EXPERIMENTAL FLIGHT TRAINING WAS CONDUCTED IN CONJUNCTION WITH A COMMERCIAL MODEL GROUND TRAINER TO DETERMINE ITS EFFECTIVENESS IN CONTRIBUTING TO THE PROFICIENCY LEVEL USUALLY OBTAINED BY STUDENTS UNDERGOING A RIGIDLY CONTROLLED FLIGHT SYLLABUS WITHOUT USE OF SYNTHETIC TRAINING DEVICES. DIFFERENTIAL LEVELS OF TRAINING WITH THE GROUND TRAINERS…

  14. SR-71B - in Flight - View from Air Force Tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This look-down view shows NASA 831, an SR-71B flown by Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, as it cruises over the Mojave Desert. The photo was from an Air Force refueling tanker taken on a 1997 mission. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in

  15. SR-71B - in flight over snow-capped mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Dryden's SR-71B, NASA 831, slices across the snowy southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California after being refueled by an Air Force Flight Test Center tanker during a recent flight. The Mach 3 aircraft, on loan to NASA by the U.S. Air Force, were flown by the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, during the decade of the 1990s as testbeds for high-speed, high-altitude aeronautical research. Capable of flying more than 2200 mph and at altitudes of over 80,000 feet, they were excellent platforms for research and experiments in aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground much like sharp thunderclaps when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startle affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It

  16. Astronaut Eileen Collins in Full Fuselage Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, pilot for the STS-63 mission, participates in STS-63 training at JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory. Collins is seated at the pilot's station in the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT).

  17. Astronaut Eileen Collins in Full Fuselage Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, pilot for the STS-63 mission, participates in STS-63 training at JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory. Collins is seated at the pilot's station in the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) (48403-4); Collins looks out the aft flight deck window in the Shuttle mockup trainer (48405).

  18. Training Alcoholism Trainers. Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Alcohol Education, Arlington, VA.

    This manual was developed to upgrade the training design and delivery skills of inservice trainers in the field of alcoholism. It is geared for inservice trainers with little or no formal background in design/delivery of adult education programs, who spend at least 50% of the time in training activities. Contents include: (1) adult learning…

  19. SR-71B - in Flight with F-18 Chase Aircraft - View from Air Force Tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA 831, an SR-71B operated by the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, cruises over the Mojave Desert with an F/A-18 Hornet flying safety chase. They were photographed on a 1996 mission from an Air Force refueling tanker The F/A-18 Hornet is used primarily as a safety chase and support aircraft at Dryden. As support aircraft, the F-18s are used for safety chase, pilot proficiency and aerial photography. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used

  20. The Teacher Trainer, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This journal is designed as a forum for trainers, teachers, and trainees all over the world. Regular features include the following: "Conference Report"; "Process Options"; "People Who Train People"; "Training around the World"; "Session Report"; "Trainee Voices"; "Current Research"; "Just for Interest"; "A Trainer Like Me"; "Trainer Background";…

  1. Tic Tac Toe Math. Train the Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Alternative Learning, Bryn Mawr, PA.

    This report describes a project that developed a "Train the Trainer" program that would enable individuals to learn and teach the alternative instructional technique, Tic Tac Toe Math, developed by Richard Cooper for adult basic education students. The pilot workshop conducted as part of the project identified problems that traditional teachers…

  2. The Laptop Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meilach, Dona Z.

    1995-01-01

    Looks at the latest tools for trainers such as laptop computers, fold-up overhead projectors, LCD panels with built-in computers, and digital converters. Suggests that these products can make training portable by combining functions in single pieces of equipment and allowing trainers to make last-minute adjustments to their programs. (JOW)

  3. Trainer: Will Travel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, Ann C.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews how the U.S. Agency for International Development uses training to help countries improve their democracies and economics. Identifies resources for trainers interested in international employment. (JOW)

  4. Laser ophthalmological trainer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovva, Anatoly I.; Strinadko, Miroslav T.; Strinadko, Marina M.

    1997-12-01

    The laser ophthalmological trainer is offered. It provides stimulation of an optic analyzer by means of the simultaneous influence of different sensor zones optic auditory by the modulated laser radiation and the sound signal of the proper frequency. The trainer includes the assembly providing individual control of the permissible dose of radiation and can be used for treatment of partial atrophy of optic nerve, dystrophy of cornea, cornea syndrome after refraction surgery, inflammatory diseases of cornea, and conjunctivitis.

  5. miR-71b regulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling during starvation in planarians.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y Y; Zhao, J M; Liu, Q; Guo, Q; Liu, Z; Wang, X X; Wang, C Y; Li, R Y; Zhang, Y Z; Zhang, S T

    2015-10-05

    Planarians, which have a large population of stem cells called neoblasts, are molecularly tractable model systems used in the study of regeneration. However, planarians have strong resistance to hunger and have developed growth arrest strategies. For example, they can change their size and undergo growth regression during starvation periods. The results of the current study show that the microRNA, miR-71b, and the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway have important functions in the development of starvation-induced planarians. We demonstrate tissue-specific expression of miR-71b using in situ hybridization. By employing real-time polymerase chain reaction, we provide evidence that miR-71b is upregulated in starvation-induced planarians. Furthermore, we validate and verify the target genes of miR-71b.

  6. Working with a personal trainer

    MedlinePlus

    ... field. This shows that the trainer has a solid background in fitness. Experience . Find out how long he or she has been a personal trainer. Ask about what types of clients the trainer typically works with. If you have a health condition, ask ...

  7. Training Alcoholism Trainers. Participant Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Alcohol Education, Arlington, VA.

    This workbook is to be used in conjunction with the Trainer Manual entitled Training Alcoholism Trainers. The program was developed to upgrade training design and delivery skills of inservice trainers in the field of alcoholism. The workbook contains all the handout sheets necessary for participant sessions. (Author/BMW)

  8. Trainer Recertification Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blitzer, Roy J.; Dumas, Roland A.

    1985-01-01

    Lists reasons why people shy away from trainer recertification programs, benefits of attending such programs, and considerations that users and purchasers of training programs might keep in mind in order to get the best quality programs and service from their vendors. (CT)

  9. Training of Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormley, Wilma J.; Austin, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses specific training methods and common characteristics of participants in workshops sponsored by Agency for International Development Water and Sanitation for Health Project for extension agents, who will act as trainers in transfer of sanitation technology in developing nations. Recommendations for conducting such workshops in…

  10. Payload specialists Baudry and Chretien in the Shuttle full fuselage trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Payload specialists Patrick Baudry (left) and Jean Loup Chretien are seated at the commander and pilot stations on the Shuttle full fuselage trainer. In this view they are looking at the camera over the backs of the shuttle seats.

  11. Design, cost, and advanced technology applications for a military trainer aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, G. C.; Harper, M.

    1975-01-01

    The potential impact is examined of advanced aerodynamic and propulsive technologies in terms of operating and acquisition costs on conceptual mission and performance requirements for a future undergraduate jet pilot trainer aircraft.

  12. 77 FR 29362 - Conocophillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, PA; Notice of Affirmative Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... Employment and Training Administration Conocophillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, PA; Notice of... former workers of ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, Pennsylvania (subject firm). The... on February 28, 2012 (77 FR 12084). The initial investigation resulted in a negative...

  13. Basic fluid system trainer

    DOEpatents

    Semans, Joseph P.; Johnson, Peter G.; LeBoeuf, Jr., Robert F.; Kromka, Joseph A.; Goron, Ronald H.; Hay, George D.

    1993-01-01

    A trainer, mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  14. CYP71B15 (PAD3) Catalyzes the Final Step in Camalexin Biosynthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Schuhegger, Regina; Nafisi, Majse; Mansourova, Madina; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Olsen, Carl Erik; Svatoš, Aleš; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Glawischnig, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Camalexin represents the main phytoalexin in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The camalexin-deficient phytoalexin deficient 3 (pad3) mutant has been widely used to assess the biological role of camalexin, although the exact substrate of the cytochrome P450 enzyme 71B15 encoded by PAD3 remained elusive. 2-(Indol-3-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1,3-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid (dihydrocamalexic acid) was identified as likely intermediate in camalexin biosynthesis downstream of indole-3-acetaldoxime, as it accumulated in leaves of silver nitrate-induced pad3 mutant plants and it complemented the camalexin-deficient phenotype of a cyp79b2/cyp79b3 double-knockout mutant. Recombinant CYP71B15 heterologously expressed in yeast catalyzed the conversion of dihydrocamalexic acid to camalexin with preference of the (S)-enantiomer. Arabidopsis microsomes isolated from leaves of CYP71B15-overexpressing and induced wild-type plants were capable of the same reaction but not microsomes from induced leaves of pad3 mutants. In conclusion, CYP71B15 catalyzes the final step in camalexin biosynthesis. PMID:16766671

  15. Trainer Talk: Levels of Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engin, Marion

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to present examples of trainer talk that scaffold trainee teachers' understanding of teaching in a post-observation feedback session. Previous research into scaffolding in a teacher training context describes scaffolding at a technique or strategy level, without describing how, in linguistic terms, the trainer can support and…

  16. What Do Communication Trainers Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beebe, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Effective trainers have mastered the skills of facilitating discussion, providing helpful feedback to others, and presenting training content in an engaging manner. An experienced trainer is able to adapt training content to meet the specific needs of the trainee. Communication training is the process of developing communication skills in order to…

  17. Evaluating Student Athletic Trainers with Objective Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vosler, Skip

    Evaluation of student athletic trainers is conducted quarterly at Ohio University (Athens). The upperclassmen, along with the head athletic trainer and his assistants, help evaluate the freshmen. The evaluation of the upperclassmen is completed by the senior student trainers and the head trainer. The seniors and juniors working with the coaches in…

  18. Astronaut Paul Weitz lies in lower body negative pressure device in trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, pilot of the first manned Skylab mission, lies in the lower body negative pressure device during Skylab training at JSC. Operating the controls in the background is scientist-astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot of the mission. They are in the work and experiments area of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC.

  19. ASTP crewmen in Apollo Command Module Trainer during training session at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An interior view of the Apollo Command Module trainer in bldg 35 showing the three American ASTP prime crewmen lying in their couches during Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) training at JSC. They are, left to right, Astronauts Donald K. Slayton, docking module pilot; Vance D. Brand, command module pilot; and Thomas P. Stafford, commander.

  20. Indiana's Pilot Program for Training Teacher Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe County Community Schools Corp., Bloomington, IN.

    This project, coordinated by the Center for Innovation in Teacher Education, Indiana University, aims to improve the performance of methods instructors and teachers who supervise student teachers, to train teaching associates as methods instructors, to increase the training skills of advanced graduate students, and to increase the interdependence…

  1. Shot loading trainer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.K.

    1995-02-15

    This document presents the results from the analysis of the shot loading trainer (SLT). This device will be used to test the procedure for installing shot into the annulus of the Project W-320 shipping container. To ensure that the shot is installed uniformly around the container, vibrators will be used to settle the shot. The SLT was analyzed to ensure that it would not jeopardize worker safety during operation. The results from the static analysis of the SLT under deadweight and vibrator operating loads show that the stresses in the SLT are below code allowables. The results from the modal analysis show that the natural frequencies of the SLT are far below the operating frequencies of the vibrators, provided the SLT is mounted on pneumatic tires. The SLT was also analyzed for wind, seismic, deadweight, and moving/transporting loads. Analysis of the SLT is in accordance with SDC-4.1 for safety class 3 structures (DOE-RL 1993) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of Steel Construction (AISC 1989).

  2. MST-80B microcomputer trainer

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.D.; Fisher, E.R.; Spann, J.M.

    1980-04-01

    The microcomputer revolution in electronics is spreading so rapidly that it is difficult to educate enough people quickly and thoroughly in the new technology. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's MST-80B was developed as a way to speed learning in in-house training courses, and it is now being widely used outside LLL. The MST-80B trainer is a complete, self-contained, microcomputer system housed in a briefcase. The trainer uses the Intel 8080A 8-Bit Microprocessor (CPU), and it has its own solid-state memory, a built-in keyboard, input and output ports, and a display for visual output. The trainer is furnished with a permanent Monitor Program (in Read-Only Memory) that allows users to enter, debug, modify, and run programs of their own easily. 8 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Evolution of a NASTRAN trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grooms, H. R.; Hinz, P. J.; Collier, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The development is traced of a NASTRAN training system. The design and organization of the program is examined, including the static and dynamic modules. A discussion of how user feedback, in the form of questionnaire responses, was used to evaluate and improve the trainer is included. The trainer was used by a number of engineers, who found it to be a versatile low cost tool. It is particularly helpful in bridging the gap from theory to practical application of the finite element method for structural analysis. The program, along with documentation, is available through COSMIC.

  4. The Use of the European Portfolio for Student Teachers of Languages (EPOSTL) to Foster Teacher Autonomy: English Language Teaching (ELT) Student Teachers' and Teacher Trainers' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakir, Abdulvahit; Balcikanli, Cem

    2012-01-01

    It was the aim of this pilot study to investigate ELT student teachers' and teacher trainers' views on the use of the EPOSTL in pre-service language teacher education of a Turkish state university. Upon the implementation of the EPOSTL as a reflection tool for the second semester of 2010, 25 student teachers and 4 teacher trainers were interviewed…

  5. Prevention Program Management. Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Research Corp., Bethesda, MD.

    This training package, which centers on effective management and the operation of valid prevention programs, presents a five-day training experience designed to help managers of substance-abuse prevention programs. In this trainer manual, the introduction includes a list of course goals and objectives, a summary of the ten individual training…

  6. EKG Interpretation Program. Trainers Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Sandra M.

    This trainer's manual is designed to assist nursing instructors assigned to advanced medical surgical nursing courses in teaching students how to make basic interpretations of their patients' electrocardiographic (EKG) strips. Included in the manual are pre- and posttests and instructional units dealing with the following topics: EKG indicators,…

  7. Trainer Burnout: The Syndrome Explored.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, C. Keith; Judd, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The educators' version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory was completed by 40 of 156 in-house trainers. More than one-third experience emotional exhaustion weekly, and almost half feel a lack of personal accomplishment. Subscales of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment correlated with perceptions of organizations'…

  8. Are family practice trainers and their host practices any better? comparing practice trainers and non-trainers and their practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Family Physician (FP) trainees are expected to be provided with high quality training in well organized practice settings. This study examines differences between FP trainers and non-trainers and their practices to see whether there are differences in trainers and non-trainers and in how their practices are organized and their services are delivered. Method 203 practices (88 non-training and 115 training) with 512 FPs (335 non-trainers and 177 trainers) were assessed using the “Visit Instrument Practice organization (VIP)” on 369 items (142 FP-level; 227 Practice level). Analyses (ANOVA, ANCOVA) were conducted for each level by calculating differences between FP trainees and non-trainees and their host practices. Results Trainers scored higher on all but one of the items, and significantly higher on 47 items, of which 13 remained significant after correcting for covariates. Training practices scored higher on all items and significantly higher on 61 items, of which 23 remained significant after correcting for covariates. Trainers (and training practices) provided more diagnostic and therapeutic services, made better use of team skills and scored higher on practice organization, chronic care services and quality management than non-training practices. Trainers reported more job satisfaction and commitment and less job stress than non-trainers. Discussion There are positive differences between FP trainers and non-trainers in both the level and the quality of services provided by their host practices. Training institutions can use this information to promote the advantages of becoming a FP trainer and training practice as well as to improve the quality of training settings for FPs. PMID:23433175

  9. Skylab 2 astronauts eat space food in wardroom of Skylab trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The three members of the prime crew of the first manned Skylab mission dine on specially prepared Skylab space food in the wardromm of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer during Skylab training at the Johnson Space Center. They are, left to right, Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot; Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, pilot; and Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander.

  10. Astronaut Brand and Cosmonaut Ivanchenko in Docking Module trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronaut Vance D. Brand (foreground) and Cosmonaut Aleksandr S. Ivanchenko are seated in the Docking Module trainer in bldg 35 during Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) simulation training at JSC. Brand is the command module pilot of the American ASTP prime crew. Ivanchenko is the engineer on the Soviet ASTP fourth crew (back-up). During the exercise the American ASTP crew and the Soviet ASTP crew simulated docking the Apollo and Soyuz in Earth orbit and transferring to each other's spacecraft. This view is looking from inside the Command Module into the Docking Module. The hatchway leading into the Soyuz spacecraft orbital module mock-up is in the background.

  11. Tactics for the New Guerilla Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mershon, Phil

    2001-01-01

    Discusses tactics for surviving as a trainer in an unfriendly organizational atmosphere. Offers a method for demonstrating to managers the connection between quality assurance and employee empowerment. (JOW)

  12. Paralegal Training: Focus on Interviewing. Trainer's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Wanda R.; Donnelly, Terrence M.

    The handbook is part of a series on legal services for the elderly which can be provided by senior citizens functioning as paralegals. It is designed to assist trainers in preparing paralegals and covers the following areas: (1) planning a training program--trainees; trainers; setting; materials, equipment, and props; program content; scheduling;…

  13. Implementing a Clinical Experience for Student Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Rod

    Clinical experiences offered to students preparing to become athletic trainers at East Carolina University (North Carolina) are diverse and multiple. The program acquaints students with actual medical practices in sports medicine by allowing them to observe experienced trainers and doctors at work as well as providing opportunities for practical…

  14. Interpersonal Skills Training II: The Trainer's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Catherine; Butcher, David

    1983-01-01

    Examines the two critical functions of the interpersonal skills (IPS) trainer: (1) to analyze trainee performance and (2) to provide effective performance feedback. Discusses training styles and recommends the Causal-Analytic style. Derives guidelines for effective trainer behavior. (MEAD Subscriptions, CSML, University of Lancaster, Lancaster LA1…

  15. Facts About Drug Abuse: Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, William E.; And Others

    Following an introductory survey of the course, this modular drug abuse trainer's manual contains all course-specified materials. These materials are: the course goals and objectives; time/activity sheets; trainer guidelines, process notes, and exercise instructions; detailed lectures and supplementary information. The time/activity sheets contain…

  16. Liability, Athletic Equipment, and the Athletic Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Richard

    Standards of conduct, roles, and responsibilities expected of athletic trainers should be developed and disseminated. These guidelines could be used in court to show that the athletic trainer was following basic standards if he should be charged with liability. A review of liability cases involving athletic injuries received while athletes were…

  17. Trainers in Continuing VET: Emerging Competence Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jemeljanova, Irina

    2013-01-01

    This publication is based on the outcomes of a Cedefop study on certification processes and competence requirements supporting the professionalisation of in-company trainers. It also builds on Cedefop's work on the changing roles and professional development of VET teachers and trainers (Cedefop, 2010b; Volmari et al., 2009) and the studies…

  18. Pilot Searfoss in experiment measuring effects space flight and pilot ability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Richard A. Searfoss, pilot, participates in an experiment that measures the effects of space flight on pilot proficiency. Searfoss is conducting one of the first tests of the Portable Inflight Landing Operations Trainer (PILOT), a laptop computer loaded with software designed to create landing simulations.

  19. The Experiences of Female Athletic Trainers in the Role of the Head Athletic Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Burton, Laura; Cotrufo, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Very few women have leadership positions in athletic training (ie, head athletic training positions) in intercollegiate athletics. Research exists on the barriers to attaining the role; however, our understanding about the experiences of those currently engaged in the role is limited. Objective: To examine the experiences of female head athletic trainers as they worked toward and attained the position of head athletic trainer. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I setting. Patients or Other Participants: Eight female athletic trainers serving in the role of head athletic trainer participated in our study. The mean age of the participants was 45 ± 12 years, with 5 ± 1.5 years of experience in the role of head athletic trainer and 21 ± 10 years of experience as athletic trainers. Data Collection and Analysis: We conducted phone interviews with the 8 participants following a semistructured format. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed following a general inductive approach as described by Thomas. To establish credibility, we used a peer reviewer, member checks, and multiple-analyst triangulation. Results: Six major themes emerged from our analysis regarding the experiences of female head athletic trainers. Opportunities to become a head athletic trainer, leadership qualities, and unique personal characteristics were discussed as factors leading to the assumption of the role of the head athletic trainer. Where women hold back, family challenges, and organizational barriers speak to the potential obstacles to assuming the role of head athletic trainer. Conclusions: Female head athletic trainers did not seek the role, but through persistence and encouragement, they find themselves assuming the role. Leadership skills were discussed as important for success in the role of head athletic trainer. Life balancing and parenting were identified as barriers to women seeking the role of head athletic

  20. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers sit on flight deck of the crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup. Pilot Richard O. Covey (left) at pilot station controls and Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge (center) and MS David C. Hilmers on aft flight deck are wearing the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)). During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT shuttle mockup is located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A.

  1. Women's Perspectives of Personal Trainers: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Deana; Dail, Teresa K.; Katula, Jeffrey A.; Mustian, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Personal trainers play an integral role in the day-to-day operation of the facilities in which they work. Research has identified a number of qualities and competencies necessary to be an effective exercise leader, but there is little scholarly work addressing clients' attitudes related to the performance of personal trainers. Utilizing focus group methodology, female clients of personal trainers were recruited to provide viewpoints related to the desirable qualities of personal trainers, as well as opinions regarding trainer certification and academic preparation. Responses of the participants were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for themes. Four global themes emerged: Selection Rationale, Personal Trainer Rationale, Loyalty Rationale and Negative Characteristics. Selection Rationale consisted of qualities that influence a client's decision to hire a particular trainer (e.g., physique, results observed in other clients, social skills). Personal Trainer Rationale referred to the clients' reasons (e.g., frustration with current fitness level) for hiring a specific trainer. Loyalty Rationale referred to the credentials of a personal trainer that solidify the client/trainer relationship and Negative Characteristics referred to qualities considered unethical or unprofessional. The results suggest that undergraduate exercise science programs should devote additional time toward the development of future fitness trainers' affective qualities and that clients' would benefit from information about the credentials of personal trainers. PMID:26005398

  2. Isokinetic strength in weight-trainers.

    PubMed

    Sale, D G; MacDougall, J D

    1984-01-01

    Isokinetic strength of ankle plantarflexion (APF), knee extension (KE) and elbow extension (EE) was measured in male weight-trainers (6 power-lifters and 7 bodybuilders) and 25 untrained men of similar age and height. The weight-trainers exceeded control subjects by 21%, 25% and 73% in APF, KE and EE strength respectively. A similar pattern was obtained for limb girth, in which the weight-trainers exceeded control subjects by 6%, 13%, and 31% in calf, thigh and arm girth, respectively. Strength was similarly enhanced in the weight-trainers at the lower and higher velocities (APF 0.10, 0.63 rad X s-1, KE and EE 0.52, 3.14 rad X s-1) tested, and accounted for the positive correlation (r = 0.84) observed between low and high velocity strength. The powerlifters differed significantly from the bodybuilders only in their greater low velocity APF strength. The relatively greater enhancement of upper versus lower limb strength and muscle mass in the weight-trainers was considered in respect to training habits, trainability of different muscle groups and the state of training of muscle groups in untrained men. PMID:6542510

  3. Motivational Congruency and Discrepancy of Hawaiian Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Barton P.; Lankford, Samuel V.; Gieck, Joe H.

    1992-01-01

    Motivation is an integral part of an effective organizational management scheme. In March 1992, we sent a survey designed to assess motivational preference to all certified athletic trainers in the State of Hawaii. The population included: 6 high school athletic trainers, 10 university athletic trainers, and 9 clinic athletic trainers. The surveys were completed and returned by 80% of the population. With the exception of being an integral part of a work team (p<.05), athletic trainers in the State of Hawaii showed little discrepancy in terms of motivation. Further, there are differences among the three groups of athletic trainers in rating the importance of motivators concerning being appreciated, receiving raises, and being an integral part of a team (p< .05) Differences in motivational factors among these three groups could be influenced by the organizational structure in which the athletic trainers operate. Further investigation should include a mainland population that includes athletic trainers in professional sports and the industrial setting. PMID:16558188

  4. The German Teacher Trainers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batdi, Veli

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the aim is to identify the interpersonal self-efficacy beliefs of German teacher trainers' in Turkey. It is a descriptive survey and the population of the study consists of German teacher trainers who have worked in the seven regions of Turkey during the 2012-2013 academic year. The sample comprises 52 German teacher trainers chosen…

  5. Blood-Borne Pathogens: Guidelines for Athletic Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Athletic Training, 1995

    1995-01-01

    These guidelines cover athletic trainers and blood-borne pathogens at athletic events, student athletic trainer education, universal precautions and Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, medical records and confidentiality, infected athletic trainers, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) testing, HBV…

  6. Multiple Output Sensory Trainer (MOST). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Automated Functions, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    This final report describes the design, development, and testing of the Multiple Output Sensory Trainer (MOST), a computer-based system which enables the evaluation of students with visual impairments to determine the optimal combination of sensory adaptive aids to meet their needs. The system uses multimedia devices in conjunction with customized…

  7. The Athletic Trainer: Necessity or Luxury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weldon, Gail

    This article emphasizes the importance of including an athletic trainer who is a qualified sports medicine professional in organized school sport programs, particularly football. Educational requirements for persons who wish to go into this profession are outlined, as well as employment opportunities. (JD)

  8. Math Model for Naval Ship Handling Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golovcsenko, Igor V.

    The report describes the math model for an experimental ship handling trainer. The training task is that of a replenishment operation at sea. The model includes equations for ship dynamics of a destroyer, propeller-engine response times, ship separation, interaction effects between supply ship and destroyer, and outputs to a visual display system.…

  9. Herbal Supplements: Considerations for the Athletic Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterstein, Andrew P.; Storrs, Cordial M.

    2001-01-01

    Examines common herbal supplements, exploring potential risks associated with herbal use and providing recommendations to athletic trainers regarding patient care issues. Data from searches of the MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, CINAHL, and Academic Search Elite databases indicate that athletes must understand that natural does not equal safe, and most…

  10. Trainers in Multicultural Education: Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Masako N.; Stripp, Steven

    This three-part report describes activities of a multicultural education training project for elementary teachers in San Francisco. The three segments of the project discussed are the workshops for trainers, networking activities, and classroom evaluation activities. The two workshops, Provisioning the Multicultural Classroom and Working with…

  11. Measuring trainer fidelity in the transfer of suicide prevention training

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Wendi F.; Pisani, Anthony R.; Schmeelk-Cone, Karen; Xia, Yinglin; Tu, Xin; McMahon, Marcie; Munfakh, Jimmie Lou; Gould, Madelyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Finding effective and efficient models to train large numbers of suicide prevention interventionists, including ‘hotline’ crisis counselors, is a high priority. Train-the-trainer (TTT) models are widely used but understudied. Aims To assess the extent to which trainers following TTT delivered the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) program with fidelity, and to examine fidelity across two trainings and seven training segments. Methods We recorded and reliably rated trainer fidelity, defined as adherence to program content and competence of program delivery, for 34 newly trained ASIST trainers delivering the program to crisis center staff on two separate occasions. A total of 324 observations were coded. Trainer demographics were also collected. Results On average, trainers delivered two-thirds of the program. Previous training was associated with lower levels of trainer adherence to the program. 18% of trainers' observations were rated as solidly competent. Trainers did not improve fidelity from their first to second training. Significantly higher fidelity was found for lectures and lower fidelity was found for interactive training activities including asking about suicide and creating a safe plan. Conclusions We found wide variability in trainer fidelity to the ASIST program following TTT and few trainers had high levels of both adherence and competence. More research is needed to examine the cost-effectiveness of TTT models. PMID:24901061

  12. A robotic wheelchair trainer: design overview and a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Experiencing independent mobility is important for children with a severe movement disability, but learning to drive a powered wheelchair can be labor intensive, requiring hand-over-hand assistance from a skilled therapist. Methods To improve accessibility to training, we developed a robotic wheelchair trainer that steers itself along a course marked by a line on the floor using computer vision, haptically guiding the driver's hand in appropriate steering motions using a force feedback joystick, as the driver tries to catch a mobile robot in a game of "robot tag". This paper provides a detailed design description of the computer vision and control system. In addition, we present data from a pilot study in which we used the chair to teach children without motor impairment aged 4-9 (n = 22) to drive the wheelchair in a single training session, in order to verify that the wheelchair could enable learning by the non-impaired motor system, and to establish normative values of learning rates. Results and Discussion Training with haptic guidance from the robotic wheelchair trainer improved the steering ability of children without motor impairment significantly more than training without guidance. We also report the results of a case study with one 8-year-old child with a severe motor impairment due to cerebral palsy, who replicated the single-session training protocol that the non-disabled children participated in. This child also improved steering ability after training with guidance from the joystick by an amount even greater than the children without motor impairment. Conclusions The system not only provided a safe, fun context for automating driver's training, but also enhanced motor learning by the non-impaired motor system, presumably by demonstrating through intuitive movement and force of the joystick itself exemplary control to follow the course. The case study indicates that a child with a motor system impaired by CP can also gain a short-term benefit

  13. Pilot workload prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepitone, David D.; Shively, Robert J.; Bortolussi, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    A predicting model of pilot workload is developed using a time-based algorithm, work-load values from previous research, and experimental data obtained by a group of experienced pilots on a Singer-Link Gat-1 instrument trainer with three degrees of motion (roll, pitch, and yaw). Each pilot performed three experimental flights presented in a counterbalanced order; each flight consisted of short, medium, or long cruise and initial approach segments. Results strongly suggest that pilots were more sensitive to the rate at which work was done than to the total amount of work accomplished. The result of predictions obtained with the model showed that the time-weighted average of the component work-load ratings were able to predict the obtained work-load ratings accurately.

  14. Personal Trainer Demographics, Current Practice Trends and Common Trainee Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Waryasz, Gregory R.; Daniels, Alan H.; Gil, Joseph A.; Suric, Vladimir; Eberson, Craig P.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on maintaining a healthy lifestyle has led many individuals to seek advice on exercise from personal trainers. There are few studies to date that evaluate personal trainer education, practice trends, and injuries they have seen while training clients. A survey was distributed to personal trainers using Survey Monkey® (Palo Alto, CA, USA) with 605 personal trainers accessing the survey. An exercise related bachelor’s degree was held by 64.2% of survey participants and a certification in personal training by 89.0%. The most common personal trainer certifications were from American College of Sports Medicine (59.2%) and National Strength and Conditioning Association (28.9%). Only 2.9% of all personal trainers surveyed had no exercise-related bachelor’s degree and no personal trainer certification. The most common injuries seen by personal trainers during sessions were lumbar muscle strain (10.7%), rotator cuff tear/tendonitis (8.9%), shin splints (8.1%), ankle sprain (7.5%), and cervical muscle strain (7.4%). There is variability in the practices between different personal trainers when analyzing differences in collegiate education, personal trainer certifications, and strength and conditioning certifications. The clinical implication of the differences in practices is unknown as to the impact on injuries or exercise prescription effectiveness. PMID:27761219

  15. Vision Trainer Teaches Focusing Techniques at Home

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Based on work Stanford Research Institute did for Ames Research Center, Joseph Trachtman developed a vision trainer to treat visual focusing problems in the 1980s. In 2014, Trachtman, operating out of Seattle, released a home version of the device called the Zone-Trac. The inventor has found the biofeedback process used by the technology induces an alpha-wave brain state, causing increased hand-eye coordination and reaction times, among other effects

  16. Design of Multimedia Situational Awareness Training for Pilots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homan, Willem J.

    1998-01-01

    A recent development in aviation is the personal computer aviation training device (PC-ATD). This article provides an overview of instructional multimedia for pilot training, specifically for enhancing situational awareness (SA), a state in which a pilot's perceptions match reality. Discusses how PC-based trainers can be used to familiarize pilots…

  17. Seals, seal trainers, and mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P J; Cousins, D V; Gow, B L; Collins, D M; Williamson, B H; Dagnia, H T

    1993-01-01

    In 1986, three seals died in a marine park in Western Australia; culture of postmortem tissue suggested infection with Mycobacterium bovis. In 1988, a seal trainer who had been employed at the Western Australian marine park until 1985 developed pulmonary tuberculosis caused by M. bovis while working in a zoo 3,000 km away on the east coast of Australia. Culture characteristics, biochemical behavior, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and restriction endonuclease analysis suggested that the strains of M. bovis infecting the seals and trainer were identical but unique and differed from reference strains and local cattle strains of M. bovis. The infection in both the seals and the trainer had a destructive but indolent course. This is the first time that M. bovis has been observed in seals and the first time that tuberculous infection has been documented to be transmitted from seals to humans. Further investigation of the extent of tuberculous infection in seal populations elsewhere in the world seems warranted, and those working with seals and other marine animals should be monitored for infection. PMID:8420412

  18. Cardiac Structure and Function in Weight Trainers Runners, and Runner/Weight Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, Barbara A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Study compared cardiac structure and function in adult male weight trainers, runners, and those who did both. Results indicate men who run or weight train and run have similar heart structural and functional characteristics and greater relative internal diameter and left ventricular wall thickness than men who only weight train. (SM)

  19. Supervising Athletic Trainers' Perceptions of Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainers' Professional Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrasher, Ashley B.; Walker, Stacy E.; Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Recent debate has ensued regarding the readiness of newly credentialed athletic trainers (ATs) to function as independent clinicians. Some ATs believe the professional preparation of athletic training students is not adequate. Objective: To describe supervisors' perceptions regarding the preparation of college graduate assistants (GAs) to…

  20. The Teacher Trainer, A Practical Journal Mainly for Modern Language Teacher Trainers, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The three issues of the journal on second language teacher education include these articles: "Monitoring and Evaluating the Production of Materials on a Large Scale Trainer Training Workshop" (R. Williams, Choong Kam Foong, Diana Lubelska); Sensory Channels in ESL Instruction" (Michael E. Rudder); "Using the In-Service Feedback Session To Promote…

  1. The Teacher Trainer: A Practical Journal Mainly for Modern Language Teacher Trainers, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This document consists of the three issues of the serial "The Teacher Trainer" issued during 1992. Articles include: "Resistance to Change in Teacher Training Courses"; "Teacher Training Games Series: Game 6: Language Bridge"; "How Trainees Can Provide a Resource for Staff Development"; "Do Unto Them As They Are To Do Unto Others"; "Maximizing…

  2. 24 CFR 3286.305 - Installation trainer criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... qualified trainer, a person must meet the experience requirements of this section. (2) Any entity other than... trainers meet the requirements of this section. (b) Experience prerequisites. In order to qualify as a... be responsible for providing training: (1) Has a minimum of 3,600 hours of experience in one or...

  3. The ADA and Persons with Cognitive Disabilities. Trainer's Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Ithaca. School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell Univ.

    This comprehensive trainer's guide and participant manual are designed to provide a planning process through which training programs on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its implications for persons with cognitive disabilities can be developed and delivered in a systematic way. Module 1 of the trainer's guide, "Planning and…

  4. Anhydrous Ammonia Training Module. Trainer's Package. Participant's Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, Bart; And Others

    This document contains a trainer's and a participant's package for teaching employees on site safe handling procedures for working with anhydrous ammonia, especially on farms. The trainer's package includes the following: a description of the module; a competency; objectives; suggested instructional aids; a training outline (or lesson plan) for…

  5. The Student Trainer Clinical Experience at Lock Haven State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasi, David

    An integral part of the clinical experience for athletic trainers at Lock Haven State College (Pennsylvania) is training in first aid and learning to evaluate not only sport-related injuries but all injuries. Thorough knowledge is expected of athletic trainers in the areas of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, first aid, and treatment of…

  6. A joint course for general practitioner and practice nurse trainers.

    PubMed Central

    Bolden, K J; Lewis, A P

    1990-01-01

    An experimental multidisciplinary course for prospective general practitioner and practice nurse trainers is described. Factual knowledge and attitudes were measured before and after the course and some of the changes measured emphasized the importance of multidisciplinary training. The ideas generated by the group of nurse trainers in terms of their future professional development were identified. PMID:2265007

  7. 24 CFR 3286.303 - Responsibilities of qualified trainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-Administered States § 3286.303 Responsibilities of qualified trainers. (a) Curriculum and hours. In providing... program, qualified trainers must adequately address the curriculum and instruction-time requirements... compliance with the applicable curriculum and time requirements under subparts C and D of this part....

  8. 24 CFR 3286.303 - Responsibilities of qualified trainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-Administered States § 3286.303 Responsibilities of qualified trainers. (a) Curriculum and hours. In providing... program, qualified trainers must adequately address the curriculum and instruction-time requirements... compliance with the applicable curriculum and time requirements under subparts C and D of this part....

  9. Astronaut William Gregory practices with PILOT laptop computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut William G. Gregory, pilot for STS-67 mission, moves a control stick with his hands and monitors a landing scenario on his computer screen aboard the Earth orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. This activity measures the effects of space flight on pilot proficiency and is supported by the Portable Inflight Landing Operations Trainer (PILOT). The control stick is positioned near the primary stick which controls the Orbiter's maneuvers.

  10. Athletic Trainers Can Impact Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Kathie S.

    1994-01-01

    With increasing numbers of athletic trainers working in nontraditional settings and the recognition of athletic trainers as allied health professionals, it is important that athletic trainers be knowledgeable about the health risks facing the nation in the 90s. Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives contains 300 health objectives for the nation for the year 2000. Athletic trainers have a unique opportunity to assist other health professionals in implementing these health objectives and improving the quality of life of the citizens of the United States. In this article, I present a sample of the 300 health objectives for the nation and make suggestions regarding how athletic trainers can assist in the achievement and implementation of the objectives. PMID:16558286

  11. (Ga(0.71)B(0.29))PO(4) with a high-cristobalite-type structure refined from powder data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Xi; Liu, Jin-You; Mi, Jin-Xiao; Zhao, Jing-Tai

    2010-01-01

    Gallium boron phosphate, (Ga(0.71)B(0.29))PO(4), was synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure is isostructural with the tetra-gonal high-cristobalite structure with space group P which is built from alternating Ga(B)O(4) and PO(4) tetra-hedra inter-connected by sharing the common O-atom vertices, resulting in a three-dimensional structure with two-dimensional six-membered-ring tunnels running along the a and b axes. PMID:21579590

  12. Lessons from a Train-the-Trainer Professional Development Program: The Sustainable Trainer Engagement Program (STEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupla, Christine; Gladney, Alicia; Dalton, Heather; LaConte, Keliann; Truxillo, Jeannette; Shipp, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    The Sustainable Trainer Engagement Program (STEP) is a modified train-the-trainer professional development program being conducted by the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI). STEP has provided two cohorts of 6-8th grade science specialists and lead teachers in the Houston region with in-depth Earth and Space Science (ESS) content, activities, and pedagogy over 15 days each, aligned with Texas science standards. This project has two over-arching goals: to improve middle school ESS instruction, and to create and test an innovative model for Train-the-Trainer.This poster will share details regarding STEP’s activities and resources, program achievements, and its main findings to date. STEP is being evaluated by external evaluators at the Research Institute of Texas, part of the Harris County Department of Education. External evaluation shows an increase after one year in STEP participants’ knowledge (cohort 1 showed a 10% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase), confidence in teaching Earth and Space Science effectively (cohort 1 demonstrated a 10% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase), and confidence in preparing other teachers (cohort 1 demonstrated a 12% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase). By September 2015, STEP participants led (or assisted in leading) approximately 40 workshops for about 1800 science teachers in Texas. Surveys of teachers attending professional development conducted by STEP participants show very positive responses, with averages for conference workshop evaluations ranging from 3.6 on a 4 point scale, and other evaluations averaging from 4.1 to 5.0 on a 5 point scale.Main lessons for the team on the train-the-trainer model include: a lack of confidence by leaders in K-12 science education in presenting ESS professional development, difficulties in arranging for school or district content-specific professional development, the minimal duration of most school and district professional development sessions, and uncertainties in

  13. Accuracy of Athletic Trainer and Physician Diagnoses in Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Nicholas J; Tucker, Bradford; Freedman, Kevin B; Austin, Luke S; Eck, Brandon; Pepe, Matthew; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P

    2016-09-01

    It is standard practice in high school athletic programs for certified athletic trainers to evaluate and treat injured student athletes. In some cases, a trainer refers an athlete to a physician for definitive medical management. This study was conducted to determine the rate of agreement between athletic trainers and physicians regarding assessment of injuries in student athletes. All high school athletes who were injured between 2010 and 2012 at 5 regional high schools were included in a research database. All patients who were referred for physician evaluation and treatment were identified and included in this analysis. A total of 286 incidents met the inclusion criteria. A total of 263 (92%) of the athletic trainer assessments and physician diagnoses were in agreement. In the 23 cases of disagreement, fractures and sprains were the most common injuries. Kappa analysis showed the highest interrater agreement in injuries classified as dislocations and concussions and the lowest interrater agreement in meniscal/labral injuries and fractures. In the absence of a confirmed diagnosis, agreement among health care providers can be used to infer accuracy. According to this principle, as agreement between athletic trainers and physicians improves, there is a greater likelihood of arriving at the correct assessment and treatment plan. Athletic trainers are highly skilled professionals who are well trained in the evaluation of athletic injuries. The current study showed that additional training in identifying fractures may be beneficial to athletic trainers and the athletes they treat. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e944-e949.]. PMID:27398784

  14. Next Generation Flight Controller Trainer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Scott; Barry, Matthew R.; Benton, Isaac; Bishop, Michael M.; Evans, Steven; Harvey, Jason; King, Timothy; Martin, Jacob; Mercier, Al; Miller, Walt; Payne, Dan L.; Phu, Hanh; Thompson, James C.; Aadsen, Ron

    2008-01-01

    The Next Generation Flight Controller Trainer (NGFCT) is a relatively inexpensive system of hardware and software that provides high-fidelity training for spaceshuttle flight controllers. NGFCT provides simulations into which are integrated the behaviors of emulated space-shuttle vehicle onboard general-purpose computers (GPCs), mission-control center (MCC) displays, and space-shuttle systems as represented by high-fidelity shuttle mission simulator (SMS) mathematical models. The emulated GPC computers enable the execution of onboard binary flight-specific software. The SMS models include representations of system malfunctions that can be easily invoked. The NGFCT software has a flexible design that enables independent updating of its GPC, SMS, and MCC components.

  15. Virtual Airway Skills Trainer (VAST) Simulator

    PubMed Central

    DEMIREL, Doga; YU, Alexander; HALIC, Tansel; SANKARANARAYANAN, Ganesh; RYASON, Adam; SPINDLER, David; BUTLER, Kathryn L.; CAO, Caroline; PETRUSA, Emil; MOLINA, Marcos; JONES, Dan; DE, Suvranu; DEMOYA, Marc; JONES, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of Virtual Airway Skill Trainer (VAST) tasks. The simulated tasks are a part of two main airway management techniques; Endotracheal Intubation (ETI) and Cricothyroidotomy (CCT). ETI is a simple nonsurgical airway management technique, while CCT is the extreme surgical alternative to secure the airway of a patient. We developed identification of Mallampati class, finding the optimal angle for positioning pharyngeal/mouth axes tasks for ETI and identification of anatomical landmarks and incision tasks for CCT. Both ETI and CCT simulators were used to get physicians’ feedback at Society for Education in Anesthesiology and Association for Surgical Education spring meetings. In this preliminary validation study, total 38 participants for ETI and 48 for CCT performed each simulation task and completed pre and post questionnaires. In this work, we present the details of the simulation for the tasks and also the analysis of the collected data from the validation study. PMID:27046559

  16. Emergency Management Computer-Aided Trainer (EMCAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, R. C.; Johnson, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The Emergency Management Computer-Aided Trainer (EMCAT) developed by Essex Corporation or NASA and the Federal Emergency Management Administration's (FEMA) National Fire Academy (NFA) is described. It is a computer based training system for fire fighting personnel. A prototype EMCAT system was developed by NASA first using video tape images and then video disk images when the technology became available. The EMCAT system is meant to fill the training needs of the fire fighting community with affordable state-of-the-art technologies. An automated real time simulation of the fire situation was needed to replace the outdated manual training methods currently being used. In order to be successful, this simulator had to provide realism, be user friendly, be affordable, and support multiple scenarios. The EMCAT system meets these requirements and therefore represents an innovative training tool, not only for the fire fighting community, but also for the needs of other disciplines.

  17. Characterizations of a Quality Certified Athletic Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Scot; Wolfe, Brent D.; Gould, Trenton E.; Piland, Scott G.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Didactic proficiency does not ensure clinical aptitude. Quality athletic health care requires clinical knowledge and affective traits. Objective: To develop a grounded theory explaining the constructs of a quality certified athletic trainer (AT). Design: Delphi study. Setting: Interviews in conference rooms or business offices and by telephone. Patients or Other Participants: Thirteen ATs (men = 8, women = 5) stratified across the largest employment settings (high school, college, clinical) in the 4 largest districts of the National Athletic Trainers' Association (2, 3, 4, 9). Data Collection and Analysis: Open-ended interview questions were audio recorded, transcribed, and reviewed before condensing. Two member checks ensured trustworthiness. Open coding reduced text to descriptive adjectives. Results: We grouped adjectives into 5 constructs (care, communication, commitment, integrity, knowledge) and grouped these constructs into 2 higher-order constructs (affective traits, effective traits). Conclusions: According to participants, ATs who demonstrate the ability to care, show commitment and integrity, value professional knowledge, and communicate effectively with others can be identified as quality ATs. These abilities facilitate the creation of positive relationships. These relationships allow the quality AT to interact with patients and other health care professionals on a knowledgeable basis that ultimately improves health care delivery. Our resulting theory supported the examination of characteristics not traditionally assessed in an athletic training education program. If researchers can show that these characteristics develop ATs into quality ATs (eg, those who work better with others, relate meaningfully with patients, and improve the standard of health care), they must be cultivated in the educational setting. PMID:22488194

  18. Auscultation of the Chest and Abdomen by Athletic Trainers.

    PubMed

    McChesney, John A.; McChesney, John W.

    2001-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a practical overview of the methods and techniques of auscultation of the chest and abdomen for use during the physical examination of athletes. Our intent is to provide information on this clinical technique to assist athletic trainers in recognizing and referring athletes presenting with potentially serious internal organ conditions. BACKGROUND: Use of the stethoscope is a clinical skill increasingly necessary for athletic trainers. Given the expanding breadth of both the assessment techniques used by athletic trainers and the populations they care for and the fact that clinical instruction guidelines have changed in the newly adopted National Athletic Trainers' Association Educational Competencies, our goal is to provide a framework upon which future instruction can be based. DESCRIPTION: This review covers the use of a stethoscope for auscultation of the chest and abdomen. Auscultation of the heart is covered first, followed by techniques for auscultating the breath sounds. Lastly, auscultation of the abdomen describes techniques for listening for bowel sounds and arterial bruits. CLINICAL ADVANTAGES: During the assessment of injuries to and illnesses of athletes, knowledge of auscultatory techniques is valuable and of increasing importance to athletic trainers. Athletic trainers who do not know how to perform auscultation may fail to recognize, and therefore fail to refer for further evaluation, athletes with potentially serious pathologic conditions.

  19. An Onboard ISS Virtual Reality Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miralles, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Prior to the retirement of the Space Shuttle, many exterior repairs on the International Space Station (ISS) were carried out by shuttle astronauts, trained on the ground and flown to the Station to perform these specific repairs. With the retirement of the shuttle, this is no longer an available option. As such, the need for ISS crew members to review scenarios while on flight, either for tasks they already trained for on the ground or for contingency operations has become a very critical issue. NASA astronauts prepare for Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) or Spacewalks through numerous training media, such as: self-study, part task training, underwater training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), hands-on hardware reviews and training at the Virtual Reality Laboratory (VRLab). In many situations, the time between the last session of a training and an EVA task might be 6 to 8 months. EVA tasks are critical for a mission and as time passes the crew members may lose proficiency on previously trained tasks and their options to refresh or learn a new skill while on flight are limited to reading training materials and watching videos. In addition, there is an increased need for unplanned contingency repairs to fix problems arising as the Station ages. In order to help the ISS crew members maintain EVA proficiency or train for contingency repairs during their mission, the Johnson Space Center's VRLab designed an immersive ISS Virtual Reality Trainer (VRT). The VRT incorporates a unique optical system that makes use of the already successful Dynamic On-board Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) software to assist crew members with procedure reviews and contingency EVAs while on board the Station. The need to train and re-train crew members for EVAs and contingency scenarios is crucial and extremely demanding. ISS crew members are now asked to perform EVA tasks for which they have not been trained and potentially have never seen before. The Virtual Reality Trainer (VRT

  20. Supervising Athletic Trainers' Perceptions of Professional Socialization of Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainers in the Collegiate Setting

    PubMed Central

    Thrasher, Ashley B.; Walker, Stacy E.; Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Many newly credentialed athletic trainers gain initial employment as graduate assistants (GAs) in the collegiate setting, yet their socialization into their role is unknown. Exploring the socialization process of GAs in the collegiate setting could provide insight into how that process occurs. Objective: To explore the professional socialization of GAs in the collegiate setting to determine how GAs are socialized and developed as athletic trainers. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Individual phone interviews. Patients or Other Participants: Athletic trainers (N = 21) who had supervised GAs in the collegiate setting for a minimum of 8 years (16 men [76%], 5 women [24%]; years of supervision experience = 14.6 ± 6.6). Data Collection and Analysis: Data were collected via phone interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed by a 4-person consensus team with a consensual qualitative-research design. The team independently coded the data and compared ideas until a consensus was reached, and a codebook was created. Trustworthiness was established through member checks and multianalyst triangulation. Results: Four themes emerged: (1) role orientation, (2) professional development and support, (3) role expectations, and (4) success. Role orientation occurred both formally (eg, review of policies and procedures) and informally (eg, immediate role immersion). Professional development and support consisted of the supervisor mentoring and intervening when appropriate. Role expectations included decision-making ability, independent practice, and professionalism; however, supervisors often expected GAs to function as experienced, full-time staff. Success of the GAs depended on their adaptability and on the proper selection of GAs by supervisors. Conclusions: Supervisors socialize GAs into the collegiate setting by providing orientation, professional development, mentoring, and intervention when necessary. Supervisors are encouraged to

  1. Training Analysis of P-3 Replacement Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Robert F.; And Others

    The report covers an evaluation of current P-3 pilot training programs at the replacement squadron level. It contains detailed discussions concerning training hardware and software that have been supplied. A detailed examination is made of the curriculum and the simulation capabilities and utilization of P-3 operational flight trainers. Concurrent…

  2. T-4G Methodology: Undergraduate Pilot Training T-37 Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Robert R.; And Others

    The report's brief introduction describes the application of T-4G methodology to the T-37 instrument phase of undergraduate pilot training. The methodology is characterized by instruction in trainers, proficiency advancement, a highly structured syllabus, the training manager concept, early exposure to instrument training, and hands-on training.…

  3. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Hilmers, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, slides out CCT side hatch on his back via platform extension. Astronaut Steven R. Nagel, who has served as both mission specialist and pilot on two previous missions, briefs Hilmers. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  4. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Covey, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and communications carrier assembly (CCA), pulls himself up onto flight deck from the middeck through the interdeck access hatch. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT is in launch (vertical) position therefore the aft middeck bulkhead becomes the floor (note technician at the side hatch).

  5. STS-26 crew trains in JSC full fuselage trainer (FFT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers are briefed during a training exercise in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Seated outside the open side hatch of the full fuselage trainer (FFT) (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, and Pilot Richard O. Covey. Looking on at right are Astronaut Office Chief Daniel C. Brandenstein (standing) and astronaut James P. Bagian. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  6. STS-26 crew trains in JSC full fuselage trainer (FFT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers are briefed during a training exercise in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Seated outside the open side hatch of the full fuselage trainer (FFT) (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, and Pilot Richard O. Covey. Astronaut Steven R. Nagel (left), positioned in the open side hatch, briefs the crew on the pole escape system as he demonstrates some related equipment. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. The photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  7. Development of a Burn Escharotomy Assessment Tool: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ur, Rebecca; Holmes, James H; Johnson, James E; Molnar, Joseph A; Carter, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn injuries can require escharotomies which are urgent, infrequent, and relatively high-risk procedures necessary to preserve limb perfusion and sometimes ventilation. The American Burn Association Advanced Burn Life Support© course educates surgeons and emergency providers about escharotomy incisions but lacks a biomimetic trainer to demonstrate, practice, or provide assessment. The goal was to build an affordable biomimetic trainer with discrete points of failure and pilot a validation study. Fellowship-trained burn and plastic surgeons worked with special effect artists and anatomists to develop a biomimetic trainer with three discrete points of failure: median or ulnar nerve injury, fasciotomy, and failure to check distal pulse. Participants were divided between experienced and inexperienced, survey pre- and post-procedure on a biomimetic model while being timed. The trainer total cost per participant was less than $35. Eighteen participants were involved in the study. The inexperienced (0-1 prior escharotomies performed) had significantly more violations at the discrete points of failure relative to more experienced participants (P = .036). Face validity was assessed with 100% of participants agreement that the model appeared similar to real life and was valuable in their training. Given the advancements in biomimetic models and the need to train surgeons in how to perform infrequent, emergent surgical procedures, an escharotomy trainer is needed today. The authors developed an affordable model with a successful pilot study demonstrating discrimination between experienced and inexperienced surgeons. Additional research is needed to increase the reliability and assessment metrics.

  8. An Onboard ISS Virtual Reality Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miralles, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Prior to the retirement of the Space Shuttle, many exterior repairs on the International Space Station (ISS) were carried out by shuttle astronauts, trained on the ground and flown to the station to perform these repairs. After the retirement of the shuttle, this is no longer an available option. As such, the need for the ISS crew members to review scenarios while on flight, either for tasks they already trained or for contingency operations has become a very critical subject. In many situations, the time between the last session of Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) training and an Extravehicular Activity (EVA) task might be 6 to 8 months. In order to help with training for contingency repairs and to maintain EVA proficiency while on flight, the Johnson Space Center Virtual Reality Lab (VRLab) designed an onboard immersive ISS Virtual Reality Trainer (VRT), incorporating a unique optical system and making use of the already successful Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphical (DOUG) graphics software, to assist crew members with current procedures and contingency EVAs while on flight. The VRT provides an immersive environment similar to the one experienced at the VRLab crew training facility at NASA Johnson Space Center. EVA tasks are critical for a mission since as time passes the crew members may lose proficiency on previously trained tasks. In addition, there is an increased need for unplanned contingency repairs to fix problems arising as the ISS ages. The need to train and re-train crew members for EVAs and contingency scenarios is crucial and extremely demanding. ISS crew members are now asked to perform EVA tasks for which they have not been trained and potentially have never seen before.

  9. Wound Care Management: Proper Protocol Differs From Athletic Trainers' Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    As research techniques in wound care management improve, treatment protocols for the care of wounds must also change to ensure safe and optimal healing. In this study, I surveyed current practices of athletic trainers regarding the care of athletic wounds and compared the findings to current literature. I contacted 501 athletic trainers, including all NATA curricular undergraduate directors. Overall response rate was 58%; 78% of the athletic trainers from the curricular schools responded. Wet-to-dry, irrigation, and soaks were the three most common methods used to debride and cleanse a wound. Povidone-iodine (Betadine) and hydrogen peroxide were the two most popular cleansing agents. Conventional gauze was the primary dressing used by 67% of the athletic trainers, while 20% of those surveyed used occlusive dressings. Although povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide are commonly used, both are toxic to cells involved in the wound-healing process and delay healing. Research indicates that the best method of cleansing and debriding a wound is to irrigate it with saline. Occlusive dressings have a lower infection rate, are viral barriers, and are associated with faster wound healing and less pain than gauze dressings. Athletic trainers need to assess their wound care protocols so that they give the best possible care to their athletes. PMID:16558365

  10. Trainers' Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, M.; Castrén, M.; Nurmi, J.; Niemi-Murola, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers' attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D), Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N = 185) focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree). Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse's Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation). Cronbach's alphas were 0.92–0.51. Statistics were Student's t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p < 0.01). Participants scoring high on Hesitation scale (p < 0.01) were less confident about their Nurse's Role (p < 0.01) and Nontechnical Skills (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Quality of undergraduate education affects the work of CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills. PMID:27144027

  11. STS 51-E crew is briefed on the Shuttle full fuselage trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    STS 51-E crew is briefed on the Shuttle full fuselage trainer. Astronauts Dave Griggs (foreground), Jean Loup Chretien (behind Griggs) and Jeff Hoffman are being shown the workings of the trainer by flight instructors.

  12. Motivational Congruency and Discrepancy Between Certified Athletic Trainers and Noncertified Student Athletic Trainers in the State of Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Barton P.; Lankford, Samuel V.; Noda, Laurie S.

    1992-01-01

    In March 1992, a survey to assess motivational preference was sent to all certified athletic trainers who were practicing in the State of Hawaii and all noncertified student athletic trainers who were enrolled in the athletic training curriculum at the University of Hawaii. The return rate was 80% for certified athletic trainers and 100% for student athletic trainers. The findings of the study indicated that a motivational discrepancy exists for the following motivational stems: freedom on the job, job growth, benefits and wages, being appreciated, helping the organization obtain goals, receiving raises, being an integral part of the work team, job security, and feedback on job performance (p <.05). Further, the study indicated differences in rating the importance of motivators between the certified and the student athletic trainers concerning freedom on the job, opportunity for advancement, benefits and wages, and job security (p <.05). The differences in motivational factors between the two groups indicated that the students are more concerned with intrinsic types of motivators and less concerned with extrinsic rewards. Further investigation needs to include mainland populations and students in approved/accredited curriculums. PMID:16558187

  13. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Management of Sport Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Broglio, Steven P.; Cantu, Robert C.; Gioia, Gerard A.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Kutcher, Jeffrey; Palm, Michael; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To provide athletic trainers, physicians, and other health care professionals with best-practice guidelines for the management of sport-related concussions. Background: An estimated 3.8 million concussions occur each year in the United States as a result of sport and physical activity. Athletic trainers are commonly the first medical providers available onsite to identify and evaluate these injuries. Recommendations: The recommendations for concussion management provided here are based on the most current research and divided into sections on education and prevention, documentation and legal aspects, evaluation and return to play, and other considerations. PMID:24601910

  14. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zinder, Steven M.; Basler, Rodney S. W.; Foley, Jack; Scarlata, Chris; Vasily, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, education, and management of skin infections in athletes. Background: Trauma, environmental factors, and infectious agents act together to continually attack the integrity of the skin. Close quarters combined with general poor hygiene practices make athletes particularly vulnerable to contracting skin diseases. An understanding of basic prophylactic measures, clinical features, and swift management of common skin diseases is essential for certified athletic trainers to aid in preventing the spread of infectious agents. Recommendations: These guidelines are intended to provide relevant information on skin infections and to give specific recommendations for certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care. PMID:20617918

  15. Adult Trainers in Greece: Qualifications, Teaching Effectiveness, and Competency-Based Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinia, Vasiliki; Kritikos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the research has been to investigate the views of adult education trainers with regards to the qualifications which form part of the "effective adult trainer profile." Trainers in Adult Education were asked to express their views on the specific qualifications (e.g. work experience, studies, etc.) which increase (and to…

  16. Advanced Trainers Development Workshop (Islamabad, Pakistan, July 7-26, 1990). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.; Arney, Barbara S.

    Materials are provided from a 3-week workshop with 18 participants that was designed to prepare competent Pakistani trainers of trainers. The final report describes the Advanced Trainers Development Workshop (ATDW) design, development of participant and instructor manuals, participant selection and self-assessments, and participant presentations.…

  17. Managing Your Medical Resources: An Opportunity for the National Athletic Trainers Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hite, Roger W.

    Athletic trainers, whether or not they are university-based, should link themselves and their programs to the traditional medical community. A harmful communication gap now exists between athletic trainers and other medical professionals as a result of differences in value systems, clientele, and professional image. Trainers should market…

  18. OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR FROM FIRST FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR FROM FIRST FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, SUPPORTS AND FOUNDATION BLOCKS. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR AT SECOND FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR AT SECOND FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING CONTROL CENTER CAB. VIEW FACING WEST/NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Trainer's Guide to Blocks: A Creative Curriculum for Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Diane Trister

    This trainer's guide is designed for day care center directors and others responsible for teacher training and parent education who wish to develop and present workshops based on the manual "Blocks - A Creative Curriculum for Early Childhood." The guide is divided into five sections, called "sessions," which correspond to the first five chapters…

  1. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Fluid Replacement for Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Hillman, Susan K.; Montain, Scott J.; Reiff, Ralph V.; Rich, Brent S. E.; Roberts, William O.; Stone, Jennifer A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents recommendations from the National Athletic Trainers Association for optimizing the fluid replacement practices of athletes, explaining that dehydration can compromise athletic performance and increase the risk of exertional heat injury. Athletes must be educated about the risks of dehydration and overhydration. They must learn fluid…

  2. Virtual Environment Training: Auxiliary Machinery Room (AMR) Watchstation Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hriber, Dennis C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a project implemented at Newport News Shipbuilding that used Virtual Environment Training to improve the performance of submarine crewmen. Highlights include development of the Auxiliary Machine Room (AMR) Watchstation Trainer; Digital Video Interactive (DVI); screen layout; test design and evaluation; user reactions; authoring language;…

  3. Designing Training Programmes for EIU and ESD: A Trainer's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNESCO Bangkok, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The training guide is based on a TOT (Training of Trainer) workshop conducted in September 2005 in Chiangmai, Thailand jointly by Asia Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding (APCEIU) and UNESCO's Asia Pacific Programme of Educational Innovation for Development (APEID). The publication provides a comprehensive guide to trainers…

  4. The Somali Oyster--Training the Trainers in TEFL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Julian

    1985-01-01

    Describes a situation which raises problems for in-service training in teaching English as a foreign language and discusses a suggested procedure for dealing with the problem. Argues that the procedure for training the trainers should be the same as that for training the teachers and for teaching the language students. (SED)

  5. Management of Cerebral Concussion in Sports: The Athletic Trainer's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliaro, Scott; Anderson, Scott; Hooker, Dan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a new approach in the evaluation and management of concussions from the athletic trainer's perspective. This quantifiable assessment technique provides more information on which return-to-play decisions can be made based on the athlete's symptoms and performance on objective tests. It can be used during initial sideline examinations as…

  6. Tools for Tomorrow: Women in the Trades. Trainer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Area Technical Coll., WI.

    This guide is intended for use by trainers presenting the Tools for Tomorrow program, a technical college program to train women for employment in 13 skilled trades. Discussed in the first two sections are these topics: the program's purposes, barriers encountered by women seeking to enter trades, and various aspects of implementing the Tools for…

  7. New Careers Positions Descriptions: Sourcebook for Trainers, Entry Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Jacob R.; And Others

    Intended to assist in the development phase of New Careers program development, this trainer's sourcebook contains: (1) descriptions of 44 entry level positions in the major human services fields, including explanations of such elements as position title, introduction and general description, position control, duties, responsibilities, and…

  8. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Emergency Planning in Athletics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, J. C.; Courson, Ronald W.; Kleiner, Douglas M.; McLoda, Todd A.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a position statement by the National Athletic Trainers' Association on emergency planning in athletics, examining the professional and legal importance of emergency plans and looking at components of emergency plans, which include implementation, personnel, equipment, communication, transportation, venue location, emergency care…

  9. Basic Techniques of Blacksmithing: A Manual for Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Pete; And Others

    Designed for trainers of Peace Corps Volunteers, this guide contains instructional materials for a training program in basic blacksmithing skills. The objective is to give volunteers a knowledge of metals and metalworking that will help them support rural communities in developing countries in their efforts to produce tools for agricultural and…

  10. New Careers: The Teacher Aide. A Manual for Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Sheldon S.; Fishman, Jacob R.

    This manual is intended for use by trainers of teacher aides in New Careers programs (which focus on training the unemployed and/or underemployed for entry-level placement as nonprofessionals in human service occupations). An introductory chapter considers the qualifications of the training team, qualifications of the trainee, the function and job…

  11. Social Conflict and Negotiative Problem Solving. Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth, Gretchen A.; And Others

    This document is a trainer manual for a five-day workshop on social conflict and negotiative problem solving. Objectives of the workshop include an understanding of (1) personal orientation to conflict; (2) differences between collaborative, negotiative, and win-lose conflict-solving strategies; (3) in-depth conditions and processes for successful…

  12. 24 CFR 3286.303 - Responsibilities of qualified trainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION PROGRAM Training of Installers in HUD... program, qualified trainers must adequately address the curriculum and instruction-time requirements... of the times, locations, names of attendees at each session, and content of all courses offered....

  13. The Teacher Trainer. Volume Five, Numbers One, Two, and Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Three 1991 issues of a British journal for modern language teacher trainers are provided. Articles include the following: "Perspectives on the In-service Training Needs of Non-native Speaking Teachers of English to Youth Learners" (Jennifer Jarvis); "Royal Society of Arts Certificate Trainees Speak Out" (Mario Rinvolucri); "Medical Education as…

  14. Just-in-Time Web Searches for Trainers & Adult Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, James J.

    Trainers and adult educators often need to quickly locate quality information on the World Wide Web (WWW) and need assistance in searching for such information. A "search engine" is an application used to query existing information on the WWW. The three types of search engines are computer-generated indexes, directories, and meta search engines.…

  15. Attitudes of Trainers and Medical Students towards Using Modern Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzhiiliev, Vassil Stefanov; Dobreva, Zhaneta Stoykova

    2011-01-01

    The development of universities as independent scientific centers determines their mission to incorporate the most modern achievements of science into the students' practical training. This research on the attitudes of the participants in this process towards the use of modern practices encompasses both trainers and students, and it consists of…

  16. Inservice Kit: Evaluating and Improving Teaching Performance. Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mireau, Laurie

    This manual is for use by the trainer or leader of a workshop based upon the inservice manual: "Evaluating and Improving Teaching Performance." In the introduction, suggestions for planning, logistics, equipment, and evaluation of a successful workshop are made. The chapters are linked to those of the inservice manual by topic of the workshop…

  17. Trainer Guide: Business and Finance Managerial. Camp Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Suggested ideas on conducting a managerial workshop for camp directors are offered in this trainer's guide. Workshops must be at least one full day of training (6 hours) on each topic to be counted toward the American Camping Association (ACA) Camp Director Certification Program. Suggested topics to be addressed are: (1) basic principles and…

  18. Trainers in Motion: Creating a Participant-Centered Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidakovich, Jim

    This guide to interactive training provides tools and techniques to stimulate the trainer's imagination to provide enriching, engaging training and an energizing learning experience. An introduction describes a REST Stop: give time to Reflect on the concept, Expand the content and Extract ideas with the intent of Stimulating imaginative Thinking.…

  19. 24 CFR 3286.305 - Installation trainer criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... building construction industry; (iii) In design work related to the building construction industry; or (2... curriculum. In order to register as a qualified trainer, an individual or other training entity must submit... curriculum requirements established in § 3286.308 or § 3286.309, as applicable....

  20. Parents as Trainers about Disability in Low Income Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConkey, Roy; Mariga, Lilian; Braadland, Nina; Mphole, Palesa

    2000-01-01

    A 5-day workshop is described which was designed specifically to prepare Lesotho parents to act as trainers for other parents with a child who has a disability. Twelve months after participating in the workshop, participants (n=21) had organized 19 training events throughout Lesotho for families and community groups. (Contains 13 references.)…

  1. Management Skills for Alcohol Program Administrators; Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Alcohol Education, Arlington, VA.

    This trainer's manual contains complete instructions and resource references for delivering the management skills program designed to upgrade the skills and performance of managerial personnel in the alcoholism field. It provides four areas of information: (1) course content and methodology, target audience, assumptions and suggestions; (2)…

  2. Embodied Narratives in Becoming a Counselling Trainer: An Autoethnographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meekums, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    This autoethnographic study addresses the newly appointed counselling trainer's question "How did I get here?" The procedure is described, and findings are presented as partial narratives of the Wounded Dancer, poems and prose written from different voices. Themes are revealed of love, healing, risk taking, unconventionality, physicality and…

  3. Pindar's Tenth Olympian and athlete-trainer pederasty.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The comparison of the adolescent boxer Hagesidamus and his trainer Ilas to Patroclus and Achilles in Pindar's Olympian 10.16-21 and the subsequent comparison of Hagesidamus to Ganymede in Olympian 10.99-105 suggest that the relationship was in some sense pederastic, particularly in the wake of Aeschylus' treatment of Achilles and Patroclus in these terms in Myrmidons. This possibility motivates a broader examination of the evidence for such relationships in fifth-century Greece. There is no doubt that the palaestra was a central locus for the formation of pederastic liaisons and that athletic nudity was integral to the esthetic construction of adolescent beauty. There is also no doubt that the trainer's position afforded him regular intimacy and close physical contact with boys; several Hellenistic texts take for granted the erotic opportunities connected with the position. The Solonian law presuming to protect pupils from such relationships, attested in Aeschines, was probably a late fifth-century development in reaction to their common occurrence in earlier generations. Evidence also exists for lovers acting as financial backers to boy athletes or as informal trainers. Some of the most intriguing evidence for the conflation of the trainer's and lover's roles can be found in red-figure vase painting of the late sixth and fifth centuries. PMID:16338892

  4. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Exertional Heat Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Casa, Douglas J.; DeMartini, Julie K.; Bergeron, Michael F.; Csillan, Dave; Eichner, E. Randy; Lopez, Rebecca M.; Ferrara, Michael S.; Miller, Kevin C.; O'Connor, Francis; Sawka, Michael N.; Yeargin, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective  To present best-practice recommendations for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of exertional heat illnesses (EHIs) and to describe the relevant physiology of thermoregulation. Background  Certified athletic trainers recognize and treat athletes with EHIs, often in high-risk environments. Although the proper recognition and successful treatment strategies are well documented, EHIs continue to plague athletes, and exertional heat stroke remains one of the leading causes of sudden death during sport. The recommendations presented in this document provide athletic trainers and allied health providers with an integrated scientific and clinically applicable approach to the prevention, recognition, treatment of, and return-to-activity guidelines for EHIs. These recommendations are given so that proper recognition and treatment can be accomplished in order to maximize the safety and performance of athletes. Recommendations  Athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals should use these recommendations to establish onsite emergency action plans for their venues and athletes. The primary goal of athlete safety is addressed through the appropriate prevention strategies, proper recognition tactics, and effective treatment plans for EHIs. Athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals must be properly educated and prepared to respond in an expedient manner to alleviate symptoms and minimize the morbidity and mortality associated with these illnesses. PMID:26381473

  5. 24 CFR 3286.307 - Process for obtaining trainer's qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Process for obtaining trainer's qualification. 3286.307 Section 3286.307 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT...

  6. "Training the Trainers" of Teachers in France: Assessment and Outlook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapostolle, Guy

    2009-01-01

    With the creation of IUFMs (university institutes of teacher training) in the 1990s, the training of teacher trainers in France has become a fundamental part of the renewal of teacher training. It is seen as a fundamental lever for the IUFMs to achieve the tasks and goals entrusted to them: training teachers who need to accommodate the new demands…

  7. Study of small civil turbofan engines applicable to military trainer airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenbrand, R. W.; Merrill, G. L.; Burnett, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Small turbofan engine design concepts were applied to military trainer airplanes to establish the potential for commonality between civil and military engines. Several trainer configurations were defined and studied. A ""best'' engine was defined for the trainer mission, and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the effects on airplane size and efficiency of wing loading, power loading, configuration, aerodynamic quality, and engine quality. It is concluded that a small civil aircraft is applicable to military trainer airplanes. Aircraft designed with these engines are smaller, less costly, and more efficient than existing trainer aircraft.

  8. A dental-based, athletic trainer-mediated spit tobacco cessation program for professional baseball players.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M M; Greene, J C; Ellison, J A; Letendre, M A; Bergert, N

    1998-05-01

    During 1997 spring training, the National Spit Tobacco Education Program provided a spit (smokeless) tobacco intervention program to 16 professional baseball clubs. The program consisted of an awareness-raising presentation and an opportunity to discuss quitting spit tobacco use with an expert cessation counselor. For two clubs, however, a more extensive intervention was pilot-tested for feasibility and acceptability among their major- and minor-league teams during their regularly scheduled health examinations at the beginning of spring training. The intervention included an oral exam by a dentist who advised spit tobacco users to stop and pointed out any spit tobacco-associated lesions in the player's mouth, brief cessation counseling by a specially trained dental hygienist, and ongoing support and follow-up by the certified athletic trainer to promote cessation. Findings from this pilot study indicate that this intervention, which is dependent upon involvement of dental professionals, was feasible to implement during spring training and appeared to be well-received by the athletes. Dental professionals are in an excellent position to advise and help spit tobacco users to quit and can have an important role in helping youth overcome this rapidly growing addiction.

  9. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in athletic trainer.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yan-Ying; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Hsieh, Yi-Jung; Fu, Li-Lan

    2011-06-01

    INTRODUCTION Athletic trainers often work for elongated and irregular hours or days, and need to react in emergency situations. These professionals are at risk for work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). This study investigated the WMSDs experienced by athletic trainers (ATs), plus related personal and occupational factors. METHODS A customized questionnaire with subject's demographic and WMSDs information was constructed and administered in all accessible ATs in Taiwan. In addition to descriptive analysis of demographics and WMSDs, the relationship between personal/occupational-related factors and WMSD symptoms were also evaluated. Results A total of 146 effective questionnaires were returned. The results indicated that a 48.5% prevalence rate of athletic trainers in Taiwan, and these disorders are mainly located in low back (42%), finger (38%) and shoulder (26%) regions. Logistic regression revealed that average work hour (odds ratio (OR) = 1.834, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.066-3.156) and continue education participation (OR = 0.346, 95% CI: 0.140-0.854) were the most significant predictors for WMSDs occurrence. Performing taping was the most significant predictor for the low back (OR = 28.274, 95% CI: 2.568-311.423) and finger (OR = 19.535, 95% CI:2.273-167.912) symptoms; while performing providing first aid (OR = 12.128, 95% CI:3.881-37.899) was the most significant predictor for the shoulder's. Conclusion This study revealed that athletic trainers in Taiwan area suffered from high rate of WMSDs, and the relationship between WMSDs and specific job features were reported. Preventive and therapeutic modifications of the work environment to decrease the occurrence of WMSDs are in need for athletic trainers and other similar professions. Further research examining safe patient handling ergonomics, proper equipment in the context of athletic training and professional development strategies must be pursued.

  10. The Teacher Trainer: A Practical Journal Mainly for Modern Language Teacher Trainers. Volume Four, Numbers One-Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This document consists of the three 1990 issues of "The Teacher Trainer," a journal for language teacher educators. The following articles appear in these issues: "Writing as a Learning Process in Teacher Education and Development"; "An 'Upside Down' Teacher Training Course"; "Training Teachers as Explainers: A Checklist"; "A Fresh Look at Team…

  11. SR-71 Pilot Rogers E. Smith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Research pilot Rogers E. Smith is shown here in front of the SR-71 Blackbird he flew for NASA. Rogers was one of the two original NASA research pilots assigned to the SR-71 high speed research program at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Smith has been a NASA research pilot at Dryden since 1982. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. The SR-71 is capable of flying more than 2200 mph (Mach 3+) and at altitudes of over 80,000 feet. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data

  12. SR-71 Pilot Stephen (Steve) D. Ishmael

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA research pilot Stephen D. Ishmael is pictured here in front of an SR-71 Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Ishmael was one of two NASA research pilots assigned to the SR-71 high speed research program in the early 1990s at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994), Edwards, California. Ishmael became a NASA research pilot in 1977. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and

  13. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Environmental Cold Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Cappaert, Thomas A; Stone, Jennifer A; Castellani, John W; Krause, Bentley Andrew; Smith, Daniel; Stephens, Bradford A

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of environmental cold injuries. Background: Individuals engaged in sport-related or work-related physical activity in cold, wet, or windy conditions are at risk for environmental cold injuries. An understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology, risk management, recognition, and immediate care of environmental cold injuries is an essential skill for certified athletic trainers and other health care providers working with individuals at risk. Recommendations: These recommendations are intended to provide certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care with the specific knowledge and problem-solving skills needed to address environmental cold injuries. Each recommendation has been graded (A, B, or C) according to the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criterion scale. PMID:19030143

  14. Prototype Videodisk-Based Part-Task Thermal Imaging Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickner, Michael S.; Foyle, David C.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Thermal images, or infrared images, are representations of the world based on heat, instead of visible light. Research has shown that the resulting thermal image results in perceptual differences leading to difficulties in interpretation (e.g., the determination of slope angle, concavity/convexity), or increased identification latencies. A joint research project between the United States (NASA and U.S. Army) and Israel (Ministry of Defense and Israel Air Force) has resulted in the development of a prototype part-task trainer for the acquisition of perceptual skills associated with thermal imaging usage. This prototype system is videodisk-based under computer control, using recordings of thermal images. A lesson section introduces declarative knowledge, in which the basic physics and heuristics of thermal imagery are taught. An exercise section teaches procedural knowledge, with the user viewing dynamic, actual imagery, with an interactive detection/location determination task. The general philosophy and design of the trainer will be demonstrated.

  15. Bhutan. Training forms master trainers for second cycle project.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    A Masters Trainers Training Program has been undertaken as part of the project, BHU/90/P01 (Population Education for Schools and Communities), which began in 1990, in order to prepare for the second part of the project (1993-1996) during which 600 school teachers will be trained. Upgrading the competence and skills of teachers in teaching population education is required for the successful implementation of the project. A pool of master trainers will be selected from participants, who include lecturers from Teachers Training College, Paro and National Institute of Education, Samtse, the District Education Officers, Curriculum Officers, CTDD, and the school inspectors. The training sessions covered theory and practice; the course content focused on population growth, environment, ecosystem, agricultural productions, family life education, health and teaching methodologies, and curriculum development.

  16. A model curriculum vitae: what are the trainers looking for?

    PubMed

    Chambler, A F; Chapman-Sheath, P J; Pearse, M F

    1998-04-01

    In this new era of Calman, the curriculum vitae (CV) still remains the most important document in furthering the careers of doctors. A survey of postgraduate deans and college regional training advisors opinions on CVs was undertaken. The results have allowed a model CV to be compiled expressing the layout and most of the features which senior trainers feel are important when producing a CV.

  17. Mobile close combat tactical trainer location and routing model

    SciTech Connect

    Djang, P.; Scott, M.

    1994-12-31

    In the short term future, the Army will purchase 21 Mobile Close Combat Tactical Trainers (MCCTTs) for the Reserve Component. The Army plans to buy 11 Armor and 10 Infantry versions of these trainers. The trainers are high fidelity simulators that teach tactical operations at the company and platoon level. The simulators are mounted on 3 tractor-trailers and are capable of traveling to the cities, towns and villages (known as home stations) where the Reserve Component platoons reside. The TRADOC System Manager - Combined Arms Tactical Trainer requested that TRAC-WSMR conduct a stationing analysis to determine where these devices should be located. We have created location and routing models for both Armor and Infantry MCCTTs. We developed a p-median model to determine the locations that minimize the distance between the MCCTTs and a number of home stations. Once we know where to locate the MCCTTs, we developed transportation, set covering and traveling salesperson models to decide the routing strategy that minimizes the distance the MCCTTs must travel, thereby prolonging their life. Our models insure that all platoons receive a minimum of three MCCTT training sessions per year and that the units do not have to travel more than 60 miles away from their home. If the Army uses the same routing strategy for the MCCTTs as they have done for a predecessor system, then our efforts have estimated annual savings of 700, 000 or 10 Million over the system life. Finally, given the current training requirement, our work demonstrates that the Army`s procurement strategy needs to be adjusted; we show that the Army needs to buy fewer Infantry MCCTTs than planned; we show that if the excess is converted to Armor MCCTTs, then a less expensive overall solution can be computed.

  18. Diagnostic Problem Solving in Male Collegiate Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Fredrick A.; Mensch, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Knowledge and experience may be important factors for understanding expertise based upon a clinician's ability to select and execute an appropriate response as a clinician during injury evaluation. Objective: To describe how collegiate male certified athletic trainers represent injury-evaluation domain knowledge during a situational interview using a think-aloud protocol. Design: Qualitative. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I and II colleges in National Athletic Trainers' Association District 3. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 20 male certified athletic trainers (n = 10 with less than 2 years of experience in the college setting and n = 10 with at least 10 years of experience in the college setting) participated in the study. Data Collection and Analysis: We collected data using a situational interview and questionnaire. Data were transcribed, reduced to meaningful units, and analyzed using verbal analysis procedures. Member checks, triangulation of data, field journaling, and peer-debriefing techniques were used to ensure trustworthiness of the data. Knowledge concepts were enumerated to describe differences between experts and novices. Results: Compared with novices, experts had more knowledge concepts of patient history and predictions and fewer concepts of situation appraisal. Conclusions: Expertise in athletic training shares traits with other areas in health care. Athletic training education and professional development may benefit from our understanding which cognitive processes differentiate expert practice. Future investigators should attempt to describe other settings and study diagnostic problem solving in a natural environment. PMID:24972043

  19. 24 CFR 3286.309 - Continuing education-trainers and curriculum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continuing education-trainers and...-Administered States § 3286.309 Continuing education-trainers and curriculum. (a) HUD-mandated elements. Only... HUD to be an element of the continuing education requirement set out in § 3286.205(b)(2) for...

  20. Space motion sickness preflight adaptation training: preliminary studies with prototype trainers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Rock, J. C.; von Gierke, H. E.; Ouyang, L.; Reschke, M. F.; Arrott, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    Preflight training frequently has been proposed as a potential solution to the problem of space motion sickness. The paper considers successively the otolith reinterpretation, the concept for a preflight adaptation trainer and the research with the Miami University Seesaw, the Wright Patterson Air-Force Base Dynamic Environment Simulator and the Visually Coupled Airborne Systems Simulator prototype adaptation trainers.

  1. Opinion of NCAA Coaches and Trainers Toward the Use of Ergogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meylink, Willa D.; Struck, Phyllis J.

    This study determined the opinion of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) coaches and trainers toward the use of certain ergogenic drugs. A researcher-constructed opinionnaire consisting of 38 statements was sent to football, wrestling, basketball, gymnastics, swimming and diving, and track and field coaches and trainers. Those surveyed…

  2. Concussion Assessment in California Community College Football: Athletic Trainers' Strides toward a Safer Return to Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Nancy Resendes

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method study was to compare current practices of athletic trainers in the management of concussion in football at California Community Colleges (CCC) with the concussion management guidelines set forth by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA). The study also set out to gain understanding of why some athletic…

  3. Effectiveness of Immediate Verbal Feedback on Trainer Behaviour During Communication Training with Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Vonderen, A.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of immediate verbal feedback on trainer behaviour during communication training sessions with individuals with intellectual disability (ID) was assessed. Trainers were six undergraduate university students majoring in psychology. The procedure consisted of interrupting the sequence of trials of training by the supervisor and then giving…

  4. More than Meets the Eye? Rethinking the Role of Workplace Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Roger; Simons, Michele; Bone, John

    A study explored the role of the workplace trainer in the building of training/learning cultures in workplaces in Australia. Following a literature review, stage 1 data collection involved observations and interviews in 18 enterprises in New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia where trainers were facilitating learning with one or two…

  5. Exposure of Athletic Trainers to Potentially Infectious Bodily Fluids in the High School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlemas, David A.; Jessee, K. Brian; Mulder, Diane K.; Rehberg, Robb S.

    1997-01-01

    Examined high school athletic trainers' exposure to potentially infectious bodily fluids. Data on number of potential exposures per game and practice, number of athletes removed from competition for bleeding, and number of times athletes changed uniforms indicated that trainers had significant chances of being exposed to potentially infectious…

  6. The Certified Athletic Trainer: Is Your School System Missing a Key Player?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dan; Winterstein, Andrew P.

    An athletic trainer (ATC) who is certified by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) is an allied health professional with specific expertise in prevention, recognition, and care of injuries to athletes. Such individuals are college-degreed specialists in sports medicine who practice under the direction of a physician. ATCs perform six…

  7. The Trainer's Handbook. The AMA Guide to Effective Training. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Garry

    This trainer's handbook is designed to be a desktop reference on the nature of training and the procedures involved in training preparation and provision. Part 1 covers the essential interaction skills required of trainers (maintaining leadership, creating learning associations, planning lessons, controlling training groups, analyzing trainees,…

  8. E-Learning Initiatives for Teachers and Trainers in the Mediterranean Region: Comparative Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulon, Arnaud

    2009-01-01

    Teacher and trainer training is one of the most important determinants of the success of reforms in technical and vocational education and training (TVET) systems in recent years in the Mediterranean region. This is based upon the assumption that the role of teachers and trainers in the reform of TVET is a dual one; that of stakeholder and…

  9. From Trainee to Trainer: Crossing over to the Other Side of the Fence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gil-Rodriguez, Elena; Butcher, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the authors' experiences of the transition from trainee to trainer on a psychotherapeutic training programme, and some of the challenges involved. Using the framework offered by Rizq (2009), the article examines the many parallel processes implicit in the roles of trainee, trainer and therapist. We explore these using…

  10. Schools Are for All Kids. Part II: School Site Implementation. Trainer's Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roger, Blair; And Others

    This trainer's packet, designed to be used in conjunction with the participant's manual, was prepared for a 2-day workshop to restructure schools to embrace all children, including those with disabilities. The trainer's materials include: program objectives; masters for overhead transparencies; and descriptions of learning activities, including…

  11. How Person-Centred Counselling Trainers Understand and Experience Their Role in the Current British Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballinger, Liz

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a qualitative study into the experience of person-centred training from the viewpoint of the trainer. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was the adopted approach. The researcher conducted a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews with five person-centred trainers with experience across a range of…

  12. 24 CFR 3286.313 - Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Expiration and renewal of trainer...-Administered States § 3286.313 Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification. (a) Expiration. Each notice of qualification issued or renewed under this subpart D will expire 5 years after the date of its issuance...

  13. 24 CFR 3286.313 - Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Expiration and renewal of trainer...-Administered States § 3286.313 Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification. (a) Expiration. Each notice of qualification issued or renewed under this subpart D will expire 5 years after the date of its issuance...

  14. 24 CFR 3286.313 - Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Expiration and renewal of trainer...-Administered States § 3286.313 Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification. (a) Expiration. Each notice of qualification issued or renewed under this subpart D will expire 5 years after the date of its issuance...

  15. 24 CFR 3286.313 - Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Expiration and renewal of trainer...-Administered States § 3286.313 Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification. (a) Expiration. Each notice of qualification issued or renewed under this subpart D will expire 5 years after the date of its issuance...

  16. Description and Initial Evaluation of a Computer-Based Individual Trainer for the Radar Intercept Observer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigney, Joseph W.; And Others

    An individual trainer for giving students in the radar intercept observer (RIO) schools concentrated practice in procedures for air-to-air intercepts was designed around a programmable graphics terminal with two integral minicomputers and 8k of core memory. The trainer automatically administers practice in computing values of variables in the…

  17. A trainer's role in effecting a cultural change

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, G.P.

    1991-11-01

    Teaching is a process used to bring about a change in a person or target group for the benefit of that individual, society, or the organization. The trainer's role in effecting a cultural change is not as a teacher of cultural behaviors but as a facilitator of cultural change. This paper will concentrate primarily on the analysis, solicitation of management support, and implementation phases of effecting a cultural change among a target group from the trainer's side of the process. The three major aspects of a cultural change program also will be discussed. They are: (1) gathering data, (2) soliciting management support, and (3) the implementation phase. Analysis tools such as direct observation measurement, informal and formal surveys will be discussed, and the uses of each will be demonstrated. The data gathered in the analysis phase will be used to identify cultural deficiencies in the group and to solicit management support for a cultural change. The design and development phases will be bypassed, and several methods of accomplishing the implementation phase will be highlighted.

  18. Athletic Trainers as HIV/AIDS Educators for Athletes.

    PubMed

    Hunt, B P; Pujol, T J

    1994-06-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to spread among the population at large. The age group 20 through 29 is the fastest growing demographic group in terms of AIDS diagnosis. This study examined a specific subgroup of that population: male and female college athletes. Subjects were 821 scholarship basketball players from 53 NCAA institutions across the nation. A survey instrument required respondents to identify common sources of HIV/AIDS information and preferred instructional formats for HIV/AIDS education. Mass media (92.4%), parents (62.2%), and teammates/peers (54.8%) were most commonly identified. Athletic trainers and team physicians were identified by 32.2% and 43.4% of the sample, respectively. The athletes indicated preference for video presentations (66.5%), small group discussions (58.8%), and question and answer sessions with expert panels (52.4%) as the most preferred instructional formats. Athletic trainers and team physicians can use the information presented in this paper to enhance their important roles in HIV/AIDS education for student athletes.

  19. School Psychology Trainers' Identification of Current Stressors in the Work Lives of Urban Practitioners: A Comparison Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Eileen; Wishner, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    Investigates school-psychology trainers' identification of current stressors in the work lives of practitioners. While there appears to be general agreement between faculty trainers and practitioners on the identification and relative ranking of work-related stress, faculty trainers consider those events to be more stressful than do the…

  20. Training Parent-Trainers to Facilitate Career Education Practices in Homes of Urban Handicapped Youth. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Univ. of New York, NY. Inst. for Research and Development in Occupational Education.

    A project was designed to enrich the career growth and development of inner-city handicapped junior high students by training parent-trainers using a trainer-of-trainers model. Through the training process, the project also aimed at forging a strong working relationship among collaborating groups whose personnel were being trained. To achieve…

  1. Rules of Engagement: The Joint Influence of Trainer Expressiveness and Trainee Experiential Learning Style on Engagement and Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangel, Bertha; Chung, Wonjoon; Harris, T. Brad; Carpenter, Nichelle C.; Chiaburu, Dan S.; Moore, Jenna L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the joint effect of trainer expressiveness and trainee experiential learning style on training transfer intentions. Extending prior research where trainer expressiveness has been established as a positive predictor of transfer, we show that trainer expressiveness is more impactful for trainees with high (vs. low) experiential…

  2. 77 FR 44685 - ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Shrack, Young...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Employment and Training Administration ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Shrack, Young, and Associates, Inc., and Project Control Associates, Trainer, PA; Notice of...Phillips Company, Trainer Refinery, including on-site leased workers from Shrack, Young, and...

  3. The Impact of Structured On-the-Job Training (S-OJT) on a Trainer's Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Daeyeon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the causal relationships between S-OJT trainer preparation, self-efficacy as a trainer, trainers' delivery of S-OJT, and organizational commitment as a consequence of employing S-OJT. This study proposed a theoretical model from the review of related literature and then empirically investigated the fitness…

  4. The accuracy of simulated indoor time trials utilizing a CompuTrainer and GPS data.

    PubMed

    Peveler, Willard W

    2013-10-01

    The CompuTrainer is commonly used to measure cycling time trial performance in a laboratory setting. Previous research has demonstrated that the CompuTrainer tends toward underestimating power at higher workloads but provides reliable measures. The extent to which the CompuTrainer is capable of simulating outdoor time trials in a laboratory setting has yet to be examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of replicating an outdoor time trial course indoors by comparing completion times between the actual time trial course and the replicated outdoor time trial course on the CompuTrainer. A global positioning system was used to collect data points along a local outdoor time trial course. Data were then downloaded and converted into a time trial course for the CompuTrainer. Eleven recreational to highly trained cyclists participated in this study. To participate in this study, subjects had to have completed a minimum of 2 of the local Cleves time trial races. Subjects completed 2 simulated indoor time trials on the CompuTrainer. Mean finishing times for the mean indoor performance trial (34.58 ± 8.63 minutes) were significantly slower in relation to the mean outdoor performance time (26.24 ± 3.23 minutes). Cyclists' finish times increased (performance decreased) by 24% on the indoor time trials in relation to the mean outdoor times. There were no significant differences between CompuTrainer trial 1 (34.77 ± 8.54 minutes) and CompuTrainer trial 1 (34.37 ± 8.76 minutes). Because of the significant differences in times between the indoor and outdoor time trials, meaningful comparisons of performance times cannot be made between the two. However, there were no significant differences found between the 2 CompuTrainer trials, and therefore the CompuTrainer can still be recommended for laboratory testing between trials.

  5. Injury surveillance in community sport: Can we obtain valid data from sports trainers?

    PubMed

    Ekegren, C L; Gabbe, B J; Finch, C F

    2015-06-01

    A lack of available injury data on community sports participants has hampered the development of informed preventive strategies for the broad-base of sports participation. In community sports settings, sports trainers or first-aiders are well-placed to carry out injury surveillance, but few studies have evaluated their ability to do so. The aim of this study was to investigate the reporting rate and completeness of sports trainers' injury records and agreement between sports trainers' and players' reports of injury in community Australian football. Throughout the football season, one sports trainer from each of four clubs recorded players' injuries. To validate these data, we collected self-reported injury data from players via short message service (SMS). In total, 210 discrete injuries were recorded for 139 players, 21% by sports trainers only, 59% by players via SMS only, and 21% by both. Completeness of injury records ranged from 95% to 100%. Agreement between sports trainers and players ranged from K = 0.32 (95% confidence interval: 0.27, 0.37) for date of return to football to K = 1.00 for activity when injured. Injury data collected by sports trainers may be of adequate quality for providing an understanding of the profile of injuries. However, data are likely to underestimate injury rates and should be interpreted with caution.

  6. Construction and validation of a low-cost surgical trainer based on iPhone technology for training laparoscopic skills.

    PubMed

    Pérez Escamirosa, Fernando; Ordorica Flores, Ricardo; Minor Martínez, Arturo

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we describe the construction and validation of a laparoscopic trainer using an iPhone 5 and a plastic document holder case. The abdominal cavity was simulated with a clear plastic document holder case. On 1 side of the case, 2 holes for entry of laparoscopic instruments were drilled. We added a window to place the camera of the iPhone, which works as our camera of the trainer. Twenty residents carried out 4 tasks using the iPhone Trainer and a physical laparoscopic trainer. The time of all tasks were analyzed with a simple paired t test. The construction of the trainer took 1 hour, with a cost of trainers. iPhone Trainer is a reusable and fully functional device that allows surgeons to practice their skills anywhere and at their own pace.

  7. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Kersey, Robert D.; Elliot, Diane L.; Goldberg, Linn; Kanayama, Gen; Leone, James E.; Pavlovich, Mike; Pope, Harrison G.

    2012-01-01

    This NATA position statement was developed by the NATA Research & Education Foundation. Objective This manuscript summarizes the best available scholarly evidence related to anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) as a reference for health care professionals, including athletic trainers, educators, and interested others. Background Health care professionals associated with sports or exercise should understand and be prepared to educate others about AAS. These synthetic, testosterone-based derivatives are widely abused by athletes and nonathletes to gain athletic performance advantages, develop their physiques, and improve their body image. Although AAS can be ergogenic, their abuse may lead to numerous negative health effects. Recommendations Abusers of AAS often rely on questionable information sources. Sports medicine professionals can therefore serve an important role by providing accurate, reliable information. The recommendations provide health care professionals with a current and accurate synopsis of the AAS-related research. PMID:23068595

  8. Inexpensive home-made laparoscopic trainer and camera.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Morgan R; McLaren, Scott L

    2004-08-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is a well-established and important component of modern surgical practice across a range of surgical specialties. However, training in this modality is hampered by the nature of the equipment and its cost, and the difficulty of much of the surgery undertaken. Hence it can take some time for advanced and especially basic trainees to attain competency in laparoscopic techniques, and it remains difficult to practise or refine techniques. A solution to one half of this problem has been investigated by designing an inexpensive home-made laparoscopic camera and trainer system that can be assembled and used by one or more trainees either in a skills lab or at home. The components are readily available and the present system comprises a CMOS spy camera mounted on a rigid plastic tube that is used within a translucent plastic training box, obviating the need for an inbuilt light source. The costs were successfully constrained to under NZ$200. PMID:15315575

  9. Therapists, Trainers, and Acupuncturists: Focused Review for the Orthopedic Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Domes, Christopher M; Kruger, Cori L

    2015-12-01

    Effective treatment of orthopedic injuries requires a multidisciplinary team, including physical and occupational therapists, athletic trainers, massage therapists, and acupuncturists. Orthopedic surgeons commonly encounter these practitioners but may not be familiar with the training, credentialing, and most importantly, the appropriate use of members of this team. There are general similarities in practice locations as well as types of symptoms addressed by the providers discussed, which include the treatment of physical pain, evaluation and treatment of physical impairment, and some facilitation of adaptation to the limitations caused by injuries. Across the 5 types of providers discussed there are widely varying training and licensing requirements, specializations, and continuing education requirements to maintain licensure. This article provides a focused review of these members of the multidisciplinary team and highlights the current American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommendations for the use of occupational and physical therapists for orthopedic conditions, including hip fractures, total hip arthroplasty, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  10. Digital trainer developed for robotic assisted cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Røtnes, J S; Kaasa, J; Westgaard, G; Eriksen, E M; Hvidsten, P Ø; Strøm, K; Sørhus, V; Halbwachs, Y; Elle, O J; Fosse, E

    2001-01-01

    Robotic systems for cardiac surgery have been introduced in clinical trials to facilitate minimally invasive techniques. Widespread use of surgical robotics necessitates new training methods to improve skills and continue practicing as the robotic systems are frequently being upgraded. Today, robotic training is performed on expensive animal models. An integration of a digital trainer with the two present robotic systems applied in coronary artery bypass procedures on beating heart requires real time simulation of tissue mechanics, sutures, instruments and bleeding. However, it requires no extra haptic device, since the robotic master is the haptic apparatus itself. By developing new data structures and parametric geometry descriptions we have demonstrated the possibility of obtaining surgical simulation on a standard PC Linux system. This technology is beneficial when simulation is exploited over a network with limited bandwidth, especially when it comes to the handling of soft tissue dynamics. PMID:11317783

  11. Computer Based Training: Field Deployable Trainer and Shared Virtual Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, Terence J.

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut training has traditionally been conducted at specific sites with specialized facilities. Because of its size and nature the training equipment is generally not portable. Efforts are now under way to develop training tools that can be taken to remote locations, including into orbit. Two of these efforts are the Field Deployable Trainer and Shared Virtual Reality projects. Field Deployable Trainer NASA has used the recent shuttle mission by astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian space station, Mir, as an opportunity to develop and test a prototype of an on-orbit computer training system. A laptop computer with a customized user interface, a set of specially prepared CD's, and video tapes were taken to the Mir by Ms. Lucid. Based upon the feedback following the launch of the Lucid flight, our team prepared materials for the next Mir visitor. Astronaut John Blaha will fly on NASA/MIR Long Duration Mission 3, set to launch in mid September. He will take with him a customized hard disk drive and a package of compact disks containing training videos, references and maps. The FDT team continues to explore and develop new and innovative ways to conduct offsite astronaut training using personal computers. Shared Virtual Reality Training NASA's Space Flight Training Division has been investigating the use of virtual reality environments for astronaut training. Recent efforts have focused on activities requiring interaction by two or more people, called shared VR. Dr. Bowen Loftin, from the University of Houston, directs a virtual reality laboratory that conducts much of the NASA sponsored research. I worked on a project involving the development of a virtual environment that can be used to train astronauts and others to operate a science unit called a Biological Technology Facility (BTF). Facilities like this will be used to house and control microgravity experiments on the space station. It is hoped that astronauts and instructors will ultimately be able to share

  12. Robotics On-Board Trainer (ROBoT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Genevieve; Alexander, Greg

    2013-01-01

    ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that astronauts use for training on a frequent basis. This software consists of two primary software groups. The first series of components is responsible for displaying the graphical scenes. The remaining components are responsible for simulating the Mobile Servicing System (MSS), the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS), and the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Free Flyer Robotics Operations. The MSS simulation software includes: Robotic Workstation (RWS) simulation, a simulation of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), a simulation of the ISS Command and Control System (CCS), and a portion of the Portable Computer System (PCS) software necessary for MSS operations. These components all run under the CentOS4.5 Linux operating system. The JEMRMS simulation software includes real-time, HIL, dynamics, manipulator multi-body dynamics, and a moving object contact model with Tricks discrete time scheduling. The JEMRMS DST will be used as a functional proficiency and skills trainer for flight crews. The HTV Free Flyer Robotics Operations simulation software adds a functional simulation of HTV vehicle controllers, sensors, and data to the MSS simulation software. These components are intended to support HTV ISS visiting vehicle analysis and training. The scene generation software will use DOUG (Dynamic On-orbit Ubiquitous Graphics) to render the graphical scenes. DOUG runs on a laptop running the CentOS4.5 Linux operating system. DOUG is an Open GL-based 3D computer graphics rendering package. It uses pre-built three-dimensional models of on-orbit ISS and space shuttle systems elements, and provides realtime views of various station and shuttle configurations.

  13. Feedback Control for a Smart Wheelchair Trainer Based on the Kinect Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Aurelia McLaughlin

    This thesis describes a Microsoft Kinect-based feedback controller for a robot-assisted powered wheelchair trainer for children with a severe motor and/or cognitive disability. In one training mode, "computer gaming" mode, the wheelchair is allowed to rotate left and right while the children use a joystick to play video games shown on a screen in front of them. This enables them to learn the use of the joystick in a motivating environment, while experiencing the sensation and dynamics of turning in a safe setting. During initial pilot testing of the device, it was found that the wheelchair would creep forward while children were playing the games. This thesis presents a mathematical model of the wheelchair dynamics that explains the origin of the creep as a center of gravity offset from the wheel axis or a mismatch of the torques applied to the chair. Given these possible random perturbations, a feedback controller was developed to cancel these effects, correcting the system creep. The controller uses a Microsoft Kinect sensor to detect the distance to the screen displaying the computer game, as well as the left-right position (parallel parking concept) with respect to the screen, and then adjusts the wheel torque commands based on this measurement. We show through experimental testing that this controller effectively stops the creep. An added benefit of the feedback controller is that it approximates a washout filter, such as those used in aircraft simulators, to convey a more realistic sense of forward/backward motion during game play.

  14. Design of Human-Machine Interface and altering of pelvic obliquity with RGR Trainer.

    PubMed

    Pietrusinski, Maciej; Unluhisarcikli, Ozer; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Cajigas, Iahn; Bonato, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The Robotic Gait Rehabilitation (RGR) Trainer targets secondary gait deviations in stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. Using an impedance control strategy and a linear electromagnetic actuator, the device generates a force field to control pelvic obliquity through a Human-Machine Interface (i.e. a lower body exoskeleton). Herein we describe the design of the RGR Trainer Human-Machine Interface (HMI) and we demonstrate the system's ability to alter the pattern of movement of the pelvis during gait in a healthy subject. Results are shown for experiments during which we induced hip-hiking - in healthy subjects. Our findings indicate that the RGR Trainer has the ability of affecting pelvic obliquity during gait. Furthermore, we provide preliminary evidence of short-term retention of the modified pelvic obliquity pattern induced by the RGR Trainer.

  15. Teachback methodology: building global training capacity with a unique training-of-trainers course.

    PubMed

    Tryon, C; Hopkins, P; Khan, A; Walton, W

    2015-03-21

    To meet the global demand for training assistance in tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a systematic model was created to conduct training-of-trainers courses. The Teachback Methodology curriculum was created using adult learning principles and implemented by collaborating with partners to create training-of-trainers courses. A total of 42 courses were held in 18 countries, resulting in 901 participants being able to enhance their training skills. During training-of-trainers courses, the participants practice teaching a course. Trainers observe the participants' performance and provide feedback on training skills and accuracy of course content. The methodology can be integrated with TB and HIV courses to enhance training capacity and help build a competent workforce.

  16. Engaging primary healthcare nurses in men's health education: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rizio, Taletha A; Thomas, Wendy J; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Collins, Veronica; Holden, Carol A

    2016-03-01

    Many countries have identified a need for targeted men's health promotion within primary health care as part of broader men's health policy. Primary health care nurses are well placed to deliver such services but may lack the requisite skills. The aim of this study was to pilot the delivery phase of an education program and evaluate a train-the-trainer approach for delivering men's health education to primary health care nurses. The 8-h train-the-trainer workshop was designed to equip nurses to deliver men's health education workshops to peers. Surveys of facilitators (n = 18) and peer workshop participants (n = 98) evaluated their level of confidence in men's health and knowledge and skills in men's health promotion. After completing the train-the-trainer workshop, most facilitators expressed confidence (92%), and all indicated sufficient knowledge and access to resources to deliver a peer workshop. All agreed that the module was sufficiently flexible to suit their local setting. Following the peer education workshop, facilitators and workshop participants reported high levels of confidence and knowledge in men's health promotion. This pilot evaluation suggests train-the-trainer is an effective model to deliver men's health education across a range of settings, with a flexible approach to raising awareness and improving the skills of primary health care nurses in men's health promotion.

  17. Left-handed cardiac surgery: tips from set up to closure for trainees and their trainers.

    PubMed

    Burdett, Clare; Dunning, Joel; Goodwin, Andrew; Theakston, Maureen; Kendall, Simon

    2016-09-01

    There are certain obstacles which left-handed surgeons can face when training but these are not necessary and often perpetuated by a lack of knowledge. Most have been encountered and overcome at some point but unless recorded and disseminated they will have to be resolved repeatedly by each trainee and their trainers. This article highlights difficulties that the left-hander may encounter in cardiac surgery and gives practical operative advice for both trainees and their trainers to help overcome them.

  18. Learning About Cockpit Automation: From Piston Trainer to Jet Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casner, Stephen M.

    2003-01-01

    Two experiments explored the idea of providing cockpit automation training to airline-bound student pilots using cockpit automation equipment commonly found in small training airplanes. In a first experiment, pilots mastered a set of tasks and maneuvers using a GPS navigation computer, autopilot, and flight director system installed in a small training airplane Students were then tested on their ability to complete a similar set of tasks using the cockpit automation system found in a popular jet transport aircraft. Pilot were able to successfully complete 77% of all tasks in the jet transport on their first attempt. An analysis of a control group suggests that the pilot's success was attributable to the application of automation principles they had learned in the small airplane. A second experiment looked at two different ways of delivering small-aeroplane cockpit automation training: a self-study method, and a dual instruction method. The results showed a slight advantage for the self-study method. Overall, the results of the two studies cast a strong vote for the incorporation of cockpit automation training in curricula designed for pilot who will later transition to the jet fleet.

  19. Ground Training Devices in Job Sample Approach to UPT [Undergraduate Pilot Training] Selection and Screening. Final Report, September 1972-August 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMaster, W. Dean; Gray, Thomas H.

    The purpose of this study was to develop a screening procedure for undergraduate pilot training (UPT). This procedure was based upon the use of ground-based instrument trainers in which UPT candidates, naive to flying, were evaluated in their performance of job sample tasks; i.e., basic instrument flying. Training and testing sessions were…

  20. An expert system for a distributed real-time trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purinton, Steven C.; Wang, Caroline K.

    1988-01-01

    The problem addressed by this expert system concerns the expansion of capability of a Real Time Trainer for the Spacelab flight crew. As requirements for more models or fidelity are placed upon the system, expansion is necessary. The simulator can be expanded using a larger processor or by going to a distributed system and expand by adding additional processors. The distributed system is preferable because it is more economical and can be expanded in a more incremental manner. An expert system was developed to evaluate modeling and timing capability within a real time training simulator. The expert system is based upon a distributed configuration. Components of the modeled system are control tasks, network tasks, emulator tasks, processors, displays, and a network. The distributed module expert system (DMES) allows the configuring of processors, tasks, display use, keyboard use, and selection of alternate methods to update the data buffer. Modules can be defined with execution occurring in a specific processor on a network. The system consists of a knowledge front end editor to interactively generate or update the knowledge base, an inference engine, a display module, and a recording module.

  1. Training of trainers in the Caribbean Basin Water Management Project.

    PubMed

    France, R W

    1982-01-01

    This article discusses the Caribbean Basin Water Management Project, a joint venture of 10 Caribbean countries, the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Government of the Netherlands, and PAHO. In 1977 an assessment of the project revealed that though training activities were carried out, most of them were designed for engineers and technicians-a small percentage of all employees-who did not pass on their knowledge to their coworkers. The training of trainers program was initiated to encourage improved communication among staff members. The fundamental precept of this program is that training should be a basic component of management activities. The article outlines the criteria for selecting participants for the training workshops, stressing that the prospective candidates should be in supervisory positions where training is part of their job. Instructors should also be carefully selected, and, as in the case of the participants, should have a long-term commitment to the water utility. At the end of the workshop series, the trainees should be able to make a task analysis, write and evaluate performance objectives, demonstrate communication techniques, use training aids, develop and implement an instructional sequence, and apply evaluation mechanisms. The article summarizes the benefits of the program, such as increased productivity of the supervisors, better communication between supervisors and the staff, and improved attitudes on the part of the staff toward their work.

  2. Prototype part task trainer: A remote manipulator system simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, David

    1989-01-01

    The Part Task Trainer program (PTT) is a kinematic simulation of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) for the orbiter. The purpose of the PTT is to supply a low cost man-in-the-loop simulator, allowing the student to learn operational procedures which then can be used in the more expensive full scale simulators. PTT will allow the crew members to work on their arm operation skills without the need for other people running the simulation. The controlling algorithms for the arm were coded out of the Functional Subsystem Requirements Document to ensure realistic operation of the simulation. Relying on the hardware of the workstation to provide fast refresh rates for full shaded images allows the simulation to be run on small low cost stand alone work stations, removing the need to be tied into a multi-million dollar computer for the simulation. PTT will allow the student to make errors which in full scale mock up simulators might cause failures or damage hardware. On the screen the user is shown a graphical representation of the RMS control panel in the aft cockpit of the orbiter, along with a main view window and up to six trunion and guide windows. The dials drawn on the panel may be turned to select the desired mode of operation. The inputs controlling the arm are read from a chair with a Translational Hand Controller (THC) and a Rotational Hand Controller (RHC) attached to it.

  3. Collegiate Athletic Trainers' Confidence in Helping Female Athletes With Eating Disorders.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Jennifer L.; King, Keith A.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2004-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine college athletic trainers' confidence in helping female athletes who have eating disorders. DESIGN AND SETTING: We mailed a 4-page, 53-item survey to head certified athletic trainers at all National Collegiate Athletic Association Division IA and IAA institutions (N = 236). A 2- wave mailing design was used to increase response rate. SUBJECTS: A total of 171 athletic trainers returned completed surveys for a response rate of 77%. Eleven institutions either did not identify their head athletic trainer or did not have an identifiable mailing address. Two surveys were undeliverable because of incorrect mailing addresses. MEASUREMENTS: The survey consisted of 4 subscales: (1) efficacy expectation, (2) outcome expectation, (3) outcome value, and (4) experience in dealing with eating disorders. Content validity was established by review from a national panel of experts. Reliability ranged from.66 to.73 for the subscales. RESULTS: Although virtually all athletic trainers (91%) had dealt with a female athlete with an eating disorder, only 1 in 4 (27%) felt confident identifying a female athlete with an eating disorder, and only 1 in 3 (38%) felt confident asking an athlete if she had an eating disorder. One in 4 athletic trainers (25%) worked at an institution that did not have a policy on handling eating disorders. Almost all athletic trainers (93%) felt that increased attention needs to be paid to preventing eating disorders among collegiate female athletes. CONCLUSIONS: Collegiate athletic programs are encouraged to develop and implement eating-disorder policies. Continuing education on the prevention of eating disorders among athletes is also strongly recommended. PMID:15085214

  4. Astronauts Harbaugh and Collins with T-38 jet trainers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts Eileen M. Collins and Gregory J. Harbaugh discuss current weather conditions with NASA pilot Jack Nickel, safety officer in the Aircraft Operations Division (AOD) at JSC. With Collins in the front seat, the two astronauts were about to take a f

  5. STS-56 Commander Cameron and Pilot Oswald at CCT hatch during JSC training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron (right) and Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), stand at the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup, prior to entering the mockup. Once inside the CCT, they will don their launch and entry helmets (LEHs) and participate in emergency egress (bailout) procedures. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  6. STS-38 Pilot Culbertson rolls through CCT side hatch during egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Pilot Frank L. Culbertson, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), rolls through the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Assisted by technicians, Culbertson practices emergency egress through the side hatch using the crew escape system (CES) pole which extends out the side hatch. The inflated safety cushion breaks Culbertson's fall as he rolls out of the side hatch.

  7. Group 12, 1987 ASCAN C. Michael Foale sits at the pilots station in JSC's FFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Group 12, 1987 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) C. Michael Foale sits at the forward flight deck pilots station controls in JSC's Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT). The FFT is used to familiarize the astronauts with the hardware in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle orbiters. It is one of the mockup training devices located in the Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE. Foale is one of 15 ASCANs recently selected by NASA.

  8. [Psychophysiological aspects of the color coding of pilot navigational information on onboard electronic displays].

    PubMed

    Oboznov, A A; Boiarskiĭ, A N; Buturlin, A I

    1986-01-01

    Psychophysiological characteristics of pilots were compared when they used a color or a black-and-white electronic indicator in simulating a landing approach on a pilot trainer. No significant differences were seen in the objective evaluations of the visual function or in the precision with which the prescribed flight profile was maintained. However, subjective preferences were given to the color indicator. When the task was more complex (simulation of the deviated landing course), the time spent on looking for significant symbols and on recovering the necessary course decreased, if the pilots used a color indicator. It is concluded that the use of a color indicator can be redundant in performing simple tasks and therefore indifferent for pilot activities but it can be useful in performing complicated tasks when the pilot has to make a precise and quick assessment of the situation.

  9. Understanding Group and Leader (UGL) trainers' personality characteristics and affective profiles

    PubMed Central

    Rapp Ricciardi, Max; Åkerman, Jeanette; Eerikäinen, Peter; Ambjörnsson, Annika; Andersson Arntén, Ann-Christine; Mihailovic, Marko; Archer, Trevor; Garcia, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Understanding Group and Leader (UGL), provided by the Swedish National Defense College and mentored by UGL-trainers, is one of the most popular management programs among civilians in Sweden. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding the training. We used the affective profile model (i.e., the combination of positive, PA, and negative affect, NA) to mapp important markers of empowerment, self-awareness, adaptive coping skills, and maturity among the UGL-trainers. The aims were: (1) to compare profiles between UGL-trainers and managers/supervisors and (2) to investigate differences in personal characteristics. Method: UGL-trainers (N = 153) and the comparison group (104 Swedish Chiefs of Police) completed an online survey on optimism, self-esteem, locus of control, and affect. The four profiles are: self-fulfilling (high PA, low NA), high affective (high PA, high NA), low affective (high PA, low NA), and self-destructive (low PA, high NA). Results: The self-fulfilling profile was more common among UGL-trainers (25.70%) than among Chiefs of Police (19.20%). UGL-trainers, compared to Chiefs of Police, were more likely to express a self-fulling than a low affective profile (OR = 2.22, p < 0.05) and a high affective than a low affective profile (OR = 1.43, p < 0.001). UGL-trainers with a self-fulfilling profile, compared to those with a self-destructive profile, scored higher in optimism, higher in self-esteem, and lower in external locus of control. Conclusions: The probability of self-fulfillment rather than low affectivity was higher among UGL-trainers. Self-fulfillment was associated to markers of self-awareness and adaptive coping skills. However, the most common profile was the low affective, which is associated to low performance during stress, low degree of personal development, low degree of purpose in life, and low resilience. Hence, it might be important for UGL-trainers to have a continuous training in awareness after

  10. The Professional Socialization of the Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Eason, Christianne M.; Clines, Stephanie; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The graduate assistant athletic trainer (AT) position often serves as one's first experience working independently as an AT and is also an important aspect of the professional socialization process. The socialization experiences of graduate assistant ATs have yet to be fully explored. Objective: To understand the socialization process for graduate assistant ATs during their graduate experience. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: We conducted phone interviews with all participants. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 25 graduate assistant ATs (20 women, 5 men) studying in 1 of 3 academic tracks: (1) accredited postprofessional athletic training program (n = 8), (2) postprofessional athletic training program (n = 11), or (3) a nonathletic training degree program (n = 6). The average age was 25 ± 5 years, and the median age was 24 years. Participants were certified by the Board of Certification for an average of 2 ± 0.4 years. Data Collection and Analysis: We analyzed the data using a general inductive approach. Peer review, field notes, and intercoder reliability established trustworthiness. Data saturation guided participant recruitment. Results: The ability to gain clinical independence as a practitioner was an important socialization process. Having the chance to develop a relationship with a mentor, who provided support, guidance, and more of a hierarchical relationship, was an important socializing agent for the graduate assistant AT. Participants used the orientation session as a means to understand the expectations and role of the graduate-assistant position. Academic coursework was a way to achieve better inductance into the role via the opportunity to apply classroom skills during their clinical practice. Conclusions: Socializing the graduate assistant blends formal and informal processes. Transition to practice is a critical aspect of the profession; thus, supporting autonomous practice with directed mentoring can promote professional

  11. Athletic Directors' Barriers to Hiring Athletic Trainers in High Schools

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Raso, Samantha R.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Stearns, Rebecca L.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    Context In its best-practices recommendation, the Inter-Association Task Force for Preventing Sudden Death in Secondary School Athletics Programs urged all high schools to have a certified athletic trainer (AT) on staff. Despite the recommendation, many high schools lack the medical services of an AT. Objective To examine the barriers that athletic directors (ADs) face in hiring ATs in public high schools and in providing medical coverage for their student-athletes. Design Qualitative study. Setting Semistructured telephone interviews. Patients or Other Participants Twenty full-time public high school ADs (17 men, 3 women) from various geographical regions of the United States (6 North, 4 South, 4 Midwest, 6 West) participated. Data saturation guided the total number of participants. Data Collection and Analysis We completed telephone interviews guided by a semistructured questionnaire with all participants. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were included as steps to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data using the principles of the general inductive approach. Results We identified 3 themes. Lack of power represented the inability of an AD to hire an AT, which was perceived to be a responsibility of the superintendent and school board. Budget concerns pertained to the funding allocated to specific resources within a school, which often did not include an AT. Nonbudget concerns represented rural locations without clinics or hospitals nearby; misconceptions about the role of an AT, which led to the belief that first-aid–trained coaches are appropriate medical providers; and community support from local clinics, hospitals, and volunteers. Conclusions Many ADs would prefer to employ ATs in their schools; however, they perceive that they are bound by the hiring and budgeting decisions of superintendents and school boards. Public school systems are experiencing the consequences of national budget

  12. Long-lasting virtual motorcycle-riding trainer effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Vidotto, Giulio; Tagliabue, Mariaelena; Tira, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to test the long-lasting effects of learning acquired with a virtual motorcycle-riding trainer as a tool to improve hazard perception. During the simulation, the rider can interact with other road actors and experience the most common potential accident situations in order to learn to modify his or her behavior to anticipate hazards and avoid crashes. We compared performance to the riding simulator of the two groups of participants: the experimental group, which was trained with the same simulator one year prior, and the control group that had not received any type of training with a riding or driving simulator. All of the participants had ridden a moped in the previous 12 months. The experimental group showed greater abilities to avoid accidents and recognize hazards in comparison to their performance observed a year before, whereas the performance of the control group was similar to that of the experimental group 1 year before in the first two sessions, and even better in the third. We interpreted this latter result as a consequence of their prior on-road experience. Also, the fact that the performance of the experimental group at the beginning of the follow-up is better than that recorded at the end of the training—1 year before—is in line with the idea of a transfer from the on-road experience to the simulator. The present data confirm our main expectation that the effectiveness of the riding training simulator on the ability to cope with potentially dangerous situations persists over time and provides additional evidence in favor of the idea that simulators may be considered useful tools for training the ability to detect and react to hazards, leading to an improvement of this higher-order cognitive skill that persists over time. Implications for the reciprocal influence of the training with the simulator and the on-the road experience are discussed as well. PMID:26579036

  13. DARE Train-the-Trainer Pedagogy Development Using 2-Round Delphi Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Kua, Phek Hui Jade; Soon, Swee Sung

    2016-01-01

    The Dispatcher-Assisted first REsponder programme aims to equip the public with skills to perform hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and to use an automated external defibrillator (AED). By familiarising them with instructions given by a medical dispatcher during an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest call, they will be prepared and empowered to react in an emergency. We aim to formalise curriculum and standardise the way information is conveyed to the participants. A panel of 20 experts were chosen. Using Delphi methodology, selected issues were classified into open-ended and close-ended questions. Consensus for an item was established at a 70% agreement rate within the panel. Questions that had 60%–69% agreement were edited and sent to the panel for another round of voting. After 2 rounds of voting, 70 consensus statements were agreed upon. These covered the following: focus of CPR; qualities and qualifications of trainers; recognition of agonal breathing; head-tilt-chin lift; landmark for chest compression; performance of CPR when injuries are present; trainers' involvement in training lay people; modesty of female patients during CPR; AED usage; content of trainer's manual; addressing of questions and answers; updates-dissemination to trainers and attendance of refresher courses. Recommendations for pedagogy for trainers of dispatcher-assisted CPR programmes were developed. PMID:27660757

  14. The Development of Expert Male National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Certified Athletic Trainers.

    PubMed

    Malasarn, Ruemruk; Bloom, Gordon A; Crumpton, Rebecca

    2002-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the major influences in the development of expert male National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I certified athletic trainers. DESIGN AND SETTING: The participants were individually interviewed, and the data were transcribed and coded. SUBJECTS: Seven male NCAA Division I certified athletic trainers, who averaged 29 years of experience in the profession and 20 years at the Division I level. RESULTS: We found 3 higher-order categories that explained the development of the certified athletic trainers and labeled these meaningful experiences, personal attributes, and mentoring. The growth and development of the athletic trainers were influenced by a variety of meaningful experiences that began during their time as students and continued throughout their careers. These experiences involved dealing with challenging job conditions, educational conditions, and attempts to promote and improve the profession. The personal attributes category encompassed the importance of a caring and service-oriented attitude, building relationships with athletes, and maintaining strong bonds within their own families. Mentoring of these individuals occurred both inside and outside the athletic training profession. CONCLUSION: We provide a unique view of the development of athletic trainers that should be of interest to those in the field, regardless of years of experience.

  15. DARE Train-the-Trainer Pedagogy Development Using 2-Round Delphi Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Kua, Phek Hui Jade; Soon, Swee Sung

    2016-01-01

    The Dispatcher-Assisted first REsponder programme aims to equip the public with skills to perform hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and to use an automated external defibrillator (AED). By familiarising them with instructions given by a medical dispatcher during an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest call, they will be prepared and empowered to react in an emergency. We aim to formalise curriculum and standardise the way information is conveyed to the participants. A panel of 20 experts were chosen. Using Delphi methodology, selected issues were classified into open-ended and close-ended questions. Consensus for an item was established at a 70% agreement rate within the panel. Questions that had 60%–69% agreement were edited and sent to the panel for another round of voting. After 2 rounds of voting, 70 consensus statements were agreed upon. These covered the following: focus of CPR; qualities and qualifications of trainers; recognition of agonal breathing; head-tilt-chin lift; landmark for chest compression; performance of CPR when injuries are present; trainers' involvement in training lay people; modesty of female patients during CPR; AED usage; content of trainer's manual; addressing of questions and answers; updates-dissemination to trainers and attendance of refresher courses. Recommendations for pedagogy for trainers of dispatcher-assisted CPR programmes were developed.

  16. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Management of Asthma in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael G; Weiler, John M; Baker, Robert; Collins, James; D'Alonzo, Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To present guidelines for the recognition, prophylaxis, and management of asthma that lead to improvement in the quality of care certified athletic trainers and other heath care providers can offer to athletes with asthma, especially exercise-induced asthma. Background: Many athletes have difficulty breathing during or after athletic events and practices. Although a wide variety of conditions can predispose an athlete to breathing difficulties, the most common cause is undiagnosed or uncontrolled asthma. At least 15% to 25% of athletes may have signs and symptoms suggestive of asthma, including exercise-induced asthma. Athletic trainers are in a unique position to recognize breathing difficulties caused by undiagnosed or uncontrolled asthma, particularly when asthma follows exercise. Once the diagnosis of asthma is made, the athletic trainer should play a pivotal role in supervising therapies to prevent and control asthma symptoms. It is also important for the athletic trainer to recognize when asthma is not the underlying cause for respiratory difficulties, so that the athlete can be evaluated and treated properly. Recommendations: The recommendations contained in this position statement describe a structured approach for the diagnosis and management of asthma in an exercising population. Athletic trainers should be educated to recognize asthma symptoms in order to identify patients who might benefit from better management and should understand the management of asthma, especially exercise-induced asthma, to participate as active members of the asthma care team. PMID:16284647

  17. Adaptive hybrid brain-computer interaction: ask a trainer for assistance!

    PubMed

    Müller-Putz, Gernot R; Steyrl, David; Faller, Josef

    2014-01-01

    In applying mental imagery brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) to end users, training is a key part for novice users to get control. In general learning situations, it is an established concept that a trainer assists a trainee to improve his/her aptitude in certain skills. In this work, we want to evaluate whether we can apply this concept in the context of event-related desynchronization (ERD) based, adaptive, hybrid BCIs. Hence, in a first session we merged the features of a high aptitude BCI user, a trainer, and a novice user, the trainee, in a closed-loop BCI feedback task and automatically adapted the classifier over time. In a second session the trainees operated the system unassisted. Twelve healthy participants ran through this protocol. Along with the trainer, the trainees achieved a very high overall peak accuracy of 95.3 %. In the second session, where users operated the BCI unassisted, they still achieved a high overall peak accuracy of 83.6%. Ten of twelve first time BCI users successfully achieved significantly better than chance accuracy. Concluding, we can say that this trainer-trainee approach is very promising. Future research should investigate, whether this approach is superior to conventional training approaches. This trainer-trainee concept could have potential for future application of BCIs to end users.

  18. Effectiveness of train-the-trainer HIV education: a model from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ann Bartley; Le, Suu Thi; Colby, Donn; Thu Le, Trang Thi; Pollack, Todd; Cosimi, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    As HIV prevention and treatment efforts expand around the globe, local capacity-building to update and maintain nurses' HIV competence is essential. The purpose of this project was to develop and sustain a national network of nurse-trainers who could provide ongoing HIV continuing education and training experiences to Vietnamese nurses. Over the course of 6 years, 87 nurses received training to become HIV trainers; their HIV knowledge increased significantly (p = .001), as did teaching self-confidence (p = .001 to .007). The 87 nurses subsequently reported training more than 67,000 health care workers. Recipients of train-the-trainer-led workshops demonstrated increased HIV knowledge (p = .001) and increased willingness to provide nursing care for HIV-infected patients (p = .001). The program demonstrated that including a substantial amount of instruction in pedagogical strategies and experiential learning could enhance knowledge transfer, expand education outreach, and contribute to sustainable HIV competence among nurses. PMID:24103742

  19. Effectiveness of immediate verbal feedback on trainer behaviour during communication training with individuals with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    van Vonderen, A

    2004-03-01

    The effect of immediate verbal feedback on trainer behaviour during communication training sessions with individuals with intellectual disability (ID) was assessed. Trainers were six undergraduate university students majoring in psychology. The procedure consisted of interrupting the sequence of trials of training by the supervisor and then giving brief corrective feedback. Feedback was focused on the accuracy of the following procedural aspects: (1) entry behaviour; (2) prompt level and order of presenting response prompts; (3) use of reinforcement; (4) pace of presenting trials; and (5) if this occurred, handling trainee's disruptive behaviour during training. Data were collected in a nonconcurrent multiple baseline design. Results indicated a statistically significant increase of the percentage correct trainer behaviour as compared to the baseline phase. Maintenance of effect of feedback was recorded during post-training and follow-up.

  20. STS-56 Commander Cameron and Pilot Oswald on CCT flight deck in JSC's MAIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron, (left) and Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs) and launch and entry helmets (LEHs), are seated on the forward flight deck of the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup. Cameron mans the commander station controls and Oswald the pilots station controls during an emergency egress (bailout) simulation. The view was taken from the aft flight deck looking forward and includes Cameron's and Oswald's profiles and the forward flight deck controls and checklists. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  1. The Training/Development of In-Company Trainers/Supervisors of Young People--The Case of Greece.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantinides, Xenophon; And Others

    This document describes the training of the in-company trainer of young people in Greece. Chapter 1 describes the context of training. Chapter 2 describes the methodology used in the study including questionnaires, interviews, and a forum. Chapter 3 reports the results of the study in the following categories: training manager, in-company trainer,…

  2. Goal-Setting: Guidelines for Diagnosis and Rehabilitation Program Development: Trainer's Guide. Advanced Facilitative Case Management Series, Training Package II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.; Rubin, Stanford E.

    This guide is the introductory volume for the second in a series of instructor-assisted training modules for rehabilitation counselors, supervisors, and graduate students. This trainer's guide for the second module focuses on the counseling skills needed for rehabilitation of the severely disabled and provides the trainer with the information and…

  3. Teacher and Trainer Training. Workshop on Curriculum Innovation (3rd, Budapest, Hungary, October 14-16, 1998). Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Training Foundation, Turin (Italy).

    This report contains 12 papers about and from a 3-day teacher and trainer training workshop that was attended by 37 individuals representing 12 European Union partner countries and 7 member states. The following papers are included: "For a Modern Organisation of Training Institutions and a Corresponding Professionalism of Teachers and Trainers"…

  4. Reliability of Entry-Level Athletic Trainers' Palpation Skills of Bony Anatomical Landmarks in the Lumbopelvic Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Sarah M.; Jacobs, Michelle M.; Gorgos, Kara S.; Wasylyk, Nicole T.; Hanrahan, Sean; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Accuracy of locating various lumbopelvic landmarks for novice athletic trainers has not been examined. Objective: To examine reliability of novice athletic trainers for identification of the L4 spinous process and right and left posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS). Design: Cross-sectional reliability. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or…

  5. Trainers and Learners Constructing a Community of Practice: Masculine Work Cultures and Learning Safety in the Mining Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Margaret; Abrahamsson, Lena

    2003-01-01

    Interviews and observations involving 20 coal miners and 7 trainers found the group constructed a community of practice that reinforced the culture of masculinity. Miners learned safety measures through experience and from coworkers. Trainers viewed their work as simulated environments and codified practices, which implicitly devalue experiential…

  6. Communicating Leave No Trace ethics and practices: Efficacy of two-day trainer courses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, M.L.; Marion, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Heavy recreational visitation within protected natural areas has resulted in many ecological impacts. Many of these impacts may be avoided or minimized through adoption of low-impact hiking and camping practices. Although ?No Trace? messages have been promoted in public lands since the 1970s, few studies have documented the reception and effectiveness of these messages. The U.S. Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics develops and promotes two-day Trainer courses that teach Leave No Trace (LNT) skills and ethics to outdoor professionals, groups, and interested individuals. This study examined the change in knowledge, ethics, and behavior of LNT Trainer course participants. The respondents were a convenience sample of participants in Trainer courses offered from April through August 2003. Trainer course instructors administered pre-course and post-course questionnaires to their participants, and we contacted participants individually with a followup questionnaire 4 months after completion of their course. Scores for each of the sections increased immediately following the course, and decreased slightly over the 4 months following the course. Overall, more than half of the knowledge and behavior items, and half of the ethics items, showed significant improvement from pre-course measures to the follow-up. Age, reported LNT experience, and backpacking experience affected the participants? pre-course knowledge and behavior scores. Younger, less experienced respondents also showed a greater improvement in behavior following the course. Trainer course participants also shared their LNT skills and ethics with others both formally and informally. In summary, the LNT Trainer course was successful in increasing participants? knowledge, ethics, and behavior, which they then shared with others. Since many low impact skills taught in the LNT curriculum are supported by scientific research, LNT educational programs have the potential to effectively minimize the environmental

  7. CF NEUTRON TIME OF FLIGHT TRANSMISSION FOR MATERIAL IDENTIFICATION FOR WEAPONS TRAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, John T; Valentine, Timothy E; Blakeman, Edward D; Pare, Victor

    2011-01-01

    The neutron transmission, elastic scattering, and non elastic reactions can be used to distinguish various isotopes. Neutron transmission as a function of energy can be used in some cases to identify materials in unknown objects. A time tagged californium source that provides a fission spectrum of neutrons is a useful source for neutron time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurements. Many nuclear weapons trainer units for a particular weapons system (no fissile, but of same weight and center of gravity) in shipping containers were returned to the National Nuclear Security Administration Y-12 National Security Complex in the mid 1990s. Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) measurements with a time tagged californium neutron source were used to verify that these trainers did not contain fissile material. In these blind tests, the time distributions of neutrons through the containers were measured as a function of position to locate the approximate center of the trainer in the container. Measurements were also performed with an empty container. TOF template matching measurements were then performed at this location for a large number of units. In these measurements, the californium source was located on one end of the container and a proton recoil scintillator was located on the other end. The variations in the TOF transmission for times corresponding to 1 to 5 MeV were significantly larger than statistical. Further examination of the time distribution or the energy dependence revealed that these variations corresponded to the variations in the neutron cross section of aluminum averaged over the energy resolution of the californium TOF measurement with a flight path of about 90 cm. Measurements using different thicknesses of aluminum were also performed with the source and detector separated the same distance as for the trainer measurements. These comparison measurements confirmed that the material in the trainers was aluminum, and the total thickness of

  8. An Assessment of Burnout in Graduate Assistant Certified Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Monsma, Eva; Dixon, Colin; Mensch, James

    2012-01-01

    Context: Graduate assistant athletic trainers (GAATs) must balance the demands of clinical care and the academic load of graduate-level students. Objective: To examine burnout among GAATs with clinical assistantships at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I institutions and to identify the personal and situational variables that are related to burnout. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Division I universities offering graduate assistantship programs. Patients or Other Participants: Two hundred one GAATs enrolled at NCAA Division I universities with graduate assistantship positions. Main Outcome Measures(s): The Athletic Training Burnout Inventory, which assesses stress and burnout among ATs through 4 constructs: emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, administrative responsibility, time commitment, and organizational support. The 6-point Likert scale is anchored by 1 (never true) and 6 (always true). Results: The GAATs who traveled with athletic teams (4.051 ± 0.895) and those who provided classroom instruction (4.333 ± 1.16) reported higher levels of stress due to time commitment than those who did not travel (3.713 ± 1.22) or teach (3.923 ± 0.929). We also found a difference in administrative responsibility across clinical settings (F6,194  =  3.507, P  =  .003). The results showed that GAATs in NCAA Division I clinical settings (44.55 ± 13.17 hours) worked more hours than those in NCAA Division III clinical settings (33.69 ± 12.07 hours) and those in high school settings (30.51 ± 9.934 hours). Conclusions: Graduate assistant ATs are at risk for burnout because of the time necessary to complete their clinical and academic responsibilities and their additional administrative responsibilities. Graduate assistants who work in the Division I clinical setting are at greater risk for burnout than those in the secondary school setting because of the large number of hours required. PMID

  9. Enhancing Classroom Participation of Rural Trainee Teachers of English through Use of Action Research: A Reflecton from a Chinese Teacher Trainer's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ping, Wang

    2015-01-01

    A common problem for Chinese teacher trainers is coping with a passive class with silent trainee learners, when trainees tend to be unresponsive and avoid interactions with the trainer. This is especially true when a trainer seeks interactions in the process of training, such as asking questions to the class as a whole or expecting at least one…

  10. Life-Stress Sources and Symptoms of Collegiate Student Athletic Trainers Over the Course of an Academic Year

    PubMed Central

    Etzel, Edward F.; Lantz, Christopher D.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of life-stress sources that student athletic trainers encountered over the course of an academic year, to investigate the existence of sex differences in stress source symptoms, and to provide athletic training staffs with suggestions on ways to assist student athletic trainers. Design and Setting: In a classroom setting, the 25-item Quick Stress Questionnaire (QSQ) was administered to all subjects at the beginning of each month during an academic year. The QSQ, which can be completed in approximately 5 minutes, uses a 9-point Likert scale ranging from 1 (little stress) to 9 (extreme stress) to measure sources of stress and stress-related symptoms. Subjects: The sample consisted of 11 male and 9 female student athletic trainers enrolled in a Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)-accredited undergraduate program at a mid-Atlantic university. Measurements: We computed descriptive statistics for the stress items and symptoms (ie, cognitive, somatic, and behavioral) and graphed them according to sex. Separate sex × time analyses of variance were performed to investigate changes in cognitive, somatic, and behavioral stress over the course of the study and to determine if these changes were different for male and female student athletic trainers. Results: Academic and financial concerns represented the greatest sources of stress for student athletic trainers. Repeated-measures analyses of variance indicated that stress levels fluctuated significantly during the academic year, with peak stress levels experienced during midterm and at the end of the spring semester. Although female student athletic trainers consistently reported higher levels of stress than their male counterparts, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Student athletic trainers exhibited fluctuations in their stress levels throughout an academic calendar. Academic and financial concerns were the most common

  11. An investigation into the effectiveness of the "trainer of trainers" model for in-service science professional development programs for elementary teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, Ruth Ann

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the "Trainer of Trainers" model of professional development for elementary science teachers participating in the Mathematics and Science Education Cooperative (MSEC). In this professional development model, a core group of teachers (key and lead) received professional development sessions taught by science education professors. After the work sessions for the core group of teachers, training materials and equipment were distributed among the five elementary schools within the school district. Under the auspices of the "Trainer of Trainers" model, the core group of teachers were to share information, plan, and collaborate with their grade level team members. In the past, university team members of the MSEC program have been neither directly nor indirectly involved in the second phase of the program. The target population of this study included approximately 200 teachers in the MSEC program who taught grades kindergarten through six in five different elementary schools. The school district is located in an unincorporated area near a southwestern metroplex. The district has a predominately low-income population and a high percentage of minority students that represent a diversity of ethnicities. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in data collection. Focus groups, interviews, observations, and survey instruments were the primary sources of data collection. Triangulation methods were used to establish validity and verification of data. Analysis was an on-going process that included several levels of affinity groups, interrelationship diagrams, path diagrams, and system influence diagrams. Interviews and feedback surveys were also used to evaluate the problem under investigation. Teachers considered the state-mandated assessment test to have the largest impact on the school curriculum and to be the primary reason that teachers could not find time for science teaching. Furthermore, they

  12. Program for Infant/Toddler Caregivers. Trainer's Manual, Module II: Group Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Signer, Sheila M., Ed.; And Others

    This trainer's manual covers module II of the Program for Infant/Toddler Caregivers (PITC), a four-module video training course for providers of family and center day care. The manual is intended to be used by module instructors and includes an overview of the PITC and instructions for using the manual and its accompanying videos. The module…

  13. A Trainer's Guide to the Creative Curriculum for Preschool, Volume 1: Getting Started.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Candy; Dodge, Diane Trister

    The Creative Curriculum for Preschool is a comprehensive resource for establishing and sustaining a quality preschool program. The first of two volumes of trainer's guides to The Creative Curriculum for Preschool, this book offers detailed workshops and handouts on the foundation of the curriculum, four of the five components of the curriculum…

  14. A Training Package for Implementing the IEP Process in Wyoming. Volume I. Trainers' Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Beverly; And Others

    Volume I of a four volume series presents a trainers' guide designed for administrators, assessment personnel, and others involved in the development and implementation of individualized education programs (IEPs) for handicapped children in Wyoming. The training content is divided into the following seven topics (with sample subtopics in…

  15. The Levels of German Teacher Trainers Working in Turkey Regarding Reigeluth's Organizational Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batdi, Veli; Elaldi, Senel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the views of German teacher trainers working in Turkey about their level regarding Reigeluth's organizational strategies and to analyze their views in terms of gender, geographic region, seniority, and graduated high school variables. While the population of the study consisted of German teacher trainers…

  16. Certified Athletic Trainers in Secondary Schools: Report of the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyznicki, James M.; Riggs, Joseph A.; Champion, Hunter C.

    1999-01-01

    Identifies professional responsibilities, educational requirements, and current use of certified athletic trainers in prevention and care of high school sports injuries, using literature from the MEDLINE and Health STAR databases. Whereas most high school sports injuries are minor, adequately trained personnel should be present to ensure early…

  17. Model Curriculum And Trainer's Guide for Programs to Combat White-Collar Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karchmer, Clifford L.

    This model curriculum is addressed to the training needs of personnel working in general white-collar crime assignments located in state and local police or prosecutors' offices. It is designed intentionally to orient personnel to the requirements of building a case as it moves along the enforcement process. Materials on trainer use and…

  18. Women's Human Rights Education Trainers in Turkey: Situated Empowerment for Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibbitts, Felisa L.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents evidence of the links between human rights education and social change by analyzing the long-term effects on 88 trainers engaged in a non-formal adult training program sponsored by a women's human rights group in Turkey, Women for Women's Human Rights--New Ways. In this article, I show the transformative impacts of carrying…

  19. Reflections on Communities of Practice, On-Line Learning and Transformation: Teachers, Lecturers and Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avis, James; Fisher, Roy

    2006-01-01

    Engagement in communities of practice has increasingly come to be seen as an important aspect of adult learning. Participation within such communities is thought to provide a dialogic space in which learning can take place. These ideas are increasingly being applied to the work of teachers, lecturers, and trainers. This reflective paper addresses…

  20. Cross-cultural communication capabilities of U.S. military trainers: host nation perspective.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Maysaa; Alameri, Ali; Jawad, Shakir; Alani, Yasir; Zuerlein, Scott; Nakano, Gregg; Anderson, Warner; Beadling, Charles

    2013-06-01

    A survey was conducted to assess trainee perception of the cross-cultural communication competency of U.S. military trainers and their satisfaction with the training they received. Findings from the survey show that U.S. military trainers rely significantly on local interpreters. This indicates variability in the ability of the trainers to communicate effectively with host nation partners, the variability being dependent on the capabilities of the individual interpreter. The findings illustrate the importance of providing military health personnel with training on how to work effectively with interpreters. The use of supplementary resources such as electronic translation devises when the interpreter is not capable of conveying health-related training information with the desired level of accuracy is recommended. Expanding the availability of general cultural training, which provides baseline information on local values, traditions, and customs in addition to health-specific cultural orientation, is also recommended to help military health trainers customize their training content and methods to fit the local environment.

  1. Exploring Intercultural Competence in Teacher Education: A Comparative Study between Science and Foreign Language Teacher Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akpinar, Kadriye Dilek; Ünaldi, Ihsan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the intercultural outcomes of short-term study visit programs for Foreign Language and Science teacher trainers. A mixed method including quantitative and qualitative data was used to compare the differences between the two groups' intercultural development in terms of their study field. Fantini's questionnaire…

  2. Athletic Trainers' Perceptions of the Importance, Preparation and Time Spent in the Athletic Training Content Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Context: Graduates of professional programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education are expected to be competent and proficient in the athletic training content areas. Objective: The unique skills and knowledge that an athletic trainer (AT) must possess may have more importance in one clinical setting than in…

  3. Evaluation of a Trainer for Sensor Operators on Gunship II Aircraft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cream, Bertram W.

    This report describes the design, development, and evaluation of a training device intended to enable ground-based practice of equipment operation and target-tracking skills that are required by the Forward-Looking Infrared (FLIR) and Low Light Level TV (LLLTV) sensor operators assigned to Gunship II aircraft. This trainer makes use of a…

  4. Program for Infant/Toddler Caregivers. Trainer's Manual, Module III: Learning and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Signer, Sheila M., Ed.; Wright, Sylvia Stein, Ed.

    This trainer's manual covers module III of the Program for Infant/Toddler Caregivers (PITC), a four-module video training course for providers of family and center day care. The manual is intended to be used by module instructors and includes an overview of the PITC and instructions for using the manual and its accompanying videos. The module…

  5. Insect Identification Educational Volunteers Created in Train-the-Trainer Workshops in Oregon and Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corp, Mary K.; Rondon, Silivia I.; Van Vleet, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    The "train-the-trainer" model successfully created volunteer educators in insect identification. Intensive training programs prepared 71 individuals during 2 1/2-day (20 hour) training sessions. Trainees included university Extension faculty (13), agricultural professionals (13), and certified Master Gardeners (45). The sessions were…

  6. The Winning Trainer. Winning Ways To Involve People in Learning. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eitington, Julius E.

    This updated and expanded edition provides a number of new concepts and techniques that should prove valuable to the trainer who is interested in involving his/her learners experientially. It primarily cover methods that relate to the delivery of the training. The book's organization reflects group-in-action bias--the more participative,…

  7. Astronaut Alan Bean looks over data acquisition camera on Skylab trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander for Skylab 3, the second manned Skylab mission, looks over the data acquisition camera mounted on the water tank in the upper level of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) one-G trainer at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC).

  8. The long and winding road: personal reflections of an anti-racism trainer.

    PubMed

    Ring, J M

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the intense personal and professional preparation necessary for becoming an effective anti-racism trainer. The author draws upon diversity training models and theory, as well as personal experiences and reflections charted as a white man actively involved in this field over the past ten years.

  9. Surviving and Thriving in the IPSI Suite Environment. An Active Learning Guide for Educators and Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buddin, Ike

    This guide was developed to help users and trainers to use the expert system called IPSI Suite. The first section provides an introduction and overview to the IPSI Suite, an integrated software package that, at its basic level, facilitates the following processes: (1) course curriculum development, (2) lesson planning, and (3) student performance…

  10. The Professional Socialization of Certified Athletic Trainers in High School Settings: A Grounded Theory Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitney, William A.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated how certified athletic trainers initially learned and continued to learn their professional responsibilities in the high school setting. Interview data highlighted two thematic categories: an informal induction process (aspects of organizational learning) and creating networks for learning. Results indicated that informal learning was…

  11. Building a Sustainable Life Science Information Literacy Program Using the Train-the-Trainer Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Patricia; Newhouse, Renae; Perry, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    The train-the-trainer model has great potential for expanding information literacy programs without placing undue burden on already overextended librarians; it is surprisingly underused in academic libraries. At the University of Kentucky, we employed this model to create a new information literacy program in an introductory biology lab. We…

  12. Personal and Family Financial Planning. A Staff Development Workshop for Secondary School Trainers and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannister, Rosella; And Others

    This manual for teacher trainers and staff development specialists contains information and materials for an 18-hour personal and financial planning workshop for secondary teachers. Part A is a guide for workshop directors. It defines personal and family financial planning, provides background information on financial planning education, and…

  13. Comprehensive Service Delivery through Senior Centers and Other Community Focal Points: Trainer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Aging, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide provides instructional materials and approaches for use by continuing educators, trainers, state units, area agencies on aging, or others responsible for staff development. Section I gives an overview of the mutual needs and responsibilities of adults with learning needs and those who assist them to meet those needs. Section II assists…

  14. Developing a Competent Workforce. Adult Learning Strategies for Vocational Educators and Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonczi, Andrew, Ed.

    The intent of this document is to provide teachers in vocational education and trainers in industry, commerce and government with a greater understanding of the role of vocational education and training in the current context of economic and industrial change in Australia. Following an introduction, section 1 deals with the policy context of the…

  15. 77 FR 39741 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Curricula Review and Revision: NIC Trainer Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... in the following: Curriculum design and development; Adult learning theory; Current research in the... demonstrated knowledge of adult learning theory? Is there a demonstrated knowledge of the ITIP model of... train trainers in existing curricula. All curricula will follow the Instructional Theory into...

  16. Trainers Attitudes towards the Teaching of AIDS Education in a Kenyan Teachers' College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nzau, K. A.; Ondimu, K. A.; Gikuhi, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the teaching of AIDS education. The study was mainly concerned with the implementation of the AIDS education curriculum. In particular the study sought to investigate the attitudes held by trainers and trainees towards the subject and make suggestions to improve its teaching. The study was conducted in a…

  17. E-Learning and the Professional Development of Trainers and Vocational Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Thessaloniki (Greece).

    The professional development activities in which trainers and vocational teachers are engaging to acquire new expertise in e-learning were examined through a survey that was completed by 446 individuals. Nearly 80% of the respondents were from within the European Union (EU). The rest came from other European countries, North American, Australia,…

  18. PROGRAM TO TRAIN TRADE UNIONISTS AND CAA STAFF WORKERS AS COMMUNITY ACTION TRAINERS, CURRICULUM AND SCHEDULE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EIGER, NORMAN

    OBJECTIVES OF THE TEN-DAY RESIDENTIAL TRAINING PROGRAM HELD IN JUNE 1967 WERE--TO UNDERSTAND THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER, TO DEVELOP SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE IN WORKING WITH GROUPS AND IN IMPLEMENTING COMMUNITY ACTION TRAINING PROGRAMS, TO HEIGHTEN SELF-AWARENESS, TO LEARN TO APPLY FORCE FIELD ANALYSIS TO PROBLEM SOLVING, TO INTERPRET LABOR'S POSITION IN…

  19. Employer Perceptions of the Academic Preparation of Entry-Level Certified Athletic Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massie, J. Brett; Strang, Adam J.; Ward, Rose Marie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine employers' (clinic based ATs) perceived satisfaction of the academic preparation of entry-level ATs, and to identify perceived inadequacies of the (ATEP) curriculum. Design and Setting: Athletic trainers employed in clinical setting completed an online survey instrument. Subjects: One-hundred-four ATs serving in the NATA…

  20. Effects of Trainer Expressiveness, Seductive Details, and Trainee Goal Orientation on Training Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Annette

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on trainer expressiveness and trainee mastery orientation within the context of the seductive details effect. The seductive details effect refers to inclusion of "highly interesting and entertaining information that is only tangentially related to the topic" (Harp & Mayer, 1998, p. 1). One hundred thirty-two participants…

  1. Current Drug Education Policies in NCAA Institutions: Perceptions of Head Athletic Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirazi, Aida; Tricker, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    This study compared the perceptions of head athletic trainers (HATS) from NCAA member Divisions I, II, and III regarding current athletic department drug education policies in their institutions. A Web-based questionnaire collected responses from 353 HATS. Drug education programs focused more on providing information about the negative…

  2. The Teacher Trainer: A Practical Journal for Those Who Train, Mentor and Educate TESOL Teachers, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    These three journal issues include the following articles: "Competence in Facilitation" (Graham O'Connel); "Is My Map to Scale?" (Mark Wilson); "A Trainer's Dozen" (Barbara Thornton and Mary Lou McCloskey); "Carrot Ice Cream: Reactions to the New or Different" (Tessa Woodward); "Feeding (back to) the Five Thousand" (Julietta Schoenmann);…

  3. A Description and Evaluation of a Course to Train Group-Based Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krupp, Steven; Wheelan, Susan A.

    1979-01-01

    This article centers around a training of trainers course. The course was developed in response to student and departmental needs to provide advanced graduate students with the opportunity to have supervised practicum experience and explore theoretical issues in group training as part of their education and preparation within the department.…

  4. Injured Athletes' Perceived Loss of Identity: Educational Implications for Athletic Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockhart, Barbara D.

    2010-01-01

    Context: As educators, athletic trainers should familiarize athletes with the concepts of self acceptance self-esteem and identity to assuage psychological trauma accompanying injury because the more a person identifies with being an athlete, the more difficult it is to deal with athletic injury. Objective: The objective of this article is to…

  5. The Most Effective Way of Delivering a Train-the-Trainers Program: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Jennifer; Mann, Mala K.; Jones, Caryl; van Buschbach, Susanne; Olff, Miranda; Bisson, Jonathan I.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Previous literature has shown that multifaceted, interactive interventions may be the most effective way to train health and social care professionals. A Train-the-Trainer (TTT) model could incorporate all these components. We conducted a systematic review to determine the overall effectiveness and optimal delivery of TTT programs.…

  6. A Statewide Train-the-Trainer Model for Effective Entrepreneurship and Workforce Readiness Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Nia Imani; Brown, Mananmi; Piechocinski, Alganesh; Wells, Kendra

    2012-01-01

    A statewide youth and adult train-the-trainer model that integrates workforce readiness and entrepreneurship can have a profound effect on young people's academic performance, interest in college, and overall youth development. Participants in workforce and entrepreneurship programs develop personal resources that have value in school, in the…

  7. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Evaluation of Dietary Supplements for Performance Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Jackie L; Franks, Rob; Ransone, Jack; Powers, Michael E; Laquale, Kathleen M; Carlson-Phillips, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To help athletic trainers promote a “food-first” philosophy to support health and performance, understand federal and sport governing body rules and regulations regarding dietary supplements and banned substances, and become familiar with reliable resources for evaluating the safety, purity, and efficacy of dietary supplements. Background The dietary supplement industry is poorly regulated and takes in billions of dollars per year. Uneducated athletes need to gain a better understanding of the safety, eligibility, and efficacy concerns associated with choosing to take dietary supplements. The athletic trainer is a valuable athletic team member who can help in the educational process. In many cases, athletic trainers are asked to help evaluate the legality, safety, and efficacy of dietary supplements. For this position statement, our mission is to provide the athletic trainer with the necessary resources for these tasks. Recommendations Proper nutrition and changes in the athlete's habitual diet should be considered first when improved performance is the goal. Athletes need to understand the level of regulation (or lack thereof) governing the dietary supplement industry at the international, federal, state, and individual sport-participation levels. Athletes should not assume a product is safe simply because it is marketed over the counter. All products athletes are considering using should be evaluated for purity (ie, truth in labeling), safety, and efficacy. PMID:23672334

  8. 24 CFR 3286.309 - Continuing education-trainers and curriculum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... curriculum. 3286.309 Section 3286.309 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...-Administered States § 3286.309 Continuing education-trainers and curriculum. (a) HUD-mandated elements. Only... number of hours and the required curriculum for such subject areas, according to experience with...

  9. 24 CFR 3286.309 - Continuing education-trainers and curriculum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... curriculum. 3286.309 Section 3286.309 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...-Administered States § 3286.309 Continuing education-trainers and curriculum. (a) HUD-mandated elements. Only... number of hours and the required curriculum for such subject areas, according to experience with...

  10. Train the Trainer Effectiveness Trials of Behavioral Intervention for Individuals with Autism: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shire, Stephanie Yoshiko; Kasari, Connie

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review examines train the trainer (TTT) effectiveness trials of behavioral interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Published methodological quality scales were used to assess studies including participant description, research design, intervention, outcomes, and analysis. Twelve studies including 9 weak…

  11. Efficacy of the "HealthMatters Program" Train-the-Trainer Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Beth; Sisirak, Jasmina; Chang, Yen-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study examines the efficacy of a staff-led, health promotion intervention entitled "HealthMatters Program: Train-the-Trainer" Model to improve health among adults with intellectual disabilities. While data support the benefits of health promotion for adults with intellectual disabilities in controlled settings, little…

  12. Upgrading Interpersonal Skills in the Community: Training of Trainers and Helpers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turock, Art; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a two-stage project for upgrading practitioners' interpersonal skills in a statewide service delivery system. Involved selection and training of trainers and teaching service providers a model for helping that described the skills, goals, and process for facilitating client action. Provides a brief summary of workshop evaluation data.…

  13. Working for Quality Child Care: Good Child Care Jobs Equals Good Care for Children. Trainer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellm, Dan; Haack, Peggy

    Noting that the education and training of most early childhood practitioners lack information on child care as an adult work environment, this guide is designed to assist trainers in providing practitioners information about working with the array of adults they encounter on the job, the serious challenges and instabilities in the field, and the…

  14. 24 CFR 3286.313 - Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification. 3286.313 Section 3286.313 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  15. The design and fabrication of the Centaur neutral buoyancy trainer and related hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, Alan S.; Hollingsworth, Michael

    1986-01-01

    Two full scale mockups of the Centaur upper stage were designed, fabricated and delivered to NASA. One was the Centaur Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) trainer and the other was the Centaur 1-G mockup. The Centaur upper stage booster is designed to carry the spacecraft Galileo to Jupiter, and the spacecraft Ulysses to an orbit around the Sun after launch from the Space Shuttle. The flight vehicle has several Extravehicular Activity (EVA) contingency tasks that require crew training. This need for crew training generated the requirement for the Centaur WETF crew trainer, which is high fidelity in areas of expected crew interface. During the production of the Centaur WETF crew trainer, the need for a jumper cable from Centaur to the Orbiter was identified. This EVA contingency task would be the installation of a cable from the Orbiter cargo bay sill to various command data boxes on Centaur to allow crew control deployment should a failure occur. This task required the upgrading of volumetric boxes on the trainer to a high fidelity configuration including electrical connector installation and cable routing.

  16. Treatment and Prevention of Acute Diarrhoea. Guidelines for the Trainers of Health Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This booklet, intended primarily for the trainers of middle-level community health workers in underdeveloped countries, is designed to help such workers present the topic of diarrhea treatment and prevention in training courses. Divided into five sections, the booklet gives guidelines on treatment and prevention, with particular emphasis on the…

  17. Educational Preparation for the Clinic Job Setting: Clinical Athletic Trainers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Jim; Combs, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Context: Acquiring input from all stakeholders on the importance of existing competencies and suggestions for new ones is essential to competency-based pedagogical design quality. Objective: To survey athletic trainers (ATs) employed in clinical settings to assess their perceptions of the competencies most pertinent to their settings and whether…

  18. Infusing Multicultural and Social Justice Competencies within Counseling Practice: A Guide for Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheely-Moore, Angela I.; Kooyman, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    In light of the rapidly changing demographics of the United States, it is imperative for counselor educators and trainers of mental health professionals to infuse instructional strategies that promote multicultural and social justice (MSJ) competencies for trainees. The purpose of this article is to translate MSJ-based teaching strategies within…

  19. The Pilot Training Study: Advanced Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, P. J.

    An overview is presented of advanced pilot training and of the formal advanced pilot training program that constitutes the primary means of providing this training. Section I deals with the various phases of advanced pilot training that a pilot may encounter during his career; Section II deals with the types of aircraft that require some form of…

  20. Training the Trainers of Tomorrow Today - driving excellence in medical education.

    PubMed

    Fellow-Smith, Elizabeth; Beveridge, Ed; Hogben, Katy; Wilson, Graeme; Lowe, John; Abraham, Rachel; Ingle, Digby; Bennett, Danielle; Hernandez, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Training the Trainers of Tomorrow Today (T4) is a new way to deliver "Training for Trainers". Responding to local dissatisfaction with existing arrangements, T4 builds on 3 essential requirements for a future shape of training: 1. Clinical Leadership and a Collaborative Approach 2. Cross-Specialty Design and Participation 3. Local Delivery and Governance Networks Design principles also included: 3 levels of training to reflect differing needs of clinical supervisors, educational supervisors and medical education leader, mapping to GMC requirements and the London Deanery's Professional Development Framework; alignment of service, educational theory and research; recognition of challenges in delivering and ensuring attendance in busy acute and mental health settings, and the development of a faculty network. The delivery plan took into account census of professional development uptake and GMC Trainee Surveys. Strong engagement and uptake from the 11 Trusts in NW London has been achieved, with powerful penetration into all specialties. Attendance has exceeded expectations. Against an initial 12 month target of 350 attendances, 693 were achieved in the first 8 months. Evaluation of content demonstrates modules are pitched appropriately to attendees needs, with positive feedback from trainers new to the role. Delivery style has attracted high ratings of satisfaction: 87% attendees rating delivery as "good\\excellent". External evaluation of impact demonstrated improved training experiences through changes in supervision, the learning environment and understanding of learning styles. We have addressed sustainability of the programme by advertising and recruiting Local Faculty Development Trainers. Volunteer consultants and higher trainees are trained to deliver the programme on a cascade model, supported by the Specialty Tutors, individual coaching and educational bursaries. The Trainers are local champions for excellence in training, provide a communication between the

  1. Pilot Training Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooz, William E.

    The purpose of the Pilot Training Study is to produce tools with which to analyze the pilot training process of the Air Force in terms of the resources required to train pilots and the cost of pilot training. These tools allow examination of the training courses themselves, and also of the policy factors which drive the need for pilots. The tools…

  2. SR-71 Pilots and Crew (Smith, Meyer, Bohn-Meyer, Ishmael)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The two pilot-engineer teams that flew the SR-71 aircraft at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, are, from top of ladder, pilot Rogers Smith, flight engineer Robert Meyer, pilot Steven Ishmael, and flight engineer Marta Bohn-Meyer. The Meyers are the first husband-wife team of aeronautical engineers at Dryden on flight status. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear

  3. SR-71 Pilots and Crew (Smith, Meyer, Bohn-Meyer, Ishmael)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The two pilot-engineer teams that flew the SR-71 aircraft at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, are, from left, pilot Rogers Smith, flight engineers Robert Meyer and Marta Bohn-Meyer, and pilot Steven Ishmael. The Meyers are the first husband-wife team of aeronautical engineers at Dryden on flight status. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or

  4. The current state of personal training: an industry perspective of personal trainers in a small Southeast community.

    PubMed

    Melton, Deana I; Katula, Jeffrey A; Mustian, Karen M

    2008-05-01

    Although research has identified a number of qualities and competencies necessary to be an effective exercise leader, the fitness industry itself is largely unregulated and lacks a unified governing body. As such, a plethora of personal trainer certifications exists with varying degrees of validity that fail to ensure qualified trainers and, therefore, protect the consumer. It is argued that the potential consequences of this lack of regulation are poor societal exercise adherence, potential injury to the client, and poor public perception of personal trainers. Additionally, it is not known whether personal trainers are meeting the needs of their clients or what criteria are used in the hiring of personal trainers. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the current state of personal training in a midsized Southeast city by using focus group methodology. Local personal trainers were recruited for the focus groups (n = 11), and the results from which were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for themes using inductive reasoning by the authors. Qualities and characteristics that identified by participants clustered around 4 main themes. Client selection rationale consisted of qualities that influenced a client's decision to hire a particular trainer (e.g., physique, gender, race). Client loyalty referred to the particular qualities involved in maintaining clients (e.g., motivation skills, empathy, social skills). Credentials referred to formal training (e.g., college education, certifications). Negative characteristics referred to qualities considered unethical or unprofessional (e.g., sexual comments, misuse of power) as well as the consequences of those behaviors (e.g., loss of clients, potential for litigation). These results are discussed regarding the implications concerning college programs, certification organizations, increasing public awareness of expectations of qualified trainers, and a move towards state licensure.

  5. The Athletic Trainer's Role in Modifying Nutritional Behaviors of Adolescent Athletes: Putting Theory into Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hackman, Robert M.; Katra, Jane E.; Geertsen, Susan M.

    1992-01-01

    Nutritional practices influence athletic performance and recovery from injury. The athletic trainer is ideally positioned to effect dietary changes with adolescent athletes—a group at high-risk for nutritional imbalances. Research shows that young adults generally do not change dietary practices when given factual nutrition and health information. This article provides a variety of behavior change strategies, based on models derived from health education and health psychology, which are likely to influence dietary choices. Promoting self-efficacy by enhancing perception of choice and control, peer modeling, cooperative support networks, goal-setting techniques, and behavioral self-monitoring may provide the motivational framework necessary to enhance dietary compliance. Dietary behavior change techniques are a valuable part of an athletic trainer's resources. PMID:16558172

  6. The Professional Socialization of the Athletic Trainer Serving as a Preceptor

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The role of the preceptor requires the athletic trainer to be versed in effective instructional techniques, supervisory skills, and communication skills beyond his or her competence as an athletic trainer, but many have not received formal training in educational techniques. Objective: To gain a better understanding about the professional socialization process for the athletic trainer assuming the role of the preceptor. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Athletic training education programs. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-four preceptors (11 men, 13 women; age = 32 ± 7 years, clinical experience = 9 ± 6 years, preceptor experience = 5 ± 3 years) employed in the collegiate (n = 12) or secondary school (n = 12) setting. Data Collection and Analysis: We gathered data using asynchronous, in-depth interviewing via QuestionPro. We analyzed data using a general inductive approach to uncover the dominant themes. Credibility was secured by using consistency and stakeholder checks and a peer review. Results: We identified 2 main themes by which preceptors develop in their roles as clinical instructors: formal processes and informal processes. The participants used observations, previous experiences or interactions with role models, and self-reflection and evaluation as informal socialization processes. Formal socialization processes included preceptor training/workshops, professional development, and formal teacher certification. Conclusions: Athletic trainers who serve as preceptors learned their roles by a combination of informal and formal processes. Preceptor training sessions appeared to be effective in initially helping preceptors learn their responsibilities, whereby more informal processes seemed to help them refine their skills. Furthermore, one socialization strategy did not appear to dominate role learning; rather, a combination of several processes fostered an understanding. PMID:24377957

  7. Automated real time peg and tool detection for the FLS trainer box.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Arun; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes a method that effectively tracks trocar tool and peg positions in real time to allow real time assessment of the peg transfer task of the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS). By utilizing custom code along with OpenCV libraries, tool and peg positions can be accurately tracked without altering the original setup conditions of the FLS trainer box. This is achieved via a series of image filtration sequences, thresholding functions, and Haar training methods.

  8. Automated real time peg and tool detection for the FLS trainer box.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Arun; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes a method that effectively tracks trocar tool and peg positions in real time to allow real time assessment of the peg transfer task of the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS). By utilizing custom code along with OpenCV libraries, tool and peg positions can be accurately tracked without altering the original setup conditions of the FLS trainer box. This is achieved via a series of image filtration sequences, thresholding functions, and Haar training methods. PMID:22357006

  9. Training-of-trainers: A strategy to build country capacity for SLMTA expansion and sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Talkmore; Yao, Katy; Ndlovu, Nqobile; Moyo, Sikhulile

    2015-01-01

    Background The Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA) programme uses a training-of-trainers (TOT) model to build capacity for programme scale-up. The TOT strategy is designed to maximise utilisation of its graduates whilst minimising inconsistencies and ensuring high programme quality during global expansion. Objectives To describe the SLMTA TOT programme approach. Methods The two-week training, led by carefully selected and trained master trainers, enables effective and authentic implementation of the curriculum by its graduates. The teachback methodology used allows participants to practise teaching the curriculum whilst learning its content. A trainer’s toolkit provides all the materials necessary for teaching and must be followed faithfully during training. Two surveys were conducted to assess the effectiveness of the TOT strategy: one sent to 316 TOT graduates in 25 countries and the other sent to the programme leaders in 10 countries. Results By the end of 2013, 433 SLMTA trainers had been trained who, in turn, taught more than 1900 people to implement SLMTA in 617 laboratories in 47 countries. Ninety-seven percent of the 433 TOT graduates and 87% of the 38 master trainers are based in developing countries. Ninety-two per cent of the graduates have been utilised at least once in programme implementation and, as of August 2013, 87% of them were still actively involved in programme activities. Ninety-seven per cent of the graduates stated that the TOT workshop prepared them well for training or other programme tasks. Conclusion The SLMTA TOT strategy is effective in building local capacity for global programme expansion whilst maintaining programme quality. PMID:26753131

  10. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Conservative Management and Prevention of Ankle Sprains in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Thomas W.; Hertel, Jay; Amendola, Ned; Docherty, Carrie L.; Dolan, Michael G.; Hopkins, J. Ty; Nussbaum, Eric; Poppy, Wendy; Richie, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals in the conservative management and prevention of ankle sprains in athletes. Background: Because ankle sprains are a common and often disabling injury in athletes, athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals must be able to implement the most current and evidence-supported treatment strategies to ensure safe and rapid return to play. Equally important is initiating preventive measures to mitigate both first-time sprains and the chance of reinjury. Therefore, considerations for appropriate preventive measures (including taping and bracing), initial assessment, both short- and long-term management strategies, return-to-play guidelines, and recommendations for syndesmotic ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability are presented. Recommendations: The recommendations included in this position statement are intended to provide athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals with guidelines and criteria to deliver the best health care possible for the prevention and management of ankle sprains. An endorsement as to best practice is made whenever evidence supporting the recommendation is available. PMID:23855363

  11. Recruitment and Rotation of the Trainers in the Lifelong Learning Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamaqi, Xhevrie; Rubio, Pilar Olave; Alvarez, Jesús Miguel

    The workplace of today is characterized by rapid changes in work processes, in competition, in customer demands, and in work practices. To keep abreast of these rapid changes employers and employees must be committed to lifelong learning in order to keep ahead. One of the most important actors in the lifelong learning development process are the trainers, whose professional characteristics needs meeting new skills and adapting an varied and specific contents of the current labour market. Affected by the discontinuity and a high rate of job rotation, the recognition of it labour status and basic competence and skills, forms part of the Bologna Process recognized as Vocational Education Training (VET). Sixty in-depth interviews realized to managers of the centres of formation, are used as tools to obtain information about following topics: recruitment strategies, conventional and not conventional routes of the recruitment, rate rotation, qualification and training of the Spanish trainers. The transcription of the interviews achieve that not always exist a previous plan of recruitment, except that it is a question as big centers of formation. Also, the obtained information indicates a high rate of rotation that affects the trainers ones as professionals since there exists the discontinuity of the formative offer on the labour market.

  12. Is the new AquaTrainer® snorkel valid for VO2 assessment in swimming?

    PubMed

    Baldari, C; Fernandes, R J; Meucci, M; Ribeiro, J; Vilas-Boas, J P; Guidetti, L

    2013-04-01

    The Cosmed AquaTrainer® snorkel, in connection with the K4b2 analyzer, is the most recent instrument used for real time gas analysis during swimming. This study aimed to test if a new AquaTrainer® snorkel with 2 (SV2) or 4 (SV4) valves is comparable to a standard face mask (Mask) being valid for real time gas analysis under controlled laboratory and swimming pool conditions. 9 swimmers performed 2 swimming and 3 cycling tests at 3 different workloads on separate days. Tests were performed in random order, at constant exercise load with direct turbine temperature measurements, breathing with Mask, SV4 and SV2 while cycling, and with SV2 and SV4 while swimming. A high agreement was obtained using Passing - Bablok regression analysis in oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, tidal volumes, pulmonary ventilation, expiratory fraction of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and heart rate comparing different conditions in swimming and cycling. Proportional and fixed differences were always rejected (95% CI always contained the value 1 for the slope and the 0 for the intercept). In conclusion, the new SV2 AquaTrainer® snorkel, can be considered a valid device for gas analysis, being comparable to the Mask and the SV4 in cycling, and to the SV4 in swimming. PMID:23041962

  13. Is the new AquaTrainer® snorkel valid for VO2 assessment in swimming?

    PubMed

    Baldari, C; Fernandes, R J; Meucci, M; Ribeiro, J; Vilas-Boas, J P; Guidetti, L

    2013-04-01

    The Cosmed AquaTrainer® snorkel, in connection with the K4b2 analyzer, is the most recent instrument used for real time gas analysis during swimming. This study aimed to test if a new AquaTrainer® snorkel with 2 (SV2) or 4 (SV4) valves is comparable to a standard face mask (Mask) being valid for real time gas analysis under controlled laboratory and swimming pool conditions. 9 swimmers performed 2 swimming and 3 cycling tests at 3 different workloads on separate days. Tests were performed in random order, at constant exercise load with direct turbine temperature measurements, breathing with Mask, SV4 and SV2 while cycling, and with SV2 and SV4 while swimming. A high agreement was obtained using Passing - Bablok regression analysis in oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, tidal volumes, pulmonary ventilation, expiratory fraction of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and heart rate comparing different conditions in swimming and cycling. Proportional and fixed differences were always rejected (95% CI always contained the value 1 for the slope and the 0 for the intercept). In conclusion, the new SV2 AquaTrainer® snorkel, can be considered a valid device for gas analysis, being comparable to the Mask and the SV4 in cycling, and to the SV4 in swimming.

  14. Men, muscles, and body image: comparisons of competitive bodybuilders, weight trainers, and athletically active controls

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, T; Lewis, R; Cash, T; Pope, H

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate body image and psychosocial adjustment among competitive bodybuilders, non-competitive weight trainers, and athletically active men. Methods: Participants were 40 men in each of the three groups who were assessed on body composition and multiple facets of body image evaluation, investment and anxiety, eating attitudes, and social self esteem. Results: Relative to the other two groups, competitive bodybuilders had greater body mass due to fat-free body mass. Although groups did not differ in their situational body image discomfort, competitive bodybuilders and weight trainers had a more positive global appearance evaluation and were more psychologically invested in their physical appearance. Compared with active controls, men in both weightlifting groups were more satisfied with their upper torso and muscle tone. Competitive bodybuilders reported more mid torso satisfaction than the other two groups. Competitive bodybuilders also wished to be significantly heavier than controls did and reported higher social self esteem but greater eating disturbance. Conclusions: The findings suggest that competitive bodybuilders as a group are not more "muscle dysmorphic" than either non-competitive weight trainers or physically active men who do not train with weights. PMID:15793091

  15. Comparison of the inertial properties and forces required to initiate movement for three gait trainers.

    PubMed

    Paleg, Ginny; Huang, Morris; Vasquez Gabela, Stephanie C; Sprigle, Stephen; Livingstone, Roslyn

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inertial properties and forces required to initiate movement on two different surfaces in a sample of three commonly prescribed gait trainers. Tests were conducted in a laboratory setting to compare the Prime Engineering KidWalk, Rifton Pacer, and Snug Seat Mustang with and without a weighted anthropometric test dummy configured to the weight and proportions of a 4-year-old child. The Pacer was the lightest and the KidWalk the heaviest while footprints of the three gait trainers were similar. Weight was borne fairly evenly on the four casters of the Pacer and Mustang while 85% of the weight was borne on the large wheels of the mid-wheel drive KidWalk. These differences in frame style, wheel, and caster style and overall mass impact inertial properties and forces required to initiate movement. Test results suggest that initiation forces on tile were equivalent for the Pacer and KidWalk while the Mustang had the highest initiation force. Initiation forces on carpet were lowest for the KidWalk and highest for the Mustang. This initial study of inertia and movement initiation forces may provide added information for clinicians to consider when selecting a gait trainer for their clients.

  16. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Safe Weight Loss and Maintenance Practices in Sport and Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Turocy, Paula Sammarone; DePalma, Bernard F.; Horswill, Craig A.; Laquale, Kathleen M.; Martin, Thomas J.; Perry, Arlette C.; Somova, Marla J.; Utter, Alan C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To present athletic trainers with recommendations for safe weight loss and weight maintenance practices for athletes and active clients and to provide athletes, clients, coaches, and parents with safe guidelines that will allow athletes and clients to achieve and maintain weight and body composition goals. Background: Unsafe weight management practices can compromise athletic performance and negatively affect health. Athletes and clients often attempt to lose weight by not eating, limiting caloric or specific nutrients from the diet, engaging in pathogenic weight control behaviors, and restricting fluids. These people often respond to pressures of the sport or activity, coaches, peers, or parents by adopting negative body images and unsafe practices to maintain an ideal body composition for the activity. We provide athletic trainers with recommendations for safe weight loss and weight maintenance in sport and exercise. Although safe weight gain is also a concern for athletic trainers and their athletes and clients, that topic is outside the scope of this position statement. Recommendations: Athletic trainers are often the source of nutrition information for athletes and clients; therefore, they must have knowledge of proper nutrition, weight management practices, and methods to change body composition. Body composition assessments should be done in the most scientifically appropriate manner possible. Reasonable and individualized weight and body composition goals should be identified by appropriately trained health care personnel (eg, athletic trainers, registered dietitians, physicians). In keeping with the American Dietetics Association (ADA) preferred nomenclature, this document uses the terms registered dietitian or dietician when referring to a food and nutrition expert who has met the academic and professional requirements specified by the ADA's Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education. In some cases, a registered nutritionist may have

  17. Influence of running shoes and cross-trainers on Achilles tendon forces during running compared with military boots.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, P J; Atkins, S

    2015-06-01

    Military recruits are known to be susceptible to Achilles tendon pathology. The British Army have introduced footwear models, the PT-03 (cross-trainer) and PT1000 (running shoes), in an attempt to reduce the incidence of injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the Achilles tendon forces of the cross-trainer and running shoe in relation to conventional army boots. Ten male participants ran at 4.0 m/s in each footwear condition. Achilles tendon forces were obtained throughout the stance phase of running and compared using repeated-measures ANOVAs. The results showed that the time to peak Achilles tendon force was significantly shorter when running in conventional army boots (0.12 s) in comparison with the cross-trainer (0.13 s) and running shoe (0.13 s). Achilles tendon loading rate was shown to be significantly greater in conventional army boots (38.73 BW/s) in comparison with the cross-trainer (35.14 BW/s) and running shoe (33.57 BW/s). The results of this study suggest that the running shoes and cross-trainer footwear are associated with reductions in Achilles tendon parameters that have been linked to the aetiology of injury, and thus it can be hypothesised that these footwear could be beneficial for military recruits undertaking running exercises.

  18. Trainer-to-student ratios for teaching psychomotor skills in health care fields, as applied to osteopathic manipulative medicine.

    PubMed

    Snider, Karen T; Seffinger, Michael A; Ferrill, Heather P; Gish, Eric E

    2012-04-01

    The hallmark of osteopathic medical education is the inclusion of hands-on instruction in osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM), which includes palpatory diagnosis and osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). This OMM training typically involves a primary instructor presenting theory and techniques with step-by-step demonstrations to a large group of first- and second-year osteopathic medical students. Additional instructors, referred to as table trainers, assist the primary instructor by supervising the students as they practice the presented techniques. To the authors' knowledge, there is no currently accepted standard for a table trainer-to-student ratio in OMM skills laboratories within osteopathic medical schools in the United States. However, through a Google Web search and PubMed literature review, the authors identified published trainer-to-student ratios used in other health care skills training curricula. Psychomotor skills training courses in health care fields typically have a table trainer-to-student ratio of 1 trainer to 8 or fewer students. On the basis of these findings and psychomotor skills learning theory, the authors conclude that this ratio is likely sufficient for OMM skills training.

  19. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Athletic Trainers' Concussion-Management Practice Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kassandra C.; Jordan, Erin M.; Joyner, A. Barry; Burdette, G. Trey; Buckley, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: A cornerstone of the recent consensus statements on concussion is a multifaceted concussion-assessment program at baseline and postinjury and when tracking recovery. Earlier studies of athletic trainers' (ATs') practice patterns found limited use of multifaceted protocols; however, these authors typically grouped diverse athletic training settings together. Objective: To (1) describe the concussion-management practice patterns of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I ATs, (2) compare these practice patterns to earlier studies, and (3) objectively characterize the clinical examination. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Online survey. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 610 ATs from NCAA Division I institutions, for a response rate of 34.4%. Main Outcome Measure(s): The survey had 3 subsections: demographic questions related to the participant's experiences, concussion-assessment practice patterns, and concussion-recovery and return-to-participation practice patterns. Specific practice-pattern questions addressed balance, cognitive and mental status, neuropsychological testing, and self-reported symptoms. Finally, specific components of the clinical examination were examined. Results: We identified high rates of multifaceted assessments (ie, assessments using at least 3 techniques) during testing at baseline (71.2%), acute concussion assessment (79.2%), and return to participation (66.9%). The specific techniques used are provided along with their adherence with evidence-based practice findings. Respondents endorsed a diverse array of clinical examination techniques that often overlapped objective concussion-assessment protocols or were likely used to rule out associated potential conditions. Respondents were cognizant of the Third International Consensus Statement, the National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement, and the revised NCAA Sports Medicine Handbook recommendations. Conclusions: Athletic trainers in

  20. Perceptions of Workplace Bullying Among Athletic Trainers in the Collegiate Setting

    PubMed Central

    Weuve, Celest; Pitney, William A.; Martin, Malissa; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Bullying has received a vast amount of attention in the recent past. One form of bullying, workplace bullying (WPB), has been a substantial concern explored in many health professions that can negatively influence a health care provider's role in an organization. To date, however, WPB has not been investigated in athletic training contexts. Objective: To examine the perceptions of certified athletic trainers who experienced or witnessed WPB during employment in the collegiate setting. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: College or university. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen athletic trainers (7 women, 8 men) with an average age of 42 ± 12 years. Data Collection and Analysis: Data were collected via semistructured, in-depth phone interviews or asynchronous online interviews. Data were analyzed using an inductive content analysis. Trustworthiness was established with member checks and peer debriefing. Results: Four themes emerged from the analysis: (1) antecedents of WPB, (2) consequences of WPB, (3) coping with WPB, and (4) lack of workplace environment training. The antecedents of WPB involved the bully's personality and perceptions of the athletic training profession as well as environmental factors including the pressure to win and a lack of administrative support. The consequences of WPB included increased stress, feelings of inadequacy, and increased distrust. Individuals coped with WPB by relying on emotional resilience and avoidance. A final theme, lack of workplace environment training, revealed that little attention was given to interpersonal issues and WPB in the workplace. Conclusions: Workplace bullying incidents occur when administrators tolerate bullying behaviors from controlling and manipulative individuals who lack respect for the athletic training professional. Several negative outcomes result from bullying interactions, including stress and anxiety; WPB is dealt with by learning to be more emotionally resilient and avoiding

  1. Pelvic Muscle Exercises Using A Home Trainer for Pelvic Muscle Dysfunction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic muscle exercises can help improve symptoms of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. This article describes the case of a 66-year-old woman with moderate pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and mild urinary incontinence (UI) who initiated pelvic muscle exercises with the assistance of a novel, at-home trainer equipped with a vaginal sensor and accompanying smartphone app software, the PeriCoach system (Analytica, 2015). After 8 weeks of training with the device, she showed improvements in strength, endurance, and disability, as measured by manual muscle test, electromyography, and Pelvic Floor Disability Index scores. Older women can use biofeedback technology to improve pelvic floor muscle function successfully at home. PMID:27281865

  2. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Nelson, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, peers out the open CCT side hatch and prepares to deploy inflatable slide. Technicians observe the activity from scaffolding on either side of the hatch. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  3. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck tests cushion outside the crew compartment trainer (CCT) side hatch. Hauck, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, tumbles out CCT side hatch onto cushion as technicians look on. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT is located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A.

  4. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Nelson, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, is strapped into his launch and entry station on the CCT middeck. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  5. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Preventing Sudden Death in Sports

    PubMed Central

    Casa, Douglas J.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Anderson, Scott A.; Courson, Ronald W.; Heck, Jonathan F.; Jimenez, Carolyn C.; McDermott, Brendon P.; Miller, Michael G.; Stearns, Rebecca L.; Swartz, Erik E.; Walsh, Katie M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention and screening, recognition, and treatment of the most common conditions resulting in sudden death in organized sports. Background: Cardiac conditions, head injuries, neck injuries, exertional heat stroke, exertional sickling, asthma, and other factors (eg, lightning, diabetes) are the most common causes of death in athletes. Recommendations: These guidelines are intended to provide relevant information on preventing sudden death in sports and to give specific recommendations for certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care. PMID:22488236

  6. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Lightning Safety for Athletics and Recreation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Katie M.; Cooper, Mary Ann; Holle, Ron; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Roeder, William P.; Ryan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the education, prevention, and management of lightning injuries for those involved in athletics or recreation. Background: Lightning is the most common severe-storm activity encountered annually in the United States. The majority of lightning injuries can be prevented through an aggressive educational campaign, vacating outdoor activities before the lightning threat, and an understanding of the attributes of a safe place from the hazard. Recommendations: This position statement is focused on supplying information specific to lightning safety and prevention and treatment of lightning injury and providing lightning-safety recommendations for the certified athletic trainer and those who are involved in athletics and recreation. PMID:23672391

  7. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, MS Springer on JSC crew compartment trainer middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer, wearing navy blue launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), participates in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) exercises. MS Springer is seated in mission specialist seat on CCT middeck, the position he will occupy during the entry phase of flight. Behind Springer is the closed airlock hatch and stowed treadmill. The crew escape system (CES) pole extends overhead from starboard wall to side hatch. On Springer's left is the galley. CCT is located in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Photo was taken by Bill Bowers of JSC.

  8. Trilevel interaction design model for pilot part-task training

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, J.H.; Pistone, R.A.; Stoddard, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Development of effective, scenario-driven training exercises requires both an instructional design and a delivery system that match the subject domain and needs of the students. The Training Research Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory conducts research and development of prototype training systems. One of the Team's efforts is a joint research project, supported with funding and behavioral science guidance from the Army Research Institute, to develop a prototype part-task trainer for student helicopter pilots. The Team designed a ''trilevel interaction'' model and a Level III interactive videodisc delivery system for this project. The model, founded on instructional and psychological theory, should be transferable to other domains where part-task training is appropriate.

  9. Injuries associated with the use of ejection seats in Finnish pilots.

    PubMed

    Visuri, T; Aho, J

    1992-08-01

    During the years 1958-91 17 Finnish pilots were forced to use ejection seats. The aircraft types were as follows: a) BA Hawk in 6 instances; b) a Mig 21-F-13 in 4; c) a Mig-21-Bis in 3; d) a Gnat Folland in 2; e) a Vampire Trainer in 1; and f) a MU-3 in 1 case. There were 3 ejections completed successfully, 12 pilots sustained slight injuries, and 5 pilots suffered major injuries--3 from compression fractures of the thoracic spine, 1 from fracture of the femur, and 1 from rupture of the medial collateral ligament of the knee. All major injuries were associated with Soviet aircraft. One BA-Hawk pilot died due to a direct impact against a tree after a low-altitude ejection. Two pilots launched the seat under negative G-forces. One of these became temporarily blind, and suffered a partial loss of vision for 3 months. Four Hawk pilots were saved during landing phase by a tandem ejection, receiving only minor injuries. PMID:1510649

  10. A New Assessment Tool. A Professional Development Kit for Trainers and Assessors Incorporating Language, Literacy and Numeracy Skills into Training Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulbourn, Barbara; Alexander, Ann

    This kit is designed to help trainers and assessors understand the importance of workplace communication in training packages. Section 1 explains what trainers and assessors need to know about communication skills, and how to use the kit. Section 2 provides an overview of training packages. It describes the endorsed parts of the package, which…

  11. The North Dakota Mental Health and Aging Education Project: Curriculum Design and Training Outcomes for a Train-the-Trainer Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Margaret A.; Chromy, Barbara; Philbrick, Candace A.; Sanders, Gregory F.; Muske, Kara L.; Bratteli, Marlys

    2009-01-01

    A training curriculum on mental health and aging was developed and disseminated to 32 natural caregivers throughout a frontier state using a train-the-trainer model. Those certified as trainers included social workers, religious professionals, volunteers, long-term care employees, nurses, home health workers, and professional and informal…

  12. Reflective Education as a Means of Changing Teacher Trainers' Attitudes towards Universal Values in the Education System of the Developing Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essawi, Mohammad; Abu-Hussain, Jamal; Fadila, Dalia

    2014-01-01

    The proposed intervention program's aim was to change teacher trainers' attitudes towards universal values. The program takes into account the unique cultural context of the developing society. The goal of the program was to reduce the gap between declared teacher trainers' attitudes and their actual attitudes towards universal values in the…

  13. Reshaping the Focus of Vocational Teacher and Trainer Training. A Cross Country Review of Needs, Achievements and Obstacles in Central and Eastern Europe. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Soren P.

    This document reports the results of a comparative analysis of the current situation and future needs of teacher and trainer training in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Following an introductory section explaining the methodology of the study, the second section focuses on features common to teacher and trainer training in all Central…

  14. The application of additive technologies in creation a medical simulator-trainer of the human head operating field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashapov, L. N.; Kashapov, N. F.; Kashapov, R. N.; Pashaev, B. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the work was to determine the possible application of additive manufacturing technology during the manufacturing process as close as possible to reality of medical simulator-trainers. In work were used some additive manufacturing technologies: selective laser sintering (SLS), fused deposition modeling (FDM), binder Jetting. As a result, a prototype of simulator-trainer of the human head operating field, which based on the CT real patient, was manufactured and conducted its tests. It was found that structure, which is obtained with the use of 3D-printers ProJet 160, most appropriate and closest to the real properties of the bone.

  15. National Athletic Trainers' Association Releases New Guidelines for Exertional Heat Illnesses: What School Nurses Need to Know.

    PubMed

    VanScoy, Rachel M; DeMartini, Julie K; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    Exertional heat illnesses (EHI) occur in various populations and settings. Within a school setting, there are student athletes who take part in physical activity where the risk of EHI is increased. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) released an updated position statement on EHI in September of 2015. This article is a summary of the position statement. The sports medicine team, including school nurses and athletic trainers, provides quality health care to these physically active individuals. Thus, it is important for school nurses to understand the prevention, recognition, and treatment of EHI. PMID:26941054

  16. National Athletic Trainers' Association Releases New Guidelines for Exertional Heat Illnesses: What School Nurses Need to Know.

    PubMed

    VanScoy, Rachel M; DeMartini, Julie K; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    Exertional heat illnesses (EHI) occur in various populations and settings. Within a school setting, there are student athletes who take part in physical activity where the risk of EHI is increased. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) released an updated position statement on EHI in September of 2015. This article is a summary of the position statement. The sports medicine team, including school nurses and athletic trainers, provides quality health care to these physically active individuals. Thus, it is important for school nurses to understand the prevention, recognition, and treatment of EHI.

  17. Effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's trainer behavior during one-to-one training with children with severe intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    van Vonderen, Annemarie; Didden, Robert; Beeking, Fenneke

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on response prompting and trainer behavior of direct-care staff during one-to-one training with five children with severe intellectual disability was assessed. During instruction, written information and verbal instruction were given concerning correct and incorrect trainer behavior and response prompting. Video feedback consisted of (a) interrupting a video presentation if an error occurred, (b) providing positive feedback, and (c) prompting the trainer to avoid errors or omissions. The results showed that instruction resulted in an improvement (though not significantly) in correct trainer behavior while video feedback was significantly effective in improving correct trainer behavior. Results were maintained at a 5-week follow-up.

  18. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Preventing, Detecting, and Managing Disordered Eating in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Bonci, Christine M; Bonci, Leslie J; Granger, Lorita R; Johnson, Craig L; Malina, Robert M; Milne, Leslie W; Ryan, Randa R; Vanderbunt, Erin M

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, detection, and comprehensive management of disordered eating (DE) in athletes. Background: Athletes with DE rarely self-report their symptoms. They tend to deny the condition and are often resistant to referral and treatment. Thus, screenings and interventions must be handled skillfully by knowledgeable professionals to obtain desired outcomes. Certified athletic trainers have the capacity and responsibility to play active roles as integral members of the health care team. Their frequent daily interactions with athletes help to facilitate the level of medical surveillance necessary for early detection, timely referrals, treatment follow-through, and compliance. Recommendations: These recommendations are intended to provide certified athletic trainers and others participating in the health maintenance and performance enhancement of athletes with specific knowledge and problem-solving skills to better prevent, detect, and manage DE. The individual biological, psychological, sociocultural, and familial factors for each athlete with DE result in widely different responses to intervention strategies, challenging the best that athletics programs have to offer in terms of resources and expertise. The complexity, time intensiveness, and expense of managing DE necessitate an interdisciplinary approach representing medicine, nutrition, mental health, athletic training, and athletics administration in order to facilitate early detection and treatment, make it easier for symptomatic athletes to ask for help, enhance the potential for full recovery, and satisfy medicolegal requirements. Of equal importance is establishing educational initiatives for preventing DE. PMID:18335017

  19. Substance abuse prevention in Cape Town's peri-urban settlements: local health trainers' perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Puljević, Cheneal; Learmonth, Despina

    2014-01-01

    South Africa currently experiences high levels of alcohol and other drug (AOD) abuse. As a result there is a need for the initiation of regional AOD abuse prevention programmes with a specific focus on youth prevention strategies. The Medical Knowledge Institute (MKI) is a non-profit organisation which develops and facilitates health information workshops to members of disadvantaged peri-urban communities in South Africa. This research investigated the views of eight local MKI health trainers on factors contributing to AOD abuse in their communities. Although the expected focus of the discussion was on prevention strategies and effective interventions, the trainers placed more emphasis on the individual and community factors influencing AOD abuse. The themes which emerged through the research included: status, government, (di)stress, gender, recreation, consequences and community. This research holds significance as it has the potential to assist further development of community-based AOD prevention workshops and to guide public health policy and service development for AOD abuse. PMID:25750776

  20. Building blocks for peer success: lessons learned from a train-the-trainer program.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Carol R; Downes, Alicia; Eddens, Shalini; Ruiz, John

    2012-01-01

    The National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) calls for a reduction in health disparities, a reduction in new HIV infections, and improved retention in HIV care and treatment. It acknowledges that HIV-positive peers can play an important role in supporting these aims. However, peer training must be comprehensive enough to equip peers with the knowledge and skills needed for this work. This article describes the development of a national train the trainer (TTT) model for HIV peer educators, and the results of its implementation and replication. A mixed methods evaluation identified who was trained locally as a result of TTT implementation, what aspects of the TTT were most useful to trainers in implementing local training sessions, and areas for improvement. Over the course of 1 year, 91 individuals were trained at 1 of 6 TTT sessions. These individuals then conducted 26 local training sessions for 272 peers. Factors that facilitated local replication training included the teach-back/feedback model, faculty modeling of facilitation styles, financial support for training logistics, and faculty support in designing and implementing the training. The model could be improved by providing instruction on how to incorporate peers as part of the training team. TTT programs that are easily replicable in the community will be an important asset in developing a peer workforce that can help implement the National AIDS Strategy.

  1. The Design of a Primary Flight Trainer using Concurrent Engineering Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladesic, James G.; Eastlake, Charles N.; Kietzmann, Nicholas H.

    1993-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering (CE) concepts seek to coordinate the expertise of various disciplines from initial design configuration selection through product disposal so that cost efficient design solutions may be achieve. Integrating this methodology into an undergraduate design course sequence may provide a needed enhancement to engineering education. The Advanced Design Program (ADP) project at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (EMU) is focused on developing recommendations for the general aviation Primary Flight Trainer (PFT) of the twenty first century using methods of CE. This project, over the next two years, will continue synthesizing the collective knowledge of teams composed of engineering students along with students from other degree programs, their faculty, and key industry representatives. During the past year (Phase I). conventional trainer configurations that comply with current regulations and existing technologies have been evaluated. Phase I efforts have resulted in two baseline concepts, a high-wing, conventional design named Triton and a low-wing, mid-engine configuration called Viper. In the second and third years (Phases II and III). applications of advanced propulsion, advanced materials, and unconventional airplane configurations along with military and commercial technologies which are anticipated to be within the economic range of general aviation by the year 2000, will be considered.

  2. Can Health Trainers Make a Difference With Difficult-to-Engage Clients? A Multisite Case Study.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Di; Kerlin, Lianne

    2015-09-01

    A political attempt in the United Kingdom to address health inequalities in the past decade has been the government's initiative to employ local health trainers (HTs) or health trainer champions (HTCs) to support disadvantaged individuals with aspects of their health-related behaviors. HT/HTCs provide health-related information and support to individuals with healthy eating, physical activity, and smoking cessation. They undertake community engagement and direct individuals to relevant health services. They differ in that HTs are trained to provide health interventions to individuals or groups and to make referrals to specialist health care services when necessary. This article provides an evaluation of HT/HTCs interventions across three sites, including one prison, one probation service (three teams), and one mental health center. An evaluation framework combining process and outcome measures was employed that used mixed methods to capture data relating to the implementation of the service, including the context of the HT/HTCs interventions, the reactions of their clients, and the outcomes reported. It was found that HT/HTCs interventions were more effective in the prison and mental health center compared with the probation site largely as a result of contextual factors. PMID:25794692

  3. Kinematical changes in swimming front Crawl and Breaststroke with the AquaTrainer snorkel.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Tiago; Silva, António José; Reis, António Malvas; Costa, Mário; Garrido, Nuno; Policarpo, Fernando; Reis, Victor Machado

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the kinematical changes when swimming maximal bouts in Front Crawl and Breaststroke with the AquaTrainer snorkel. Thirteen male swimmers (7 at Breaststroke and 6 at Front Crawl) of national level performed randomly two maximal bouts of 100-m swims: one bout using the AquaTrainer snorkel (snorkel swim) and another one without the snorkel (free swim). The swims were videotaped in sagittal plane with a pair of cameras providing 2D kinematics evaluation. The following measures were assessed: swimming performance (T100), stroke cycle period (P), stroke rate (SR), stroke length (SL), swimming velocity (v), swimming efficiency as estimated by the stroke index (SI), speed fluctuation (dv) and the mathematical characterisation of dv. T100 was significantly higher when swimming with the snorkel than in free swimming at Breaststroke (Delta = 6.26%) and at Front Crawl (Delta = 4.75%). P, SR and SL, as well as SI and dv did not present significant differences. The main finding of the study was that changes in the swimming velocity imposed by the use of the Aquatrainer do not seem due to changes in general kinematics or swimming efficiency.

  4. Can Health Trainers Make a Difference With Difficult-to-Engage Clients? A Multisite Case Study.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Di; Kerlin, Lianne

    2015-09-01

    A political attempt in the United Kingdom to address health inequalities in the past decade has been the government's initiative to employ local health trainers (HTs) or health trainer champions (HTCs) to support disadvantaged individuals with aspects of their health-related behaviors. HT/HTCs provide health-related information and support to individuals with healthy eating, physical activity, and smoking cessation. They undertake community engagement and direct individuals to relevant health services. They differ in that HTs are trained to provide health interventions to individuals or groups and to make referrals to specialist health care services when necessary. This article provides an evaluation of HT/HTCs interventions across three sites, including one prison, one probation service (three teams), and one mental health center. An evaluation framework combining process and outcome measures was employed that used mixed methods to capture data relating to the implementation of the service, including the context of the HT/HTCs interventions, the reactions of their clients, and the outcomes reported. It was found that HT/HTCs interventions were more effective in the prison and mental health center compared with the probation site largely as a result of contextual factors.

  5. Sit-to-Stand Trainer: An Apparatus for Training "Normal-Like" Sit to Stand Movement.

    PubMed

    Matjacic, Zlatko; Zadravec, Matjaz; Oblak, Jakob

    2016-06-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) transfer training is probably the most demanding task in rehabilitation. We have developed an innovative STS trainer that offers variable levels of mechanical support and speeds of STS transfer. In a group of neurologically intact individuals we compared kinematics, kinetics and electromyography (EMG) patterns of STS transfer assessed in three experimental conditions with increasing degree of mechanical support (MIN STS-T, MED STS-T, and MAX STS-T) to natural, unassisted STS movement (NO STS-T). The resulting ankle, knee, hip joint and trunk angles in experimental conditions MED STS-T and MIN STS-T were very similar to experimental condition NO STS-T. Vertical ground reaction forces and EMG patterns in the tibialis anterior, quadriceps and hamstrings show a clear trend toward "normal" patterns as the level of mechanical support from the device is progressively reduced. We have further tested the feasibility of the STS trainer in five stroke subjects at two levels of support showing that increased voluntary effort is needed when the support is reduced. Based on these results we conclude that negligible constraints are imposed by the device on a user's STS transfer kinematics, which is an important prerequisite for considering clinical use of the device for training in neurologically impaired.

  6. Case Report: Using an Auditory Trainer with Caregiver Video Modeling to Enhance Communication and Socialization Behaviors in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baharav, Eva; Darling, Rieko

    2008-01-01

    A minimally verbal child with autism was exposed to short daily sessions of watching his parents on video in conjunction with an FM auditory trainer for a period of 4 weeks. Baseline measures of verbal and social behaviors were taken pre-treatment and repeated post treatment. Results indicate substantial gains in word productions, social…

  7. Reading, Writing and Cultivating. A Resource Book for Post-Literacy Trainers Based on Experiences in Senegal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millican, Juliet

    This resource book is intended to help trainers working on postliteracy programs in agricultural areas of West Africa. Its primary focus is on the role of literacy in the management of irrigation systems and farmer cooperatives and on program administration activities such as recordkeeping, registration, and credit. However, strategies for meeting…

  8. COED Transactions, Vol. XI, No. 12, December 1979. Some Alternate Applications of Microprocessor Trainers in Support of Undergraduate Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Eugene E., Ed.

    Ways are described for the use of a microprocessor trainer in undergraduate laboratories. Listed are microcomputer applications that have been used as demonstrations and which provide signals for other experiments which are not related to microprocessors. Information and figures are provided for methods to do the following: direct generation of…

  9. Water and Sanitation Technologies: A Trainer's Manual. Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Bradley D.

    This guide, which includes an outline of 222 hours of technical training integrated with training in community organization techniques, is intended for trainers who prepare Peace Corps water and sanitation technicians and engineers for field service. The training program developed by the guide covers these subject areas: community development,…

  10. Metabolic Cost of Stride Rate, Resistance, and Combined Use of Arms and Legs on the Elliptical Trainer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mier, Constance M.; Feito, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    We measured the effects of stride rate, resistance, and combined arm-leg use on energy expenditure during elliptical trainer exercise and assessed the accuracy of the manufacturer's energy expenditure calculations. Twenty-six men and women (M age = 29 years, SD = 8; M body weight = 73.0 kg, SD = 15.2) participated. Twenty-two participants…

  11. Made to Measure: Language, Literacy and Numeracy in TCF [Textile, Clothing, and Footwear] Industry Training. A Guide for Workplace Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Sue

    This guide is designed to help workplace trainers in the textile, clothing, and footwear (TCF) industry to become more aware of the language, literacy, and numeracy demands of training. It is divided into two main sections. Section 1, "Background Information," covers understanding language, literacy, and numeracy; understanding training in the TCF…

  12. Mothers as Early Cognitive Trainers: Guiding Low-Income Mothers to Work with Their Pre-Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Phyllis

    The Mother-Child Home Program was planned as a home-based, two-year cognitive intervention method. Women with varied incomes and education, both volunteer and paid, made 30-minute home visits twice weekly to help mothers become cognitive trainers of their own toddlers (starting at age two). Mother-child verbal interaction was stimulated with gifts…

  13. Support from Teachers and Trainers in Vocational Education and Training: The Pathways to Career Aspirations and Further Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Claudia; Stalder, Barbara E.; Tschan, Franziska; Häfeli, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Transition from school to work is a challenging period for young people with learning difficulties. In the dual vocational system of Switzerland, teachers at vocational educational and training (VET)-schools, as well as trainers at VET-companies, provide important support. We were interested in the different pathways from this support to…

  14. Paper Copters and Potential: Leveraging Afterschool and Youth Development Trainers to Extend the Reach of STEM Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingwood, Stephanie A.; Sorensen, Jennifer B.

    2014-01-01

    October 6, 2012: 109 adults simultaneously threw their heads back and shouted "I discovered!" at the top of their lungs. Slightly mangled bright-green paper helicopters littered the floor. The class was six minutes into a daylong journey of discovery, during which this group of volunteer trainers would learn to facilitate a curriculum…

  15. The Training of Trainers in Educational Planning. Report of an IIEP Workshop (Nairobi, Kenya, June 29-July 10, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). International Inst. for Educational Planning.

    The main aim of the International Institute for Educational Planning's program "Training the Trainers" is to improve the technical skills of planning specialists and to develop their organizational capabilities so that they can run national training programs. The objectives of the workshop described in this reort were to design the content of…

  16. Moral Dilemmas in a Military Context. a Case Study of a Train the Trainer Course on Military Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Baarle, Eva; Bosch, Jolanda; Widdershoven, Guy; Verweij, Desiree; Molewijk, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Moral competence is important for soldiers who have to deal with complex moral dilemmas in practice. However, openly dealing with moral dilemmas and showing moral competence is not always easy within the culture of a military organization. In this article, based on analysis of experiences during a train the trainer course on military ethics, we…

  17. Examining the Effectiveness of a Train-the-Trainer Model: Training Teachers to Use Pivotal Response Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    The train-the-trainer (TTT) model, which has also been called pyramidal training, triadic training, and helper model training, focuses on initially training a person or people who, in turn, train other people at their home agency. The TTT model has promise of being both efficient and cost-effective. The TTT model may be especially useful in…

  18. An Early Childhood Collaboration Project in India. Cross-Continent Training of Trainers: A Relationship-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stine, Helen; Aviles, Jill; McCreedy, Barbara; Rajesh, Anubha; Sethi, Ridhi; Gupta, Vini

    2007-01-01

    When a Virginia-based international consulting company extended its early education services to India, a model of collaborative, interactive training--Training of Trainers--was born. To apply the principles of quality early childhood education in India, training must be meaningful, sustainable, and relationship based. In this article,…

  19. Female Head Athletic Trainers in NCAA Division I (IA Football) Athletics: How They Made It to the Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorant, JoAnne

    2012-01-01

    The profession of athletic training has opened its doors to women, who now slightly outnumber men in the profession (Shingles, 2001; WATC, 1997, 2005). Unfortunately, this representation does not carry over into positions of high rank. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the lived experiences of female head athletic trainers in…

  20. Knowledge Representation and Self-Regulatory Experiences of Expert and Novice Certified Athletic Trainers in College and University Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardin, Fredrick Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how male, collegiate, certified athletic trainers (AT's) represent knowledge during 5 injury evaluation scenarios. A second purpose of the study was to identify what self-regulatory behaviors participants engaged in to improve or maintain their skills. Knowledge representation was studied as cue selection…

  1. Self-Perceived Educational Preparedness of Entry-Level Athletic Trainers Regarding Preventing Sudden Death in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Yabor, Thomas M.; Salvatore, Anthony C.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: As the first medical professionals on scene when emergency situations arise in sport, athletic trainers (ATs) need to be proficient in recognizing and managing these conditions. Recent evidence regarding exertional heatstroke indicates a lack of educational training as a factor preventing implementation of best practices, yet other causes…

  2. Technical Work Experience vs. College Credit in Meeting the Need for Technically Experienced Industry Trainers/Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebo, Emma M.; Smith, Mack W.

    Enrollment data confirmed that by fall of 1985, half of the 70 students enrolled in vocational teacher education coursework at Idaho State University (ISU) were involved in corporate training outside of vocational education. ISU's Vocational Teacher Education (VTE) Program has developed a new degree program for corporate trainers that maintains…

  3. A Trainer's Guide to El Comienzo & Esto Es Familiar: Keys to Training Spanish-Speaking Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellm, Dan

    This set of manuals was developed by the California Child Care Initiative for the training of Spanish-speaking family day care providers. The English-language trainer's guide has been designed to accompany "El Comienzo" ("The Beginner") and "Esto Es Familiar" ("It's a Family Affair"). The Spanish-language "El Comienzo" is an information kit…

  4. Fire fighting trainers' exposure to carcinogenic agents in smoke diving simulators.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Juha; Mäkelä, Mauri; Mikkola, Jouni; Huttu, Ismo

    2010-01-15

    It is well known that fire fighters are potentially exposed to various carcinogenic agents at a fire scene. An almost unheeded issue, however, is fire fighters' exposure to carcinogenic agents in smoke diving simulators. Biomonitoring (urinary muconic acid, 1-naphthol and 1-pyrenol), dermal (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and occupational hygiene measurements (cyanides, hydrogen cyanide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds and formaldehyde) were used to determine how the burning material, the type of simulator and protective clothing used affect fire fighting trainers' exposure. The highest excretion of 1-pyrenol (sampled 6h after end of exposure, in average 4.3-9.2nmol/L) and emissions of benzene (1.0-2.5mg/m(3)) and hydrogen cyanide (0.2-0.9mg/m(3)) were measured during the burning of conifer plywood and chipboard, and the lowest when pure pine and spruce wood (1.5nmol/L, 0.6mg/m(3), and 0.05mg/m(3)) was burned. However the safest burning material seemed to be propane (1.0nmol/L, 0.2mg/m(3), and not measured). The type of simulator used affected trainers' exposure very clearly. The highest dermal whole body exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in the fire house simulator (in average 1200ng/cm(2)). Clearly lower exposure levels were measured in container training sessions (760ng/cm(2)), where the average dermal exposure level was 35% lower than in the fire house. The exposure levels (30ng/cm(2)) in the gas simulator in turn, were only 4% of the levels in container training sessions. The amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons decreased by 80% on trainers' hands when they used under gloves (in average 8.7ng/cm(2)) compared to those (48.4ng/cm(2)) who did not. There was not difference in protection efficiency against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between tested fire suits (Brage and Bristol). PMID:19576276

  5. Training of Trainers: Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Research Corp., Bethesda, MD.

    This manual is designed to train individuals to deliver courses developed within the National Training System of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The training guide, describes the content and activities that constitute training delivery, identifies behaviors and skills associated with training delivery, elaborates on program design and…

  6. The Pilot Training Study: Personnel Flow and the PILOT Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooz, W. E.

    The results of the Rand study of pilot flows and the computer-operated decision model, called the PILOT model, are described. The flows of pilots within the Air Force are caused by policies that require the career-development rotation of pilots from cockpit jobs to desk jobs, the maintenance of a supplement of pilots in excess of cockpit-related…

  7. Being a trainer in the French vocational training system: a case study of job status and working conditions in relation to perceived health.

    PubMed

    Delgoulet, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This communication presents part of an international project focused on the work of trainers from an ergonomics perspective. The objective is to identify in the French vocational training system the various types of job status of trainers and their impact on working conditions and health. In order to explore this issue, we met with 11 trainers, all volunteers, working in the music or human resources sectors. Semi-structured interviews and transcriptions of two weeks of the trainers' professional schedules form the data collected. The analyses show that trainers have various job statuses as trainers and sometimes hold down several jobs at the same time. These working situations create freedom but lack security. With very long daily or weekly working hours, the relationships with trainees and clients are qualified as both very interesting, but also one of the most difficult aspects of the work. The 11 trainers, who considered themselves to be in good health, do however declare infra-pathological disorders, which they often relate to their working conditions. These findings are discussed with regard to the literature and raise issues relating to ergonomic methods in activity analysis and situated action.

  8. [Improving the collective self-efficacy of the teams of nurse trainers at IFSI through professional didactics].

    PubMed

    Nagels, Marc

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to show that the analysis of the activity is a factor of construction of the collective self-efficacy of the trainers of five training institutes in nursing care (IFSI). As a collective system of beliefs on the capacity of the group to attain its goals, self-efficacy finds its foundations in the sociocognitive theory which articulates, within a mutual triadic causality, the personal, behavioral and environmental factors of the human agentivity. The personal determiners (self-efficacy, cognitive organization of the activity) are put in connection with the behavioral (production of the performance) and environmental (attribution of skill, professional tasks and standards) factors. The intervention consisted in introducing one hundred and nine nurse trainers to work analysis in a context of hospital reforms. The collective self-efficacy of the trainers appears as a key variable of the success of these reforms. The collective self-efficacy was the object of a pre-test and a qualitative post-test on the basis of motivational indicators, of the effectiveness of the educational realizations to the students and the estimation of the performance of the group to conduct the reform. The level of collective self-efficacy increases and the first realizations maintain the belief of the trainers in their capacity to succeed collectively in the implementation of the training plan. This is the first research in France which shows that the analysis of the activity comes along with an increase of the collective self-efficacy in work. These results question the practices of the trainers beyond the paramedical sector alone. PMID:21568116

  9. [Improving the collective self-efficacy of the teams of nurse trainers at IFSI through professional didactics].

    PubMed

    Nagels, Marc

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to show that the analysis of the activity is a factor of construction of the collective self-efficacy of the trainers of five training institutes in nursing care (IFSI). As a collective system of beliefs on the capacity of the group to attain its goals, self-efficacy finds its foundations in the sociocognitive theory which articulates, within a mutual triadic causality, the personal, behavioral and environmental factors of the human agentivity. The personal determiners (self-efficacy, cognitive organization of the activity) are put in connection with the behavioral (production of the performance) and environmental (attribution of skill, professional tasks and standards) factors. The intervention consisted in introducing one hundred and nine nurse trainers to work analysis in a context of hospital reforms. The collective self-efficacy of the trainers appears as a key variable of the success of these reforms. The collective self-efficacy was the object of a pre-test and a qualitative post-test on the basis of motivational indicators, of the effectiveness of the educational realizations to the students and the estimation of the performance of the group to conduct the reform. The level of collective self-efficacy increases and the first realizations maintain the belief of the trainers in their capacity to succeed collectively in the implementation of the training plan. This is the first research in France which shows that the analysis of the activity comes along with an increase of the collective self-efficacy in work. These results question the practices of the trainers beyond the paramedical sector alone.

  10. Effects of G-trainer, cycle ergometry, and stretching on physiological and psychological recovery from endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    West, Amy D; Cooke, Matthew B; LaBounty, Paul M; Byars, Allyn G; Greenwood, Mike

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 3 treatment modes (Anti-Gravity Treadmill [G-trainer], stationary cycling [CompuTrainer], and static stretching) on the physiological and psychological recovery after an acute bout of exhaustive exercise. In a crossover design, 12 aerobically trained men (21.3 ± 2.3 years, 72.1 ± 8.1 kg, 178.4 ± 6.3 cm, (Equation is included in full-text article.): 53.7 ± 6.3 ml·kg·min) completed a 29-km stationary cycling time trial. Immediately after the time trial, subjects completed 30 minutes of G-trainer or CompuTrainer (40% (Equation is included in full-text article.)) or static stretching exercises. A significant time effect was detected for plasma lactate (p = 0.010) and serum cortisol (p = 0.039) after exercise. No treatment or treatment by time interaction was identified for lactate or cortisol, respectively. No main effects for time, treatment, or treatment by time interaction were identified for interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). No differences were observed among treatments in skeletal muscle peak power output, mean power output, time to peak power, and rate to fatigue at 24 hours postexercise bout. Finally, no significant changes in mood status were observed after exercise and between treatment groups. When compared with stationary cycling and static stretching, exercise recovery performed on the G-trainer was unable to reduce systemic markers of stress and inflammation, blood lactate, or improve anaerobic performance and psychological mood states after an exhaustive bout of endurance exercise. Further research is warranted that includes individualized recovery modalities to create balances between the stresses of training and competition.

  11. Impact of Elliptical Trainer Ergonomic Modifications on Perceptions of Safety, Comfort, Workout, and Usability for People With Physical Disabilities and Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yu; Buster, Thad W.; Taylor, Adam P.; Nelson, Carl A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The popularity of elliptical training has grown in rehabilitation, fitness, and home settings as a means for improving fitness and walking, yet many people with physical disabilities and chronic conditions experience difficulties when trying to use elliptical trainers. Objective The purpose of this study was to compare, for people with disabilities and chronic conditions, perceptions of safety, comfort, workout, and usability of 4 elliptical trainers before and after the development of a set of low-cost adaptations. Design This study was a quasi-experimental repeated-measures investigation. Methods Twenty adults with diverse medical conditions and functional abilities evaluated 4 elliptical trainers for safety, comfort, workout, and usability. Barriers to the use of the elliptical trainers and solutions to improve the use of the trainers were identified. Prototype modifications were designed, and participants reassessed the same features after the modifications were made. Results An integrated system (steps, bench, side rails, center rail or handle, deeper foot wells, and 1-handed heart rate monitor) was developed. Although at least 25% of participants required physical assistance to get on or off the elliptical trainers before modification, only one required this after modification. Before modification, only 1 participant was able to mount each device independently; after modification, 6 to 8 participants were able to do so. Up to 25% of participants continued to require assistance to initiate or sustain pedal movement. Compared with participants' ratings of the elliptical trainers before modification, those after modification were higher for safety (55% increase in visual analog scale ratings), comfort (43% higher), ability to achieve a good workout (23% greater), and usability (24% increase). Limitations To date, only 4 elliptical trainers have been studied with a small sample of convenience. Conclusions Elliptical trainers posed access challenges to

  12. Space motion sickness preflight adaptation training Preliminary studies with prototype trainers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Ouyang, L.; Rock, J. C.; Von Gierke, H. E.; Reschke, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation hypothesis (Parker et al., 1985), preflight adaptation procedures and several preflight adaptation trainers (PATs) have been developed. Two PAT prototypes, the Miami University Seesaw (MUS) and the Dynamic Environmental Simulator (DES), include a physical room that is moved relative to the restrained subject. Results from the MUS and DES PAT experiments indicate that exposure to the produced sensory rearrangement can change eye movement reflexes. The changes persisted for a period longer than the training exposure period, indicating similarity with the eye-movement reflexes observed immediately postflight in weightlessness-adapted astronauts. It is concluded that the apparatus and procedures to preadapt astronauts to the sensory rearrangement of weightless space flight can be developed on the basis of the reported PATs and procedures. The third PAT prototype tested, which employs a computer-generated scene, failed to produce changes similar to those recorded in the MUS and DES experiments.

  13. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Prevention of Pediatric Overuse Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.; Decoster, Laura C.; Loud, Keith J.; Micheli, Lyle J.; Parker, J. Terry; Sandrey, Michelle A.; White, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To provide certified athletic trainers, physicians, and other health care professionals with recommendations on best practices for the prevention of overuse sports injuries in pediatric athletes (aged 6–18 years). Background: Participation in sports by the pediatric population has grown tremendously over the years. Although the health benefits of participation in competitive and recreational athletic events are numerous, one adverse consequence is sport-related injury. Overuse or repetitive trauma injuries represent approximately 50% of all pediatric sport-related injuries. It is speculated that more than half of these injuries may be preventable with simple approaches. Recommendations: Recommendations are provided based on current evidence regarding pediatric injury surveillance, identification of risk factors for injury, preparticipation physical examinations, proper supervision and education (coaching and medical), sport alterations, training and conditioning programs, and delayed specialization. PMID:21391806

  14. STS-26 MS Hilmers during egress training at JSC's MAIL full fuselage trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), tries out the new crew escape system (CES) inflated slide during an emergency egress training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Technicians stand on either side of the slide ready to help Hilmers to his feet once he reaches the bottom. Watching from floor level at the far left is astronaut Steven R. Nagel. A second crewmember stands in the open side hatch of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) awaiting his turn to slide to 'safety'. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (LESs) and checked out CES slide and other CES configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. The CES pole extends out the side hatch just above Hilmers' head.

  15. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Nelson, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, maneuvers himself into middeck mission specialists seat as MS David C. Hilmers pulls himself up onto flight deck from the middeck through the interdeck access hatch. Side hatch is closed and stowed treadmill appears in the foreground. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT is in launch (vertical) position therefore the aft middeck bulkhead and airlock become the floor.

  16. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Lounge, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and communications carrier assembly (CCA), pulls himself up onto flight deck from the middeck through the interdeck access hatch. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT is in launch (vertical) position therefore the aft middeck bulkhead becomes the floor (note technician at the side hatch).

  17. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Nelson, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, exits CCT via slide inflated at side hatch. Technicians at the bottom of the slide prepare to help Nelson to his feet as a second set of technicians observe the activity from scaffolding on either side of the open hatch. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  18. Mechanical design and driving mechanism of an isokinetic functional electrical stimulation-based leg stepping trainer.

    PubMed

    Hamzaid, N A; Fornusek, C; Ruys, A; Davis, G M

    2007-12-01

    The mechanical design of a constant velocity (isokinetic) leg stepping trainer driven by functional electrical stimulation-evoked muscle contractions was the focus of this paper. The system was conceived for training the leg muscles of neurologically-impaired patients. A commercially available slider crank mechanism for elliptical stepping exercise was adapted to a motorized isokinetic driving mechanism. The exercise system permits constant-velocity pedalling at cadences of 1-60 rev x min(-1). The variable-velocity feature allows low pedalling forces for individuals with very weak leg muscles, yet provides resistance to higher pedalling effort in stronger patients. In the future, the system will be integrated with a computer-controlled neuromuscular stimulator and a feedback control unit to monitor training responses of spinal cord-injured, stroke and head injury patients.

  19. Mechanical design and driving mechanism of an isokinetic functional electrical stimulation-based leg stepping trainer.

    PubMed

    Hamzaid, N A; Fornusek, C; Ruys, A; Davis, G M

    2007-12-01

    The mechanical design of a constant velocity (isokinetic) leg stepping trainer driven by functional electrical stimulation-evoked muscle contractions was the focus of this paper. The system was conceived for training the leg muscles of neurologically-impaired patients. A commercially available slider crank mechanism for elliptical stepping exercise was adapted to a motorized isokinetic driving mechanism. The exercise system permits constant-velocity pedalling at cadences of 1-60 rev x min(-1). The variable-velocity feature allows low pedalling forces for individuals with very weak leg muscles, yet provides resistance to higher pedalling effort in stronger patients. In the future, the system will be integrated with a computer-controlled neuromuscular stimulator and a feedback control unit to monitor training responses of spinal cord-injured, stroke and head injury patients. PMID:18274073

  20. Development and evaluation of a prototype in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, J. B., Jr.; Morris, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    An in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer capable of providing simulated indications of instrument flight in a typical general aviation aircraft independent of ground based navigation aids was developed. The IFR navaid related instruments and circuits from an ATC 610J table top simulator were installed in a Cessna 172 aircraft and connected to its electrical power and pitot static systems. The benefits expected from this hybridization concept include increased safety by reducing the number of general aviation aircraft conducting IFR training flights in congested terminal areas, and reduced fuel use and instruction costs by lessening the need to fly to and from navaid equipped airports and by increased efficiency of the required in-flight training. Technical feasibility was demonstrated and the operational feasibility of the concept was evaluated. Results indicated that the in-flight simulator is an effective training device for teaching IFR procedural skills.

  1. Position versus force control: using the 2-DOF robotic ankle trainer to assess ankle's motor control.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, Amir B; Nabian, Mohsen; Hartman, Amber; Corsino, Johnathan; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Holden, Maureen K

    2014-01-01

    An estimated of 2,000,000 acute ankle sprains occur annually in the United States. Furthermore, ankle disabilities are caused by neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and stroke. The virtually interfaced robotic ankle and balance trainer (vi-RABT) was introduced as a cost-effective platform-based rehabilitation robot to improve overall ankle/balance strength, mobility and control. The system is equipped with 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF) controlled actuation along with complete means of angle and torque measurement mechanisms. Vi-RABT was used to assess ankle strength, flexibility and motor control in healthy human subjects, while playing interactive virtual reality games on the screen. The results suggest that in the task with 2-DOF, subjects have better control over ankle's position vs. force.

  2. Facilitating the professional development role of clinicians: evaluating the impact of the clinician-trainer program.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda

    2004-06-01

    The professionalisation of nursing has been accompanied by recognition of the need for ongoing professional development. Continuing education is considered as an important method in maintaining professional development. Despite this recognition there is a paucity of literature addressing either the problems experienced in accessing and utilising continuing education or innovative programs designed to overcome these problems. This paper describes the impact evaluation of the clinician-trainer program, developed by the Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice (CPNRP). This program was developed with a view to equip experienced psychiatric/mental health clinicians with the skills to provide workplace professional development to nursing colleagues. The evaluation suggests that for most participants (n=21), the program has lead to an increase in the delivery of continuing education sessions.

  3. Collaboration between human and nonhuman players in Night Vision Tactical Trainer-Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglie, Stephen T.; Gallogly, James J.

    2016-05-01

    The Night Vision Tactical Trainer - Shadow (NVTT-S) is a U.S. Army-developed training tool designed to improve critical Manned-Unmanned Teaming (MUMT) communication skills for payload operators in Unmanned Aerial Sensor (UAS) crews. The trainer is composed of several Government Off-The-Shelf (GOTS) simulation components and takes the trainee through a series of escalating engagements using tactically relevant, realistically complex, scenarios involving a variety of manned, unmanned, aerial, and ground-based assets. The trainee is the only human player in the game and he must collaborate, from his web-based mock operating station, with various non-human players via spoken natural language over simulated radio in order to execute the training missions successfully. Non-human players are modeled in two complementary layers - OneSAF provides basic background behaviors for entities while NVTT provides higher level models that control entity actions based on intent extracted from the trainee's spoken natural dialog with game entities. Dialog structure is modeled based on Army standards for communication and verbal protocols. This paper presents an architecture that integrates the U.S. Army's Night Vision Image Generator (NVIG), One Semi- Automated Forces (OneSAF), a flight dynamics model, as well as Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) speech recognition and text to speech products to effect an environment with sufficient entity counts and fidelity to enable meaningful teaching and reinforcement of critical communication skills. It further demonstrates the model dynamics and synchronization mechanisms employed to execute purpose-built training scenarios, and to achieve ad-hoc collaboration on-the-fly between human and non-human players in the simulated environment.

  4. National Athletic Trainers' Association-Accredited Postprofessional Athletic Training Education: Attractors and Career Intentions

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Context Anecdotally, we know that students select graduate programs based on location, finances, and future career goals. Empirically, however, we lack information on what attracts a student to these programs. Objective To gain an appreciation for the selection process of graduate study. Design Qualitative study. Setting Postprofessional programs in athletic training (PPATs) accredited by the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Patients or Other Participants A total of 19 first-year PPAT students participated, representing 13 of the 16 accredited PPAT programs. Data Collection and Analysis All interviews were conducted via phone and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the interview data followed the procedures as outlined by a grounded theory approach. Trustworthiness was secured by (1) participant checks, (2) participant verification, and (3) multiple analyst triangulations. Results Athletic training students select PPAT programs for 4 major reasons: reputation of the program or faculty (or both), career intentions, professional socialization, and mentorship from undergraduate faculty or clinical instructors (or both). Participants discussed long-term professional goals as the driving force behind wanting an advanced degree in athletic training. Faculty and clinical instructor recommendations and the program's prestige helped guide the decisions. Participants also expressed the need to gain more experience, which promoted autonomy, and support while gaining that work experience. Final selection of the PPAT program was based on academic offerings, the assistantship offered (including financial support), advanced knowledge of athletic training concepts and principles, and apprenticeship opportunities. Conclusions Students who attend PPAT programs are attracted to advancing their entry-level knowledge, are committed to their professional development as athletic trainers, and view the profession of athletic training as a life-long career. The combination of

  5. AquaTrainer® Snorkel does not Increase Hydrodynamic Drag but Influences Turning Time.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, J; Figueiredo, P; Guidetti, L; Alves, F; Toussaint, H; Vilas-Boas, J P; Baldari, C; Fernandes, R J

    2016-04-01

    Our purpose was to verify if the use of the new AquaTrainer(®) respiratory snorkel lead to an increase of front crawl hydrodynamic drag and whether the constraint of using an adapted turning technique influences its corresponding turning time. 12 swimmers performed 2 (without and with snorkel) 12×25 front crawl repetitions from low to maximal velocity on the measuring active drag system. Complementarily, 3 swimming turns were compared: open turn with snorkel, tumble turn and open turn without snorkel. Drag values were similar without vs. with snorkel at 0.9, 1.1, 1.3, 1.5 and 1.7 m.s(-1) velocities: 15.84 ±5.32 vs. 16.18±4.81, 25.60±6.69 vs. 26.03±6.17, 38.37±8.04 vs. 38.88±7.56, 54.64±10.06 vs. 55.08±9.55, 74.77±14.09 vs. 74.92±13.14 N, (respectively, p≥0.05), and high agreement between conditions was observed (p<0.01). Front crawl swimming with snorkel using the open turn implied an increase in turning time of 14.2 and 5.1% than the tumble turn and open turn without the apparatus (p<0.01). AquaTrainer(®) snorkel does not lead to an increase in active drag during front crawl performed at a large range of velocities and, consequently, the metabolic energy necessary to overcome total drag will not be affected. However, turning with it requires an additional time that should be taken into account in scientific research and training conditions.

  6. 'Train the trainer' model: implications for health professionals and farm family health in Australia.

    PubMed

    Brumby, Susan; Smith, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Australia is a large country with 60% of land used for agricultural production. Its interior is sparsely populated, with higher morbidity and mortality recorded in rural areas, particularly farmers, farm families, and agricultural workers. Rural health professionals in addressing health education gaps of farming groups have reported using behavioralist approaches. These approaches in isolation have been criticized as disempowering for participants who are identified as passive learners or 'empty vessels.' A major challenge in rural health practice is to develop more inclusive and innovative models in building improved health outcomes. The Sustainable Farm Families Train the Trainer (SFFTTT) model is a 5-day program developed by Western District Health Service designed to enhance practice among health professionals working with farm families in Australia. This innovative model of addressing farmer health asks health professionals to understand the context of the farm family and encourages them to value the experience and existing knowledge of the farmer, the family and the farm business. The SFFTTT program has engaged with health agencies, community, government, and industry groups across Australia and over 120 rural nurses have been trained since 2005. These trainers have successfully delivered programs to 1000 farm families, with high participant completion, positive evaluation, and improved health indicators. Rural professionals report changes in how they approach health education, clinical practice, and promotion with farm families and agricultural industries. This paper highlights the success of SFFTTT as an effective tool in enhancing primary health practice in rural and remote settings. The program is benefiting not only drought ravaged farmers but assisting rural nurses, health agencies, and health boards to engage with farm families at a level not identified previously. Furthermore, nurses and health professionals are now embracing a more 'farmer

  7. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Lightning Safety for Athletics and Recreation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Katie M.; Bennett, Brian; Cooper, Mary Ann; Holle, Ronald L.; Kithil, Richard; López, Raul E.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To educate athletic trainers and others about the dangers of lightning, provide lightning-safety guidelines, define safe structures and locations, and advocate prehospital care for lightning-strike victims. Background: Lightning may be the most frequently encountered severe-storm hazard endangering physically active people each year. Millions of lightning flashes strike the ground annually in the United States, causing nearly 100 deaths and 400 injuries. Three quarters of all lightning casualties occur between May and September, and nearly four fifths occur between 10:00 AM and 7:00 PM, which coincides with the hours for most athletic or recreational activities. Additionally, lightning casualties from sports and recreational activities have risen alarmingly in recent decades. Recommendations: The National Athletic Trainers' Association recommends a proactive approach to lightning safety, including the implementation of a lightning-safety policy that identifies safe locations for shelter from the lightning hazard. Further components of this policy are monitoring local weather forecasts, designating a weather watcher, and establishing a chain of command. Additionally, a flash-to-bang count of 30 seconds or more should be used as a minimal determinant of when to suspend activities. Waiting 30 minutes or longer after the last flash of lightning or sound of thunder is recommended before athletic or recreational activities are resumed. Lightning- safety strategies include avoiding shelter under trees, avoiding open fields and spaces, and suspending the use of land-line telephones during thunderstorms. Also outlined in this document are the prehospital care guidelines for triaging and treating lightning-strike victims. It is important to evaluate victims quickly for apnea, asystole, hypothermia, shock, fractures, and burns. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is effective in resuscitating pulseless victims of lightning strike. Maintenance of cardiopulmonary

  8. Unmanned Aircraft: A Pilot's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pestana, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the challenges of "piloting" a unmanned aircraft. The topic include the pilot-vehicle interact design, the concept of pilot/operator, and role of NASA's Ikhana UAS in the western states fire mission.

  9. From experienced to novice: a reflective account on the changing role of front-line implementer to program trainer in Project P.A.T.H.S.

    PubMed

    Wu, Florence K Y; Shek, Daniel T L

    2012-01-01

    Although training plays an important role in the successful implementation of positive youth development programs, research on training and trainers in this field is grossly neglected. In this paper, a trainer of a positive youth development program in Hong Kong (Project P.A.T.H.S.; Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes) reflected about her transition from the role of a teacher (and program implementer) to the role of a trainer. Based on the reflection, the transformations involved, including self-perception, teaching role and teaching strategies, were highlighted. The issue of how previous experience influenced training in the context of positive youth development was also discussed. It is suggested that involvement of front-line practitioners in the training of positive youth development programs is workable, although systematic training for the novice trainers may be needed.

  10. To Educate Pilots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Dayton Y.

    1968-01-01

    As the highly trained ex-military pilots of World War II began to retire from commercial flying, there was concern over the pilot shortage, especially among the airlines with their growing needs. Miami-Dade Junior College, in January 1965, was the first to respond to this need. Although initial enrollment was expected to be small, 150 applications…

  11. SuperPILOT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissmann, Stephen M.

    1983-01-01

    SuperPILOT is Apple Computer's new computer assisted instruction authoring language. Provided is a review of SuperPILOT, indicated to be ideally suited for the development of interactive tutorials for the classroom. Includes comments on the language's strengths/weaknesses as well as comments on system requirements and special program features. (JN)

  12. Medical Handbook for Pilots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This handbook provides information on an airline pilot's physical and mental status and related medical factors which may affect his/her performance. Contents include information on the physical examination for pilots, the flyer's environment, hypoxia, hyperventilation, gas in the body, the ears, alcohol, drugs and flying, carbon monoxide, vision,…

  13. Preparing Pilots for Takeoff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravage, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Why would schools consider partnering with a vendor to operate a pilot? Why not just wait until the final product is released? For starters, pilots provide schools with a golden opportunity to get an early look at the software, take it for a test flight, and ask for changes tailored to their operating environment and business needs. In some cases,…

  14. Making and Maintaining Lifestyle Changes with the Support of a Lay Health Advisor: Longitudinal Qualitative Study of Health Trainer Services in Northern England

    PubMed Central

    Visram, Shelina; Clarke, Charlotte; White, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore and document the experiences of those receiving support from a lay health trainer, in order to inform the optimisation and evaluation of such interventions. Design Longitudinal qualitative study with up to four serial interviews conducted over 12 months. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative approach associated with grounded theory. Participants 13 health trainers, 5 managers and 26 clients. Setting Three health trainer services targeting disadvantaged communities in northern England. Results The final dataset comprised 116 interviews (88 with clients and 28 with staff). Discussions with health trainers and managers revealed a high degree of heterogeneity between the local services in terms of their primary aims and activities. However, these were found to converge over time. There was agreement that health trainer interventions are generally ‘person-centred’ in terms of being tailored to the needs of individual clients. This led to a range of self-reported outcomes, including behaviour changes, physical health improvements and increased social activity. Factors impacting on the maintenance of lifestyle changes included the cost and timing of health-promoting activities, ill-health or low mood. Participants perceived a need for ongoing access to low cost facilities to ensure that any lifestyle changes can be maintained in the longer term. Conclusions Health trainers may be successful in terms of supporting people from socio-economically disadvantaged communities to make positive lifestyle changes, as well as achieving other health-related outcomes. This is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach; commissioners and providers should select the intervention models that best meet the needs of their local populations. By delivering holistic interventions that address multiple lifestyle risks and incorporate relapse prevention strategies, health trainers could potentially have a significant impact on health

  15. Training Trainers in health and human rights: Implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. Methods A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Results Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28%) completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%). Twenty-two respondents (48%) implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66) to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. Conclusion This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation to incorporate human

  16. Sleep Position Trainer versus Tennis Ball Technique in Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eijsvogel, Michiel M.; Ubbink, Rinse; Dekker, Janita; Oppersma, Eline; de Jongh, Frans H.; van der Palen, Job; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein G.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Positional therapy (PT) is an effective therapy in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (POSAS) when used, but the compliance of PT is low. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new kind of PT is effective and can improve compliance. Methods: 29 patients were treated with the sleep position trainer (SPT), 26 patients with the tennis ball technique (TBT). At baseline and 1 month polysomnography, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Quebec Sleep Questionnaire (QSQ) were taken. Daily compliance was objectively measured in both groups. Results: Both therapies prevent supine sleep position to a median of 0% (min-max: SPT 0.0% to 67%, TBT 0.0% to 38.9%), resulting in a treatment success (AHI < 5) in 68.0% of the SPT and 42.9% of the TBT patients. The ESS at baseline was < 10 in both groups. Sleep quality parameters, such as wake after sleep onset (WASO; p = 0.001) and awakenings (p = 0.006), improved more in the SPT group. Total QSQ scores (0.4 ± 0.2, p = 0.03), the QSQ domains nocturnal symptoms (0.7 ± 0.2, p = 0.01), and social interactions (0.8 ± 0.3, p = 0.02) changed in favor of the SPT group. Effective compliance (≥ 4 h/night + ≥ 5 days/week) was 75.9% for the SPT and 42.3% for the TBT users (p = 0.01). Conclusion: In mild POSAS with normal EES the new SPT device and the standard TBT are equally effective in reducing respiratory indices. However, compared to the TBT, sleep quality, quality of life, and compliance improved significantly more in the SPT group. Citation: Eijsvogel MM, Ubbink R, Dekker J, Oppersma E, de Jongh FH, van der Palen J, Brusse-Keizer MG. Sleep position trainer versus tennis ball technique in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):139–147. PMID:25515276

  17. 14 CFR 61.94 - Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Student pilot seeking a sport pilot... Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations at... operational control tower in other airspace. (a) A student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or...

  18. Pilot Weather Advisor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindamood, Glenn; Martzaklis, Konstantinos Gus; Hoffler, Keith; Hill, Damon; Mehrotra, Sudhir C.; White, E. Richard; Fisher, Bruce D.; Crabill, Norman L.; Tucholski, Allen D.

    2006-01-01

    The Pilot Weather Advisor (PWA) system is an automated satellite radio-broadcasting system that provides nearly real-time weather data to pilots of aircraft in flight anywhere in the continental United States. The system was designed to enhance safety in two distinct ways: First, the automated receipt of information would relieve the pilot of the time-consuming and distracting task of obtaining weather information via voice communication with ground stations. Second, the presentation of the information would be centered around a map format, thereby making the spatial and temporal relationships in the surrounding weather situation much easier to understand

  19. Pilot weather advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, W. A.; Seth, S.; Crabill, N. L.; Shipley, S. T.; Graffman, I.; Oneill, J.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the work performed by ViGYAN, Inc., to demonstrate the Pilot Weather Advisor cockpit weather data system using a broadcast satellite communication system are presented. The Pilot Weather Advisor demonstrated that the technical problems involved with transmitting significant amount of weather data to an aircraft in-flight or on-the-ground via satellite are solvable with today's technology. The Pilot Weather Advisor appears to be a viable solution for providing accurate and timely weather information for general aviation aircraft.

  20. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Preparticipation Physical Examinations and Disqualifying Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Kevin M.; Bolin, Delmas J.; Carek, Peter J.; Konin, Jeff G.; Neal, Timothy L.; Violette, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Objective To present athletic trainers with recommendations for the content and administration of the preparticipation physical examination (PPE) as well as considerations for determining safe participation in sports and identifying disqualifying conditions. Background Preparticipation physical examinations have been used routinely for nearly 40 years. However, considerable debate exists as to their efficacy due to the lack of standardization in the process and the lack of conformity in the information that is gathered. With the continuing rise in sports participation at all levels and the growing number of reported cases of sudden death in organized athletics, the sports medicine community should consider adopting a standardized process for conducting the PPE to protect all parties. Recommendations Recommendations are provided to equip the sports medicine community with the tools necessary to conduct the PPE as effectively and efficiently as possible using available scientific evidence and best practices. In addition, the recommendations will help clinicians identify those conditions that may threaten the health and safety of participants in organized sports, may require further evaluation and intervention, or may result in potential disqualification. PMID:24499039

  1. Issues in development, evaluation, and use of the NASA Preflight Adaptation Trainer (PAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Norman E.; Kennedy, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    The Preflight Adaptation Trainer (PAT) is intended to reduce or alleviate space adaptation syndrome by providing opportunities for portions of that adaptation to occur under normal gravity conditions prior to space flight. Since the adaptation aspects of the PAT objectives involve modification not only of the behavior of the trainee, but also of sensiomotor skills which underly the behavioral generation, the defining of training objectives of the PAT utilizes four mechanisms: familiarization, demonstration, training and adaptation. These mechanisms serve as structural reference points for evaluation, drive the content and organization of the training procedures, and help to define the roles of the PAT instructors and operators. It was determined that three psychomotor properties are most critical for PAT evaluation: reliability; sensitivity; and relevance. It is cause for concern that the number of measures available to examine PAT effects exceed those that can be properly studied with the available sample sizes; special attention will be required in selection of the candidate measure set. The issues in PAT use and application within a training system context are addressed through linking the three training related mechanisms of familiarization, demonstration and training to the fourth mechanism, adaptation.

  2. Personal digital exercise trainer for managing, monitoring and recording the exercise.

    PubMed

    Kumar Diwakar, Praveen; Keun Oh, Young; Park, Seung-Hun; Yoon, Young-Ro

    2005-01-01

    We developed a portable digital exercise trainer device which manages, monitors and records the user's physical status and workout during exercise session. It guides the user in doing efficient exercise to reach specific fitness goals. It keeps the full exercise program i.e. exercises start date and time, duration, mode, control parameter, intensity in its memory which helps the user in managing his exercise. Exercise program can be downloaded from the internet. During exercise it continuously monitors the user's physiological parameters: heart rate, number of steps walked, and energy consumed. If these parameters do not range within prescribed target zone, the device will alarm the user as a feedback to control exercise. The device displays these parameters on graphic LCD. During exercise it continuously records the heart rate and number of steps walked every 10 seconds along with exercise date and time. This stored information can be used as treatment for the user by an exercise expert. Real-time ECG monitoring can be viewed wirelessly on a remote PC.

  3. Haptic wearables as sensory replacement, sensory augmentation and trainer - a review.

    PubMed

    Shull, Peter B; Damian, Dana D

    2015-01-01

    Sensory impairments decrease quality of life and can slow or hinder rehabilitation. Small, computationally powerful electronics have enabled the recent development of wearable systems aimed to improve function for individuals with sensory impairments. The purpose of this review is to synthesize current haptic wearable research for clinical applications involving sensory impairments. We define haptic wearables as untethered, ungrounded body worn devices that interact with skin directly or through clothing and can be used in natural environments outside a laboratory. Results of this review are categorized by degree of sensory impairment. Total impairment, such as in an amputee, blind, or deaf individual, involves haptics acting as sensory replacement; partial impairment, as is common in rehabilitation, involves haptics as sensory augmentation; and no impairment involves haptics as trainer. This review found that wearable haptic devices improved function for a variety of clinical applications including: rehabilitation, prosthetics, vestibular loss, osteoarthritis, vision loss and hearing loss. Future haptic wearables development should focus on clinical needs, intuitive and multimodal haptic displays, low energy demands, and biomechanical compliance for long-term usage. PMID:26188929

  4. Mobile robotic assistive balance trainer - an intelligent compliant and adaptive robotic balance assistant for daily living.

    PubMed

    Tiseo, Carlo; Lim, Zhen Yi; Shee, Cheng Yap; Ang, Wei Tech

    2014-01-01

    Balance control probably has the greatest impact on independence in activities of daily living (ADL), because it is a fundamental motor skill and prerequisite to the maintenance of a myriad of postures and mobile activities. We propose a new rehabilitation therapy to administer standing and mobile balance control training, enabled by a Mobile Robotic Assistive Balance Trainer (MRABT). The targeted group for this initial work is post stroke patients, although it can be extended to subjects with other neurological insults in the future. The proposed system consists of a mobile base and a parallel robotic arm which provides support to the patient at the hip. The compliant robotic arm with intelligent control algorithm will only provide support and assistance to the patient when the center of mass of the body deviates beyond the predefined safety boundary, mimicking the helping hands of a parent when a toddler learns to walk. In this paper, we present our initial work in the design and kinematic analysis of the system. PMID:25571190

  5. Improving brain injury cognitive rehabilitation by personalized telerehabilitation services: Guttmann neuropersonal trainer.

    PubMed

    Solana, Javier; Cáceres, César; García-Molina, Alberto; Opisso, Eloy; Roig, Teresa; Tormos, José M; Gómez, Enrique J

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive rehabilitation aims to remediate or alleviate the cognitive deficits appearing after an episode of acquired brain injury (ABI). The purpose of this work is to describe the telerehabilitation platform called Guttmann Neuropersonal Trainer (GNPT) which provides new strategies for cognitive rehabilitation, improving efficiency and access to treatments, and to increase knowledge generation from the process. A cognitive rehabilitation process has been modeled to design and develop the system, which allows neuropsychologists to configure and schedule rehabilitation sessions, consisting of set of personalized computerized cognitive exercises grounded on neuroscience and plasticity principles. It provides remote continuous monitoring of patient's performance, by an asynchronous communication strategy. An automatic knowledge extraction method has been used to implement a decision support system, improving treatment customization. GNPT has been implemented in 27 rehabilitation centers and in 83 patients' homes, facilitating the access to the treatment. In total, 1660 patients have been treated. Usability and cost analysis methodologies have been applied to measure the efficiency in real clinical environments. The usability evaluation reveals a system usability score higher than 70 for all target users. The cost efficiency study results show a relation of 1-20 compared to face-to-face rehabilitation. GNPT enables brain-damaged patients to continue and further extend rehabilitation beyond the hospital, improving the efficiency of the rehabilitation process. It allows customized therapeutic plans, providing information to further development of clinical practice guidelines.

  6. Active noise reduction in aviation helmets during a military jet trainer test flight.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, R; Kuronen, P; Korteoja, M

    2001-01-01

    Cockpit noise measurements were carried out in a two-seat jet trainer. For the continuous time and frequency analyses a two-channel tape-recording system was constructed of two miniature microphones connected through an amplifier to a digital tape-recorder. The analysed and averaged noise exposure including radio communication was 80-81 dB when the ANC system was on and 84-89 dB when the ANC system was off. For the conventional flight helmet the same noise exposure was 86 dB, and the noise exposure in the cockpit was 104-106 dB. The effect of the ANC system on the averaged noise exposure (L(Aeq8min)) was an improvement of 4-8 dB over the noise attenuation of the same helmets when the ANC system was off. Both ANC systems worked properly during the test flights. No severe ringing or voice circulation was found except during extreme vibration.

  7. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Acute Management of the Cervical Spine–Injured Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Erik E; Boden, Barry P; Courson, Ronald W; Decoster, Laura C; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Norkus, Susan A; Rehberg, Robb S; Waninger, Kevin N

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To provide certified athletic trainers, team physicians, emergency responders, and other health care professionals with recommendations on how to best manage a catastrophic cervical spine injury in the athlete. Background: The relative incidence of catastrophic cervical spine injury in sports is low compared with other injuries. However, cervical spine injuries necessitate delicate and precise management, often involving the combined efforts of a variety of health care providers. The outcome of a catastrophic cervical spine injury depends on the efficiency of this management process and the timeliness of transfer to a controlled environment for diagnosis and treatment. Recommendations: Recommendations are based on current evidence pertaining to prevention strategies to reduce the incidence of cervical spine injuries in sport; emergency planning and preparation to increase management efficiency; maintaining or creating neutral alignment in the cervical spine; accessing and maintaining the airway; stabilizing and transferring the athlete with a suspected cervical spine injury; managing the athlete participating in an equipment-laden sport, such as football, hockey, or lacrosse; and considerations in the emergency department. PMID:19478836

  8. Mobile robotic assistive balance trainer - an intelligent compliant and adaptive robotic balance assistant for daily living.

    PubMed

    Tiseo, Carlo; Lim, Zhen Yi; Shee, Cheng Yap; Ang, Wei Tech

    2014-01-01

    Balance control probably has the greatest impact on independence in activities of daily living (ADL), because it is a fundamental motor skill and prerequisite to the maintenance of a myriad of postures and mobile activities. We propose a new rehabilitation therapy to administer standing and mobile balance control training, enabled by a Mobile Robotic Assistive Balance Trainer (MRABT). The targeted group for this initial work is post stroke patients, although it can be extended to subjects with other neurological insults in the future. The proposed system consists of a mobile base and a parallel robotic arm which provides support to the patient at the hip. The compliant robotic arm with intelligent control algorithm will only provide support and assistance to the patient when the center of mass of the body deviates beyond the predefined safety boundary, mimicking the helping hands of a parent when a toddler learns to walk. In this paper, we present our initial work in the design and kinematic analysis of the system.

  9. Athletic Trainers' Barriers to Maintaining Professional Commitment in the Collegiate Setting

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Eason, Christianne M.; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Professional commitment simply describes one's obligation to his or her work. For athletic trainers (ATs), the demanding work environment and job expectations may affect their characterization of professional commitment. Our breadth of knowledge regarding professional commitment within athletic training is narrow. Objective: To evaluate the professional commitment of ATs in the collegiate setting. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Collegiate. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-three Board of Certification-certified ATs employed in the collegiate setting (National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I = 11, Division II = 9, Division III = 13) with an average of 10 ± 8 years of clinical experience volunteered. Data saturation guided the total number of participants. Data Collection and Analysis: Online journaling via QuestionPro was completed by all participants. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were conducted for data credibility. Analysis followed a general inductive method. Results: Four themes speak to the factors that negatively affect ATs' professional enthusiasm and commitment: (1) life stage, (2) work overload, (3) organizational climate, and (4) human resources. The latter 3 speak to the effect the workplace can have on ATs' professional commitment, and the first speaks to the effect outside responsibilities can have. Conclusions: Our results suggest that several of the factors that negatively influence the professional commitment of collegiate ATs are modifiable organizational components. Developing resiliency strategies at the individual and organizational levels may help to facilitate improved professional commitment for the AT. PMID:25761133

  10. Haptic wearables as sensory replacement, sensory augmentation and trainer - a review.

    PubMed

    Shull, Peter B; Damian, Dana D

    2015-07-20

    Sensory impairments decrease quality of life and can slow or hinder rehabilitation. Small, computationally powerful electronics have enabled the recent development of wearable systems aimed to improve function for individuals with sensory impairments. The purpose of this review is to synthesize current haptic wearable research for clinical applications involving sensory impairments. We define haptic wearables as untethered, ungrounded body worn devices that interact with skin directly or through clothing and can be used in natural environments outside a laboratory. Results of this review are categorized by degree of sensory impairment. Total impairment, such as in an amputee, blind, or deaf individual, involves haptics acting as sensory replacement; partial impairment, as is common in rehabilitation, involves haptics as sensory augmentation; and no impairment involves haptics as trainer. This review found that wearable haptic devices improved function for a variety of clinical applications including: rehabilitation, prosthetics, vestibular loss, osteoarthritis, vision loss and hearing loss. Future haptic wearables development should focus on clinical needs, intuitive and multimodal haptic displays, low energy demands, and biomechanical compliance for long-term usage.

  11. Evaluating A Computer Based Skills Acquisition Trainer To Classify Badminton Players

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Minh Vu; Bedford, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the statistical ability of both neural networks and discriminant function analysis on the newly developed SATB program. Using these statistical tools, we identified the accuracy of the SATB in classifying badminton players into different skill level groups. Forty-one participants, classified as advanced, intermediate, or beginner skilled level, participated in this study. Results indicated neural networks are more effective in predicting group membership, and displayed higher predictive validity when compared to discriminant analysis. Using these outcomes, in conjunction with the physiological and biomechanical variables of the participants, we assessed the authenticity and accuracy of the SATB and commented on the overall effectiveness of the visual based training approach to training badminton athletes. Key points Neural networks are more effective in predicting group membership and displayed higher predictive validity when compared to discriminant analysis. These results provide implications for coaches and trainers of badminton to implement visual based training methods into their own training program. Predicting shot type was more successful that predicting location placement. This suggests implications for training badminton player’s judgement of shuttlecock trajectory. PMID:24150628

  12. Structuralized box-trainer laparoscopic training significantly improves performance in complex virtual reality laparoscopic tasks

    PubMed Central

    Stefaniak, Tomasz J.; Makarewicz, Wojciech; Proczko, Monika; Gruca, Zbigniew; Śledziński, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In the era of flowering minimally invasive surgical techniques there is a need for new methods of teaching surgery and supervision of progress in skills and expertise. Virtual and physical box-trainers seem especially fit for this purpose, and allow for improvement of proficiency required in laparoscopic surgery. Material and methods The study included 34 students who completed the authors‘ laparoscopic training on physical train-boxes. Progress was monitored by accomplishment of 3 exercises: moving pellets from one place to another, excising and clipping. Analysed parameters included time needed to complete the exercise and right and left hand movement tracks. Students were asked to do assigned tasks prior to, in the middle and after the training. Results The duration of the course was 28 h in total. Significant shortening of the time to perform each exercise and reduction of the left hand track were achieved. The right hand track was shortened only in exercise number 1. Conclusions Exercises in the laboratory setting should be regarded as an important element of the process of skills acquisition by a young surgeon. Virtual reality laparoscopic training seems to be a new, interesting educational tool, and at the same time allows for reliable control and assessment of progress. PMID:23255997

  13. Building National Capacity for Research Mentor Training: An Evidence-Based Approach to Training the Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Pfund, Christine; Spencer, Kimberly C.; Asquith, Pamela; House, Stephanie C.; Miller, Sarah; Sorkness, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Research mentor training (RMT), based on the published Entering Mentoring curricula series, has been shown to improve the knowledge and skills of research mentors across career stages, as self-reported by both the mentors engaged in training and their mentees. To promote widespread dissemination and empower others to implement this evidence-based training at their home institutions, we developed an extensive, interactive, multifaceted train-the-trainer workshop. The specific goals of these workshops are to 1) increase facilitator knowledge of an RMT curriculum, 2) increase facilitator confidence in implementing the curriculum, 3) provide a safe environment to practice facilitation of curricular activities, and 4) review implementation strategies and evaluation tools. Data indicate that our approach results in high satisfaction and significant confidence gains among attendees. Of the 195 diverse attendees trained in our workshops since Fall 2010, 44% report implementation at 39 different institutions, collectively training more than 500 mentors. Further, mentors who participated in the RMT sessions led by our trained facilitators report high facilitator effectiveness in guiding discussion. Implications and challenges to building the national capacity needed for improved research mentoring relationships are discussed. PMID:26033872

  14. The relationship between the drive for muscularity and muscle dysmorphia in male and female weight trainers.

    PubMed

    Robert, Courtney A; Munroe-Chandler, Krista J; Gammage, Kimberley L

    2009-09-01

    Muscle dysmorphia is a form of body dysmorphic disorder in which individuals have a pathological preoccupation with their muscularity and, more specifically, an extreme fear that their bodies are too small. Relatively few empirical studies have been completed on muscle dysmorphia, and even fewer studies on the relationship between the drive for muscularity and muscle dysmorphia in men and women. The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between the drive for muscularity and muscle dysmorphia in male (n = 55) and female (n = 59) recreational weight trainers. Results revealed that the behavior and diet subscales of the drive for muscularity significantly predicted muscle dysmorphia in males and females accounting for 69% and 46% of the total variance, respectively. Although the overall scores of muscle dysmorphia do not indicate clinical levels, these findings suggest that behaviors such as arranging one's schedule around his/her training regimen and dieting in order to gain muscle predict characteristics of muscle dysmorphia in men and women. PMID:19675500

  15. 33 CFR 110.71b - Wye River, Wye, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... western shore of Wye River opposite Drum Point enclosed by a line drawn from latitude 38°53′17″ N., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″...

  16. 33 CFR 110.71b - Wye River, Wye, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′13″ W.; thence following the shoreline to the point of beginning....

  17. 33 CFR 110.71b - Wye River, Wye, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′13″ W.; thence following the shoreline to the point of beginning....

  18. 33 CFR 110.71b - Wye River, Wye, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′13″ W.; thence following the shoreline to the point of beginning....

  19. 33 CFR 110.71b - Wye River, Wye, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′13″ W.; thence following the shoreline to the point of beginning....

  20. Automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, J. L., Jr.; Haidt, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    An Automated Pilot Advisory System (APAS) was developed and operationally tested to demonstrate the concept that low cost automated systems can provide air traffic and aviation weather advisory information at high density uncontrolled airports. The system was designed to enhance the see and be seen rule of flight, and pilots who used the system preferred it over the self announcement system presently used at uncontrolled airports.

  1. Climate Change Boot Camps: Targeting Policy Makers and Outreach Trainers in Arizona to Improve Climate Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, D. B.; Guido, Z. S.; Buizer, J.; Roy, M.

    2010-12-01

    Bringing climate change issues into focus for decision makers is a growing challenge. Decision makers are often confronted with unique informational needs, a lack of useable information, and needs for customized climate change training, among other issues. Despite significant progress in improving climate literacy among certain stakeholders such as water managers, recent reports have highlighted the growing demand for climate-change information in regions and sectors across the US. In recent years many ventures have sprung up to address these gaps and have predominantly focused on K-12 education and resource management agencies such as the National Park Service and National Weather Service. However, two groups that are critical for integrating climate information into actions have received less attention: (1) policy makers and (2) outreach experts, such as Cooperative Extension agents. Climate Change Boot Camps (CCBC) is a joint effort between the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS)—a NOAA Regionally Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program—and researchers at Arizona State University to diagnose climate literacy and training gaps in Arizona and develop a process that converts these deficiencies into actionable knowledge among the two aforementioned groups. This presentation will highlight the initial phases of the CCBC process, which has as its outcomes the identification of effective strategies for reaching legislators, climate literacy and training needs for both policy makers and trainers, and effective metrics to evaluate the success of these efforts. Specific attention is given to evaluating the process from initial needs assessment to the effectiveness of the workshops. Web curriculum and training models made available on the internet will also be developed, drawing on extensive existing Web resources for other training efforts and converted to meet the needs of these two groups. CCBC will also leverage CLIMAS’ long history of

  2. Sports Nutrition Knowledge Among Collegiate Athletes, Coaches, Athletic Trainers, and Strength and Conditioning Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Torres-McGehee, Toni M.; Pritchett, Kelly L.; Zippel, Deborah; Minton, Dawn M.; Cellamare, Adam; Sibilia, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Context: Coaches, athletic trainers (ATs), strength and conditioning specialists (SCSs), and registered dietitians are common nutrition resources for athletes, but coaches, ATs, and SCSs might offer only limited nutrition information. Little research exists about sports nutrition knowledge and current available resources for nutrition information for athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs. Objective: To identify resources of nutrition information that athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs use; to examine nutrition knowledge among athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs; and to determine confidence levels in the correctness of nutrition knowledge questions within all groups. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I, II, and III institutions across the United States. Patients and Other Participants: The 579 participants consisted of athletes (n = 185), coaches (n = 131), ATs (n = 192), and SCSs (n = 71). Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants answered questions about nutrition resources and domains regarding basic nutrition, supplements and performance, weight management, and hydration. Adequate sports nutrition knowledge was defined as an overall score of 75% in all domains (highest achievable score was 100%). Results: Participants averaged 68.5% in all domains. The ATs (77.8%) and SCSs (81.6%) had the highest average scores. Adequate knowledge was found in 35.9% of coaches, 71.4% of ATs, 83.1% of SCSs, and only 9% of athletes. The most used nutrition resources for coaches, ATs, and SCSs were registered dietitians. Conclusions: Overall, we demonstrated that ATs and SCSs have adequate sports nutrition knowledge, whereas most coaches and athletes have inadequate knowledge. Athletes have frequent contact with ATs and SCSs; therefore, proper nutrition education among these staff members is critical. We suggest that proper nutrition programming should be provided for athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs. However, a separate nutrition program

  3. Exploring the Transition to Practice for the Newly Credentialed Athletic Trainer: A Programmatic View

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Walker, Stacy E.; Thrasher, Ashley Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Context  Some newly credentialed athletic trainers (ATs) pursue a postprofessional degree with a curriculum that specifically advances their athletic training practice. It is unknown how those postprofessional programs assist in their transition to practice. Objective  To gain an understanding of initiatives used by postprofessional athletic training programs to facilitate role transition from student to professional during their graduate degree programs. Design  Qualitative study. Setting  Semistructured telephone interviews. Patients or Other Participants  A total of 19 program directors (10 men, 9 women) from 13 Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education-accredited and 6 unaccredited postprofessional athletic training programs. Data Collection and Analysis  Telephone interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed verbatim. For data analysis, we used the principles of general inductive approach. Credibility was maintained using peer review, member checks, and researcher triangulation. Results  Three facilitators of transition to practice emerged: orientation sessions, mentoring, and assistantship. Participants used orientation sessions ranging from a few hours to more than 1 week to provide and discuss program polices and expectations and to outline roles and responsibilities. Faculty, preceptors, and mentors were integrated into the orientation for the academic and clinical portions of the program. All participants described a mentoring process in which students were assigned by the program or informally developed. Mentors included the assigned preceptor, a staff AT, or peer students in the program. The clinical assistantship provided exposure to the daily aspects of being an AT. Barriers to transition to practice included previous educational experiences and time management. Participants reported that students with more diverse didactic and clinical education experiences had easier transitions. The ability to manage time also

  4. Athletic Trainers' Attitudes Toward Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual National Collegiate Athletic Association Student-Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Ensign, Kristine A.; Yiamouyiannis, Athena; White, Kristi M.; Ridpath, B. David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Researchers have investigated heterosexuals' attitudes toward homosexuals, focusing on factors such as sex, race, religion, education, and contact experiences. However, in the context of sport, this research is deficient. We found no published literature investigating athletic trainers (ATs') attitudes toward lesbian, gay, and bisexual student-athletes (LGB). Objective: To determine heterosexual ATs' attitudes toward LGB student-athletes in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Design: Cross-sectional study Setting: E-mailed survey. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 964 ATs employed at member institutions. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured attitudes using the Attitudes Toward Lesbian, Gay Men, and Bisexuals (ATLGB) Scale. To determine the extent to which sex, religion, and whether having an LGB friend or family member had an effect on ATs' attitudes, we performed analysis of variance. To establish the effect of age on ATs' attitudes, we calculated a Pearson correlation. We used an independent t test to identify differences between ATs who reported working with LGB student-athletes and ATs who did not. Results: With ATLGB score as the dependent factor, a main effect was noted for sex, religion, and having an LGB friend or family member (P < .01 for all comparisons). Age and total score were related (P < .01). A difference was seen in the ATLGB scores between ATs who were aware of LGB student-athletes on their teams and ATs who were not (P < .001). Conclusions: Many ATs hold positive attitudes toward LGB student-athletes, especially females, those who have an LGB friend or family member, and those who are aware of LGB student-athletes. Still, it is important to provide an open environment in the athletic training room for all student-athletes. PMID:21214353

  5. The Secondary School Football Coach's Relationship With the Athletic Trainer and Perspectives on Exertional Heat Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Adams, William M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Casa, Douglas J.; Huggins, Robert A.; Burton, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Context: Prior researchers have examined the first-aid knowledge and decision making among high school coaches, but little is known about their perceived knowledge of exertional heat stroke (EHS) or their relationships with an athletic trainer (AT). Objective: To examine secondary school football coaches' perceived knowledge of EHS and their professional relationship with an AT. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Web-based management system. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-eight secondary school head football coaches (37 men, 1 woman) participated in this study. Their average age was 47 ± 10 years old, and they had 12 ± 9 years' experience as a head football coach. Data Collection and Analysis: Participants responded to a series of online questions that were focused on their perceived knowledge of EHS and professional relationships with ATs. Data credibility was established through multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review. We analyzed the data by borrowing from the principles of a general inductive approach. Results: Two dominant themes emerged from the data: perceived self-confidence of the secondary school coach and the influence of the AT. The first theme highlighted the perceived confidence, due to basic emergency care training, of the coach regarding management of an emergency situation, despite a lack of knowledge. The second theme illustrated the secondary school coach's positive professional relationships with ATs regarding patient care and emergency procedures. Of the coaches who participated, 89% (34 out of 38) indicated positive interactions with their ATs. Conclusions: These secondary school coaches were unaware of the potential causes of EHS or the symptoms associated with EHS, and they had higher perceived levels of self-confidence in management abilities than indicated by their perceived knowledge level. The secondary school football coaches valued and understood the role of the AT regarding patient and emergency care. PMID:24933433

  6. The Professional Socialization of Collegiate Female Athletic Trainers: Navigating Experiences of Gender Bias

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Borland, John F.; Burton, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Context Female athletic trainers (ATs) experience gender discrimination in the workplace due to stereotypical gender roles, but limited information is available regarding the topic. Objective To understand the challenges and obstacles faced by young female ATs working in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletics. Design Exploratory study using semistructured interviews. Setting Division I clinical setting. Patients or Other Participants A total of 14 female ATs were included in the study, using both criterion and snowball- sampling techniques. Their mean age was 27 ± 2 years, with 5 ± 2 years of overall clinical experience. Criteria included employment at the Division I clinical setting, being a full-time assistant AT, and at least 3 years of working experience but no more than 9 years to avoid role continuance. Data Collection and Analysis Analysis of the interview data followed inductive procedures as outlined by a grounded theory approach. Credibility was established by member checks, multiple-analyst triangulation, and peer review. Results Clear communication with both coaches and players about expectations and philosophies regarding medical care, a supportive head AT in terms of clinical competence, and having and serving as a role model were cited as critical tools to alleviate gender bias in the workplace. Conclusions The female ATs in this study stressed the importance of being assertive with coaches early in the season with regard to the AT's role on the team. They reasoned that these actions brought forth a greater perception of congruity between their roles as ATs and their gender and age. We suggest that female athletic training students seek mentors in their field while they complete their coursework and practicums. The ATs in the current study indicated that a mentor, regardless of sex, helped them feel empowered to navigate the male-centric terrain of athletic departments by encouraging them to be assertive and not second

  7. Pilot-optimal augmentation synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    An augmentation synthesis method usable in the absence of quantitative handling qualities specifications, and yet explicitly including design objectives based on pilot-rating concepts, is presented. The algorithm involves the unique approach of simultaneously solving for the stability augmentation system (SAS) gains, pilot equalization and pilot rating prediction via optimal control techniques. Simultaneous solution is required in this case since the pilot model (gains, etc.) depends upon the augmented plant dynamics, and the augmentation is obviously not a priori known. Another special feature is the use of the pilot's objective function (from which the pilot model evolves) to design the SAS.

  8. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    SciTech Connect

    Rabari, Anil; Fadipe, Oloruntomi

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  9. A new electromechanical trainer for sensorimotor rehabilitation of paralysed fingers: A case series in chronic and acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Stefan; Kuhlmann, H; Wilk, J; Tomelleri, C; Kirker, Stephen GB

    2008-01-01

    Background The functional outcome after stroke is improved by more intensive or sustained therapy. When the affected hand has no functional movement, therapy is mainly passive movements. A novel device for repeating controlled passive movements of paralysed fingers has been developed, which will allow therapists to concentrate on more complicated tasks. A powered cam shaft moves the four fingers in a physiological range of movement. Methods After refining the training protocol in 2 chronic patients, 8 sub-acute stroke patients were randomised to receive additional therapy with the Finger Trainer for 20 min every work day for four weeks, or the same duration of bimanual group therapy, in addition to their usual rehabilitation. Results In the chronic patients, there was a sustained reduction in finger and wrist spasticity, but there was no improvement in active movements. In the subacute patients, mean distal Fugl-Meyer score (0–30) increased in the control group from 1.25 to 2.75 (ns) and 0.75 to 6.75 in the treatment group (p < .05). Median Modified Ashworth score increased 0/5 to 2/5 in the control group, but not in the treatment group, 0 to 0. Only one patient, in the treatment group, regained function of the affected hand. No side effects occurred. Conclusion Treatment with the Finger Trainer was well tolerated in sub-acute & chronic stroke patients, whose abnormal muscle tone improved. In sub-acute stroke patients, the Finger Trainer group showed small improvements in active movement and avoided the increase in tone seen in the control group. This series was too small to demonstrate any effect on functional outcome however. PMID:18771581

  10. STS 51-G crewmembers participate in training in crew compartment trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Four members of the STS 51-G crew participate in a training exercise in the Shuttle mission simulator and training facility at JSC. Steven R. Nagel, left foreground, is a mission specialist. Sultan Salam Abdelazize Al-Saud (right foreground) is a payload specialist. In the background are Astronauts Daniel C. Brandenstein (left) in the commander's station and John O. Creighton in the pilot's position.

  11. Case report: Using an auditory trainer with caregiver video modeling to enhance communication and socialization behaviors in autism.

    PubMed

    Baharav, Eva; Darling, Rieko

    2008-04-01

    A minimally verbal child with autism was exposed to short daily sessions of watching his parents on video in conjunction with an FM auditory trainer for a period of 4 weeks. Baseline measures of verbal and social behaviors were taken pre-treatment and repeated post treatment. Results indicate substantial gains in word productions, social orienting, and increased eye contact. Results are discussed in terms of the contributions of auditory-visual processing to establishing communication and socialization in autism and early intervention effectiveness.

  12. The ScanTrainer obstetrics and gynaecology ultrasound virtual reality training simulator: A cost model to determine the cost viability of replacing clinical training with simulation training

    PubMed Central

    Ray, AF

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce an economic cost model comparing the use of the Medaphor ScanTrainer virtual reality training simulator for obstetrics and gynaecology ultrasound to achieve basic competence, with the traditional training method. A literature search and survey of expert opinion were used to identify resources used in training. An executable model was produced in Excel. The model showed a cost saving for a clinic using the ScanTrainer of £7114 per annum. The uncertainties of the model were explored and it was found to be robust. Threshold values for the key drivers of the model were identified. Using the ScanTrainer is cost saving for clinics with at least two trainees per year to train, if it would take at least six lists to train them using the traditional training method and if a traditional training list has at least two fewer patients than a standard list. PMID:27433245

  13. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  14. Test pilot and engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Goggles at the ready, this Langley test pilot and engineer conducted research business high above the ground. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, by James Schultz (page 24). This photograph is also published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen (page 163). In the early years the flight research team was usually made up of a test pilot (Thomas Carroll, front cockpit) and an engineer (John W. Gus Crowley,Jr.).

  15. Pilot selection and training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Personality and situational factors relevant to individual and group performance in highly demanding environments, such as those faced by astronauts or by jet transport crew, are discussed. It is emphasized that although technical competence and proficiency in pilot selection are prerequisites for safety, operating a modern jet transport is a group endeavor that requires the effective coordination of the entire crew. A self-report test battery for measuring positive and negative personality traits of pilot candidates, termed the Personal Characteristics Inventory, is described.

  16. PILOT optical alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longval, Y.; Mot, B.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Baustista, L.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Bray, N.; de Bernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P..; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-07-01

    PILOT is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the polarization of dust emission in the diffuse interstellar medium in our Galaxy at wavelengths 240 μm with an angular resolution about two arcminutes. Pilot optics is composed an off-axis Gregorian type telescope and a refractive re-imager system. All optical elements, except the primary mirror, are in a cryostat cooled to 3K. We combined the optical, 3D dimensional measurement methods and thermo-elastic modeling to perform the optical alignment. The talk describes the system analysis, the alignment procedure, and finally the performances obtained during the first flight in September 2015.

  17. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division and Primary Job Title of Athletic Trainers and Their Job Satisfaction or Intention to Leave Athletic Training

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, Aaron B.; Henning, Jolene M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Membership in the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has declined in recent years, generating much debate about professional commitment. Objective: To compare the contributing factors of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training of certified athletic trainers (ATs) employed in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) institutions. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A link to a Web-based questionnaire containing the Spector Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS) and an original Intention to Leave Survey (ITLS) was distributed by e-mail to 1003 certified members of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 191 certified members of the NATA employed in a college or university setting in a primarily clinical capacity; representing all NCAA divisions; and having the job title of head athletic trainer, associate/assistant athletic trainer, or graduate assistant/intern athletic trainer. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used separate 3 × 3 factorial analyses of variance to compare the mean scores of each JSS subscale and of the ITLS with NCAA division and job title. A stepwise multiple regression was used to determine the strength of the relationships between the JSS subscales and the ITLS. Results: We found differences for job title in the subscales of Fringe Benefits (F2,182 = 7.82, P = .001) and Operating Conditions (F2,182 = 12.01, P < .001). The JSS subscale Nature of Work was the greatest indicator of intention to leave (β = −0.45). Conclusions: We found a strong negative correlation between various facets of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training. The NCAA division seemed to have no effect on an individual's job satisfaction or intention to leave the profession. In addition, only Fringe Benefits and Operating Conditions seemed to be affected by job title. The ATs had similar levels of job satisfaction regardless of NCAA division, and their job titles were not a

  18. Single-Pilot Workload Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jason; Williams, Kevin; Hackworth, Carla; Burian, Barbara; Pruchnicki, Shawn; Christopher, Bonny; Drechsler, Gena; Silverman, Evan; Runnels, Barry; Mead, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Integrated glass cockpit systems place a heavy cognitive load on pilots (Burian Dismukes, 2007). Researchers from the NASA Ames Flight Cognition Lab and the FAA Flight Deck Human Factors Lab examined task and workload management by single pilots. This poster describes pilot performance regarding programming a reroute while at cruise and meeting a waypoint crossing restriction on the initial descent.

  19. General Aviation Pilot Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Warren L.

    General Aviation Pilot Education (GAPE) was a safety program designed to improve the aeronautical education of the general aviation pilot in anticipation that the national aircraft accident rate might be improved. GAPE PROGRAM attempted to reach the average general aviation pilot with specific and factual information regarding the pitfalls of his…

  20. Pilot project on population education under approval. Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    A 3-year pilot project, requested by the Ministry of Education of the Government of Lao PDR, will introduce population education in formal and nonformal formats. The goal of the project is to help teachers, students, trainers, and out-of-school adults make rational decisions about birth spacing and family size in order to maintain an acceptable level of quality of life. Sites will include two upper secondary schools, two lower secondary schools, two primary schools, and one adult education center. Population education will be integrated as a separate unit into social sciences and biology in grades 6-11. In grades 4-5, it will be presented as part of "The World Around Us". In the nonformal sector, it will be integrated into basic literacy, skills development, health and family life education, and civic education activities. Curricula, teaching-learning, and training materials will be produced by the Ministry of Education. Areas covered will include population policy, demography, birth spacing, population and development, quality of life, environment, gender role and responsibilities, values and beliefs, aging, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and drug abuse. Short-term attachment, training courses, and study visits abroad will develop national expertise. Courses for teachers and textbook writers are proposed. The Ministry of Education will implement the program through the Department of General Education, the Department of Teacher's Education, the Research Institute of Educational Sciences, the Pedagogical Institute, the Teacher Training College, the Teacher Development Centre, and the Department of Nonformal Education.

  1. Personal and Environmental Characteristics Predicting Burnout Among Certified Athletic Trainers at National Collegiate Athletic Association Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Kania, Michelle L; Meyer, Barbara B; Ebersole, Kyle T

    2009-01-01

    Context: Recent research in the health care professions has shown that specific personal and environmental characteristics can predict burnout, which is a negative coping strategy related to stressful situations. Burnout has been shown to result in physiologic (eg, headaches, difficulty sleeping, poor appetite), psychological (eg, increased negative self-talk, depression, difficulty in interpersonal relationships), and behavioral (eg, diminished care, increased absenteeism, attrition) symptoms. Objective: To examine the relationship between selected personal and environmental characteristics and burnout among certified athletic trainers (ATs). Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: A demographic survey that was designed for this study and the Maslach Burnout Inventory–Human Services Survey. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 206 ATs employed at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) institutions as clinical ATs volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s): We assessed personal and environmental characteristics of ATs with the demographic survey and measured burnout using the Maslach Burnout Inventory–Human Services Survey. Multiple regression analyses were performed to examine relationships between specific personal and environmental characteristics and each of the 3 subscales of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal accomplishment). Results: Most ATs we surveyed experienced low to average levels of burnout. Personal characteristics predicted 45.5% of the variance in emotional exhaustion (P < .001), 21.5% of the variance in depersonalization (P < .001), and 24.8% of the variance in personal accomplishment (P < .001). Environmental characteristics predicted 16.7% of the variance in emotional exhaustion (P  =  .005), 14.4% of the variance in depersonalization (P  =  .024), and 10.4% of the variance in personal accomplishment (P  =  .209). Stress level and coaches' pressure to medically clear athletes predicted ratings

  2. Preparation of the Professional Athletic Trainer: A Descriptive Study of Undergraduate and Graduate Degree Programs

    PubMed Central

    Cavallario, Julie M.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Context The examination of the appropriate professional degree for preparation as an athletic trainer is of interest to the profession. Descriptive information concerning universal outcomes is needed to understand the effect of a degree change. Objective To obtain and compare descriptive information related to professional athletic training programs and a potential degree change and to determine if any of these factors contribute to success on existing universal outcome measures. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Web-based survey. Patients or Other Participants We contacted 364 program directors; 178 (48.9%; 163 undergraduate, 15 postbaccalaureate) responded. Intervention(s) The survey consisted of 46 questions: 45 questions that dealt with 5 themes (institutional demographics [n = 13], program admissions [n = 6], program outcomes [n = 10], program design [n = 9], faculty and staff [n = 7]) and 1 optional question. Main Outcome Measure(s) Descriptive statistics for all programs were calculated. We compared undergraduate and postbaccalaureate programs by examining universal outcome variables. Results Descriptive statistics demonstrated that 33 programs could not support postbaccalaureate degrees, and a substantial loss of faculty could occur if the degree requirement changed (553 graduate assistants, 642 potentially underqualified instructors). Postbaccalaureate professional programs had higher 2011–2012 first-time Board of Certification (BOC) passing rates (U = 464.5, P = .001), 3-year aggregate first-time BOC passing rates (U = 451.5, P = .001), and employment rates for 2011–2012 graduates employed within athletic training (U = 614.0, P = .01). Linear multiple-regression models demonstrated that program and institution type contributed to the variance of the first-time BOC passing rates and the 3-year aggregate first-time BOC passing rates (P < .05). Conclusions Students in postbaccalaureate athletic training programs performed better in universal outcome

  3. An elliptical trainer may render the Wingate all-out test more anaerobic.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Ozgur; Colakoglu, Muzaffer; Kuzucu, Erinc O; Delextrat, Anne

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of the 3 main energy pathways during a 30-second elliptical all-out test (EAT) compared with the Wingate all-out test (WAT). Participants were 12 male team sport players (age, 20.3 ± 1.8 years; body mass, 74.8 ± 12.4 kg; height, 176.0 ± 9.10 cm; body fat, 12.1 ± 1.0%). Net energy outputs from the oxidative, phospholytic, and glycolytic energy systems were calculated from oxygen uptake data recorded during 30-second test, the fast component of postexercise oxygen uptake kinetics, and peak blood lactate concentration, respectively. In addition, mechanical power indices were calculated. The main results showed that compared with WAT, EAT was characterized by significantly lower absolute and relative contributions of the oxidative system (16.9 ± 2.5 J vs. 19.8 ± 4.9 J; p ≤ 0.05 and 11.2 ± 1.5% vs. 15.7 ± 3.28%; p ≤ 0.001). In addition, significantly greater absolute and relative contributions of the phospholytic system (66.1 ± 15.8 J vs. 50.7 ± 15.9 J; p ≤ 0.01 and 43.8 ± 6.62% vs. 39.1 ± 6.87%; p ≤ 0.05) and a significantly greater absolute contribution of the glycolytic system (68.6 ± 18.4 J vs. 57.4 ± 13.7 J; p ≤ 0.01) were observed in EAT compared with WAT. Finally, all power indices, except the fatigue index, were significantly greater in EAT than WAT (p ≤ 0.05). Because of the significantly lower aerobic contribution in EAT compared with WAT, elliptical trainers may be a good alternative to cycle ergometers to assess anaerobic performance in athletes involved in whole-body activities.

  4. A workshop report on promoting HIV/AIDS understanding through a capacity building train-the-trainer educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Diesel, Holly J; Nsagha, Dickson S; Sab, Clement M; Taliaferro, Donna; Rosenburg, Neal S

    2011-01-01

    Nursing educators are frequently confronted with challenges that bring about innovation and transition to new ways of transferring knowledge in their home environments. These challenges are magnified when approached from an international perspective. Optimal implementation of knowledge transfer incorporates choosing models that promote local initiatives in line with increasingly decentralized educational structures. These decentralized models are a means to foster ongoing participation for both educators and students in their own professional development. Innovative education stems from creativity in approaching the need with formats and activities to meet a specific challenge. This experimental study builds upon previous study by the authors which was conducted in March, 2009, based upon the qualitative open focus forum at each of the five nursing programs. Overwhelmingly, the Cameroonian nursing students expressed a keen desire to study the HIV infected pregnant woman and the feeding options of the newborn. The study team developed the train-the-trainer program which was delivered at the University of Buea in the Southwest region of Cameroon in March, 2011. TTT is particularly effective for reaching large audiences and also permits a degree of sustainability such that the Cameroonian students will be trainers for subsequent cohorts of their peers. This study continues to strengthen the collaborative endeavors between the two nursing schools; the University of Buea (UB) and Goldfarb School of Nursing (GSON) at Barnes Jewish College in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA. The final aim of the intervention was the initiation of collaborative relationships between the faculty members of the two educational organizations.

  5. A workshop report on promoting HIV/AIDS understanding through a capacity building train-the-trainer educational intervention

    PubMed Central

    Diesel, Holly J; Nsagha, Dickson S; Sab, Clement M; Taliaferro, Donna; Rosenburg, Neal S

    2011-01-01

    Nursing educators are frequently confronted with challenges that bring about innovation and transition to new ways of transferring knowledge in their home environments. These challenges are magnified when approached from an international perspective. Optimal implementation of knowledge transfer incorporates choosing models that promote local initiatives in line with increasingly decentralized educational structures. These decentralized models are a means to foster ongoing participation for both educators and students in their own professional development. Innovative education stems from creativity in approaching the need with formats and activities to meet a specific challenge. This experimental study builds upon previous study by the authors which was conducted in March, 2009, based upon the qualitative open focus forum at each of the five nursing programs. Overwhelmingly, the Cameroonian nursing students expressed a keen desire to study the HIV infected pregnant woman and the feeding options of the newborn. The study team developed the train-the-trainer program which was delivered at the University of Buea in the Southwest region of Cameroon in March, 2011. TTT is particularly effective for reaching large audiences and also permits a degree of sustainability such that the Cameroonian students will be trainers for subsequent cohorts of their peers. This study continues to strengthen the collaborative endeavors between the two nursing schools; the University of Buea (UB) and Goldfarb School of Nursing (GSON) at Barnes Jewish College in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA. The final aim of the intervention was the initiation of collaborative relationships between the faculty members of the two educational organizations. PMID:22187599

  6. Reducing the number of animals used for microsurgery training programs by using a task-trainer simulator.

    PubMed

    Guerreschi, P; Qassemyar, A; Thevenet, J; Hubert, T; Fontaine, C; Duquennoy-Martinot, V

    2014-01-01

    To master the skills needed for microsurgery techniques, residents must enrol in a long and complex training program that includes manipulations on simulators, on ex vivo tissues and finally in vivo training. This final step consists of performing vascular anastomoses on murine models. We propose here a simulation program designed to decrease the number of rats used during the final in vivo training. Our study presents the materials used, the various exercises proposed and their evaluations. Two identical student groups were compared in the framework of the University Diploma of Microsurgery. Group A (seven students) followed a classic training program, all of whom achieved permeable vascular anastomoses. A total of 149 rats were needed for this group. Group B (seven students) first validated their manipulations on the task-trainer simulation program. A mean of 6 h was necessary to obtain this validation. All these students achieved the required permeable vascular anastomoses but only 77 rats were used for this group. This simulation program spared 72 rats, abiding by the Russell and Burch concept of a humane experimental technique, namely the 3R principles. This home-made, cost-efficient and easy-to-use task trainer included various exercises with increasing difficulty levels and a progressive scoring system. We believe that microsurgery training needs to include both simple and sophisticated tools in order to reduce the number of animals used to master these surgical skills.

  7. Exploring the Athletic Trainer's Role in Assisting Student-Athletes Presenting With Alcohol-Related Unintentional Injuries.

    PubMed

    Howell, Steven M; Barry, Adam E; Pitney, William A

    2015-09-01

    Compared with their nonathlete peers, collegiate athletes consume higher quantities of alcohol, drink with greater frequency, and exhibit an increased propensity to engage in heavy episodic drinking (ie, binge drinking), which often may result in alcohol-related consequences. Moreover, collegiate athletes are also more likely to engage in other maladaptive lifestyle behaviors, such as participating in physical fights and riding with an intoxicated driver, and less likely to engage in protective behaviors, such as wearing a helmet while operating a motorcycle, moped, or bicycle. Taken together, these behaviors clearly pose a health risk for student-athletes and increase the likelihood that they will experience an alcohol-related unintentional injury (ARUI). An ARUI represents a risk not only to the health and well-being of collegiate athletes but also to their athletic performances, collegiate careers, and potential professional opportunities. Therefore, athletic trainers need to be equipped with the knowledge and skills to provide face-to-face brief interventions to student-athletes presenting with ARUIs and to evaluate the effect of their involvement. We address potential action items for implementation by athletic trainers.

  8. Exploring the Athletic Trainer's Role in Assisting Student-Athletes Presenting With Alcohol-Related Unintentional Injuries.

    PubMed

    Howell, Steven M; Barry, Adam E; Pitney, William A

    2015-09-01

    Compared with their nonathlete peers, collegiate athletes consume higher quantities of alcohol, drink with greater frequency, and exhibit an increased propensity to engage in heavy episodic drinking (ie, binge drinking), which often may result in alcohol-related consequences. Moreover, collegiate athletes are also more likely to engage in other maladaptive lifestyle behaviors, such as participating in physical fights and riding with an intoxicated driver, and less likely to engage in protective behaviors, such as wearing a helmet while operating a motorcycle, moped, or bicycle. Taken together, these behaviors clearly pose a health risk for student-athletes and increase the likelihood that they will experience an alcohol-related unintentional injury (ARUI). An ARUI represents a risk not only to the health and well-being of collegiate athletes but also to their athletic performances, collegiate careers, and potential professional opportunities. Therefore, athletic trainers need to be equipped with the knowledge and skills to provide face-to-face brief interventions to student-athletes presenting with ARUIs and to evaluate the effect of their involvement. We address potential action items for implementation by athletic trainers. PMID:26287493

  9. Pilot Class Testing: Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle. Washington Foreign Language Program.

    Statistics derived from test score data from the pilot classes participating in the Washington Foreign Language Program are presented in tables in this report. An index accompanies the tables, itemizing the classes by level (FLES, middle, and high school), grade test, language skill, and school. MLA-Coop test performances for each class were…

  10. ISOE Pilot Project Update

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Hagemeyer D. E. Lewis

    2012-05-05

    This slide show introduces the Pilot Project to increase the value of Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) data by increasing participation and amount of data reported from the U.S., reduce the hurdles and effort in participating, streamline the process of reporting and reduce time delay, and eliminate data entry and redundant effort.

  11. Telescience Testbed Pilot Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Maria L. (Editor); Leiner, Barry M. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Telescience Testbed Pilot Program is developing initial recommendations for requirements and design approaches for the information systems of the Space Station era. During this quarter, drafting of the final reports of the various participants was initiated. Several drafts are included in this report as the University technical reports.

  12. Teacher Trainers' and Trainees' Perceptions, Practices, and Constraints to Active Learning Methods: The Case of English Department in Bahir Dar University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engidaw, Berhanu

    2014-01-01

    This study is on teacher trainers and teacher trainees' perceptions and practices of active learning and the constraints to implementing them in the English Department of Bahir Dar University. A mixed study approach that involves a quantitative self administered questionnaire, a semi-structured lesson observation guide, and qualitative in…

  13. Assessment of United States and Japanese Athletic Trainers' Satisfaction with Current Ascension Pathways and Interest in Future Transnational Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presuto, Dax A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this cross-system and cross-cultural study was to investigate the current athletic training systems in the US and Japan, to assess US and Japanese athletic trainers' satisfaction with current athletic training ascension pathways in their respective country and to determine their interest in future transnational…

  14. In-Country TEFL/Crossover Tropical Agricultural Training Manual. Trainer's Edition. Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franck, Carl R.; And Others

    This trainer's manual was developed for two purposes: (1) as a record of what was done with the 1984 Test of English as a Foreign Language (TEFL)/Crossover Agricultural Training program in Thailand, and (2) as a resource to share with other Peace Corps countries where in-country basic tropical agriculture training is conducted. Throughout the…

  15. Evaluation of a School-Based Train-the-Trainer Intervention Program to Teach First Aid and Risk Reduction among High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruth, Ann K.; Pryor, Susan; Cormier, Cathy; Bateman, Aaron; Matzke, Brenda; Gilmore, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Background: Farming is a hazardous occupation posing health risks from agricultural exposures for the farm owner and family members. First Aid for Rural Medical Emergencies (F.A.R.M.E.) was developed to support a train-the-trainer (TTT) program to prepare high school students to teach first aid skills and risk reduction through peer interaction.…

  16. A Study on the Relationship between Ability, Motivational, and Work Environmental Influences and the Degree of Transfer of Learning of New Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, LaNettae

    2010-01-01

    There is greater emphasis being placed on developing employees' competencies to help organizations achieve their operational and business goals. One of the essential functions of a training department is to support the organization's business goals and initiatives. The urgent and insistent demand for capable and proficient trainers has led to the…

  17. Understanding Learning and Teaching in Papua New Guinea: Elementary Teacher Trainers Engaged in Cultural Authorship in the Context of National Educational Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlee, Joanne M.; Farrell, Ann; Davis, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, Papua New Guinea (PNG) has pursued educational reform in elementary teacher education. Because elementary teachers and teacher education are central to the reform agenda, there is a need to gain empirical evidence about how PNG teacher trainers' understandings about learning and teaching impact on their practice. The study…

  18. An Example of a Qualitative Evaluation of Performance Change from a Train the Trainer Seminar Intervention. Instructional Development Technical Report Number 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrence, David R.

    The National Elevator Industry Educational Program (NEIEP) is a training trust established by an industry trade association and a union to maintain the supply of well-trained competent elevator mechanics. The NEIEP conducts Train the Trainer seminars that present a skill-building program to give each instructor a range of techniques and strategies…

  19. Survey Instrument Validity Part II: Validation of a Survey Instrument Examining Athletic Trainers' Knowledge and Practice Beliefs Regarding Exertional Heat Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of developing and validating an instrument to investigate an athletic trainer's attitudes and behaviors regarding the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke. Background: Following up from our initial paper, which discussed the process of survey instrument design and…

  20. Teacher Trainers' and Trainee Teachers' Understanding towards the Curriculum Philosophy Regarding Soft Skills Embedment in the Malaysian Institute of Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Aminuddin; Maharoff, Marina; Abiddin, Norhasni Zainal; Ro'is, Ihsan

    2016-01-01

    The embedment of soft skills into education programs in higher education is closely related to the curriculum philosophy brought by the respective institutions. The soft skills are embedded through understanding belief systems and practices among the teacher trainers. Furthermore it provides an insight into the curriculum philosophy on how to…

  1. Literacy Practices and Clerical Competency Standards: Implications for Trainers and Assessors. Research into Practice Series Number 8. Adult Literacy Research Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Ann

    This booklet, which is written for adult literacy practitioners in Australia, argues that adult literacy practitioners working as trainers and assessors must become familiar with the tasks and texts used by competent workers in particular occupations and industries, and must understand how those tasks and texts fit within the broader social…

  2. Nutrition Improvement through Mixed Gardening in the Humid Tropics. A Trainer's Manual. Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Paul

    This manual is designed to provide Peace Corps trainers with suggested guidelines on the presentation of a nutrition-oriented household food production training program to community-level field workers. The manual describes and discusses simple, low-cost, local resources that may be available to the community. When applied through a home garden,…

  3. Feasibility of a Brief Community-Based Train-the-Trainer Lesson to Reduce the Risk of Falls among Community Dwelling Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Katherine B.; John, Deborah H.

    2014-01-01

    The Better Balance, Better Bones, Better Bodies (B-Better©) program was developed to disseminate simple home-based strategies to prevent falls and improve functional health of older adults using a train-the-trainer model. Delivered by Family & Community Education Study Group program volunteers, the lesson stresses the importance of a…

  4. Use of Train-the-Trainer Sensorimotor Group Experience (TTSMGE) to Promote Functional Motor Skill Development in an Urban US Preschool Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipp, Genevieve Pinto; Olson, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    As the demand for services from therapists in the educational environment continues to grow, both physical and occupational therapists seek innovative and effective ways to meet the identified needs of the child and school environment. Train-the-trainer model of service delivery can be used to meet the needs of both the therapist and the preschool…

  5. A Model Train-The-Trainer Program for HACCP-Based Food Safety Training in the Retail/Food Service Industry: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kenneth E.; Knabel, Steve; Mendenhall, Von

    1999-01-01

    A survey showed states are adopting higher training and certification requirements for food-service workers. A train-the-trainer model was developed to prepare extension agents, health officers, and food-service managers to train others in food-safety procedures. (SK)

  6. Successful Strategies for Educating Hard-to-Reach Populations: Lessons Learned from Massachusetts' Train-the-Trainer Project Using the "Helping You Take Care of Yourself" Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besculides, Melanie; Trebino, Lisa; Nelson, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of providing education on breast, cervical and cardiovascular health to hard-to-reach women throughout Massachusetts using an innovative derivation of the "train-the-trainer" approach. Innovation included use of contracts with community-based organizations (CBOs) that required data collection in return for…

  7. Education and Training in Aging: A Practical Guide for Professionals. Proceedings and Final Report of the Region VIII Symposia for Trainers in Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Ginger M., Ed.

    These proceedings are intended for use by educators, trainers, and others with responsibility for developing short-term educational programs in the field of aging. The articles are practical tools containing a wealth of concepts and suggestions for designing conferences, workshops, and short courses on aging. The articles were developed or…

  8. Validation of Competences and Professionalisation of Teachers and Trainers = Validation des Acquis et Professionnalisation des Enseignants et Formateurs. CEDEFOP Dossier Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Blignieres-Legeraud, Anne; Bjornavold, Jens; Charraud, Anne-Marie; Gerard, Francoise; Diamanti, Stamatina; Freundlinger, Alfred; Bjerknes, Ellen; Covita, Horacio

    A workshop aimed to clarify under what conditions the validation of knowledge gained through experience can be considered a professionalizing factor for European Union teachers and trainers by creating a better link between experience and training and between vocational training and qualifications. Seven papers were presented in addition to an…

  9. Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial of An Athletic Trainer-Directed Spit (Smokeless) Tobacco Intervention for Collegiate Baseball Athletes: Results After 1 Year.

    PubMed

    Gansky, Stuart A; Ellison, James A; Rudy, Diane; Bergert, Ned; Letendre, Mark A; Nelson, Lisa; Kavanagh, Catherine; Walsh, Margaret M

    2005-06-01

    Context: Athletes in the United States are at high risk for using spit (smokeless) tobacco (ST) and incurring its associated adverse health effects.Objective: To examine whether an athletic trainer-directed ST intervention could decrease initiation and promote cessation of ST use among male collegiate baseball athletes.Design: Stratified, cluster-randomized controlled trial.Setting: Fifty-two California colleges.Patients or Other Participant(s): A total of 883 subjects in 27 intervention colleges and 702 subjects in 25 control colleges participated, as did 48 certified athletic trainers.Intervention(s): For college athletic trainers and associated dental professionals, a 3-hour video conference, and for collegiate athletes, an oral cancer screening with feedback and brief counseling during the preseason health screenings, athletic trainer support for cessation, and a peer-led educational baseball team meeting.Main Outcome Measure(s): The subjects' ST use over 1 year was assessed by self-report. At the end of the study, the certified athletic trainers were mailed a survey assessing their tobacco use and perceptions and behavior related to tobacco control in the athletic environment. We used multivariable logistic regression models for clustered responses (generalized estimating equations) to test the difference between groups in ST-use initiation and cessation and to identify significant overall predictors of noninitiation and cessation of ST use.Results: Of the 1585 athletes recruited, 1248 (78.7%) were followed up at 12 months. In addition, 48 of the 52 athletic trainers (92%) responded to the 1-year follow-up survey. The ST-use initiation (incidence) was 5.1% in intervention colleges and 8.4% in control colleges (generalized estimating equation odds ratio = 0.58, 95% confidence interval = 0.35-0.99). Predictors of ST noninitiation were low lifetime tobacco and monthly alcohol use (odds ratio = 1.98, 95% confidence interval = 1.40- 2.82) and athletic trainers

  10. Blind Pilot Decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Ralf R.; Cottatellucci, Laura; Vehkapera, Mikko

    2014-10-01

    A subspace projection to improve channel estimation in massive multi-antenna systems is proposed and analyzed. Together with power-controlled hand-off, it can mitigate the pilot contamination problem without the need for coordination among cells. The proposed method is blind in the sense that it does not require pilot data to find the appropriate subspace. It is based on the theory of large random matrices that predicts that the eigenvalue spectra of large sample covariance matrices can asymptotically decompose into disjoint bulks as the matrix size grows large. Random matrix and free probability theory are utilized to predict under which system parameters such a bulk decomposition takes place. Simulation results are provided to confirm that the proposed method outperforms conventional linear channel estimation if bulk separation occurs.

  11. ADS pilot program Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauson, J.; Heuser, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Applications Data Service (ADS) is a system based on an electronic data communications network which will permit scientists to share the data stored in data bases at universities and at government and private installations. It is designed to allow users to readily locate and access high quality, timely data from multiple sources. The ADS Pilot program objectives and the current plans for accomplishing those objectives are described.

  12. Telescience Testbed Pilot Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Maria L. (Editor); Leiner, Barry M. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Telescience Testbed Pilot Program (TTPP) is intended to develop initial recommendations for requirements and design approaches for the information system of the Space Station era. Multiple scientific experiments are being performed, each exploring advanced technologies and technical approaches and each emulating some aspect of Space Station era science. The aggregate results of the program will serve to guide the development of future NASA information systems.

  13. Pilot Eye Scanning under Actual Single Pilot Instrument Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinoie, Kenichi; Sunada, Yasuto

    Operations under single pilot instrument flight rules for general aviation aircraft is known to be one of the most demanding pilot tasks. Scanning numerous instruments plays a key role for perception and decision-making during flight. Flight experiments have been done by a single engine light airplane to investigate the pilot eye scanning technique for IFR flights. Comparisons between the results by an actual flight and those by a PC-based flight simulator are made. The experimental difficulties of pilot eye scanning measurements during the actual IFR flight are discussed.

  14. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, F.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be sent, as a script to be run, or it can be fetched from a remote location. A pilot 2.0 can run on every computing resource, e.g.: on CREAM Computing elements, on DIRAC Computing elements, on Virtual Machines as part of the contextualization script, or IAAC resources, provided that these machines are properly configured, hiding all the details of the Worker Nodes (WNs) infrastructure. Pilots 2.0 can be generated server and client side. Pilots 2.0 are the “pilots to fly in all the skies”, aiming at easy use of computing power, in whatever form it is presented. Another aim is the unification and simplification of the monitoring infrastructure for all kinds of computing resources, by using pilots as a network of distributed sensors coordinated by a central resource monitoring system. Pilots 2.0 have been developed using the command pattern. VOs using DIRAC can tune pilots 2.0 as they need, and extend or replace each and every pilot command in an easy way. In this

  15. Perceived Outcomes of Web-Based Modules Designed to Enhance Athletic Trainers' Knowledge of Evidence-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Cailee E.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.; Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Wyant, Aimee L.; Mutchler, Jessica M.; Pitney, William A.; Hays, Danica G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The release of evidence-based practice (EBP) Web-based learning modules to the membership of the National Athletic Trainers' Association has provided athletic trainers (ATs) the opportunity to enhance their knowledge of the various EBP concepts. Whereas increasing the knowledge of EBP among ATs is important, assessing whether this newfound knowledge is being translated into clinical practice and didactic education is crucial. Objective: To explore the effectiveness of an educational intervention regarding EBP on the didactic instruction patterns of athletic training educators and the clinical practice behaviors of clinicians. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Individual telephone interviews. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 25 ATs (12 educators, 13 clinicians; experience as an AT = 16.00 ± 9.41 years) were interviewed. Data Collection and Analysis: We conducted 1 individual telephone interview with each participant. After transcription, the data were analyzed and coded into common themes and categories. Triangulation of the data occurred via the use of multiple researchers and member checking to confirm the accuracy of the data. Results: Participants perceived the EBP Web-based modules to produce numerous outcomes regarding education and clinical practice. These outcomes included perceived knowledge gain among participants, an increase in the importance and scope of EBP, a positive effect on educators' didactic instruction patterns and on instilling value and practice of EBP among students, and an enhanced ability among clinicians to implement EBP within clinical practice. However, some clinicians reported the Web-based modules had no current effect on clinical practice. Conclusions: Although the EBP Web-based modules were successful at enhancing knowledge among ATs, translation of knowledge into the classroom and clinical practice remains limited. Researchers should aim to identify effective strategies to help ATs implement EBP concepts into

  16. 75 FR 56857 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ...'' (74 FR 12500), which revised the training, qualification, certification, and operating requirements... their test on the first attempt is not a change from the existing rule.'' 74 FR 42500, 42538. The use of... Administration 14 CFR Part 141 RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification...

  17. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  18. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  19. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  20. Evaluation of the pilot phase of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health Module.

    PubMed

    Tsey, Komla; Chigeza, Philemon; Holden, Carol A; Bulman, Jack; Gruis, Hilton; Wenitong, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This article evaluates the pilot phase of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health Module. Although men experience higher levels of illness and die younger than women, educational programs to support health workers utilise a gender-based approach to increase participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males in health care are rare and lack appropriate content. Recognising this gap in service provision, and under the guidance of a Reference Group comprising community leaders in Aboriginal and Torres Strait male health, a comprehensive and culturally appropriate Male Health Module has been developed to enhance the capacity of health workers to improve access to services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males. Methods used were: in-depth interviews with Module developers, pilot workshops for trainers and health workers, questionnaires and focus group discussions with workshop participants, and participant observations. As well as enhancing capacity to facilitate access to health services for men, the Module was deemed relevant because of its potential to promote health worker empowerment and wellbeing. Findings revealed that improving access to services for men required male and female health workers working in partnership. Despite overall enthusiasm for the Module, the findings also revealed deep fear that it would end up 'collecting dust on shelves'. Strategies to improve the Module quality and accessibility are highlighted.

  1. Pilot climate data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A usable data base, the Pilot climate Data System (PCDS) is described. The PCDS is designed to be an interactive, easy-to-use, on-line generalized scientific information system. It efficiently provides uniform data catalogs; inventories, and access method, as well as manipulation and display tools for a large assortment of Earth, ocean and atmospheric data for the climate-related research community. Researchers can employ the PCDS to scan, manipulate, compare, display, and study climate parameters from diverse data sets. Software features, and applications of the PCDS are highlighted.

  2. The design, construction and operation of the helicopter underwater escape trainer

    SciTech Connect

    Urguhart, A.E.

    1983-09-01

    Civil helicopters hopefully are not likely to be subjected to the possibility of being shot from the skies and descending in an uncontrolled manner. Should a civil helicopter have to ditch, due to some mechanical or electrical failure, it is reasonable to predict that it may do so in a controlled manner, with the pilot either taking the positive decision to ditch the helicopter, or being forced to do so. It is for such controlled or nearly controlled ditchings that training of personnel should be considered. The air-crews involved in flying civil helicopters are not dissimilar to military service personnel, in that they are a disciplined group of professionals qualified and experienced in their business of flying and ditching. However, the offshore worker, being ferried to his place of work, is, in essence, the human cargo forced by necessity to be transported by helicopter. Many offshore employees may not wish to be, or particularly enjoy, being transported over the North Sea by helicopter nevertheless, it is the only viable mode of transport and, with the number of helicopter flights which are currently being undertaken to and from the North Sea installations, it is not being over-pessimistic to foresee the likelihood of a civil helicopter with passengers having to ditch in the sea.

  3. Motivational Engineering for Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzberg, Frederick I.; And Others

    The study was an investigation of student pilot motivation for, and toward, the Air Training Command's undergraduate pilot training (UPT) program. The motivation hygiene approach was used to identify the motivational factors operating in the UPT program systematically. This approach has been used extensively in industry and with success in a…

  4. Evaluating a Community-Partnered Cancer Clinical Trials Pilot Intervention with African American Communities

    PubMed Central

    Green, Melissa A.; Michaels, Margo; Blakeney, Natasha; Odulana, Adebowale A.; Isler, Malika Roman; Richmond, Alan; Long, Debra G.; Robinson, William S.; Taylor, Yhenneko J.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cancer Clinical Trial (CCT) accrual and retention rates remain disproportionately low among African Americans. Awareness and access to trials are crucial facilitators of trial participation. Strategies developed within a community-based participatory framework (CBPR) are potential solutions to increase awareness and access to CCTs. In this study, we describe the pilot phase of three innovative community-centered modules to improve basic CCT knowledge, awareness of locations to access CCT information, and opportunities to participate in CCTs. Design Four community organizations completed Community Bridges to CCTs training-of-the trainer and recruited adult African American volunteers to participate in one of three CCT education modules: a workshop about CCTs; a role-play describing one person's experience with CCTs; or a call and response session reviewing myths and facts about CCTs. Pre- and post-test surveys were collected and analyzed using McNemar agreement statistic to evaluate changes in knowledge and attitudes regarding trials. Results Trainers enrolled 125 participants in the Call and Response (n=22), Role-play (n=60), and Workshop (n=43) modules. Module participants were mostly African American, female, and mean age of 53 years. Comparison of pre and post-test responses demonstrates favorable changes in awareness of CCTs and where to access to CCTs across the sample. Analysis by module type indicates significant increases for participants in the Call and Response (p < 0.01) and Role-Play modules (p < 0.001), but not the Workshop module. Conclusion Despite measures taken to increase the participation and retention rate of African Americans in clinical trials, little advancement has been made. Developing tailored community education modules on CCTs within the CBPR framework is a promising innovation to increase knowledge about CCTs and favorable attitudes about participation that are known precursors to trial enrollment. PMID:25564207

  5. Evaluating a community-partnered cancer clinical trials pilot intervention with African American communities.

    PubMed

    Green, Melissa A; Michaels, Margo; Blakeney, Natasha; Odulana, Adebowale A; Isler, Malika Roman; Richmond, Alan; Long, Debra G; Robinson, William S; Taylor, Yhenneko J; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2015-03-01

    Cancer clinical trial (CCT) accrual and retention rates remain disproportionately low among African Americans. Awarenesss and access to trials are crucial facilitators of trial participation. Strategies developed within a community-based participatory framework (CBPR) are potential solutions to increase awareness and access to CCTs. In this study, we describe the pilot phase of three innovative community-centered modules to improve basic CCT knowledge, awareness of locations to access CCT information, and opportunities to participate in CCTs. Four community organizations completed Community Bridges to CCT training-of-the-trainer and recruited adult African American volunteers to participate in one of three CCT education modules: a workshop about CCTs, a role play describing one person's experience with CCTs, or a call and response session reviewing myths and facts about CCTs. Pre- and post-test surveys were collected and analyzed using McNemar agreement statistic to evaluate changes in knowledge and attitudes regarding trials. Trainers enrolled 125 participants in the call and response (n = 22), role play (n = 60), and workshop (n = 43) modules. Module participants were mostly African American, female, and with a mean age of 53 years. Comparison of pre- and post-test responses demonstrates favorable changes in awareness of CCTs and where to access CCTs across the sample. Analysis by module type indicates significant increases for participants in the call and response (p < 0.01) and role play modules (p < 0.001), but not the workshop module. Despite measures taken to increase the participation and retention rate of African Americans in clinical trials, little advancement has been made. Developing tailored community education modules on CCTs within the CBPR framework is a promising innovation to increase knowledge about CCTs and favorable attitudes about participation that are known precursors to trial enrollment.

  6. Train the Trainer: A Program To Support the Efficient Transfer of Knowledge from Network Engineers to Local Area Network Managers. Case Study of the University Of Missouri-Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Continuous learning is necessary in order to be successful in the labor market of the future. Implementing train-the-trainer programs is an efficient way to share company-specific skill and knowledge. (JOW)

  7. The Challenge of Implementing Peer-Led Interventions in a Professionalized Health Service: A Case Study of the National Health Trainers Service in England

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, Jonathan; Taylor, Rebecca; Parry, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Context In 2004, the English Public Health White Paper Choosing Health introduced “health trainers” as new members of the National Health Service (NHS) workforce. Health trainers would offer one-to-one peer-support to anyone who wished to adopt and maintain a healthier lifestyle. Choosing Health implicitly envisaged health trainers working in community settings in order to engage “hard-to-reach” individuals and other groups who often have the poorest health but who engage the least with traditional health promotion and other NHS services. Methods During longitudinal case studies of 6 local health trainer services, we conducted in-depth interviews with key stakeholders and analyzed service activity data. Findings Rather than an unproblematic and stable implementation of community-focused services according to the vision in Choosing Health, we observed substantial shifts in the case studies’ configuration and delivery as the services embedded themselves in the local NHS systems. To explain these observations, we drew on a recently proposed conceptual framework to examine and understand the adoption and diffusion of innovations in health care systems. Conclusions The health trainer services have become more “medicalized” over time, and in doing so, the original theory underpinning the program has been threatened. The paradox is that policymakers and practitioners recognize the need to have a different service model for traditional NHS services if they want hard-to-reach populations to engage in preventive actions as a first step to redress health inequalities. The long-term sustainability of any new service model, however, depends on its aligning with the established medical system's (ie, the NHS's) characteristics. PMID:25492602

  8. Understanding Athletic Trainers' Beliefs Toward a Multifacted Sport-Related Concussion Approach: Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Justin; Vela, Luzita; Housman, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Context: Practice guidelines recommend a multifaceted approach for managing concussions, but a relatively small percentage of athletic trainers (ATs) follow these recommendations. Understanding ATs' beliefs toward the recommended concussion practice guidelines is the first step in identifying interventions that could increase compliance. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) allows us to measure ATs' beliefs toward the recommended concussion practice guidelines. Objective: To examine the influence of ATs' beliefs toward the current recommended concussion guidelines on concussion-management practice through an application of the TPB. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A Web link with a survey was e-mailed to 1000 randomly selected members of the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA). Patients or Other Participants: A total of 221 certified ATs working in secondary school/clinic, high school, and college/university settings. Main Outcome Measure(s): A 66-item survey reflecting the current recommended concussion guidelines of the NATA and International Conference on Concussion in Sport was created to measure beliefs using the TPB constructs attitude toward the behavior (BA), subjective norms (SN), perceived behavioral control (PBC), and behavioral intention (BI) of ATs. We used a linear multiple regression to determine if the TPB constructs BA, SN, and PBC predicted BI and if PBC and BI predicted behavior according to the TPB model. Results: We found that BA, SN, and PBC predicted BI (R = 0.683, R2 = 0.466, F3,202 = 58.78, P < .001). The BA (t202 = 5.53, P < .001) and PBC (t202 = 9.64, P < .001) contributed to the model, whereas SN (t202 = −0.84, P = .402) did not. The PBC and BI predicted behavior (R = 0.661, R2 = 0.437, F2,203 = 78.902, P < .001). Conclusions: In this sample, the TPB constructs predicted BI and behavior of ATs' compliance with recommended concussion-management guidelines. The BA and PBC were the most influential constructs, indicating

  9. Athletic Trainers' Familiarity With and Perceptions of Academic Accommodations in Secondary School Athletes After Sport-Related Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richelle M.; Welch, Cailee E.; Parsons, John T.; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich

    2015-01-01

    Context: Sport-related concussion can affect athletes' sport participation and academic success. With the recent emphasis on cognitive rest, student-athletes may benefit from academic accommodations (AA) in the classroom; however, athletic trainers' (ATs') perceived familiarity with, and use of, AA is unknown. Objective: To assess secondary school ATs' perceived familiarity with, attitudes and beliefs about, and incorporation of AA for student-athletes after sport-related concussion. A secondary purpose was to determine whether employment status altered familiarity and use of AA. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Online survey. Patients or Other Participants: Of 3286 possible respondents, 851 secondary school ATs accessed the survey (response rate = 25.9%; 308 men [36.2%], 376 women [44.2%], 167 respondents [19.6%] with sex information missing; age = 37.3 ± 10.1 years). Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants were solicited via e-mail to complete the Beliefs, Attitudes and Knowledge Following Pediatric Athlete Concussion among Athletic Trainers employed in the secondary school setting (BAKPAC-AT) survey. The BAKPAC-AT assessed ATs' perceived familiarity, perceptions, and roles regarding 504 plans, Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), and returning student-athletes to the classroom. Independent variables were employment status (full time versus part time), employment model (direct versus outreach), years certified, and years of experience in the secondary school setting. The dependent variables were participants' responses to the AA questions. Spearman rank-correlation coefficients were used to assess relationships and Mann-Whitney U and χ2 tests (P < .05) were used to identify differences. Results: Respondents reported that approximately 41% of the student-athletes whose sport-related concussions they managed received AA. Respondents employed directly by the school were more familiar with 504 plans (P < .001) and IEPs (P < .001) and had a greater belief

  10. NAESA Augmentation Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, John J.

    1998-01-01

    This project was one project within the Native American Earth and Space Academy (NAESA). NAESA is a national initiative comprised of several organizations that support programs which focus on 1) enhancing the technological, scientific and pedagogical skills of K-14 teachers who instruct Native Americans, 2) enhancing the understanding and applications of science, technology, and engineering of college-bound Native Americans and teaching them general college "survival skills" (e.g., test taking, time management, study habits), 3) enhancing the scientific and pedagogical skills of the faculty of tribally-controllcd colleges and community colleges with large Native American enrollments, and 4) strengthening the critical relationships between students, their parents, tribal elders, and their communities. This Augmentation Pilot Project focused on the areas of community-school alliances and intemet technology use in teaching and learning and daily living addressing five major objectives.

  11. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

  12. 77 FR 67433 - Community Advantage Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Community Advantage Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of extension of and changes to Community Advantage Pilot Program and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Community Advantage (``CA'') Pilot Program is a pilot program to increase SBA-guaranteed loans to...

  13. 14 CFR 61.51 - Pilot logbooks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... by § 91.109 of this chapter. (2) Type of pilot experience or training— (i) Solo. (ii) Pilot in... (2) Satisfy the recent flight experience requirements of this part. (d) Logging of solo flight time... one pilot flight crewmember, a pilot may log as solo flight time only that flight time when the...

  14. 14 CFR 61.51 - Pilot logbooks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... by § 91.109 of this chapter. (2) Type of pilot experience or training— (i) Solo. (ii) Pilot in... (2) Satisfy the recent flight experience requirements of this part. (d) Logging of solo flight time... one pilot flight crewmember, a pilot may log as solo flight time only that flight time when the...

  15. 49 CFR 230.110 - Pilots.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pilots. 230.110 Section 230.110 Transportation... and Equalizing System § 230.110 Pilots. (a) General provisions. Pilots shall be securely attached... clearance. The minimum clearance of pilot above the rail shall be 3 inches and the maximum clearance...

  16. 14 CFR 27.771 - Pilot compartment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pilot compartment. 27.771 Section 27.771... Pilot compartment. For each pilot compartment— (a) The compartment and its equipment must allow each pilot to perform his duties without unreasonable concentration or fatigue; (b) If there is provision...

  17. 14 CFR 183.23 - Pilot examiners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pilot examiners. 183.23 Section 183.23... REGULATIONS REPRESENTATIVES OF THE ADMINISTRATOR Kinds of Designations: Privileges § 183.23 Pilot examiners. Any pilot examiner, instrument rating examiner, or airline transport pilot examiner may— (a)...

  18. 14 CFR 29.771 - Pilot compartment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pilot compartment. 29.771 Section 29.771... Pilot compartment. For each pilot compartment— (a) The compartment and its equipment must allow each pilot to perform his duties without unreasonable concentration or fatigue; (b) If there is provision...

  19. 14 CFR 183.23 - Pilot examiners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot examiners. 183.23 Section 183.23... REGULATIONS REPRESENTATIVES OF THE ADMINISTRATOR Kinds of Designations: Privileges § 183.23 Pilot examiners. Any pilot examiner, instrument rating examiner, or airline transport pilot examiner may— (a)...

  20. 49 CFR 230.110 - Pilots.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pilots. 230.110 Section 230.110 Transportation... and Equalizing System § 230.110 Pilots. (a) General provisions. Pilots shall be securely attached... clearance. The minimum clearance of pilot above the rail shall be 3 inches and the maximum clearance...

  1. 14 CFR 27.771 - Pilot compartment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot compartment. 27.771 Section 27.771... Pilot compartment. For each pilot compartment— (a) The compartment and its equipment must allow each pilot to perform his duties without unreasonable concentration or fatigue; (b) If there is provision...

  2. 14 CFR 29.771 - Pilot compartment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot compartment. 29.771 Section 29.771... Pilot compartment. For each pilot compartment— (a) The compartment and its equipment must allow each pilot to perform his duties without unreasonable concentration or fatigue; (b) If there is provision...

  3. Automatic Pilot For Flight-Test Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Eugene L.; Jones, Frank P.; Roncoli, Ralph B.

    1992-01-01

    Autopilot replaces pilot during automatic maneuvers. Pilot, based on ground, flies aircraft to required altitude, then turns control over to autopilot. Increases quality of maneuvers significantly beyond that attainable through remote manual control by pilot on ground. Also increases quality of maneuvers because it performs maneuvers faster than pilot could and because it does not have to repeat poorly executed maneuvers.

  4. 76 FR 56262 - Community Advantage Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... Community Advantage Pilot Program (``CA Pilot Program'') (76 FR 9626). Pursuant to the authority provided to... ADMINISTRATION Community Advantage Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION: Notice of change to Community Advantage Pilot Program. SUMMARY: On February 18, 2011, SBA published a...

  5. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... purposes other than receiving flight training, may apply for a commercial pilot certificate and ratings... placed on an airline transport pilot certificate. A person who is a military pilot or former military.... airline transport pilot certificate may be issued the rating at the airline transport pilot...

  6. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... purposes other than receiving flight training, may apply for a commercial pilot certificate and ratings... placed on an airline transport pilot certificate. A person who is a military pilot or former military.... airline transport pilot certificate may be issued the rating at the airline transport pilot...

  7. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... purposes other than receiving flight training, may apply for a commercial pilot certificate and ratings... placed on an airline transport pilot certificate. A person who is a military pilot or former military.... airline transport pilot certificate may be issued the rating at the airline transport pilot...

  8. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... purposes other than receiving flight training, may apply for a commercial pilot certificate and ratings... placed on an airline transport pilot certificate. A person who is a military pilot or former military.... airline transport pilot certificate may be issued the rating at the airline transport pilot...

  9. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... purposes other than receiving flight training, may apply for a commercial pilot certificate and ratings... placed on an airline transport pilot certificate. A person who is a military pilot or former military.... airline transport pilot certificate may be issued the rating at the airline transport pilot...

  10. The importance of material resources and qualified trainers in adult non-formal education and training centres in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayombe, Celestin; Lombard, Antoinette

    2016-04-01

    Non-formal education and training (NFET) programmes in public and private centres in South Africa aim to meet the training needs of adults who have been deprived of formal education which would have fostered skills acquisition and access to employment earlier in their lives. The concern which informs this paper is that adults who face long-term unemployment due to a lack of marketable skills often remain unemployed after completing NFET programmes. The paper assesses the extent to which material and human resources have affected skills acquisition and graduate employment in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The results show that material and human resource challenges in most public and some private centres have led to gaps in skills training. Programmes focus too strongly on academic credits and certificates and not enough on employment as an end goal. The authors argue that the existence of suitable training materials and qualified trainers with practical experience and specific technical skills constitutes favourable conditions ("enabling environments") for graduate employment. Without improvement in material and human resources, adult trainees will continue to experience difficulties integrating into the labour market, and the cycle of poverty and social exclusion will remain unbroken.

  11. Research and development for Onboard Navigation (ONAV) ground based expert/trainer system: ONAV entry expert system code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1988-01-01

    A complete listing is given of the expert system rules for the Entry phase of the Onboard Navigation (ONAV) Ground Based Expert Trainer System for aircraft/space shuttle navigation. These source listings appear in the same format as utilized and required by the C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) expert system shell which is the basis for the ONAV entry system. A schematic overview is given of how the rules are organized. These groups result from a partitioning of the rules according to the overall function which a given set of rules performs. This partitioning was established and maintained according to that established in the knowledge specification document. In addition, four other groups of rules are specified. The four groups (control flow, operator inputs, output management, and data tables) perform functions that affect all the other functional rule groups. As the name implies, control flow ensures that the rule groups are executed in the order required for proper operation; operator input rules control the introduction into the CLIPS fact base of various kinds of data required by the expert system; output management rules control the updating of the ONAV expert system user display screen during execution of the system; and data tables are static information utilized by many different rule sets gathered in one convenient place.

  12. Risk factors and injury prevention in elite athletes: a descriptive study of the opinions of physical therapists, doctors and trainers

    PubMed Central

    Saragiotto, Bruno T.; Di Pierro, Carla; Lopes, Alexandre D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal injuries occur frequently in elite athletes. Understanding what professionals who work with patients with sports injuries think about prevention has been suggested as an important aspect to improve the effectiveness of programs to prevent sports injuries. Objectives To describe and characterize the opinions of physical therapists, physicians and trainers on 'risk factors' and 'prevention of injury' in elite athletes. Method This is a qualitative study with semi-structured interviews with members of the medical and technical department of the Brazilian delegation who participated in the Pan American Games of Guadalajara 2011. The interview was conducted using two questions: 1) "What do you think can cause injuries in athletes participating in your sport?" 2) "What do you do to prevent injuries in your sport?" The interviews were analyzed in two stages, the identification of thematic units, followed by the categorization and grouping of thematic units. Results We interviewed a total of 30 professionals. Regarding question 1, the main factors attributed as responsible for injury were over-training and incorrect sports techniques. Regarding question 2, the main reported strategies used to prevent injuries were muscle strengthening, nutritional counseling and guidance. Conclusions The main factors affecting the appearance of lesions were over-training, incorrect sports technique, inadequate nutrition and factors related to the athlete's behavior. The main injury prevention strategies were muscle strengthening, nutritional counseling and guidance. PMID:24845023

  13. The Effects on Kinematics and Muscle Activity of Walking in a Robotic Gait Trainer During Zero-Force Control.

    PubMed

    van Asseldonk, Edwin H F; Veneman, Jan F; Ekkelenkamp, Ralf; Buurke, Jaap H; van der Helm, Frans C T; van der Kooij, Herman

    2008-08-01

    "Assist as needed" control algorithms promote activity of patients during robotic gait training. Implementing these requires a free walking mode of a device, as unassisted motions should not be hindered. The goal of this study was to assess the normality of walking in the free walking mode of the LOPES gait trainer, an 8 degrees-of-freedom lightweight impedance controlled exoskeleton. Kinematics, gait parameters and muscle activity of walking in a free walking mode in the device were compared with those of walking freely on a treadmill. Average values and variability of the spatio-temporal gait variables showed no or small (relative to cycle-to-cycle variability) changes and the kinematics showed a significant and relevant decrease in knee angle range only. Muscles involved in push off showed a small decrease, whereas muscles involved in acceleration and deceleration of the swing leg showed an increase of their activity. Timing of the activity was mainly unaffected. Most of the observed differences could be ascribed to the inertia of the exoskeleton. Overall, walking with the LOPES resembled free walking, although this required several adaptations in muscle activity. These adaptations are such that we expect that Assist as Needed training can be implemented in LOPES.

  14. Vertebral pain in helicopter pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auffret, R.; Delahaye, R. P.; Metges, P. J.; VICENS

    1980-01-01

    Pathological forms of spinal pain engendered by piloting helicopters were clinically studied. Lumbalgia and pathology of the dorsal and cervical spine are discussed along with their clinical and radiological signs and origins.

  15. Active Job Monitoring in Pilots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Eileen; Fischer, Max; Giffels, Manuel; Jung, Christopher; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in high energy physics (HEP) including multi-core jobs and multi-core pilots require data centres to gain a deep understanding of the system to monitor, design, and upgrade computing clusters. Networking is a critical component. Especially the increased usage of data federations, for example in diskless computing centres or as a fallback solution, relies on WAN connectivity and availability. The specific demands of different experiments and communities, but also the need for identification of misbehaving batch jobs, requires an active monitoring. Existing monitoring tools are not capable of measuring fine-grained information at batch job level. This complicates network-aware scheduling and optimisations. In addition, pilots add another layer of abstraction. They behave like batch systems themselves by managing and executing payloads of jobs internally. The number of real jobs being executed is unknown, as the original batch system has no access to internal information about the scheduling process inside the pilots. Therefore, the comparability of jobs and pilots for predicting run-time behaviour or network performance cannot be ensured. Hence, identifying the actual payload is important. At the GridKa Tier 1 centre a specific tool is in use that allows the monitoring of network traffic information at batch job level. This contribution presents the current monitoring approach and discusses recent efforts and importance to identify pilots and their substructures inside the batch system. It will also show how to determine monitoring data of specific jobs from identified pilots. Finally, the approach is evaluated.

  16. National conversion pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, D.; Nichols, F.; Lily, A.

    1994-12-31

    Manufacturing Sciences Corporation (MSC) has undertaken a project from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to convert buildings that are currently contaminated at Rocky Flats into buildings that are capable of producing commercial products. This conversion project is called the National Conversion Pilot Project (NCPP). The mission of the NCPP is to explore and demonstrate at the Rocky Flats site the feasibility of economic conversion at DOE facilities. This project was officially started on April 1 with the signing of a Cooperative Assistance Agreement between MSC and the DOE. The NCPP was jointly announced by Roy Romer, Governor of the State of Colorado; Mark Silverman, Manager of the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Office; Jack McGraw, Activity Administrator for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8; and Tom Looby, Director of the Office of Environment from the Colorado Department of Health. On March 25, 1994, Hazel O`Leary, the Secretary of the DOE, toured the site of the NCPP and heartily endorsed the project as an example of how the DOE and commercial industry can jointly accomplish the conversion and cleanup of government facilities into productive commercial ventures.

  17. Polymer Science Pilot Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Mary L.

    1996-07-01

    Natural polymers such as cellulose, proteins, and DNA have been part of earth's store of chemicals long before chemists existed. However, polymers synthesized by chemists first appeared on this planet only sixty years ago. A veritable explosion of materials first known as plastics, later polymers, followed. Today polymers, natural and synthetic, are everywhere, and it is appropriate to include an introduction to polymers in the education of future scientists. The Polymer Science Pilot Program consists of a sequence of experiences with polymers, designed to focus upon the ways in which these materials resemble and/or compare with nonpolymers in physical properties, versatility, and function. The modular format makes it possible for educators to select specific sections of the program for integration into other college chemistry courses. The team learning aspect of he program can also be recommended to educators who select a specific module. When this program was presented at a Middle Atlantic Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society, some attendees were concerned about the limited number of participants as compared with the seemingly large number of college instructors. It was explained that the concentrated format of the four day program necessitates this instructor-to-student ratio; one class consisting of eighteen participants was tried and it was found that some aspects of the program, especially the research paper preparation, were not as thoroughly moderated.

  18. Test pilot Michael R. Swann

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Michael R. Swann joined the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center on June 5, 1978, transferring from the NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, as a research pilot. Swann attended North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota, from September 1968 to February 1977, where he earned his Masters in Physics. He was a member of three national honorary scholastic fraternities. Prior to joining NASA Swann served concurrently as an Aerospace Defense Command Interceptor pilot in the Air National Guard for five years and as a college physics instructor at North Dakota State University for two years. While at Johnson Space Center Mike was a pilot on high altitude earth resources and air sampling missions. He was also an instructor and check pilot for the Astronaut Space Flight Readiness Training program. As a Dryden research pilot Mike was involved with the F-111 #778 Transonic Aircraft Technology (TACT) program, F-15 # 281 Shuttle Tile tests, programs on the F-8C #802 and the PA-30 #808 Remotely Piloted Research Vehicle. He flew the Bell 47G #822 helicopter in support of research with the three-eighths-scale F-15 Spin Research Vehicle. On March 28, 1979, Mike made a pilot familiarization flight in the YF-12A #935. He also flew support flights in the F-104, C-47, T-37, T-38, and the Jetstar aircraft. Michael R. Swann was born June 5, 1949, in Fargo, North Dakota; he was fatally injured in a recreational glider accident on July 28, 1981, near California City, California.

  19. Career and Family Aspirations of Female Athletic Trainers Employed in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Setting

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Eason, Christianne M.; Ferraro, Elizabeth M.; Goodman, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Context: Female athletic trainers (ATs) tend to depart the profession of athletic training after the age of 30. Factors influencing departure are theoretical. Professional demands, particularly at the collegiate level, have also been at the forefront of anecdotal discussion on departure factors. Objective: To understand the career and family intentions of female ATs employed in the collegiate setting. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-seven female ATs (single = 14, married with no children = 6, married with children = 7) employed in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I setting. Data Collection and Analysis: All female ATs responded to a series of open-ended questions via reflective journaling. Data were analyzed via a general inductive approach. Trustworthiness was established by peer review, member interpretive review, and multiple-analyst triangulation. Results: Our participants indicated a strong desire to focus on family or to start a family as part of their personal aspirations. Professionally, many female ATs were unsure of their longevity within the Division I collegiate setting or even the profession itself, with 2 main themes emerging as factors influencing decisions to depart: family planning persistence and family planning departure. Six female ATs planned to depart the profession entirely because of conflicts with motherhood and the role of the AT. Only 3 female ATs indicated a professional goal of persisting at the Division I setting regardless of their family or marital status, citing their ability to maintain work-life balance because of support networks. The remaining 17 female ATs planned to make a setting change to balance the roles of motherhood and AT because the Division I setting was not conducive to parenting. Conclusions: Our results substantiate those of previous researchers, which indicate the Division I setting can be

  20. Determining eye-hand coordination using the sport vision trainer: an evaluation of test-retest reliability.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Paul H; Sparks, S Andy; Murphy, Philip N; Carnegie, Evelyn; Marchant, David C

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the number of test-retest trials required to familiarize participants in order to provide acceptable reliability for the measurement of an eye-hand coordination task using the Sport Vision Trainer (SVT). Two schedules were conducted (S1 and S2). For S1, 64 participants (male n = 51, age 20.8 ± 4.9 years; female n = 13, age 20.1 ± 2.1 years) attended four sessions each 1 week apart, and undertook four trials using the SVT. For S2, 60 participants (male n = 46, age 20.8 ± 4.9 years; female n = 14, age 20.1 ± 2.1 years) attended one 20-minute schedule consisting of four consecutive trials using the SVT. Limits of agreement (LoA) analyses showed that absolute reliability was increased in both studies. The LoA for S2 indicate that error decreased between trial 1-2, 2-3, and 3-4; ± 0.95 (CI, -1.16, +2.56sec), ± 0.97 (CI, -1.66, +2.14sec), ± 0.69 (CI, -1.08, +1.62sec). It was concluded that reliable measurements of eye-hand coordination can be obtained using the SVT in one session.