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Sample records for 71b pilot trainer

  1. SR-71B - Mach 3 Trainer in Flight at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The setting sun peeks beneath a SR-71B Blackbird, silhouetted against the orange hues of the western sky on a 1995 flight from at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  2. SR-71B - Mach 3 Trainer in Flight at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    An SR-71B Blackbird aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is seen here silhouetted against the golden colors of a sunset sky on a 1995 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  3. SR-71B - Mach 3 Trainer in Flight at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The setting sun peeks beneath a SR-71B Blackbird, silhouetted against the orange hues of the western sky on a 1995 flight from at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  4. SR-71 with LASRE pod parked on ramp next to SR-71B trainer aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A NASA SR-71A with the Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment mounted parks beside a NASA SR-71B trainer aircraft. The linear aerospike experiment was mounted on the SR-71 No. 844 on Aug. 26, at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in preparation for its first flight, which took place on 31 October 1997. The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen through the experiment to check its plumbing system for leaks and to test engine operational characteristics. During the other three flights, liquid oxygen was cycled through the engine. Two engine hot-firings were also completed on the ground. A final hot-fire test flight was canceled because of liquid oxygen leaks in the test apparatus. The LASRE experiment itself was a 20-percent-scale, half-span model of a lifting body shape (X-33) without the fins. It was rotated 90 degrees and equipped with eight thrust cells of an aerospike engine and was mounted on a housing known as the 'canoe,' which contained the gaseous hydrogen, helium, and instrumentation gear. The model, engine, and canoe together were called a 'pod.' The experiment focused on determining how a reusable launch vehicle's engine flume would affect the

  5. SR-71B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photo shows NASA's SR-71B, one of three triple-sonic SR-71s initially loaned to NASA by the Air Force, cruises over the California desert en route to NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, from Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, CA, July 25, 1991. The aircraft, two SR-71As and the SR-71B, were loaned to NASA for high-speed, high -altitude testbeds for research in such areas as aerodynamics, propulsion structures, thermal protection materials, and instrumentation. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which

  6. AN EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF A GROUND PILOT TRAINER IN GENERAL AVIATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHAPMAN, G. COURTNEY

    THREE GROUPS OF SUBJECTS WERE TRAINED TO PRIVATE PILOT PROFICIENCY, USING A GROUND PILOT TRAINER, TO FIND HOW MANY HOURS OF GROUND TRAINING CAN BE SUBSTITUTED FOR AIRCRAFT DUAL INSTRUCTION. TRAINING TIME REQUIRED WAS COMPARED BETWEEN GROUPS AND WITH THAT OF A CONTROL GROUP NOT USING A TRAINER. THE GROUP THAT USED THE TRAINER MOST NEEDED…

  7. Assessment of Two Methods of Sequencing Ground Trainer Practice for Undergraduate Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Gary B.; And Others

    The study was an operational evaluation of two methods of instruction sequencing for the T-38 phase of Undergraduate Pilot Training. Scheduling of concentrated trainer phases prior to aircraft flight improved student performance for early aircraft rides as compared with an intermixed trainer and aircraft schedule. Although grade differences washed…

  8. The Virtual Flier: The Link Trainer, Flight Simulation, and Pilot Identity.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chihyung

    2015-01-01

    The Link Trainer is often described as the first successful attempt at what we now recognize as flight simulation and even virtual reality. Instead of asking how well the device simulated flight conditions, this article shows that what the Link Trainer simulated was not the conditions of the air, but rather the conditions of the cockpit that was gradually filled with flight instruments. The article also considers the Link Trainer as a cultural space in which shifting ideas about what it meant to be a pilot were manifested. A pilot in the Link Trainer was trained into a new category of flier-the virtual flier-who was an avid reader of instruments and an attentive listener to signals. This article suggests that, by situating the pilot within new spaces, protocols, and relationships, technologies of simulation have constituted the identity of the modern pilot and other operators of machines. PMID:26334696

  9. Astronaut John H. Casper uses Portable In-flight Landing Operations Trainer (PILOT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut John H. Casper, mission commander, participates in an experiment that measures the effects of space flight on pilot proficiency. Astronauts Casper and Andrew M. Allen, pilot, continued the testing of the Portable In-flight Landing Operations Trainer (PILOT), which first flew onboard Columbia in October of 1993.

  10. Train the Trainer for general practice trainer - a report of the pilot within the programme Verbundweiterbildungplus

    PubMed Central

    Steinhäuser, Jost; Ledig, Thomas; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Eicher, Christiane; Engeser, Peter; Roos, Marco; Bungartz, Jessica; Joos, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Since 2008 the Verbundweiterbildungplus programme of the Competence Centre General Practice Baden-Wuerttemberg offers continual improvement with regards to content and structure of general practice training. The programme uses the didactical concept of the CanMEDs competencies, which were developed in Canada, as a postgraduate medical training framework. Train the trainer (TTT)-programmes are an additional important element of these contentual optimisations of postgraduate training. Within this article we describe the conception and evaluation of the first TTT-workshop within the programme Verbundweiterbildungplus. Methods: The conception of the first TTT-workshop was influenced by results of a survey of general practitioner (GP) trainers and by experiences with teaching GP trainers involved in medical undergraduate teaching. A questionnaire was designed to get a self-assessment about organisational and didactic aspects oriented on the CanMEDs competencies of postgraduate medical training. In addition, the workshop was evaluated by the participants. Results: The workshop lasted 12 teaching units and included the following elements: introduction into the CanMEDs competencies, feedback training, fault management, legal and organisational aspects of post graduate training. From the 29 participating trainers 76% were male and on average 57 years old. The evaluation showed a good to very good acceptance of the workshop. Initial self-rating showed the need of improving in the fields of determining learning objectives, providing formative feedback and incorporation of a trainee. Most trainers rated themselves as very good in procure CanMEDs competencies with the exclusion of the competencies “Manager“ and “Scholar“. Conclusion: A TTT-programme is an important method to improve GP training which has not been used in Germany so far. Such a GP TTT-programme should highlight especially training in providing feedback and teaching in management aspects

  11. AN EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF A GROUND PILOT TRAINER IN GENERAL AVIATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BUTLER, E. DEAN; LANIER, H. MILLER

    AN EXPERIMENT WAS CONDUCTED BY MIDDLE TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY TO ASSESS THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A GROUND PILOT TRAINER USED TO DEVELOP PRIMARY AND INSTRUMENT FLIGHT PROFICIENCIES. THE STUDY REQUIRED DIFFERENTIAL USE OF THE DEVICE WITH THREE GROUPS OF CANDIDATES, AND COMPARISON OF TRAINING PROGRESS AND ATTAINED PROFICIENCY VERSUS THAT OF GROUP OF…

  12. Effects of 'Real World' Radio Chatter on Mid-Phase Instrument Ground Trainer Proficiency: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goebel, Ronald A.; And Others

    Under a background condition of either recorded radio chatter or no radio chatter, the individual performances of two flights of mid-phase instrument student pilots were measured during a simulated instrument cross-country mission in the T-38 ground trainer. Operational constraints prevented the exercise of optimal experimental controls, thereby…

  13. STS-26 Pilot Covey during egress training at JSC's MAIL full fuselage trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), slides to safety using the new crew escape system (CES) inflated slide during an emergency egress training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Technicians stand on either side of the slide ready to help Covey to his feet once he reaches the bottom. The CES pole extends out the open side hatch of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT). During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (LESs) and checked out CES slide and other CES configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  14. AN EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF A GROUND PILOT TRAINER IN GENERAL AVIATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PHILLIPS, C.R., JR.

    EXPERIMENTAL FLIGHT TRAINING WAS CONDUCTED IN CONJUNCTION WITH A COMMERCIAL MODEL GROUND TRAINER TO DETERMINE ITS EFFECTIVENESS IN CONTRIBUTING TO THE PROFICIENCY LEVEL USUALLY OBTAINED BY STUDENTS UNDERGOING A RIGIDLY CONTROLLED FLIGHT SYLLABUS WITHOUT USE OF SYNTHETIC TRAINING DEVICES. DIFFERENTIAL LEVELS OF TRAINING WITH THE GROUND TRAINERS…

  15. Engaging in the Study of Organizations. A Temporary Systems Approach to the Description and Analysis of Teacher Corps' Pilot Trainer Workshops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Brenda; And Others

    This report is a description and analysis of Teacher Corps' Pilot Trainer Workshops (PTW) conducted in July, 1977. The volume serves two purposes: First, it provides descriptive information to those parties who may be involved in the delivery of programs similar to the Teacher Corps project, as well as providing specific recommendations regarding…

  16. SR-71B - in Flight - View from Air Force Tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This look-down view shows NASA 831, an SR-71B flown by Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, as it cruises over the Mojave Desert. The photo was from an Air Force refueling tanker taken on a 1997 mission. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in

  17. SR-71B - in flight over snow-capped mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Dryden's SR-71B, NASA 831, slices across the snowy southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California after being refueled by an Air Force Flight Test Center tanker during a recent flight. The Mach 3 aircraft, on loan to NASA by the U.S. Air Force, were flown by the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, during the decade of the 1990s as testbeds for high-speed, high-altitude aeronautical research. Capable of flying more than 2200 mph and at altitudes of over 80,000 feet, they were excellent platforms for research and experiments in aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground much like sharp thunderclaps when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startle affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It

  18. The Crew Compartment Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-93 crew emergency egress training in the Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT). The five crewmembers of STS-93 in the middeck mock-up are from left to right: Mission Specialist Michel Tognini, Mission Specialist Catherine 'Cady' Coleman, Pilot Jeffrey Ashby, Commander Eileen Collins and Mission Specialist Stephen Hawley.

  19. Astronaut Eileen Collins in Full Fuselage Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, pilot for the STS-63 mission, participates in STS-63 training at JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory. Collins is seated at the pilot's station in the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT).

  20. Astronaut Eileen Collins in Full Fuselage Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, pilot for the STS-63 mission, participates in STS-63 training at JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory. Collins is seated at the pilot's station in the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) (48403-4); Collins looks out the aft flight deck window in the Shuttle mockup trainer (48405).

  1. Training Alcoholism Trainers. Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Alcohol Education, Arlington, VA.

    This manual was developed to upgrade the training design and delivery skills of inservice trainers in the field of alcoholism. It is geared for inservice trainers with little or no formal background in design/delivery of adult education programs, who spend at least 50% of the time in training activities. Contents include: (1) adult learning…

  2. SR-71B - in Flight with F-18 Chase Aircraft - View from Air Force Tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA 831, an SR-71B operated by the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, cruises over the Mojave Desert with an F/A-18 Hornet flying safety chase. They were photographed on a 1996 mission from an Air Force refueling tanker The F/A-18 Hornet is used primarily as a safety chase and support aircraft at Dryden. As support aircraft, the F-18s are used for safety chase, pilot proficiency and aerial photography. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used

  3. The Teacher Trainer, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This journal is designed as a forum for trainers, teachers, and trainees all over the world. Regular features include the following: "Conference Report"; "Process Options"; "People Who Train People"; "Training around the World"; "Session Report"; "Trainee Voices"; "Current Research"; "Just for Interest"; "A Trainer Like Me"; "Trainer Background";…

  4. Tic Tac Toe Math. Train the Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Alternative Learning, Bryn Mawr, PA.

    This report describes a project that developed a "Train the Trainer" program that would enable individuals to learn and teach the alternative instructional technique, Tic Tac Toe Math, developed by Richard Cooper for adult basic education students. The pilot workshop conducted as part of the project identified problems that traditional teachers…

  5. [The use of a robot-assisted Gait Trainer GT1 in patients in the acute period of cerebral stroke: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Skvortsova, V I; Ivanova, G E; Kovrazhkina, E A; Rumiantseva, N A; Staritsyn, A N; Suvorov, A Iu; Sogomonian, E K

    2008-01-01

    An aim of the study was to evaluate efficacy of using Gait Trainer GT1, a robot-assisted gait trainer with a system of body-weight support, for the rehabilitation of gait in patients in the acute period of cerebral stroke. A main group included 30 patients in the acute period of ischemic and hemorrhage stroke and a control group--20 age- and sex matched patients. Patients of both groups had daily kinesitherapy sessions with a rehabilitator. Patients of the main group had additional sessions on the Gait Trainer GT1 from the moment of functional readiness to adequate orthostatic probe. Efficacy of rehabilitation was assessed in the four following phases: the first verticalization of patient in the standing position, adaptation of patient to the standing position, walking with assistance, independent walking. Muscular power (scores) in all muscles of low extremities, muscle tonus (the Ashfort scale), amplitude of tendinous reflexes on the reflexes scale, sensory disturbances and discoordination syndromes (specially elaborated scales), pathological positions in the axial muscular system and extremities, functional status (a steadiness scale, the Berg balance scale, the Barthel scale, 5 m test) were assessed in each phase. Stabilometry was conducted for objective evaluation of vertical balance function. The duration of sessions on GT1 and a number of exercises were depended on the patient's tolerability to physical activity. Percentage of relief was determined by the ability of a patient to balance in the standing position. Each patient had 8-10 sessions. A significant improvement of the functional status: ability to balance in standing position, walking, increase of self-care skills were observed in both groups. No significant differences in the level of functional improvements were found compared to the control group. However some peculiarities of the rehabilitation of primary neurologic deficit were observed during CT1-trainings: the normalization of muscle tonus

  6. Astronaut Richard Covey in the Crew Compartment trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Astronaut Richard O. Covey sits at the pilot's station in the one-G Crew Compartment trainer (CCT) at JSC. Astronaut Frederick H. (Rick) Hauck (almost obscured at left) is in the commander's station. Covey was named as pilot for the STS 26 mission to be flown in 1988.

  7. miR-71b regulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling during starvation in planarians.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y Y; Zhao, J M; Liu, Q; Guo, Q; Liu, Z; Wang, X X; Wang, C Y; Li, R Y; Zhang, Y Z; Zhang, S T

    2015-01-01

    Planarians, which have a large population of stem cells called neoblasts, are molecularly tractable model systems used in the study of regeneration. However, planarians have strong resistance to hunger and have developed growth arrest strategies. For example, they can change their size and undergo growth regression during starvation periods. The results of the current study show that the microRNA, miR-71b, and the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway have important functions in the development of starvation-induced planarians. We demonstrate tissue-specific expression of miR-71b using in situ hybridization. By employing real-time polymerase chain reaction, we provide evidence that miR-71b is upregulated in starvation-induced planarians. Furthermore, we validate and verify the target genes of miR-71b. PMID:26505338

  8. National Athletic Trainers' Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... represent, engage and foster the continued growth and development of the athletic training profession and athletic trainers as unique health care providers. Professional Development Center Use the free CEUs that come with ...

  9. Laser ophthalmological trainer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovva, Anatoly I.; Strinadko, Miroslav T.; Strinadko, Marina M.

    1997-12-01

    The laser ophthalmological trainer is offered. It provides stimulation of an optic analyzer by means of the simultaneous influence of different sensor zones optic auditory by the modulated laser radiation and the sound signal of the proper frequency. The trainer includes the assembly providing individual control of the permissible dose of radiation and can be used for treatment of partial atrophy of optic nerve, dystrophy of cornea, cornea syndrome after refraction surgery, inflammatory diseases of cornea, and conjunctivitis.

  10. Training Alcoholism Trainers. Participant Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Alcohol Education, Arlington, VA.

    This workbook is to be used in conjunction with the Trainer Manual entitled Training Alcoholism Trainers. The program was developed to upgrade training design and delivery skills of inservice trainers in the field of alcoholism. The workbook contains all the handout sheets necessary for participant sessions. (Author/BMW)

  11. Cyborg mini-trainer.

    PubMed

    Mosso, José L; Nieto, Jesus J; Carbajal, Manuel F; Marmolejo, Jorge; Ochoa, Enrique; De La Fuente, Mireya; Almazan, Andrew; Obrador, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We present the smallest surgical trainer with a total weight of 400 gr, built in aluminum of 25 cm large and 24 cm wide, and 23 cm high. It's a system integrated by a small and open module, a lamp and a microcamera connected to a Head Mounted display. It holds two endoscopic instruments, and items to make knots or sutures and enhance visual-motor coordination. The vision we got is by a small microcamera displayed to a Head Mounted Display HMD. This surgical trainer is the smallest in the worldwide, easy to install, and easy to carry. PMID:19377148

  12. CYP71B15 (PAD3) Catalyzes the Final Step in Camalexin Biosynthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Schuhegger, Regina; Nafisi, Majse; Mansourova, Madina; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Olsen, Carl Erik; Svatoš, Aleš; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Glawischnig, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Camalexin represents the main phytoalexin in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The camalexin-deficient phytoalexin deficient 3 (pad3) mutant has been widely used to assess the biological role of camalexin, although the exact substrate of the cytochrome P450 enzyme 71B15 encoded by PAD3 remained elusive. 2-(Indol-3-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1,3-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid (dihydrocamalexic acid) was identified as likely intermediate in camalexin biosynthesis downstream of indole-3-acetaldoxime, as it accumulated in leaves of silver nitrate-induced pad3 mutant plants and it complemented the camalexin-deficient phenotype of a cyp79b2/cyp79b3 double-knockout mutant. Recombinant CYP71B15 heterologously expressed in yeast catalyzed the conversion of dihydrocamalexic acid to camalexin with preference of the (S)-enantiomer. Arabidopsis microsomes isolated from leaves of CYP71B15-overexpressing and induced wild-type plants were capable of the same reaction but not microsomes from induced leaves of pad3 mutants. In conclusion, CYP71B15 catalyzes the final step in camalexin biosynthesis. PMID:16766671

  13. Payload specialists Baudry and Chretien in the Shuttle full fuselage trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Payload specialists Patrick Baudry (left) and Jean Loup Chretien are seated at the commander and pilot stations on the Shuttle full fuselage trainer. In this view they are looking at the camera over the backs of the shuttle seats.

  14. Training of Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormley, Wilma J.; Austin, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses specific training methods and common characteristics of participants in workshops sponsored by Agency for International Development Water and Sanitation for Health Project for extension agents, who will act as trainers in transfer of sanitation technology in developing nations. Recommendations for conducting such workshops in…

  15. The Teacher Trainer, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This document consists of the three issues of the journal "The Teacher Trainer" published in 1994. This journal is designed for those interested in modern language teacher training. It makes use of a variety of formats: article, letter, comment, quotation, cartoon, interview, spoof, Haiku ideas. Typical article topics during 1994 included:…

  16. Trainer Recertification Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blitzer, Roy J.; Dumas, Roland A.

    1985-01-01

    Lists reasons why people shy away from trainer recertification programs, benefits of attending such programs, and considerations that users and purchasers of training programs might keep in mind in order to get the best quality programs and service from their vendors. (CT)

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF CRITERIA AND METHODS FOR EVALUATING TRAINER AIRCRAFT EFFECTIVENESS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KUSEWITT, J.B.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO DEVELOP A METHOD FOR DETERMINING OBJECTIVE MEASURES OF TRAINER AIRCRAFT EFFECTIVENESS TO EVALUATE PROGRAM ALTERNATIVES FOR TRAINING PILOTS FOR FLEET FIGHTER AND ATTACK-TYPE AIRCRAFT. THE TRAINING SYLLABUS WAS BASED ON AVERAGE STUDENT ABILITY. THE BASIC PROBLEM WAS TO ESTABLISH QUANTITATIVE TIME-DIFFICULTY…

  18. 77 FR 29362 - Conocophillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, PA; Notice of Affirmative Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... on February 28, 2012 (77 FR 12084). The initial investigation resulted in a negative determination... Employment and Training Administration Conocophillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, PA; Notice of... former workers of ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, Pennsylvania (subject firm)....

  19. ASTP crewmen in Apollo Command Module Trainer during training session at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The three members of the American ASTP prime crew are photographed inside the Apollo Command Module (CM) trainer in a water tank in bldg 260 during water egress training at JSC. They are, left to right, Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander; Vance D. Brand, command module pilot; and Donald K. Slayton, docking module pilot (23430); Slayton attaches his life preserver as he egresses an Apollo Command Module trainer in a water tank in bldg 260 during water egresss training at JSC. Astronauts Brand (on left) and Stafford have already egressed the trainer and are seated in a three-man life raft.

  20. Basic fluid system trainer

    DOEpatents

    Semans, Joseph P.; Johnson, Peter G.; LeBoeuf, Jr., Robert F.; Kromka, Joseph A.; Goron, Ronald H.; Hay, George D.

    1993-01-01

    A trainer, mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  1. High-definition displays for realistic simulator and trainer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Reginald; Hopper, Darrel G.; Beyer, Steve; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1998-09-01

    Current flight simulators and trainers do not provide acceptable levels of visual display performance (performance that would allow ground based trainers to economically replace aircraft flying training) for many air-to-air and air-to- ground training scenarios. Ground training for pilots could be made significantly more realistic, allowing the ground-based curricula to be enlarged. The enhanced ground based training could then more readily augment actual aircraft flying (training) time. This paper presents the technology need and opportunity to create a new class of immersive simulator- trainer systems having some 210 million pixels characterized especially by a 20-20 visual acuity synthetic vision system having some 150 million pixels. The same new display technology base is needed for planned crew stations for uninhabited combat air vehicles (UCAV), advanced aircraft cockpits and mission crewstations, and for the space plane.

  2. What Do Communication Trainers Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beebe, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Effective trainers have mastered the skills of facilitating discussion, providing helpful feedback to others, and presenting training content in an engaging manner. An experienced trainer is able to adapt training content to meet the specific needs of the trainee. Communication training is the process of developing communication skills in order to…

  3. Trainer Talk: Levels of Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engin, Marion

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to present examples of trainer talk that scaffold trainee teachers' understanding of teaching in a post-observation feedback session. Previous research into scaffolding in a teacher training context describes scaffolding at a technique or strategy level, without describing how, in linguistic terms, the trainer can support and…

  4. Information for Librarians and Trainers

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/training/trainers.html Information for Librarians and Trainers To use ... Lesson Plan for High School Health and Fitness Education - PDF (University of Washington Center for Public Health ... Health Information Tutorials Medical Words: ...

  5. Astronaut Paul Weitz prepares to use bicycle ergometer in Skylab trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, pilot for the first manned Skylab mission, prepares to check out the bicycle ergometer in the work and experiments area of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer during Skylab training at the Johnson Space Center. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot of the mission, is in the background.

  6. ASTP crewmen in Apollo Command Module Trainer during training session at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An interior view of the Apollo Command Module trainer in bldg 35 showing the three American ASTP prime crewmen lying in their couches during Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) training at JSC. They are, left to right, Astronauts Donald K. Slayton, docking module pilot; Vance D. Brand, command module pilot; and Thomas P. Stafford, commander.

  7. Reinforcing Behavior of "Naive" Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanzetta, John T.; Hannah, T. E.

    1969-01-01

    Presents an experiment showing that naive trainers tend to allow factors such as task difficulty and competence of the trainee to affect the kind of reinforcement administered. Bibliography, tables, and graphs. (JB)

  8. Three STS 26 astronauts training in the Crew Compartment trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Three astronauts named in January 1987 as part of a five-member crew for NASA's first flight since the Challenger accident are shown in a photo session of July 1986. Left to right are Astronauts John M. (Mike) Lounge, Richard O. Covey and David C. Hilmers. Lounge and Hilmers will serve as Mission specialists for the STS 26 flight and Covey will serve as pilot. The three are on the middeck of JSC's one-G Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT).

  9. Skylab 3 crew during training in Orbital Workshop trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The three prime crewmen of the Skylab 3 mission check over flight data during a training session in the crew quarters of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility at JSC. They are from left to right, Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot; and Astronauts Alan L. bean, commander, and Jack R. Lousma, pilot (28419); Skylab 3 crew work with Inflight Medical Support System (IMSS) resupply container atop the food table in the OWS. From left to right are Garriott, Lousma and Bean (28420).

  10. The Use of the European Portfolio for Student Teachers of Languages (EPOSTL) to Foster Teacher Autonomy: English Language Teaching (ELT) Student Teachers' and Teacher Trainers' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakir, Abdulvahit; Balcikanli, Cem

    2012-01-01

    It was the aim of this pilot study to investigate ELT student teachers' and teacher trainers' views on the use of the EPOSTL in pre-service language teacher education of a Turkish state university. Upon the implementation of the EPOSTL as a reflection tool for the second semester of 2010, 25 student teachers and 4 teacher trainers were interviewed…

  11. EKG Interpretation Program. Trainers Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Sandra M.

    This trainer's manual is designed to assist nursing instructors assigned to advanced medical surgical nursing courses in teaching students how to make basic interpretations of their patients' electrocardiographic (EKG) strips. Included in the manual are pre- and posttests and instructional units dealing with the following topics: EKG indicators,…

  12. Trainer Burnout: The Syndrome Explored.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, C. Keith; Judd, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The educators' version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory was completed by 40 of 156 in-house trainers. More than one-third experience emotional exhaustion weekly, and almost half feel a lack of personal accomplishment. Subscales of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment correlated with perceptions of organizations'…

  13. Classifying E-Trainer Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julien, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To set-up a classification of the types of profiles and competencies that are required to set-up a good e-learning programme. This approach provides a framework within which a set of standards can be defined for e-trainers. Design/methodology/approach: Open and distance learning (ODL) has been developing in Europe, due to new tools in…

  14. Skylab 2 astronauts eat space food in wardroom of Skylab trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The three members of the prime crew of the first manned Skylab mission dine on specially prepared Skylab space food in the wardromm of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer during Skylab training at the Johnson Space Center. They are, left to right, Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot; Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, pilot; and Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander.

  15. 24 CFR 3286.305 - Installation trainer criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Installation trainer criteria. 3286...-Administered States § 3286.305 Installation trainer criteria. (a) Trainer qualification required. (1) All... by trainers who are registered with HUD as qualified trainers. In order to register with HUD as...

  16. Astronaut Brand and Cosmonaut Ivanchenko in Docking Module trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronaut Vance D. Brand (foreground) and Cosmonaut Aleksandr S. Ivanchenko are seated in the Docking Module trainer in bldg 35 during Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) simulation training at JSC. Brand is the command module pilot of the American ASTP prime crew. Ivanchenko is the engineer on the Soviet ASTP fourth crew (back-up). During the exercise the American ASTP crew and the Soviet ASTP crew simulated docking the Apollo and Soyuz in Earth orbit and transferring to each other's spacecraft. This view is looking from inside the Command Module into the Docking Module. The hatchway leading into the Soyuz spacecraft orbital module mock-up is in the background.

  17. Tactics for the New Guerilla Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mershon, Phil

    2001-01-01

    Discusses tactics for surviving as a trainer in an unfriendly organizational atmosphere. Offers a method for demonstrating to managers the connection between quality assurance and employee empowerment. (JOW)

  18. STS-34 crew poses on flight deck of JSC's crew compartment trainer (CCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers pose on flight deck of JSC's crew compartment trainer (CCT) for group portrait. Taking a break from training and wearing launch and entry suits (LESs) are (left to right) Pilot Michael J. McCulley, Mission Specialist (MS) Shannon W. Lucid, MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, MS Ellen S. Baker, and Commander Donald E. Williams. All crewmembers are in their designated stations for launch and entry except Baker who will occupy a seat on OV-104's middeck. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. The photograph was taken by Bill Bowers, a crew trainer at JSC.

  19. VR robotic surgery: randomized blinded study of the dV-Trainer robotic simulator.

    PubMed

    Lendvay, Thomas S; Casale, Pasquale; Sweet, Robert; Peters, Craig

    2008-01-01

    This research represents a randomized blinded pilot study to evaluate the acceptability and validity of a da Vinci robotic virtual reality simulator platform tested during a pediatric robotic surgery post-graduate course during the annual American Urological Association meeting in June 2007. Course enrollees performed robotic skills tasks on the da Vinci robot and on an offline dV-Trainer and course participant demographic and performance data were analyzed. The majority of learners believed that VR simulation is useful for teaching robotic skills, they believed that the offline trainer can teach robotic skills comparable to a dry lab robotics skills station, and the offline trainer was able to discriminate between experts and novices of robotic surgery, thereby meeting criteria for face, content, and construct validities. This is the first reported acceptability study of a VR robotic surgery simulator as compared to the da Vinci robot system. PMID:18391295

  20. Liability, Athletic Equipment, and the Athletic Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Richard

    Standards of conduct, roles, and responsibilities expected of athletic trainers should be developed and disseminated. These guidelines could be used in court to show that the athletic trainer was following basic standards if he should be charged with liability. A review of liability cases involving athletic injuries received while athletes were…

  1. Trainers in Continuing VET: Emerging Competence Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jemeljanova, Irina

    2013-01-01

    This publication is based on the outcomes of a Cedefop study on certification processes and competence requirements supporting the professionalisation of in-company trainers. It also builds on Cedefop's work on the changing roles and professional development of VET teachers and trainers (Cedefop, 2010b; Volmari et al., 2009) and the studies…

  2. Facts About Drug Abuse: Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, William E.; And Others

    Following an introductory survey of the course, this modular drug abuse trainer's manual contains all course-specified materials. These materials are: the course goals and objectives; time/activity sheets; trainer guidelines, process notes, and exercise instructions; detailed lectures and supplementary information. The time/activity sheets contain…

  3. Evaluating Presentation Skills of Volunteer Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohan, Donna K.

    A systematic method for evaluating the presentation skills of volunteer trainers would enable the discovery of hidden problems. It would also increase individual trainer skills and satisfaction and improve the overall effectiveness of the training program. A first step is to determine the general presentation skills a successful volunteer trainer…

  4. Training the gastrointestinal endoscopy trainer.

    PubMed

    Waschke, Kevin A; Anderson, John; Macintosh, Donald; Valori, Roland M

    2016-06-01

    Endoscopy training has traditionally been accomplished by an informal process in the endoscopy unit that parallels apprenticeship training seen in other areas of professional education. Subsequent to an audit, a series of interventions were implemented in the English National Health Service to support both service delivery and to improve endoscopy training. The resulting training centers deliver a variety of hands-on endoscopy courses, established in parallel with the roll out of a colon cancer screening program that monitors and documents quality outcomes among endoscopists. The program developed a 'training the trainer' module that subsequently became known as the Training the Colonoscopy Trainer course (TCT). Several years after its implementation, colonoscopy quality outcomes in the UK have improved substantially. The core TCT program has spread to other countries with demonstration of a marked impact on endoscopy training and performance. The aim of this chapter is to describe the principles that underlie effective endoscopy training in this program using the TCT as an example. While the review focuses on the specific example of colonoscopy training, the approach is generic to the teaching of any technical skill; it has been successfully transferred to the teaching of laparoscopic surgery as well as other endoscopic techniques. PMID:27345649

  5. The Experiences of Female Athletic Trainers in the Role of the Head Athletic Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Burton, Laura; Cotrufo, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Very few women have leadership positions in athletic training (ie, head athletic training positions) in intercollegiate athletics. Research exists on the barriers to attaining the role; however, our understanding about the experiences of those currently engaged in the role is limited. Objective: To examine the experiences of female head athletic trainers as they worked toward and attained the position of head athletic trainer. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I setting. Patients or Other Participants: Eight female athletic trainers serving in the role of head athletic trainer participated in our study. The mean age of the participants was 45 ± 12 years, with 5 ± 1.5 years of experience in the role of head athletic trainer and 21 ± 10 years of experience as athletic trainers. Data Collection and Analysis: We conducted phone interviews with the 8 participants following a semistructured format. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed following a general inductive approach as described by Thomas. To establish credibility, we used a peer reviewer, member checks, and multiple-analyst triangulation. Results: Six major themes emerged from our analysis regarding the experiences of female head athletic trainers. Opportunities to become a head athletic trainer, leadership qualities, and unique personal characteristics were discussed as factors leading to the assumption of the role of the head athletic trainer. Where women hold back, family challenges, and organizational barriers speak to the potential obstacles to assuming the role of head athletic trainer. Conclusions: Female head athletic trainers did not seek the role, but through persistence and encouragement, they find themselves assuming the role. Leadership skills were discussed as important for success in the role of head athletic trainer. Life balancing and parenting were identified as barriers to women seeking the role of head athletic

  6. Professional Development Needs and Interests of Early Childhood Education Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Teresa A.; Tannock, Michelle T.

    2011-01-01

    An online survey of early childhood education (ECE) trainers was conducted to assess their professional development needs and determine any differences between new and experienced trainers. Trainers identified teaching techniques and resources commonly used. The survey information is guiding the development of ECE trainer criteria in a…

  7. In-Company Trainers of Young People in Irish Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGennis, Brenda; Scott, Liam

    A study of the training of the in-company trainer of young people in Ireland was conducted from January through March 1988. Directors of training and the trainers themselves were interviewed in 15 companies. An additional 50 trainers responded to a mailed questionnaire. Trainers were primarily men in their thirties with a background in teaching,…

  8. ASTP crewmen in Docking Module trainer during training session at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An interior view of the Docking Module trainer in bldg 35 during Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) joint crew training at JSC. Astronaut Donald K. Slayton (right) is the docking module pilot of the American ASTP prime crew. The other man is Cosmonaut Valeriy N. Kubasov, engineer on the Soviet ASTP first (prime) crew. The training session simulated activities on the second day in space. The Docking module is designed to link the Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft.

  9. STS-26 crew stowage review in Bldg 9A crew compartment trainer (CCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers rehearse for their upcoming mission in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in the JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Standing on the CCT middeck, Pilot Richard O. Covey hands a snack package to Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge (back to the camera). Covey selected the snack from the meal tray assemblies (foodtrays) mounted on the forward middeck lockers.

  10. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers sit on flight deck of the crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup. Pilot Richard O. Covey (left) at pilot station controls and Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge (center) and MS David C. Hilmers on aft flight deck are wearing the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)). During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT shuttle mockup is located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A.

  11. Women's Perspectives of Personal Trainers: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Deana; Dail, Teresa K.; Katula, Jeffrey A.; Mustian, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Personal trainers play an integral role in the day-to-day operation of the facilities in which they work. Research has identified a number of qualities and competencies necessary to be an effective exercise leader, but there is little scholarly work addressing clients' attitudes related to the performance of personal trainers. Utilizing focus group methodology, female clients of personal trainers were recruited to provide viewpoints related to the desirable qualities of personal trainers, as well as opinions regarding trainer certification and academic preparation. Responses of the participants were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for themes. Four global themes emerged: Selection Rationale, Personal Trainer Rationale, Loyalty Rationale and Negative Characteristics. Selection Rationale consisted of qualities that influence a client's decision to hire a particular trainer (e.g., physique, results observed in other clients, social skills). Personal Trainer Rationale referred to the clients' reasons (e.g., frustration with current fitness level) for hiring a specific trainer. Loyalty Rationale referred to the credentials of a personal trainer that solidify the client/trainer relationship and Negative Characteristics referred to qualities considered unethical or unprofessional. The results suggest that undergraduate exercise science programs should devote additional time toward the development of future fitness trainers' affective qualities and that clients' would benefit from information about the credentials of personal trainers. PMID:26005398

  12. Isokinetic strength in weight-trainers.

    PubMed

    Sale, D G; MacDougall, J D

    1984-01-01

    Isokinetic strength of ankle plantarflexion (APF), knee extension (KE) and elbow extension (EE) was measured in male weight-trainers (6 power-lifters and 7 bodybuilders) and 25 untrained men of similar age and height. The weight-trainers exceeded control subjects by 21%, 25% and 73% in APF, KE and EE strength respectively. A similar pattern was obtained for limb girth, in which the weight-trainers exceeded control subjects by 6%, 13%, and 31% in calf, thigh and arm girth, respectively. Strength was similarly enhanced in the weight-trainers at the lower and higher velocities (APF 0.10, 0.63 rad X s-1, KE and EE 0.52, 3.14 rad X s-1) tested, and accounted for the positive correlation (r = 0.84) observed between low and high velocity strength. The powerlifters differed significantly from the bodybuilders only in their greater low velocity APF strength. The relatively greater enhancement of upper versus lower limb strength and muscle mass in the weight-trainers was considered in respect to training habits, trainability of different muscle groups and the state of training of muscle groups in untrained men. PMID:6542510

  13. Unanticipated Consequences among Trainers Delivering S-OJT: The Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, DaeYeon; Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    This study reviewed trainers' actions in the design and delivery of S-OJT and the preparation of S-OJT trainers. Trainers' behaviors and their preparation of S-OJT trainers tend to create the leaning and developmental opportunity for the trainer through social interactions between the trainer and the trainee/stakeholders. This study discussed…

  14. Motivational Congruency and Discrepancy of Hawaiian Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Barton P.; Lankford, Samuel V.; Gieck, Joe H.

    1992-01-01

    Motivation is an integral part of an effective organizational management scheme. In March 1992, we sent a survey designed to assess motivational preference to all certified athletic trainers in the State of Hawaii. The population included: 6 high school athletic trainers, 10 university athletic trainers, and 9 clinic athletic trainers. The surveys were completed and returned by 80% of the population. With the exception of being an integral part of a work team (p<.05), athletic trainers in the State of Hawaii showed little discrepancy in terms of motivation. Further, there are differences among the three groups of athletic trainers in rating the importance of motivators concerning being appreciated, receiving raises, and being an integral part of a team (p< .05) Differences in motivational factors among these three groups could be influenced by the organizational structure in which the athletic trainers operate. Further investigation should include a mainland population that includes athletic trainers in professional sports and the industrial setting. PMID:16558188

  15. Disseminating Improved Practices: Are Volunteer Farmer Trainers Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukuyu, B.; Place, F.; Franzel, S.; Kiptot, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper assesses the effectiveness of volunteer farmer trainers in promoting adoption of agricultural technologies in western Kenya. Specifically, the purpose was to assess the type of information they disseminated, farmer trainers' characteristics desirable to farmer trainees, and how trainees evaluate farmer trainers.…

  16. Exploring Trainers' Engaging Instructional Practices: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arghode, Vishal; Wang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the phenomenon of training engagement from the trainers' perspective. Specifically, two questions guided this inquiry. First, how do trainers define engagement in the training context? and What strategies do trainers use to engage trainees? Design/methodology/approach: The collective case study approach was…

  17. 24 CFR 3286.307 - Process for obtaining trainer's qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Process for obtaining trainer's...-Administered States § 3286.307 Process for obtaining trainer's qualification. (a) Where to apply. An applicant for qualification as a trainer must provide the applicant's legal name, address, and telephone...

  18. The German Teacher Trainers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batdi, Veli

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the aim is to identify the interpersonal self-efficacy beliefs of German teacher trainers' in Turkey. It is a descriptive survey and the population of the study consists of German teacher trainers who have worked in the seven regions of Turkey during the 2012-2013 academic year. The sample comprises 52 German teacher trainers chosen…

  19. Blood-Borne Pathogens: Guidelines for Athletic Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Athletic Training, 1995

    1995-01-01

    These guidelines cover athletic trainers and blood-borne pathogens at athletic events, student athletic trainer education, universal precautions and Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, medical records and confidentiality, infected athletic trainers, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) testing, HBV…

  20. The Effectiveness of Subject Matter Experts as Technical Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Saundra Wall

    2001-01-01

    Subject matter experts have knowledge and experience to be technical trainers, but they may require training in adult learning theory and teaching methods. Research on trainer effectiveness is needed to identify ways to improve the use of subject matter experts as trainers. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  1. The basket trainer: A homemade laparoscopic trainer attainable to every resident

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Nidal

    2010-01-01

    Laparoscopic trainers have been proved to be effective to improve skills of laparoscopic surgery; they are usually installed at hospital in the surgical department with limited access hours, usually inconvenient to the schedule of the resident. Simple trainer boxes are necessary for residents who desire developing their skills at home independently to the venue and hours of surgical departments. Our goal is to bring the laparoscopic trainer to the desktop of the surgical resident by making it very cheap, small, light, secure and easy to construct. We describe a model of laparoscopic trainer using steel basket which, we believe, meets all of the above-mentioned requirements. It is accessible to any personal budget and can be constructed with a minimum of hand skill. It is small and light enough to permit its daily use on the desktop of the resident for a couple of hours, then after it can be stocked in any locker. PMID:20585486

  2. Math Model for Naval Ship Handling Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golovcsenko, Igor V.

    The report describes the math model for an experimental ship handling trainer. The training task is that of a replenishment operation at sea. The model includes equations for ship dynamics of a destroyer, propeller-engine response times, ship separation, interaction effects between supply ship and destroyer, and outputs to a visual display system.…

  3. The Athletic Trainer: Necessity or Luxury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weldon, Gail

    This article emphasizes the importance of including an athletic trainer who is a qualified sports medicine professional in organized school sport programs, particularly football. Educational requirements for persons who wish to go into this profession are outlined, as well as employment opportunities. (JD)

  4. Community-Based Prevention Specialist. Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Research Corp., Bethesda, MD.

    This trainer manual is designed to assist facilitators in the design of entry-level courses and programs for substance abuse prevention specialists. The manual initially concentrates on a basic, generic approach to community work, and introduces the knowledge and skills needed to implement substance abuse prevention programs by using the community…

  5. The Selective Task Trainer: The Expert Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerson, Charles W.

    1995-01-01

    Examines simulator classification and design in light of new technology, current research, and a changing focus for using flight simulators in the military, and proposes a selective task trainer that addresses the expert's performance needs. Highlights include motor skill physiology; retention; automaticity skills; the novice to expert…

  6. Lead Sampling Technician Training Course. Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ICF, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This document presents a model curriculum for use by trainers presenting training course in assessing and reporting dust and debris from deteriorated lead-based paint. The course, which was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is intended for use with housing quality standard inspectors, rehabilitation specialists, home…

  7. The National Career Development Guidelines. Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This trainer's manual is a companion volume to five local handbooks developed to support specialized implementation of the National Career Development Guidelines in elementary schools, middle and junior high schools, high schools, post-secondary institutions, and business organizations. It describes a 2-day training workshop for members of local…

  8. Herbal Supplements: Considerations for the Athletic Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterstein, Andrew P.; Storrs, Cordial M.

    2001-01-01

    Examines common herbal supplements, exploring potential risks associated with herbal use and providing recommendations to athletic trainers regarding patient care issues. Data from searches of the MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, CINAHL, and Academic Search Elite databases indicate that athletes must understand that natural does not equal safe, and most…

  9. Training the Trainers for Small Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Allan A.

    1990-01-01

    Training for small businesses requires an entrepreneurial rather than a conventional approach. Critical trainer competencies include profiling the business, segmenting the market, understanding the business development process, introducing the relevant environment, delivering enterprise skills training, and teaching across the board. (SK)

  10. Multiple Output Sensory Trainer (MOST). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Automated Functions, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    This final report describes the design, development, and testing of the Multiple Output Sensory Trainer (MOST), a computer-based system which enables the evaluation of students with visual impairments to determine the optimal combination of sensory adaptive aids to meet their needs. The system uses multimedia devices in conjunction with customized…

  11. Measuring trainer fidelity in the transfer of suicide prevention training

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Wendi F.; Pisani, Anthony R.; Schmeelk-Cone, Karen; Xia, Yinglin; Tu, Xin; McMahon, Marcie; Munfakh, Jimmie Lou; Gould, Madelyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Finding effective and efficient models to train large numbers of suicide prevention interventionists, including ‘hotline’ crisis counselors, is a high priority. Train-the-trainer (TTT) models are widely used but understudied. Aims To assess the extent to which trainers following TTT delivered the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) program with fidelity, and to examine fidelity across two trainings and seven training segments. Methods We recorded and reliably rated trainer fidelity, defined as adherence to program content and competence of program delivery, for 34 newly trained ASIST trainers delivering the program to crisis center staff on two separate occasions. A total of 324 observations were coded. Trainer demographics were also collected. Results On average, trainers delivered two-thirds of the program. Previous training was associated with lower levels of trainer adherence to the program. 18% of trainers' observations were rated as solidly competent. Trainers did not improve fidelity from their first to second training. Significantly higher fidelity was found for lectures and lower fidelity was found for interactive training activities including asking about suicide and creating a safe plan. Conclusions We found wide variability in trainer fidelity to the ASIST program following TTT and few trainers had high levels of both adherence and competence. More research is needed to examine the cost-effectiveness of TTT models. PMID:24901061

  12. A robotic wheelchair trainer: design overview and a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Experiencing independent mobility is important for children with a severe movement disability, but learning to drive a powered wheelchair can be labor intensive, requiring hand-over-hand assistance from a skilled therapist. Methods To improve accessibility to training, we developed a robotic wheelchair trainer that steers itself along a course marked by a line on the floor using computer vision, haptically guiding the driver's hand in appropriate steering motions using a force feedback joystick, as the driver tries to catch a mobile robot in a game of "robot tag". This paper provides a detailed design description of the computer vision and control system. In addition, we present data from a pilot study in which we used the chair to teach children without motor impairment aged 4-9 (n = 22) to drive the wheelchair in a single training session, in order to verify that the wheelchair could enable learning by the non-impaired motor system, and to establish normative values of learning rates. Results and Discussion Training with haptic guidance from the robotic wheelchair trainer improved the steering ability of children without motor impairment significantly more than training without guidance. We also report the results of a case study with one 8-year-old child with a severe motor impairment due to cerebral palsy, who replicated the single-session training protocol that the non-disabled children participated in. This child also improved steering ability after training with guidance from the joystick by an amount even greater than the children without motor impairment. Conclusions The system not only provided a safe, fun context for automating driver's training, but also enhanced motor learning by the non-impaired motor system, presumably by demonstrating through intuitive movement and force of the joystick itself exemplary control to follow the course. The case study indicates that a child with a motor system impaired by CP can also gain a short-term benefit

  13. Flight Hour Reductions in Fleet Replacement Pilot Training through Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smode, Alfred F.

    A project was undertaken to integrate the 2F87F operational flight trainer into the program for training replacement patrol plane pilots. The objectives were to determine the potential of the simulator as a substitute environment for learning aircraft tasks and to effectively utilize the simulator in pilot training. The students involved in the…

  14. Reliability/Validity of the fortius trainer.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, J J; Losco, B

    2011-05-01

    This study examined the reliability/validity of power output measured using the Fortius Virtual Reality cycle trainer. 10 cyclists (age: 28±6 years; V˙O (2)max: 60.9±7.2 ml · kg (-1) · min (-1); peak power: 393±82 W) completed three 20 km time trials on a Fortius cycle trainer. During each time trial, power output was measured at 1 Hz using the Fortius internal software and a PowerTap power monitor. Validity calculated for the Fortius trainer; Pearson correlation coefficient (r=0.99; 95% CI: 0.98-0.99; p<0.01) and typical error of estimate (3.5%; 95% CI: 3.2-3.9%), was similar to other established laboratory ergometers. No differences (F (2,16)=0.32; p=0.73) in mean 20 km power were observed between trial 1 (253±46 W), 2 (258±49 W), or 3 (255±50 W). Test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV)) was better between trial 2 and 3 (ICC=1.00 (CI: 0.98-1.00); CV: 1.6% (CI: 1.1-3.3%)) compared with trial 1 and 2 (ICC=0.98 (CI: 0.91-1.00); CV: 3.3% (CI: 2.2-6.4%)). The Fortius cycle trainer is a valid and reliable device for the measurement of power output in cyclists, thus providing an alternative to larger more expensive laboratory ergometers. PMID:21380964

  15. Vision Trainer Teaches Focusing Techniques at Home

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Based on work Stanford Research Institute did for Ames Research Center, Joseph Trachtman developed a vision trainer to treat visual focusing problems in the 1980s. In 2014, Trachtman, operating out of Seattle, released a home version of the device called the Zone-Trac. The inventor has found the biofeedback process used by the technology induces an alpha-wave brain state, causing increased hand-eye coordination and reaction times, among other effects

  16. STS-27 Atlantis, OV-104, crewmembers in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-27 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), participate in exercises in the JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT). The four crewmembers are pictured in the stations they will man for the launch and entry phases of the mission. At forward controls are Pilot Guy S. Gardner (left) and Commander Robert L. Gibson. Behind them are Mission Specialist (MS) Richard M. Mullane (left) and MS Jerry L. Ross. CCT is located in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Photo was taken by Bill Bowers of JSC.

  17. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, crewmembers in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), participate in exercises in the JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT). Four crewmembers are pictured in the stations they will man for entry phase of the mission. At forward controls are Pilot John E. Blaha (left) and Commander Michael L. Coats. Behind them are Mission Specialist (MS) James P. Bagian (left) and MS James F. Buchli. CCT is located in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Photo was taken by Bill Bowers of JSC.

  18. Seals, seal trainers, and mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P J; Cousins, D V; Gow, B L; Collins, D M; Williamson, B H; Dagnia, H T

    1993-01-01

    In 1986, three seals died in a marine park in Western Australia; culture of postmortem tissue suggested infection with Mycobacterium bovis. In 1988, a seal trainer who had been employed at the Western Australian marine park until 1985 developed pulmonary tuberculosis caused by M. bovis while working in a zoo 3,000 km away on the east coast of Australia. Culture characteristics, biochemical behavior, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and restriction endonuclease analysis suggested that the strains of M. bovis infecting the seals and trainer were identical but unique and differed from reference strains and local cattle strains of M. bovis. The infection in both the seals and the trainer had a destructive but indolent course. This is the first time that M. bovis has been observed in seals and the first time that tuberculous infection has been documented to be transmitted from seals to humans. Further investigation of the extent of tuberculous infection in seal populations elsewhere in the world seems warranted, and those working with seals and other marine animals should be monitored for infection. PMID:8420412

  19. The Teacher Trainer, A Practical Journal Mainly for Modern Language Teacher Trainers, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The three issues of the journal on second language teacher education include these articles: "Monitoring and Evaluating the Production of Materials on a Large Scale Trainer Training Workshop" (R. Williams, Choong Kam Foong, Diana Lubelska); Sensory Channels in ESL Instruction" (Michael E. Rudder); "Using the In-Service Feedback Session To Promote…

  20. The Teacher Trainer: A Practical Journal Mainly for Modern Language Teacher Trainers, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This document consists of the three issues of "The Teacher Trainer" published in 1993. Articles include: "Why I Left an RSA Diploma Course"; "Two Anxiety Dreams Experienced During the RSA Diploma in TEFLA Course"; "Why Do an RSA Diploma Training Course?"; "Training for Medical General Practice: Assessment Techniques and What We Can Borrow for EFL…

  1. Supervising Athletic Trainers' Perceptions of Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainers' Professional Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrasher, Ashley B.; Walker, Stacy E.; Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Recent debate has ensued regarding the readiness of newly credentialed athletic trainers (ATs) to function as independent clinicians. Some ATs believe the professional preparation of athletic training students is not adequate. Objective: To describe supervisors' perceptions regarding the preparation of college graduate assistants (GAs) to…

  2. The Teacher Trainer: A Practical Journal Mainly for Modern Language Teacher Trainers, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This document consists of the three issues of the serial "The Teacher Trainer" issued during 1992. Articles include: "Resistance to Change in Teacher Training Courses"; "Teacher Training Games Series: Game 6: Language Bridge"; "How Trainees Can Provide a Resource for Staff Development"; "Do Unto Them As They Are To Do Unto Others"; "Maximizing…

  3. The Student Trainer Clinical Experience at Lock Haven State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasi, David

    An integral part of the clinical experience for athletic trainers at Lock Haven State College (Pennsylvania) is training in first aid and learning to evaluate not only sport-related injuries but all injuries. Thorough knowledge is expected of athletic trainers in the areas of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, first aid, and treatment of…

  4. Anhydrous Ammonia Training Module. Trainer's Package. Participant's Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, Bart; And Others

    This document contains a trainer's and a participant's package for teaching employees on site safe handling procedures for working with anhydrous ammonia, especially on farms. The trainer's package includes the following: a description of the module; a competency; objectives; suggested instructional aids; a training outline (or lesson plan) for…

  5. 24 CFR 3286.303 - Responsibilities of qualified trainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-Administered States § 3286.303 Responsibilities of qualified trainers. (a) Curriculum and hours. In providing... program, qualified trainers must adequately address the curriculum and instruction-time requirements... compliance with the applicable curriculum and time requirements under subparts C and D of this part....

  6. A Program to Improve Teacher Performance in Head Start Classrooms based on a Trainer of Trainers Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmshurst, Ann

    This practicum addressed the need to provide training in basic early childhood education subject areas to Head Start teachers and teacher assistants. A trainer of trainers approach was implemented because of the large number of teachers involved (approximately 1,300 in the Los Angeles County Schools Head Start grantee programs). Goals for…

  7. Identification of multiloop pilot describing functions obtained from simulated approaches to an aircraft carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewell, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    Predicted results of a simulation of the pilot's approach control strategy in the presence of pilot remnant are presented. The aircraft dynamics and the turbulence environment are representative of a trainer-type aircraft. The non-intrusive pilot identification program (NIPIP) was used to identify the pilot's control strategy required by this highly-coupled, multiloop control task. The results are presented in terms of frequency responses of the individual elements of the pilot's control strategy and indicate that NIPIP can identify the pilot's describing functions even in the presence of significant amounts of pilot remnant.

  8. Lessons from a Train-the-Trainer Professional Development Program: The Sustainable Trainer Engagement Program (STEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupla, Christine; Gladney, Alicia; Dalton, Heather; LaConte, Keliann; Truxillo, Jeannette; Shipp, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    The Sustainable Trainer Engagement Program (STEP) is a modified train-the-trainer professional development program being conducted by the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI). STEP has provided two cohorts of 6-8th grade science specialists and lead teachers in the Houston region with in-depth Earth and Space Science (ESS) content, activities, and pedagogy over 15 days each, aligned with Texas science standards. This project has two over-arching goals: to improve middle school ESS instruction, and to create and test an innovative model for Train-the-Trainer.This poster will share details regarding STEP’s activities and resources, program achievements, and its main findings to date. STEP is being evaluated by external evaluators at the Research Institute of Texas, part of the Harris County Department of Education. External evaluation shows an increase after one year in STEP participants’ knowledge (cohort 1 showed a 10% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase), confidence in teaching Earth and Space Science effectively (cohort 1 demonstrated a 10% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase), and confidence in preparing other teachers (cohort 1 demonstrated a 12% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase). By September 2015, STEP participants led (or assisted in leading) approximately 40 workshops for about 1800 science teachers in Texas. Surveys of teachers attending professional development conducted by STEP participants show very positive responses, with averages for conference workshop evaluations ranging from 3.6 on a 4 point scale, and other evaluations averaging from 4.1 to 5.0 on a 5 point scale.Main lessons for the team on the train-the-trainer model include: a lack of confidence by leaders in K-12 science education in presenting ESS professional development, difficulties in arranging for school or district content-specific professional development, the minimal duration of most school and district professional development sessions, and uncertainties in

  9. Health trainers making a difference to mental health and wellbeing.

    PubMed

    White, Judy; Bagnall, Anne-Marie; Trigwell, Joanne

    2015-05-01

    This short report explores the key findings from a review(1) of information on health trainers in 2013/2014 which had a particular focus on mental health and wellbeing. After summarising the key findings of the review, it focuses on mental health, briefly exploring the links between mental and physical health before discussing what differences engagement with a health trainer made to people's sense of self-efficacy and wellbeing. Health trainers are a non-clinical workforce introduced in 2004,(2) who receive training in competencies to enable them to support people in disadvantaged communities to improve their health.(3) The population groups or settings that health trainers focus on varies from service to service, but all work one-to-one, most spending at least an hour with a client at their first appointment, supporting and enabling them to decide what they want to do. The emphasis is on the client determining their own priorities and how to achieve them. Generally, health trainers see clients for a total of six sessions, where how to achieve goals and progress towards them is discussed. The Data Collection and Reporting System (DCRS) is used by approximately 60% of Health Trainer Services to record monitoring data. Around 90% of Health Trainer Services using DCRS record ethnographic data on health trainers and clients, plus the issues clients worked on and the progress they made. There is also a wide range of other data which can be recorded, including before and after mental health and wellbeing scores. We were given access to aggregate data in order to conduct an analysis. Descriptive statistics were generated to calculate percentage change pre- to post-intervention. A total of 1,377 (= 919 full time equivalents) health trainers were recorded in the DCRS system as working with 97,248 clients in England during 2013/2014. The health trainer model embodies the principle of lay support,(4) and services aim to recruit a high proportion of their staff from similar

  10. Next Generation Flight Controller Trainer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Scott; Barry, Matthew R.; Benton, Isaac; Bishop, Michael M.; Evans, Steven; Harvey, Jason; King, Timothy; Martin, Jacob; Mercier, Al; Miller, Walt; Payne, Dan L.; Phu, Hanh; Thompson, James C.; Aadsen, Ron

    2008-01-01

    The Next Generation Flight Controller Trainer (NGFCT) is a relatively inexpensive system of hardware and software that provides high-fidelity training for spaceshuttle flight controllers. NGFCT provides simulations into which are integrated the behaviors of emulated space-shuttle vehicle onboard general-purpose computers (GPCs), mission-control center (MCC) displays, and space-shuttle systems as represented by high-fidelity shuttle mission simulator (SMS) mathematical models. The emulated GPC computers enable the execution of onboard binary flight-specific software. The SMS models include representations of system malfunctions that can be easily invoked. The NGFCT software has a flexible design that enables independent updating of its GPC, SMS, and MCC components.

  11. Virtual Airway Skills Trainer (VAST) Simulator.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Doga; Yu, Alexander; Halic, Tansel; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Ryason, Adam; Spindler, David; Butler, Kathryn L; Cao, Caroline; Petrusa, Emil; Molina, Marcos; Jones, Dan; De, Suvranu; Demoya, Marc; Jones, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of Virtual Airway Skill Trainer (VAST) tasks. The simulated tasks are a part of two main airway management techniques; Endotracheal Intubation (ETI) and Cricothyroidotomy (CCT). ETI is a simple nonsurgical airway management technique, while CCT is the extreme surgical alternative to secure the airway of a patient. We developed identification of Mallampati class, finding the optimal angle for positioning pharyngeal/mouth axes tasks for ETI and identification of anatomical landmarks and incision tasks for CCT. Both ETI and CCT simulators were used to get physicians' feedback at Society for Education in Anesthesiology and Association for Surgical Education spring meetings. In this preliminary validation study, total 38 participants for ETI and 48 for CCT performed each simulation task and completed pre and post questionnaires. In this work, we present the details of the simulation for the tasks and also the analysis of the collected data from the validation study. PMID:27046559

  12. Emergency Management Computer-Aided Trainer (EMCAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, R. C.; Johnson, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The Emergency Management Computer-Aided Trainer (EMCAT) developed by Essex Corporation or NASA and the Federal Emergency Management Administration's (FEMA) National Fire Academy (NFA) is described. It is a computer based training system for fire fighting personnel. A prototype EMCAT system was developed by NASA first using video tape images and then video disk images when the technology became available. The EMCAT system is meant to fill the training needs of the fire fighting community with affordable state-of-the-art technologies. An automated real time simulation of the fire situation was needed to replace the outdated manual training methods currently being used. In order to be successful, this simulator had to provide realism, be user friendly, be affordable, and support multiple scenarios. The EMCAT system meets these requirements and therefore represents an innovative training tool, not only for the fire fighting community, but also for the needs of other disciplines.

  13. Characterizations of a Quality Certified Athletic Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Scot; Wolfe, Brent D.; Gould, Trenton E.; Piland, Scott G.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Didactic proficiency does not ensure clinical aptitude. Quality athletic health care requires clinical knowledge and affective traits. Objective: To develop a grounded theory explaining the constructs of a quality certified athletic trainer (AT). Design: Delphi study. Setting: Interviews in conference rooms or business offices and by telephone. Patients or Other Participants: Thirteen ATs (men = 8, women = 5) stratified across the largest employment settings (high school, college, clinical) in the 4 largest districts of the National Athletic Trainers' Association (2, 3, 4, 9). Data Collection and Analysis: Open-ended interview questions were audio recorded, transcribed, and reviewed before condensing. Two member checks ensured trustworthiness. Open coding reduced text to descriptive adjectives. Results: We grouped adjectives into 5 constructs (care, communication, commitment, integrity, knowledge) and grouped these constructs into 2 higher-order constructs (affective traits, effective traits). Conclusions: According to participants, ATs who demonstrate the ability to care, show commitment and integrity, value professional knowledge, and communicate effectively with others can be identified as quality ATs. These abilities facilitate the creation of positive relationships. These relationships allow the quality AT to interact with patients and other health care professionals on a knowledgeable basis that ultimately improves health care delivery. Our resulting theory supported the examination of characteristics not traditionally assessed in an athletic training education program. If researchers can show that these characteristics develop ATs into quality ATs (eg, those who work better with others, relate meaningfully with patients, and improve the standard of health care), they must be cultivated in the educational setting. PMID:22488194

  14. Skills Needed by Office Support Staff as Perceived by Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Diane C.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 429 secretarial/clerical trainers received 191 responses emphasizing that postsecondary office systems curricula should focus on communication and human relations skills, technology-related applications, telephone techniques, transcription, and keyboarding accuracy. (SK)

  15. Astronaut Richard Covey working in the Crew Compartment Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Astronaut Richard O. Covey retrieves a helmet from a stowed extravehicular mobility unit (EM) spacesuit in the airlock of the one-G crew compartment trainer (CCT) at JSC. Covey was training for the STS 26 flight.

  16. The Trainer's Role in Stress Management and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlans, Vanja

    1986-01-01

    This article explores the role of the trainer in relation to the management of stress and its prevention and considers some of the available research in order to put the problem into perspective. (Author)

  17. Training Analysis of P-3 Replacement Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Robert F.; And Others

    The report covers an evaluation of current P-3 pilot training programs at the replacement squadron level. It contains detailed discussions concerning training hardware and software that have been supplied. A detailed examination is made of the curriculum and the simulation capabilities and utilization of P-3 operational flight trainers. Concurrent…

  18. T-4G Methodology: Undergraduate Pilot Training T-37 Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Robert R.; And Others

    The report's brief introduction describes the application of T-4G methodology to the T-37 instrument phase of undergraduate pilot training. The methodology is characterized by instruction in trainers, proficiency advancement, a highly structured syllabus, the training manager concept, early exposure to instrument training, and hands-on training.…

  19. Use your phone to build a simple laparoscopic trainer.

    PubMed

    van Duren, Bh; van Boxel, Gi

    2014-10-01

    Simulation is becoming increasingly integral to surgical training with progressive restrictions on working hours. This paper describes a unique, cable free, laparoscopic trainer that can be constructed using items readily available to the average surgical trainee. The trainer described is not a substitute for surgical practice but, nonetheless, a useful tool in developing skills such as hand-eye co-ordination, triangulation and depth queuing. PMID:25336827

  20. Use your phone to build a simple laparoscopic trainer

    PubMed Central

    van Duren, BH; van Boxel, GI

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is becoming increasingly integral to surgical training with progressive restrictions on working hours. This paper describes a unique, cable free, laparoscopic trainer that can be constructed using items readily available to the average surgical trainee. The trainer described is not a substitute for surgical practice but, nonetheless, a useful tool in developing skills such as hand-eye co-ordination, triangulation and depth queuing. PMID:25336827

  1. Auscultation of the Chest and Abdomen by Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    McChesney, John A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To present a practical overview of the methods and techniques of auscultation of the chest and abdomen for use during the physical examination of athletes. Our intent is to provide information on this clinical technique to assist athletic trainers in recognizing and referring athletes presenting with potentially serious internal organ conditions. Background: Use of the stethoscope is a clinical skill increasingly necessary for athletic trainers. Given the expanding breadth of both the assessment techniques used by athletic trainers and the populations they care for and the fact that clinical instruction guidelines have changed in the newly adopted National Athletic Trainers' Association Educational Competencies, our goal is to provide a framework upon which future instruction can be based. Description: This review covers the use of a stethoscope for auscultation of the chest and abdomen. Auscultation of the heart is covered first, followed by techniques for auscultating the breath sounds. Lastly, auscultation of the abdomen describes techniques for listening for bowel sounds and arterial bruits. Clinical Advantages: During the assessment of injuries to and illnesses of athletes, knowledge of auscultatory techniques is valuable and of increasing importance to athletic trainers. Athletic trainers who do not know how to perform auscultation may fail to recognize, and therefore fail to refer for further evaluation, athletes with potentially serious pathologic conditions. PMID:12937462

  2. Development of a Burn Escharotomy Assessment Tool: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ur, Rebecca; Holmes, James H; Johnson, James E; Molnar, Joseph A; Carter, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn injuries can require escharotomies which are urgent, infrequent, and relatively high-risk procedures necessary to preserve limb perfusion and sometimes ventilation. The American Burn Association Advanced Burn Life Support© course educates surgeons and emergency providers about escharotomy incisions but lacks a biomimetic trainer to demonstrate, practice, or provide assessment. The goal was to build an affordable biomimetic trainer with discrete points of failure and pilot a validation study. Fellowship-trained burn and plastic surgeons worked with special effect artists and anatomists to develop a biomimetic trainer with three discrete points of failure: median or ulnar nerve injury, fasciotomy, and failure to check distal pulse. Participants were divided between experienced and inexperienced, survey pre- and post-procedure on a biomimetic model while being timed. The trainer total cost per participant was less than $35. Eighteen participants were involved in the study. The inexperienced (0-1 prior escharotomies performed) had significantly more violations at the discrete points of failure relative to more experienced participants (P = .036). Face validity was assessed with 100% of participants agreement that the model appeared similar to real life and was valuable in their training. Given the advancements in biomimetic models and the need to train surgeons in how to perform infrequent, emergent surgical procedures, an escharotomy trainer is needed today. The authors developed an affordable model with a successful pilot study demonstrating discrimination between experienced and inexperienced surgeons. Additional research is needed to increase the reliability and assessment metrics. PMID:26594860

  3. An Onboard ISS Virtual Reality Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miralles, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Prior to the retirement of the Space Shuttle, many exterior repairs on the International Space Station (ISS) were carried out by shuttle astronauts, trained on the ground and flown to the Station to perform these specific repairs. With the retirement of the shuttle, this is no longer an available option. As such, the need for ISS crew members to review scenarios while on flight, either for tasks they already trained for on the ground or for contingency operations has become a very critical issue. NASA astronauts prepare for Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) or Spacewalks through numerous training media, such as: self-study, part task training, underwater training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), hands-on hardware reviews and training at the Virtual Reality Laboratory (VRLab). In many situations, the time between the last session of a training and an EVA task might be 6 to 8 months. EVA tasks are critical for a mission and as time passes the crew members may lose proficiency on previously trained tasks and their options to refresh or learn a new skill while on flight are limited to reading training materials and watching videos. In addition, there is an increased need for unplanned contingency repairs to fix problems arising as the Station ages. In order to help the ISS crew members maintain EVA proficiency or train for contingency repairs during their mission, the Johnson Space Center's VRLab designed an immersive ISS Virtual Reality Trainer (VRT). The VRT incorporates a unique optical system that makes use of the already successful Dynamic On-board Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) software to assist crew members with procedure reviews and contingency EVAs while on board the Station. The need to train and re-train crew members for EVAs and contingency scenarios is crucial and extremely demanding. ISS crew members are now asked to perform EVA tasks for which they have not been trained and potentially have never seen before. The Virtual Reality Trainer (VRT

  4. Supervising Athletic Trainers' Perceptions of Professional Socialization of Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainers in the Collegiate Setting

    PubMed Central

    Thrasher, Ashley B.; Walker, Stacy E.; Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Many newly credentialed athletic trainers gain initial employment as graduate assistants (GAs) in the collegiate setting, yet their socialization into their role is unknown. Exploring the socialization process of GAs in the collegiate setting could provide insight into how that process occurs. Objective: To explore the professional socialization of GAs in the collegiate setting to determine how GAs are socialized and developed as athletic trainers. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Individual phone interviews. Patients or Other Participants: Athletic trainers (N = 21) who had supervised GAs in the collegiate setting for a minimum of 8 years (16 men [76%], 5 women [24%]; years of supervision experience = 14.6 ± 6.6). Data Collection and Analysis: Data were collected via phone interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed by a 4-person consensus team with a consensual qualitative-research design. The team independently coded the data and compared ideas until a consensus was reached, and a codebook was created. Trustworthiness was established through member checks and multianalyst triangulation. Results: Four themes emerged: (1) role orientation, (2) professional development and support, (3) role expectations, and (4) success. Role orientation occurred both formally (eg, review of policies and procedures) and informally (eg, immediate role immersion). Professional development and support consisted of the supervisor mentoring and intervening when appropriate. Role expectations included decision-making ability, independent practice, and professionalism; however, supervisors often expected GAs to function as experienced, full-time staff. Success of the GAs depended on their adaptability and on the proper selection of GAs by supervisors. Conclusions: Supervisors socialize GAs into the collegiate setting by providing orientation, professional development, mentoring, and intervention when necessary. Supervisors are encouraged to

  5. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Covey, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and communications carrier assembly (CCA), pulls himself up onto flight deck from the middeck through the interdeck access hatch. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT is in launch (vertical) position therefore the aft middeck bulkhead becomes the floor (note technician at the side hatch).

  6. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Hilmers, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, slides out CCT side hatch on his back via platform extension. Astronaut Steven R. Nagel, who has served as both mission specialist and pilot on two previous missions, briefs Hilmers. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  7. STS-26 crew trains in JSC full fuselage trainer (FFT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers are briefed during a training exercise in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Seated outside the open side hatch of the full fuselage trainer (FFT) (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, and Pilot Richard O. Covey. Astronaut Steven R. Nagel (left), positioned in the open side hatch, briefs the crew on the pole escape system as he demonstrates some related equipment. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. The photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  8. STS-26 crew trains in JSC full fuselage trainer (FFT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers are briefed during a training exercise in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Seated outside the open side hatch of the full fuselage trainer (FFT) (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, and Pilot Richard O. Covey. Looking on at right are Astronaut Office Chief Daniel C. Brandenstein (standing) and astronaut James P. Bagian. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  9. STS-27 Atlantis, OV-104, crewmembers in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-27 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), participate in exercises in the JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT). Four crewmembers are pictured in the stations they will man for the launch and entry phases of the mission. They are joined by the fifth crewmember, 'borrowed' for a moment from the middeck. At forward controls are Pilot Guy S. Gardner (left) and Commander Robert L. Gibson. Behind them are Mission Specialist (MS) Richard M. Mullane (left) and MS Jerry L. Ross. MS William M. Shepherd stands at aft station. Shepherd will occupy Atlantis' middeck for launch and entry phase of the flight. CCT is located in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Photo was taken by Bill Bowers of JSC.

  10. STS-28 Columbia, OV-102, crewmembers in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-28 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), participate in exercises in the JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT). Four crewmembers are pictured in the stations they will man for the launch and entry phases of the mission. They are joined by the fifth crewmember, 'borrowed' for a moment from the middeck. At forward controls are Pilot Richard N. Richards (left) and Commander Brewster H. Shaw, Jr. Behind them are Mission Specialist (MS) James C. Adamson (left) and MS David C. Leestma. MS Mark N. Brown stands at aft station. Brown will occupy Columbia's middeck for launch and entry phase of the flight. CCT is located in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Photo was taken by Bill Bowers of JSC.

  11. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, crewmembers in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), participate in exercises in the JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT). Four crewmembers are pictured in the stations they will man for entry phase of the mission. They are joined by the fifth crewmember, 'borrowed' for a moment from the middeck. At forward controls are Pilot John E. Blaha (left) and Commander Michael L. Coats. Behind them are Mission Specialist (MS) James P. Bagian (left) and MS James F. Buchli. MS Robert C. Springer stands at aft station. Springer will occupy Discovery's middeck for entry phase of the flight while Bagian will occupy that post for launch. CCT is located in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Photo was taken by Bill Bowers of JSC.

  12. Trainers' Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, M.; Castrén, M.; Nurmi, J.; Niemi-Murola, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers' attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D), Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N = 185) focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree). Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse's Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation). Cronbach's alphas were 0.92–0.51. Statistics were Student's t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p < 0.01). Participants scoring high on Hesitation scale (p < 0.01) were less confident about their Nurse's Role (p < 0.01) and Nontechnical Skills (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Quality of undergraduate education affects the work of CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills. PMID:27144027

  13. An Onboard ISS Virtual Reality Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miralles, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Prior to the retirement of the Space Shuttle, many exterior repairs on the International Space Station (ISS) were carried out by shuttle astronauts, trained on the ground and flown to the station to perform these repairs. After the retirement of the shuttle, this is no longer an available option. As such, the need for the ISS crew members to review scenarios while on flight, either for tasks they already trained or for contingency operations has become a very critical subject. In many situations, the time between the last session of Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) training and an Extravehicular Activity (EVA) task might be 6 to 8 months. In order to help with training for contingency repairs and to maintain EVA proficiency while on flight, the Johnson Space Center Virtual Reality Lab (VRLab) designed an onboard immersive ISS Virtual Reality Trainer (VRT), incorporating a unique optical system and making use of the already successful Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphical (DOUG) graphics software, to assist crew members with current procedures and contingency EVAs while on flight. The VRT provides an immersive environment similar to the one experienced at the VRLab crew training facility at NASA Johnson Space Center. EVA tasks are critical for a mission since as time passes the crew members may lose proficiency on previously trained tasks. In addition, there is an increased need for unplanned contingency repairs to fix problems arising as the ISS ages. The need to train and re-train crew members for EVAs and contingency scenarios is crucial and extremely demanding. ISS crew members are now asked to perform EVA tasks for which they have not been trained and potentially have never seen before.

  14. STS 51-E crew is briefed on the Shuttle full fuselage trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    STS 51-E crew is briefed on the Shuttle full fuselage trainer. Astronauts Dave Griggs (foreground), Jean Loup Chretien (behind Griggs) and Jeff Hoffman are being shown the workings of the trainer by flight instructors.

  15. Motivational Congruency and Discrepancy Between Certified Athletic Trainers and Noncertified Student Athletic Trainers in the State of Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Barton P.; Lankford, Samuel V.; Noda, Laurie S.

    1992-01-01

    In March 1992, a survey to assess motivational preference was sent to all certified athletic trainers who were practicing in the State of Hawaii and all noncertified student athletic trainers who were enrolled in the athletic training curriculum at the University of Hawaii. The return rate was 80% for certified athletic trainers and 100% for student athletic trainers. The findings of the study indicated that a motivational discrepancy exists for the following motivational stems: freedom on the job, job growth, benefits and wages, being appreciated, helping the organization obtain goals, receiving raises, being an integral part of the work team, job security, and feedback on job performance (p <.05). Further, the study indicated differences in rating the importance of motivators between the certified and the student athletic trainers concerning freedom on the job, opportunity for advancement, benefits and wages, and job security (p <.05). The differences in motivational factors between the two groups indicated that the students are more concerned with intrinsic types of motivators and less concerned with extrinsic rewards. Further investigation needs to include mainland populations and students in approved/accredited curriculums. PMID:16558187

  16. 24 CFR 3286.311 - Suspension or revocation of trainer's qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension or revocation of trainer... Installers in HUD-Administered States § 3286.311 Suspension or revocation of trainer's qualification. (a) Oversight. The Secretary may make a continuing evaluation of the manner in which each qualified trainer...

  17. Adult Trainers in Greece: Qualifications, Teaching Effectiveness, and Competency-Based Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinia, Vasiliki; Kritikos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the research has been to investigate the views of adult education trainers with regards to the qualifications which form part of the "effective adult trainer profile." Trainers in Adult Education were asked to express their views on the specific qualifications (e.g. work experience, studies, etc.) which increase (and to…

  18. Roles of Informal Workplace Trainers in Different Organizational Contexts: Empirical Evidence from Australian Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poell, Rob F.; Van der Krogt, Ferd J.; Vermulst, A. A.; Harris, Roger; Simons, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Informal workplace trainers help employees learn what they need to know and do in order to get their job done. Little is known about the actions of informal workplace trainers, who may be colleagues or supervisors. This study provides an empirical basis for actions undertaken by informal workplace trainers. A total of 350 Australian enterprises…

  19. How Good Are Trainers' Personal Methods Compared to Two Structured Training Strategies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walls, Richard T.; And Others

    Training methods naturally employed by trainers were analyzed and compared to systematic structured training procedures. Trainers were observed teaching retarded subjects how to assemble a bicycle brake, roller skate, carburetor, and lawn mower engine. Trainers first taught using their own (personal) method, which was recorded in terms of types of…

  20. School Nurses Vis-a-Vis Athletic Trainers in Secondary School Sports Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews past and present views of the working relationship between a school's nurse and athletic trainer and discusses the author's own study which revealed that, compared to trainers, school nurses possess insufficient knowledge to assume adequate injury management. Offers a sample job description for a head athletic trainer. (WD)

  1. Open and Distance Learning and the Professionalisation of Trainers. TTnet Dossier No. 4. CEDEFOP Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brugia, Mara; Gerard, Francoise; Tetart, Michel; Battezzati, Luciano; Mallet, Jeanne; Pellerey, Michele; Walker, Simon

    This document contains five papers from a 1999 workshop in Rome on enhancing the professional skills and qualifications of trainers in open and distance learning organized by the TTnet network (Training of Trainers network). "The Different Types of Open and Distance Training and Their Impact on Trainers' Skills" (Michel Tetart) examines the…

  2. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Management of Sport Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Broglio, Steven P.; Cantu, Robert C.; Gioia, Gerard A.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Kutcher, Jeffrey; Palm, Michael; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To provide athletic trainers, physicians, and other health care professionals with best-practice guidelines for the management of sport-related concussions. Background: An estimated 3.8 million concussions occur each year in the United States as a result of sport and physical activity. Athletic trainers are commonly the first medical providers available onsite to identify and evaluate these injuries. Recommendations: The recommendations for concussion management provided here are based on the most current research and divided into sections on education and prevention, documentation and legal aspects, evaluation and return to play, and other considerations. PMID:24601910

  3. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zinder, Steven M.; Basler, Rodney S. W.; Foley, Jack; Scarlata, Chris; Vasily, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, education, and management of skin infections in athletes. Background: Trauma, environmental factors, and infectious agents act together to continually attack the integrity of the skin. Close quarters combined with general poor hygiene practices make athletes particularly vulnerable to contracting skin diseases. An understanding of basic prophylactic measures, clinical features, and swift management of common skin diseases is essential for certified athletic trainers to aid in preventing the spread of infectious agents. Recommendations: These guidelines are intended to provide relevant information on skin infections and to give specific recommendations for certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care. PMID:20617918

  4. Reliability and Validity of an Instrument to Describe Burnout Among Collegiate Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Clapper, Daniel C; Harris, Laura L

    2008-01-01

    Context: The existing investigations of professional burnout among certified athletic trainers (ATs) were conducted before 2000. Since 2000, several educational and legal changes have redefined the job duties and responsibilities of the AT working in collegiate athletics. Objective: To develop an instrument to determine factors that contribute to burnout in ATs employed within the collegiate athletics setting. Design: Descriptive study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I-A universities. Patients or Other Participants: Instrument design experts and ATs employed in various NCAA Division I-A athletic programs. Main Outcome Measure(s): The Athletic Training Burnout Inventory (ATBI) included the Maslach Burnout Inventory (18 items) plus 45 new items to address established factors that lead to burnout and to address workload issues specific to athletic training. We initially developed 3 constructs (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, level of stress, and level of organizational support) and included them in the 2 field tests and first pilot test of the ATBI. For the second pilot test, the instrument comprised 4 constructs: emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, administrative responsibility, time commitment, and organizational support. The 2 field tests were conducted to establish face and content validity of the ATBI. Reliability analyses were conducted twice on the 2 separate pilot tests using a Cronbach α set a priori at .70 and an item-to-total correlation. Results: The second pilot test of the ATBI with the 4 constructs was determined reliable (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, α = .85; administrative responsibility, α = .82; time commitment, α = .86; and organizational support, α = .80); however, some items within 2 constructs appeared suspect with low item-to-total correlations (<0.25). Conclusions: The second administration of the ATBI produced an acceptable response rate. All 4 constructs were reliable

  5. Study of small civil turbofan engines applicable to military trainer airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenbrand, R. W.; Merrill, G. L.; Burnett, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Small turbofan engine design concepts were applied to military trainer airplanes to establish the potential for commonality between civil and military engines. Several trainer configurations were defined and studied. A ""best'' engine was defined for the trainer mission, and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the effects on airplane size and efficiency of wing loading, power loading, configuration, aerodynamic quality, and engine quality. It is concluded that a small civil aircraft is applicable to military trainer airplanes. Aircraft designed with these engines are smaller, less costly, and more efficient than existing trainer aircraft.

  6. SR-71 Pilot Rogers E. Smith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Research pilot Rogers E. Smith is shown here in front of the SR-71 Blackbird he flew for NASA. Rogers was one of the two original NASA research pilots assigned to the SR-71 high speed research program at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Smith has been a NASA research pilot at Dryden since 1982. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. The SR-71 is capable of flying more than 2200 mph (Mach 3+) and at altitudes of over 80,000 feet. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data

  7. SR-71 Pilot Stephen (Steve) D. Ishmael

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA research pilot Stephen D. Ishmael is pictured here in front of an SR-71 Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Ishmael was one of two NASA research pilots assigned to the SR-71 high speed research program in the early 1990s at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994), Edwards, California. Ishmael became a NASA research pilot in 1977. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and

  8. The Art of Evaluation: A Handbook for Educators and Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenwick, Tara J.; Parsons, Jim

    This book introduces adult educators and trainers to the principles and techniques of learner evaluation in the various contexts of adult education. The following are among the topics discussed: (1) the purposes of evaluation (the importance of authentic evaluation; principles of evaluation; traps in evaluation); (2) evaluating one's philosophy…

  9. In the Trainer's Voice: A Study of Training Transfer Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Holly M.

    2009-01-01

    Data were gathered from members of a large professional training organization regarding their practices for supporting training transfer. Transfer factor categories grounded in the literature were used to code the data using content analysis procedures. Commensurate with the transfer literature, results suggest that trainers reported strategies…

  10. Workplace Learning & Leadership: A Handbook for Library and Nonprofit Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Lori; Signorelli, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The best kind of learning is that which never ends--and a culture of training means that staff will be more flexible and responsive to new ideas and strategies, imperative in today's libraries. In this practical resource, leading workplace trainers Reed and Signorelli offer guidance on improving the effectiveness of training programs. Their book…

  11. Professional Development for Teacher Trainers: A Materials Writing Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiely, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates a materials writing approach to professional development in English language teaching (ELT). The context is the training of teacher trainers, and the specific focus is a United Kingdom course for ELT professionals from Polish teacher training institutions. The article describes the background to the course, analyzes teacher training…

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Exertional Heat Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Casa, Douglas J.; DeMartini, Julie K.; Bergeron, Michael F.; Csillan, Dave; Eichner, E. Randy; Lopez, Rebecca M.; Ferrara, Michael S.; Miller, Kevin C.; O'Connor, Francis; Sawka, Michael N.; Yeargin, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective  To present best-practice recommendations for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of exertional heat illnesses (EHIs) and to describe the relevant physiology of thermoregulation. Background  Certified athletic trainers recognize and treat athletes with EHIs, often in high-risk environments. Although the proper recognition and successful treatment strategies are well documented, EHIs continue to plague athletes, and exertional heat stroke remains one of the leading causes of sudden death during sport. The recommendations presented in this document provide athletic trainers and allied health providers with an integrated scientific and clinically applicable approach to the prevention, recognition, treatment of, and return-to-activity guidelines for EHIs. These recommendations are given so that proper recognition and treatment can be accomplished in order to maximize the safety and performance of athletes. Recommendations  Athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals should use these recommendations to establish onsite emergency action plans for their venues and athletes. The primary goal of athlete safety is addressed through the appropriate prevention strategies, proper recognition tactics, and effective treatment plans for EHIs. Athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals must be properly educated and prepared to respond in an expedient manner to alleviate symptoms and minimize the morbidity and mortality associated with these illnesses. PMID:26381473

  13. Overview of Characteristics of Handicapping Conditions: A Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Stephen; And Others

    The trainer's manual presents information to be covered in a workshop for regular educators on characteristics of all handicapping conditions. Strategies in the workshop acquaint trainees with techinques and methods for identifying, referring, and assessing the handicapped child, with emphasis on the awareness and understanding of the…

  14. Identification, Referral and Assessment of Handicapped Students: A Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spearman, Carolyn; Gaddis, Ruth

    The trainer's manual offers a sampling of workshop materials to assist the regular classroom teacher in the process of screening, identification, referral, and assessment of handicapped students. Following an introduction are sections with information, sample handouts, forms, and checklists on the following topics (sample subtopics in…

  15. A Trainer's Manual of Behavioral Interventions for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaddis, Ruth; And Others

    The trainer's manual is designed to assist workshop trainees (regular and special educators) in improving their skills and competencies through identification, methods, and remediation principles to modify and adapt curricular offerings to meet the behavioral needs of handicapped children, with emphasis in serving these children in the regular…

  16. Attitudes of Trainers and Medical Students towards Using Modern Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzhiiliev, Vassil Stefanov; Dobreva, Zhaneta Stoykova

    2011-01-01

    The development of universities as independent scientific centers determines their mission to incorporate the most modern achievements of science into the students' practical training. This research on the attitudes of the participants in this process towards the use of modern practices encompasses both trainers and students, and it consists of…

  17. Trainer Guide: Business and Finance Managerial. Camp Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Suggested ideas on conducting a managerial workshop for camp directors are offered in this trainer's guide. Workshops must be at least one full day of training (6 hours) on each topic to be counted toward the American Camping Association (ACA) Camp Director Certification Program. Suggested topics to be addressed are: (1) basic principles and…

  18. Assertion Training and Trainer Effects on Unassertive and Aggressive Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentz, Mary Ann Wood

    1980-01-01

    Findings indicate that the effects of assertion training generalized to novel teacher, parent, and student situations and to the in vivo test. Structured learning training with teacher trainers produced more assertive behavior in teacher situations. Performance was differentially affected by type of participant. (Author)

  19. OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR AT SECOND FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR AT SECOND FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING CONTROL CENTER CAB. VIEW FACING WEST/NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR FROM FIRST FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR FROM FIRST FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, SUPPORTS AND FOUNDATION BLOCKS. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. The Somali Oyster--Training the Trainers in TEFL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Julian

    1985-01-01

    Describes a situation which raises problems for in-service training in teaching English as a foreign language and discusses a suggested procedure for dealing with the problem. Argues that the procedure for training the trainers should be the same as that for training the teachers and for teaching the language students. (SED)

  2. "Training the Trainers" of Teachers in France: Assessment and Outlook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapostolle, Guy

    2009-01-01

    With the creation of IUFMs (university institutes of teacher training) in the 1990s, the training of teacher trainers in France has become a fundamental part of the renewal of teacher training. It is seen as a fundamental lever for the IUFMs to achieve the tasks and goals entrusted to them: training teachers who need to accommodate the new demands…

  3. Addressing the Challenges of Training Competent Trainers in Computer Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stemmer, Paul M., Jr.; Carlson, Elizabeth Uzdavinis

    This report on the TMT (Training Modules for Trainers) Project, part of the Special Discretionary Grant Program developed by the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) in response to the need for coordinated training activities, begins with a discussion of the emerging problem of upgrading teachers' computer literacy skills. A description of the…

  4. Trainer Guide: Site and Facilities Managerial. Camp Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Composed of two units, the managerial trainer guide addresses the planning and maintenance of camp site and facilities. Designed to provide the camp director with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan and maintain the site and facilities, the guide includes a pre-assessment checklist, performance objectives, suggested activities and…

  5. The Teacher Trainer. Volume Five, Numbers One, Two, and Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Three 1991 issues of a British journal for modern language teacher trainers are provided. Articles include the following: "Perspectives on the In-service Training Needs of Non-native Speaking Teachers of English to Youth Learners" (Jennifer Jarvis); "Royal Society of Arts Certificate Trainees Speak Out" (Mario Rinvolucri); "Medical Education as…

  6. Management of Cerebral Concussion in Sports: The Athletic Trainer's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliaro, Scott; Anderson, Scott; Hooker, Dan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a new approach in the evaluation and management of concussions from the athletic trainer's perspective. This quantifiable assessment technique provides more information on which return-to-play decisions can be made based on the athlete's symptoms and performance on objective tests. It can be used during initial sideline examinations as…

  7. Intelligent virtual agents as language trainers facilitate multilingualism

    PubMed Central

    Macedonia, Manuela; Groher, Iris; Roithmayr, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new generation of language trainers: intelligent virtual agents (IVAs) with human appearance and the capability to teach foreign language vocabulary. We report results from studies that we have conducted with Billie, an IVA employed as a vocabulary trainer, as well as research findings on the acceptance of the agent as a trainer by adults and children. The results show that Billie can train humans as well as a human teacher can and that both adults and children accept the IVA as a trainer. The advantages of IVAs are multiple. First, their teaching methods can be based on neuropsychological research findings concerning memory and learning practice. Second, virtual teachers can provide individualized training. Third, they coach users during training, are always supportive, and motivate learners to train. Fourth, agents will reside in the user's mobile devices and thus be at the user's disposal everywhere and anytime. Agents in apps will make foreign language training accessible to anybody at low cost. This will enable people around the world, including physically, financially, and geographically disadvantaged persons, to learn a foreign language and help to facilitate multilingualism. PMID:24782799

  8. Just-in-Time Web Searches for Trainers & Adult Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, James J.

    Trainers and adult educators often need to quickly locate quality information on the World Wide Web (WWW) and need assistance in searching for such information. A "search engine" is an application used to query existing information on the WWW. The three types of search engines are computer-generated indexes, directories, and meta search engines.…

  9. Trainer Guide: Food Service Managerial. Camp Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Designed for a food service managerial workshop, the trainer's guide is organized into four separate units: personnel management, menu planning, food purchasing, and food service operations. Performance objectives to be met on completion of the workshop include: improving personnel operations for a camp's food service; demonstrating knowledge of…

  10. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Fluid Replacement for Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Hillman, Susan K.; Montain, Scott J.; Reiff, Ralph V.; Rich, Brent S. E.; Roberts, William O.; Stone, Jennifer A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents recommendations from the National Athletic Trainers Association for optimizing the fluid replacement practices of athletes, explaining that dehydration can compromise athletic performance and increase the risk of exertional heat injury. Athletes must be educated about the risks of dehydration and overhydration. They must learn fluid…

  11. Management Skills for Alcohol Program Administrators; Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Alcohol Education, Arlington, VA.

    This trainer's manual contains complete instructions and resource references for delivering the management skills program designed to upgrade the skills and performance of managerial personnel in the alcoholism field. It provides four areas of information: (1) course content and methodology, target audience, assumptions and suggestions; (2)…

  12. Astronaut John Glenn during training exercise in Mercury Procedures Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Mercury Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. runs through a training exercise in the Mercury Procedures Trainer in use at Space Task Group, Langley Field, Virginia. This Link-type spacecraft simulator permits the practice of both normal and emergency modes of systems operations.

  13. Pindar's Tenth Olympian and athlete-trainer pederasty.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The comparison of the adolescent boxer Hagesidamus and his trainer Ilas to Patroclus and Achilles in Pindar's Olympian 10.16-21 and the subsequent comparison of Hagesidamus to Ganymede in Olympian 10.99-105 suggest that the relationship was in some sense pederastic, particularly in the wake of Aeschylus' treatment of Achilles and Patroclus in these terms in Myrmidons. This possibility motivates a broader examination of the evidence for such relationships in fifth-century Greece. There is no doubt that the palaestra was a central locus for the formation of pederastic liaisons and that athletic nudity was integral to the esthetic construction of adolescent beauty. There is also no doubt that the trainer's position afforded him regular intimacy and close physical contact with boys; several Hellenistic texts take for granted the erotic opportunities connected with the position. The Solonian law presuming to protect pupils from such relationships, attested in Aeschines, was probably a late fifth-century development in reaction to their common occurrence in earlier generations. Evidence also exists for lovers acting as financial backers to boy athletes or as informal trainers. Some of the most intriguing evidence for the conflation of the trainer's and lover's roles can be found in red-figure vase painting of the late sixth and fifth centuries. PMID:16338892

  14. Training of Trainers: New Institutional and Functional Structures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Fernanda Oliveira; Rychener, Frederique

    1992-01-01

    Participants at a forum in Lisbon, Portugal, discussed training of trainers in the European Community. Discussions centered on the changes taking place in production systems and ways in which occupational activities are performed, the changing roles and concepts of vocational training, and the growing diversity of users. Problems surrounding…

  15. Trainer Guide: Health and Safety Managerial. Camp Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Consisting of two units on health and safety, the trainer's guide provides suggested activities and methods of acquiring performance objectives in each unit; sample workshop schedules for 6-hour training sessions for small, average, and large groups; suggestions for organizing and using discussion groups; an annotated reference list; and support…

  16. Training Citizen Groups on Educational Testing Issues: A Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Beverly L.; And Others

    The purpose of this manual is to provide measurement specialists and educational evaluators with procedures for identifying the key testing issues of importance to citizen groups and aid them in adapting materials for use in workshops with these groups. The manual is divided into five sections to assist the trainer in developing all aspects of a…

  17. Virtual Environment Training: Auxiliary Machinery Room (AMR) Watchstation Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hriber, Dennis C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a project implemented at Newport News Shipbuilding that used Virtual Environment Training to improve the performance of submarine crewmen. Highlights include development of the Auxiliary Machine Room (AMR) Watchstation Trainer; Digital Video Interactive (DVI); screen layout; test design and evaluation; user reactions; authoring language;…

  18. Fast Track to Success: Top Young Trainers 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freifeld, Lorri

    2012-01-01

    Supercharged. High-performers. Leaders of the pack. This article presents "Training" magazine's 2012 Top Young Trainers--those high-potential training professionals who are on the fast track to success. For the fifth year, "Training" magazine is pleased to recognize the outstanding talents, accomplishments, and leadership exhibited by 40 learning…

  19. Basic Techniques of Blacksmithing: A Manual for Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Pete; And Others

    Designed for trainers of Peace Corps Volunteers, this guide contains instructional materials for a training program in basic blacksmithing skills. The objective is to give volunteers a knowledge of metals and metalworking that will help them support rural communities in developing countries in their efforts to produce tools for agricultural and…

  20. Trainer Guide: Serving Campers With Special Needs. Camp Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhiser, Judy

    Part of the materials developed for Project STRETCH (Strategies to Try out Resources to Enhance the Training of Camp directors serving the Handicapped), this guide consists of three sections: an introduction, the managerial trainer guide, and appendices. Section I addresses the rise of organized camping as big business, the need to provide camping…

  1. Embodied Narratives in Becoming a Counselling Trainer: An Autoethnographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meekums, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    This autoethnographic study addresses the newly appointed counselling trainer's question "How did I get here?" The procedure is described, and findings are presented as partial narratives of the Wounded Dancer, poems and prose written from different voices. Themes are revealed of love, healing, risk taking, unconventionality, physicality and…

  2. The Teacher Trainer: A Practical Journal Mainly for Modern Language Teacher Trainers. Volume Four, Numbers One-Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This document consists of the three 1990 issues of "The Teacher Trainer," a journal for language teacher educators. The following articles appear in these issues: "Writing as a Learning Process in Teacher Education and Development"; "An 'Upside Down' Teacher Training Course"; "Training Teachers as Explainers: A Checklist"; "A Fresh Look at Team…

  3. The Multifunctional Enzyme CYP71B15 (PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3) Converts Cysteine-Indole-3-Acetonitrile to Camalexin in the Indole-3-Acetonitrile Metabolic Network of Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Christoph; Westphal, Lore; Schmotz, Constanze; Prade, Elke; Scheel, Dierk; Glawischnig, Erich

    2009-01-01

    Accumulation of camalexin, the characteristic phytoalexin of Arabidopsis thaliana, is induced by a great variety of plant pathogens. It is derived from Trp, which is converted to indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) by successive action of the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP79B2/B3 and CYP71A13. Extracts from wild-type plants and camalexin biosynthetic mutants, treated with silver nitrate or inoculated with Phytophthora infestans, were comprehensively analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This metabolomics approach was combined with precursor feeding experiments to characterize the IAN metabolic network and to identify novel biosynthetic intermediates and metabolites of camalexin. Indole-3-carbaldehyde and indole-3-carboxylic acid derivatives were shown to originate from IAN. IAN conjugates with glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteine, and cysteine [Cys(IAN)] accumulated in challenged phytoalexin deficient3 (pad3) mutants. Cys(IAN) rescued the camalexin-deficient phenotype of cyp79b2 cyp79b3 and was itself converted to dihydrocamalexic acid (DHCA), the known substrate of CYP71B15 (PAD3), by microsomes isolated from silver nitrate–treated Arabidopsis leaves. Surprisingly, yeast-expressed CYP71B15 also catalyzed thiazoline ring closure, DHCA formation, and cyanide release with Cys(IAN) as substrate. In conclusion, in the camalexin biosynthetic pathway, IAN is derivatized to the intermediate Cys(IAN), which serves as substrate of the multifunctional cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP71B15. PMID:19567706

  4. Prototype Videodisk-Based Part-Task Thermal Imaging Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickner, Michael S.; Foyle, David C.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Thermal images, or infrared images, are representations of the world based on heat, instead of visible light. Research has shown that the resulting thermal image results in perceptual differences leading to difficulties in interpretation (e.g., the determination of slope angle, concavity/convexity), or increased identification latencies. A joint research project between the United States (NASA and U.S. Army) and Israel (Ministry of Defense and Israel Air Force) has resulted in the development of a prototype part-task trainer for the acquisition of perceptual skills associated with thermal imaging usage. This prototype system is videodisk-based under computer control, using recordings of thermal images. A lesson section introduces declarative knowledge, in which the basic physics and heuristics of thermal imagery are taught. An exercise section teaches procedural knowledge, with the user viewing dynamic, actual imagery, with an interactive detection/location determination task. The general philosophy and design of the trainer will be demonstrated.

  5. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Environmental Cold Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Cappaert, Thomas A; Stone, Jennifer A; Castellani, John W; Krause, Bentley Andrew; Smith, Daniel; Stephens, Bradford A

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of environmental cold injuries. Background: Individuals engaged in sport-related or work-related physical activity in cold, wet, or windy conditions are at risk for environmental cold injuries. An understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology, risk management, recognition, and immediate care of environmental cold injuries is an essential skill for certified athletic trainers and other health care providers working with individuals at risk. Recommendations: These recommendations are intended to provide certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care with the specific knowledge and problem-solving skills needed to address environmental cold injuries. Each recommendation has been graded (A, B, or C) according to the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criterion scale. PMID:19030143

  6. Astronaut John Glenn during training exercise in Mercury Procedures Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Close-up view of Mercury Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. as he runs through a training exercise in the Mercury Procedures Trainer in use at Space Task Group, Langley Field, Virginia. This Link-type spacecraft simulator permits the practice of both normal and emergency modes of systems operations. Glenn is in the Mercury pressure suit and is wearing his helmet, just as he would if the flight were real.

  7. Diagnostic Problem Solving in Male Collegiate Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Fredrick A.; Mensch, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Knowledge and experience may be important factors for understanding expertise based upon a clinician's ability to select and execute an appropriate response as a clinician during injury evaluation. Objective: To describe how collegiate male certified athletic trainers represent injury-evaluation domain knowledge during a situational interview using a think-aloud protocol. Design: Qualitative. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I and II colleges in National Athletic Trainers' Association District 3. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 20 male certified athletic trainers (n = 10 with less than 2 years of experience in the college setting and n = 10 with at least 10 years of experience in the college setting) participated in the study. Data Collection and Analysis: We collected data using a situational interview and questionnaire. Data were transcribed, reduced to meaningful units, and analyzed using verbal analysis procedures. Member checks, triangulation of data, field journaling, and peer-debriefing techniques were used to ensure trustworthiness of the data. Knowledge concepts were enumerated to describe differences between experts and novices. Results: Compared with novices, experts had more knowledge concepts of patient history and predictions and fewer concepts of situation appraisal. Conclusions: Expertise in athletic training shares traits with other areas in health care. Athletic training education and professional development may benefit from our understanding which cognitive processes differentiate expert practice. Future investigators should attempt to describe other settings and study diagnostic problem solving in a natural environment. PMID:24972043

  8. Educating the clinical trainer: professional gain for the trainee? A controlled intervention study in general practice.

    PubMed

    Jochemsen-van der Leeuw, H G A Ria; van Dijk, Nynke; de Jong, Wilfried; Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether a 'teach-the-trainer' course leads to improvements in, firstly, the knowledge and attitude of clinical trainers and their trainees, and, secondly, the role model behaviour of the clinical trainers. A controlled intervention study was performed with GP trainers and GP trainees from four training institutes in the Netherlands. Clinical trainers in the two intervention institutes received two 3-h training sessions on weight management, focusing on knowledge and attitudes towards obesity, and on conveying the correct professional competency as a positive role model for trainees. This was measured using questionnaires on knowledge, attitude, and role model behaviour (the role model apperception tool; RoMAT). GP trainers showed an increase in knowledge and several characteristics could be identified as being related to positive role model behaviour. A small correlation was found between the trainer's score on the RoMAT and the attitude of the trainee. A teach-the-trainer course in which knowledge, attitudes, and role modelling are integrated proved to be a first step toward improving the knowledge of clinical trainers, but did not result in a measurably better professional outcome for the trainee, maybe due to a more objective level of assessment. PMID:25338922

  9. Organizational Commitment Among Intercollegiate Head Athletic Trainers: Examining Our Work Environment

    PubMed Central

    Winterstein, Andrew P.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To 1) examine the commitment of head athletic trainers to their intercollegiate work environments, 2) develop a model that better reflects the head athletic trainer's daily work setting, and 3) use new techniques to describe the various ways head athletic trainers demonstrate commitment to their organizations. Design and Setting: Organizational commitment (OC) surveys were sent to 461 head athletic trainers identified for the sample. A response rate of 71.5% (330/461) was obtained from the mail survey. Subjects: A proportional random sample of head athletic trainers was taken from a population identified in the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) directory of intercollegiate athletics as Division I, II, and III institutions. Measurements: Returned OC surveys were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics for all demographic and OC variables. Exploratory cluster analysis was performed to examine naturally clustering groups. Results: Exploratory cluster analysis revealed five naturally clustering groups that represent the head athletic trainers' patterns of commitment across the specific organizational targets. Paired t tests indicated that the continuance commitment scores were significantly lower than the affective and normative scores across the sample. Analysis of variance tests indicated significant differences for specific commitment dimensions based on gender and NCAA division demographics. Beyond that, the five-cluster solution revealed no particular demographic characteristics that predisposed individuals to specific clusters. Conclusions: The findings reinforce a central theme in intercollegiate athletic training: that student-athletes and student athletic trainers are the primary focus of the head athletic trainers' commitment. Positive attachment and obligation directed toward student-athletes and student athletic trainers link the five clusters. Commitment patterns in areas other than student

  10. Interactivity in a Web Conference Training Context: Effects on Trainers and Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Keri K.; Mottet, Timothy P.

    2008-01-01

    Organizations continue to use technology to train and share information. This study focused specifically on how trainers and trainees interact in the mediated Web conference training context. Using the rhetorical and relational goal theory of instructional communication, this 2x2 experimental study tested the effects of trainer-controlled and…

  11. Evaluation of the Person-Centered Care Essentials Program: Importance of Trainers in Achieving Targeted Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Scott P.; O'Brien, Catherine J.; Edelman, Perry; Fazio, Sam

    2011-01-01

    A person-centered care (PCC) training program was developed and disseminated to 84 institutes for retired religious persons across the United States. The program was delivered via a train-the-trainer model wherein institute trainers attended a 2-day training conference, then taught the material to direct care workers (DCWs) at their respective…

  12. How Person-Centred Counselling Trainers Understand and Experience Their Role in the Current British Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballinger, Liz

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a qualitative study into the experience of person-centred training from the viewpoint of the trainer. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was the adopted approach. The researcher conducted a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews with five person-centred trainers with experience across a range of…

  13. Space motion sickness preflight adaptation training: preliminary studies with prototype trainers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Rock, J. C.; von Gierke, H. E.; Ouyang, L.; Reschke, M. F.; Arrott, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    Preflight training frequently has been proposed as a potential solution to the problem of space motion sickness. The paper considers successively the otolith reinterpretation, the concept for a preflight adaptation trainer and the research with the Miami University Seesaw, the Wright Patterson Air-Force Base Dynamic Environment Simulator and the Visually Coupled Airborne Systems Simulator prototype adaptation trainers.

  14. Policy Development in Sex and Drug Education.; Professional Standards for Human Relations Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upcraft, M. Lee

    In the first of these papers, the author discusses how and why he and his colleagues established a set of professional standards for trainers or group leaders in the human relations program for undergraduates at Pennsylvania State, as well as a procedure for enforcing trainer qualifications and performance. The need for standards is viewed in…

  15. A Study of Vocational Trainers' Professional Satisfaction in Taiwan Republic of China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Rong-Jyue

    Vocational trainers at 15 vocational training centers in Taiwan were surveyed by mail to determine if the satisfaction of the trainers was related to in-service experience, age, job title, method of teaching, education level, factory experience, and teacher training. Other variables in the study included vocational training administration,…

  16. From Trainee to Trainer: Crossing over to the Other Side of the Fence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gil-Rodriguez, Elena; Butcher, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the authors' experiences of the transition from trainee to trainer on a psychotherapeutic training programme, and some of the challenges involved. Using the framework offered by Rizq (2009), the article examines the many parallel processes implicit in the roles of trainee, trainer and therapist. We explore these using…

  17. Opinion of NCAA Coaches and Trainers Toward the Use of Ergogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meylink, Willa D.; Struck, Phyllis J.

    This study determined the opinion of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) coaches and trainers toward the use of certain ergogenic drugs. A researcher-constructed opinionnaire consisting of 38 statements was sent to football, wrestling, basketball, gymnastics, swimming and diving, and track and field coaches and trainers. Those surveyed…

  18. 24 CFR 3286.309 - Continuing education-trainers and curriculum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provider of continuing education units who is certified by the International Association for Continuing... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuing education-trainers and...-Administered States § 3286.309 Continuing education-trainers and curriculum. (a) HUD-mandated elements....

  19. 24 CFR 3286.309 - Continuing education-trainers and curriculum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continuing education-trainers and...-Administered States § 3286.309 Continuing education-trainers and curriculum. (a) HUD-mandated elements. Only... HUD to be an element of the continuing education requirement set out in § 3286.205(b)(2) for...

  20. 24 CFR 3286.309 - Continuing education-trainers and curriculum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continuing education-trainers and...-Administered States § 3286.309 Continuing education-trainers and curriculum. (a) HUD-mandated elements. Only... HUD to be an element of the continuing education requirement set out in § 3286.205(b)(2) for...

  1. 24 CFR 3286.309 - Continuing education-trainers and curriculum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continuing education-trainers and...-Administered States § 3286.309 Continuing education-trainers and curriculum. (a) HUD-mandated elements. Only... HUD to be an element of the continuing education requirement set out in § 3286.205(b)(2) for...

  2. Concussion Assessment in California Community College Football: Athletic Trainers' Strides toward a Safer Return to Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Nancy Resendes

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method study was to compare current practices of athletic trainers in the management of concussion in football at California Community Colleges (CCC) with the concussion management guidelines set forth by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA). The study also set out to gain understanding of why some athletic…

  3. Realism of procedural task trainers in a pediatric emergency medicine procedures course

    PubMed Central

    Shefrin, Allan; Khazei, Afshin; Cheng, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians have minimal experience in life saving procedures and have turned to task trainers to learn these skills. Realism of these models is an important consideration that has received little study. Method PEM physicians and trainees participated in a day long procedural training course that utilized commercially available and homemade task trainers to teach pericardiocentesis, chest tube insertion, cricothyroidotomy and central line insertion. Participants rated the realism of the task trainers as part of a post-course survey. Results The homemade task trainers received variable realism ratings, with 91% of participants rating the pork rib chest tube model as realistic, 82% rating the gelatin pericardiocentesis mold as realistic and 36% rating the ventilator tubing cricothyroidotomy model as realistic. Commercial trainers also received variable ratings, with 45% rating the chest drain and pericardiocentesis simulator as realistic, 74% rating the crichotracheotomy trainer as realistic and 80% rating the central line insertion trainer as realistic. Conclusions Task training models utilized in our course received variable realism ratings. When deciding what type of task trainer to use future courses should carefully consider the desired aspect of realism, and how it aligns with the procedural skill, balanced with cost considerations. PMID:26451232

  4. Preparing the Communication Specialist: Some Implications of an Ongoing "Train the Trainer" Program in One Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Mark R.; Caplette, Michele

    Interviews with six managers trained to teach the Interpersonal Managing Skills (IMS) program at the Lockheed Missiles and Space Company provided insights into three aspects of communication training programs: training skills, the trainer role, and methods of training the trainer. A highly structured, packaged program, IMS teaches five…

  5. Role Problems for Trainers in an Arab-Jewish Conflict-Management Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargal, David; Bar, Haviva

    1990-01-01

    Describes and analyzes role problems of trainers who conduct conflict-management workshops between Arabs and Jews in Israel. Uses role theory to focus on problems of role ambiguity and role conflict, citing examples of each. Concludes with discussion of consequences of role problems on trainers' performance. (Author/TE)

  6. Guide for Trainers. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Dottie C.; Grady, Kathleen A.

    This monograph, the second in a series of five, provides information for trainers on interdisciplinary team training and humanistic patient care in hospices. Designed to help outside trainers who may be invited by a hospice to conduct its training, the materials help instructors to understand the nature of hospices, to determine whether or not the…

  7. Effective Approaches: A Manual for Teachers of Handicapped Preschoolers Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovell, Carrie; Fry, Betty

    The manual for the trainer of Head Start teachers is designed to accompany teacher units on basic techniques for working with handicapped preschool children. Following administrator and trainer tests are sections on the following areas: using the manual, setting up the program, the point system, negotiating with the director, negotiating with…

  8. Legal and ethical dilemmas in drug management for team physicians and athletic trainers.

    PubMed

    St Mary, E W

    1998-05-01

    Increasing violations of prescription drug regulations should alert physicians, trainers, and physiotherapists at collegiate and professional levels. Failure to adhere to state and federal requirements can have severe consequences for both physician and nonphysician practitioners. Training manuals that include a chapter on drug management will not allow disciplinary powers in themselves, but will put the problems in proper perspective for athletic trainers. PMID:9598847

  9. E-Learning Initiatives for Teachers and Trainers in the Mediterranean Region: Comparative Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulon, Arnaud

    2009-01-01

    Teacher and trainer training is one of the most important determinants of the success of reforms in technical and vocational education and training (TVET) systems in recent years in the Mediterranean region. This is based upon the assumption that the role of teachers and trainers in the reform of TVET is a dual one; that of stakeholder and…

  10. The Certified Athletic Trainer: Is Your School System Missing a Key Player?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dan; Winterstein, Andrew P.

    An athletic trainer (ATC) who is certified by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) is an allied health professional with specific expertise in prevention, recognition, and care of injuries to athletes. Such individuals are college-degreed specialists in sports medicine who practice under the direction of a physician. ATCs perform six…

  11. The ECCO Logo Project: Materials for Classroom Teachers and Teacher Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempel, Michael; And Others

    In the fall of 1985, the Educational Computer Consortium of Ohio (ECCO) presented an extensive series of workshops on Logo. The workshops were divided into two categories: those for teacher-trainers and those for classroom teachers. This booklet presents materials developed by a core of five participants in the workshops for trainers using Logo…

  12. Certified Trainer Systems in the National Diffusion Network. A Guidebook for Educational Disseminators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Martha

    This guidebook describes procedures followed by National Diffusion Network (NDN) certified trainers when they are helping to disseminate information about the NDN or when they are helping school personnel adopt an NDN program or practice. It is noted that, because NDN certified trainers can help in information dissemination and program…

  13. An Investigation of Trainer Certification (Preparation) Programs in the Private Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, James A.

    As part of a larger 2-year study of the nature of excellent vocational educators who work in business and industry, this paper describes what has been learned from a number of case studies about trainer "certification" (preparation) programs in business and industry. More specifically, the paper describes the processes used to certify trainers and…

  14. Schools Are for All Kids. Part II: School Site Implementation. Trainer's Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roger, Blair; And Others

    This trainer's packet, designed to be used in conjunction with the participant's manual, was prepared for a 2-day workshop to restructure schools to embrace all children, including those with disabilities. The trainer's materials include: program objectives; masters for overhead transparencies; and descriptions of learning activities, including…

  15. 24 CFR 3286.313 - Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Expiration and renewal of trainer...-Administered States § 3286.313 Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification. (a) Expiration. Each notice of qualification issued or renewed under this subpart D will expire 5 years after the date of its issuance...

  16. 24 CFR 3286.313 - Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Expiration and renewal of trainer...-Administered States § 3286.313 Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification. (a) Expiration. Each notice of qualification issued or renewed under this subpart D will expire 5 years after the date of its issuance...

  17. 24 CFR 3286.313 - Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Expiration and renewal of trainer...-Administered States § 3286.313 Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification. (a) Expiration. Each notice of qualification issued or renewed under this subpart D will expire 5 years after the date of its issuance...

  18. 24 CFR 3286.313 - Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Expiration and renewal of trainer...-Administered States § 3286.313 Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification. (a) Expiration. Each notice of qualification issued or renewed under this subpart D will expire 5 years after the date of its issuance...

  19. Exposure of Athletic Trainers to Potentially Infectious Bodily Fluids in the High School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlemas, David A.; Jessee, K. Brian; Mulder, Diane K.; Rehberg, Robb S.

    1997-01-01

    Examined high school athletic trainers' exposure to potentially infectious bodily fluids. Data on number of potential exposures per game and practice, number of athletes removed from competition for bleeding, and number of times athletes changed uniforms indicated that trainers had significant chances of being exposed to potentially infectious…

  20. Rules of Engagement: The Joint Influence of Trainer Expressiveness and Trainee Experiential Learning Style on Engagement and Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangel, Bertha; Chung, Wonjoon; Harris, T. Brad; Carpenter, Nichelle C.; Chiaburu, Dan S.; Moore, Jenna L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the joint effect of trainer expressiveness and trainee experiential learning style on training transfer intentions. Extending prior research where trainer expressiveness has been established as a positive predictor of transfer, we show that trainer expressiveness is more impactful for trainees with high (vs. low) experiential…

  1. The Impact of Structured On-the-Job Training (S-OJT) on a Trainer's Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Daeyeon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the causal relationships between S-OJT trainer preparation, self-efficacy as a trainer, trainers' delivery of S-OJT, and organizational commitment as a consequence of employing S-OJT. This study proposed a theoretical model from the review of related literature and then empirically investigated the fitness…

  2. A trainer's role in effecting a cultural change

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, G.P.

    1991-11-01

    Teaching is a process used to bring about a change in a person or target group for the benefit of that individual, society, or the organization. The trainer's role in effecting a cultural change is not as a teacher of cultural behaviors but as a facilitator of cultural change. This paper will concentrate primarily on the analysis, solicitation of management support, and implementation phases of effecting a cultural change among a target group from the trainer's side of the process. The three major aspects of a cultural change program also will be discussed. They are: (1) gathering data, (2) soliciting management support, and (3) the implementation phase. Analysis tools such as direct observation measurement, informal and formal surveys will be discussed, and the uses of each will be demonstrated. The data gathered in the analysis phase will be used to identify cultural deficiencies in the group and to solicit management support for a cultural change. The design and development phases will be bypassed, and several methods of accomplishing the implementation phase will be highlighted.

  3. Sexual Harassment: A Concern for the Athletic Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez, Benito J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Sexual harassment is a vital social issue that affects the business community, educational institutions, and personnel in the U.S. military. Addressing sexual harassment in the athletic training clinical setting is an important issue for the athletic training professional. Athletic trainers need to understand the complex definitions of sexual harassment and how to identify and handle claims of sexual harassment in order to prevent sexual harassment from occurring and to prevent civil lawsuits of alleged sexual harassment. Background: Professional journals, legal textbooks, policy handbooks, unpublished findings from the NATA Women in Athletic Training Committee report, and current news media sources were used to gain a greater understanding of this social problem. Description: To make the athletic trainer aware of this important social issue and to offer suggestions for the athletic training staff to aid in preventing problems of sexual harassment. Clinical Advantages: This article provides definitions and examples of sexual harassment, discussion of policy development, and suggestions for ways to eliminate sexual harassment in the athletic training environment. PMID:16558507

  4. Engaging primary healthcare nurses in men's health education: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rizio, Taletha A; Thomas, Wendy J; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Collins, Veronica; Holden, Carol A

    2016-03-01

    Many countries have identified a need for targeted men's health promotion within primary health care as part of broader men's health policy. Primary health care nurses are well placed to deliver such services but may lack the requisite skills. The aim of this study was to pilot the delivery phase of an education program and evaluate a train-the-trainer approach for delivering men's health education to primary health care nurses. The 8-h train-the-trainer workshop was designed to equip nurses to deliver men's health education workshops to peers. Surveys of facilitators (n = 18) and peer workshop participants (n = 98) evaluated their level of confidence in men's health and knowledge and skills in men's health promotion. After completing the train-the-trainer workshop, most facilitators expressed confidence (92%), and all indicated sufficient knowledge and access to resources to deliver a peer workshop. All agreed that the module was sufficiently flexible to suit their local setting. Following the peer education workshop, facilitators and workshop participants reported high levels of confidence and knowledge in men's health promotion. This pilot evaluation suggests train-the-trainer is an effective model to deliver men's health education across a range of settings, with a flexible approach to raising awareness and improving the skills of primary health care nurses in men's health promotion. PMID:26803801

  5. Inexpensive home-made laparoscopic trainer and camera.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Morgan R; McLaren, Scott L

    2004-08-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is a well-established and important component of modern surgical practice across a range of surgical specialties. However, training in this modality is hampered by the nature of the equipment and its cost, and the difficulty of much of the surgery undertaken. Hence it can take some time for advanced and especially basic trainees to attain competency in laparoscopic techniques, and it remains difficult to practise or refine techniques. A solution to one half of this problem has been investigated by designing an inexpensive home-made laparoscopic camera and trainer system that can be assembled and used by one or more trainees either in a skills lab or at home. The components are readily available and the present system comprises a CMOS spy camera mounted on a rigid plastic tube that is used within a translucent plastic training box, obviating the need for an inbuilt light source. The costs were successfully constrained to under NZ$200. PMID:15315575

  6. Model flight tests of a spin-resistant trainer configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, Long P.; Ross, Holly M.; Robelen, David B.

    1992-01-01

    Powered, radio-controlled flight tests were conducted on a 1/4-scale model of a spin-resistant trainer configuration to determine the stall departure and spin resistance characteristics provided by an outboard wing leading-edge droop modification. The model was instrumented to provide quantitative as well as qualitative information on flight characteristics. Flight test results indicated that the unmodified configuration (wing leading-edge droop off) exhibited an abrupt, uncontrollable roll departure at the stall. With the outboard wing leading-edge droop installed, the modified configuration exhibited flight characteristics that were resistant to stall departure and spin entry. The stall departure and spin resistance characteristics of the modified configuration were demonstrated in flight maneuvers that included idle-power stalls, full-power stalls, sideslip stalls, and accelerated stalls.

  7. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Kersey, Robert D.; Elliot, Diane L.; Goldberg, Linn; Kanayama, Gen; Leone, James E.; Pavlovich, Mike; Pope, Harrison G.

    2012-01-01

    This NATA position statement was developed by the NATA Research & Education Foundation. Objective This manuscript summarizes the best available scholarly evidence related to anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) as a reference for health care professionals, including athletic trainers, educators, and interested others. Background Health care professionals associated with sports or exercise should understand and be prepared to educate others about AAS. These synthetic, testosterone-based derivatives are widely abused by athletes and nonathletes to gain athletic performance advantages, develop their physiques, and improve their body image. Although AAS can be ergogenic, their abuse may lead to numerous negative health effects. Recommendations Abusers of AAS often rely on questionable information sources. Sports medicine professionals can therefore serve an important role by providing accurate, reliable information. The recommendations provide health care professionals with a current and accurate synopsis of the AAS-related research. PMID:23068595

  8. Feedback Control for a Smart Wheelchair Trainer Based on the Kinect Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Aurelia McLaughlin

    This thesis describes a Microsoft Kinect-based feedback controller for a robot-assisted powered wheelchair trainer for children with a severe motor and/or cognitive disability. In one training mode, "computer gaming" mode, the wheelchair is allowed to rotate left and right while the children use a joystick to play video games shown on a screen in front of them. This enables them to learn the use of the joystick in a motivating environment, while experiencing the sensation and dynamics of turning in a safe setting. During initial pilot testing of the device, it was found that the wheelchair would creep forward while children were playing the games. This thesis presents a mathematical model of the wheelchair dynamics that explains the origin of the creep as a center of gravity offset from the wheel axis or a mismatch of the torques applied to the chair. Given these possible random perturbations, a feedback controller was developed to cancel these effects, correcting the system creep. The controller uses a Microsoft Kinect sensor to detect the distance to the screen displaying the computer game, as well as the left-right position (parallel parking concept) with respect to the screen, and then adjusts the wheel torque commands based on this measurement. We show through experimental testing that this controller effectively stops the creep. An added benefit of the feedback controller is that it approximates a washout filter, such as those used in aircraft simulators, to convey a more realistic sense of forward/backward motion during game play.

  9. Computer Based Training: Field Deployable Trainer and Shared Virtual Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, Terence J.

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut training has traditionally been conducted at specific sites with specialized facilities. Because of its size and nature the training equipment is generally not portable. Efforts are now under way to develop training tools that can be taken to remote locations, including into orbit. Two of these efforts are the Field Deployable Trainer and Shared Virtual Reality projects. Field Deployable Trainer NASA has used the recent shuttle mission by astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian space station, Mir, as an opportunity to develop and test a prototype of an on-orbit computer training system. A laptop computer with a customized user interface, a set of specially prepared CD's, and video tapes were taken to the Mir by Ms. Lucid. Based upon the feedback following the launch of the Lucid flight, our team prepared materials for the next Mir visitor. Astronaut John Blaha will fly on NASA/MIR Long Duration Mission 3, set to launch in mid September. He will take with him a customized hard disk drive and a package of compact disks containing training videos, references and maps. The FDT team continues to explore and develop new and innovative ways to conduct offsite astronaut training using personal computers. Shared Virtual Reality Training NASA's Space Flight Training Division has been investigating the use of virtual reality environments for astronaut training. Recent efforts have focused on activities requiring interaction by two or more people, called shared VR. Dr. Bowen Loftin, from the University of Houston, directs a virtual reality laboratory that conducts much of the NASA sponsored research. I worked on a project involving the development of a virtual environment that can be used to train astronauts and others to operate a science unit called a Biological Technology Facility (BTF). Facilities like this will be used to house and control microgravity experiments on the space station. It is hoped that astronauts and instructors will ultimately be able to share

  10. Robotics On-Board Trainer (ROBoT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Genevieve; Alexander, Greg

    2013-01-01

    ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that astronauts use for training on a frequent basis. This software consists of two primary software groups. The first series of components is responsible for displaying the graphical scenes. The remaining components are responsible for simulating the Mobile Servicing System (MSS), the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS), and the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Free Flyer Robotics Operations. The MSS simulation software includes: Robotic Workstation (RWS) simulation, a simulation of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), a simulation of the ISS Command and Control System (CCS), and a portion of the Portable Computer System (PCS) software necessary for MSS operations. These components all run under the CentOS4.5 Linux operating system. The JEMRMS simulation software includes real-time, HIL, dynamics, manipulator multi-body dynamics, and a moving object contact model with Tricks discrete time scheduling. The JEMRMS DST will be used as a functional proficiency and skills trainer for flight crews. The HTV Free Flyer Robotics Operations simulation software adds a functional simulation of HTV vehicle controllers, sensors, and data to the MSS simulation software. These components are intended to support HTV ISS visiting vehicle analysis and training. The scene generation software will use DOUG (Dynamic On-orbit Ubiquitous Graphics) to render the graphical scenes. DOUG runs on a laptop running the CentOS4.5 Linux operating system. DOUG is an Open GL-based 3D computer graphics rendering package. It uses pre-built three-dimensional models of on-orbit ISS and space shuttle systems elements, and provides realtime views of various station and shuttle configurations.

  11. Ground Training Devices in Job Sample Approach to UPT [Undergraduate Pilot Training] Selection and Screening. Final Report, September 1972-August 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMaster, W. Dean; Gray, Thomas H.

    The purpose of this study was to develop a screening procedure for undergraduate pilot training (UPT). This procedure was based upon the use of ground-based instrument trainers in which UPT candidates, naive to flying, were evaluated in their performance of job sample tasks; i.e., basic instrument flying. Training and testing sessions were…

  12. Christa McAuliffe during her training ride in the T-38 jet trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Payload specialist Sharon Christa McAuliffe egresses the rear station of a NASA T-38 jet trainer at Ellington Field near JSC, where the Teacher in Space participant is in training for the STS 51-L mission.

  13. Christa McAuliffe during her training ride in the T-38 jet trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Payload specialist Sharon Christa McAuliffe appears to be enjoying her ride during her training in the T-38 jet trainer. Part of Galveston Island and the Greater Houston Metropolitan area can be seen in the background.

  14. Astronaut Anna Fisher practices control of the RMS in a trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Anna Lee Fisher, mission specialist for 51-A, practices control of the remote manipulator system (RMS) at a special trainer at JSC. Dr. Fisher is pictured in the manipulator development facility (MDF) of JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory.

  15. Design of Human – Machine Interface and Altering of Pelvic Obliquity with RGR Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Pietrusinski, Maciej; Unluhisarcikli, Ozer; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Cajigas, Iahn; Bonato, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The Robotic Gait Rehabilitation (RGR) Trainer targets secondary gait deviations in stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. Using an impedance control strategy and a linear electromagnetic actuator, the device generates a force field to control pelvic obliquity through a Human-Machine Interface (i.e. a lower body exoskeleton). Herein we describe the design of the RGR Trainer Human-Machine Interface (HMI) and we demonstrate the system’s ability to alter the pattern of movement of the pelvis during gait in a healthy subject. Results are shown for experiments during which we induced hip-hiking – in healthy subjects. Our findings indicate that the RGR Trainer has the ability of affecting pelvic obliquity during gait. Furthermore, we provide preliminary evidence of short-term retention of the modified pelvic obliquity pattern induced by the RGR Trainer. PMID:22275693

  16. Training medical students in general practice: a qualitative study among general practitioner trainers in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Ramanayake, R. P. J. C.; De Silva, A. H. W.; Perera, D. P.; Sumanasekera, R. D. N.; Athukorala, L. A. C. L.; Fernando, K. A. T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Worldwide Family Medicine has gained an important place in the undergraduate medical curriculum over the last few decades and general practices have become training centers for students. Exposure to patients early in the disease process, out patient management of common problems, follow up of chronic diseases and psychosocial aspects of health and disease are educational advantages of community based training but such training could have varying impact on patients, students and trainers. This study explored the views of General Practitioner (GP) trainers on their experience in training students. Methodology: This qualitative study was conducted among GP trainers of the faculty of medicine, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka, to explore their experience on wide range of issues related to their role as GP trainers. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Themes expressed were identified. Results: Altruistic reasons, self-satisfaction, self-esteem and opportunity to improve their knowledge were the motivations for their involvement in teaching. Teachers were confident of their clinical and teaching skills. They perceived that patients were willing participants of the process and benefited from it. There was a positive impact on consultation dynamics. Time pressure was the major problem and ideal number of trainees per session was two. They were willing to attend teacher training workshops to update their knowledge. Conclusions: GP trainers driven by altruistic reasons were willing participants of student training process. The perceived advantages of involvement of teaching for trainers and patients were an encouragement for potential trainers. University should organize training sessions for trainers which will boost their knowledge, confidence and teaching skills which will eventually benefit students. PMID:25949960

  17. STS-47 Commander Gibson and Pilot Brown at CCT side hatch during JSC training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Spacelab Japan (SLJ) Commander Robert L. Gibson (right) and Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Jr, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), pose in front of the Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT) mockup side hatch during post landing emergency egress procedures held at JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE. Note that the crew escape system (CES) pole is in position at side hatch but is not extended.

  18. STS-38 Pilot Culbertson rolls through CCT side hatch during egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Pilot Frank L. Culbertson, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), rolls through the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Assisted by technicians, Culbertson practices emergency egress through the side hatch using the crew escape system (CES) pole which extends out the side hatch. The inflated safety cushion breaks Culbertson's fall as he rolls out of the side hatch.

  19. STS-56 Commander Cameron and Pilot Oswald at CCT hatch during JSC training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron (right) and Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), stand at the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup, prior to entering the mockup. Once inside the CCT, they will don their launch and entry helmets (LEHs) and participate in emergency egress (bailout) procedures. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  20. STS-50 Columbia, OV-102, Pilot Bowersox uses sky-genie during egress exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-50 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Pilot Kenneth D. Bowersox participates in post landing emergency egress training in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE. Bowersox, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), exited the Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup, through an overhead window and now lowers himself to the ground using the sky-genie device. Technicians look on from below.

  1. Pilot performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, Jennifer

    1988-01-01

    For many years, the emphasis has been placed on the performance of the aircraft, rather than on those who fly the aircraft. This is largely due to the relative safety of flying. Just in the last few years there have been several major accidents that have shown that flying is not quite as safe as it was thought to be. Sixty-five percent of these accidents are a result of pilot performance decrements, and so it is obvious that there is a need to reduce that figure. A study has been mandated to evaluate the performance of pilots. This includes workload, circadium rhythms, jet lag, and any other factors which might affect a pilot's performance in the cockpit. The purpose of this study is to find out when and why the decrement in a pilot's performance occur and how to remedy the situation.

  2. Athletic Trainers' Beliefs Toward Working With Special Olympics Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Conatser, Phillip; Naugle, Keith; Tillman, Mark; Stopka, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Context: Certified athletic trainers (ATs) are often the first health care providers to treat injured athletes. However, few researchers have studied ATs' beliefs concerning working with Special Olympics athletes. Objectives: To examine ATs' beliefs toward working with Special Olympics athletes by using the theory of planned behavior model and to examine the influence of moderator variables. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Athletic Trainers' Beliefs Toward Special Olympics Athletes survey instruments were mailed to 147 directors of Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs–accredited athletic training education programs (ATEPDs) in 43 states and 120 cities. Patients or Other Participants: One hundred twenty ATEPDs (44 women, 76 men). Main Outcome Measure(s): We used stepwise multiple regression analysis to determine whether attitude toward the behavior, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control predicted intention and to determine which moderator variables predicted attitude toward the behavior, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control. Pearson product moment correlations were used to determine ATEPDs' beliefs about how competent they felt working with Special Olympics athletes and whether they were currently working with these athletes. Results: We found that subjective norm, attitude toward the behavior, and perceived behavioral control predicted intention (R  =  0.697, R2  =  0.486, F3,112  =  35.3, P < .001) and that intention predicted ATEPDs' actual behaviors (R  =  0.503, R2  =  0.253, F1,118  =  39.995, P < .001). Moderator variables that predicted attitude toward the behavior included more years of experience working with Special Olympics athletes, completion of 1 or more courses in adapted physical activity, ATEPDs' competence, completion of 1 or more special education courses, and sex (R  =  0.589, R2  =  0.347, F5,111  =  11.780, P < .001). Moderator variables that

  3. Learning About Cockpit Automation: From Piston Trainer to Jet Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casner, Stephen M.

    2003-01-01

    Two experiments explored the idea of providing cockpit automation training to airline-bound student pilots using cockpit automation equipment commonly found in small training airplanes. In a first experiment, pilots mastered a set of tasks and maneuvers using a GPS navigation computer, autopilot, and flight director system installed in a small training airplane Students were then tested on their ability to complete a similar set of tasks using the cockpit automation system found in a popular jet transport aircraft. Pilot were able to successfully complete 77% of all tasks in the jet transport on their first attempt. An analysis of a control group suggests that the pilot's success was attributable to the application of automation principles they had learned in the small airplane. A second experiment looked at two different ways of delivering small-aeroplane cockpit automation training: a self-study method, and a dual instruction method. The results showed a slight advantage for the self-study method. Overall, the results of the two studies cast a strong vote for the incorporation of cockpit automation training in curricula designed for pilot who will later transition to the jet fleet.

  4. An expert system for a distributed real-time trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purinton, Steven C.; Wang, Caroline K.

    1988-01-01

    The problem addressed by this expert system concerns the expansion of capability of a Real Time Trainer for the Spacelab flight crew. As requirements for more models or fidelity are placed upon the system, expansion is necessary. The simulator can be expanded using a larger processor or by going to a distributed system and expand by adding additional processors. The distributed system is preferable because it is more economical and can be expanded in a more incremental manner. An expert system was developed to evaluate modeling and timing capability within a real time training simulator. The expert system is based upon a distributed configuration. Components of the modeled system are control tasks, network tasks, emulator tasks, processors, displays, and a network. The distributed module expert system (DMES) allows the configuring of processors, tasks, display use, keyboard use, and selection of alternate methods to update the data buffer. Modules can be defined with execution occurring in a specific processor on a network. The system consists of a knowledge front end editor to interactively generate or update the knowledge base, an inference engine, a display module, and a recording module.

  5. Prototype part task trainer: A remote manipulator system simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, David

    1989-01-01

    The Part Task Trainer program (PTT) is a kinematic simulation of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) for the orbiter. The purpose of the PTT is to supply a low cost man-in-the-loop simulator, allowing the student to learn operational procedures which then can be used in the more expensive full scale simulators. PTT will allow the crew members to work on their arm operation skills without the need for other people running the simulation. The controlling algorithms for the arm were coded out of the Functional Subsystem Requirements Document to ensure realistic operation of the simulation. Relying on the hardware of the workstation to provide fast refresh rates for full shaded images allows the simulation to be run on small low cost stand alone work stations, removing the need to be tied into a multi-million dollar computer for the simulation. PTT will allow the student to make errors which in full scale mock up simulators might cause failures or damage hardware. On the screen the user is shown a graphical representation of the RMS control panel in the aft cockpit of the orbiter, along with a main view window and up to six trunion and guide windows. The dials drawn on the panel may be turned to select the desired mode of operation. The inputs controlling the arm are read from a chair with a Translational Hand Controller (THC) and a Rotational Hand Controller (RHC) attached to it.

  6. Tutor-Trainers' Resource Handbook; Part A.--Reading Directors' Organizational Guidelines, Part B.--Tutor-Trainers' Guidelines, and Part C.--Teacher-Orientation Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Right to Read Program.

    The intent of this handbook is to provide guidelines for tutor-trainers, reading directors, and the community coordinators who need help in organizing programs for training reading tutors. The handbook is divided into three parts. "Reading Directors' Organizational Guidelines" is intended to give direction necessary to form the support group for…

  7. TRAINER Manual for Use with TRAINER: Computer Assisted Learning and Practice Modules. A Textual Representation, Section A: Dialog and Section B: ORBIT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruso, Elaine

    This self-instruction guide for online searching using DIALOG or ORBIT search systems, developed at the University of Pittsburgh, is designed to allow users of scientific and technical information to access databases without an intermediary. The guide is segmented into three parts: the basic TRAINER manual and separate textual representations of…

  8. STS-56 Commander Cameron and Pilot Oswald on CCT flight deck in JSC's MAIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron, (left) and Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs) and launch and entry helmets (LEHs), are seated on the forward flight deck of the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup. Cameron mans the commander station controls and Oswald the pilots station controls during an emergency egress (bailout) simulation. The view was taken from the aft flight deck looking forward and includes Cameron's and Oswald's profiles and the forward flight deck controls and checklists. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  9. Understanding Group and Leader (UGL) trainers' personality characteristics and affective profiles

    PubMed Central

    Rapp Ricciardi, Max; Åkerman, Jeanette; Eerikäinen, Peter; Ambjörnsson, Annika; Andersson Arntén, Ann-Christine; Mihailovic, Marko; Archer, Trevor; Garcia, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Understanding Group and Leader (UGL), provided by the Swedish National Defense College and mentored by UGL-trainers, is one of the most popular management programs among civilians in Sweden. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding the training. We used the affective profile model (i.e., the combination of positive, PA, and negative affect, NA) to mapp important markers of empowerment, self-awareness, adaptive coping skills, and maturity among the UGL-trainers. The aims were: (1) to compare profiles between UGL-trainers and managers/supervisors and (2) to investigate differences in personal characteristics. Method: UGL-trainers (N = 153) and the comparison group (104 Swedish Chiefs of Police) completed an online survey on optimism, self-esteem, locus of control, and affect. The four profiles are: self-fulfilling (high PA, low NA), high affective (high PA, high NA), low affective (high PA, low NA), and self-destructive (low PA, high NA). Results: The self-fulfilling profile was more common among UGL-trainers (25.70%) than among Chiefs of Police (19.20%). UGL-trainers, compared to Chiefs of Police, were more likely to express a self-fulling than a low affective profile (OR = 2.22, p < 0.05) and a high affective than a low affective profile (OR = 1.43, p < 0.001). UGL-trainers with a self-fulfilling profile, compared to those with a self-destructive profile, scored higher in optimism, higher in self-esteem, and lower in external locus of control. Conclusions: The probability of self-fulfillment rather than low affectivity was higher among UGL-trainers. Self-fulfillment was associated to markers of self-awareness and adaptive coping skills. However, the most common profile was the low affective, which is associated to low performance during stress, low degree of personal development, low degree of purpose in life, and low resilience. Hence, it might be important for UGL-trainers to have a continuous training in awareness after

  10. Adaptive hybrid brain-computer interaction: ask a trainer for assistance!

    PubMed

    Müller-Putz, Gernot R; Steyrl, David; Faller, Josef

    2014-01-01

    In applying mental imagery brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) to end users, training is a key part for novice users to get control. In general learning situations, it is an established concept that a trainer assists a trainee to improve his/her aptitude in certain skills. In this work, we want to evaluate whether we can apply this concept in the context of event-related desynchronization (ERD) based, adaptive, hybrid BCIs. Hence, in a first session we merged the features of a high aptitude BCI user, a trainer, and a novice user, the trainee, in a closed-loop BCI feedback task and automatically adapted the classifier over time. In a second session the trainees operated the system unassisted. Twelve healthy participants ran through this protocol. Along with the trainer, the trainees achieved a very high overall peak accuracy of 95.3 %. In the second session, where users operated the BCI unassisted, they still achieved a high overall peak accuracy of 83.6%. Ten of twelve first time BCI users successfully achieved significantly better than chance accuracy. Concluding, we can say that this trainer-trainee approach is very promising. Future research should investigate, whether this approach is superior to conventional training approaches. This trainer-trainee concept could have potential for future application of BCIs to end users. PMID:25570252

  11. GP trainers and trainees - trait and gender differences in personality: implications for GP training.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Megan; MacLeod, Sheona; Kedziora, Marta; Main, Paul

    2016-05-01

    This study looked at differences between established GP trainers and current GP trainees in relation to personality traits. Personality differences are particularly important for training in the UK context where the attributes of successful GPs may be evolving as the context changes, and where there is a unique one-to-one relationship between trainer and trainee. GP trainers and trainees attending educational events were invited to participate in this study by completing the NEO-PI-R, a personality measure. Correlation and multiple regression analysis demonstrated differences between these groups; some in line with expected differences relating to age and gender. Others, such as lower reported levels of emotional resilience, may be particular to this trainee population. Overall the gender differences are significant given the trend towards the feminisation of the medical profession. Generational differences may also explain some behaviour and attitudinal differences which can aid trainers' understanding of training issues. The findings have important implications for training, particularly in relation to the development of emotional resilience for GP trainees, and for recruitment. Further research correlating educational outcomes and perceived satisfaction with a GP career and GP training would indicate if trainer/trainee personality differences have a direct bearing on educational outcomes and future practice. PMID:27059247

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Management of Asthma in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael G; Weiler, John M; Baker, Robert; Collins, James; D'Alonzo, Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To present guidelines for the recognition, prophylaxis, and management of asthma that lead to improvement in the quality of care certified athletic trainers and other heath care providers can offer to athletes with asthma, especially exercise-induced asthma. Background: Many athletes have difficulty breathing during or after athletic events and practices. Although a wide variety of conditions can predispose an athlete to breathing difficulties, the most common cause is undiagnosed or uncontrolled asthma. At least 15% to 25% of athletes may have signs and symptoms suggestive of asthma, including exercise-induced asthma. Athletic trainers are in a unique position to recognize breathing difficulties caused by undiagnosed or uncontrolled asthma, particularly when asthma follows exercise. Once the diagnosis of asthma is made, the athletic trainer should play a pivotal role in supervising therapies to prevent and control asthma symptoms. It is also important for the athletic trainer to recognize when asthma is not the underlying cause for respiratory difficulties, so that the athlete can be evaluated and treated properly. Recommendations: The recommendations contained in this position statement describe a structured approach for the diagnosis and management of asthma in an exercising population. Athletic trainers should be educated to recognize asthma symptoms in order to identify patients who might benefit from better management and should understand the management of asthma, especially exercise-induced asthma, to participate as active members of the asthma care team. PMID:16284647

  13. The Professional Socialization of the Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Eason, Christianne M.; Clines, Stephanie; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The graduate assistant athletic trainer (AT) position often serves as one's first experience working independently as an AT and is also an important aspect of the professional socialization process. The socialization experiences of graduate assistant ATs have yet to be fully explored. Objective: To understand the socialization process for graduate assistant ATs during their graduate experience. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: We conducted phone interviews with all participants. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 25 graduate assistant ATs (20 women, 5 men) studying in 1 of 3 academic tracks: (1) accredited postprofessional athletic training program (n = 8), (2) postprofessional athletic training program (n = 11), or (3) a nonathletic training degree program (n = 6). The average age was 25 ± 5 years, and the median age was 24 years. Participants were certified by the Board of Certification for an average of 2 ± 0.4 years. Data Collection and Analysis: We analyzed the data using a general inductive approach. Peer review, field notes, and intercoder reliability established trustworthiness. Data saturation guided participant recruitment. Results: The ability to gain clinical independence as a practitioner was an important socialization process. Having the chance to develop a relationship with a mentor, who provided support, guidance, and more of a hierarchical relationship, was an important socializing agent for the graduate assistant AT. Participants used the orientation session as a means to understand the expectations and role of the graduate-assistant position. Academic coursework was a way to achieve better inductance into the role via the opportunity to apply classroom skills during their clinical practice. Conclusions: Socializing the graduate assistant blends formal and informal processes. Transition to practice is a critical aspect of the profession; thus, supporting autonomous practice with directed mentoring can promote professional

  14. Long-lasting virtual motorcycle-riding trainer effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Vidotto, Giulio; Tagliabue, Mariaelena; Tira, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to test the long-lasting effects of learning acquired with a virtual motorcycle-riding trainer as a tool to improve hazard perception. During the simulation, the rider can interact with other road actors and experience the most common potential accident situations in order to learn to modify his or her behavior to anticipate hazards and avoid crashes. We compared performance to the riding simulator of the two groups of participants: the experimental group, which was trained with the same simulator one year prior, and the control group that had not received any type of training with a riding or driving simulator. All of the participants had ridden a moped in the previous 12 months. The experimental group showed greater abilities to avoid accidents and recognize hazards in comparison to their performance observed a year before, whereas the performance of the control group was similar to that of the experimental group 1 year before in the first two sessions, and even better in the third. We interpreted this latter result as a consequence of their prior on-road experience. Also, the fact that the performance of the experimental group at the beginning of the follow-up is better than that recorded at the end of the training—1 year before—is in line with the idea of a transfer from the on-road experience to the simulator. The present data confirm our main expectation that the effectiveness of the riding training simulator on the ability to cope with potentially dangerous situations persists over time and provides additional evidence in favor of the idea that simulators may be considered useful tools for training the ability to detect and react to hazards, leading to an improvement of this higher-order cognitive skill that persists over time. Implications for the reciprocal influence of the training with the simulator and the on-the road experience are discussed as well. PMID:26579036

  15. Athletic Trainers' Facilitators of Professional Commitment in the Collegiate Setting

    PubMed Central

    Eason, Christianne M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Professional responsibility, rewards and respect, and time for rejuvenation are factors supporting professional commitment for athletic trainers (ATs) in the high school setting. The inherent complexities of an occupational setting can mitigate perceptions of professional commitment. Thus far, evidence is lacking regarding professional commitment for ATs in other occupational settings. Objective: To extend the literature on professional commitment of the AT to the collegiate setting. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Collegiate. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-three Board of Certification-certified ATs employed in the collegiate setting (National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I = 11, Division II = 9, Division III = 13) with an average of 10 ± 8 years of clinical experience volunteered. Data saturation guided the total number of participants. Data Collection and Analysis: Online journaling via QuestionPro was used to collect data from all participants. Two strategies, multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review, were completed to satisfy data credibility. Data were evaluated using a general inductive approach. Results: Likert-scale data revealed no differences regarding levels of professional commitment across divisions. Two themes emerged from the inductive-content analysis: (1) professional responsibility and (2) coworker support. The emergent theme of professional responsibility contained 4 subthemes: (1) dedication to advancing the athletic training profession, (2) ardor for job responsibilities, (3) dedication to the student-athlete, and (4) commitment to education. Our participants were able to better maintain their own professional commitment when they felt their coworkers were also committed to the profession. Conclusions: The collegiate ATs investigated in this study, regardless of division, demonstrated professional commitment propelled by their aspiration to advance the profession, as well as their dedication to student

  16. A Simulation Trainer for Complex Articular Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yehyawi, Tameem M.; Thomas, Thaddeus P.; Ohrt, Gary T.; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Karam, Matthew D.; Brown, Thomas D.; Anderson, Donald D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purposes of this study were (1) to develop a physical model to improve articular fracture reduction skills, (2) to develop objective assessment methods to evaluate these skills, and (3) to assess the construct validity of the simulation. Methods: A surgical simulation was staged utilizing surrogate tibial plafond fractures. Multiple three-segment radio-opacified polyurethane foam fracture models were produced from the same mold, ensuring uniform surgical complexity between trials. Using fluoroscopic guidance, five senior and seven junior orthopaedic residents reduced the fracture through a limited anterior window. The residents were assessed on the basis of time to completion, hand movements (tracked with use of a motion capture system), and quality of the obtained reduction. Results: All but three of the residents successfully reduced and fixed the fracture fragments (one senior resident and two junior residents completed the reduction but were unsuccessful in fixating all fragments). Senior residents had an average time to completion of 13.43 minutes, an average gross articular step-off of 3.00 mm, discrete hand motions of 540 actions, and a cumulative hand motion distance of 79 m. Junior residents had an average time to completion of 14.75 minutes, an average gross articular step-off of 3.09 mm, discrete hand motions of 511 actions, and a cumulative hand motion distance of 390 m. Conclusions: The large difference in cumulative hand motion distance, despite comparable numbers of discrete hand motion events, indicates that senior residents were more precise in their hand motions. The present experiment establishes the basic construct validity of the simulation trainer. Further studies are required to demonstrate that this laboratory-based model for articular fracture reduction training, along with an objective assessment of performance, can be used to improve resident surgical skills. PMID:23824397

  17. Which person is my trainer? Spontaneous visual discrimination of human individuals by bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Masaki; Uwano, Yuka; Ogura, Sato; Chin, Hyangsun; Dozaki, Masahiro; Saito, Toyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Bottlenose dolphins are known to use signature whistles to identify conspecifics auditorily. However, the way in which they recognize individuals visually is less well known. We investigated their visual recognition of familiar human individuals under the spontaneous discrimination task. In each trial, the main trainer appeared from behind a panel. In test trials, two persons (one was the main trainer) appeared from the left and right sides of the panel and moved along the poolside in opposite directions. Three of the four dolphins spontaneously followed their main trainers significantly above the level of chance. Subsequent tests, however, revealed that when the two persons wore identical clothing, the following response deteriorated. This suggests that dolphins can spontaneously discriminate human individuals using visual cues, but they do not utilize facial cues, but body area for this discrimination. PMID:26191479

  18. Reliability of Entry-Level Athletic Trainers' Palpation Skills of Bony Anatomical Landmarks in the Lumbopelvic Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Sarah M.; Jacobs, Michelle M.; Gorgos, Kara S.; Wasylyk, Nicole T.; Hanrahan, Sean; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Accuracy of locating various lumbopelvic landmarks for novice athletic trainers has not been examined. Objective: To examine reliability of novice athletic trainers for identification of the L4 spinous process and right and left posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS). Design: Cross-sectional reliability. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or…

  19. Trainers and Learners Constructing a Community of Practice: Masculine Work Cultures and Learning Safety in the Mining Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Margaret; Abrahamsson, Lena

    2003-01-01

    Interviews and observations involving 20 coal miners and 7 trainers found the group constructed a community of practice that reinforced the culture of masculinity. Miners learned safety measures through experience and from coworkers. Trainers viewed their work as simulated environments and codified practices, which implicitly devalue experiential…

  20. The Understandings about Learners and Learning that Are Imparted in Certificate IV Level Courses for VET Teachers and Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Michele; Smith, Erica

    2008-01-01

    Much of the literature on Vocational Education and Training (VET) professional development for teachers and trainers in Australia has been descriptive, outlining the development, construction and outcomes of a range of initiatives or analysing the nature and extend of initial and on-going professional development for teacher sand trainers. There…

  1. Effect of Certified Personal Trainer Services on Stage of Exercise Behavior and Exercise Mediators in Female College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Donald V.; Bryant, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the effect of certified personal trainer services on exercise behavior by using the transtheoretical model of behavioral change. Participants: Female college students (n = 449) completed surveys during the first week (T1) and last week (T2) of the fall semester. Methods: Students receiving personal trainer services…

  2. 77 FR 44685 - ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Shrack, Young...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Workers From Shrack, Young, and Associates, Inc., and Project Control Associates, Trainer, PA; Notice of... subject worker group includes on-site leased workers from Shrack, Young, and Associates, Inc. and Project...Phillips Company, Trainer Refinery, including on-site leased workers from Shrack, Young, and...

  3. Teacher and Trainer Training. Workshop on Curriculum Innovation (3rd, Budapest, Hungary, October 14-16, 1998). Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Training Foundation, Turin (Italy).

    This report contains 12 papers about and from a 3-day teacher and trainer training workshop that was attended by 37 individuals representing 12 European Union partner countries and 7 member states. The following papers are included: "For a Modern Organisation of Training Institutions and a Corresponding Professionalism of Teachers and Trainers"…

  4. Communicating Leave No Trace ethics and practices: Efficacy of two-day trainer courses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, M.L.; Marion, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Heavy recreational visitation within protected natural areas has resulted in many ecological impacts. Many of these impacts may be avoided or minimized through adoption of low-impact hiking and camping practices. Although ?No Trace? messages have been promoted in public lands since the 1970s, few studies have documented the reception and effectiveness of these messages. The U.S. Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics develops and promotes two-day Trainer courses that teach Leave No Trace (LNT) skills and ethics to outdoor professionals, groups, and interested individuals. This study examined the change in knowledge, ethics, and behavior of LNT Trainer course participants. The respondents were a convenience sample of participants in Trainer courses offered from April through August 2003. Trainer course instructors administered pre-course and post-course questionnaires to their participants, and we contacted participants individually with a followup questionnaire 4 months after completion of their course. Scores for each of the sections increased immediately following the course, and decreased slightly over the 4 months following the course. Overall, more than half of the knowledge and behavior items, and half of the ethics items, showed significant improvement from pre-course measures to the follow-up. Age, reported LNT experience, and backpacking experience affected the participants? pre-course knowledge and behavior scores. Younger, less experienced respondents also showed a greater improvement in behavior following the course. Trainer course participants also shared their LNT skills and ethics with others both formally and informally. In summary, the LNT Trainer course was successful in increasing participants? knowledge, ethics, and behavior, which they then shared with others. Since many low impact skills taught in the LNT curriculum are supported by scientific research, LNT educational programs have the potential to effectively minimize the environmental

  5. The Pilot Training Study: Advanced Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, P. J.

    An overview is presented of advanced pilot training and of the formal advanced pilot training program that constitutes the primary means of providing this training. Section I deals with the various phases of advanced pilot training that a pilot may encounter during his career; Section II deals with the types of aircraft that require some form of…

  6. Enhancing Classroom Participation of Rural Trainee Teachers of English through Use of Action Research: A Reflecton from a Chinese Teacher Trainer's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ping, Wang

    2015-01-01

    A common problem for Chinese teacher trainers is coping with a passive class with silent trainee learners, when trainees tend to be unresponsive and avoid interactions with the trainer. This is especially true when a trainer seeks interactions in the process of training, such as asking questions to the class as a whole or expecting at least one…

  7. Evaluation of the THRESHOLD trainer for inspiratory muscle endurance training: comparison with the weighted plunger method.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P H; Cowley, A J; Kinnear, W J

    1996-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to enhance exercise performance. The weighted plunger (WP) system of inspiratory threshold loading is the most commonly used method of IMT, but is expensive and cumbersome. We have evaluated a commercially available portable spring-loaded IMT device, the THRESHOLD trainer. The WP and THRESHOLD trainer devices were evaluated with their opening pressures set, in random order, at 10, 20, 30 and 40 cmH2O. Using an airpump, pressure at the valve inlet was recorded at the point at which the valve opened, and at airflow rates of 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 L.min-1. Ten THRESHOLD trainers were then compared using the same opening pressures and airflow rates. Finally, 10 patients with stable chronic heart failure (CHF) inspired, in random order, through the WP and THRESHOLD trainer for 4 min each. The pressure-time product (PTP) was calculated for each 4 min period, to compare the work performed on inspiring through each device. The mean measured opening pressures for the WP set at 10, 20, 30 and 40 cmH2O, were 9.0, 19.3, 27.9 and 39.2 cmH2O, respectively, and there was little change over the range of flow tested. Corresponding values for the THRESHOLD trainer were 7.5, 16.9, 26.2 and 39.1 cmH2O, with the pressure being closer to the set pressure as flow increased to that seen in clinical practice. The 10 different trainers tested performed very similarly to one another. Work performed (as measured by PTP) on inspiring through the WP and THRESHOLD trainer was not significantly different. Although less accurate than the weighted plunger, the THRESHOLD trainer is an inexpensive device of consistent quality. In a clinical setting it would be a satisfactory option for inspiratory muscle training in most patients, but less so in patients with very low inspiratory flow rates. PMID:8980985

  8. STS-108 Pilot Mark E. Kelly arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Pilot Mark E. Kelly arrives at KSC KSC-01PD-1706 KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-108 Pilot Mark E. Kelly arrives at KSC in a T-38 jet trainer. He and the rest of the crew will be preparing for launch Nov. 29 on Space Shuttle Endeavour. Liftoff is scheduled for 7:41 p.m. EST. Top priorities for the STS-108 (UF-1) mission of Endeavour are rotation of the International Space Station Expedition Three and Expedition Four crews, bringing water, equipment and supplies to the station in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, and completion of spacewalk and robotics tasks. Mission Specialists Linda A. Godwin and Daniel M. Tani will take part in the spacewalk to install thermal blankets over two pieces of equipment at the bases of the Space Station's solar wings. Dominic L. Gorie is the commander on the mission.

  9. Life-Stress Sources and Symptoms of Collegiate Student Athletic Trainers Over the Course of an Academic Year

    PubMed Central

    Etzel, Edward F.; Lantz, Christopher D.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of life-stress sources that student athletic trainers encountered over the course of an academic year, to investigate the existence of sex differences in stress source symptoms, and to provide athletic training staffs with suggestions on ways to assist student athletic trainers. Design and Setting: In a classroom setting, the 25-item Quick Stress Questionnaire (QSQ) was administered to all subjects at the beginning of each month during an academic year. The QSQ, which can be completed in approximately 5 minutes, uses a 9-point Likert scale ranging from 1 (little stress) to 9 (extreme stress) to measure sources of stress and stress-related symptoms. Subjects: The sample consisted of 11 male and 9 female student athletic trainers enrolled in a Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)-accredited undergraduate program at a mid-Atlantic university. Measurements: We computed descriptive statistics for the stress items and symptoms (ie, cognitive, somatic, and behavioral) and graphed them according to sex. Separate sex × time analyses of variance were performed to investigate changes in cognitive, somatic, and behavioral stress over the course of the study and to determine if these changes were different for male and female student athletic trainers. Results: Academic and financial concerns represented the greatest sources of stress for student athletic trainers. Repeated-measures analyses of variance indicated that stress levels fluctuated significantly during the academic year, with peak stress levels experienced during midterm and at the end of the spring semester. Although female student athletic trainers consistently reported higher levels of stress than their male counterparts, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Student athletic trainers exhibited fluctuations in their stress levels throughout an academic calendar. Academic and financial concerns were the most common

  10. Psychosocial Aspects of Athletic Injuries as Perceived by Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Damien; Granquist, Megan D.; Arvinen-Barrow, Monna M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Despite the Psychosocial Strategies and Referral content area, athletic trainers (ATs) generally lack confidence in their ability to use this information. Objective: The current study's primary purpose was to determine (a) perceived psychological responses and coping behaviors athletes may present to ATs, (b) psychosocial strategies ATs currently use with their athletes, (c) psychosocial strategies ATs deem important to learn more about, and (d) ATs' current practices in referring athletes to counseling or sport psychology services. Design:  Mixed-methods study. Setting: Online survey containing both quantitative and qualitative items. Patients or Other Participants:   A total of 215 ATs (86 male, 129 female), representing a response rate of 22.50%. Main Outcome Measure(s): The Athletic Training and Sport Psychology Questionnaire. Results: Stress/anxiety (4.24 ± 0.82), anger (3.70 ± 0.96), and treatment adherence problems (3.62 ± 0.94) were rated as the primary psychological responses athletes may present upon injury. Adherence and having a positive attitude were identified as key determinants in defining athletes' successful coping with their injuries. The top 3 selected psychosocial strategies were keeping the athlete involved with the team (4.57 ± 0.73), using short-term goals (4.45 ± 0.67), and creating variety in rehabilitation exercises (4.32 ± 0.75). The top 3 rated psychosocial strategies ATs deem important to learn more about were understanding motivation (4.29 ± 0.89), using effective communication (4.24 ± 0.91), and setting realistic goals (4.22 ± 0.97). Of the sample, only 59 (27.44%) ATs reported referring an athlete for counseling services, and 37 (84.09%) of those who had access to a sport psychologist (n = 44) reported referring for sport psychology services. Conclusions:  These results not only highlight ATs' current use of psychosocial strategies but also their desires to increase their current knowledge and understanding

  11. An investigation into the effectiveness of the "trainer of trainers" model for in-service science professional development programs for elementary teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, Ruth Ann

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the "Trainer of Trainers" model of professional development for elementary science teachers participating in the Mathematics and Science Education Cooperative (MSEC). In this professional development model, a core group of teachers (key and lead) received professional development sessions taught by science education professors. After the work sessions for the core group of teachers, training materials and equipment were distributed among the five elementary schools within the school district. Under the auspices of the "Trainer of Trainers" model, the core group of teachers were to share information, plan, and collaborate with their grade level team members. In the past, university team members of the MSEC program have been neither directly nor indirectly involved in the second phase of the program. The target population of this study included approximately 200 teachers in the MSEC program who taught grades kindergarten through six in five different elementary schools. The school district is located in an unincorporated area near a southwestern metroplex. The district has a predominately low-income population and a high percentage of minority students that represent a diversity of ethnicities. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in data collection. Focus groups, interviews, observations, and survey instruments were the primary sources of data collection. Triangulation methods were used to establish validity and verification of data. Analysis was an on-going process that included several levels of affinity groups, interrelationship diagrams, path diagrams, and system influence diagrams. Interviews and feedback surveys were also used to evaluate the problem under investigation. Teachers considered the state-mandated assessment test to have the largest impact on the school curriculum and to be the primary reason that teachers could not find time for science teaching. Furthermore, they

  12. Pilot Training Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooz, William E.

    The purpose of the Pilot Training Study is to produce tools with which to analyze the pilot training process of the Air Force in terms of the resources required to train pilots and the cost of pilot training. These tools allow examination of the training courses themselves, and also of the policy factors which drive the need for pilots. The tools…

  13. SR-71 Pilots and Crew (Smith, Meyer, Bohn-Meyer, Ishmael)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The two pilot-engineer teams that flew the SR-71 aircraft at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, are, from left, pilot Rogers Smith, flight engineers Robert Meyer and Marta Bohn-Meyer, and pilot Steven Ishmael. The Meyers are the first husband-wife team of aeronautical engineers at Dryden on flight status. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or

  14. SR-71 Pilots and Crew (Smith, Meyer, Bohn-Meyer, Ishmael)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The two pilot-engineer teams that flew the SR-71 aircraft at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, are, from top of ladder, pilot Rogers Smith, flight engineer Robert Meyer, pilot Steven Ishmael, and flight engineer Marta Bohn-Meyer. The Meyers are the first husband-wife team of aeronautical engineers at Dryden on flight status. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear

  15. Trainers Attitudes towards the Teaching of AIDS Education in a Kenyan Teachers' College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nzau, K. A.; Ondimu, K. A.; Gikuhi, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the teaching of AIDS education. The study was mainly concerned with the implementation of the AIDS education curriculum. In particular the study sought to investigate the attitudes held by trainers and trainees towards the subject and make suggestions to improve its teaching. The study was conducted in a…

  16. Working for Quality Child Care: Good Child Care Jobs Equals Good Care for Children. Trainer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellm, Dan; Haack, Peggy

    Noting that the education and training of most early childhood practitioners lack information on child care as an adult work environment, this guide is designed to assist trainers in providing practitioners information about working with the array of adults they encounter on the job, the serious challenges and instabilities in the field, and the…

  17. Exploring Intercultural Competence in Teacher Education: A Comparative Study between Science and Foreign Language Teacher Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akpinar, Kadriye Dilek; Ünaldi, Ihsan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the intercultural outcomes of short-term study visit programs for Foreign Language and Science teacher trainers. A mixed method including quantitative and qualitative data was used to compare the differences between the two groups' intercultural development in terms of their study field. Fantini's questionnaire…

  18. Implementing a K-12 Train the Trainer Professional Development Model through the School Improvement Grant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollnow, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Effective professional development has been shown to improve instruction and increase student academic achievement. The Train the Trainer professional development model is often chosen by the state Department of Education for its efficiency and cost effectiveness of delivering training to schools and districts widely distributed throughout the…

  19. Certified Athletic Trainers as Certified Teachers: A Model for Making It Happen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unruh, Nita; Unruh, Scott; Scantling, Ed

    2008-01-01

    School administrators don't usually consider hiring a certified athletic trainer for managing the medical issues that arise from students' participation in athletics, perhaps because they believe it would be too expensive to hire someone solely to manage injury and illness for just a portion of the students. Since it is important to provide…

  20. Trainer Talk in Post-Observation Feedback Sessions: An Exploration of Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engin, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Learning takes place in a particular social context and in interaction with others. One of the tools of mediation between the learner and the subject to be learned is talk. In a teacher training context, it is through the use of particular talk that trainers can guide and scaffold their trainees towards learning, and the basic premise is that…

  1. Competence-Based Analysis of Needs in VET Teachers and Trainers: An Italian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Riccardo; Tacconi, Giuseppe; Caputo, Beniamino

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the research presented here was to detect, in line with the European Union's "Education and Training 2020" work program, the training needs of teachers and trainers working in the vocational education and training (VET) system in the Italian Region of Veneto to design courses, experiences and other training programs…

  2. Equality in the Workplace. An Equal Opportunities Handbook for Trainers. Human Resource Management in Action Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Helen

    This workbook, which is intended as a practical guide for human resource managers, trainers, and others concerned with developing and implementing equal opportunities training programs in British workplaces, examines issues in and methods for equal opportunities training. The introduction gives an overview of current training trends and issues.…

  3. Certified Athletic Trainers in Secondary Schools: Report of the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyznicki, James M.; Riggs, Joseph A.; Champion, Hunter C.

    1999-01-01

    Identifies professional responsibilities, educational requirements, and current use of certified athletic trainers in prevention and care of high school sports injuries, using literature from the MEDLINE and Health STAR databases. Whereas most high school sports injuries are minor, adequately trained personnel should be present to ensure early…

  4. A Trainer's Manual of Guidelines for Establishing a Teacher-Made Materials Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spearman, Carolyn; And Others

    The trainer's manual provides guidelines for conducting a workshop to help regular educators with methods, techniques, and teacher made materials ideas for the special child in the regular classroom. Sections address preparation for the workshop, content description, and research implications for construction and use of instructional materials.…

  5. Efficacy of the "HealthMatters Program" Train-the-Trainer Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Beth; Sisirak, Jasmina; Chang, Yen-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study examines the efficacy of a staff-led, health promotion intervention entitled "HealthMatters Program: Train-the-Trainer" Model to improve health among adults with intellectual disabilities. While data support the benefits of health promotion for adults with intellectual disabilities in controlled settings, little…

  6. Helper Plus Trainer: A Two-Phase Program for the Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delworth, Ursula; Moore, Marv

    1974-01-01

    The authors present modes used to train both paraprofessionals and graduate students for a wide range of tasks within the helping process. With emphasis on the mastery of the behavior of systems entry, their training program combines the components of careful trainee selection, competence building, and trainer preparation. (LA)

  7. Research and development for Onboard Navigation (ONAV) ground based expert/trainer system: Test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1988-01-01

    The test results for the onboard navigation (ONAV) Ground Based Expert System Trainer System for an aircraft/space shuttle navigation entry phase system are described. A summary of the test methods and analysis results are included. Functional inspection and execution, interface tests, default data sources, function call returns, status light indicators, and user interface command acceptance are covered.

  8. Practising Mental Rotation Using Interactive Desktop Mental Rotation Trainer (iDeMRT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafi, Ahmad; Samsudin, Khairulanuar

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study involving 30 undergraduates (mean age = 20.5 years) in mental rotation (MR) training was conducted in an interactive Desktop Mental Rotation Trainer (iDeMRT). Stratified random sampling assigned students into one experimental group and one control group. The former trained in iDeMRT and the latter trained in conventional…

  9. Train the Trainer Effectiveness Trials of Behavioral Intervention for Individuals with Autism: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shire, Stephanie Yoshiko; Kasari, Connie

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review examines train the trainer (TTT) effectiveness trials of behavioral interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Published methodological quality scales were used to assess studies including participant description, research design, intervention, outcomes, and analysis. Twelve studies including 9 weak…

  10. A Statewide Train-the-Trainer Model for Effective Entrepreneurship and Workforce Readiness Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Nia Imani; Brown, Mananmi; Piechocinski, Alganesh; Wells, Kendra

    2012-01-01

    A statewide youth and adult train-the-trainer model that integrates workforce readiness and entrepreneurship can have a profound effect on young people's academic performance, interest in college, and overall youth development. Participants in workforce and entrepreneurship programs develop personal resources that have value in school, in the…

  11. Mobile Teacher Trainers for UPE: An Experiment Programme in Rural Bangladesh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dove, Linda A.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of teacher training is examined, specifically, the concept of mobile teacher trainers in Bangladesh. Discusses primary education in Bangladesh, primary school teachers, development of teacher training, Assistant Thana Education Officers (ATEOs), cluster training, teacher leaflets, and ATEOs as field officers and as mobile teacher…

  12. Injured Athletes' Perceived Loss of Identity: Educational Implications for Athletic Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockhart, Barbara D.

    2010-01-01

    Context: As educators, athletic trainers should familiarize athletes with the concepts of self acceptance self-esteem and identity to assuage psychological trauma accompanying injury because the more a person identifies with being an athlete, the more difficult it is to deal with athletic injury. Objective: The objective of this article is to…

  13. 24 CFR 3286.309 - Continuing education-trainers and curriculum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continuing education-trainers and curriculum. 3286.309 Section 3286.309 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN...

  14. Positive Approaches to Managing Troubled Students: A Mini-Course. Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Raymond M.

    The inservice teacher workshop trainer's manual includes an abstract of the minicourse, and lists activities, handouts, and assignments for sessions on improving classroom behavior and self concept. The document is divided into four sections, each focusing on a workshop session. Workshop sessions cover the use of contracts, reward programs, and…

  15. The Teacher Trainer: A Practical Journal for Those Who Train, Mentor and Educate TESOL Teachers, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    These three journal issues include the following articles: "Competence in Facilitation" (Graham O'Connel); "Is My Map to Scale?" (Mark Wilson); "A Trainer's Dozen" (Barbara Thornton and Mary Lou McCloskey); "Carrot Ice Cream: Reactions to the New or Different" (Tessa Woodward); "Feeding (back to) the Five Thousand" (Julietta Schoenmann);…

  16. Intelligent Conduct of Fire Trainer: Intelligent Technology Applied to Simulator-Based Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Denis; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes an intelligent tutoring system (ITS) that demonstrates how intelligent feedback can enhance conventional simulation-based training. An explanation is given of the Intelligent Conduct of Fire Trainer (INCOFT), which was designed to provide training exercises for soldiers operating the PATRIOT missile system, and its implications for…

  17. The Most Effective Way of Delivering a Train-the-Trainers Program: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Jennifer; Mann, Mala K.; Jones, Caryl; van Buschbach, Susanne; Olff, Miranda; Bisson, Jonathan I.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Previous literature has shown that multifaceted, interactive interventions may be the most effective way to train health and social care professionals. A Train-the-Trainer (TTT) model could incorporate all these components. We conducted a systematic review to determine the overall effectiveness and optimal delivery of TTT programs.…

  18. A Training Package for Implementing the IEP Process in Wyoming. Volume I. Trainers' Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Beverly; And Others

    Volume I of a four volume series presents a trainers' guide designed for administrators, assessment personnel, and others involved in the development and implementation of individualized education programs (IEPs) for handicapped children in Wyoming. The training content is divided into the following seven topics (with sample subtopics in…

  19. Role Orientation of Certified Athletic Trainers at Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumels, Kirk; Beach, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the role orientation hierarchy among teaching, research, service, and administrative responsibilities of certified athletic trainers (ATCs) employed at the collegiate level. Design and Setting: Four single response role orientation questions regarding their actual, ideal, promoted, and most appropriate role…

  20. Evaluation of a Train-the-Trainer Program for Tobacco Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Fenlon, Christine M.; Kroon, Lisa A.; Prokhorov,, Alexander V.; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To assess pharmacy faculty members' perceptions of the Rx for Change tobacco cessation program materials and train-the-trainer program. Methods Pharmacy faculty members attended a 14.5 hour train-the-trainer program conducted over 3 days. Posttraining survey instruments assessed participants' (n = 188) characteristics and factors hypothesized to be associated with program adoption. Results Prior to the training, 49.5% of the faculty members had received no formal training for treating tobacco use and dependence, and 46.3% had never taught students how to treat tobacco use and dependence. Participants' self-rated abilities to teach tobacco cessation increased posttraining (p < 0.001). The curriculum materials were viewed as either moderately (43.9%) or highly (54.0%) compatible for integration into existing curricula, and 68.3% reported they were “highly likely” to implement the program in the upcoming year. Conclusions Participation in a national train-the-trainer program significantly increased faculty members' perceived ability to teach tobacco-related content to pharmacy students, and the majority of participants indicated a high likelihood of adopting the Rx for Change program at their school. The train-the-trainer model appears to be a viable and promising strategy for promoting adoption of curricular innovations on a national scale. PMID:19503693

  1. Effects of Trainer Expressiveness, Seductive Details, and Trainee Goal Orientation on Training Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Annette

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on trainer expressiveness and trainee mastery orientation within the context of the seductive details effect. The seductive details effect refers to inclusion of "highly interesting and entertaining information that is only tangentially related to the topic" (Harp & Mayer, 1998, p. 1). One hundred thirty-two participants…

  2. Insect Identification Educational Volunteers Created in Train-the-Trainer Workshops in Oregon and Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corp, Mary K.; Rondon, Silivia I.; Van Vleet, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    The "train-the-trainer" model successfully created volunteer educators in insect identification. Intensive training programs prepared 71 individuals during 2 1/2-day (20 hour) training sessions. Trainees included university Extension faculty (13), agricultural professionals (13), and certified Master Gardeners (45). The sessions were…

  3. Astronaut Alan Bean looks over data acquisition camera on Skylab trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander for Skylab 3, the second manned Skylab mission, looks over the data acquisition camera mounted on the water tank in the upper level of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) one-G trainer at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC).

  4. Educational Preparation for the Clinic Job Setting: Clinical Athletic Trainers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Jim; Combs, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Context: Acquiring input from all stakeholders on the importance of existing competencies and suggestions for new ones is essential to competency-based pedagogical design quality. Objective: To survey athletic trainers (ATs) employed in clinical settings to assess their perceptions of the competencies most pertinent to their settings and whether…

  5. Training for Change. A Training Pack To Support Adults with Learning Disabilities To Become Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Adult Continuing Education, Leicester (England).

    This training package consists of a print training guide to accompany an audiotape and videotape. It is designed to support adults with learning disabilities in their efforts to become trainers. Adult learners who complete the training package as part of a further education college, adult education center, day center, or self-advocacy group…

  6. Model Curriculum And Trainer's Guide for Programs to Combat White-Collar Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karchmer, Clifford L.

    This model curriculum is addressed to the training needs of personnel working in general white-collar crime assignments located in state and local police or prosecutors' offices. It is designed intentionally to orient personnel to the requirements of building a case as it moves along the enforcement process. Materials on trainer use and…

  7. What Could an Equitable Instructional Design Achieve? An Experiment with Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudet, Jeanne d'Arc; Lapointe, Claire

    2002-01-01

    Interviews were conducted before and after 10 trainers attended workshops on using an educational equity guide for nontraditional training. Pretraining resistance to equity gave way to new awareness of issues and learner concerns and willingness to change practice. Training modified male and female participants' discourses in different ways.…

  8. Coping with Unemployment. I. The Trainers' Guide. II. The Participants' Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordus, Jeanne Prial

    This document contains both a trainers' guide and a participants' book for a one-day workshop on coping with unemployment. The workshop is planned to enable participants to withstand a period of joblessness with a minimum of personal stress. It includes information about specific unemployment-related problems, methods of stress management,…

  9. Employer Perceptions of the Academic Preparation of Entry-Level Certified Athletic Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massie, J. Brett; Strang, Adam J.; Ward, Rose Marie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine employers' (clinic based ATs) perceived satisfaction of the academic preparation of entry-level ATs, and to identify perceived inadequacies of the (ATEP) curriculum. Design and Setting: Athletic trainers employed in clinical setting completed an online survey instrument. Subjects: One-hundred-four ATs serving in the NATA…

  10. Women's Human Rights Education Trainers in Turkey: Situated Empowerment for Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibbitts, Felisa L.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents evidence of the links between human rights education and social change by analyzing the long-term effects on 88 trainers engaged in a non-formal adult training program sponsored by a women's human rights group in Turkey, Women for Women's Human Rights--New Ways. In this article, I show the transformative impacts of carrying…

  11. Crew trainer Viet Nguyen briefs Canadian astronaut Marc Garneau, mission specialist, on Remote

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Crew trainer Viet Nguyen briefs Canadian astronaut Marc Garneau, mission specialist, on Remote Manipulation System (RMS) procedures during a training session in the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). Garneau will be making his second flight in space when he joins five NASA astronauts for nine days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour next month.

  12. Trainer Perceptions of Culture, Race and Ethnicity on Facilitation of Training Programs: A Global Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesch, Mari Jo

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how trainers perceive and manage training programs with racially and ethnically diverse participants. Five themes emerged: global perspective, learning styles and culturally diverse participants, facilitation style, preparation for training with culturally diverse groups and, culturally sensitive training materials.…

  13. Treatment and Prevention of Acute Diarrhoea. Guidelines for the Trainers of Health Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This booklet, intended primarily for the trainers of middle-level community health workers in underdeveloped countries, is designed to help such workers present the topic of diarrhea treatment and prevention in training courses. Divided into five sections, the booklet gives guidelines on treatment and prevention, with particular emphasis on the…

  14. The design and fabrication of the Centaur neutral buoyancy trainer and related hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, Alan S.; Hollingsworth, Michael

    1986-01-01

    Two full scale mockups of the Centaur upper stage were designed, fabricated and delivered to NASA. One was the Centaur Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) trainer and the other was the Centaur 1-G mockup. The Centaur upper stage booster is designed to carry the spacecraft Galileo to Jupiter, and the spacecraft Ulysses to an orbit around the Sun after launch from the Space Shuttle. The flight vehicle has several Extravehicular Activity (EVA) contingency tasks that require crew training. This need for crew training generated the requirement for the Centaur WETF crew trainer, which is high fidelity in areas of expected crew interface. During the production of the Centaur WETF crew trainer, the need for a jumper cable from Centaur to the Orbiter was identified. This EVA contingency task would be the installation of a cable from the Orbiter cargo bay sill to various command data boxes on Centaur to allow crew control deployment should a failure occur. This task required the upgrading of volumetric boxes on the trainer to a high fidelity configuration including electrical connector installation and cable routing.

  15. Building a Sustainable Life Science Information Literacy Program Using the Train-the-Trainer Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Patricia; Newhouse, Renae; Perry, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    The train-the-trainer model has great potential for expanding information literacy programs without placing undue burden on already overextended librarians; it is surprisingly underused in academic libraries. At the University of Kentucky, we employed this model to create a new information literacy program in an introductory biology lab. We…

  16. Treating High School Sports Injuries--Are Coaches/Trainers Competent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, P. Joanne; Miller, Lori K.

    1991-01-01

    High school coaches and athletic trainers should know proper first aid techniques, have special knowledge about particular sports injuries, have a good understanding of safety precautions for playing equipment and skill techniques, and understand environmental factors that may affect athletes. (JD)

  17. Personal and Family Financial Planning. A Staff Development Workshop for Secondary School Trainers and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannister, Rosella; And Others

    This manual for teacher trainers and staff development specialists contains information and materials for an 18-hour personal and financial planning workshop for secondary teachers. Part A is a guide for workshop directors. It defines personal and family financial planning, provides background information on financial planning education, and…

  18. Effective Communication and Training. A Guide for Workplace Trainers in the Australian Coal Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukin, Annabelle

    This guide is designed to help workplace trainers in Australia's coal industry improve coal miners' operator and general communication skills through a curriculum that integrates training in language, literacy, and numeracy. The following topics are discussed in the guide's seven sections: the changing workplace (changing work environment;…

  19. Learning To Change. A Resource for Trainers, Managers and Learners Based on Self-Organised Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harri-Augstein, Sheila; Webb, Ian M.

    This publication shows step-by-step how trainers may use self-organized learning (SOL) to achieve real and lasting change within an organization at all levels. Each of the eight chapters begins with an "agenda board" outlining the contents and ends with a section featuring suggested activities for developing the skills. An introduction explores…

  20. Training primary health care workers about drugs: a national survey of UK trainers' perceptions towards training.

    PubMed

    Albery, I P; Heuston, J; Durand, M A; Groves, P; Gossop, M; Strang, J

    1996-12-01

    Reports have consistently shown that non-specialist drug workers (whose working role is not specifically concentrated on dealing with drug-related issues) are reluctant to work with drug users. A number of explanations have been offered to account for this unwillingness including attitudinal factors, occupational constraints and a lack of motivation to learn about drug-related issues. Previously, it has been shown that training affects commitment to working with substance misusers, although failure to attract particular professional groups (e.g. general practitioners) into training courses has also been reported. No previous research has examined the views of trainers about training primary health care and health-related workers. This study of a (non-probability) sample of UK drug trainers (n = 145) assessed training activity for different health care workers, and trainers' differential perceptions of training needs and methods. GPs were the group least likely to become trained about drug issues. Training in attitudes towards drug using individuals was perceived to be more important than either skills or knowledge training for GPs, practice nurses, other nurses and probation officers. Experiential training methods were perceived to be more important than a didactic approach for training all health groups except GPs for whom lecture type instruction was believed to be equally appropriate. Seventy-nine percent of subjects reported providing training across drugs in alcohol or drugs, alcohol and tobacco. Most trainers who stated that certain professions required independent training believed that GPs should be trained separately from other groups. PMID:16203392

  1. Athletic Trainers' Perceptions of the Importance, Preparation and Time Spent in the Athletic Training Content Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Context: Graduates of professional programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education are expected to be competent and proficient in the athletic training content areas. Objective: The unique skills and knowledge that an athletic trainer (AT) must possess may have more importance in one clinical setting than in…

  2. Evaluation of a Trainer for Sensor Operators on Gunship II Aircraft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cream, Bertram W.

    This report describes the design, development, and evaluation of a training device intended to enable ground-based practice of equipment operation and target-tracking skills that are required by the Forward-Looking Infrared (FLIR) and Low Light Level TV (LLLTV) sensor operators assigned to Gunship II aircraft. This trainer makes use of a…

  3. Infusing Multicultural and Social Justice Competencies within Counseling Practice: A Guide for Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheely-Moore, Angela I.; Kooyman, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    In light of the rapidly changing demographics of the United States, it is imperative for counselor educators and trainers of mental health professionals to infuse instructional strategies that promote multicultural and social justice (MSJ) competencies for trainees. The purpose of this article is to translate MSJ-based teaching strategies within…

  4. 24 CFR 3286.313 - Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expiration and renewal of trainer qualification. 3286.313 Section 3286.313 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  5. Emerging Issues in Special Education Tort Liability: Implications for Special Educators and Teacher Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAfee, James K.

    1987-01-01

    Critical issues in tort liability that confront special educators and teacher trainers include malpractice (failure to learn), misdiagnosis, immunity, impact of a handicap on standard of care, confidentiality, access to emergency medical services, the use of aversive consequences, child abuse and corporal punishment, and school violence.…

  6. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Evaluation of Dietary Supplements for Performance Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Jackie L; Franks, Rob; Ransone, Jack; Powers, Michael E; Laquale, Kathleen M; Carlson-Phillips, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To help athletic trainers promote a “food-first” philosophy to support health and performance, understand federal and sport governing body rules and regulations regarding dietary supplements and banned substances, and become familiar with reliable resources for evaluating the safety, purity, and efficacy of dietary supplements. Background The dietary supplement industry is poorly regulated and takes in billions of dollars per year. Uneducated athletes need to gain a better understanding of the safety, eligibility, and efficacy concerns associated with choosing to take dietary supplements. The athletic trainer is a valuable athletic team member who can help in the educational process. In many cases, athletic trainers are asked to help evaluate the legality, safety, and efficacy of dietary supplements. For this position statement, our mission is to provide the athletic trainer with the necessary resources for these tasks. Recommendations Proper nutrition and changes in the athlete's habitual diet should be considered first when improved performance is the goal. Athletes need to understand the level of regulation (or lack thereof) governing the dietary supplement industry at the international, federal, state, and individual sport-participation levels. Athletes should not assume a product is safe simply because it is marketed over the counter. All products athletes are considering using should be evaluated for purity (ie, truth in labeling), safety, and efficacy. PMID:23672334

  7. Developing a Competent Workforce. Adult Learning Strategies for Vocational Educators and Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonczi, Andrew, Ed.

    The intent of this document is to provide teachers in vocational education and trainers in industry, commerce and government with a greater understanding of the role of vocational education and training in the current context of economic and industrial change in Australia. Following an introduction, section 1 deals with the policy context of the…

  8. Preadaptation to the stimulus rearrangement of weightlessness: Preliminary studies and concepts for trainer designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Reschke, M. F.

    1988-01-01

    An effort to develop preflight adaptation training (PAT) apparatus and procedures to adapt astronauts to the stimulus rearrangement of weightless spaceflight is being pursued. Based on the otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation model of sensory adaptation to weightlessness, two prototype preflight adaptation trainers (PAT) have been developed. These trainers couple pitch movement of the subject with translation of the visual surround. Subjects were exposed to this stimulus rearrangement for periods of 30 m. The hypothesis is that exposure to the rearrangement would attenuate vertical eye movements was supported by two experiments using the Miami University Seesaw (MUS) PAT prototype. The Dynamic Environment Simulator (DES) prototype failed to support this hypothesis; this result is attributed to a pecularity of the DES apparatus. A final experiment demonstrated that changes in vertical eye movements were not a consequence of fixation on an external target during exposure to a control condition. Together these experiments support the view that preflight adaptation training can alter eye movements in a manner consistent with adaptation to weightlessness. Following these initial studies, concepts for development of operational preflight trainers were proposed. The trainers are intended to: demonstrate the stimulus rearrangement of weightlessness; allow astronauts to train in altered sensory environment; modify sensory motor reflexes; and reduce/eliminate space motion sickness symptoms.

  9. Training the Trainers of Tomorrow Today - driving excellence in medical education.

    PubMed

    Fellow-Smith, Elizabeth; Beveridge, Ed; Hogben, Katy; Wilson, Graeme; Lowe, John; Abraham, Rachel; Ingle, Digby; Bennett, Danielle; Hernandez, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Training the Trainers of Tomorrow Today (T4) is a new way to deliver "Training for Trainers". Responding to local dissatisfaction with existing arrangements, T4 builds on 3 essential requirements for a future shape of training: 1. Clinical Leadership and a Collaborative Approach 2. Cross-Specialty Design and Participation 3. Local Delivery and Governance Networks Design principles also included: 3 levels of training to reflect differing needs of clinical supervisors, educational supervisors and medical education leader, mapping to GMC requirements and the London Deanery's Professional Development Framework; alignment of service, educational theory and research; recognition of challenges in delivering and ensuring attendance in busy acute and mental health settings, and the development of a faculty network. The delivery plan took into account census of professional development uptake and GMC Trainee Surveys. Strong engagement and uptake from the 11 Trusts in NW London has been achieved, with powerful penetration into all specialties. Attendance has exceeded expectations. Against an initial 12 month target of 350 attendances, 693 were achieved in the first 8 months. Evaluation of content demonstrates modules are pitched appropriately to attendees needs, with positive feedback from trainers new to the role. Delivery style has attracted high ratings of satisfaction: 87% attendees rating delivery as "good\\excellent". External evaluation of impact demonstrated improved training experiences through changes in supervision, the learning environment and understanding of learning styles. We have addressed sustainability of the programme by advertising and recruiting Local Faculty Development Trainers. Volunteer consultants and higher trainees are trained to deliver the programme on a cascade model, supported by the Specialty Tutors, individual coaching and educational bursaries. The Trainers are local champions for excellence in training, provide a communication between the

  10. The current state of personal training: an industry perspective of personal trainers in a small Southeast community.

    PubMed

    Melton, Deana I; Katula, Jeffrey A; Mustian, Karen M

    2008-05-01

    Although research has identified a number of qualities and competencies necessary to be an effective exercise leader, the fitness industry itself is largely unregulated and lacks a unified governing body. As such, a plethora of personal trainer certifications exists with varying degrees of validity that fail to ensure qualified trainers and, therefore, protect the consumer. It is argued that the potential consequences of this lack of regulation are poor societal exercise adherence, potential injury to the client, and poor public perception of personal trainers. Additionally, it is not known whether personal trainers are meeting the needs of their clients or what criteria are used in the hiring of personal trainers. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the current state of personal training in a midsized Southeast city by using focus group methodology. Local personal trainers were recruited for the focus groups (n = 11), and the results from which were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for themes using inductive reasoning by the authors. Qualities and characteristics that identified by participants clustered around 4 main themes. Client selection rationale consisted of qualities that influenced a client's decision to hire a particular trainer (e.g., physique, gender, race). Client loyalty referred to the particular qualities involved in maintaining clients (e.g., motivation skills, empathy, social skills). Credentials referred to formal training (e.g., college education, certifications). Negative characteristics referred to qualities considered unethical or unprofessional (e.g., sexual comments, misuse of power) as well as the consequences of those behaviors (e.g., loss of clients, potential for litigation). These results are discussed regarding the implications concerning college programs, certification organizations, increasing public awareness of expectations of qualified trainers, and a move towards state licensure. PMID:18438226

  11. Pilot model hypothesis testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.; Berry, P. W.

    1982-01-01

    The aircraft control time history predicted by the optimal control pilot model and actual pilot tracking data obtained from NASA Langley's differential maneuvering simulator (DMS) are analyzed. The analysis is performed using a hypothesis testing scheme modified to allow for changes in the true hypothesis. A finite number of pilot models, each with different hypothesized internal model representations of the aircraft dynamics, are constructed. The hypothesis testing scheme determines the relative probability that each pilot model best matches the DMS data. By observing the changes in probabilities, it is possible to determine when the pilot changes control strategy and which hypothesized pilot model best represent's the pilot's control behavior.

  12. The Athletic Trainer's Role in Modifying Nutritional Behaviors of Adolescent Athletes: Putting Theory into Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hackman, Robert M.; Katra, Jane E.; Geertsen, Susan M.

    1992-01-01

    Nutritional practices influence athletic performance and recovery from injury. The athletic trainer is ideally positioned to effect dietary changes with adolescent athletes—a group at high-risk for nutritional imbalances. Research shows that young adults generally do not change dietary practices when given factual nutrition and health information. This article provides a variety of behavior change strategies, based on models derived from health education and health psychology, which are likely to influence dietary choices. Promoting self-efficacy by enhancing perception of choice and control, peer modeling, cooperative support networks, goal-setting techniques, and behavioral self-monitoring may provide the motivational framework necessary to enhance dietary compliance. Dietary behavior change techniques are a valuable part of an athletic trainer's resources. PMID:16558172

  13. [Microsurgical training in Germany - results of a survey among trainers and trainees].

    PubMed

    Kolbenschlag, J; Gehl, B; Daigeler, A; Kremer, T; Hirche, C; Vogt, P M; Horch, R; Lehnhardt, M; Kneser, U

    2014-08-01

    Reconstructive microsurgery is an essential part of plastic surgery. To live up to the high technical demands of today's sophisticated techniques, a structured microsurgical training is required. However, such curricula are rare in Germany. We therefore evaluated the concepts and requests of trainers as well as trainees regarding an optimal microsurgical training. We found that the demands of both sides to be fairly similar. How-ever, there were factors potentially hindering the implementation of such curricula, foremost the increasing economic pressure. Based on our findings, representatives of microsurgical trainers and trainees, together with national societies might be able to establish a national curriculum for microsurgical training. The clinical implementation of such a structured train-ing will require significant personal resources. However, this expenditure seems to be justified by the increasing complexity of techniques, the rising demand of patients and the limited time for -surgical training. PMID:25162241

  14. ASTP crewmen in Docking Module trainer during training session at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An interior view of the Docking Module trainer in bldg 35 during Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) joint crew training at JSC. Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, commander of the American ASTP prime crew, is on the right. The other crewman is Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov, commander of the Soviet ASTP prime crew. The training session simulated activities on the second day in Earth orbit. The Docking Module is designed to link the Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft.

  15. Automated real time peg and tool detection for the FLS trainer box.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Arun; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes a method that effectively tracks trocar tool and peg positions in real time to allow real time assessment of the peg transfer task of the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS). By utilizing custom code along with OpenCV libraries, tool and peg positions can be accurately tracked without altering the original setup conditions of the FLS trainer box. This is achieved via a series of image filtration sequences, thresholding functions, and Haar training methods. PMID:22357006

  16. STS-26 crew stowage review in Bldg 9A crew compartment trainer (CCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers rehearse for their upcoming mission in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in the JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Standing on the CCT middeck, the crewmembers have just selected a snack from the meal tray assembly (foodtray) mounted on the forward middeck lockers. Left to right are Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, and MS George D. Nelson.

  17. The E-Learning Question and Answer Book: A Survival Guide for Trainers and Business Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Allan J.

    This book answers more than 70 key questions that business managers and trainers ask about using e-learning in their company as a business tool. Chapters 1 and 3-11 are comprised of questions and answers related to these topics: what e-learning is all about; what e-learning costs; applying e-learning to the business; what today's e-learning…

  18. Training the Trainers of Tomorrow Today - driving excellence in medical education

    PubMed Central

    Fellow-Smith, Elizabeth; Beveridge, Ed; Hogben, Katy; Wilson, Graeme; Lowe, John; Abraham, Rachel; Ingle, Digby; Bennett, Danielle; Hernandez, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Training the Trainers of Tomorrow Today (T4) is a new way to deliver “Training for Trainers”. Responding to local dissatisfaction with existing arrangements, T4 builds on 3 essential requirements for a future shape of training: 1. Clinical Leadership and a Collaborative Approach 2. Cross-Specialty Design and Participation 3. Local Delivery and Governance Networks Design principles also included: 3 levels of training to reflect differing needs of clinical supervisors, educational supervisors and medical education leader, mapping to GMC requirements and the London Deanery's Professional Development Framework; alignment of service, educational theory and research; recognition of challenges in delivering and ensuring attendance in busy acute and mental health settings, and the development of a faculty network. The delivery plan took into account census of professional development uptake and GMC Trainee Surveys. Strong engagement and uptake from the 11 Trusts in NW London has been achieved, with powerful penetration into all specialties. Attendance has exceeded expectations. Against an initial 12 month target of 350 attendances, 693 were achieved in the first 8 months. Evaluation of content demonstrates modules are pitched appropriately to attendees needs, with positive feedback from trainers new to the role. Delivery style has attracted high ratings of satisfaction: 87% attendees rating delivery as “good\\excellent”. External evaluation of impact demonstrated improved training experiences through changes in supervision, the learning environment and understanding of learning styles. We have addressed sustainability of the programme by advertising and recruiting Local Faculty Development Trainers. Volunteer consultants and higher trainees are trained to deliver the programme on a cascade model, supported by the Specialty Tutors, individual coaching and educational bursaries. The Trainers are local champions for excellence in training, provide a communication

  19. Is the new AquaTrainer® snorkel valid for VO2 assessment in swimming?

    PubMed

    Baldari, C; Fernandes, R J; Meucci, M; Ribeiro, J; Vilas-Boas, J P; Guidetti, L

    2013-04-01

    The Cosmed AquaTrainer® snorkel, in connection with the K4b2 analyzer, is the most recent instrument used for real time gas analysis during swimming. This study aimed to test if a new AquaTrainer® snorkel with 2 (SV2) or 4 (SV4) valves is comparable to a standard face mask (Mask) being valid for real time gas analysis under controlled laboratory and swimming pool conditions. 9 swimmers performed 2 swimming and 3 cycling tests at 3 different workloads on separate days. Tests were performed in random order, at constant exercise load with direct turbine temperature measurements, breathing with Mask, SV4 and SV2 while cycling, and with SV2 and SV4 while swimming. A high agreement was obtained using Passing - Bablok regression analysis in oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, tidal volumes, pulmonary ventilation, expiratory fraction of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and heart rate comparing different conditions in swimming and cycling. Proportional and fixed differences were always rejected (95% CI always contained the value 1 for the slope and the 0 for the intercept). In conclusion, the new SV2 AquaTrainer® snorkel, can be considered a valid device for gas analysis, being comparable to the Mask and the SV4 in cycling, and to the SV4 in swimming. PMID:23041962

  20. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Conservative Management and Prevention of Ankle Sprains in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Thomas W.; Hertel, Jay; Amendola, Ned; Docherty, Carrie L.; Dolan, Michael G.; Hopkins, J. Ty; Nussbaum, Eric; Poppy, Wendy; Richie, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals in the conservative management and prevention of ankle sprains in athletes. Background: Because ankle sprains are a common and often disabling injury in athletes, athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals must be able to implement the most current and evidence-supported treatment strategies to ensure safe and rapid return to play. Equally important is initiating preventive measures to mitigate both first-time sprains and the chance of reinjury. Therefore, considerations for appropriate preventive measures (including taping and bracing), initial assessment, both short- and long-term management strategies, return-to-play guidelines, and recommendations for syndesmotic ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability are presented. Recommendations: The recommendations included in this position statement are intended to provide athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals with guidelines and criteria to deliver the best health care possible for the prevention and management of ankle sprains. An endorsement as to best practice is made whenever evidence supporting the recommendation is available. PMID:23855363

  1. Comparison of the inertial properties and forces required to initiate movement for three gait trainers.

    PubMed

    Paleg, Ginny; Huang, Morris; Vasquez Gabela, Stephanie C; Sprigle, Stephen; Livingstone, Roslyn

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inertial properties and forces required to initiate movement on two different surfaces in a sample of three commonly prescribed gait trainers. Tests were conducted in a laboratory setting to compare the Prime Engineering KidWalk, Rifton Pacer, and Snug Seat Mustang with and without a weighted anthropometric test dummy configured to the weight and proportions of a 4-year-old child. The Pacer was the lightest and the KidWalk the heaviest while footprints of the three gait trainers were similar. Weight was borne fairly evenly on the four casters of the Pacer and Mustang while 85% of the weight was borne on the large wheels of the mid-wheel drive KidWalk. These differences in frame style, wheel, and caster style and overall mass impact inertial properties and forces required to initiate movement. Test results suggest that initiation forces on tile were equivalent for the Pacer and KidWalk while the Mustang had the highest initiation force. Initiation forces on carpet were lowest for the KidWalk and highest for the Mustang. This initial study of inertia and movement initiation forces may provide added information for clinicians to consider when selecting a gait trainer for their clients. PMID:26820253

  2. Recruitment and Rotation of the Trainers in the Lifelong Learning Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamaqi, Xhevrie; Rubio, Pilar Olave; Alvarez, Jesús Miguel

    The workplace of today is characterized by rapid changes in work processes, in competition, in customer demands, and in work practices. To keep abreast of these rapid changes employers and employees must be committed to lifelong learning in order to keep ahead. One of the most important actors in the lifelong learning development process are the trainers, whose professional characteristics needs meeting new skills and adapting an varied and specific contents of the current labour market. Affected by the discontinuity and a high rate of job rotation, the recognition of it labour status and basic competence and skills, forms part of the Bologna Process recognized as Vocational Education Training (VET). Sixty in-depth interviews realized to managers of the centres of formation, are used as tools to obtain information about following topics: recruitment strategies, conventional and not conventional routes of the recruitment, rate rotation, qualification and training of the Spanish trainers. The transcription of the interviews achieve that not always exist a previous plan of recruitment, except that it is a question as big centers of formation. Also, the obtained information indicates a high rate of rotation that affects the trainers ones as professionals since there exists the discontinuity of the formative offer on the labour market.

  3. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Management of the Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Carolyn C; Corcoran, Matthew H; Crawley, James T; Guyton Hornsby, W; Peer, Kimberly S; Philbin, Rick D; Riddell, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the certified athletic trainer in the management of type 1 diabetes in the athlete. Background: In managing diabetes, the most important goal is to keep blood glucose levels at or as close to normal levels as possible without causing hypoglycemia. This goal requires the maintenance of a delicate balance among hypoglycemia, euglycemia, and hyperglycemia, which is often more challenging in the athlete due to the demands of physical activity and competition. However, effectively managing blood glucose, lipid, and blood pressure levels is necessary to ensuring the long-term health and well-being of the athlete with diabetes. Recommendations: These recommendations are intended to provide the certified athletic trainer participating in the management of an athlete with type 1 diabetes mellitus with the specific knowledge and problem-solving skills needed. Athletic trainers have more contact with the athlete with diabetes than most members of the diabetes management team do and so must be prepared to assist the athlete as required. PMID:18176622

  4. Peer training of safety-related skills to institutional staff: benefits for trainers and trainees.

    PubMed Central

    van Den Pol, R A; Reid, D H; Fuqua, R W

    1983-01-01

    A peer training program, in which experienced staff trained new staff, was evaluated as a method for teaching and maintaining safety-related caregiver skills in an institutional setting for the developmentally disabled. Three sets of safety-type skills were assessed in simulated emergency situations: responding to facility fires, managing aggressive attacks by residents, and assisting residents during convulsive seizures. Using a multiple-baseline research design, results indicated that the peer training program was an effective method of training the three types of emergency skills to new direct care staff. The program also appeared effective in improving the skills of the peer trainers. Perhaps most importantly, results indicated that if experienced staff functioned as peer trainers for particular emergency skills, then their proficiency in those skills maintained over time whereas their proficiency declined in emergency skills for which they did not act as peer trainers. Social validity information collected from available staff 23 months after the program was completed supported the utility of the training in terms of staff responses during actual emergencies. Also, acceptability measures indicated that staff liked participating in the program. However, some inconsistencies between staff verbal reports and performance-based measures of acceptability were noted. Results are discussed regarding the overall effectiveness of the peer training program, the importance of maintenance strategies for safety-related skills, and the need for multidimensional analyses of staff acceptability in staff training/management research. PMID:6885668

  5. STS-56 Pilot Oswald, in LES/LEH, uses sky genie during JSC egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), simulates an emergency egress procedure at JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE. Having exited the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup, through an overhead aft flight deck window, Oswald lowers himself to the ground using the sky-genie. Training instructor Kenneth D. Trujillo assumes the role of a crewmate assisting from a position on the ground. The sky-genie is carried on all Space Shuttle flights for emergency egress purposes.

  6. STS-65 Commander Cabana and Pilot Halsell during MAIL Bldg 9NE egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Commander Robert D. Cabana (left) and Pilot James D. Halsell, Jr, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), listen to briefing by crew training staffer. The STS-65 crew was in the Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE for crew egress training. The full fuselage trainer (FFT), used for rehearsals, forms the backdrop for the photo. The two will join four NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist for the International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, later this year.

  7. STS-36 Commander Creighton and Pilot Casper during egress training at JSC CCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-36 Commander John O. Creighton (right) and Pilot John H. Casper, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), pose for this photo before participating in emergency egress training in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Behind the crewmembers is the open side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup. The crewmembers will practice egress procedures necessary in the event of an emergency onboard the shuttle. Creighton and Casper are scheduled to fly aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, for an upcoming Department of Defense (DOD) mission.

  8. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Safe Weight Loss and Maintenance Practices in Sport and Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Turocy, Paula Sammarone; DePalma, Bernard F.; Horswill, Craig A.; Laquale, Kathleen M.; Martin, Thomas J.; Perry, Arlette C.; Somova, Marla J.; Utter, Alan C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To present athletic trainers with recommendations for safe weight loss and weight maintenance practices for athletes and active clients and to provide athletes, clients, coaches, and parents with safe guidelines that will allow athletes and clients to achieve and maintain weight and body composition goals. Background: Unsafe weight management practices can compromise athletic performance and negatively affect health. Athletes and clients often attempt to lose weight by not eating, limiting caloric or specific nutrients from the diet, engaging in pathogenic weight control behaviors, and restricting fluids. These people often respond to pressures of the sport or activity, coaches, peers, or parents by adopting negative body images and unsafe practices to maintain an ideal body composition for the activity. We provide athletic trainers with recommendations for safe weight loss and weight maintenance in sport and exercise. Although safe weight gain is also a concern for athletic trainers and their athletes and clients, that topic is outside the scope of this position statement. Recommendations: Athletic trainers are often the source of nutrition information for athletes and clients; therefore, they must have knowledge of proper nutrition, weight management practices, and methods to change body composition. Body composition assessments should be done in the most scientifically appropriate manner possible. Reasonable and individualized weight and body composition goals should be identified by appropriately trained health care personnel (eg, athletic trainers, registered dietitians, physicians). In keeping with the American Dietetics Association (ADA) preferred nomenclature, this document uses the terms registered dietitian or dietician when referring to a food and nutrition expert who has met the academic and professional requirements specified by the ADA's Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education. In some cases, a registered nutritionist may have

  9. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Athletic Trainers' Concussion-Management Practice Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kassandra C.; Jordan, Erin M.; Joyner, A. Barry; Burdette, G. Trey; Buckley, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: A cornerstone of the recent consensus statements on concussion is a multifaceted concussion-assessment program at baseline and postinjury and when tracking recovery. Earlier studies of athletic trainers' (ATs') practice patterns found limited use of multifaceted protocols; however, these authors typically grouped diverse athletic training settings together. Objective: To (1) describe the concussion-management practice patterns of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I ATs, (2) compare these practice patterns to earlier studies, and (3) objectively characterize the clinical examination. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Online survey. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 610 ATs from NCAA Division I institutions, for a response rate of 34.4%. Main Outcome Measure(s): The survey had 3 subsections: demographic questions related to the participant's experiences, concussion-assessment practice patterns, and concussion-recovery and return-to-participation practice patterns. Specific practice-pattern questions addressed balance, cognitive and mental status, neuropsychological testing, and self-reported symptoms. Finally, specific components of the clinical examination were examined. Results: We identified high rates of multifaceted assessments (ie, assessments using at least 3 techniques) during testing at baseline (71.2%), acute concussion assessment (79.2%), and return to participation (66.9%). The specific techniques used are provided along with their adherence with evidence-based practice findings. Respondents endorsed a diverse array of clinical examination techniques that often overlapped objective concussion-assessment protocols or were likely used to rule out associated potential conditions. Respondents were cognizant of the Third International Consensus Statement, the National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement, and the revised NCAA Sports Medicine Handbook recommendations. Conclusions: Athletic trainers in

  10. Validity of the 3-Minute All-Out Exercise Test on the CompuTrainer.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ida E; Gartner, Hannah E; Williams, Jade L; Pettitt, Robert W

    2016-03-01

    The 3-minute all-out exercise test (3MT) has emerged as a useful procedure for identifying critical power (CP) and the finite work capacity above CP (W') within a single visit. The CP concept enables for the prediction of exhaustive time limits (T(LIMs)) for a wide range of severe intensity power outputs and is a method for prescribing high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Road cyclists often use the CompuTrainer for indoor HIIT. The purpose of this study was to validate the 3MT for use on the CompuTrainer. On 4 separate visits, 10 competitive cyclists performed a 3MT, and three separate constant-load bouts projected to yield exhaustive T(LIMs) of 3, 6, and 9 minutes, respectively, using the Computrainer. Actual CP and W' were calculated using the linear work-time (W-t) and power-inverse time (1/t) models. The results for CP (W) from the 3MT (215 ± 40), the W-t model (212 ± 36), and the 1/t model (213 ± 36) did not differ (F = 2.96, p = 0.11, η2(p) = 0.43). Similarly, the results for W' (kJ) for the 3MT (11.2 ± 4.0), the W-t model (12.1 ± 6.5), and the 1/s model (11.7 ± 6.3) did not differ (F = 2.40, p = 0.15, η2(p) = 0.375). We conclude that use of the 3MT and the CP concept for performance assessment and HIIT prescription on the CompuTrainer is a valid procedure. PMID:26340469

  11. Perceptions of Workplace Bullying Among Athletic Trainers in the Collegiate Setting

    PubMed Central

    Weuve, Celest; Pitney, William A.; Martin, Malissa; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Bullying has received a vast amount of attention in the recent past. One form of bullying, workplace bullying (WPB), has been a substantial concern explored in many health professions that can negatively influence a health care provider's role in an organization. To date, however, WPB has not been investigated in athletic training contexts. Objective: To examine the perceptions of certified athletic trainers who experienced or witnessed WPB during employment in the collegiate setting. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: College or university. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen athletic trainers (7 women, 8 men) with an average age of 42 ± 12 years. Data Collection and Analysis: Data were collected via semistructured, in-depth phone interviews or asynchronous online interviews. Data were analyzed using an inductive content analysis. Trustworthiness was established with member checks and peer debriefing. Results: Four themes emerged from the analysis: (1) antecedents of WPB, (2) consequences of WPB, (3) coping with WPB, and (4) lack of workplace environment training. The antecedents of WPB involved the bully's personality and perceptions of the athletic training profession as well as environmental factors including the pressure to win and a lack of administrative support. The consequences of WPB included increased stress, feelings of inadequacy, and increased distrust. Individuals coped with WPB by relying on emotional resilience and avoidance. A final theme, lack of workplace environment training, revealed that little attention was given to interpersonal issues and WPB in the workplace. Conclusions: Workplace bullying incidents occur when administrators tolerate bullying behaviors from controlling and manipulative individuals who lack respect for the athletic training professional. Several negative outcomes result from bullying interactions, including stress and anxiety; WPB is dealt with by learning to be more emotionally resilient and avoiding

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Lightning Safety for Athletics and Recreation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Katie M.; Cooper, Mary Ann; Holle, Ron; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Roeder, William P.; Ryan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the education, prevention, and management of lightning injuries for those involved in athletics or recreation. Background: Lightning is the most common severe-storm activity encountered annually in the United States. The majority of lightning injuries can be prevented through an aggressive educational campaign, vacating outdoor activities before the lightning threat, and an understanding of the attributes of a safe place from the hazard. Recommendations: This position statement is focused on supplying information specific to lightning safety and prevention and treatment of lightning injury and providing lightning-safety recommendations for the certified athletic trainer and those who are involved in athletics and recreation. PMID:23672391

  13. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Preventing Sudden Death in Sports

    PubMed Central

    Casa, Douglas J.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Anderson, Scott A.; Courson, Ronald W.; Heck, Jonathan F.; Jimenez, Carolyn C.; McDermott, Brendon P.; Miller, Michael G.; Stearns, Rebecca L.; Swartz, Erik E.; Walsh, Katie M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention and screening, recognition, and treatment of the most common conditions resulting in sudden death in organized sports. Background: Cardiac conditions, head injuries, neck injuries, exertional heat stroke, exertional sickling, asthma, and other factors (eg, lightning, diabetes) are the most common causes of death in athletes. Recommendations: These guidelines are intended to provide relevant information on preventing sudden death in sports and to give specific recommendations for certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care. PMID:22488236

  14. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Nelson, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, is strapped into his launch and entry station on the CCT middeck. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  15. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Nelson, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, peers out the open CCT side hatch and prepares to deploy inflatable slide. Technicians observe the activity from scaffolding on either side of the hatch. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  16. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck tests cushion outside the crew compartment trainer (CCT) side hatch. Hauck, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, tumbles out CCT side hatch onto cushion as technicians look on. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT is located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A.

  17. Pattern cutting and ligating loop simulation in Virtual Basic Laparoscopic Skill Trainer (VBLaST.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Woojin; Halic, Tansel; De, Suvranu

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the pattern cutting and ligating loop simulation in the Virtual Basic Laparoscopic Skill Trainer (VBLaST©). In the simulation, the gauze, tubular foam, and ligating loop thread are modeled by the mass-spring method and constraint projection for the inextensible characteristics. Discrete simulation states defined based on the tool-object interaction types are utilized to efficiently and accurately manages the physics simulation, collision processing, and haptic feedback in real-time. An automated scoring system provides quantitative measurement for evaluation of trainees' skills. The simulation results show advanced visual realism and real-time performances. PMID:23400120

  18. Pelvic Muscle Exercises Using A Home Trainer for Pelvic Muscle Dysfunction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic muscle exercises can help improve symptoms of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. This article describes the case of a 66-year-old woman with moderate pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and mild urinary incontinence (UI) who initiated pelvic muscle exercises with the assistance of a novel, at-home trainer equipped with a vaginal sensor and accompanying smartphone app software, the PeriCoach system (Analytica, 2015). After 8 weeks of training with the device, she showed improvements in strength, endurance, and disability, as measured by manual muscle test, electromyography, and Pelvic Floor Disability Index scores. Older women can use biofeedback technology to improve pelvic floor muscle function successfully at home. PMID:27281865

  19. Pulmonary Rehabilitation Using Modified Threshold Inspiratory Muscle Trainer (IMT) in Patients with Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Funda; Tasci, Canturk; Savci, Sema; Tozkoparan, Ergun; Deniz, Omer; Balkan, Arzu; Bilgic, Hayati

    2012-01-01

    It is aimed to present the usefulness of inspiratory muscle trainer (IMT) in treatment of a 20-year-old male patient with diaphragmatic paralysis and tetraplegia due to spinal cord injury (SCI), and supporting effect of IMT in recovering from respiratory failure by rendering his diaphragm functions. The treatment was applied through the tracheostomy cannula by a modified IMT device. After applying IMT for three weeks, it was observed that the diaphragm recovered its functions in electromyography (EMG) test. As a result, in this study, we present a case where a patient could live without any respiratory device for the rest of his life with the help of modified IMT. PMID:22536264

  20. A 'mutually agreed statement of learning' in general practice trainer appraisal: the place of peer appraisal by experienced course members.

    PubMed

    Main, Paul; Curtis, Anthony; Pitts, John; Irish, Bill

    2009-03-01

    This study explored participants' views of an approach based on an appraisal model within formal trainer courses as a means of focusing trainers' continuing professional development as educators -- the mutually agreed statement of learning (MASL). It used a qualitative approach of retrospective semi-structured interviews. We have previously shown that this approach was successful, acceptable, and well received by the majority of trainers. The use of peer-led MASLs (i.e. Co-MASL) in personal development planning was universally more popular than facilitator-led sessions. This approach resulted in a more formative approach that opened up mutual conversations that also promoted and enhanced reflective learning. The role of the group facilitator was valued in helping to structure the sessions. The wider use of peers and mentors to help deaneries with educational planning is recommended. PMID:19519994

  1. Instruction and Video Feedback to Improve Staff's Trainer Behaviour and Response Prompting during One-to-One Training with Young Children with Severe Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Vonderen, Annemarie; Duker, Pieter; Didden, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on correct trainer behaviour and the use of prompt sequences of 10 direct-care staff during one-to-one training with 10 young children with severe intellectual disability. Following baseline, trainers received instruction (written and verbal) concerning (in)correct trainer…

  2. The North Dakota Mental Health and Aging Education Project: Curriculum Design and Training Outcomes for a Train-the-Trainer Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Margaret A.; Chromy, Barbara; Philbrick, Candace A.; Sanders, Gregory F.; Muske, Kara L.; Bratteli, Marlys

    2009-01-01

    A training curriculum on mental health and aging was developed and disseminated to 32 natural caregivers throughout a frontier state using a train-the-trainer model. Those certified as trainers included social workers, religious professionals, volunteers, long-term care employees, nurses, home health workers, and professional and informal…

  3. Reflective Education as a Means of Changing Teacher Trainers' Attitudes towards Universal Values in the Education System of the Developing Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essawi, Mohammad; Abu-Hussain, Jamal; Fadila, Dalia

    2014-01-01

    The proposed intervention program's aim was to change teacher trainers' attitudes towards universal values. The program takes into account the unique cultural context of the developing society. The goal of the program was to reduce the gap between declared teacher trainers' attitudes and their actual attitudes towards universal values in the…

  4. Reshaping the Focus of Vocational Teacher and Trainer Training. A Cross Country Review of Needs, Achievements and Obstacles in Central and Eastern Europe. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Soren P.

    This document reports the results of a comparative analysis of the current situation and future needs of teacher and trainer training in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Following an introductory section explaining the methodology of the study, the second section focuses on features common to teacher and trainer training in all Central…

  5. A New Assessment Tool. A Professional Development Kit for Trainers and Assessors Incorporating Language, Literacy and Numeracy Skills into Training Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulbourn, Barbara; Alexander, Ann

    This kit is designed to help trainers and assessors understand the importance of workplace communication in training packages. Section 1 explains what trainers and assessors need to know about communication skills, and how to use the kit. Section 2 provides an overview of training packages. It describes the endorsed parts of the package, which…

  6. National Athletic Trainers' Association Releases New Guidelines for Exertional Heat Illnesses: What School Nurses Need to Know.

    PubMed

    VanScoy, Rachel M; DeMartini, Julie K; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    Exertional heat illnesses (EHI) occur in various populations and settings. Within a school setting, there are student athletes who take part in physical activity where the risk of EHI is increased. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) released an updated position statement on EHI in September of 2015. This article is a summary of the position statement. The sports medicine team, including school nurses and athletic trainers, provides quality health care to these physically active individuals. Thus, it is important for school nurses to understand the prevention, recognition, and treatment of EHI. PMID:26941054

  7. The application of additive technologies in creation a medical simulator-trainer of the human head operating field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashapov, L. N.; Kashapov, N. F.; Kashapov, R. N.; Pashaev, B. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the work was to determine the possible application of additive manufacturing technology during the manufacturing process as close as possible to reality of medical simulator-trainers. In work were used some additive manufacturing technologies: selective laser sintering (SLS), fused deposition modeling (FDM), binder Jetting. As a result, a prototype of simulator-trainer of the human head operating field, which based on the CT real patient, was manufactured and conducted its tests. It was found that structure, which is obtained with the use of 3D-printers ProJet 160, most appropriate and closest to the real properties of the bone.

  8. The Pilot Training Study: Personnel Flow and the PILOT Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooz, W. E.

    The results of the Rand study of pilot flows and the computer-operated decision model, called the PILOT model, are described. The flows of pilots within the Air Force are caused by policies that require the career-development rotation of pilots from cockpit jobs to desk jobs, the maintenance of a supplement of pilots in excess of cockpit-related…

  9. Kinematical changes in swimming front Crawl and Breaststroke with the AquaTrainer snorkel.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Tiago; Silva, António José; Reis, António Malvas; Costa, Mário; Garrido, Nuno; Policarpo, Fernando; Reis, Victor Machado

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the kinematical changes when swimming maximal bouts in Front Crawl and Breaststroke with the AquaTrainer snorkel. Thirteen male swimmers (7 at Breaststroke and 6 at Front Crawl) of national level performed randomly two maximal bouts of 100-m swims: one bout using the AquaTrainer snorkel (snorkel swim) and another one without the snorkel (free swim). The swims were videotaped in sagittal plane with a pair of cameras providing 2D kinematics evaluation. The following measures were assessed: swimming performance (T100), stroke cycle period (P), stroke rate (SR), stroke length (SL), swimming velocity (v), swimming efficiency as estimated by the stroke index (SI), speed fluctuation (dv) and the mathematical characterisation of dv. T100 was significantly higher when swimming with the snorkel than in free swimming at Breaststroke (Delta = 6.26%) and at Front Crawl (Delta = 4.75%). P, SR and SL, as well as SI and dv did not present significant differences. The main finding of the study was that changes in the swimming velocity imposed by the use of the Aquatrainer do not seem due to changes in general kinematics or swimming efficiency. PMID:20379828

  10. State of emergency medicine in Rwanda 2015: an innovative trainee and trainer model.

    PubMed

    Mbanjumucyo, Gabin; DeVos, Elizabeth; Pulfrey, Simon; Epino, Henry M

    2015-01-01

    The 1994 Rwandan war and genocide left more than 1 million people dead; millions displaced; and the country's economic, social, and health infrastructure destroyed. Despite remaining one of the poorest countries in the world, Rwanda has made remarkable gains in health, social, and economic development over the last 20 years, but modern emergency care has been slow to progress. Rwanda has recently established the Human Resources for Health program to rapidly build capacity in multiple sectors of its healthcare delivery system, including emergency medicine. This project involves multiple medical and surgical residencies, nursing programs, allied health professional trainings, and hospital administrative support. A real strength of the program is that trainers work with international faculty at Rwanda's referral hospital, but also as emergency medicine specialty trainers when returning to their respective district hospitals. Rwanda's first emergency medicine trainees are playing a unique and important role in the implementation of emergency care systems and education in the country's district hospitals. While there has been early vital progress in building emergency medicine's foundations in Rwanda, there remains much work to be done. This will be accomplished with careful planning and strong commitment from the country's healthcare and emergency medicine leaders. PMID:26101554

  11. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Preventing, Detecting, and Managing Disordered Eating in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Bonci, Christine M; Bonci, Leslie J; Granger, Lorita R; Johnson, Craig L; Malina, Robert M; Milne, Leslie W; Ryan, Randa R; Vanderbunt, Erin M

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, detection, and comprehensive management of disordered eating (DE) in athletes. Background: Athletes with DE rarely self-report their symptoms. They tend to deny the condition and are often resistant to referral and treatment. Thus, screenings and interventions must be handled skillfully by knowledgeable professionals to obtain desired outcomes. Certified athletic trainers have the capacity and responsibility to play active roles as integral members of the health care team. Their frequent daily interactions with athletes help to facilitate the level of medical surveillance necessary for early detection, timely referrals, treatment follow-through, and compliance. Recommendations: These recommendations are intended to provide certified athletic trainers and others participating in the health maintenance and performance enhancement of athletes with specific knowledge and problem-solving skills to better prevent, detect, and manage DE. The individual biological, psychological, sociocultural, and familial factors for each athlete with DE result in widely different responses to intervention strategies, challenging the best that athletics programs have to offer in terms of resources and expertise. The complexity, time intensiveness, and expense of managing DE necessitate an interdisciplinary approach representing medicine, nutrition, mental health, athletic training, and athletics administration in order to facilitate early detection and treatment, make it easier for symptomatic athletes to ask for help, enhance the potential for full recovery, and satisfy medicolegal requirements. Of equal importance is establishing educational initiatives for preventing DE. PMID:18335017

  12. The GOBLET training portal: a global repository of bioinformatics training materials, courses and trainers

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, Manuel; Jimenez, Rafael C.; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Budd, Aidan; Brazas, Michelle D.; Fernandes, Pedro L.; Gaeta, Bruno; van Gelder, Celia; Korpelainen, Eija; Lewitter, Fran; McGrath, Annette; MacLean, Daniel; Palagi, Patricia M.; Rother, Kristian; Taylor, Jan; Via, Allegra; Watson, Mick; Schneider, Maria Victoria; Attwood, Teresa K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Rapid technological advances have led to an explosion of biomedical data in recent years. The pace of change has inspired new collaborative approaches for sharing materials and resources to help train life scientists both in the use of cutting-edge bioinformatics tools and databases and in how to analyse and interpret large datasets. A prototype platform for sharing such training resources was recently created by the Bioinformatics Training Network (BTN). Building on this work, we have created a centralized portal for sharing training materials and courses, including a catalogue of trainers and course organizers, and an announcement service for training events. For course organizers, the portal provides opportunities to promote their training events; for trainers, the portal offers an environment for sharing materials, for gaining visibility for their work and promoting their skills; for trainees, it offers a convenient one-stop shop for finding suitable training resources and identifying relevant training events and activities locally and worldwide. Availability and implementation: http://mygoblet.org/training-portal Contact: manuel.corpas@tgac.ac.uk PMID:25189782

  13. Can Health Trainers Make a Difference With Difficult-to-Engage Clients? A Multisite Case Study.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Di; Kerlin, Lianne

    2015-09-01

    A political attempt in the United Kingdom to address health inequalities in the past decade has been the government's initiative to employ local health trainers (HTs) or health trainer champions (HTCs) to support disadvantaged individuals with aspects of their health-related behaviors. HT/HTCs provide health-related information and support to individuals with healthy eating, physical activity, and smoking cessation. They undertake community engagement and direct individuals to relevant health services. They differ in that HTs are trained to provide health interventions to individuals or groups and to make referrals to specialist health care services when necessary. This article provides an evaluation of HT/HTCs interventions across three sites, including one prison, one probation service (three teams), and one mental health center. An evaluation framework combining process and outcome measures was employed that used mixed methods to capture data relating to the implementation of the service, including the context of the HT/HTCs interventions, the reactions of their clients, and the outcomes reported. It was found that HT/HTCs interventions were more effective in the prison and mental health center compared with the probation site largely as a result of contextual factors. PMID:25794692

  14. Substance abuse prevention in Cape Town's peri-urban settlements: local health trainers' perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Puljević, Cheneal; Learmonth, Despina

    2014-01-01

    South Africa currently experiences high levels of alcohol and other drug (AOD) abuse. As a result there is a need for the initiation of regional AOD abuse prevention programmes with a specific focus on youth prevention strategies. The Medical Knowledge Institute (MKI) is a non-profit organisation which develops and facilitates health information workshops to members of disadvantaged peri-urban communities in South Africa. This research investigated the views of eight local MKI health trainers on factors contributing to AOD abuse in their communities. Although the expected focus of the discussion was on prevention strategies and effective interventions, the trainers placed more emphasis on the individual and community factors influencing AOD abuse. The themes which emerged through the research included: status, government, (di)stress, gender, recreation, consequences and community. This research holds significance as it has the potential to assist further development of community-based AOD prevention workshops and to guide public health policy and service development for AOD abuse. PMID:25750776

  15. Sit-to-Stand Trainer: An Apparatus for Training "Normal-Like" Sit to Stand Movement.

    PubMed

    Matjacic, Zlatko; Zadravec, Matjaz; Oblak, Jakob

    2016-06-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) transfer training is probably the most demanding task in rehabilitation. We have developed an innovative STS trainer that offers variable levels of mechanical support and speeds of STS transfer. In a group of neurologically intact individuals we compared kinematics, kinetics and electromyography (EMG) patterns of STS transfer assessed in three experimental conditions with increasing degree of mechanical support (MIN STS-T, MED STS-T, and MAX STS-T) to natural, unassisted STS movement (NO STS-T). The resulting ankle, knee, hip joint and trunk angles in experimental conditions MED STS-T and MIN STS-T were very similar to experimental condition NO STS-T. Vertical ground reaction forces and EMG patterns in the tibialis anterior, quadriceps and hamstrings show a clear trend toward "normal" patterns as the level of mechanical support from the device is progressively reduced. We have further tested the feasibility of the STS trainer in five stroke subjects at two levels of support showing that increased voluntary effort is needed when the support is reduced. Based on these results we conclude that negligible constraints are imposed by the device on a user's STS transfer kinematics, which is an important prerequisite for considering clinical use of the device for training in neurologically impaired. PMID:26068547

  16. The Design of a Primary Flight Trainer using Concurrent Engineering Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladesic, James G.; Eastlake, Charles N.; Kietzmann, Nicholas H.

    1993-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering (CE) concepts seek to coordinate the expertise of various disciplines from initial design configuration selection through product disposal so that cost efficient design solutions may be achieve. Integrating this methodology into an undergraduate design course sequence may provide a needed enhancement to engineering education. The Advanced Design Program (ADP) project at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (EMU) is focused on developing recommendations for the general aviation Primary Flight Trainer (PFT) of the twenty first century using methods of CE. This project, over the next two years, will continue synthesizing the collective knowledge of teams composed of engineering students along with students from other degree programs, their faculty, and key industry representatives. During the past year (Phase I). conventional trainer configurations that comply with current regulations and existing technologies have been evaluated. Phase I efforts have resulted in two baseline concepts, a high-wing, conventional design named Triton and a low-wing, mid-engine configuration called Viper. In the second and third years (Phases II and III). applications of advanced propulsion, advanced materials, and unconventional airplane configurations along with military and commercial technologies which are anticipated to be within the economic range of general aviation by the year 2000, will be considered.

  17. Support from Teachers and Trainers in Vocational Education and Training: The Pathways to Career Aspirations and Further Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Claudia; Stalder, Barbara E.; Tschan, Franziska; Häfeli, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Transition from school to work is a challenging period for young people with learning difficulties. In the dual vocational system of Switzerland, teachers at vocational educational and training (VET)-schools, as well as trainers at VET-companies, provide important support. We were interested in the different pathways from this support to…

  18. Knowledge Representation and Self-Regulatory Experiences of Expert and Novice Certified Athletic Trainers in College and University Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardin, Fredrick Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how male, collegiate, certified athletic trainers (AT's) represent knowledge during 5 injury evaluation scenarios. A second purpose of the study was to identify what self-regulatory behaviors participants engaged in to improve or maintain their skills. Knowledge representation was studied as cue selection…

  19. Paper Copters and Potential: Leveraging Afterschool and Youth Development Trainers to Extend the Reach of STEM Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingwood, Stephanie A.; Sorensen, Jennifer B.

    2014-01-01

    October 6, 2012: 109 adults simultaneously threw their heads back and shouted "I discovered!" at the top of their lungs. Slightly mangled bright-green paper helicopters littered the floor. The class was six minutes into a daylong journey of discovery, during which this group of volunteer trainers would learn to facilitate a curriculum…

  20. COED Transactions, Vol. XI, No. 12, December 1979. Some Alternate Applications of Microprocessor Trainers in Support of Undergraduate Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Eugene E., Ed.

    Ways are described for the use of a microprocessor trainer in undergraduate laboratories. Listed are microcomputer applications that have been used as demonstrations and which provide signals for other experiments which are not related to microprocessors. Information and figures are provided for methods to do the following: direct generation of…

  1. Field Evaluation of the Generalized Maintenance Trainer-Simulator: I. Fleet Communications System. ; Technical Report No. 89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigney, J. W.; And Others

    This report describes the Generalized Maintenance Trainer-Simulator (GMTS), an instructional system designed to give electronics students intensive troubleshooting practice in a simulated hands-on training environment, and reports on a field evaluation of the GMTS applied to systems level troubleshooting in radio communications. The GMTS can be…

  2. Moral Dilemmas in a Military Context. a Case Study of a Train the Trainer Course on Military Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Baarle, Eva; Bosch, Jolanda; Widdershoven, Guy; Verweij, Desiree; Molewijk, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Moral competence is important for soldiers who have to deal with complex moral dilemmas in practice. However, openly dealing with moral dilemmas and showing moral competence is not always easy within the culture of a military organization. In this article, based on analysis of experiences during a train the trainer course on military ethics, we…

  3. Reading, Writing and Cultivating. A Resource Book for Post-Literacy Trainers Based on Experiences in Senegal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millican, Juliet

    This resource book is intended to help trainers working on postliteracy programs in agricultural areas of West Africa. Its primary focus is on the role of literacy in the management of irrigation systems and farmer cooperatives and on program administration activities such as recordkeeping, registration, and credit. However, strategies for meeting…

  4. A Collection of Ideas and Materials for Vocational Trainers. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System. Monograph Series: Improving Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coon, Herbert L.

    A great variety and amount of teaching materials and methods related to water quality and other Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concerns have been developed. Program developers/trainers responsible for instructional programs will find in ERIC and the Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS) enough material to organize dozens of…

  5. Water and Sanitation Technologies: A Trainer's Manual. Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Bradley D.

    This guide, which includes an outline of 222 hours of technical training integrated with training in community organization techniques, is intended for trainers who prepare Peace Corps water and sanitation technicians and engineers for field service. The training program developed by the guide covers these subject areas: community development,…

  6. Made to Measure: Language, Literacy and Numeracy in TCF [Textile, Clothing, and Footwear] Industry Training. A Guide for Workplace Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Sue

    This guide is designed to help workplace trainers in the textile, clothing, and footwear (TCF) industry to become more aware of the language, literacy, and numeracy demands of training. It is divided into two main sections. Section 1, "Background Information," covers understanding language, literacy, and numeracy; understanding training in the TCF…

  7. Metabolic Cost of Stride Rate, Resistance, and Combined Use of Arms and Legs on the Elliptical Trainer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mier, Constance M.; Feito, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    We measured the effects of stride rate, resistance, and combined arm-leg use on energy expenditure during elliptical trainer exercise and assessed the accuracy of the manufacturer's energy expenditure calculations. Twenty-six men and women (M age = 29 years, SD = 8; M body weight = 73.0 kg, SD = 15.2) participated. Twenty-two participants…

  8. Handbook for Trainers in Educational Management--With Special Reference to Countries in Asia and the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pareek, Udai; Rao, T. V.

    Within the framework of UNESCO's program in the field of educational policies, planning and administration, the training of educational planners, and the training and upgrading of educational administration staff is a high priority concern. Addressed to both trainers and practitioners, this three-part handbook stresses the development of training…

  9. A Trainer's Guide to El Comienzo & Esto Es Familiar: Keys to Training Spanish-Speaking Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellm, Dan

    This set of manuals was developed by the California Child Care Initiative for the training of Spanish-speaking family day care providers. The English-language trainer's guide has been designed to accompany "El Comienzo" ("The Beginner") and "Esto Es Familiar" ("It's a Family Affair"). The Spanish-language "El Comienzo" is an information kit…

  10. Perceived Skills and Abilities Required by Athletic Trainers in Hospital and Clinical Management Positions: A Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Hazelbaker, Chadron B

    2013-01-01

    Context: Athletic training has expanded from traditional sport-team settings to varied settings involving active populations. Athletic trainers also use their education and abilities in administration to take on roles of management in hospitals and health care clinics. Objective: To begin to explore the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed in the emerging practice setting of health care management. Design: Delphi study. Setting: Directed surveys. Patients or Other Participants: Eight athletic trainers working as hospital and health care clinic managers in varied geographic settings. Data Collection and Analysis: Three rounds of directed surveys were used and included (1) a series of demographic questions and 1 focused, open-ended question, (2) 32 statements scored on a 6-point Likert-type scale with no neutral statement, and (3) 10 statements ranked in order of importance for the athletic trainer working as a health care manager. Results: I grouped the results into 2 categories: leadership skills and management tools. Conclusions: According to participants, effective health care managers need a strong understanding of business and management tools along with more interpersonal skills in communication and leadership. The results are consistent with the literature and may be applied in athletic training education programs and by athletic trainers seeking health care management positions. PMID:23672329

  11. Research and development for Onboard Navigation (ONAV) ground based expert/trainer system: Preliminary ascent knowledge requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1988-01-01

    The preliminary version of expert knowledge for the Onboard Navigation (ONAV) Ground Based Expert Trainer Ascent system for the space shuttle is presented. Included is some brief background information along with the information describing the knowledge the system will contain. Information is given on rules and heuristics, telemetry status, landing sites, inertial measurement units, and a high speed trajectory determinator (HSTD) state vector.

  12. An Early Childhood Collaboration Project in India. Cross-Continent Training of Trainers: A Relationship-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stine, Helen; Aviles, Jill; McCreedy, Barbara; Rajesh, Anubha; Sethi, Ridhi; Gupta, Vini

    2007-01-01

    When a Virginia-based international consulting company extended its early education services to India, a model of collaborative, interactive training--Training of Trainers--was born. To apply the principles of quality early childhood education in India, training must be meaningful, sustainable, and relationship based. In this article,…

  13. Impact of exercises administered to stroke patients with balance trainer on rehabilitation results: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Ordahan, B; Karahan, A Y; Basaran, A; Turkoglu, G; Kucuksarac, S; Cubukcu, M; Tekin, L; Polat, AD; Kuran, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of the exercises administered to stroke patients with the balance trainer (BALANCE-trainer, art.nr. 07001-001TM) on balance, level of independence and ambulation parameters. Material and method Fifty patients with hemiplegia were randomized into either study group or control group. Patients in the control group received 30 sessions of conventional rehabilitation program and patients in the study group were trained with balance trainer in addition to conventional rehabilitation program. Balance level and postural control were evaluated with Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed-Up and Go Test (TUG). Their functional statuses were evaluated using Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Evaluations were repeated following the six-week rehabilitation program. Results Of the 50 participants, 19 were women (38%) and 31 were men (62%). The mean age was 57.1 ± 9.2 years. The time that elapsed after stroke was 87.3 ± 26.3 days. Statistically significant improvements were noted in BBS, TUG and FIM in intra-group evaluations for both groups. Statistically significant improvements were documented in BBS and TUG levels for inter-group evaluation (respectively p =0.038, p =0.025), while the difference in FIM levels was not statistically significant (p >0.05). Conclusion Positive impact of balance trainer on balance and postural control was demonstrated in stroke patients in the current study. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):125-130.

  14. Mothers as Early Cognitive Trainers: Guiding Low-Income Mothers to Work with Their Pre-Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Phyllis

    The Mother-Child Home Program was planned as a home-based, two-year cognitive intervention method. Women with varied incomes and education, both volunteer and paid, made 30-minute home visits twice weekly to help mothers become cognitive trainers of their own toddlers (starting at age two). Mother-child verbal interaction was stimulated with gifts…

  15. Technical Work Experience vs. College Credit in Meeting the Need for Technically Experienced Industry Trainers/Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebo, Emma M.; Smith, Mack W.

    Enrollment data confirmed that by fall of 1985, half of the 70 students enrolled in vocational teacher education coursework at Idaho State University (ISU) were involved in corporate training outside of vocational education. ISU's Vocational Teacher Education (VTE) Program has developed a new degree program for corporate trainers that maintains…

  16. Self-Perceived Educational Preparedness of Entry-Level Athletic Trainers Regarding Preventing Sudden Death in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Yabor, Thomas M.; Salvatore, Anthony C.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: As the first medical professionals on scene when emergency situations arise in sport, athletic trainers (ATs) need to be proficient in recognizing and managing these conditions. Recent evidence regarding exertional heatstroke indicates a lack of educational training as a factor preventing implementation of best practices, yet other causes…

  17. Female Head Athletic Trainers in NCAA Division I (IA Football) Athletics: How They Made It to the Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorant, JoAnne

    2012-01-01

    The profession of athletic training has opened its doors to women, who now slightly outnumber men in the profession (Shingles, 2001; WATC, 1997, 2005). Unfortunately, this representation does not carry over into positions of high rank. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the lived experiences of female head athletic trainers in…

  18. Examining the Effectiveness of a Train-the-Trainer Model: Training Teachers to Use Pivotal Response Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    The train-the-trainer (TTT) model, which has also been called pyramidal training, triadic training, and helper model training, focuses on initially training a person or people who, in turn, train other people at their home agency. The TTT model has promise of being both efficient and cost-effective. The TTT model may be especially useful in…

  19. Case Report: Using an Auditory Trainer with Caregiver Video Modeling to Enhance Communication and Socialization Behaviors in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baharav, Eva; Darling, Rieko

    2008-01-01

    A minimally verbal child with autism was exposed to short daily sessions of watching his parents on video in conjunction with an FM auditory trainer for a period of 4 weeks. Baseline measures of verbal and social behaviors were taken pre-treatment and repeated post treatment. Results indicate substantial gains in word productions, social…

  20. Using Conversion and Design Social R & D Principles to Identify Some Practice Implications for the Training of Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapides, Jerry

    This literature review examines 12 current works dealing with converting basic research on adult learning, adult development, adult education, instructional methods, and learning theory to practical application in the training of trainers. Focus of the review is on translating principles from scientific language to language more suitable to…

  1. Unmanned Aircraft: A Pilot's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pestana, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the challenges of "piloting" a unmanned aircraft. The topic include the pilot-vehicle interact design, the concept of pilot/operator, and role of NASA's Ikhana UAS in the western states fire mission.

  2. Fire fighting trainers' exposure to carcinogenic agents in smoke diving simulators.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Juha; Mäkelä, Mauri; Mikkola, Jouni; Huttu, Ismo

    2010-01-15

    It is well known that fire fighters are potentially exposed to various carcinogenic agents at a fire scene. An almost unheeded issue, however, is fire fighters' exposure to carcinogenic agents in smoke diving simulators. Biomonitoring (urinary muconic acid, 1-naphthol and 1-pyrenol), dermal (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and occupational hygiene measurements (cyanides, hydrogen cyanide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds and formaldehyde) were used to determine how the burning material, the type of simulator and protective clothing used affect fire fighting trainers' exposure. The highest excretion of 1-pyrenol (sampled 6h after end of exposure, in average 4.3-9.2nmol/L) and emissions of benzene (1.0-2.5mg/m(3)) and hydrogen cyanide (0.2-0.9mg/m(3)) were measured during the burning of conifer plywood and chipboard, and the lowest when pure pine and spruce wood (1.5nmol/L, 0.6mg/m(3), and 0.05mg/m(3)) was burned. However the safest burning material seemed to be propane (1.0nmol/L, 0.2mg/m(3), and not measured). The type of simulator used affected trainers' exposure very clearly. The highest dermal whole body exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in the fire house simulator (in average 1200ng/cm(2)). Clearly lower exposure levels were measured in container training sessions (760ng/cm(2)), where the average dermal exposure level was 35% lower than in the fire house. The exposure levels (30ng/cm(2)) in the gas simulator in turn, were only 4% of the levels in container training sessions. The amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons decreased by 80% on trainers' hands when they used under gloves (in average 8.7ng/cm(2)) compared to those (48.4ng/cm(2)) who did not. There was not difference in protection efficiency against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between tested fire suits (Brage and Bristol). PMID:19576276

  3. Effects of G-trainer, cycle ergometry, and stretching on physiological and psychological recovery from endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    West, Amy D; Cooke, Matthew B; LaBounty, Paul M; Byars, Allyn G; Greenwood, Mike

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 3 treatment modes (Anti-Gravity Treadmill [G-trainer], stationary cycling [CompuTrainer], and static stretching) on the physiological and psychological recovery after an acute bout of exhaustive exercise. In a crossover design, 12 aerobically trained men (21.3 ± 2.3 years, 72.1 ± 8.1 kg, 178.4 ± 6.3 cm, (Equation is included in full-text article.): 53.7 ± 6.3 ml·kg·min) completed a 29-km stationary cycling time trial. Immediately after the time trial, subjects completed 30 minutes of G-trainer or CompuTrainer (40% (Equation is included in full-text article.)) or static stretching exercises. A significant time effect was detected for plasma lactate (p = 0.010) and serum cortisol (p = 0.039) after exercise. No treatment or treatment by time interaction was identified for lactate or cortisol, respectively. No main effects for time, treatment, or treatment by time interaction were identified for interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). No differences were observed among treatments in skeletal muscle peak power output, mean power output, time to peak power, and rate to fatigue at 24 hours postexercise bout. Finally, no significant changes in mood status were observed after exercise and between treatment groups. When compared with stationary cycling and static stretching, exercise recovery performed on the G-trainer was unable to reduce systemic markers of stress and inflammation, blood lactate, or improve anaerobic performance and psychological mood states after an exhaustive bout of endurance exercise. Further research is warranted that includes individualized recovery modalities to create balances between the stresses of training and competition. PMID:24936899

  4. [Improving the collective self-efficacy of the teams of nurse trainers at IFSI through professional didactics].

    PubMed

    Nagels, Marc

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to show that the analysis of the activity is a factor of construction of the collective self-efficacy of the trainers of five training institutes in nursing care (IFSI). As a collective system of beliefs on the capacity of the group to attain its goals, self-efficacy finds its foundations in the sociocognitive theory which articulates, within a mutual triadic causality, the personal, behavioral and environmental factors of the human agentivity. The personal determiners (self-efficacy, cognitive organization of the activity) are put in connection with the behavioral (production of the performance) and environmental (attribution of skill, professional tasks and standards) factors. The intervention consisted in introducing one hundred and nine nurse trainers to work analysis in a context of hospital reforms. The collective self-efficacy of the trainers appears as a key variable of the success of these reforms. The collective self-efficacy was the object of a pre-test and a qualitative post-test on the basis of motivational indicators, of the effectiveness of the educational realizations to the students and the estimation of the performance of the group to conduct the reform. The level of collective self-efficacy increases and the first realizations maintain the belief of the trainers in their capacity to succeed collectively in the implementation of the training plan. This is the first research in France which shows that the analysis of the activity comes along with an increase of the collective self-efficacy in work. These results question the practices of the trainers beyond the paramedical sector alone. PMID:21568116

  5. To Educate Pilots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Dayton Y.

    1968-01-01

    As the highly trained ex-military pilots of World War II began to retire from commercial flying, there was concern over the pilot shortage, especially among the airlines with their growing needs. Miami-Dade Junior College, in January 1965, was the first to respond to this need. Although initial enrollment was expected to be small, 150 applications…

  6. SuperPILOT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissmann, Stephen M.

    1983-01-01

    SuperPILOT is Apple Computer's new computer assisted instruction authoring language. Provided is a review of SuperPILOT, indicated to be ideally suited for the development of interactive tutorials for the classroom. Includes comments on the language's strengths/weaknesses as well as comments on system requirements and special program features. (JN)

  7. Test Pilot and Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1920-01-01

    Goggles at the ready, this Langley test pilot and engineer conducted research business high above the ground. In the early years the flight research team was usually made up of a test pilot (Thomas Carroll, front cockpit) and an engineer (John W. Gus Crowley, Jr.).

  8. Medical Handbook for Pilots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This handbook provides information on an airline pilot's physical and mental status and related medical factors which may affect his/her performance. Contents include information on the physical examination for pilots, the flyer's environment, hypoxia, hyperventilation, gas in the body, the ears, alcohol, drugs and flying, carbon monoxide, vision,…

  9. Preparing Pilots for Takeoff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravage, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Why would schools consider partnering with a vendor to operate a pilot? Why not just wait until the final product is released? For starters, pilots provide schools with a golden opportunity to get an early look at the software, take it for a test flight, and ask for changes tailored to their operating environment and business needs. In some cases,…

  10. Space motion sickness preflight adaptation training Preliminary studies with prototype trainers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Ouyang, L.; Rock, J. C.; Von Gierke, H. E.; Reschke, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation hypothesis (Parker et al., 1985), preflight adaptation procedures and several preflight adaptation trainers (PATs) have been developed. Two PAT prototypes, the Miami University Seesaw (MUS) and the Dynamic Environmental Simulator (DES), include a physical room that is moved relative to the restrained subject. Results from the MUS and DES PAT experiments indicate that exposure to the produced sensory rearrangement can change eye movement reflexes. The changes persisted for a period longer than the training exposure period, indicating similarity with the eye-movement reflexes observed immediately postflight in weightlessness-adapted astronauts. It is concluded that the apparatus and procedures to preadapt astronauts to the sensory rearrangement of weightless space flight can be developed on the basis of the reported PATs and procedures. The third PAT prototype tested, which employs a computer-generated scene, failed to produce changes similar to those recorded in the MUS and DES experiments.

  11. Development and evaluation of a prototype in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, J. B., Jr.; Morris, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    An in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer capable of providing simulated indications of instrument flight in a typical general aviation aircraft independent of ground based navigation aids was developed. The IFR navaid related instruments and circuits from an ATC 610J table top simulator were installed in a Cessna 172 aircraft and connected to its electrical power and pitot static systems. The benefits expected from this hybridization concept include increased safety by reducing the number of general aviation aircraft conducting IFR training flights in congested terminal areas, and reduced fuel use and instruction costs by lessening the need to fly to and from navaid equipped airports and by increased efficiency of the required in-flight training. Technical feasibility was demonstrated and the operational feasibility of the concept was evaluated. Results indicated that the in-flight simulator is an effective training device for teaching IFR procedural skills.

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Prevention of Pediatric Overuse Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.; Decoster, Laura C.; Loud, Keith J.; Micheli, Lyle J.; Parker, J. Terry; Sandrey, Michelle A.; White, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To provide certified athletic trainers, physicians, and other health care professionals with recommendations on best practices for the prevention of overuse sports injuries in pediatric athletes (aged 6–18 years). Background: Participation in sports by the pediatric population has grown tremendously over the years. Although the health benefits of participation in competitive and recreational athletic events are numerous, one adverse consequence is sport-related injury. Overuse or repetitive trauma injuries represent approximately 50% of all pediatric sport-related injuries. It is speculated that more than half of these injuries may be preventable with simple approaches. Recommendations: Recommendations are provided based on current evidence regarding pediatric injury surveillance, identification of risk factors for injury, preparticipation physical examinations, proper supervision and education (coaching and medical), sport alterations, training and conditioning programs, and delayed specialization. PMID:21391806

  13. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Nelson, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, maneuvers himself into middeck mission specialists seat as MS David C. Hilmers pulls himself up onto flight deck from the middeck through the interdeck access hatch. Side hatch is closed and stowed treadmill appears in the foreground. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT is in launch (vertical) position therefore the aft middeck bulkhead and airlock become the floor.

  14. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Lounge, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and communications carrier assembly (CCA), pulls himself up onto flight deck from the middeck through the interdeck access hatch. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT is in launch (vertical) position therefore the aft middeck bulkhead becomes the floor (note technician at the side hatch).

  15. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson trains in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Nelson, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, exits CCT via slide inflated at side hatch. Technicians at the bottom of the slide prepare to help Nelson to his feet as a second set of technicians observe the activity from scaffolding on either side of the open hatch. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  16. STS-26 MS Hilmers during egress training at JSC's MAIL full fuselage trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), tries out the new crew escape system (CES) inflated slide during an emergency egress training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Technicians stand on either side of the slide ready to help Hilmers to his feet once he reaches the bottom. Watching from floor level at the far left is astronaut Steven R. Nagel. A second crewmember stands in the open side hatch of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) awaiting his turn to slide to 'safety'. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (LESs) and checked out CES slide and other CES configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. The CES pole extends out the side hatch just above Hilmers' head.

  17. Mechanical design and driving mechanism of an isokinetic functional electrical stimulation-based leg stepping trainer.

    PubMed

    Hamzaid, N A; Fornusek, C; Ruys, A; Davis, G M

    2007-12-01

    The mechanical design of a constant velocity (isokinetic) leg stepping trainer driven by functional electrical stimulation-evoked muscle contractions was the focus of this paper. The system was conceived for training the leg muscles of neurologically-impaired patients. A commercially available slider crank mechanism for elliptical stepping exercise was adapted to a motorized isokinetic driving mechanism. The exercise system permits constant-velocity pedalling at cadences of 1-60 rev x min(-1). The variable-velocity feature allows low pedalling forces for individuals with very weak leg muscles, yet provides resistance to higher pedalling effort in stronger patients. In the future, the system will be integrated with a computer-controlled neuromuscular stimulator and a feedback control unit to monitor training responses of spinal cord-injured, stroke and head injury patients. PMID:18274073

  18. AquaTrainer® Snorkel does not Increase Hydrodynamic Drag but Influences Turning Time.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, J; Figueiredo, P; Guidetti, L; Alves, F; Toussaint, H; Vilas-Boas, J P; Baldari, C; Fernandes, R J

    2016-04-01

    Our purpose was to verify if the use of the new AquaTrainer(®) respiratory snorkel lead to an increase of front crawl hydrodynamic drag and whether the constraint of using an adapted turning technique influences its corresponding turning time. 12 swimmers performed 2 (without and with snorkel) 12×25 front crawl repetitions from low to maximal velocity on the measuring active drag system. Complementarily, 3 swimming turns were compared: open turn with snorkel, tumble turn and open turn without snorkel. Drag values were similar without vs. with snorkel at 0.9, 1.1, 1.3, 1.5 and 1.7 m.s(-1) velocities: 15.84 ±5.32 vs. 16.18±4.81, 25.60±6.69 vs. 26.03±6.17, 38.37±8.04 vs. 38.88±7.56, 54.64±10.06 vs. 55.08±9.55, 74.77±14.09 vs. 74.92±13.14 N, (respectively, p≥0.05), and high agreement between conditions was observed (p<0.01). Front crawl swimming with snorkel using the open turn implied an increase in turning time of 14.2 and 5.1% than the tumble turn and open turn without the apparatus (p<0.01). AquaTrainer(®) snorkel does not lead to an increase in active drag during front crawl performed at a large range of velocities and, consequently, the metabolic energy necessary to overcome total drag will not be affected. However, turning with it requires an additional time that should be taken into account in scientific research and training conditions. PMID:26667927

  19. The Professional Socialization of Certified Athletic Trainers in High School Settings: A Grounded Theory Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Pitney, William A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To gain an understanding of the professional socialization experiences of certified athletic trainers (ATCs) working in the high school setting. Design and Setting: A qualitative investigation using a grounded theory approach was conducted to explore the experiences related to how ATCs learned their professional role in the high school setting. Participants: A total of 15 individuals (12 ATCs currently practicing at the high school level, 2 current high school athletic directors who are also ATCs, and 1 former high school ATC) participated in the study. The average number of years in their current position for the 12 currently practicing ATCs was 10.16 ± 7.44, with a range of 2 to 25 years. The 2 athletic directors averaged 5.5 years of experience in their roles, and the former high school athletic trainer had worked in that setting for 1 academic year. Data Analysis: The interviews were transcribed and then analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding. Peer debriefing, member checks, and triangulation were used to establish the trustworthiness of the study. Results: Informal learning processes were discovered as the overarching theme. This overarching theme was constructed from 2 thematic categories that emerged from the investigation: (1) an informal induction process: aspects of organizational learning, and (2) creating networks for learning. Conclusions: Informal learning is critical to the professional socialization process of ATCs working in the high school setting. Because informal learning hinges on self-direction, self-evaluation, reflection, and critical thinking, the findings of this study indicate that both preservice and continuing education should attempt to foster and enhance these qualities. PMID:12937587

  20. National Athletic Trainers' Association-Accredited Postprofessional Athletic Training Education: Attractors and Career Intentions

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Context Anecdotally, we know that students select graduate programs based on location, finances, and future career goals. Empirically, however, we lack information on what attracts a student to these programs. Objective To gain an appreciation for the selection process of graduate study. Design Qualitative study. Setting Postprofessional programs in athletic training (PPATs) accredited by the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Patients or Other Participants A total of 19 first-year PPAT students participated, representing 13 of the 16 accredited PPAT programs. Data Collection and Analysis All interviews were conducted via phone and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the interview data followed the procedures as outlined by a grounded theory approach. Trustworthiness was secured by (1) participant checks, (2) participant verification, and (3) multiple analyst triangulations. Results Athletic training students select PPAT programs for 4 major reasons: reputation of the program or faculty (or both), career intentions, professional socialization, and mentorship from undergraduate faculty or clinical instructors (or both). Participants discussed long-term professional goals as the driving force behind wanting an advanced degree in athletic training. Faculty and clinical instructor recommendations and the program's prestige helped guide the decisions. Participants also expressed the need to gain more experience, which promoted autonomy, and support while gaining that work experience. Final selection of the PPAT program was based on academic offerings, the assistantship offered (including financial support), advanced knowledge of athletic training concepts and principles, and apprenticeship opportunities. Conclusions Students who attend PPAT programs are attracted to advancing their entry-level knowledge, are committed to their professional development as athletic trainers, and view the profession of athletic training as a life-long career. The combination of

  1. Syndesmotic Ankle Sprains in Football: A Survey of National Football League Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Doughtie, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To obtain information regarding syndesmotic ankle sprains and to identify a specific treatment modality that reduces the recovery time for syndesmotic ankle sprains. Design and Setting: A mailed survey conducted from the Sports Medicine Department of Tufts University. Subjects: I sent a survey to the head athletic trainers of all 30 National Football League teams. Of the surveys mailed, 23 (77%) were returned. Measurements: The survey consisted of 8 questions pertaining to syndesmotic ankle sprains with respect to mechanism of injury, playing surface, diagnostic tests, immediate and follow-up treatment modalities, best treatment, recovery time, and taping procedure. Results: A variety of causes were noted as being responsible for syndesmotic ankle sprains; the most frequently described mechanism of injury involved a rotational component. Playing surface was not thought to be a factor in the incidence of syndesmotic ankle sprains. Most athletic trainers (96%) indicated that plain radiographs were part of the diagnostic process, while 52% noted that magnetic resonance imaging was also ordered for suspected syndesmotic ankle sprains. The most frequently used modalities during the acute stage were ice, electrical muscle stimulation, casting or bracing (or both), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Proprioception training, ultrasound, and taping were the most commonly used modalities during follow-up treatment. Immobilization, cortico-steroid injection, and ice and exercise were reported to be the best treatments for reducing recovery time of syndesmotic ankle sprains. Conclusions: To date, no treatment plan or modality for syndesmotic ankle sprains has been shown to effectively provide an early and safe return to football. Therefore, the need is clear for prospective studies comparing treatment protocols and severity of injury. PMID:16558541

  2. Certified Athletic Trainers' Knowledge of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Common Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    Kahanov, Leamor; Gilmore, Elizabeth J.; Eberman, Lindsey E.; Roberts, Jeffrey; Semerjian, Tamar; Baldwin, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Context: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are increasingly common in athletic settings. The MRSA knowledge and infection-control practices of certified athletic trainers (ATs) and the cleanliness of the athletic training room are important factors in preventing MRSA infections. Objective: To assess knowledge of MRSA and the use of common disinfectants among ATs and to explore their infection-control practices. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: High school and collegiate athletic training rooms. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 163 ATs from National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III and high schools, representing all 10 National Athletic Trainers' Association districts. Main Outcome Measure(s): Frequencies, analyses of variance, and χ2 tests were used to assess current practices and opinions and relationships between factors. Results: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was perceived as a national problem by 92% of respondents; 57% perceived MRSA as a problem in their practice setting. Most respondents had treated general infections (88%), staphylococcal infections (75%), and MRSA infections (57%). Male sex was associated with treating all 3 types of infections (χ2 test, P < .05). Noncurriculum education was associated with a lack of recognition of environmental issues as risk factors and with the use of isopropyl alcohol for disinfection (χ2 test, P < .05). For example, 10% of respondents did not recognize that contaminated whirlpools can be a source of MRSA infection. Respondents also incorrectly identified effective cleaning solutions. Thirty percent of respondents cleaned their hands frequently or sometimes before treating each athlete and 35% cleaned their hands sometimes, occasionally, or never after seeing each athlete. Conclusions: The majority of ATs were informed about MRSA and made correct disinfection choices. However, improvements are still needed, and not all ATs were using

  3. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Lightning Safety for Athletics and Recreation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Katie M.; Bennett, Brian; Cooper, Mary Ann; Holle, Ronald L.; Kithil, Richard; López, Raul E.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To educate athletic trainers and others about the dangers of lightning, provide lightning-safety guidelines, define safe structures and locations, and advocate prehospital care for lightning-strike victims. Background: Lightning may be the most frequently encountered severe-storm hazard endangering physically active people each year. Millions of lightning flashes strike the ground annually in the United States, causing nearly 100 deaths and 400 injuries. Three quarters of all lightning casualties occur between May and September, and nearly four fifths occur between 10:00 AM and 7:00 PM, which coincides with the hours for most athletic or recreational activities. Additionally, lightning casualties from sports and recreational activities have risen alarmingly in recent decades. Recommendations: The National Athletic Trainers' Association recommends a proactive approach to lightning safety, including the implementation of a lightning-safety policy that identifies safe locations for shelter from the lightning hazard. Further components of this policy are monitoring local weather forecasts, designating a weather watcher, and establishing a chain of command. Additionally, a flash-to-bang count of 30 seconds or more should be used as a minimal determinant of when to suspend activities. Waiting 30 minutes or longer after the last flash of lightning or sound of thunder is recommended before athletic or recreational activities are resumed. Lightning- safety strategies include avoiding shelter under trees, avoiding open fields and spaces, and suspending the use of land-line telephones during thunderstorms. Also outlined in this document are the prehospital care guidelines for triaging and treating lightning-strike victims. It is important to evaluate victims quickly for apnea, asystole, hypothermia, shock, fractures, and burns. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is effective in resuscitating pulseless victims of lightning strike. Maintenance of cardiopulmonary

  4. Collaboration between human and nonhuman players in Night Vision Tactical Trainer-Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglie, Stephen T.; Gallogly, James J.

    2016-05-01

    The Night Vision Tactical Trainer - Shadow (NVTT-S) is a U.S. Army-developed training tool designed to improve critical Manned-Unmanned Teaming (MUMT) communication skills for payload operators in Unmanned Aerial Sensor (UAS) crews. The trainer is composed of several Government Off-The-Shelf (GOTS) simulation components and takes the trainee through a series of escalating engagements using tactically relevant, realistically complex, scenarios involving a variety of manned, unmanned, aerial, and ground-based assets. The trainee is the only human player in the game and he must collaborate, from his web-based mock operating station, with various non-human players via spoken natural language over simulated radio in order to execute the training missions successfully. Non-human players are modeled in two complementary layers - OneSAF provides basic background behaviors for entities while NVTT provides higher level models that control entity actions based on intent extracted from the trainee's spoken natural dialog with game entities. Dialog structure is modeled based on Army standards for communication and verbal protocols. This paper presents an architecture that integrates the U.S. Army's Night Vision Image Generator (NVIG), One Semi- Automated Forces (OneSAF), a flight dynamics model, as well as Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) speech recognition and text to speech products to effect an environment with sufficient entity counts and fidelity to enable meaningful teaching and reinforcement of critical communication skills. It further demonstrates the model dynamics and synchronization mechanisms employed to execute purpose-built training scenarios, and to achieve ad-hoc collaboration on-the-fly between human and non-human players in the simulated environment.

  5. 'Train the trainer' model: implications for health professionals and farm family health in Australia.

    PubMed

    Brumby, Susan; Smith, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Australia is a large country with 60% of land used for agricultural production. Its interior is sparsely populated, with higher morbidity and mortality recorded in rural areas, particularly farmers, farm families, and agricultural workers. Rural health professionals in addressing health education gaps of farming groups have reported using behavioralist approaches. These approaches in isolation have been criticized as disempowering for participants who are identified as passive learners or 'empty vessels.' A major challenge in rural health practice is to develop more inclusive and innovative models in building improved health outcomes. The Sustainable Farm Families Train the Trainer (SFFTTT) model is a 5-day program developed by Western District Health Service designed to enhance practice among health professionals working with farm families in Australia. This innovative model of addressing farmer health asks health professionals to understand the context of the farm family and encourages them to value the experience and existing knowledge of the farmer, the family and the farm business. The SFFTTT program has engaged with health agencies, community, government, and industry groups across Australia and over 120 rural nurses have been trained since 2005. These trainers have successfully delivered programs to 1000 farm families, with high participant completion, positive evaluation, and improved health indicators. Rural professionals report changes in how they approach health education, clinical practice, and promotion with farm families and agricultural industries. This paper highlights the success of SFFTTT as an effective tool in enhancing primary health practice in rural and remote settings. The program is benefiting not only drought ravaged farmers but assisting rural nurses, health agencies, and health boards to engage with farm families at a level not identified previously. Furthermore, nurses and health professionals are now embracing a more 'farmer

  6. Is gynaecological surgical training a cause for concern? A questionnaire survey of trainees and trainers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Astract Background Concerns have been raised as to whether the current postgraduate training programme for gynaecological surgery is being detrimentally affected by changes in working practices, in particular the European Working Time Directive (EWTD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the surgical activity of obstetrics and gynaecology trainees and to explore trainees' and trainers' opinions on the current barriers and potential solutions to surgical training. Methods Two questionnaire surveys were conducted, one to obstetrics and gynaecology trainees working within the West Midlands Deanery and a second to consultant gynaecologists in the West Midlands region. Results One hundred and four trainees (64.3%) and 66 consultant gynaecologists (55.0%) responded. Sixty-six trainees (66.7%) reported attending up to one operating list per week. However, 28.1% reported attending up to one list every two weeks or less and 5 trainees stated that they had not attended a list at all over the preceding 8 weeks. Trainees working in a unit with less than 3999 deliveries attended significantly more theatre sessions compared to trainees in units with over 4000 deliveries (p = 0.007), as did senior trainees (p = 0.032) and trainees attached to consultants performing major gynaecological surgery (p = 0.022). In the previous 8 weeks, only 6 trainees reported performing a total abdominal hysterectomy independently, all were senior trainees (ST6 and above). In the trainers' survey, only two respondents (3.0%) agreed that the current program produces doctors competent in general gynaecological surgery by the end of training, compared to 48 (73.8%) respondents who disagreed. Conclusions Trainees' concerns over a lack of surgical training appear to be justified. The main barriers to training are perceived to be a lack of team structure and a lack of theatre time. PMID:21668984

  7. Pilot Weather Advisor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindamood, Glenn; Martzaklis, Konstantinos Gus; Hoffler, Keith; Hill, Damon; Mehrotra, Sudhir C.; White, E. Richard; Fisher, Bruce D.; Crabill, Norman L.; Tucholski, Allen D.

    2006-01-01

    The Pilot Weather Advisor (PWA) system is an automated satellite radio-broadcasting system that provides nearly real-time weather data to pilots of aircraft in flight anywhere in the continental United States. The system was designed to enhance safety in two distinct ways: First, the automated receipt of information would relieve the pilot of the time-consuming and distracting task of obtaining weather information via voice communication with ground stations. Second, the presentation of the information would be centered around a map format, thereby making the spatial and temporal relationships in the surrounding weather situation much easier to understand

  8. Pilot weather advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, W. A.; Seth, S.; Crabill, N. L.; Shipley, S. T.; Graffman, I.; Oneill, J.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the work performed by ViGYAN, Inc., to demonstrate the Pilot Weather Advisor cockpit weather data system using a broadcast satellite communication system are presented. The Pilot Weather Advisor demonstrated that the technical problems involved with transmitting significant amount of weather data to an aircraft in-flight or on-the-ground via satellite are solvable with today's technology. The Pilot Weather Advisor appears to be a viable solution for providing accurate and timely weather information for general aviation aircraft.

  9. 14 CFR 61.94 - Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Student pilot seeking a sport pilot... Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations at... operational control tower in other airspace. (a) A student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or...

  10. 14 CFR 61.94 - Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Student pilot seeking a sport pilot... Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations at... operational control tower in other airspace. (a) A student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or...

  11. 14 CFR 61.94 - Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Student pilot seeking a sport pilot... Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations at... operational control tower in other airspace. (a) A student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or...

  12. 14 CFR 61.94 - Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Student pilot seeking a sport pilot... Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations at... operational control tower in other airspace. (a) A student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or...

  13. 14 CFR 61.94 - Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Student pilot seeking a sport pilot... Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations at... operational control tower in other airspace. (a) A student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or...

  14. Making and Maintaining Lifestyle Changes with the Support of a Lay Health Advisor: Longitudinal Qualitative Study of Health Trainer Services in Northern England

    PubMed Central

    Visram, Shelina; Clarke, Charlotte; White, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore and document the experiences of those receiving support from a lay health trainer, in order to inform the optimisation and evaluation of such interventions. Design Longitudinal qualitative study with up to four serial interviews conducted over 12 months. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative approach associated with grounded theory. Participants 13 health trainers, 5 managers and 26 clients. Setting Three health trainer services targeting disadvantaged communities in northern England. Results The final dataset comprised 116 interviews (88 with clients and 28 with staff). Discussions with health trainers and managers revealed a high degree of heterogeneity between the local services in terms of their primary aims and activities. However, these were found to converge over time. There was agreement that health trainer interventions are generally ‘person-centred’ in terms of being tailored to the needs of individual clients. This led to a range of self-reported outcomes, including behaviour changes, physical health improvements and increased social activity. Factors impacting on the maintenance of lifestyle changes included the cost and timing of health-promoting activities, ill-health or low mood. Participants perceived a need for ongoing access to low cost facilities to ensure that any lifestyle changes can be maintained in the longer term. Conclusions Health trainers may be successful in terms of supporting people from socio-economically disadvantaged communities to make positive lifestyle changes, as well as achieving other health-related outcomes. This is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach; commissioners and providers should select the intervention models that best meet the needs of their local populations. By delivering holistic interventions that address multiple lifestyle risks and incorporate relapse prevention strategies, health trainers could potentially have a significant impact on health

  15. Pilot Overmyer on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    On middeck port side, Pilot Overmyer, looks down at freefloating object. On his left, attached to port side wall, are a dessert package, a prepackaged meal, control panel ML86B, and water dispenser kit with water gun.

  16. Automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, J. L., Jr.; Haidt, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    An Automated Pilot Advisory System (APAS) was developed and operationally tested to demonstrate the concept that low cost automated systems can provide air traffic and aviation weather advisory information at high density uncontrolled airports. The system was designed to enhance the see and be seen rule of flight, and pilots who used the system preferred it over the self announcement system presently used at uncontrolled airports.

  17. Telescience testbed pilot program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.

    1988-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association (USRA), under sponsorship from the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications, is conducting a Telescience Testbed Pilot Program. Fifteen universities, under subcontract to USRA, are conducting a variety of scientific experiments using advanced technology to determine the requirements and evaluate the tradeoffs for the information system of the Space Station era. An interim set of recommendations based on the experiences of the first six months of the pilot program is presented.

  18. 33 CFR 110.71b - Wye River, Wye, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′13″ W.; thence following the shoreline to the point of beginning....

  19. 33 CFR 110.71b - Wye River, Wye, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′13″ W.; thence following the shoreline to the point of beginning....

  20. 33 CFR 110.71b - Wye River, Wye, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′13″ W.; thence following the shoreline to the point of beginning....

  1. 33 CFR 110.71b - Wye River, Wye, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′13″ W.; thence following the shoreline to the point of beginning....

  2. 33 CFR 110.71b - Wye River, Wye, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′23″ W., to latitude 38°53′18″ N., longitude 76°11′13″ W.; thence following the shoreline to the point of beginning....

  3. Assessment of the Clinical Trainer as a Role Model: A Role Model Apperception Tool (RoMAT)

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Nynke; Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Positive role modeling by clinical trainers is important for helping trainees learn professional and competent behavior. The authors developed and validated an instrument to assess clinical trainers as role models: the Role Model Apperception Tool (RoMAT). Method On the basis of a 2011 systematic review of the literature and through consultation with medical education experts and with clinical trainers and trainees, the authors developed 17 attributes characterizing a role model, to be assessed using a Likert scale. In 2012, general practice (GP) trainees, in their first or third year of postgraduate training, who attended a curriculum day at four institutes in different parts of the Netherlands, completed the RoMAT. The authors performed a principal component analysis on the data that were generated, and they tested the instrument’s validity and reliability. Results Of 328 potential GP trainees, 279 (85%) participated. Of these, 202 (72%) were female, and 154 (55%) were first-year trainees. The RoMAT demonstrated both content and convergent validity. Two components were extracted: “Caring Attitude” and “Effectiveness.” Both components had high reliability scores (0.92 and 0.84, respectively). Less experienced trainees scored their trainers significantly higher on the Caring Attitude component. Conclusions The RoMAT proved to be a valid, reliable instrument for assessing clinical trainers’ role-modeling behavior. Both components include an equal number of items addressing personal (Heart), teaching (Head), and clinical (Hands-on) qualities, thus demonstrating that competence in the “3Hs” is a condition for positive role modeling. Educational managers (residency directors) and trainees alike can use the RoMAT. PMID:24556764

  4. Development and Initial Validation of a Virtual Reality Haptically Augmented Surgical Knot-Tying Trainer for the Autosuture™ ENDOSTITCH™ Instrument

    PubMed Central

    KURENOV, Sergei; PUNAK, Sukitti; PETERS, Jorg; LEE, Constance; CENDAN, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The Autosuture™ Endostitch ™ device (Covidien, CT) is difficult to learn. In particular, the handle requires the use of a toggle which is unique in this instrument. We have developed a virtual reality trainer for the device that offers the use of the actual instrument handle while creating a visible virtual instrument tip complete with virtual needle and suture on a monitor. This report represents the development and initial validation experiments for the device. PMID:19377135

  5. A case report of lung cancer in a horse trainer caused by exposure to respirable crystalline silica: an exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Kim, Boowook; Choi, Byung-Soon; Park, So Young; Kwag, Hyun-Suk; Kim, In-Ah; Jeong, Ji Yeon

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present a case of lung cancer in a 48-year-old male horse trainer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case report to include an exposure assessment of respirable crystalline silica (RCS) as a quartz. The trainer had no family history of lung cancer. Although he had a 15 pack/year cigarette-smoking history, he had stopped smoking 12 years prior to his diagnosis. For the past 23 years, he had performed longeing, and trained 7-12 horses per day on longeing arena surfaces covered by recycled sands, the same surfaces used in race tracks. We investigated his workplace RCS exposure, and found it to be the likely cause of his lung cancer. The 8-hour time weight average range of RCS was 0.020 to 0.086 mg/m(3) in the longeing arena. Horse trainers are exposed to RCS from the sand in longeing arenas, and the exposure level is high enough to have epidemiological ramifications for the occupational risk of lung cancer. PMID:23515369

  6. A Case Report of Lung Cancer in a Horse Trainer Caused by Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica: An Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Park, So Young; Kwag, Hyun-Suk; Kim, In-Ah; Jeong, Ji Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a case of lung cancer in a 48-year-old male horse trainer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case report to include an exposure assessment of respirable crystalline silica (RCS) as a quartz. The trainer had no family history of lung cancer. Although he had a 15 pack/year cigarette-smoking history, he had stopped smoking 12 years prior to his diagnosis. For the past 23 years, he had performed longeing, and trained 7-12 horses per day on longeing arena surfaces covered by recycled sands, the same surfaces used in race tracks. We investigated his workplace RCS exposure, and found it to be the likely cause of his lung cancer. The 8-hour time weight average range of RCS was 0.020 to 0.086 mg/m3 in the longeing arena. Horse trainers are exposed to RCS from the sand in longeing arenas, and the exposure level is high enough to have epidemiological ramifications for the occupational risk of lung cancer. PMID:23515369

  7. Clinical-Education-Setting Standards Are Helpful in the Professional Preparation of Employed, Entry-Level Certified Athletic Trainers.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Tim; Weidner, Thomas G

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the helpfulness of clinical-education-setting standards in the professional preparation of entry-level certified athletic trainers. DESIGN AND SETTING: We developed a 22-item questionnaire based on the 12 standards presented by Weidner and Laurent. Subjects used a Likert scale (0 = no help, 5 = very helpful) to indicate their perceptions of the helpfulness of each standard in preparing them for their roles and responsibilities as certified athletic trainers. SUBJECTS: We surveyed employed, entry-level certified athletic trainers who recently completed Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs-accredited athletic training education programs. MEASUREMENTS: Percentage means were computed for the helpfulness ratings of each standard. A percentage mean was computed for the overall contribution of clinical education to professional development. Chi-square analyses were used to assess the differences in helpfulness ratings among respondents. RESULTS: The overall mean score across all standards was 4.17. No significant differences in the helpfulness ratings of any of the respondents were noted regardless of sex, ethnicity, number of clinical-education hours, total semesters of clinical education, settings in which students gained clinical experience, or current employment (P

  8. Sleep Position Trainer versus Tennis Ball Technique in Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eijsvogel, Michiel M.; Ubbink, Rinse; Dekker, Janita; Oppersma, Eline; de Jongh, Frans H.; van der Palen, Job; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein G.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Positional therapy (PT) is an effective therapy in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (POSAS) when used, but the compliance of PT is low. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new kind of PT is effective and can improve compliance. Methods: 29 patients were treated with the sleep position trainer (SPT), 26 patients with the tennis ball technique (TBT). At baseline and 1 month polysomnography, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Quebec Sleep Questionnaire (QSQ) were taken. Daily compliance was objectively measured in both groups. Results: Both therapies prevent supine sleep position to a median of 0% (min-max: SPT 0.0% to 67%, TBT 0.0% to 38.9%), resulting in a treatment success (AHI < 5) in 68.0% of the SPT and 42.9% of the TBT patients. The ESS at baseline was < 10 in both groups. Sleep quality parameters, such as wake after sleep onset (WASO; p = 0.001) and awakenings (p = 0.006), improved more in the SPT group. Total QSQ scores (0.4 ± 0.2, p = 0.03), the QSQ domains nocturnal symptoms (0.7 ± 0.2, p = 0.01), and social interactions (0.8 ± 0.3, p = 0.02) changed in favor of the SPT group. Effective compliance (≥ 4 h/night + ≥ 5 days/week) was 75.9% for the SPT and 42.3% for the TBT users (p = 0.01). Conclusion: In mild POSAS with normal EES the new SPT device and the standard TBT are equally effective in reducing respiratory indices. However, compared to the TBT, sleep quality, quality of life, and compliance improved significantly more in the SPT group. Citation: Eijsvogel MM, Ubbink R, Dekker J, Oppersma E, de Jongh FH, van der Palen J, Brusse-Keizer MG. Sleep position trainer versus tennis ball technique in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):139–147. PMID:25515276

  9. Athletic Trainer Perceptions of Life-Work Balance and Parenting Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Eberman, Lindsey E.; Kahanov, Leamor

    2013-01-01

    Context: Life-work balance may be one reason for retention concerns among athletic trainers (ATs), yet evidence does not exist to support the supposition. Objective: To assess the perceptions of ATs regarding life-work balance, specifically on parenting issues. Design: Survey. Setting: Online survey at www.surveymonkey.com. Patients or Other Participants: A random sample of National Athletic Trainers' Association members (N = 9516) received the survey; 20.6% (n = 1962; male = 954, female = 816; age = 37 ± 10 years, experience = 13 ± 9 years) completed any portion of the survey. Most respondents worked in the college/university (34.5%, n = 657 of 1908) and secondary school settings (25.9%, n = 476 of 1908). A majority of participants (50.7%, n = 898 of 1770) were parents. Intervention(s): We calculated frequencies and percentages and used Mann-Whitney U tests and Kruskal-Wallis tests to identify the differences between sexes and among job settings on life-work balance measures among parents. Main Outcome Measures: The questionnaire included 8 life-work balance items, 7 parenting challenge items, and 3 nonparent items. Results: The results indicate that sex and setting significantly affected perceptions about parenting. Males articulated a stronger sense of difficulty in finding balance as a working parent (P < .001; 1.95 ± 1.98). Females felt more strongly than males that managing work and family was stressful (P = .04; 3.86 ± 1.13) and caused burnout (P = .004; 3.50 ± 1.24), and that their energy tended to fall short of their needs (P < .001; 3.74 ± 1.15). The decision not to have children was strongly affected by the work setting (P = .014; 3.37 ± 1.42). Both college/university (4.14 ± 0.85) and secondary school (4.03 ± 0.90) ATs would prefer to spend more time at home, as compared with ATs in other settings (P < .001). College/university ATs (P = .025; 3.17 ± 1.23) felt most strongly that their families were neglected because of work. In none of the

  10. Experiences With Workplace Bullying Among Athletic Trainers in the Collegiate Setting

    PubMed Central

    Weuve, Celest; Pitney, William A.; Martin, Malissa; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Workplace bullying (WPB) is a series of persistent negative interactions that affect a clinician's ability to perform his or her role. Although WPB has been studied in other health professions, to date, no information exists pertaining to WPB in athletic training. Objective: To determine the prevalence of WPB in the collegiate setting and examine factors that influence its occurrence. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Collegiate setting. Patients or Other Participants: There were 723 (329 female, 394 male) athletic trainers (ATs) aged 37.5 ± 10.4 years. Main Outcome Measure(s): We collected data via the validated and reliable online Athletic Training Environment Survey. Descriptive statistics were obtained to determine a bullying score for each AT and examine the prevalence of WPB. Chi-square analyses were performed to examine the differences between (1) sex, (2) academic degree level, (3) employment title, and (4) National Athletic Trainers' Association district. Results: A total of 106 participants (14.7%) had a score of 2 or higher, indicating they were bullied in the athletic training setting. Of those bullied, 47 (44.3%) were women and 59 (55.7%) were men. There was no difference between women and men with respect to having experienced bullying (χ21 = 0.068, P = .794). Moreover, no difference existed in the prevalence of bullying among ATs holding various degrees (χ23 = 6.73, P = .081) or among ATs holding various titles within an organization (χ25 = 3.55, P = .616). More (χ21 = 23.77, P = < .001) perpetrators were male (74.2%, n = 75) than female (25.8%, n = 26); of these, 38.2% (n = 39) were coaches, 17.6% (n = 18) were supervisory ATs, and 8.8% (n = 9) were coworker ATs. Conclusions: Bullying was experienced by both male and female ATs in the collegiate setting, and a higher number of bullies were male. More research is necessary to explore WPB in other work settings. PMID:25098660

  11. "It Happened in Seconds" Firefighter Burn Prevention Program: Evaluation of a "Train the Trainer" Course.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Steven A; Held, Jenny M; Hollowed, Kathleen A; Woods, Jason; Holmes, James H

    2016-01-01

    Each year, there are approximately 100 firefighter fatalities and tens of thousands of injuries in the United States. 'It Happened in Seconds' is a firefighter burn injury awareness program offered to firefighters nationwide. The course focuses on situational awareness, personal protective equipment, and burn injury prevention. In order to create more instructors, a 'Train the Trainer' instructor course was developed to prepare experienced firefighters and healthcare providers from around the United States to teach firefighters in their respective communities. This study evaluates trainees' perception of the instructor course. Three instructor courses were held in a period between November 2013 and January 2015. Trainees were asked to complete both precourse/postcourse assessments and provide demographics. In both surveys, trainees rated their confidence to instruct firefighters about burn prevention and their awareness about firefighter-specific burn issues using a 5-point Likert Scale (1 = none and 5 = high). The postassessment asked if trainees thought the course should be mandatory for all firefighters. Pretest and post-test scores were compared using a Wilcoxon's signed-rank test. A total of 140 experienced firefighters and healthcare professionals completed the Train the Trainer course. The average age was 40 ± 9 years, and 41 were women and 99 men. The average trainee had 13.6 ± 9 years experience in his or her respective job and 11 ± 9 years experience in burn care. Trainees reported a significant increase in their confidence to instruct firefighters about burn prevention (2.9/5 precourse vs. 4.5/5 postcourse, P < .0001) and in their current awareness of firefighter-specific burn issues (3.2 precourse vs. 4.4 postcourse, P < .0001). In the postcourse assessment, 139 of 140 respondents agreed that the 'It Happened in Seconds' course should be mandatory for all firefighters. This study showed that experienced firefighters and healthcare professionals

  12. Training Trainers in health and human rights: Implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. Methods A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Results Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28%) completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%). Twenty-two respondents (48%) implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66) to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. Conclusion This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation to incorporate human

  13. Pilot-optimal augmentation synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    An augmentation synthesis method usable in the absence of quantitative handling qualities specifications, and yet explicitly including design objectives based on pilot-rating concepts, is presented. The algorithm involves the unique approach of simultaneously solving for the stability augmentation system (SAS) gains, pilot equalization and pilot rating prediction via optimal control techniques. Simultaneous solution is required in this case since the pilot model (gains, etc.) depends upon the augmented plant dynamics, and the augmentation is obviously not a priori known. Another special feature is the use of the pilot's objective function (from which the pilot model evolves) to design the SAS.

  14. Haptic wearables as sensory replacement, sensory augmentation and trainer - a review.

    PubMed

    Shull, Peter B; Damian, Dana D

    2015-01-01

    Sensory impairments decrease quality of life and can slow or hinder rehabilitation. Small, computationally powerful electronics have enabled the recent development of wearable systems aimed to improve function for individuals with sensory impairments. The purpose of this review is to synthesize current haptic wearable research for clinical applications involving sensory impairments. We define haptic wearables as untethered, ungrounded body worn devices that interact with skin directly or through clothing and can be used in natural environments outside a laboratory. Results of this review are categorized by degree of sensory impairment. Total impairment, such as in an amputee, blind, or deaf individual, involves haptics acting as sensory replacement; partial impairment, as is common in rehabilitation, involves haptics as sensory augmentation; and no impairment involves haptics as trainer. This review found that wearable haptic devices improved function for a variety of clinical applications including: rehabilitation, prosthetics, vestibular loss, osteoarthritis, vision loss and hearing loss. Future haptic wearables development should focus on clinical needs, intuitive and multimodal haptic displays, low energy demands, and biomechanical compliance for long-term usage. PMID:26188929

  15. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Preparticipation Physical Examinations and Disqualifying Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Kevin M.; Bolin, Delmas J.; Carek, Peter J.; Konin, Jeff G.; Neal, Timothy L.; Violette, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Objective To present athletic trainers with recommendations for the content and administration of the preparticipation physical examination (PPE) as well as considerations for determining safe participation in sports and identifying disqualifying conditions. Background Preparticipation physical examinations have been used routinely for nearly 40 years. However, considerable debate exists as to their efficacy due to the lack of standardization in the process and the lack of conformity in the information that is gathered. With the continuing rise in sports participation at all levels and the growing number of reported cases of sudden death in organized athletics, the sports medicine community should consider adopting a standardized process for conducting the PPE to protect all parties. Recommendations Recommendations are provided to equip the sports medicine community with the tools necessary to conduct the PPE as effectively and efficiently as possible using available scientific evidence and best practices. In addition, the recommendations will help clinicians identify those conditions that may threaten the health and safety of participants in organized sports, may require further evaluation and intervention, or may result in potential disqualification. PMID:24499039

  16. Athletic Trainers' Barriers to Maintaining Professional Commitment in the Collegiate Setting

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Eason, Christianne M.; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Professional commitment simply describes one's obligation to his or her work. For athletic trainers (ATs), the demanding work environment and job expectations may affect their characterization of professional commitment. Our breadth of knowledge regarding professional commitment within athletic training is narrow. Objective: To evaluate the professional commitment of ATs in the collegiate setting. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Collegiate. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-three Board of Certification-certified ATs employed in the collegiate setting (National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I = 11, Division II = 9, Division III = 13) with an average of 10 ± 8 years of clinical experience volunteered. Data saturation guided the total number of participants. Data Collection and Analysis: Online journaling via QuestionPro was completed by all participants. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were conducted for data credibility. Analysis followed a general inductive method. Results: Four themes speak to the factors that negatively affect ATs' professional enthusiasm and commitment: (1) life stage, (2) work overload, (3) organizational climate, and (4) human resources. The latter 3 speak to the effect the workplace can have on ATs' professional commitment, and the first speaks to the effect outside responsibilities can have. Conclusions: Our results suggest that several of the factors that negatively influence the professional commitment of collegiate ATs are modifiable organizational components. Developing resiliency strategies at the individual and organizational levels may help to facilitate improved professional commitment for the AT. PMID:25761133

  17. Improving brain injury cognitive rehabilitation by personalized telerehabilitation services: Guttmann neuropersonal trainer.

    PubMed

    Solana, Javier; Cáceres, César; García-Molina, Alberto; Opisso, Eloy; Roig, Teresa; Tormos, José M; Gómez, Enrique J

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive rehabilitation aims to remediate or alleviate the cognitive deficits appearing after an episode of acquired brain injury (ABI). The purpose of this work is to describe the telerehabilitation platform called Guttmann Neuropersonal Trainer (GNPT) which provides new strategies for cognitive rehabilitation, improving efficiency and access to treatments, and to increase knowledge generation from the process. A cognitive rehabilitation process has been modeled to design and develop the system, which allows neuropsychologists to configure and schedule rehabilitation sessions, consisting of set of personalized computerized cognitive exercises grounded on neuroscience and plasticity principles. It provides remote continuous monitoring of patient's performance, by an asynchronous communication strategy. An automatic knowledge extraction method has been used to implement a decision support system, improving treatment customization. GNPT has been implemented in 27 rehabilitation centers and in 83 patients' homes, facilitating the access to the treatment. In total, 1660 patients have been treated. Usability and cost analysis methodologies have been applied to measure the efficiency in real clinical environments. The usability evaluation reveals a system usability score higher than 70 for all target users. The cost efficiency study results show a relation of 1-20 compared to face-to-face rehabilitation. GNPT enables brain-damaged patients to continue and further extend rehabilitation beyond the hospital, improving the efficiency of the rehabilitation process. It allows customized therapeutic plans, providing information to further development of clinical practice guidelines. PMID:25204001

  18. Active noise reduction in aviation helmets during a military jet trainer test flight.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, R; Kuronen, P; Korteoja, M

    2001-01-01

    Cockpit noise measurements were carried out in a two-seat jet trainer. For the continuous time and frequency analyses a two-channel tape-recording system was constructed of two miniature microphones connected through an amplifier to a digital tape-recorder. The analysed and averaged noise exposure including radio communication was 80-81 dB when the ANC system was on and 84-89 dB when the ANC system was off. For the conventional flight helmet the same noise exposure was 86 dB, and the noise exposure in the cockpit was 104-106 dB. The effect of the ANC system on the averaged noise exposure (L(Aeq8min)) was an improvement of 4-8 dB over the noise attenuation of the same helmets when the ANC system was off. Both ANC systems worked properly during the test flights. No severe ringing or voice circulation was found except during extreme vibration. PMID:11318460

  19. Issues in development, evaluation, and use of the NASA Preflight Adaptation Trainer (PAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Norman E.; Kennedy, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    The Preflight Adaptation Trainer (PAT) is intended to reduce or alleviate space adaptation syndrome by providing opportunities for portions of that adaptation to occur under normal gravity conditions prior to space flight. Since the adaptation aspects of the PAT objectives involve modification not only of the behavior of the trainee, but also of sensiomotor skills which underly the behavioral generation, the defining of training objectives of the PAT utilizes four mechanisms: familiarization, demonstration, training and adaptation. These mechanisms serve as structural reference points for evaluation, drive the content and organization of the training procedures, and help to define the roles of the PAT instructors and operators. It was determined that three psychomotor properties are most critical for PAT evaluation: reliability; sensitivity; and relevance. It is cause for concern that the number of measures available to examine PAT effects exceed those that can be properly studied with the available sample sizes; special attention will be required in selection of the candidate measure set. The issues in PAT use and application within a training system context are addressed through linking the three training related mechanisms of familiarization, demonstration and training to the fourth mechanism, adaptation.

  20. An Analysis of Trainers' Perspectives within an Ecological Framework: Factors that Influence Mine Safety Training Processes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Emily J.; Hoebbel, Cassandra L.; Rost, Kristen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Satisfactory completion of mine safety training is a prerequisite for being hired and for continued employment in the coal industry. Although training includes content to develop skills in a variety of mineworker competencies, research and recommendations continue to specify that specific limitations in the self-escape portion of training still exist and that mineworkers need to be better prepared to respond to emergencies that could occur in their mine. Ecological models are often used to inform the development of health promotion programs but have not been widely applied to occupational health and safety training programs. Methods Nine mine safety trainers participated in in-depth semi-structured interviews. A theoretical analysis of the interviews was completed via an ecological lens. Each level of the social ecological model was used to examine factors that could be addressed both during and after mine safety training. Results The analysis suggests that problems surrounding communication and collaboration, leadership development, and responsibility and accountability at different levels within the mining industry contribute to deficiencies in mineworkers' mastery and maintenance of skills. Conclusion This study offers a new technique to identify limitations in safety training systems and processes. The analysis suggests that training should be developed and disseminated with consideration of various levels—individual, interpersonal, organizational, and community—to promote skills. If factors identified within and between levels are addressed, it may be easier to sustain mineworker competencies that are established during safety training. PMID:25379324

  1. Mobile robotic assistive balance trainer - an intelligent compliant and adaptive robotic balance assistant for daily living.

    PubMed

    Tiseo, Carlo; Lim, Zhen Yi; Shee, Cheng Yap; Ang, Wei Tech

    2014-01-01

    Balance control probably has the greatest impact on independence in activities of daily living (ADL), because it is a fundamental motor skill and prerequisite to the maintenance of a myriad of postures and mobile activities. We propose a new rehabilitation therapy to administer standing and mobile balance control training, enabled by a Mobile Robotic Assistive Balance Trainer (MRABT). The targeted group for this initial work is post stroke patients, although it can be extended to subjects with other neurological insults in the future. The proposed system consists of a mobile base and a parallel robotic arm which provides support to the patient at the hip. The compliant robotic arm with intelligent control algorithm will only provide support and assistance to the patient when the center of mass of the body deviates beyond the predefined safety boundary, mimicking the helping hands of a parent when a toddler learns to walk. In this paper, we present our initial work in the design and kinematic analysis of the system. PMID:25571190

  2. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Acute Management of the Cervical Spine–Injured Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Erik E; Boden, Barry P; Courson, Ronald W; Decoster, Laura C; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Norkus, Susan A; Rehberg, Robb S; Waninger, Kevin N

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To provide certified athletic trainers, team physicians, emergency responders, and other health care professionals with recommendations on how to best manage a catastrophic cervical spine injury in the athlete. Background: The relative incidence of catastrophic cervical spine injury in sports is low compared with other injuries. However, cervical spine injuries necessitate delicate and precise management, often involving the combined efforts of a variety of health care providers. The outcome of a catastrophic cervical spine injury depends on the efficiency of this management process and the timeliness of transfer to a controlled environment for diagnosis and treatment. Recommendations: Recommendations are based on current evidence pertaining to prevention strategies to reduce the incidence of cervical spine injuries in sport; emergency planning and preparation to increase management efficiency; maintaining or creating neutral alignment in the cervical spine; accessing and maintaining the airway; stabilizing and transferring the athlete with a suspected cervical spine injury; managing the athlete participating in an equipment-laden sport, such as football, hockey, or lacrosse; and considerations in the emergency department. PMID:19478836

  3. Building National Capacity for Research Mentor Training: An Evidence-Based Approach to Training the Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Pfund, Christine; Spencer, Kimberly C.; Asquith, Pamela; House, Stephanie C.; Miller, Sarah; Sorkness, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Research mentor training (RMT), based on the published Entering Mentoring curricula series, has been shown to improve the knowledge and skills of research mentors across career stages, as self-reported by both the mentors engaged in training and their mentees. To promote widespread dissemination and empower others to implement this evidence-based training at their home institutions, we developed an extensive, interactive, multifaceted train-the-trainer workshop. The specific goals of these workshops are to 1) increase facilitator knowledge of an RMT curriculum, 2) increase facilitator confidence in implementing the curriculum, 3) provide a safe environment to practice facilitation of curricular activities, and 4) review implementation strategies and evaluation tools. Data indicate that our approach results in high satisfaction and significant confidence gains among attendees. Of the 195 diverse attendees trained in our workshops since Fall 2010, 44% report implementation at 39 different institutions, collectively training more than 500 mentors. Further, mentors who participated in the RMT sessions led by our trained facilitators report high facilitator effectiveness in guiding discussion. Implications and challenges to building the national capacity needed for improved research mentoring relationships are discussed. PMID:26033872

  4. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    SciTech Connect

    Rabari, Anil; Fadipe, Oloruntomi

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  5. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  6. Test pilot and engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Goggles at the ready, this Langley test pilot and engineer conducted research business high above the ground. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, by James Schultz (page 24). This photograph is also published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen (page 163). In the early years the flight research team was usually made up of a test pilot (Thomas Carroll, front cockpit) and an engineer (John W. Gus Crowley,Jr.).

  7. Pilot selection and training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Personality and situational factors relevant to individual and group performance in highly demanding environments, such as those faced by astronauts or by jet transport crew, are discussed. It is emphasized that although technical competence and proficiency in pilot selection are prerequisites for safety, operating a modern jet transport is a group endeavor that requires the effective coordination of the entire crew. A self-report test battery for measuring positive and negative personality traits of pilot candidates, termed the Personal Characteristics Inventory, is described.

  8. General Aviation Pilot Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Warren L.

    General Aviation Pilot Education (GAPE) was a safety program designed to improve the aeronautical education of the general aviation pilot in anticipation that the national aircraft accident rate might be improved. GAPE PROGRAM attempted to reach the average general aviation pilot with specific and factual information regarding the pitfalls of his…

  9. Single-Pilot Workload Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jason; Williams, Kevin; Hackworth, Carla; Burian, Barbara; Pruchnicki, Shawn; Christopher, Bonny; Drechsler, Gena; Silverman, Evan; Runnels, Barry; Mead, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Integrated glass cockpit systems place a heavy cognitive load on pilots (Burian Dismukes, 2007). Researchers from the NASA Ames Flight Cognition Lab and the FAA Flight Deck Human Factors Lab examined task and workload management by single pilots. This poster describes pilot performance regarding programming a reroute while at cruise and meeting a waypoint crossing restriction on the initial descent.

  10. Muscle activity and hand motion in veterinarians performing laparoscopic training tasks with a box trainer.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Araya, Angelo E; Usón-Gargallo, Jesús; Sánchez-Margallo, Juan A; Pérez-Duarte, Francisco J; Martin-Portugués, Idoia Díaz-Güemes; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate muscle activity and hand motion in veterinarians performing a standard set of laparoscopic training tasks. SAMPLE 12 veterinarians with experience performing laparoscopic procedures. PROCEDURES Participants were asked to perform peg transfer, coordination, precision cutting, and suturing tasks in a laparoscopic box trainer. Activity of the right biceps brachii, triceps brachii, forearm flexor, forearm extensor, and trapezius muscles was analyzed by means of surface electromyography. Right hand movements and wrist angle data were registered through the use of a data glove, and risk levels for the wrist joint were determined by use of a modified rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) method. One-way repeated-measures ANOVA with a Bonferroni post hoc test was performed to compare values between tasks. RESULTS Activity in the biceps muscle did not differ significantly among the 4 tasks. Activity in the triceps, forearm flexor, and forearm extensor muscles was significantly higher during precision cutting than during the coordination task. Activity in the trapezius muscle was highest during the suturing task and did not differ significantly among the other 3 tasks. The RULA score was unacceptable (score, 3) for the coordination, peg transfer, and precision cutting tasks but was acceptable (score, 2) for the suturing task. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that the ergonomics of laparoscopic training depended on the tasks performed and the design of the instruments used. Precision cutting and suturing tasks were associated with the highest muscle activity. Acceptable wrist position, as determined with the RULA method, was found with the suturing task, which was performed with an axial-handled instrument. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:186-193). PMID:27027713

  11. Climate Change Boot Camps: Targeting Policy Makers and Outreach Trainers in Arizona to Improve Climate Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, D. B.; Guido, Z. S.; Buizer, J.; Roy, M.

    2010-12-01

    Bringing climate change issues into focus for decision makers is a growing challenge. Decision makers are often confronted with unique informational needs, a lack of useable information, and needs for customized climate change training, among other issues. Despite significant progress in improving climate literacy among certain stakeholders such as water managers, recent reports have highlighted the growing demand for climate-change information in regions and sectors across the US. In recent years many ventures have sprung up to address these gaps and have predominantly focused on K-12 education and resource management agencies such as the National Park Service and National Weather Service. However, two groups that are critical for integrating climate information into actions have received less attention: (1) policy makers and (2) outreach experts, such as Cooperative Extension agents. Climate Change Boot Camps (CCBC) is a joint effort between the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS)—a NOAA Regionally Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program—and researchers at Arizona State University to diagnose climate literacy and training gaps in Arizona and develop a process that converts these deficiencies into actionable knowledge among the two aforementioned groups. This presentation will highlight the initial phases of the CCBC process, which has as its outcomes the identification of effective strategies for reaching legislators, climate literacy and training needs for both policy makers and trainers, and effective metrics to evaluate the success of these efforts. Specific attention is given to evaluating the process from initial needs assessment to the effectiveness of the workshops. Web curriculum and training models made available on the internet will also be developed, drawing on extensive existing Web resources for other training efforts and converted to meet the needs of these two groups. CCBC will also leverage CLIMAS’ long history of

  12. Athletic Trainers' Attitudes Toward Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual National Collegiate Athletic Association Student-Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Ensign, Kristine A.; Yiamouyiannis, Athena; White, Kristi M.; Ridpath, B. David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Researchers have investigated heterosexuals' attitudes toward homosexuals, focusing on factors such as sex, race, religion, education, and contact experiences. However, in the context of sport, this research is deficient. We found no published literature investigating athletic trainers (ATs') attitudes toward lesbian, gay, and bisexual student-athletes (LGB). Objective: To determine heterosexual ATs' attitudes toward LGB student-athletes in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Design: Cross-sectional study Setting: E-mailed survey. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 964 ATs employed at member institutions. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured attitudes using the Attitudes Toward Lesbian, Gay Men, and Bisexuals (ATLGB) Scale. To determine the extent to which sex, religion, and whether having an LGB friend or family member had an effect on ATs' attitudes, we performed analysis of variance. To establish the effect of age on ATs' attitudes, we calculated a Pearson correlation. We used an independent t test to identify differences between ATs who reported working with LGB student-athletes and ATs who did not. Results: With ATLGB score as the dependent factor, a main effect was noted for sex, religion, and having an LGB friend or family member (P < .01 for all comparisons). Age and total score were related (P < .01). A difference was seen in the ATLGB scores between ATs who were aware of LGB student-athletes on their teams and ATs who were not (P < .001). Conclusions: Many ATs hold positive attitudes toward LGB student-athletes, especially females, those who have an LGB friend or family member, and those who are aware of LGB student-athletes. Still, it is important to provide an open environment in the athletic training room for all student-athletes. PMID:21214353

  13. Sports Nutrition Knowledge Among Collegiate Athletes, Coaches, Athletic Trainers, and Strength and Conditioning Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Torres-McGehee, Toni M.; Pritchett, Kelly L.; Zippel, Deborah; Minton, Dawn M.; Cellamare, Adam; Sibilia, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Context: Coaches, athletic trainers (ATs), strength and conditioning specialists (SCSs), and registered dietitians are common nutrition resources for athletes, but coaches, ATs, and SCSs might offer only limited nutrition information. Little research exists about sports nutrition knowledge and current available resources for nutrition information for athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs. Objective: To identify resources of nutrition information that athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs use; to examine nutrition knowledge among athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs; and to determine confidence levels in the correctness of nutrition knowledge questions within all groups. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I, II, and III institutions across the United States. Patients and Other Participants: The 579 participants consisted of athletes (n = 185), coaches (n = 131), ATs (n = 192), and SCSs (n = 71). Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants answered questions about nutrition resources and domains regarding basic nutrition, supplements and performance, weight management, and hydration. Adequate sports nutrition knowledge was defined as an overall score of 75% in all domains (highest achievable score was 100%). Results: Participants averaged 68.5% in all domains. The ATs (77.8%) and SCSs (81.6%) had the highest average scores. Adequate knowledge was found in 35.9% of coaches, 71.4% of ATs, 83.1% of SCSs, and only 9% of athletes. The most used nutrition resources for coaches, ATs, and SCSs were registered dietitians. Conclusions: Overall, we demonstrated that ATs and SCSs have adequate sports nutrition knowledge, whereas most coaches and athletes have inadequate knowledge. Athletes have frequent contact with ATs and SCSs; therefore, proper nutrition education among these staff members is critical. We suggest that proper nutrition programming should be provided for athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs. However, a separate nutrition program

  14. The Professional Socialization of Collegiate Female Athletic Trainers: Navigating Experiences of Gender Bias

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Borland, John F.; Burton, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Context Female athletic trainers (ATs) experience gender discrimination in the workplace due to stereotypical gender roles, but limited information is available regarding the topic. Objective To understand the challenges and obstacles faced by young female ATs working in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletics. Design Exploratory study using semistructured interviews. Setting Division I clinical setting. Patients or Other Participants A total of 14 female ATs were included in the study, using both criterion and snowball- sampling techniques. Their mean age was 27 ± 2 years, with 5 ± 2 years of overall clinical experience. Criteria included employment at the Division I clinical setting, being a full-time assistant AT, and at least 3 years of working experience but no more than 9 years to avoid role continuance. Data Collection and Analysis Analysis of the interview data followed inductive procedures as outlined by a grounded theory approach. Credibility was established by member checks, multiple-analyst triangulation, and peer review. Results Clear communication with both coaches and players about expectations and philosophies regarding medical care, a supportive head AT in terms of clinical competence, and having and serving as a role model were cited as critical tools to alleviate gender bias in the workplace. Conclusions The female ATs in this study stressed the importance of being assertive with coaches early in the season with regard to the AT's role on the team. They reasoned that these actions brought forth a greater perception of congruity between their roles as ATs and their gender and age. We suggest that female athletic training students seek mentors in their field while they complete their coursework and practicums. The ATs in the current study indicated that a mentor, regardless of sex, helped them feel empowered to navigate the male-centric terrain of athletic departments by encouraging them to be assertive and not second

  15. Social Support From the Athletic Trainer and Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety at Return to Play

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingzhen; Schaefer, Julie T.; Zhang, Ni; Covassin, Tracey; Ding, Kele; Heiden, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Context: Few empirical studies have examined social support from athletic trainers (ATs) and its buffering effect during injury recovery. Objective: To examine the effect of social support received from ATs during injury recovery on reported symptoms of depression and anxiety at return to play among a cohort of collegiate athletes. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Two Big 10 Conference universities. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 594 injuries sustained by 387 collegiate athletes (397 injuries by 256 males, 197 injuries by 131 females) on 9 sports teams. Main Outcome Measure(s): Data were collected during the 2007–2011 seasons. Social support was measured using the 6-item Social Support Questionnaire. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Anxiety was measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. We used generalized estimation equation regression models to examine the effect of the social support from ATs on the odds of symptoms of depression and anxiety at return to play. Results: In 84.3% (n = 501) of injury events, injured athletes received social support from ATs during their recovery. Of these, 264 (53.1%) athletes reported being very satisfied with this social support. Whether or not athletes received social support from ATs during recovery did not affect the symptoms of depression or anxiety experienced at return to play. However, compared with athletes who were dissatisfied with the social support received from ATs, athletes who were very satisfied or satisfied with this social support were 87% (95% confidence interval = 0.06, 0.30) and 70% (95% confidence interval = 0.13, 0.70) less likely to report symptoms of depression at return to play, respectively. Similar results were observed for anxiety. Conclusions: Our findings support the buffering effect of social support from ATs and have important implications for successful recovery in both the physical and psychological aspects for

  16. The Secondary School Football Coach's Relationship With the Athletic Trainer and Perspectives on Exertional Heat Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Adams, William M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Casa, Douglas J.; Huggins, Robert A.; Burton, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Context: Prior researchers have examined the first-aid knowledge and decision making among high school coaches, but little is known about their perceived knowledge of exertional heat stroke (EHS) or their relationships with an athletic trainer (AT). Objective: To examine secondary school football coaches' perceived knowledge of EHS and their professional relationship with an AT. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Web-based management system. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-eight secondary school head football coaches (37 men, 1 woman) participated in this study. Their average age was 47 ± 10 years old, and they had 12 ± 9 years' experience as a head football coach. Data Collection and Analysis: Participants responded to a series of online questions that were focused on their perceived knowledge of EHS and professional relationships with ATs. Data credibility was established through multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review. We analyzed the data by borrowing from the principles of a general inductive approach. Results: Two dominant themes emerged from the data: perceived self-confidence of the secondary school coach and the influence of the AT. The first theme highlighted the perceived confidence, due to basic emergency care training, of the coach regarding management of an emergency situation, despite a lack of knowledge. The second theme illustrated the secondary school coach's positive professional relationships with ATs regarding patient care and emergency procedures. Of the coaches who participated, 89% (34 out of 38) indicated positive interactions with their ATs. Conclusions: These secondary school coaches were unaware of the potential causes of EHS or the symptoms associated with EHS, and they had higher perceived levels of self-confidence in management abilities than indicated by their perceived knowledge level. The secondary school football coaches valued and understood the role of the AT regarding patient and emergency care. PMID:24933433

  17. Telescience Testbed Pilot Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Maria L. (Editor); Leiner, Barry M. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Telescience Testbed Pilot Program is developing initial recommendations for requirements and design approaches for the information systems of the Space Station era. During this quarter, drafting of the final reports of the various participants was initiated. Several drafts are included in this report as the University technical reports.

  18. ISOE Pilot Project Update

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Hagemeyer D. E. Lewis

    2012-05-05

    This slide show introduces the Pilot Project to increase the value of Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) data by increasing participation and amount of data reported from the U.S., reduce the hurdles and effort in participating, streamline the process of reporting and reduce time delay, and eliminate data entry and redundant effort.

  19. A new electromechanical trainer for sensorimotor rehabilitation of paralysed fingers: A case series in chronic and acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Stefan; Kuhlmann, H; Wilk, J; Tomelleri, C; Kirker, Stephen GB

    2008-01-01

    Background The functional outcome after stroke is improved by more intensive or sustained therapy. When the affected hand has no functional movement, therapy is mainly passive movements. A novel device for repeating controlled passive movements of paralysed fingers has been developed, which will allow therapists to concentrate on more complicated tasks. A powered cam shaft moves the four fingers in a physiological range of movement. Methods After refining the training protocol in 2 chronic patients, 8 sub-acute stroke patients were randomised to receive additional therapy with the Finger Trainer for 20 min every work day for four weeks, or the same duration of bimanual group therapy, in addition to their usual rehabilitation. Results In the chronic patients, there was a sustained reduction in finger and wrist spasticity, but there was no improvement in active movements. In the subacute patients, mean distal Fugl-Meyer score (0–30) increased in the control group from 1.25 to 2.75 (ns) and 0.75 to 6.75 in the treatment group (p < .05). Median Modified Ashworth score increased 0/5 to 2/5 in the control group, but not in the treatment group, 0 to 0. Only one patient, in the treatment group, regained function of the affected hand. No side effects occurred. Conclusion Treatment with the Finger Trainer was well tolerated in sub-acute & chronic stroke patients, whose abnormal muscle tone improved. In sub-acute stroke patients, the Finger Trainer group showed small improvements in active movement and avoided the increase in tone seen in the control group. This series was too small to demonstrate any effect on functional outcome however. PMID:18771581

  20. STS 51-G crewmembers participate in training in crew compartment trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Four members of the STS 51-G crew participate in a training exercise in the Shuttle mission simulator and training facility at JSC. Steven R. Nagel, left foreground, is a mission specialist. Sultan Salam Abdelazize Al-Saud (right foreground) is a payload specialist. In the background are Astronauts Daniel C. Brandenstein (left) in the commander's station and John O. Creighton in the pilot's position.

  1. The ScanTrainer obstetrics and gynaecology ultrasound virtual reality training simulator: A cost model to determine the cost viability of replacing clinical training with simulation training

    PubMed Central

    Ray, AF

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce an economic cost model comparing the use of the Medaphor ScanTrainer virtual reality training simulator for obstetrics and gynaecology ultrasound to achieve basic competence, with the traditional training method. A literature search and survey of expert opinion were used to identify resources used in training. An executable model was produced in Excel. The model showed a cost saving for a clinic using the ScanTrainer of £7114 per annum. The uncertainties of the model were explored and it was found to be robust. Threshold values for the key drivers of the model were identified. Using the ScanTrainer is cost saving for clinics with at least two trainees per year to train, if it would take at least six lists to train them using the traditional training method and if a traditional training list has at least two fewer patients than a standard list.

  2. Making It Work. An In-Service Training Program for Vocational Educators. Module I. "Conquering Your Dropout Woes." Strategies for Retaining Students in Vocational High Schools. Trainer's Manual and Participant's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Joyce; And Others

    This module, the first in a three-volume series, deals with dropout prevention, and is organized in two parts: a trainer's manual and a participant's resource manual. It is designed for inservice training of teachers, counselors, and administrators in vocational schools. Addressed in the individual chapters of the trainer's module are the…

  3. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division and Primary Job Title of Athletic Trainers and Their Job Satisfaction or Intention to Leave Athletic Training

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, Aaron B.; Henning, Jolene M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Membership in the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has declined in recent years, generating much debate about professional commitment. Objective: To compare the contributing factors of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training of certified athletic trainers (ATs) employed in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) institutions. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A link to a Web-based questionnaire containing the Spector Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS) and an original Intention to Leave Survey (ITLS) was distributed by e-mail to 1003 certified members of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 191 certified members of the NATA employed in a college or university setting in a primarily clinical capacity; representing all NCAA divisions; and having the job title of head athletic trainer, associate/assistant athletic trainer, or graduate assistant/intern athletic trainer. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used separate 3 × 3 factorial analyses of variance to compare the mean scores of each JSS subscale and of the ITLS with NCAA division and job title. A stepwise multiple regression was used to determine the strength of the relationships between the JSS subscales and the ITLS. Results: We found differences for job title in the subscales of Fringe Benefits (F2,182 = 7.82, P = .001) and Operating Conditions (F2,182 = 12.01, P < .001). The JSS subscale Nature of Work was the greatest indicator of intention to leave (β = −0.45). Conclusions: We found a strong negative correlation between various facets of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training. The NCAA division seemed to have no effect on an individual's job satisfaction or intention to leave the profession. In addition, only Fringe Benefits and Operating Conditions seemed to be affected by job title. The ATs had similar levels of job satisfaction regardless of NCAA division, and their job titles were not a

  4. ADS pilot program Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauson, J.; Heuser, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Applications Data Service (ADS) is a system based on an electronic data communications network which will permit scientists to share the data stored in data bases at universities and at government and private installations. It is designed to allow users to readily locate and access high quality, timely data from multiple sources. The ADS Pilot program objectives and the current plans for accomplishing those objectives are described.

  5. Telescience Testbed Pilot Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Maria L. (Editor); Leiner, Barry M. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Telescience Testbed Pilot Program (TTPP) is intended to develop initial recommendations for requirements and design approaches for the information system of the Space Station era. Multiple scientific experiments are being performed, each exploring advanced technologies and technical approaches and each emulating some aspect of Space Station era science. The aggregate results of the program will serve to guide the development of future NASA information systems.

  6. An elliptical trainer may render the Wingate all-out test more anaerobic.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Ozgur; Colakoglu, Muzaffer; Kuzucu, Erinc O; Delextrat, Anne

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of the 3 main energy pathways during a 30-second elliptical all-out test (EAT) compared with the Wingate all-out test (WAT). Participants were 12 male team sport players (age, 20.3 ± 1.8 years; body mass, 74.8 ± 12.4 kg; height, 176.0 ± 9.10 cm; body fat, 12.1 ± 1.0%). Net energy outputs from the oxidative, phospholytic, and glycolytic energy systems were calculated from oxygen uptake data recorded during 30-second test, the fast component of postexercise oxygen uptake kinetics, and peak blood lactate concentration, respectively. In addition, mechanical power indices were calculated. The main results showed that compared with WAT, EAT was characterized by significantly lower absolute and relative contributions of the oxidative system (16.9 ± 2.5 J vs. 19.8 ± 4.9 J; p ≤ 0.05 and 11.2 ± 1.5% vs. 15.7 ± 3.28%; p ≤ 0.001). In addition, significantly greater absolute and relative contributions of the phospholytic system (66.1 ± 15.8 J vs. 50.7 ± 15.9 J; p ≤ 0.01 and 43.8 ± 6.62% vs. 39.1 ± 6.87%; p ≤ 0.05) and a significantly greater absolute contribution of the glycolytic system (68.6 ± 18.4 J vs. 57.4 ± 13.7 J; p ≤ 0.01) were observed in EAT compared with WAT. Finally, all power indices, except the fatigue index, were significantly greater in EAT than WAT (p ≤ 0.05). Because of the significantly lower aerobic contribution in EAT compared with WAT, elliptical trainers may be a good alternative to cycle ergometers to assess anaerobic performance in athletes involved in whole-body activities. PMID:23924890

  7. Competing Perspectives During Organizational Socialization on the Role of Certified Athletic Trainers in High School Settings

    PubMed Central

    Mensch, James; Crews, Candice; Mitchell, Murray

    2005-01-01

    Context: When certified athletic trainers (ATCs) enter a workplace, their potential for professional effectiveness is affected by a number of factors, including the individual's ability to put acquired knowledge, skills, and attitudes into practice. This ability may be influenced by the preconceived attitudes and expectations of athletes, athletes' parents, athletic directors, physical therapists, physicians, and coaches. Objective: To examine the perspectives of high school coaches and ATCs toward the ATC's role in the high school setting by looking at 3 questions: (1) What are coaches' expectations of ATCs during different phases of a sport season? (2) What do ATCs perceive their role to be during different phases of a season? and (3) How do coaches' expectations compare with ATCs' expectations? Design: Qualitative research design involving semistructured interviews. Setting: High schools. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty high school varsity basketball coaches from 10 high schools in 2 states and the ATCs assigned to these teams. Main Outcome Measure(s): For the coaches, 12 questions focused on 3 specific areas: (1) the athletic training services they received as high school basketball coaches, (2) each coach's expectations of the ATC with whom he or she was working during various phases of the season, and (3) coaches' levels of satisfaction with the athletic training services provided to their team. For the ATCs, 17 questions focused on 3 areas: (1) the ATC's background, (2) the ATC's perceived duties at different phases of the basketball season and his or her relationship with the coach, and (3) other school factors that enhanced or interfered with the ATC's ability to perform duties. Results: Three themes emerged. Coaches had limited knowledge and understanding of ATCs' qualifications, training, professional preparation, and previous experience. Coaches simply expected ATCs to be available to complement their roles. Positive communication was identified

  8. Personal and Environmental Characteristics Predicting Burnout Among Certified Athletic Trainers at National Collegiate Athletic Association Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Kania, Michelle L; Meyer, Barbara B; Ebersole, Kyle T

    2009-01-01

    Context: Recent research in the health care professions has shown that specific personal and environmental characteristics can predict burnout, which is a negative coping strategy related to stressful situations. Burnout has been shown to result in physiologic (eg, headaches, difficulty sleeping, poor appetite), psychological (eg, increased negative self-talk, depression, difficulty in interpersonal relationships), and behavioral (eg, diminished care, increased absenteeism, attrition) symptoms. Objective: To examine the relationship between selected personal and environmental characteristics and burnout among certified athletic trainers (ATs). Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: A demographic survey that was designed for this study and the Maslach Burnout Inventory–Human Services Survey. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 206 ATs employed at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) institutions as clinical ATs volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s): We assessed personal and environmental characteristics of ATs with the demographic survey and measured burnout using the Maslach Burnout Inventory–Human Services Survey. Multiple regression analyses were performed to examine relationships between specific personal and environmental characteristics and each of the 3 subscales of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal accomplishment). Results: Most ATs we surveyed experienced low to average levels of burnout. Personal characteristics predicted 45.5% of the variance in emotional exhaustion (P < .001), 21.5% of the variance in depersonalization (P < .001), and 24.8% of the variance in personal accomplishment (P < .001). Environmental characteristics predicted 16.7% of the variance in emotional exhaustion (P  =  .005), 14.4% of the variance in depersonalization (P  =  .024), and 10.4% of the variance in personal accomplishment (P  =  .209). Stress level and coaches' pressure to medically clear athletes predicted ratings

  9. Assist-as-needed robotic trainer based on reinforcement learning and its application to dart-throwing.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Chihiro; Tamei, Tomoya; Shibata, Tomohiro

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel robotic trainer for motor skill learning. It is user-adaptive inspired by the assist-as-needed principle well known in the field of physical therapy. Most previous studies in the field of the robotic assistance of motor skill learning have used predetermined desired trajectories, and it has not been examined intensively whether these trajectories were optimal for each user. Furthermore, the guidance hypothesis states that humans tend to rely too much on external assistive feedback, resulting in interference with the internal feedback necessary for motor skill learning. A few studies have proposed a system that adjusts its assistive strength according to the user's performance in order to prevent the user from relying too much on the robotic assistance. There are, however, problems in these studies, in that a physical model of the user's motor system is required, which is inherently difficult to construct. In this paper, we propose a framework for a robotic trainer that is user-adaptive and that neither requires a specific desired trajectory nor a physical model of the user's motor system, and we achieve this using model-free reinforcement learning. We chose dart-throwing as an example motor-learning task as it is one of the simplest throwing tasks, and its performance can easily be and quantitatively measured. Training experiments with novices, aiming at maximizing the score with the darts and minimizing the physical robotic assistance, demonstrate the feasibility and plausibility of the proposed framework. PMID:24531040

  10. Retention of robot-assisted surgical skills in urological surgeons acquired using Mimic dV-Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Teishima, Jun; Hattori, Minoru; Inoue, Shogo; Ikeda, Kenichiro; Hieda, Keisuke; Ohara, Shinya; Egi, Hiroyuki; Ohdan, Hideki; Matsubara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We assess the retention of robot-assisted surgical skills among urologic surgeons. Methods: The robot-assisted surgery skills of 20 urologic surgeons were assessed using a Mimic dV-Trainer program (Mimic Technologies, Inc., Seattle, WA) consisting of 6 tasks. These 20 surgeons had no previous experience either using the Mimic dV-Trainer or acting as the main surgeon in robot-assisted surgery. The surgeons completed the program 4 times in a row; after 1 year, they completed it again for a fifth time. Performance scores were recorded using the Mimic dV-Trainer’s built-in algorithm. Results: For all 6 tasks, there were significant improvements to the scores in the fourth trials compared with those in the first trials. The scores in the fifth trials did not significantly decline compared with those in the fourth trials. There was no significant difference between the fifth trial scores of surgeons with laparoscopic surgery skills/experience and those without. Conclusion: Our results indicate that fundamental robot-assisted surgical skills can be retained in the long-term after they are acquired. PMID:25132896

  11. A workshop report on promoting HIV/AIDS understanding through a capacity building train-the-trainer educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Diesel, Holly J; Nsagha, Dickson S; Sab, Clement M; Taliaferro, Donna; Rosenburg, Neal S

    2011-01-01

    Nursing educators are frequently confronted with challenges that bring about innovation and transition to new ways of transferring knowledge in their home environments. These challenges are magnified when approached from an international perspective. Optimal implementation of knowledge transfer incorporates choosing models that promote local initiatives in line with increasingly decentralized educational structures. These decentralized models are a means to foster ongoing participation for both educators and students in their own professional development. Innovative education stems from creativity in approaching the need with formats and activities to meet a specific challenge. This experimental study builds upon previous study by the authors which was conducted in March, 2009, based upon the qualitative open focus forum at each of the five nursing programs. Overwhelmingly, the Cameroonian nursing students expressed a keen desire to study the HIV infected pregnant woman and the feeding options of the newborn. The study team developed the train-the-trainer program which was delivered at the University of Buea in the Southwest region of Cameroon in March, 2011. TTT is particularly effective for reaching large audiences and also permits a degree of sustainability such that the Cameroonian students will be trainers for subsequent cohorts of their peers. This study continues to strengthen the collaborative endeavors between the two nursing schools; the University of Buea (UB) and Goldfarb School of Nursing (GSON) at Barnes Jewish College in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA. The final aim of the intervention was the initiation of collaborative relationships between the faculty members of the two educational organizations. PMID:22187599

  12. Pilot Eye Scanning under Actual Single Pilot Instrument Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinoie, Kenichi; Sunada, Yasuto

    Operations under single pilot instrument flight rules for general aviation aircraft is known to be one of the most demanding pilot tasks. Scanning numerous instruments plays a key role for perception and decision-making during flight. Flight experiments have been done by a single engine light airplane to investigate the pilot eye scanning technique for IFR flights. Comparisons between the results by an actual flight and those by a PC-based flight simulator are made. The experimental difficulties of pilot eye scanning measurements during the actual IFR flight are discussed.

  13. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, F.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be sent, as a script to be run, or it can be fetched from a remote location. A pilot 2.0 can run on every computing resource, e.g.: on CREAM Computing elements, on DIRAC Computing elements, on Virtual Machines as part of the contextualization script, or IAAC resources, provided that these machines are properly configured, hiding all the details of the Worker Nodes (WNs) infrastructure. Pilots 2.0 can be generated server and client side. Pilots 2.0 are the “pilots to fly in all the skies”, aiming at easy use of computing power, in whatever form it is presented. Another aim is the unification and simplification of the monitoring infrastructure for all kinds of computing resources, by using pilots as a network of distributed sensors coordinated by a central resource monitoring system. Pilots 2.0 have been developed using the command pattern. VOs using DIRAC can tune pilots 2.0 as they need, and extend or replace each and every pilot command in an easy way. In this

  14. 14 CFR 25.771 - Pilot compartment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pilot compartment. 25.771 Section 25.771... Pilot compartment. (a) Each pilot compartment and its equipment must allow the minimum flight crew... pilot, the airplane must be controllable with equal safety from either pilot seat. (d) The...

  15. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  16. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  17. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  18. Effectiveness of Instruction and Video Feedback on Staff's Trainer Behavior during One-to-One Training with Children with Severe Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Vonderen, Annemarie; Didden, Robert; Beeking, Fenneke

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on response prompting and trainer behavior of direct-care staff during one-to-one training with five children with severe intellectual disability was assessed. During instruction, written information and verbal instruction were given concerning correct and incorrect trainer…

  19. A Study on the Relationship between Ability, Motivational, and Work Environmental Influences and the Degree of Transfer of Learning of New Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, LaNettae

    2010-01-01

    There is greater emphasis being placed on developing employees' competencies to help organizations achieve their operational and business goals. One of the essential functions of a training department is to support the organization's business goals and initiatives. The urgent and insistent demand for capable and proficient trainers has led to the…

  20. A Multilevel Examination of the Influence of Trainee-Trainer Gender Dissimilarity and Trainee-Classroom Gender Composition Dissimilarity on Trainee Knowledge Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Suzanne T.; Towler, Annette J.; Fisher, David M.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the extent to which a trainee's gender interacts with the gender of the trainer, as well as the gender composition of the classroom, to influence the trainee's knowledge acquisition. Hypotheses based on asymmetrical relational demography arguments were tested with a multilevel model on data collected from 1,515 predominantly Hispanic…