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Sample records for 74-facility management occasional

  1. Management by Consent. Occasional Paper 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, C.

    The concept of management by consent is examined in an assessment of management techniques within academe. Issues that are analyzed include what is involved in an organization of consent and factors heralding the organizations of consent, such as (1) the view of management as a semi-profession, and (2) the spread of "matrism," which is optimistic…

  2. "Managed" Learning. An Institute of Higher Education Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Herbert E.

    A form of individualized instruction called "managed" learning is proposed. Three personnel types would be required in such a system: (1) coordinators responsible for providing some education to assigned students and "managing" the rest of the student's education; (2) general service personnel such as guidance, library, audio-visual, instructional…

  3. Natural resources management: Issues and lessons from Rwanda. Occasional paper

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, S.T.

    1990-04-01

    Rwanda is an exception among low-income developing countries in that it has given high priority to environmental and natural resource management (NRM) issues. The paper describes A.I.D.'s support for these efforts and explores the possibility of integrating them into agricultural and rural development programs in Rwanda and elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa. Major findings include: Government support is a prerequisite to developing the long-term strategies needed to address specific NRM issues; Developing appropriate NRM technologies is a complex undertaking requiring site-specific applied research; Donors should appreciate the difficulty host countries face in balancing NRM with development, conservation, and equity objectives; USAID/Rwanda assistance has covered a wide range of NRM activities, many of them complementary to those of other donors, some part of a coordinated multi-donor effort; and The Mission's program includes several innovative and potentially replicable approaches, including the promotion of ecotourism in conjunction with wildlife conservation and park management, and agroforestry and fish farming to conserve soil and water resources while increasing farm productivity. Since such activities often require costly investments and yield their ecological and economic benefits only in the long term, a broader framework than simple cost-benefit analysis might be needed in attempting to incorporate them into USAID/Rwanda's agricultural and rural development portfolio.

  4. The Role of Communication in Library Management. Occasional Paper No. 34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwenegoha, Hamza A.

    This paper defines and discusses the nature of management; outlines the primary management functions and activities, emphasizing the importance of communication and coordination to successful management; and examines the place of communication as a management function in the library setting. After a discussion of the key role of coordination in…

  5. Implementing School-Based Management in Indonesia. RTI Research Report Series. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyward, Mark; Cannon, Robert A.; Sarjono

    2011-01-01

    Indonesia, the world's fourth most populous nation, has been decentralizing its education sector for the past decade. In this context, school-based management is essential for improving the quality of education. A mixed-method, multisite assessment of a project that aimed to improve the management and governance of basic education in Indonesia…

  6. UPSTEP. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Univ., Boulder. Undergraduate Pre-Service Teacher Education Program.

    This document is the first in a series of occasional papers to be published by the Undergraduate Pre-Service Teacher Education Program (UPSTEP) at the University of Colorado (CU). The papers are intended to inform universities, public schools, and educational service agencies about noteworthy innovations in UPSTEP and to publish articles on…

  7. Education Management Organizations and the Privatization of Public Education: A Cross-National Comparison of the USA and the UK. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitz, John; Beers, Bryan

    This paper compares the development since the 1980s of privatization of education services in the U.S. and U.K. In both countries, education management organizations (EMOs) have become institutionalized to some degree, with policy-borrowing between the two countries and common ideological predisposition toward market solutions. Despite this…

  8. Critical Issues in Library Management: Organizing for Leadership and Decision-Making. Papers from the Thirty-Fifth Allerton Institute. Occasional Papers, Nos. 198/199.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Bryce L., Ed.; Weech, Terry L., Ed.

    This is a collection of six papers on critical issues in library management presented at the annual Allerton Park Conference (35th, October 24-26, 1993) sponsored by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Graduate School of Library and Information Science. The first paper, "Learning about Leadership: What Works in Modern Organizations"…

  9. Shifting Identities, Blurring Boundaries: The Changing Roles of Professional Managers in Higher Education. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.10.2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitchurch, Celia

    2008-01-01

    This paper builds on earlier reviews by the author of the changing roles and identities of contemporary professional staff in UK higher education (Whitchurch, 2004; 2006a; 2006b), and describes an empirical study that was undertaken between 2004 and 2007. It progresses the argument that the generic terms "administration" and "management" no longer…

  10. Children at Risk. Occasional Publication, 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wales Univ., Swansea. Dept. of Education

    This occasional publication presents three articles: "The identification of children needing compensatory education," which reviews critically some of the major research findings on approaches used in identifying the disadvantaged, and suggests that the designation of educational priority areas perhaps may not necessarily be the best method of…

  11. Mindful Learning 2020. Occasional Paper #8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical metaphor for the power teaching prototype, P=fm expresses interactive factors that might characterize 21st Education given President Obama's "Blueprint for Reform: Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Schools Act." That is the more global perspective taken in this occasional paper. The factors become Ellen Langer's…

  12. 41 CFR 102-74.155 - What energy conservation policy must Federal agencies follow in the management of facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What energy conservation... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation §...

  13. 41 CFR 102-74.155 - What energy conservation policy must Federal agencies follow in the management of facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What energy conservation... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation §...

  14. 41 CFR 102-74.155 - What energy conservation policy must Federal agencies follow in the management of facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What energy conservation... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation §...

  15. 41 CFR 102-74.155 - What energy conservation policy must Federal agencies follow in the management of facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What energy conservation... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation §...

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.155 - What energy conservation policy must Federal agencies follow in the management of facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What energy conservation... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.155 What energy conservation policy must Federal agencies follow in the management of...

  17. Occasional sex in an 'asexual' polyploid hermaphrodite.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Thomas G; Storhas, Martin; Schulenburg, Hinrich; Beukeboom, Leo W; Michiels, Nicolaas K

    2004-05-22

    Asexual populations are usually considered evolutionary dead-ends because they lack the mechanisms to generate and maintain sufficient genetic diversity. Yet, some asexual forms are remarkably widespread and genetically diverse. This raises the question whether asexual systems are always truly clonal or whether they have cryptic forms of sexuality that enhance their viability. In the planarian flatworm Schmidtea polychroa parthenogens are functional hermaphrodites (as are their sexual conspecifics), copulate and exchange sperm. Sperm is required for initiation of embryogenesis but usually does not contribute genetically to the offspring (sperm-dependent parthenogenesis). Using karyology and genotyping of parents and offspring, we show that in a purely parthenogenetic population an estimated 12% of all offspring are the result of partial genetic exchange. Several processes of chromosome addition and loss are involved. Some of these result in an alternation between a common triploid and a rare tetraploid state. We conclude that genetic recombination does not necessarily require segregation and fusion within the same generation, as is the case in most sexual species. These occasional sexual processes help to explain the geographical dominance of parthenogens in our study species.

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.350 - Are agencies required to meet their obligations under the Federal Service Labor-Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... exclusive representative for the employees prior to implementing this smoking policy? 102-74.350 Section 102... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking... smoking policy? Yes. Where there is an exclusive representative for the employees, Federal agencies...

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.350 - Are agencies required to meet their obligations under the Federal Service Labor-Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... exclusive representative for the employees prior to implementing this smoking policy? 102-74.350 Section 102... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking... smoking policy? Yes. Where there is an exclusive representative for the employees, Federal agencies...

  20. 41 CFR 102-74.350 - Are agencies required to meet their obligations under the Federal Service Labor-Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... exclusive representative for the employees prior to implementing this smoking policy? 102-74.350 Section 102... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking... smoking policy? Yes. Where there is an exclusive representative for the employees, Federal agencies...

  1. 41 CFR 102-74.350 - Are agencies required to meet their obligations under the Federal Service Labor-Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... exclusive representative for the employees prior to implementing this smoking policy? 102-74.350 Section 102... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking... smoking policy? Yes. Where there is an exclusive representative for the employees, Federal agencies...

  2. 41 CFR 102-74.350 - Are agencies required to meet their obligations under the Federal Service Labor-Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exclusive representative for the employees prior to implementing this smoking policy? 102-74.350 Section 102... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking... smoking policy? Yes. Where there is an exclusive representative for the employees, Federal agencies...

  3. CATESOL Occasional Papers, No. 3. Winter, 1976-77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Kenton, Ed.

    This volume of CATESOL (California Association of Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) Occasional Papers includes the following: "ESL Adult Literacy," by Jack Wigfield; "Language Teaching as a Means to Self Knowledge, Self Acceptance, and Communication with Others," by Beverly Galyean; "Let Your Students Be Actors: Using Videotape…

  4. Adult Education Occasional Papers. Volume 3. October 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Douglas, Ed.

    This collection of occasional papers, developed to show the spread of continuing education activities in Tasmania, Australia, includes (1) "Adult Education--Beyond the Traditional Class Programme" by Gordon Goward, Assistant Director of Adult Education; (2) "Forming a New Group in the Community" by Frank Perry, Prison Education Officer; (3) "The…

  5. Inclusive Classrooms: From Access to Engagement. Occasional Papers 28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrias, Eve, Ed.; Burr, Valentine, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    What would schools and classrooms look like if they truly mirrored our democratic ideals? In this issue of the Occasional Papers, five authors explore current and historical questions related to the inclusion of children with disabilities in public schools. The history of educating children with disabilities--an ongoing civil rights issue--has…

  6. New Challenges in Distance Education. Occasional Papers 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, David, Ed.

    Three challenges that face distance educators at the national, institute, and individual subject level in Australia are discussed in a set of Occasional Papers by the Riverina-Murray Institute of Higher Education (RMIHE). Australia is undergoing a period of major change. The binary system of universities and colleges of advanced education is…

  7. Historical Perspectives of CSLEA. Volume 6. Occasional Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Alexander N., Comp.

    This is the sixth of eight volumes consisting of series of publications of the Center for the Study of Liberal Education for Adults (CSLEA), such as Notes and Essays, Research Reports, Occasional Papers, and Conference Reports. These materials provide both theory and practice in the area of non-credit adult liberal education offered by colleges…

  8. Stochastic Loss of an Occasionally-Essential Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerison, Elizabeth; Desai, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Many biological functions are useful only in specific circumstances. For example, hundreds of single-gene deletions in yeast increase growth rate in some laboratory conditions. During periods of disuse, these genes are vulnerable to disruption or loss via random mutation and genetic drift. Yet they are maintained in natural populations, suggesting that they must be useful at least occasionally. Here we quantify the risk of loss of such occasionally-important functions. We focus on predicting how the statistics of environmental change determine the mean time to loss of the function. Our results suggest a refinement to the Savageau 'use-it-or-lose-it' principle of regulation, and put theoretical lower bounds on how often these functions must be necessary to the organism, in order to be maintained.

  9. Impulsivity and Cigarette Craving among Adolescent Daily and Occasional Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Amanda R.; Burris, Jessica L.; Froeliger, Brett; Saladin, Michael E.; Carpenter, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Impulsivity is a multi-dimensional construct that is robustly related to cigarette smoking. While underlying factors that account for this relation are not well understood, craving has been proposed as a central mechanism linking impulsivity to smoking. In order to further refine our understanding of associations between impulsivity and cigarette craving, the current study examined the association between impulsivity and tonic and cue-elicited craving among a sample of adolescent smokers. We expected trait impulsivity would be positively associated with both tonic and cue-elicited craving, and that this relationship would be stronger among daily vs. occasional smokers. Methods 106 smokers (ages 16–20) completed questionnaires and reported their cigarette craving prior to and immediately following presentation of each of three counterbalanced cue types: (a) in vivo smoking, (b) alcohol, and (c) neutral cue. Results Impulsivity was positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers (β=.38; p=.005), but not occasional smokers (β=.01; p=.95), with a significant impulsivity x smoker group interaction (β=1.31; p=.03). Impulsivity was unrelated to craving following smoking or alcohol cue, regardless of smoker group (all p’s>.16). Conclusions Results suggest a moderated effect in which impulsivity is positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers, but not occasional smokers. Tonic craving may serve as a mechanism linking impulsivity, smoking persistence, and nicotine dependence among daily smokers. PMID:25665916

  10. 29 CFR 553.30 - Occasional or sporadic employment-section 7(p)(2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Occasional or sporadic employment-section 7(p)(2). 553.30... Other Exemptions § 553.30 Occasional or sporadic employment-section 7(p)(2). (a) Section 7(p)(2) of the... basis to qualify for exemption under section 7(p)(2), the employee's decision to work in a...

  11. Occasional Reinforced Responses during Extinction Can Slow the Rate of Reacquisition of an Operant Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Amanda M.; Bouton, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments with rats examined reacquisition of an operant response after either extinction or a response-elimination procedure that included occasional reinforced responses during extinction. In each experiment, reacquisition was slower when response elimination had included occasional reinforced responses, although the effect was…

  12. Occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane observed in stormwater biofiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Grover, Samantha P P; Cohan, Amanda; Chan, Hon Sen; Livesley, Stephen J; Beringer, Jason; Daly, Edoardo

    2013-11-01

    Designed, green infrastructures are becoming a customary feature of the urban landscape. Sustainable technologies for stormwater management, and biofilters in particular, are increasingly used to reduce stormwater runoff volumes and peaks as well as improve the water quality of runoff discharged into urban water bodies. Although a lot of research has been devoted to these technologies, their effect in terms of greenhouse gas fluxes in urban areas has not been yet investigated. We present the first study aimed at quantifying greenhouse gas fluxes between the soil of stormwater biofilters and the atmosphere. N2O, CH4, and CO2 were measured periodically over a year in two operational vegetated biofiltration cells at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. One cell had a saturated zone at the bottom, and compost and hardwood mulch added to the sandy loam filter media. The other cell had no saturated zone and was composed of sandy loam. Similar sedges were planted in both cells. The biofilter soil was a small N2O source and a sink for CH4 for most measurement events, with occasional large emissions of both N2O and CH4 under very wet conditions. Average N2O fluxes from the cell with the saturated zone were almost five-fold greater (65.6 μg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1)) than from the other cell (13.7 μg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1)), with peaks up to 1100 μg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1). These N2O fluxes are of similar magnitude to those measured in other urban soils, but with larger peak emissions. The CH4 sink strength of the cell with the saturated zone (-3.8 μg CH4-C m(-2) h(-1)) was lower than the other cell (-18.3 μg CH4-C m(-2) h(-1)). Both cells of the biofilter appeared to take up CH4 at similar rates to other urban lawn systems; however, the biofilter cells displayed occasional large CH4 emissions following inflow events, which were not seen in other urban systems. CO2 fluxes increased with soil temperature in both cells, and in the cell without the saturated zone CO2 fluxes decreased

  13. Occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane observed in stormwater biofiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Grover, Samantha P P; Cohan, Amanda; Chan, Hon Sen; Livesley, Stephen J; Beringer, Jason; Daly, Edoardo

    2013-11-01

    Designed, green infrastructures are becoming a customary feature of the urban landscape. Sustainable technologies for stormwater management, and biofilters in particular, are increasingly used to reduce stormwater runoff volumes and peaks as well as improve the water quality of runoff discharged into urban water bodies. Although a lot of research has been devoted to these technologies, their effect in terms of greenhouse gas fluxes in urban areas has not been yet investigated. We present the first study aimed at quantifying greenhouse gas fluxes between the soil of stormwater biofilters and the atmosphere. N2O, CH4, and CO2 were measured periodically over a year in two operational vegetated biofiltration cells at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. One cell had a saturated zone at the bottom, and compost and hardwood mulch added to the sandy loam filter media. The other cell had no saturated zone and was composed of sandy loam. Similar sedges were planted in both cells. The biofilter soil was a small N2O source and a sink for CH4 for most measurement events, with occasional large emissions of both N2O and CH4 under very wet conditions. Average N2O fluxes from the cell with the saturated zone were almost five-fold greater (65.6 μg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1)) than from the other cell (13.7 μg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1)), with peaks up to 1100 μg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1). These N2O fluxes are of similar magnitude to those measured in other urban soils, but with larger peak emissions. The CH4 sink strength of the cell with the saturated zone (-3.8 μg CH4-C m(-2) h(-1)) was lower than the other cell (-18.3 μg CH4-C m(-2) h(-1)). Both cells of the biofilter appeared to take up CH4 at similar rates to other urban lawn systems; however, the biofilter cells displayed occasional large CH4 emissions following inflow events, which were not seen in other urban systems. CO2 fluxes increased with soil temperature in both cells, and in the cell without the saturated zone CO2 fluxes decreased

  14. A Very Tentative Computer System Model. Occasional Paper No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslow, Martin P.

    The developmental paper, one of a series written as the Management Information System for Occupational Education (MISOE) was conceptualized, is a first attempt to picture the computer system necessary to carry out the project's goals. It describes the basic structure and the anticipated strategies of development of the computer system to be used.…

  15. The Real Supply-Side Economics. Occasional Paper No. 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.

    Economic policy today is often stated in the terms of "demand managers" and "simple supply-siders" who look upon economic policy simply as a matter of stimulus or restraint. It matters little what programs are cut as long as overall spending is reduced to cool inflation. On the other hand, the real supply-side economists recognize the necessity…

  16. Breaking the Mold. An "Education Week" Occasional Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Eight articles, published in various issues of "Education Week" starting in March 1994 and ending July 1995, track the work of eight educational reform design teams: (1) "Back to the Future" (Lynn Olson)--the virtues and values of the past in a modern context; (2) "A Welcome Change" (Ann Bradley)--instruction school management, and social services…

  17. The Experience of External Studies. Occasional Papers No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riverina Coll. of Advanced Education, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales (Australia).

    This document brings together four invited papers by external students who have graduated from Riverina College: (1) "The External Student: One Profile" (Christine Del Gigante); (2) "Managing Life as a External Student" (Robert Landow); (3) "The Computerised Student" (John Chant); and (4) "The Right to Study" (Coral Davidson). Topics covered…

  18. Embracing the Internet. DETC Occasional Paper Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Carol; Wills, Gordon

    Since November 1995, all programs/processes of the business school of the International Management Centres (IMC) of Buckingham, England, have been conducted through the Internet. As in other distance education programs, students join the IMC program from any country in the world. Programs are always delivered to "sets" of 8-16 people who meet,…

  19. Leading the Way: Ten Tips for the Occasional Speaker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratz, Kim

    2001-01-01

    Presents 10 strategies to help parents and teachers prepare and deliver effective presentations, including: use good information; practice the presentation; control the materials; get acquainted with at least a few audience members; have a strong opening; practice anxiety management; be oneself; do not get too complicated or fancy at first; have a…

  20. Smoked Cannabis' Psychomotor and Neurocognitive Effects in Occasional and Frequent Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Ramaekers, Johannes G.; Chauchard, Emeline; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive constituent in cannabis, impairs psychomotor performance, cognition and driving ability; thus, driving under the influence of cannabis is a public safety concern. We documented cannabis' psychomotor, neurocognitive, subjective and physiological effects in occasional and frequent smokers to investigate potential differences between these smokers. Fourteen frequent (≥4x/week) and 11 occasional (<2x/week) cannabis smokers entered a secure research unit ∼19 h prior to smoking one 6.8% THC cigarette. Cognitive and psychomotor performance was evaluated with the critical tracking (CTT), divided attention (DAT), n-back (working memory) and Balloon Analog Risk (BART) (risk-taking) tasks at −1.75, 1.5, 3.5, 5.5 and 22.5 h after starting smoking. GLM (General Linear Model) repeated measures ANOVA was utilized to compare scores. Occasional smokers had significantly more difficulty compensating for CTT tracking error compared with frequent smokers 1.5 h after smoking. Divided attention performance declined significantly especially in occasional smokers, with session × group effects for tracking error, hits, false alarms and reaction time. Cannabis smoking did not elicit session × group effects on the n-back or BART. Controlled cannabis smoking impaired psychomotor function, more so in occasional smokers, suggesting some tolerance to psychomotor impairment in frequent users. These data have implications for cannabis-associated impairment in driving under the influence of cannabis cases. PMID:25745105

  1. Smoked cannabis' psychomotor and neurocognitive effects in occasional and frequent smokers.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Ramaekers, Johannes G; Chauchard, Emeline; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive constituent in cannabis, impairs psychomotor performance, cognition and driving ability; thus, driving under the influence of cannabis is a public safety concern. We documented cannabis' psychomotor, neurocognitive, subjective and physiological effects in occasional and frequent smokers to investigate potential differences between these smokers. Fourteen frequent (≥4x/week) and 11 occasional (<2x/week) cannabis smokers entered a secure research unit ∼19 h prior to smoking one 6.8% THC cigarette. Cognitive and psychomotor performance was evaluated with the critical tracking (CTT), divided attention (DAT), n-back (working memory) and Balloon Analog Risk (BART) (risk-taking) tasks at -1.75, 1.5, 3.5, 5.5 and 22.5 h after starting smoking. GLM (General Linear Model) repeated measures ANOVA was utilized to compare scores. Occasional smokers had significantly more difficulty compensating for CTT tracking error compared with frequent smokers 1.5 h after smoking. Divided attention performance declined significantly especially in occasional smokers, with session × group effects for tracking error, hits, false alarms and reaction time. Cannabis smoking did not elicit session × group effects on the n-back or BART. Controlled cannabis smoking impaired psychomotor function, more so in occasional smokers, suggesting some tolerance to psychomotor impairment in frequent users. These data have implications for cannabis-associated impairment in driving under the influence of cannabis cases. PMID:25745105

  2. Oral French Interlanguage Corpora: Tools for Data Management and Analysis. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Emma; Myles, Florence; Rule, Sarah; Mitchell, Rosamond

    This paper describes several methodological decisions made during a study of linguistic development of French in British classroom learners, highlighting the significance of choosing suitable tools for collecting, transcribing, and analyzing oral interlanguage data and noting the usefulness for interlanguage research of the CHILDES (Child Language…

  3. Perspectives on the Humanities and School-Based Curriculum Development. ACLS Occasional Paper No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Sandra; Chodorow, Stanley; Ohmann, Richard; Okura, Sandra; Purrington, Sandra Sanchez; Stein, Robert

    This paper records three plenary sessions held at the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) National Education Conference, August 27-29, 1993. The conference built on what was learned in the first year of the project and reported in ACLS Occasional Paper 20. Sessions allowed participants to talk with colleagues who had been project…

  4. The Development of Australia's National Training System: A Dynamic Tension between Consistency and Flexibility. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Kaye; McKenna, Suzy

    2016-01-01

    This occasional paper provides an overview of the development of Australia's national training system and is a key knowledge document of a wider research project "Consistency with flexibility in the Australian national training system." This research project investigates the various approaches undertaken by each of the jurisdictions to…

  5. Student Entitlement Models in Australia's National Training System: Expert Views. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Kaye; McKenna, Suzy

    2016-01-01

    This occasional paper provides the views of 17 "thought leaders" in the Australian vocational education and training (VET) sector. Their insight and opinions were sought to inform a larger research project focused on the student entitlement reforms that were introduced into the national VET system from 2012. These individuals offered a…

  6. Occasional Reinforced Trials during Extinction Can Slow the Rate of Rapid Reacquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouton, Mark E.; Woods, Amanda M.; Pineno, Oskar

    2004-01-01

    Two appetitive conditioning experiments with rats examined reacquisition after conditioned responding was eliminated by either extinction or by a partial reinforcement procedure in which reinforced trials were occasionally presented among many nonreinforced trials. In Experiment 1, reacquisition to a conditional stimulus (CS) that had been…

  7. High-Needs Schools: Preparing Teachers for Today's World. Occasional Paper Series 25

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank Street College of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the second decade of the 21st century, some schools are in trouble and some schools are not. The subject of this Occasional Paper is the preparation of teachers for schools that--lacking sufficient resources, effective leadership, or vocal advocates--are failing to educate their students by any reasonable measures. The teachers and teacher…

  8. Liberal Arts Colleges in American Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities. ACLS Occasional Paper, No. 59

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Learned Societies, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Occasional Paper presents the proceedings of a conference on "Liberal Arts Colleges in American Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities" convened by ACLS in November 2003 in Williamstown, Massachusetts with the support of the Oakley Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences at Williams…

  9. The Other 17 Hours: Valuing Out-of-School Time. Occasional Papers 30

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teitle, Jennifer, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This issue of "Bank Street Occasional Papers" explores the value of time outside of school. Educators have given relatively little scholarly attention to young people's nonschool lives. Ignored or valorized, nonschool spaces show up in educational research only as a backdrop, implying that school learning is the yardstick by which to…

  10. Teens Make the Environmental Scene. Taft Campus Occasional Paper No. VI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogl, Robert; Vogl, Sonia

    Films used as a force in creating public awareness of local environmental problems were discussed in this occasional paper. Teenagers active in an environmental studies summer program at Gill School, Bernardsville, New Jersey, realized that films effectively informed fellow citizens of such problems. They produced 8mm films portraying pollution…

  11. South Dakota State University's Library: A History. Hilton M. Briggs Library Occasional Paper Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Philip

    Tracing the history of South Dakota State University's Hilton M. Briggs Library over the past 102 years, this occasional paper describes the development of what is now the largest library (over 1.1 million total pieces) in the South Dakota Library Network from its inception as part of a small land grant college. Administrative eras are reviewed,…

  12. Rethinking Resistance in Schools: Power, Politics, and Illicit Pleasures. Occasional Paper Series 14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silin, Jonathan G.; Schultz, Steven; Bevacqua, Stephanie; Laslocky, Jenna; Tobin, Joseph; Taubman, Peter; King, Jane; Pignatelli, Frank; Ferris, Christine

    2005-01-01

    This issue of Occasional Papers began as a Graduate School seminar honoring Steven Schultz, a much beloved and respected faculty member whose untimely death from HIV/AIDS-related illnesses left a terrible hole in the lives of Bank Street staff members. The seminar, organized by Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Virginia Casper, a close friend…

  13. Marginalization and the Occasional Teacher Workforce in Ontario: The Case of Internationally Educated Teachers (IETs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Katina

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the marginalization of internationally educated teachers (IETs) as occasional teachers. In particular, it explores the experiences of three IETs as they try to gain access to full-time teacher employment within the Ontario, English-speaking public school system. Data used in this article was generated from a qualitative…

  14. 14 CFR 375.42 - Transport operations-occasional planeload charters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transport operations-occasional planeload charters. 375.42 Section 375.42 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Operations Requiring Specific Preflight Authorization of Filing § 375.42 Transport...

  15. Welcoming the Stranger: Essays on Teaching and Learning in a Diverse Society. Occasional Paper Series 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silin, Jonathan G.; Sladkova, Jana; Viladrich, Anahi; Fruedenberg, Nicholas; Duncan, Erika; Park, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This issue of "Occasional Papers" is filled with stories by and about "strangers"--people of all ages who perceive themselves or have been perceived by others as outsiders either because of who they are, where they have come from, or even how recently they have arrived in this country. Successful educators know that the ability to welcome the…

  16. A comparison of daily and occasional smokers' implicit affective responses to smoking cues.

    PubMed

    Haight, John; Dickter, Cheryl L; Forestell, Catherine A

    2012-03-01

    Previous research has not compared implicit affective responses to smoking-related stimuli in occasional (i.e., those who smoke less than one cigarette per day) and daily smokers (i.e., those who smoke at least once per day). In addition to assessing their motivations for smoking, implicit affective responses were measured using the Affect Misattribution Procedure (AMP) in occasional (n=19) and daily smokers (n=34) to smoking-related and neutral cues. Half of the cues depicted a human interacting with an object (i.e., active), whereas the remaining cues depicted objects alone (i.e., inactive). Results indicated that for the active cues, daily smokers responded more positively to smoking-related than to neutral cues, whereas occasional smokers showed no difference in their implicit responses. In addition to smoking frequency, relative differences in implicit responses to active cues were related to cognitive enhancement motivation. For inactive cues, implicit responses were related to cognitive enhancement as well as reinforcement. Because daily smokers have more positive implicit responses to active smoking-related cues than occasional smokers, these cues may play an important role in maintaining smoking behavior in daily smokers. PMID:22078800

  17. 49 CFR 372.101 - Casual, occasional, or reciprocal transportation of passengers for compensation when such...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Casual, occasional, or reciprocal transportation of passengers for compensation when such transportation is sold or arranged by anyone for compensation. 372.101 Section 372.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY...

  18. Food Production, Population Growth, and Environmental Quality. Caltech Population Program Occasional Papers, Series 1, Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth, Edward, III

    This paper, one in a series of occasional publications, discusses trends in food production and population growth, emphasizing how environmental quality will be affected. The series is intended to increase understanding of the interrelationships between population growth and socioeconomic and cultural patterns throughout the world, and to…

  19. 29 CFR 553.30 - Occasional or sporadic employment-section 7(p)(2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occasional or sporadic employment-section 7(p)(2). 553.30 Section 553.30 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS APPLICATION OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO EMPLOYEES OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS General Other Exemptions § 553.30...

  20. Codeswitching for Humour and Ethnic Identity: Written Danish-American Occasional Songs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolen, Marianne

    1992-01-01

    Individual bilingual language performance in occasional songs is examined with focus on the use of Danish and English by a female member of a Danish-American organization in both song-writing and organizational written recordkeeping. The findings confirm the hypothesis of a conditioning effect of features of genre and social role on the…

  1. The costs and benefits of occasional sex: theoretical predictions and a case study.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Thomas G; Michiels, Nico K

    2010-01-01

    Theory predicts that occasional sexual reproduction in predominantly parthenogenetic organisms offers all the advantages of obligate sexuality without paying its full costs. However, empirical examples identifying and evaluating the costs and benefits of rare sex are scarce. After reviewing the theoretical perspective on rare sex, we present our findings of potential costs and benefits of occasional sex in polyploid, sperm-dependent parthenogens of the planarian flatworm Schmidtea polychroa. Despite costs associated with the production of less fertile tetraploids as sexual intermediates, the benefits of rare sex prevail in S. polychroa and may be sufficiently strong to prevent extinction of parthenogenetic populations. This offers an explanation for the dominance of parthenogenesis in S. polychroa. We discuss the enigmatic question why not all organisms show a mixed reproduction mode.

  2. Oral fluid cannabinoid concentrations following controlled smoked cannabis in chronic frequent and occasional smokers.

    PubMed

    Anizan, Sebastien; Milman, Garry; Desrosiers, Nathalie; Barnes, Allan J; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-10-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is an alternative biological matrix for monitoring cannabis intake in drug testing, and drugged driving (DUID) programs, but OF cannabinoid test interpretation is challenging. Controlled cannabinoid administration studies provide a scientific database for interpreting cannabinoid OF tests. We compared differences in OF cannabinoid concentrations from 19 h before to 30 h after smoking a 6.8% THC cigarette in chronic frequent and occasional cannabis smokers. OF was collected with the Statsure Saliva Sampler™ OF device. 2D-GC-MS was used to quantify cannabinoids in 357 OF specimens; 65 had inadequate OF volume within 3 h after smoking. All OF specimens were THC-positive for up to 13.5 h after smoking, without significant differences between frequent and occasional smokers over 30 h. Cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) had short median last detection times (2.5-4 h for CBD and 6-8 h for CBN) in both groups. THCCOOH was detected in 25 and 212 occasional and frequent smokers' OF samples, respectively. THCCOOH provided longer detection windows than THC in all frequent smokers. As THCCOOH is not present in cannabis smoke, its presence in OF minimizes the potential for false positive results from passive environmental smoke exposure, and can identify oral THC ingestion, while OF THC cannot. THC ≥ 1 μg/L, in addition to CBD ≥ 1 μg/L or CBN ≥ 1 μg/L suggested recent cannabis intake (≤13.5 h), important for DUID cases, whereas THC ≥ 1 μg/L or THC ≥ 2 μg/L cutoffs had longer detection windows (≥30 h), important for workplace testing. THCCOOH windows of detection for chronic, frequent cannabis smokers extended beyond 30 h, while they were shorter (0-24 h) for occasional cannabis smokers.

  3. Does sugar content matter? Blood plasma glucose levels in an occasional and a specialist avian nectarivore.

    PubMed

    Witteveen, Minke; Brown, Mark; Downs, Colleen T

    2014-01-01

    Nectar composition within a plant pollinator group can be variable, and bird pollinated plants can be segregated into two groups based on their adaptations to either a specialist or an occasional bird pollination system. Specialist nectarivores rely primarily on nectar for their energy requirements, while occasional nectarivores meet their energy requirements from nectar as well as from seeds, fruit and insects. Avian blood plasma glucose concentration (PGlu) is generally high compared with mammals. It is also affected by a range of factors including species, gender, age, ambient temperature, feeding pattern, reproductive status, circadian rhythm and moult status, among others. We examined whether sugar content affected PGlu of two avian nectarivores, a specialist nectarivore the Amethyst Sunbird Chalcomitra amethystina, and an occasional nectarivore the Cape White-eye Zosterops virens, when fed sucrose-hexose sugar solution diets of varying concentrations (5%-35%). Both species regulated PGlu within a range which was affected by sampling time (fed or fasted) and not dietary sugar concentration. The range in mean PGlu was broader in Amethyst Sunbirds (11.52-16.51mmol/L) compared with Cape White-eyes (14.33-15.85mmol/L). This suggests that these birds are not constrained by dietary sugar concentration with regard to PGlu regulation, and consequently selective pressure on plants for their nectar characteristics is due to reasons other than glucose regulation. PMID:24095723

  4. Does sugar content matter? Blood plasma glucose levels in an occasional and a specialist avian nectarivore.

    PubMed

    Witteveen, Minke; Brown, Mark; Downs, Colleen T

    2014-01-01

    Nectar composition within a plant pollinator group can be variable, and bird pollinated plants can be segregated into two groups based on their adaptations to either a specialist or an occasional bird pollination system. Specialist nectarivores rely primarily on nectar for their energy requirements, while occasional nectarivores meet their energy requirements from nectar as well as from seeds, fruit and insects. Avian blood plasma glucose concentration (PGlu) is generally high compared with mammals. It is also affected by a range of factors including species, gender, age, ambient temperature, feeding pattern, reproductive status, circadian rhythm and moult status, among others. We examined whether sugar content affected PGlu of two avian nectarivores, a specialist nectarivore the Amethyst Sunbird Chalcomitra amethystina, and an occasional nectarivore the Cape White-eye Zosterops virens, when fed sucrose-hexose sugar solution diets of varying concentrations (5%-35%). Both species regulated PGlu within a range which was affected by sampling time (fed or fasted) and not dietary sugar concentration. The range in mean PGlu was broader in Amethyst Sunbirds (11.52-16.51mmol/L) compared with Cape White-eyes (14.33-15.85mmol/L). This suggests that these birds are not constrained by dietary sugar concentration with regard to PGlu regulation, and consequently selective pressure on plants for their nectar characteristics is due to reasons other than glucose regulation.

  5. Cannabinoid disposition in oral fluid after controlled cannabis smoking in frequent and occasional smokers.

    PubMed

    Newmeyer, Matthew N; Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Lee, Dayong; Mendu, Damodara R; Barnes, Allan J; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-10-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is an increasingly popular alternative matrix for drug testing, with cannabinoids being the most commonly identified illicit drug. Quantification of multiple OF cannabinoids and understanding differences in OF cannabinoid pharmacokinetics between frequent and occasional smokers improve test interpretation. The new Oral-Eze® OF collection device has an elution buffer that stabilizes analytes and improves drug recovery from the collection pad; however, its performance has not been independently evaluated. After controlled smoking of a 6.8% Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) cannabis cigarette by frequent and occasional smokers, OF was collected with the Oral-Eze device for up to 30 h. Samples were analyzed for multiple cannabinoids by a validated 2D-GC-MS method. Frequent smokers had significantly greater OF THCCOOH concentrations than occasional smokers at all times, and showed positive results for a significantly longer time. We evaluated multiple cannabinoid cut-offs; the shortest last detection times were observed when THC ≥ 1 μg/L was combined with CBD or CBN ≥ 1 μg/L. With these cut-offs, last detection times(1-13.5 h) were not significantly different between groups, demonstrating suitability for short-term cannabinoid detection independent of smoking history. Cut-offs utilizing THC alone or combined with THCCOOH showed significantly different last detection times between groups. The widest detection windows were observed with THC ≥ 1 or 2 μg/L or THCCOOH ≥ 20 ng/L. Our data illustrate the effectiveness of the Oral-Eze® device for OF collection, the impact of self-administered smoked cannabis history on OF cannabinoid results, and the ability to improve interpretation and tailor OF cannabinoid cut-offs to fulfill the detection window needs of a given program.

  6. Comparing the Effects of Negative and Mixed Emotional Messages on Predicted Occasional Excessive Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Pilar; Caballero, Amparo; Muñoz, Dolores

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present two types of emotional message, negative (sadness) versus mixed (joy and sadness), with the aim of studying their differential effect on attitude change and the probability estimated by participants of repeating the behavior of occasional excessive drinking in the near future. The results show that for the group of participants with moderate experience in this behavior the negative message, compared to the mixed one, is associated with higher probability of repeating the risk behavior and a less negative attitude toward it. These results suggest that mixed emotional messages (e.g. joy and sadness messages) could be more effective in campaigns for the prevention of this risk behavior. PMID:25977606

  7. Strong reproductive isolation despite occasional hybridization between a widely distributed and a narrow endemic Rhododendron species

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Peng; Xie, Wei-Jia; Sun, Wei-Bang; Marczewski, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive isolation (RI) plays an important role for speciation, but assessing reproductive barriers at all life-cycle stages remains challenging. In plants, most studies addressing the topic have been focusing on herbs with short generation times. The present study attempted to quantify several reproductive barriers between a hybridizing species pair of long-lived woody rhododendrons. Consistent with findings of previous studies, pre-zygotic reproductive barriers contributed more to total RI than post-zygotic reproductive barriers. Especially in the more widespread species geographic isolation was an important barrier, and pollinator constancy contributed exceptionally to RI in both species. Additionally to strong pre-zygotic reproductive barriers, post-zygotic reproductive barriers were considerable, and had asymmetric tendencies favoring one of the species as maternal parent. Overall, despite occasional hybridization, the present study provides evidence for strong RI between R. cyanocarpum and R. delavayi. PMID:26751844

  8. Emotional ambivalence in risk behaviors: the case of occasional excessive use of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Amparo; Carrera, Pilar; Muñoz, Dolores; Flor, Sánchez

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the differential and complementary role played by the theory of planned behavior (TPB) variables and by participants' emotions when recalling and describing previous experiences of such risk behavior in the prediction of the intention to repeat a risk behavior in the immediate future. We chose the behavior of occasional excessive drinking, a risk behavior characterized by evoking attitudinal ambivalence and eliciting mixed emotions, joy and sadness. The results show that emotional ambivalence is not equivalent to attitudinal ambivalence (whose indexes include that of the affective component), and that this emotional information is relevant for predicting the intention to repeat the risk behavior in the near future, enhancing the prediction of the TPB model. PMID:17549888

  9. Symptoms of cough and shortness of breath among occasional young adult smokers

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Carla J.; Klatt, Colleen M.; Perry, Cheryl L.; Thomas, Janet L.; Luo, Xianghua; Ehlinger, Edward; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The perception of negative health consequences is a common motive for quitting smoking, but specific information on the immediate health effects of occasional smoking among young adults is limited. Method: To examine the relationship between cigarette use and symptoms of (a) cough or sore throat and (b) shortness of breath or fatigue after regular activities among young adults, we performed online health screening of a random sample of 25,000 college undergraduates. The screening survey assessed demographic characteristics, smoking and related health behaviors, and respiratory symptoms in the previous 30 days. Results: The response rate was 26% (6,492/25,000). Among individuals reporting no smoking in the prior 30 days and smoking on 1–4, 5–10, 11–20, or 21–30 days, the prevalence of one or more days of cough/sore throat increased from 62.5% to 68.3%, 72.0%, 71.4%, and 73.7%, respectively (p < .001). Similarly, the prevalence of shortness of breath/fatigue increased from 42.7% to 47.1%, 56.2%, 59.5%, and 64.6%, respectively (p < .001). After controlling for demographics, other important health behaviors (e.g., days consuming alcohol and getting adequate sleep), and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure, reporting symptoms of cough/sore throat was associated with smoking on at least 21 days, whereas shortness of breath/fatigue was associated with smoking on 5 or more days. Among those reporting symptoms, increased number of days with respiratory symptoms was associated with smoking on most days as well as ETS exposure. Discussion: In conclusion, this cross-sectional study found that occasional smoking and ETS exposure were associated with an increase in the rate of respiratory symptoms (cough/sore throat and shortness of breath/fatigue) among young adults. PMID:19264863

  10. Evaluation of occasional nonresponse of a washed cod mince model to hemoglobin (Hb)-mediated oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sannaveerappa, Thippeswamy; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Undeland, Ingrid

    2007-05-30

    An emerging model to test antioxidants for application in seafoods is washed cod mince fortified with hemoglobin (Hb) as a catalyst. This system has been used to test the antioxidative activity of certain muscle extracts and some pure compounds such as BHA, BHT, TBHQ, and propyl gallate during ice storage. However, the washed cod mince model has occasionally been resistant to Hb-mediated oxidation. This has been in cases when the moisture of the model has been minimized by washes at the protein isoelectric point (pH approximately 5.5) to allow for large additions of potentially antioxidative solutions. In this paper, noncontrollable and controllable factors for this intriguing occasional oxidation resistance were studied. Compositional analyses (lipid content, alpha-tocopherol, and lipid hydroperoxides) and structural analysis of a "normal" oxidizing model and a stable model were done to identify any differences among them. Some controllable factors related to the model preparation that were studied included different washing pH values (5.5-6.6), Hb concentrations (7.2 and 13.5 microM), final model moisture contents (75, 81, and 90%), and light exposure during ice storage (0 h, 3-4 h, or 24 h of light/day). Results revealed a 2-fold higher alpha-tocopherol content in the stable model than in the oxidizing model. Electron microscopy images showed a more and less disrupted myofibrillar structure in the stable and the oxidizing cod model, respectively. This indicated that "cold setting" (i.e., pre-gelation) of the stable model may have occurred and prevented Hb from diffusing freely in the model. Controllable factors that reduced lipid oxidation in the models were less Hb and lower moisture. PMID:17461593

  11. Demographic Subgroup Trends for Various Licit and Illicit Drugs, 1975-2009. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper Series. Paper 73

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    This occasional paper serves as a supplement to one of four annual monographs from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) study, written by the study's investigators and published by the study's sponsor, the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The full 2009 survey results are reported in "Monitoring the Future National Survey Results on Drug Use,…

  12. Demographic Subgroup Trends for Various Licit and Illicit Drugs, 1975-2006. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper 67

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2007-01-01

    This occasional paper is intended to serve as a supplement to the larger annual volume, "Monitoring the Future National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2006: Volume I: Secondary School Students." This supplement contains the graphic presentation of the trends in drug use for various demographic subgroups, namely those defined by gender, college…

  13. The Daya of Egypt: Survival in a Modernizing Society. Caltech Population Program Occasional Papers, Series 1, Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Hamamsy, Laila

    This paper, one in a series of occasional publications, discusses the role of the midwife, or "daya," in contemporary Egypt. The series is intended to increase understanding of the interrelationships between population growth and socioeconomic and cultural patterns throughout the world, and to communicate this understanding to scholars and policy…

  14. A Collection of Occasional Papers on Economic Development and Productivity. Productivity Primer. Book 5. Special Publication Series No. 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    One of a series of productivity primers examining the interrelationship among vocational education, productivity, and economic development, this volume consists of seven occasional papers on economic development and productivity. Included in the collection are the following papers: "The Real Supply-Side Economics," by Anthony P. Carnevale;…

  15. Issues in Integrative Studies. An Occasional Publication of the Association for Integrative Studies. Publications for 1982, 1983, 1984/85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Raymond C., Ed.

    These three occasional publications contain the following articles: (1) Varieties of Interdisciplinary Approaches in the Social Sciences (Raymond C. Miller); (2) Five Arguments against Interdisciplinary Studies (Thomas L. Benson); (3) What Are Transdisciplinary Principles? (Robert W. Winquist); (4) Can Progress toward Interdisciplinary Education…

  16. Advancing History Education in American Schools. A Symposium at the Library of Congress. Panel 1. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council for History Education, Inc., Westlake, OH.

    This occasional paper discusses and advances the teaching of history in U.S. schools by noted historians. James Billington, the Librarian of Congress, explains the resources available through the Library of Congress' National Digital Library Program designed to bring five million items into digitized format and make them available throughout the…

  17. Longer visits on familiar plants?: testing a regular visitor's tendency to probe more flowers than occasional visitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Takashi T.

    2013-07-01

    An individual pollinator may tend to consecutively probe more flowers on a plant to which it returns at shorter intervals than other plants. In a large net cage, I let individually marked bumble bees forage on flowering heads of red clovers arranged in 37 bottles (plants), each of which was monitored by an observer to record every visit and probe for 2.5 h on each of 3 days. The data of collective visits by marked individuals revealed that the bees had their own foraging areas, in which they visited a set of plants frequently and others less often, i.e., the same individual bee repeatedly returned to certain plants as a regular visitor while sampling others as an occasional visitor. I further found that as a regular visitor, an individual bee tended to probe more flowering heads on familiar plants while probing fewer on unfamiliar plants as an occasional visitor. The mean number of consecutive probes by a bee was also positively correlated with its activity (the total number of plant visits made during the observation period). The fact that each bee behaves differently on different plants indicates that the same individual pollinator can exert different influence on the reproductive success of each plant: apparently, a pollinator likely reduces the potential for geitonogamous self-pollination when foraging as an occasional visitor. Attracting occasional visitors therefore may be beneficial for plants to avoid geitonogamy. This study thus emphasizes the importance of paying attention to pollinator individuality in pollination ecology.

  18. Demographic Subgroup Trends for Various Licit and Illicit Drugs, 1975-2000. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper 53.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.

    This occasional paper is intended to serve as a supplement to the larger annual volume, "Monitoring the Future National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2000: Volume 1: Secondary School Students." This supplement contains the graphic presentation of the trends in drug use for various demographic subgroups, namely those defined by gender, college…

  19. Demographic Subgroup Trends for Various Licit and Illicit Drugs, 1975-2007. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper 69

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2008-01-01

    This occasional paper is intended to serve as a supplement to the larger annual volume, "Monitoring the Future National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2007: Volume I: Secondary School Students." This supplement contains the graphic presentation of the trends in drug use for various demographic subgroups, namely those defined by gender, college…

  20. A Progressive Approach to the Education of Teachers: Some Principles from Bank Street College of Education. Occasional Paper Series 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nager, Nancy; Shapiro, Edna K.

    2007-01-01

    This occasional paper presents Bank Street's approach as represented in a set of five interrelated principles. It begins by briefly describing the origins and rationale of teacher education at Bank Street. From this description are generated principles that emerge from Bank Street's history and practice, linking each principle to classroom images…

  1. Occasional detection of thymic epithelial tumor 4 years after diagnosis of adult onset Still disease

    PubMed Central

    Lococo, Filippo; Bajocchi, Gianluigi; Caruso, Andrea; Valli, Riccardo; Ricchetti, Tommaso; Sgarbi, Giorgio; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thymoma is a T cell neoplasm arising from the thymic epithelium that due to its immunological role, frequently undercover derangements of immunity such a tumors and autoimmune diseases. Methods: Herein, we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first description of an association between thymoma and adult onset Still disease (AOSD) in a 47-year-old man. The first one was occasionally detected 4 years later the diagnosis of AOSD, and surgically removed via right lateral thoracotomy. Histology confirmed an encapsulated thymic tumor (type AB sec. WHO-classification). Results: The AOSD was particularly resistant to the therapy, requiring a combination of immunosuppressant followed by anti-IL1R, that was the only steroids-sparing treatment capable to induce and maintain the remission. The differential diagnosis was particularly challenging because of the severe myasthenic-like symptoms that, with normal laboratory tests, were initially misinterpreted as fibromyalgia. The pathogenic link of this association could be a thymus escape of autoreactive T lymphocytes causing autoimmunity. Conclusion: Clinicians should be always include the possibility of a thymoma in the differential diagnosis of an unusual new onset of weakness and normal laboratories data, in particular once autoimmune disease is present in the medical history. PMID:27603335

  2. New and rare coastal fishes in the Azores islands: occasional events or tropicalization process?

    PubMed

    Afonso, P; Porteiro, F M; Fontes, J; Tempera, F; Morato, T; Cardigos, F; Santos, R S

    2013-08-01

    Seven coastal fish species are newly reported for the remote north Atlantic archipelago of the Azores: Mediterranean sand eel Gymnammodytes cicerelus, bar jack Caranx ruber, two-banded seabream Diplodus vulgaris, bastard grunt Pomadasys incisus, unicorn leatherjacket filefish Aluterus scriptus and longspined porcupinefish Diodon holacanthus. The occurrence is also confirmed for 19 species that had been hitherto cited occasionally for the region, totalling a list of two elasmobranchs and 23 teleosts. Diplodus vulgaris, which appears to have recently colonized the islands, as well as roughtail stingray Dasyatis centroura and golden grey mullet Liza aurata, re-cited based on new records, are frequent or common coastal species in the Azores. The remaining 22 species, exceptional or rare in the region, are of tropical or subtropical affinity and find their northernmost distribution limit within the central and north-east Atlantic Ocean precisely in the Azores. This biogeographical pattern contrasts with that of the Azorean coastal fish community and suggests a tropicalization process in the region in line with previous findings of similar patterns across the north-east Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. These novel data from the most isolated archipelago of the North Atlantic Ocean, located in a biogeographic boundary area where colonization opportunities are reduced, reinforce the need for long-term monitoring programmes of coastal fish communities and, in particular, of indicator species groups to improve understanding of the effects of climate change on marine communities. PMID:23902306

  3. Individual freedoms versus collective responsibility: immunization decision-making in the face of occasionally competing values

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Daniel A; Omer, Saad B

    2006-01-01

    Modern public health strives for maximizing benefits for the highest number of people while protecting individual rights. Restrictions on individual rights are justified for two reasons-for the benefit of the individual or the benefit of the community. In extreme situations there may be a need to protect the health of an individual and particularly a child; even by overriding individual/parental autonomy. However, The American Academy of Pediatrics recently concluded that "Continued (vaccine) refusal after adequate discussion should be respected unless the child is put at significant risk of serious harm (as, for example, might be the case during an epidemic). Only then should state agencies be involved to override parental discretion on the basis of medical neglect". Many countries have compulsory immunization requirements. These laws curtail individual autonomy in order to protect the community from infectious diseases because unvaccinated individuals pose risk to the community – including vaccinated individuals (since vaccines are not 100% efficacious), children too young to be vaccinated, and persons who have medical vaccine contraindications. There are situations where there can be a real or perceived divergence between individual and community benefits of vaccination. This divergence may occasionally be based upon current scientific evidence and may exemplify the need for overriding individual autonomy. A divergence between individual and community benefits may also exist when there are ideological beliefs incongruent with vaccination or individuals are unaware of or do not accept available scientific evidence. When the state curtails individual freedoms for the collective good, it should address several issues including the magnitude of the individual and community risk, the strength of the individual's conviction, wider and long-term consequences of restricting individual autonomy, effective risk communication, best available scientific evidence, and

  4. Individual freedoms versus collective responsibility: immunization decision-making in the face of occasionally competing values.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Daniel A; Omer, Saad B

    2006-09-27

    Modern public health strives for maximizing benefits for the highest number of people while protecting individual rights. Restrictions on individual rights are justified for two reasons--for the benefit of the individual or the benefit of the community. In extreme situations there may be a need to protect the health of an individual and particularly a child; even by overriding individual/parental autonomy. However, The American Academy of Pediatrics recently concluded that "Continued (vaccine) refusal after adequate discussion should be respected unless the child is put at significant risk of serious harm (as, for example, might be the case during an epidemic). Only then should state agencies be involved to override parental discretion on the basis of medical neglect". Many countries have compulsory immunization requirements. These laws curtail individual autonomy in order to protect the community from infectious diseases because unvaccinated individuals pose risk to the community--including vaccinated individuals (since vaccines are not 100% efficacious), children too young to be vaccinated, and persons who have medical vaccine contraindications. There are situations where there can be a real or perceived divergence between individual and community benefits of vaccination. This divergence may occasionally be based upon current scientific evidence and may exemplify the need for overriding individual autonomy. A divergence between individual and community benefits may also exist when there are ideological beliefs incongruent with vaccination or individuals are unaware of or do not accept available scientific evidence. When the state curtails individual freedoms for the collective good, it should address several issues including the magnitude of the individual and community risk, the strength of the individual's conviction, wider and long-term consequences of restricting individual autonomy, effective risk communication, best available scientific evidence, and

  5. Distribution of Pseudomonas Species in a Dairy Plant Affected by Occasional Blue Discoloration

    PubMed Central

    Lomonaco, Sara; Nucera, Daniele; Garoglio, Davide; Dalmasso, Alessandra; Civera, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    During 2010 many cases of discoloration in mozzarella, popularly termed as blue mozzarella, have been reported to the attention of public opinion. Causes of the alteration were bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. The strong media impact of such cases has created confusion, not only among consumers, but also among experts. In order to help improving the knowledge on microbial ecology of this microorganism a study has been set up with the collaboration of a medium-sized dairy plant producing fresh mozzarella cheese, with occasional blue discoloration, conducting surveys and sampling in the pre-operational, operational and post-operational process phase, milk before and after pasteurization, water (n=12), environmental surfaces (n=22) and the air (n=27). A shelf life test was conducted on finished products stored at different temperatures (4-8°C). Among the isolates obtained from the microbiological analysis of the samples, 60 were subjected to biomolecular tests in order to confirm the belonging to Pseudomonas genus and to get an identification at species level by the amplification and sequencing of the gyrB gene. The results of microbiological tests demonstrated the presence of microorganisms belonging to the genus Pseudomonas along the entire production lane; molecular tests showed 7 different species among the 40 isolates identified. One particular species (Pseudomonas koreensis) was isolated from blue discolored mozzarella cheese and was indicated as the most relevant for the production plant, both for the distribution along the processing chain and for the consequences on the finished product. PMID:27800364

  6. The Management of Intercollegiate Athletics at UC Berkeley: Turning Points and Consequences. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.12.13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, John; Hextrum, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This white paper was prepared at the request of the Advisory Committee to the Athletic Study Center as a result of their concern over poor graduation rates in football as released by the NCAA in 2012. The paper received extensive review by the members of that committee as well as several other knowledgeable faculty and senior administrators before…

  7. Paradoxes and Dilemmas in Managing E-Learning in Higher Education. Research & Occasional Paper Series. CSHE.7.03

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guri-Rosenblit, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    The new information and communication technologies (ICT) affect currently most spheres of life, including all educational levels. Their effects are most likely to grow in the future. However, many predictions in the last few years as to the sweeping impact of the ICT on restructuring the teaching/learning practices at universities and their high…

  8. Forecasting influent flow rate and composition with occasional data for supervisory management system by time series model.

    PubMed

    Kim, J R; Ko, J H; Im, J H; Lee, S H; Kim, S H; Kim, C W; Park, T J

    2006-01-01

    The information on the incoming load to wastewater treatment plants is not often available to apply modelling for evaluating the effect of control actions on a full-scale plant. In this paper, a time series model was developed to forecast flow rate, COD, NH4(+)-N and PO4(3-)-P in influent by using 250 days data of field plant operation data. The data for 150 days and 100 days were used for model development and model validation, respectively. The missing data were interpolated by the spline method and the time series model. Three different methods were proposed for model development: one model and one-step to seven-step ahead forecasting (Method 1); seven models and one-step-ahead forecasting (Method 2); and one model and one-step-ahead forecasting (Method 3). Method 3 featured only one-step-ahead forecasting that could avoid the accumulated error and give simple estimation of coefficients. Therefore, Method 3 was the reliable approach to developing the time series model for the purpose of this research.

  9. Characteristics of occasional poor medium-range weather forecasts for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodwell, Mark; Magnusson, Linus; Bauer, Peter; Bechtold, Peter; Bonavita, Massimo; Cardinali, Carla; Diamantakis, Michail; Earnshaw, Paul; Garcia-Mendez, Antonio; Isaksen, Lars; Kallen, Erland; Klocke, Daniel; Lopez, Philippe; McNally, Tony; Persson, Anders; Prates, Fernando; Wedi, Nils

    2013-04-01

    Weather prediction at a range of a few days has become more skilful over recent decades, but forecast centres still suffer from occasional very poor forecasts - often referred to as a 'drop-outs' or 'busts'. This study focuses on European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) day-6 forecasts for Europe. The focus on particularly poor forecasts means that one must be careful what can be concluded for a single case-study, and what requires the use of a large composite of cases. Although busts are defined by area-mean scores, bust composites reveal a coherent 'Rex-type' blocking situation; with a High over North Europe and a Low over the Mediterranean. Initial conditions for these busts also reveal a coherent flow, but this is located over North America and involves a trough over the Rockies, with high convective instability to its east. This flow-type occurs particularly in spring, and is often associated with a Rossby wave that has crossed the Pacific. A composite of this initial flow-type does indeed display enhanced day-6 random forecast errors - indicating reduced inherent predictability. In the probabilistic forecasting system, ensemble spread is also enhanced but not sufficiently to match the increased error. Composite analysis of the Potential Vorticity budget shows that mesoscale convective systems, associated with the convective instability, act to slow the motion of the trough. Hence convection errors play an active role in the busts. The sub-grid-scale nature of convection highlights the importance of the representation of model uncertainty in probabilistic forecasts. The cloud and extreme conditions associated with mesoscale convective systems also reduce the availability and utility of observations provided to the data assimilation. A question of relevance to the wider community is do we have observations with sufficient accuracy to better constrain the important error-structures in the initial-conditions? Meanwhile, improvements to ensemble

  10. Legal Factors Related to Access to Campuses of Public Colleges and Universities: An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Michael A.

    Legal methods and related case law that can be used by public higher education administrators to deal with intrusions by outsiders onto the campus are examined. The following legal factors related to control of campus access are addressed: risk management, police power, general trespass, school related trespass/loitering statutes, First and…

  11. What's Wrong with a Career in Hospitality? An Examination of Student Choice. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Simon; Angliss, William

    2009-01-01

    The preference of students to choose a career in events management over hospitality despite low demand for skills is the focus of this paper. The need for greater involvement of external stakeholders is identified as important in ensuring that students make an informed decision when choosing a career path. A model representing the ideal situation…

  12. Changing Patterns in Internal Communication in Large Academic Libraries. Occasional Paper Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euster, Joanne R.

    Based on data from a 1979 survey of ARL member libraries, this study by the Office of Management Studies analyzes the responses of selected libraries which had provided internal studies or planning documents on the subject of internal communication and notes the extent of resulting changes in procedures. The studies yielded information on staff…

  13. Range-wide sex-chromosome sequence similarity supports occasional XY recombination in European tree frogs (Hyla arborea).

    PubMed

    Dufresnes, Christophe; Stöck, Matthias; Brelsford, Alan; Perrin, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with mammals and birds, most poikilothermic vertebrates feature structurally undifferentiated sex chromosomes, which may result either from frequent turnovers, or from occasional events of XY recombination. The latter mechanism was recently suggested to be responsible for sex-chromosome homomorphy in European tree frogs (Hyla arborea). However, no single case of male recombination has been identified in large-scale laboratory crosses, and populations from NW Europe consistently display sex-specific allelic frequencies with male-diagnostic alleles, suggesting the absence of recombination in their recent history. To address this apparent paradox, we extended the phylogeographic scope of investigations, by analyzing the sequences of three sex-linked markers throughout the whole species distribution. Refugial populations (southern Balkans and Adriatic coast) show a mix of X and Y alleles in haplotypic networks, and no more within-individual pairwise nucleotide differences in males than in females, testifying to recurrent XY recombination. In contrast, populations of NW Europe, which originated from a recent postglacial expansion, show a clear pattern of XY differentiation; the X and Y gametologs of the sex-linked gene Med15 present different alleles, likely fixed by drift on the front wave of expansions, and kept differentiated since. Our results support the view that sex-chromosome homomorphy in H. arborea is maintained by occasional or historical events of recombination; whether the frequency of these events indeed differs between populations remains to be clarified.

  14. Neural coordination can be enhanced by occasional interruption of normal firing patterns: a self-optimizing spiking neural network model.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Alexander; Froese, Tom; Ikegami, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The state space of a conventional Hopfield network typically exhibits many different attractors of which only a small subset satisfies constraints between neurons in a globally optimal fashion. It has recently been demonstrated that combining Hebbian learning with occasional alterations of normal neural states avoids this problem by means of self-organized enlargement of the best basins of attraction. However, so far it is not clear to what extent this process of self-optimization is also operative in real brains. Here we demonstrate that it can be transferred to more biologically plausible neural networks by implementing a self-optimizing spiking neural network model. In addition, by using this spiking neural network to emulate a Hopfield network with Hebbian learning, we attempt to make a connection between rate-based and temporal coding based neural systems. Although further work is required to make this model more realistic, it already suggests that the efficacy of the self-optimizing process is independent from the simplifying assumptions of a conventional Hopfield network. We also discuss natural and cultural processes that could be responsible for occasional alteration of neural firing patterns in actual brains.

  15. Polyethylene glycol 3350 in occasional constipation: A one-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 in subjects with self-reported occasional constipation. METHODS: Eligible subjects ≥ 17 years of age were randomized to receive either placebo or PEG 3350 17 g once daily in this multicenter, double-blind trial. Evaluations were conducted before (baseline) and after a 7-d treatment period. The primary efficacy variable was the proportion of subjects reporting complete resolution of straining and hard or lumpy stools. Secondary efficacy variables assessed the severity of the subjects’ daily bowel movement (BM) symptoms, and preference of laxatives based on diary entries, visual analog scale scores, and questionnaires. RESULTS: Of the 203 subjects enrolled in the study, 11 had major protocol violations. Complete resolution was noted by 36/98 (36.7%) subjects in the PEG 3350 group and 23/94 (24.5%) in the placebo group (P = 0.0595). The number of complete BMs without straining or lumpy stools was similar between both groups. Subjects receiving PEG 3350 experienced significant relief in straining and reduction in hardness of stools over a 7-d period (P < 0.0001). Subjects reported that PEG 3350 had a better effect on their daily lives, provided better control over a BM, better relief from constipation, cramping, and bloating, and was their preferred laxative. Adverse events (AEs) were balanced between the PEG 3350 and the placebo groups. No deaths, serious AEs, or discontinuations due to AEs were reported. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00770432. CONCLUSION: Oral administration of 17 g PEG 3350 once daily for a week is effective, safe, and well tolerated in subjects with occasional constipation. PMID:27158544

  16. Management and Planning Issues in the Use of Microcomputers in Schools. Occasional Paper in Educational Planning, Management and Statistics No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, David

    Reasons underlying the growth of interest in Asia and the Pacific region in educational computing and issues raised by such developments are examined in this paper, which begins by describing three main areas of use of microcomputers in schools--for teaching computer studies, for computer assisted learning, and for school adminstration. Reasons…

  17. Fitness to drive and cannabis: validation of two blood THCCOOH thresholds to distinguish occasional users from heavy smokers.

    PubMed

    Fabritius, Marie; Augsburger, Marc; Chtioui, Haithem; Favrat, Bernard; Giroud, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Many studies based on either an experimental or an epidemiological approach, have shown that the ability to drive is impaired when the driver is under the influence of cannabis. Baseline performances of heavy users remain impaired even after several weeks of abstinence. Symptoms of cannabis abuse and dependence are generally considered incompatible with safe driving. Recently, it has been shown that traffic safety can be increased by reporting the long-term unfit drivers to the driver licensing authorities and referring the cases for further medical assessment. Evaluation of the frequency of cannabis use is a prerequisite for a reliable medical assessment of the fitness to drive. In a previous paper we advocated the use of two thresholds based on 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) concentration in whole blood to help to distinguish occasional cannabis users (≤3 μg/L) from heavy regular smokers (≥40 μg/L). These criteria were established on the basis of results obtained in a controlled cannabis smoking study with placebo, carried out with two groups of young male volunteers; the first group was characterized by a heavy use (≥10 joints/month) while the second group was made up of occasional users smoking at most 1 joint/week. However, to date, these cutoffs have not been adequately assessed under real conditions. Their validity can now be evaluated and confirmed with 146 traffic offenders' real cases in which the whole blood cannabinoid concentrations and the frequency of cannabis use are known. The two thresholds were not challenged by the presence of ethanol (40% of cases) and of other therapeutic and illegal drugs (24%). Thus, we propose the following procedure that can be very useful in the Swiss context but also in other countries with similar traffic policies: if the whole blood THCCOOH concentration is higher than 40 μg/L, traffic offenders must be directed first and foremost toward medical assessment of their fitness to drive. This

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.100 - What are conservation programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT... programs are programs that improve energy and water efficiency and promote the use of solar and...

  19. An Investigation into Occasional White Spot Syndrome Virus Outbreak in Traditional Paddy Cum Prawn Fields in India

    PubMed Central

    Selvam, Deborah Gnana; Mujeeb Rahiman, K. M.; Mohamed Hatha, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    A yearlong (September 2009–August 2010) study was undertaken to find out possible reasons for occasional occurrence of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) outbreak in the traditional prawn farms adjoining Cochin backwaters. Physicochemical and bacteriological parameters of water and sediment from feeder canal and four shrimp farms were monitored on a fortnightly basis. The physicochemical parameters showed variation during the two production cycles and between the farms studied. Dissolved oxygen (DO) content of water from feeder canal showed low oxygen levels (as low as 0.8 mg/L) throughout the study period. There was no disease outbreak in the perennial ponds. Poor water exchange coupled with nutrient loading from adjacent houses resulted in phytoplankton bloom in shallow seasonal ponds which led to hypoxic conditions in early morning and supersaturation of DO in the afternoon besides considerably high alkaline pH. Ammonia levels were found to be very high in these ponds. WSSV outbreak was encountered twice during the study leading to mass mortalities in the seasonal ponds. The hypoxia and high ammonia content in water and abrupt fluctuations in temperature, salinity and pH might lead to considerable stress in the shrimps triggering WSSV infection in these traditional ponds. PMID:22593673

  20. Occasional presence of herpes viruses in synovial fluid and blood from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Rubén; Ordoñez, Graciela; Vázquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Pineda, Benjamín; Sotelo, Julio

    2015-10-01

    Viral agents have been suspected as participants of immune-mediated disorders. In the case of rheumatic diseases, the synovial joint cavity represents a secluded area of inflammation which could harbor etiological agents. We analyzed by polymerase chain reaction the possible presence of DNA from various herpes viruses in blood and synovial fluid from patients with either rheumatoid arthritis (n = 18), axial spondyloarthritis (n = 11), or osteoarthritis (n = 8). Relevant findings were as follows: DNA from varicella zoster virus was found in synovial fluid but not in blood mononuclear cells from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in 45 % of patients with axial spondyloarthritis but not in patients with osteoarthritis. Also, DNA from herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 was found both in the blood and in the synovial fluid from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Our results indicate the occasional presence of DNA from herpes viruses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or with axial spondyloarthritis. However, these findings might represent a parallel epiphenomenon of viral activation associated either with immunosuppressive therapy or with primary immune disturbances, rather than the etiological participation of herpes viruses in these disorders.

  1. Potential formation of bromophenols in Barcelona's tap water due to daily salt mine discharges and occasional phenol spills

    SciTech Connect

    Ventura, F.; Rivera, J.

    1986-02-01

    The presence of phenol and chlorinated phenols in drinking water has been shown to affect both taste and odor and to cause negative effects on health. The priority pollutants list issued by E.P.A. includes eleven of these compounds as suspected carcinogens. Little attention has been focussed on the presence of bromophenols. The presence of volatile brominated organic compounds has been demonstrated when bromide is present, due to chlorination. Similarly, brominated phenols might be formed during chlorination in the water works. More than 3 million inhabitants in the area of Barcelona drink water taken from Llobregat river. Quality of this raw water is strongly influenced by high contents of bromide coming from salt mines located in the upper course of the river. Phenol and phenolic compounds are usually found in raw water in the ppb range but occasional spills may increase the phenol content up to parts per million. This study shows the possibility of formation of bromophenols during normal chlorination conditions at Barcelona's water works plant.

  2. Evolution of Site-Selection Stabilizes Population Dynamics, Promotes Even Distribution of Individuals, and Occasionally Causes Evolutionary Suicide.

    PubMed

    Parvinen, Kalle; Brännström, Åke

    2016-08-01

    Species that compete for access to or use of sites, such as parasitic mites attaching to honey bees or apple maggots laying eggs in fruits, can potentially increase their fitness by carefully selecting sites at which they face little or no competition. Here, we systematically investigate the evolution of site-selection strategies among animals competing for discrete sites. By developing and analyzing a mechanistic and population-dynamical model of site selection in which searching individuals encounter sites sequentially and can choose to accept or continue to search based on how many conspecifics are already there, we give a complete characterization of the different site-selection strategies that can evolve. We find that evolution of site-selection stabilizes population dynamics, promotes even distribution of individuals among sites, and occasionally causes evolutionary suicide. We also discuss the broader implications of our findings and propose how they can be reconciled with an earlier study (Nonaka et al. in J Theor Biol 317:96-104, 2013) that reported selection toward ever higher levels of aggregation among sites as a consequence of site-selection. PMID:27647007

  3. Evolution of Site-Selection Stabilizes Population Dynamics, Promotes Even Distribution of Individuals, and Occasionally Causes Evolutionary Suicide.

    PubMed

    Parvinen, Kalle; Brännström, Åke

    2016-08-01

    Species that compete for access to or use of sites, such as parasitic mites attaching to honey bees or apple maggots laying eggs in fruits, can potentially increase their fitness by carefully selecting sites at which they face little or no competition. Here, we systematically investigate the evolution of site-selection strategies among animals competing for discrete sites. By developing and analyzing a mechanistic and population-dynamical model of site selection in which searching individuals encounter sites sequentially and can choose to accept or continue to search based on how many conspecifics are already there, we give a complete characterization of the different site-selection strategies that can evolve. We find that evolution of site-selection stabilizes population dynamics, promotes even distribution of individuals among sites, and occasionally causes evolutionary suicide. We also discuss the broader implications of our findings and propose how they can be reconciled with an earlier study (Nonaka et al. in J Theor Biol 317:96-104, 2013) that reported selection toward ever higher levels of aggregation among sites as a consequence of site-selection.

  4. Paradoxical Air Microembolism Induces Cerebral Bioelectrical Abnormalities and Occasionally Headache in Patent Foramen Ovale Patients With Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Sevgi, Eser Başak; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Demirci, Mehmet; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Dalkara, Turgay

    2012-01-01

    Background Although controversial, paradoxical embolism via patent foramen ovale (PFO) may account for some of the migraine attacks in a subset of migraine with aura (MA) patients. Induction of MA attacks with air bubble injection during transcranial Doppler ultrasound in MA patients with PFO supports this view. It is likely that cerebral embolism in patients with right-to-left shunt induces bioelectrical abnormalities to initiate MA under some conditions. Methods and Results We investigated changes in cerebral bioelectrical activity after intravenous microbubble injection in 10 MA patients with large PFO and right-to-left cardiac shunt. Eight PFO patients without migraine but with large right-to-left shunt and 12 MA patients without PFO served as controls. Four MA patients with PFO were reexamined with sham injections of saline without microbubbles. Bioelectrical activity was evaluated using spectral electroencephalography and, passage of microbubbles through cerebral arteries was monitored with transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Microbubble embolism caused significant electroencephalographic power increase in MA+PFO patients but not in control groups including the sham-injected MA+PFO patients. Headache developed in 2 MA with PFO patients after microbubble injection. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that air microembolism through large PFOs may cause cerebral bioelectrical disturbances and, occasionally, headache in MA patients, which may reflect an increased reactivity of their brain to transient subclinical hypoxia–ischemia, and suggest that paradoxical embolism is not a common cause of migraine but may induce headache in the presence of a large PFO and facilitating conditions. PMID:23316313

  5. Successful management of para-aortic lymphocyst with laparoscopic fenestration.

    PubMed

    Sarli, L; Cortellini, P; Pavlidis, C; Simonazzi, M; Sebastio, N

    2000-04-01

    Para-aortic lymphocyst occasionally follows retroperitoneal para-aortic node dissection for neoplastic diseases. We present a case in which the leakage of chylous fluid and then a para-aortic lymphocyst followed right nephrectomy and para-aortic node dissection for kidney cancer. Our method of treatment utilized conservative management of chylous ascites and laparoscopic internal drainage of the retroperitoneal lymphocyst.

  6. Effectively managing wound exudate.

    PubMed

    Chamanga, Edwin

    2015-09-01

    The management of wound exudate remains a clinical challenge despite technological advances in products with better exudate-handling capacities. This clinical challenge is occasionally encountered when thick exudate (viscous exudate) is present, and when most modern dressings do not possess the capabilities to manage the viscosity while enabling exudate absorption. Maceration to the peri-wound area poses another challenge, irrespective of the number of topical barrier application products on the market and the innovation of dressing products that lock exudate away or those that encourage vertical wicking. In addition to all the above, in clinical practice, the assessment and documentation of wound exudate remains sporadic, leading to the challenges of effective wound exudate dressing selection and cost-effective dressings.

  7. Phylogeography of a widespread species: pre-glacial vicariance, refugia, occasional blocking straits and long-distance migrations

    PubMed Central

    Santiso, Xabier; Lopez, Lúa; Retuerto, Rubén; Barreiro, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies give us the opportunity to reconstruct the historical migrations of species and link them with climatic and geographic variation. They are, therefore, a key tool to understanding the relationships among biology, geology and history. One of the most interesting biogeographical areas of the world is the Mediterranean region. However, in this area, the description of concordant phylogeographic patterns is quite scarce, which limits the understanding of evolutionary patterns related to climate. Species with one-dimensional distribution ranges, such as the strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo), are particularly useful to unravel these patterns. Here, we describe its phylogeographic structure and check for concordance with patterns seen in other Mediterranean plants: longitudinal/latitudinal clines of diversity, evidence for glacial refugia and the role of sea straits in dispersal. We also identify the most likely source for the disjunct Irish population. With this aim, we sequenced four chloroplast non-coding fragments of A. unedo from 23 populations covering its whole distribution. We determined the genetic diversity, population structure, haplotype genealogy and time to the most recent common ancestor. The genealogy revealed two clades that separated during the last 700 ky but before the last glacial maximum. One clade occupies Atlantic Iberia and North Africa, while the other occurs in the Western Mediterranean. The Eastern Mediterranean is inhabited by newer haplotypes derived from both clades, while the Irish population is closely related to Iberian demes. The straits of Sicily and Gibraltar partially restricted the gene flow. We concluded that a vicariance event during the Late Quaternary in the western end of the species' range followed by eastward migration seems a likely explanation for the observed phylogeographic pattern. The role of straits indicates an occasional communication between Europe and North Africa, suggesting that the latter was

  8. Phylogeography of a widespread species: pre-glacial vicariance, refugia, occasional blocking straits and long-distance migrations.

    PubMed

    Santiso, Xabier; Lopez, Lúa; Retuerto, Rubén; Barreiro, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies give us the opportunity to reconstruct the historical migrations of species and link them with climatic and geographic variation. They are, therefore, a key tool to understanding the relationships among biology, geology and history. One of the most interesting biogeographical areas of the world is the Mediterranean region. However, in this area, the description of concordant phylogeographic patterns is quite scarce, which limits the understanding of evolutionary patterns related to climate. Species with one-dimensional distribution ranges, such as the strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo), are particularly useful to unravel these patterns. Here, we describe its phylogeographic structure and check for concordance with patterns seen in other Mediterranean plants: longitudinal/latitudinal clines of diversity, evidence for glacial refugia and the role of sea straits in dispersal. We also identify the most likely source for the disjunct Irish population. With this aim, we sequenced four chloroplast non-coding fragments of A. unedo from 23 populations covering its whole distribution. We determined the genetic diversity, population structure, haplotype genealogy and time to the most recent common ancestor. The genealogy revealed two clades that separated during the last 700 ky but before the last glacial maximum. One clade occupies Atlantic Iberia and North Africa, while the other occurs in the Western Mediterranean. The Eastern Mediterranean is inhabited by newer haplotypes derived from both clades, while the Irish population is closely related to Iberian demes. The straits of Sicily and Gibraltar partially restricted the gene flow. We concluded that a vicariance event during the Late Quaternary in the western end of the species' range followed by eastward migration seems a likely explanation for the observed phylogeographic pattern. The role of straits indicates an occasional communication between Europe and North Africa, suggesting that the latter was

  9. Access to the UW System for Wisconsin High School Graduates. Occasional Research Brief, Volume 00, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. System, Madison.

    This paper examines trends in access rates to the University of Wisconsin (UW) system from the mid 1970s to the late 1990s with particular emphasis on how enrollment management planning for the mid to late 1990s affected the overall UW system access rate for resident undergraduates and how the application and admission patterns of these high…

  10. The Corporation of Learning: Nonprofit Higher Education Takes Lessons from Business. Research & Occasional Paper Series. CSHE.5.03

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirp, David L.

    2003-01-01

    This essay examines the ways in which nonprofit universities increasingly emulate businesses, focusing on two of the most direct forms of emulation: the creation of internal university markets at the University of Southern California through adoption of variants of resource center management (RCM) and the privatization of public higher education…

  11. Management of hyperkalaemia.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, A P; Linden, K; O'Donnell, S; Hamilton, P K; McVeigh, G E

    2013-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia, an elevated extracellular fluid potassium concentration, is a common electrolyte disorder and is present in 1-10% of hospitalised patients. Elevated serum potassium concentrations are usually asymptomatic but may be associated with electrocardiogram (ECG) changes. Hyperkalaemia occasionally leads to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Prompt recognition of this disorder, patient risk management and administration of appropriate treatment can prevent serious cardiac complications of hyperkalaemia. Further assessment of the underlying basis for hyperkalaemia usually reveals a problem with renal potassium excretion (rather than transcellular shift of potassium or excess potassium intake). Reduced potassium excretion is typically associated with decreased potassium secretion in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron of the kidney. Common causes for hyperkalaemia include kidney failure, limited delivery of sodium and water to the distal nephron and drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Treatment of life-threatening hyperkalaemia (particularly those patients with ECG changes) involves administration of intravenous calcium salts to stabilise the resting cardiac membrane potential. The potassium concentration can be lowered by administration of intravenous insulin combined with an infusion of glucose to stimulate intracellular uptake of potassium. Nebulised β-2 adrenoceptor agonists can augment the effects of intravenous insulin and glucose pending more definitive management of the recurrent hyperkalaemia risk. Additional management steps include stopping further potassium intake and careful review of prescribed drugs that may be adversely affecting potassium homeostasis. Changes to prescribing systems and an agreed institutional protocol for management of hyperkalaemia can improve patient safety for this frequently encountered electrolyte disorder.

  12. [Time profile of serum THC levels in occasional and chronic marihuana smokers after acute drog use - implication for drivind motor vehicles].

    PubMed

    Balíková, Marie; Hložek, Tomáš; Páleníček, Tomáš; Tylš, Filip; Viktorinová, Michaela; Melicher, Tomáš; Androvičová, Renáta; Tomíček, Pavel; Roman, Michal; Horáček, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis consumption has individual influence to cognitive and psychomotor functions of drivers and it has been generally accepted that driving under influence is risky in the perspective of traffic safety. However, rules how to assess fitness to drive are not quite clear. The psychoactive compound delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) impairs cognition, psychomotor behaviour and driving performance in a dose-related manner approximately. After a single drug dose, THC blood concentration peaks within minutes, before the end of smoking, with a subsequent rapid decrease to the analytical limit of detection. Peak euphoria is delayed compared to THC peak blood concentration and physiological and behavioural effects return to baseline within 3-5 hours. In chronic users, the lipophilic THC accumulates in fat tissues, where its slow redistribution into blood is the rate limiting process in its terminal elimination. In our experimental study we have attempted to contribute to this discussion with results obtained from human volunteers - cannabis consumers in Czech Republic. Aim of our study was to document the time profile of serum THC level in occasional and chronic cannabis users. The observational interval covered the time immediately after the drug consumption (an own cigarette/joint) till 24 hours after. Our preliminary results have shown that in occasional users, THC serum levels cannot be detected already 4 hours after usual cannabis dose, whereas in chronic users measurable THC concentrations in serum persist longer. Moreover, some chronic consumers were practically with permanent THC detection during our observation period and also the chronic users consumed higher THC doses significantly related to doses in occasional ones. Presented results of the experimental study with human volunteers confirm a great individual variability of the kinetic profile of THC in blood due to complicated redistribution. The practical forensic question is how long the psychotropic

  13. [Time profile of serum THC levels in occasional and chronic marihuana smokers after acute drog use - implication for drivind motor vehicles].

    PubMed

    Balíková, Marie; Hložek, Tomáš; Páleníček, Tomáš; Tylš, Filip; Viktorinová, Michaela; Melicher, Tomáš; Androvičová, Renáta; Tomíček, Pavel; Roman, Michal; Horáček, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis consumption has individual influence to cognitive and psychomotor functions of drivers and it has been generally accepted that driving under influence is risky in the perspective of traffic safety. However, rules how to assess fitness to drive are not quite clear. The psychoactive compound delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) impairs cognition, psychomotor behaviour and driving performance in a dose-related manner approximately. After a single drug dose, THC blood concentration peaks within minutes, before the end of smoking, with a subsequent rapid decrease to the analytical limit of detection. Peak euphoria is delayed compared to THC peak blood concentration and physiological and behavioural effects return to baseline within 3-5 hours. In chronic users, the lipophilic THC accumulates in fat tissues, where its slow redistribution into blood is the rate limiting process in its terminal elimination. In our experimental study we have attempted to contribute to this discussion with results obtained from human volunteers - cannabis consumers in Czech Republic. Aim of our study was to document the time profile of serum THC level in occasional and chronic cannabis users. The observational interval covered the time immediately after the drug consumption (an own cigarette/joint) till 24 hours after. Our preliminary results have shown that in occasional users, THC serum levels cannot be detected already 4 hours after usual cannabis dose, whereas in chronic users measurable THC concentrations in serum persist longer. Moreover, some chronic consumers were practically with permanent THC detection during our observation period and also the chronic users consumed higher THC doses significantly related to doses in occasional ones. Presented results of the experimental study with human volunteers confirm a great individual variability of the kinetic profile of THC in blood due to complicated redistribution. The practical forensic question is how long the psychotropic

  14. I, S, T, and J Grading Techniques for Es, Ns, Fs, and Ps: Insights from the MBTI on Managing the Grading Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornaciari, Charles J.; Lund Dean, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Most instructors at least occasionally experience grading student work as a frustrating, time-consuming task. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) instrument can be a powerful self-awareness tool for management educators seeking to enhance their grading techniques. Evidence suggests that many management professors prefer Extraversion (E),…

  15. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/13: Cooperative monitoring for confidence building: A case study of the Sino-Indian border areas

    SciTech Connect

    SIDHU,WAHEGURU PAL SINGH; YUAN,JING-DONG; BIRINGER,KENT L.

    1999-08-01

    This occasional paper identifies applicable cooperative monitoring techniques and develops models for possible application in the context of the border between China and India. The 1993 and 1996 Sino-Indian agreements on maintaining peace and tranquility along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) and establishing certain confidence building measures (CBMs), including force reductions and limitation on military exercises along their common border, are used to examine the application of technically based cooperative monitoring in both strengthening the existing terms of the agreements and also enhancing trust. The paper also aims to further the understanding of how and under what conditions technology-based tools can assist in implementing existing agreements on arms control and confidence building. The authors explore how cooperative monitoring techniques can facilitate effective implementation of arms control agreements and CBMS between states and contribute to greater security and stability in bilateral, regional, and global contexts.

  16. Over-the-Counter Agents for the Treatment of Occasional Disturbed Sleep or Transient Insomnia: A Systematic Review of Efficacy and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Larry; Wingertzahn, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the level of evidence supporting the use of common over-the-counter (OTC) agents (diphenhydramine, doxylamine, melatonin, and valerian) for occasional disturbed sleep or insomnia. Data sources: A systematic review of the literature was conducted on July 31, 2014, using MEDLINE (PubMed) and the search terms (insomnia OR sleep) AND (over*the*counter OR OTC OR non*prescription OR antihistamine OR doxylamine OR diphenhydramine OR melatonin OR valerian) with the filters English, human, and clinical trials. Study selection: Identified publications (from 2003 to July 31, 2014, following previous published literature reviews) that met the inclusion criteria were selected. The criteria included randomized placebo-controlled clinical studies that utilized overnight objective (polysomnography) or next-day participant-reported sleep-related endpoints and that were conducted in healthy participants with or without occasional disturbed sleep or diagnosed insomnia. Results: Measures of efficacy and tolerability were summarized for each study individually and grouped according to OTC agent: H1 antagonists or antihistamines (3 studies, diphenhydramine), melatonin (8), and valerian or valerian/hops (7). Of the 3 sleep agents, studies conducted with melatonin, especially prolonged-release formulations in older individuals with diagnosed insomnia, demonstrated the most consistent beneficial effects (vs placebo) on sleep measures, specifically sleep onset and sleep quality, with favorable tolerability. In contrast, the clinical trial data for diphenhydramine, immediate-release melatonin, and valerian suggested limited beneficial effects. Conclusions: A review of randomized controlled studies over the past 12 years suggests commonly used OTC sleep-aid agents, especially diphenhydamine and valerian, lack robust clinical evidence supporting efficacy and safety. PMID:27057416

  17. Management of postirradiation recurrent enterocutaneous fistula by muscle flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, R.C.; Friedman, R.; Fleischer, A.

    1989-07-01

    Occasionally surgeons have to operate on patients who have had previous abdominal or pelvic operations and irradiations for malignancies. Bowel resection with primary anastomosis under these circumstances is fraught with major complications such as anastomotic breakdown with intra-abdominal sepsis or recurrent enterocutaneous fistula, which are refractory to conventional management. New techniques for using vascularized muscle flaps from a distant nonirradiated field to achieve safe repair of the bowel defects in three such instances are presented.

  18. International consensus guidelines on the management of cytomegalovirus in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kotton, Camille N; Kumar, Deepali; Caliendo, Angela M; Asberg, Anders; Chou, Sunwen; Snydman, David R; Allen, Upton; Humar, Atul

    2010-04-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains one of the most common infections after solid organ transplantation, resulting in significant morbidity, graft loss, and occasional mortality. Management of CMV varies considerably among transplant centers. A panel of experts on CMV and solid organ transplant was convened by The Infectious Diseases Section of The Transplantation Society to develop evidence and expert opinion-based consensus guidelines on CMV management including diagnostics, immunology, prevention, treatment, drug resistance, and pediatric issues.

  19. Effects of kivia powder on Gut health in patients with occasional constipation: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of Kivia powder on supporting overall gut health through the relief of the discomfort of occasional constipation. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. Interventions The investigational product for this study was Kivia powder (Vital Food Processors Ltd., Auckland, New Zealand), containing the active ingredient Zyactinase™, 5.5 g taken daily for four weeks. Results One hundred thirty-eight subjects reporting occasional constipation were screened and 87 were randomized to placebo (n = 44) and product (n = 43). Bowel movement frequency, as measured by both average daily spontaneous bowel movements (SBM) and complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBM), were the same in both groups at baseline. There were significant increases in spontaneous bowel movements at week 1 (p = 0.001), week 2 (p = 0.001), week 3 (p = 0.000), and week 4 (p = 0.000) compared to baseline. SBM demonstrated significant differences between the treatment group and the placebo group at week 3 (p = 0.000), and week 4 (p = 0.020). The treatment group demonstrated a significantly higher rate of SBM at week 3 (p = 000) and from baseline to week 4 (p = 0.019). Significant increases in complete spontaneous bowel movements were observed at week 1 (p = 0.000), week 2 (p = 0.000), week 3 (p = 0.000), and week 4 (p = 0.000) compared to baseline. Moreover, CSBM was significantly higher for the treatment group compared to placebo at week 2 (p = 0.001). The change in average daily CSBM from baseline to week 2 was significantly higher in the treatment group than in the placebo group (p = 0.004). Abdominal discomfort or pain demonstrated significant differences between groups at week 1 (p = 0.044) and week 3 (p = 0.026). Flatulence was significantly lower for active group compared to placebo at week 2 (p = 0.047) and week 3 (p = 0.023). The number of bowel

  20. Recognition and Management of Threatened Stroke

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    Completed stroke may often be prevented by early recognition and appropriate management of the stroke-threatened patient. About 80% of strokes are ischemic, the remainder hemorrhagic. Roughly half of ischemic strokes are heralded by transient ischemic attacks (TIA). The clinical picture of TIA depends upon which part of the brain is involved. The investigation of such patients is outlined, together with current approaches to medical and surgical therapy. Intracerebral hemorrhage rarely provides any advanced warning, but occasionally subarachnoid hemorrhage may be preceded by a warning leak, the clinical picture of which is described. PMID:21286581

  1. The role of the illusion in the construction of erotic desire: narratives from heterosexual men who have occasional sex with transgender women.

    PubMed

    Reback, Cathy J; Kaplan, Rachel L; Bettcher, Talia M; Larkins, Sherry

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about men's sexual desire for and erotic attraction to male-to-female transgender women. To better understand how erotic desire is constructed, this study examined the narratives of a sample of heterosexual men who had had an occasional sexual encounter with a transgender woman. Open-ended qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 heterosexual men who reported at least one sexual encounter with a transgender woman in the previous 12 months. Using principles of Grounded Theory, three themes emerged: (1) the erotic desire that transpired from a transgender woman's construction of her femininity, (2) the sexual act that dictated the specific navigation of a transgender woman's penis and (3) the sexual dissonance that resulted from being a heterosexually identified man having sex with a partner who had a penis. These themes reflected how the participants defined and negotiated their sexual encounters, both psychologically through their understanding of sex with a transgender woman with a penis, and physically through the navigation of specific sex acts. The role of the 'illusion' was central to the meaning and construction of erotic desire. These narratives provided another framework for continuing discourse on the complexity of erotic desire. PMID:26967172

  2. Arthroscopic management of popliteal cysts

    PubMed Central

    Pankaj, Amite; Chahar, Deepak; Pathrot, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of popliteal cyst is controversial. Owing to high failure rates in open procedures, recent trend is towards arthroscopic decompression and simultaneous management of intraarticular pathology. We retrospectively analysed clinical results of symptomatic popliteal cysts after arthroscopic management at 24 month followup. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of hospital database for patients presenting with pathology suggestive of a popliteal cyst from June 2007 to December 2012 was done. Twelve cases of popliteal cyst not responding to NSAIDS and with Rauschning and Lindgren Grade 2 or 3 who consented for surgical intervention were included in the study. All patients underwent arthroscopic decompression using a posteromedial portal along with management of intraarticular pathologies as encountered. Furthermore, the unidirectional valvular effect was corrected to a bidirectional one by widening the cyst joint interface. The results were assessed as per the Rauschning and Lindgren criteria. Results: All patients were followed for a minimum of 24 months (range 24-36 months). It revealed that among the study group, six patients achieved Grade 0 status while five had a minimal limitation of range of motion accompanied by occasional pain (Grade 1). One patient had a failure of treatment with no change in the clinical grading. Conclusion: Arthroscopic approach gives easy access to decompression with the simultaneous management of articular pathologies. PMID:27053804

  3. Febrile and other occasional seizures.

    PubMed

    Bast, T; Carmant, L

    2013-01-01

    Seizures with fever that result from encephalitis or meningitis usually occur late in the course of febrile illness, and are focal and prolonged. Febrile seizures are by far the most common affecting 5% of the population, followed by posttraumatic seizures and those observed in the setting of a toxic, infectious, or metabolic encephalopathy. This chapter reviews the clinical presentation of the three most common forms, due to fever, trauma, and intoxication. Febrile seizures carry no cognitive or mortality risk. Recurrence risk is increased by young age, namely before 1 year of age. Febrile seizures that persist after the age of 6 years are usually part of the syndrome of Generalized epilepsy febrile seizures plus. These febrile seizures have a strong link with epilepsy since non-febrile seizures may occur later in the same patient and in other members of the same family with an autosomal dominant transmission. Complex febrile seizures, i.e., with focal or prolonged manifestations or followed by focal defect, are related to later mesial temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis; risk factors are seizure duration and brain malformation. Prophylactic treatment is usually not required in febrile seizures. Early onset of complex seizures is the main indication for AED prophylaxis. Early posttraumatic seizures, i.e., within the first week, are often focal and indicate brain trauma: contusion, hematoma, 24 hours amnesia, and depressed skull fracture are major factors of posttraumatic epilepsy. Prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs is not effective. Various psychotropic drugs, including antiepileptics, may cause seizures.

  4. Managing the pharmacy manager.

    PubMed

    White, S J

    1984-03-01

    Methods of self-assessment, self-development, and coping with stress in the role of hospital pharmacy manager are described. Personal development and career growth should be systematically appraised; goals and priorities should be continually re-evaluated; and time management, response to change, and impact on others should be examined. Questions for assessment in each of these areas are provided. Advice for reducing stress and avoiding burnout is given. Managers' attitudes affect employee productivity; positive attitudes and related actions that are applicable to hospital pharmacy management are described. Managers' personal and professional goals and priorities and their methods of using time and coping with stress affect management of their departments.

  5. Preliminary 3-D finite element analyses of the triggering mechanism of an occasional reactivation of a large landslide in stiff clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lollino, Piernicola; Fazio, Nunzio Luciano; Vennari, Carmela; Parise, Mario

    2015-04-01

    In December 2013 a large landslide occurred along a clay slope located at the south-western outskirts of the Montescaglioso village (Basilicata, Southern Italy) as a consequence of intense and prolonged rainfalls that presumably caused a significant increment of the pore water pressures in the slope. The slope is formed of stiff clays belonging to the formation of the Subappennine Blue Clays, which are over-consolidated and characterized by medium plasticity. According to aerial photos dating back to 1950s, the slope was already affected by previous landslide processes, so that the examined landslide process can be classified as an occasional reactivation according to the well-known classification of Cruden & Varnes (1996). Also, during the last decades several man-made actions in the area resulted in strong changes in the original water surface network that could have played some role in the slope reactivation. Based on displacement data, obtained from a monitoring system installed few days after the phenomenon, and still in function, at present the landslide does not show relevant signs of activity. Preliminary 2-D and 3-D finite element analyses have been carried out to investigate the factors that controlled the mechanism of reactivation of the landslide. The numerical model has been setup based on the available topographical, geological and geomorphological information, the geotechnical properties of the involved soils and the information concerning the piezometric regime in the slope. The results indicate that the mobilized shear strength of the clays ranges between the typical post-peak and residual values for this type of material and confirmed that the strong increment of the pore water pressures in the slope induced by the exceptional rainfalls occurred in the previous days can be identified as the main triggering factor of the reactivation.

  6. Weed Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adaptive management can complement integrated programs to manage weeds in forage production systems. This approach requires establishing management goals, developing and implementing management programs based on the goals, monitoring and assessing impacts of management efforts, and modifying goals a...

  7. Teaching Managers to Manage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Howard M.

    1970-01-01

    Haphazard training is replaced by an organized conceptual approach to managment development, with attention to managerial functions and activities, appropriate courses, general reading, and training costs. (LY)

  8. Managing Fault Management Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDougal, John M.

    2010-01-01

    As the complexity of space missions grows, development of Fault Management (FM) capabilities is an increasingly common driver for significant cost overruns late in the development cycle. FM issues and the resulting cost overruns are rarely caused by a lack of technology, but rather by a lack of planning and emphasis by project management. A recent NASA FM Workshop brought together FM practitioners from a broad spectrum of institutions, mission types, and functional roles to identify the drivers underlying FM overruns and recommend solutions. They identified a number of areas in which increased program and project management focus can be used to control FM development cost growth. These include up-front planning for FM as a distinct engineering discipline; managing different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; ensuring the necessary resources for a disciplined, coordinated approach to end-to-end fault management engineering; and monitoring FM coordination across all mission systems.

  9. Prograde dilatation with Tucker bougies: a technique for managing postoperative rectal strictures.

    PubMed

    Gamliel, Z; Wesson, D

    1991-11-01

    Postoperative rectal stricture is an occasional complication of abdominoperineal pull-through and low anterior resection of the rectum. Although the causes and pathogenesis of this phenomenon are poorly understood, various techniques for stricture dilatation have been described. In this article, we present two cases of severe postoperative rectal strictures that were not amenable to conventional methods of dilatation but were successfully managed by a technique of dilatation using Tucker bougies without general anesthesia.

  10. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  11. Information management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Wendell; Corker, Kevin

    1990-01-01

    Primary Flight Display (PFD) information management and cockpit display of information management research is presented in viewgraph form. The information management problem in the cockpit, information management burdens, the key characteristics of an information manager, the interface management system handling the flow of information and the dialogs between the system and the pilot, and overall system architecture are covered.

  12. The Not-So-Steady State of Governance in Higher Education. An Occasional Paper of the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies Program on Education for a Changing Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Donald M.

    No longer is there a clear understanding and appreciation, either inside or outside the academic community, of how, by whom, and for what purposes the institutional affairs and intellectual resources of higher education are to be managed and directed. The basic governance questions that are being asked today should relate to the locus of…

  13. Indigenous Peoples in Modern Nation-States. Proceedings from an International Workshop (Tromso, Norway, October 13-16, 1997). Occasional Papers Series A, No. 90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saugestad, Sidsel, Ed.

    The relationship between indigenous peoples and nation-states has long been of academic interest, and is also an emerging topic in the international debate about human rights and development. Universities and museums play an important part in this debate as producers, managers, and communicators of knowledge about indigenous peoples. In these…

  14. Managing government funded scientific consortia

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Bakul; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    In recent years, it is becoming apparent that good science not only requires the talents of individual scientists, but also state-of-the-art laboratory facilities. These faculties, often costing millions to billions of dollars, allow scientists unprecedented opportunities to advance their knowledge and improve the quality of human life. To make optimum use of these experimental facilities, a significant amount of computational simulations is required. These mega-projects require large-scale computational facilities and complementary infrastructures of network and software. For physical sciences in US, most of these research and development efforts are funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and National Science Foundation (NSF). Universities, US National Laboratories, and occasionally industrial partners work together on projects awarded with different flavors of government funds managed under different rules. At Fermilab, we manage multiple such collaborative computing projects for university and laboratory consortia. In this paper, I explore important lessons learned from my experience with these projects. Using examples of projects delivering computing infrastructure for the Lattice QCD Collaboration, I explain how the use of federal enterprise architecture may be deployed to run projects effectively. I also describe the lessons learned in the process. Lessons learned from the execution of the above projects are also applicable to other consortia receiving federal government funds.

  15. Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lloyd

    1998-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the identification of risk management, risk management processes such as: quantification and prioritization; mitigation planning; implementation of risk reduction; and tracking process. It develops examples and answers questions about Risk Management.

  16. Echocardiography in shock management.

    PubMed

    McLean, Anthony S

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available. The majority of pathologies found in shocked patients are readily identified using basic level 2D and M-mode echocardiography. A more comprehensive diagnosis can be achieved with advanced levels of competency, for which practice guidelines are also now available. Hemodynamic evaluation and ongoing monitoring are possible with advanced levels of competency, which includes the use of colour Doppler, spectral Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging and occasionally the use of more recent technological advances such as 3D or speckled tracking.The four core types of shock-cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, and vasoplegic-can readily be identified by echocardiography. Even within each of the main headings contained in the shock classification, a variety of pathologies may be the cause and echocardiography will differentiate which of these is responsible. Increasingly, as a result of more complex and elderly patients, the shock may be multifactorial, such as a combination of cardiogenic and septic shock or hypovolemia and ventricular outflow obstruction.The diagnostic benefit of echocardiography in the shocked patient is obvious. The increasing prevalence of critical care physicians experienced in advanced techniques means echocardiography often supplants the need for more invasive hemodynamic assessment and monitoring in shock. PMID:27543137

  17. Production Experiences with the Cray-Enabled TORQUE Resource Manager

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, Matthew A; Maxwell, Don E; Beer, David

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing resources utilize batch systems to manage the user workload. Cray systems are uniquely different from typical clusters due to Cray s Application Level Placement Scheduler (ALPS). ALPS manages binary transfer, job launch and monitoring, and error handling. Batch systems require special support to integrate with ALPS using an XML protocol called BASIL. Previous versions of Adaptive Computing s TORQUE and Moab batch suite integrated with ALPS from within Moab, using PERL scripts to interface with BASIL. This would occasionally lead to problems when all the components would become unsynchronized. Version 4.1 of the TORQUE Resource Manager introduced new features that allow it to directly integrate with ALPS using BASIL. This paper describes production experiences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the new TORQUE software versions, as well as ongoing and future work to improve TORQUE.

  18. Neurosurgical management of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ogbodo, Elisha; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; O’Sullivan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe a case of L-asparaginase induced intracranial thrombosis and subsequent haemorrhage in a newly diagnosed 30-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who was successfully managed by surgical intervention. At presentation, he had a Glasgow Coma Score of 7/15, was aphasic and had dense right hemiplegia. Neuroimaging revealed an acute anterior left middle cerebral artery infarct with parenchymal haemorrhagic conversion, mass effect and subfalcine herniation. He subsequently underwent left frontal craniotomy and evacuation of large frontal haematoma and decompressive craniectomy for cerebral oedema. Six months postoperatively he underwent titanium cranioplasty. He had made good clinical recovery and is currently mobilising independently with mild occasional episodes of expressive dysphasia, difficulty with fine motor movement on the right side, and has remained seizure free. This is the first documented case of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke managed by neurosurgical intervention. The authors emphasise the possible role of surgery in managing chemotherapy induced intracranial complications. PMID:22605598

  19. Clinical Management of Two Root Resorption Cases in Endodontic Practice.

    PubMed

    Mincik, Jozef; Urban, Daniel; Timkova, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Root resorption is a pathological process involving loss of hard dental tissues. It may occur as a consequence of dental trauma, orthodontic treatment, and bleaching, and occasionally it accompanies periodontal disease. Although the mechanism of resorption process is examined in detail, its etiology is not fully understood. Wide open apical foramen is more difficult to manage and the root canal may often overfill. In this report we present two cases of root resorption and describe means for its clinical management. We conclude that useful measure of a success or failure in managing root resorption is the persistence of the resorption process. It is a clear sign of an active ongoing inflammatory process and shows the clinical need for retreatment. PMID:27648314

  20. Clinical Management of Two Root Resorption Cases in Endodontic Practice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Root resorption is a pathological process involving loss of hard dental tissues. It may occur as a consequence of dental trauma, orthodontic treatment, and bleaching, and occasionally it accompanies periodontal disease. Although the mechanism of resorption process is examined in detail, its etiology is not fully understood. Wide open apical foramen is more difficult to manage and the root canal may often overfill. In this report we present two cases of root resorption and describe means for its clinical management. We conclude that useful measure of a success or failure in managing root resorption is the persistence of the resorption process. It is a clear sign of an active ongoing inflammatory process and shows the clinical need for retreatment. PMID:27648314

  1. Clinical Management of Two Root Resorption Cases in Endodontic Practice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Root resorption is a pathological process involving loss of hard dental tissues. It may occur as a consequence of dental trauma, orthodontic treatment, and bleaching, and occasionally it accompanies periodontal disease. Although the mechanism of resorption process is examined in detail, its etiology is not fully understood. Wide open apical foramen is more difficult to manage and the root canal may often overfill. In this report we present two cases of root resorption and describe means for its clinical management. We conclude that useful measure of a success or failure in managing root resorption is the persistence of the resorption process. It is a clear sign of an active ongoing inflammatory process and shows the clinical need for retreatment.

  2. Increased project efficiency using telemetry technology as part of an integrated data management system

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    Until recently, the use of telemetry in the environmental consulting industry has generally been limited to large scale projects and the occasional collection of equipment or field instrumentation data from environmental remediation hardware. With today`s ever increasing personal computer processing power and decreasing prices, telemetry based management is feasible for smaller scale projects. With the increased focus on cost reduction within the environmental industry, successful project managers will take advantage of increased efficiencies available through the use of telemetry. Like any tool though, those that use it must understand how to make use of telemetry technology from raw data collection through data reduction and analysis to production of the final report.

  3. Management of congenital muscular torticollis in a child: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Ta, Jennifer H; Krishnan, Miguel

    2012-11-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis is a condition in which the sternocleidomastoid muscle is shortened on the involved side, leading to an ipsilateral tilt of the head and a contralateral rotation of the face and chin. Most of these patients present in infancy and are successfully treated with physical therapy. Occasionally, patients present in childhood at which time conservative management is rarely successful. Here we present a child with torticollis who was successfully managed with a unipolar release of the sternocleidomastoid. We then review the epidemiology, proposed etiologies, and various treatment options for torticollis and their rates of success.

  4. Database Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Management of the data within a planetary data system (PDS) is addressed. Principles of modern data management are described and several large NASA scientific data base systems are examined. Data management in PDS is outlined and the major data management issues are introduced.

  5. Adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  6. Florida's salt-marsh management issues: 1991-98.

    PubMed

    Carlson, D B; O'Bryan, P D; Rey, J R

    1999-06-01

    During the 1990s, Florida has continued to make important strides in managing salt marshes for both mosquito control and natural resource enhancement. The political mechanism for this progress continues to be interagency cooperation through the Florida Coordinating Council on Mosquito Control and its Subcommittee on Managed Marshes (SOMM). Continuing management experience and research has helped refine the most environmentally acceptable source reduction methods, which typically are Rotational Impoundment Management or Open Marsh Water Management. The development of regional marsh management plans for salt marshes within the Indian River Lagoon by the SOMM has helped direct the implementation of the best management practices for these marshes. Controversy occasionally occurs concerning what management technique is most appropriate for individual marshes. The most common disagreement is over the benefits of maintaining an impoundment in an "open" vs. "closed" condition, with the "closed" condition, allowing for summer mosquito control flooding or winter waterfowl management. New federal initiatives influencing salt-marsh management have included the Indian River Lagoon-National Estuary Program and the Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program. A new Florida initiative is the Florida Department of Environmental Protection's Eco-system Management Program with continuing involvement by the Surface Water Improvement and Management program. A developing mitigation banking program has the potential to benefit marsh management but mosquito control interests may suffer if not handled properly. Larvicides remain as an important salt-marsh integrated pest management tool with the greatest acreage being treated with temephos, followed by Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis and methoprene. However, over the past 14 years, use of biorational larvicides has increased greatly.

  7. Velopharyngeal insufficiency: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Shprintzen, Robert J.; Marrinan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of Review Journal articles relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) were reviewed. All articles ascertained by PubMed search were included. Recent Findings Articles reported on the application of magnetic resonance scanning, reliability tests of the International Working Group diagnostic protocol, the use of nasometry, and techniques designed to assess the function of the velopharyngeal mechanism. Treatment papers focused on outcomes in small samples of cases and complication rates from pharyngeal flap. One paper discussed ineffective speech therapy procedures. Summary There were relatively few papers this past year. Those that were published were hindered by small and heterogeneous sample sizes, and occasionally by inappropriate methods for assessing outcomes. None of the findings will have a major impact on the current state-of-the-art for diagnosis of VPI. The speech therapy paper has a very important message that should be taken to heart by all clinicians involved in the management of children with clefts and craniofacial disorders. PMID:19448542

  8. Management of fetal endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Hughes, I A

    2003-08-01

    A number of maternal endocrine disorders, when active during pregnancy, can have adverse effects on the newborn. Frequently, these affects can be anticipated as in Graves' disease, or the adverse effect can be prevented as in macrosomia in the infant of the diabetic mother. Occasionally, there are opportunities for prenatal treatment of a fetal endocrine disorder. For instance, a large goitre that may cause problems during delivery can be treated with thyroid hormones administered intra-amniotically or as analogues that cross the placenta. A uniquely effective form of treatment for prevention of a major birth defect is administration of dexamethasone to the mother to avoid virilisation of a female fetus with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). However, such treatment should only be conducted within the framework of a clinical trial as the long-term effects of exposure to potent glucocorticoids in utero are unknown. Intrauterine growth retardation, which affects about 5% of newborns, is currently not amenable to direct pharmacological treatment before birth. However, there are more practical options for managing this condition, including improved maternal nutrition and avoidance of toxins injurious to fetal growth.

  9. Managing Fine Sediment in Regulated Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    A paradigm useful in managing dams and diversions is that the combined effects of changing flow regime and sediment supply perturb regulated rivers into sediment deficit or sediment surplus. In the U.S. Southwest, large dams constructed on interregional rivers typically create sediment deficit segments >100 km long. Further downstream, sediment surplus may occur if desert tributaries deliver sufficient amounts of fine sediment, such as parts of the Rio Grande, lower Green River, and Colorado River delta. Sediment surplus also occurs on most smaller regional rivers. The protocols for managing rivers perturbed into sediment deficit have been refined for the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam but are nonetheless challenged by externally determined water-supply agreements that require annual water deliveries that sometimes occur when there has been little tributary resupply. Virtually all of the naturally supplied sand to the depleted, 100-km long Marble Canyon comes from the Paria River. The sand delivery rate since 2012 was sufficiently large to trigger short-duration controlled floods under the High Flow Experiment (HFE) Protocol. The sand mass balance of Marble Canyon since 2012 when the HFE Protocol was adopted was positive due to the combination of relatively large sand delivery from the Paria River and average total annual flows. Large total annual flows have the potential to export large amounts of sand and create a negative sand mass balance. Despite the challenge of managing a scarce and highly variable sand supply and occasional years of large reservoir releases, the long-term (2006-2015) sand mass balance for the upstream half of Marble Canyon is indeterminant and is positive for the downstream half of Marble Canyon. The apparent success of managing sand in Grand Canyon under deficit conditions suggests that fine sediment management protocols might be developed for other regulated rivers. Implementation would require establishment of networks of

  10. Manage Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manage Stress Print This Topic En español Manage Stress Browse Sections The Basics Overview Signs and Health ... and Health Effects What are the signs of stress? When people are under stress, they may feel: ...

  11. Cash Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Mary L.; Ostrom, John S.

    1982-01-01

    Elements of an effective management program for colleges and universities are examined. Five basic purposes of an effective program of cash management are identified: developing accurate cash projections, managing cash receipts, controlling cash disbursements, establishing sound banking relationships, and investing funds. It is suggested that all…

  12. Time Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoilov, Todor, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The time management is worthy goal of many human activities. It concerns variety problems related to goals definition, assessment of available resources, control of management policies, scheduling of decisions. This book is an attempt to illustrate the decision making process in time management for different success stories, which can be used as…

  13. Program Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Tribes Educational Technical Center, Bismarck, ND.

    The program management guide to Title IV Indian Education projects acquaints participants with program management concepts relative to application forms and encourages the development of management plans and objectives. Sections provide discussions, charts, and examples for the following: regulatory authorities, administrative organizational…

  14. Risk Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, L. Nathan

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" presents an overview of risk management for school districts. The chapter first discusses four fundamental elements of risk management: (1) identifying and measuring risks; (2) reducing or eliminating risks; (3) transferring unassumable risks; and (4) assuming remaining risks. The chapter…

  15. A survey of nuclear-related agreements and possibilities for nuclear cooperation in South Asia: Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/15

    SciTech Connect

    RAJEN,GAURAV

    2000-04-01

    Several existing nuclear-related agreements already require India and Pakistan, as members, to share information. The agreements are bilateral, regional, and international. Greater nuclear transparency between India and Pakistan could be promoted by first understanding the information flows required by existing agreements. This understanding is an essential step for developing projects that can incrementally advance the sensitivity of the information being shared. This paper provides a survey of existing nuclear-related agreements involving India and Pakistan, and suggests future confidence-building projects using the frameworks provided by these agreements. The Bilateral Agreement on the Prohibition of Attack against Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Facilities is discussed as a basis for creating further agreements on restricting the use and deployment of nuclear weapons. The author suggests options for enhancing the value of the list of nuclear facilities exchanged annually as a part of this agreement. The International Atomic Energy Agency's regional cooperation agreement among countries in the Asia-Pacific region is an opportunity for greater subregional nuclear cooperation in South Asia. Linking the regional agreement with South Asian environmental cooperation and marine pollution protection efforts could provide a framework for projects involving Indian and Pakistani coastal nuclear facilities. Programs of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations that use nuclear techniques to increase food and crop production and optimize water management in arid areas also provide similar opportunities for nuclear cooperation. Other frameworks for nuclear cooperation originate from international conventions related to nuclear safety, transportation of nuclear wastes, worker protection against ionizing radiation, and the nondeployment of nuclear weapons in certain areas. The information shared by existing frameworks includes: laws and regulations (including

  16. Postoperative management of heart failure in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Yuerek, Mahsun; Rossano, Joseph W; Mascio, Christopher E; Shaddy, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) is a well-described entity occurring in 25-65% of pediatric patients undergoing open-heart surgery. With judicious intensive care management of LCOS, most patients have an uncomplicated postoperative course, and within 24 h after cardiopulmonary bypass, the cardiac function returns back to baseline. Some patients have severe forms of LCOS not responsive to medical management alone, requiring temporary mechanical circulatory support to prevent end-organ injury and to decrease myocardial stress and oxygen demand. Occasionally, cardiac function does not recover and heart transplantation is necessary. Long-term mechanical circulatory support devices are used as a bridge to transplantation because of limited availability of donor hearts. Experience in usage of continuous flow ventricular assist devices in the pediatric population is increasing. PMID:26560361

  17. Postoperative management of heart failure in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Yuerek, Mahsun; Rossano, Joseph W; Mascio, Christopher E; Shaddy, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) is a well-described entity occurring in 25-65% of pediatric patients undergoing open-heart surgery. With judicious intensive care management of LCOS, most patients have an uncomplicated postoperative course, and within 24 h after cardiopulmonary bypass, the cardiac function returns back to baseline. Some patients have severe forms of LCOS not responsive to medical management alone, requiring temporary mechanical circulatory support to prevent end-organ injury and to decrease myocardial stress and oxygen demand. Occasionally, cardiac function does not recover and heart transplantation is necessary. Long-term mechanical circulatory support devices are used as a bridge to transplantation because of limited availability of donor hearts. Experience in usage of continuous flow ventricular assist devices in the pediatric population is increasing.

  18. Management of Itch in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Judith; Buddenkotte, Joerg; Berger, Timothy G.; Steinhoff, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common, pruritic, inflammatory skin disorder. Chronic, localized, or even generalized pruritus is the diagnostic hallmark of atopic dermatitis, and its management remains a challenge for physicians. The threshold for itch and alloknesis is markedly reduced in these patients, and infections can promote exacerbation and thereby increase the itch. Modern management consists of anti-inflammatory, occasionally antiseptic, as well as antipruritic therapies to address the epidermal barrier as well as immunomodulation or infection. Mild forms of atopic dermatitis may be controlled with topical therapies, but moderate-to-severe forms often require a combination of systemic treatments consisting of antipruritic and immunosuppressive drugs, phototherapy, and topical compounds. In addition, patient education and a therapeutic regimen to help the patient cope with the itch and eczema are important adjuvant strategies for optimized long-term management. This review highlights various topical, systemic, and complementary and alternative therapies, as well as provide a therapeutic ladder for optimized long-term control of itch in atopic dermatitis. PMID:21767767

  19. Teaching Managers How to Manage

    SciTech Connect

    Hylko, J.M.

    2006-07-01

    Following graduation from a college or university with a technical degree, or through years of experience, an individual's training and career development activities typically focus on enhancing technical problem-solving skills. However, as these technical professionals, herein referred to as 'Techies', advance throughout their careers, they may be required to accept and adapt to the role of being a manager, and must undergo a transition to learn and rely on new problem-solving skills. However, unless a company has a specific manager-trainee class to address this subject and develop talent from within, an employee's management style is learned and developed 'on the job'. Both positive and negative styles are nurtured by those managers having similar qualities. Unfortunately, a negative style often contributes to the deterioration of employee morale and ultimate closing of a department or company. This paper provides the core elements of an effective management training program for 'Teaching Managers How to Manage' derived from the Department of Energy's Integrated Safety Management System and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration 's Voluntary Protection Program. Discussion topics and real-life examples concentrate on transitioning an employee from a 'Techie' to a manager; common characteristics of being a manager; the history and academic study of management; competition, change and the business of waste management; what to do after taking over a department by applying Hylko's Star of Success; command media; the formal and informal organizational charts; chain of command; hiring and developing high-degree, autonomous employees through effective communication and delegation; periodic status checks; and determining if the program is working successfully. These common characteristics of a strong management/leadership culture and practical career tips discussed herein provide a solid foundation for any company or department that is serious about developing

  20. Portfolio Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Enterprise Business Information Services Division (EBIS) supports the Laboratory and its functions through the implementation and support of business information systems on behalf of its business community. EBIS Five Strategic Focus Areas: (1) Improve project estimating, planning and delivery capability (2) Improve maintainability and sustainability of EBIS Application Portfolio (3) Leap forward in IT Leadership (4) Comprehensive Talent Management (5) Continuous IT Security Program. Portfolio Management is a strategy in which software applications are managed as assets

  1. Knowledge Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "Knowledge Management and Knowledge Dissemination" (Wim J. Nijhof), presents two case studies exploring the strategies companies use in sharing and disseminating knowledge and expertise among employees. "A Theory of Knowledge Management" (Richard J. Torraco), develops a conceptual framework for…

  2. Management Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Joaquin Delta Community Coll. District, CA.

    This manual articulates the rights, responsibilities, entitlements, and conditions of employment of management personnel at San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC). The manual first presents SJDC's mission statement and then discusses the college's management goals and priorities. An examination of SJDC's administrative organization and a list of…

  3. Weight Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quit Smoking Benefits of Quitting Health Effects of Smoking Secondhand Smoke Withdrawal Ways to Quit QuitGuide Pregnancy & Motherhood Pregnancy & Motherhood Before Your Baby is Born From Birth to 2 Years Quitting for Two SmokefreeMom Healthy Kids Parenting & ... Weight Management Weight Management ...

  4. Environmental Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandhu, Desh, Ed.

    The Indian Environmental Society, in association with the International Programme on Environmental Management Education, organized two seminars on World Environment Day and Environmental Impact Assessment during June 1980. A large number of papers on various aspects of environmental management were presented during the seminars. The papers…

  5. Classroom Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinsmore, Terri Sue

    This paper is a report of a middle-school teacher's study of classroom management. The teacher/researcher was interested in how some of the techniques in the Kovalik Integrated Thematic Instruction model of training would influence the teacher/researcher's classroom management; the effects of direct instruction within a community circle; the…

  6. Clothing Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for clothing management is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each task is…

  7. Personnel Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    The document serves as a basic text for the indoctrination of all naval officers and as an introductory text for the officer who specializes in personnel administration or manpower management. Chapter 1 contains an introductory summary of the various functions of naval personnel administration and manpower management and describes the processes of…

  8. Forest Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weicherding, Patrick J.; And Others

    This bulletin deals with forest management and provides an overview of forestry for the non-professional. The bulletin is divided into six sections: (1) What Is Forestry Management?; (2) How Is the Forest Measured?; (3) What Is Forest Protection?; (4) How Is the Forest Harvested?; (5) What Is Forest Regeneration?; and (6) What Is Forest…

  9. Sport Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkhouse, Bonnie L., Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Traditional teaching and coaching positions have become scarce but the expanding field of sport management has created its own job market, demanding new skills and preparation. Three articles are offered that explore different aspects and possibilities for a sport management career. (DF)

  10. Management Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on management development. "LMX (Leader-Member Exchange) Theory, Personality Type, and Management Development" (Janet Z. Burns) reports the results of a study on the similarities and differences in personality type (as outlined in the theories of Carl Jung and Isabel Myers) and its relationship…

  11. Management Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    The papers in this report were presented at a 1971 symposium on management education held under the auspices of the Industry Committee of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Under the major topic of "The Present State of Management Education in OECD Countries" are the following papers: "Gardens and Graveyards in…

  12. Inventory Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Known as MRO for Maintenance, Repair and Operating supplies, Tropicana Products, Inc.'s automated inventory management system is an adaptation of the Shuttle Inventory Management System (SIMS) developed by NASA to assure adequate supply of every item used in support of the Space Shuttle. The Tropicana version monitors inventory control, purchasing receiving and departmental costs for eight major areas of the company's operation.

  13. Pavement management

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, F.R.; Connor, B.; Lytton, R.L.; Darter, M.I.; Shahin, M.Y.

    1982-01-01

    The 11 papers in this report deal with the following areas: effect of pavement roughness on vehicle fuel consumption; rational seasonal load restrictions and overload permits; state-level pavement monitoring program; data requirements for long-term monitoring of pavements as a basis for development of multiple regression relations; simplified pavement management at the network level; combined priority programming of maintenance and rehabilitation for pavement networks; Arizona pavement management system: Phase 2-verification of performance prediction models and development of data base; overview of paver pavement management system; economic analysis of field implementation of paver pavement management system; development of a statewide pavement maintenance management system; and, prediction of pavement maintenance expenditure by using a statistical cost function.

  14. Plasma Cell Gingivitis: An Occasional Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mishra, M B; Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis, an infrequently observed oral condition, has been clinically characterized by diffuse gingival enlargement, erythema and sometimes desquamation. These lesions are usually asymptomatic, but invariably the patient will complain of a burning sensation in the gingiva and bleeding from the mouth. The diagnosis requires hematological screening in addition to clinical and histopathological examinations. This case report outlines one such case of plasma cell gingivitis in a 15-year-old female caused by use of an herbal, homemade toothpowder. The case presented here highlights the adverse effects and irrational use of herbal agents in dentifrices. At the same time, it emphasizes the need for comprehensive history taking, careful clinical examination and appropriate diagnostic tests in order to arrive at a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan for gingival conditions that are refractory to conventional therapy and to exclude certain malignancies and oral manifestations of systemic diseases.

  15. Taking "Innovation" on the Road. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figgis, Jane; Hillier, Yvonne

    2009-01-01

    This paper is based on a series of workshops about innovation in teaching and learning in vocational education and training (VET) which the authors conducted in March 2009. This paper addresses some of the underlying questions that practitioners have about innovation. The paper is structured in four sections: (1) a comparison of the trends in…

  16. Story Squares. CATESOL Occasional Papers, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaki, Ruth A.

    A set of specific and practical ideas for teaching language skills are presented, centered around the use of charts or "squares" of pictures that represent ideas that can be expressed in basic English. The focus is a story square, a system of pictures tied together by a plot and presented to the class as a puzzle. Squares for pronunciation can be…

  17. Comparative Education After Postmodernity. Occasional Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulston, Rolland G.

    This paper examines the postmodern challenge to how we have come to see, represent, and practice comparative and international education, beginning with the 1977 "State of the Art" special issue of the "Comparative Education Review" and up to the contributions of the Social Cartography Project at the University of Pittsburgh in 1998. The paper is…

  18. Building Communities of Readers. Occasional Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfram, Gretchen, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "Progressions" shares the lessons learned by the Lilly Endowment's Education Division from partnerships with educators, librarians, parents, and community activists. The articles look at individual components of the endowment's overall plan to promote reading among youngsters in grades five through nine, and to introduce the Middle…

  19. Writing Matters. Occasional Paper No. 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Sarah Warshauer; Hechinger, Fred

    Recent research creates a better understanding of how writing is best learned, taught, and used for learning in school and life. Research done by Anne Haas Dyson and Carol Stack has indicated that many low-income African American children may bring resources to school that are often overlooked. Matthew Downey moves from Dyson's findings about how…

  20. Morality and the Schools. Occasional Paper 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicks, Robert S.

    Moral contradictions and cross purposes in society make formal moral training in the schools difficult, if not impossible. Values clarification and school-wide programs of moral education are of questionable merit. Nevertheless, effective moral education is implicit in teaching the subjects that comprise good basic education. A mathematics…

  1. Flex-Time. A Catalyst Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catalyst, New York, NY.

    Contains history, case studies, and discussion of the use and benefits of flex-time employment, a pattern of working hours in which individual employees begin and end their work day at times of their choice, within certain limits, as long as they work a prescribed number of hours. The paper addresses the following topics: (1) What is flex-time,…

  2. Occasional Papers in Distance Education. Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, David, Ed.; Meacham, David, Ed.

    This collection of documents contains four papers: (1) "An Orientation Seminar for Prospective Wine Science and Viticulture Students" (A. V. Hood), which describes an innovation organized by staff involved in the external teaching of wine science and viticulture who sought to break down the barriers and concerns of prospective students…

  3. Choosing Advocacy. Occasional Paper Series 21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matt, Megan; Morrison, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    Two articles comprise this publication. In "Beyond the Story-Book Ending: Literature for Young Children About Parental Estrangement and Loss," Megan Matt analyzes over 30 books for young children on the topics of abandonment, estrangement, divorce, and foster care. She observes that this loss might appear as an event within the story or as a fear…

  4. Teaching Externally: Lecturers' Viewpoints. Occasional Paper 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, David, Ed.

    Perspectives of academic staff who have been involved in teaching externally are presented in three papers. In "Teaching Students Externally: The First Twelve Years," Frank Molloy examines three aspects of teaching by the external mode: preparing materials, making assignments, and providing educational experiences for students at the residential…

  5. Rural Library Service. Occasional Bibliography #3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Jane Barron

    One in a series of bibliographies related to rural library service, this document lists over 800 entries dealing with the specific concerns of rural, county, and small community libraries. Listed alphabetically by author under subject headings, the entries cover the period from 1930 to 1975 and are drawn from a variety of sources including…

  6. Teaching Nuclear Issues. Occasional Paper No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, David W.

    The nuclear debate is one of critical importance and should be explored as part of the school curriculum. The psychology of denying the issue of nuclear arms and the psychological effects of the arms race on children is examined in this paper. A number of topics that might be included in discussion of nuclear issues are the arms race, politics,…

  7. Soviet Security in Flux. Occasional Paper 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamgotch, Nish, Jr.

    If U.S. foreign policy is to be prudent and effective, it must cease relying on the doctrinaire images and cold war rhetoric of the past and take into account five intactable problems, none of them specifically military, that the Soviet Union faces. These problems are: (1) unabating deficiencies in its economy; (2) a precarious battle with…

  8. Demystifying High Technology. Occasional Paper No. 97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumberger, Russell

    Two myths about high technology are that it will be the primary source of new jobs and that it will vastly upgrade the skill requirements of jobs. Evidence does not support these myths. Most new jobs will not be in high tech fields, and technology will reduce the skill requirements. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that high tech…

  9. Mars: Cold, windy and occasionally unstable (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, S.; Becerra, P.; Diniega, S.; Dundas, C. M.; Geissler, P.; Hansen, C. J.; McEwen, A. S.; Russell, P. S.; Thomas, N.

    2013-12-01

    Once considered disappointingly inactive, the surface of Mars is now known to be quite dynamic. Almost ten Mars years of continuous spacecraft monitoring reveals a unique planetary environment where interaction of the surface with solid and gaseous CO2 dominates current activity. The action of liquid water (dominant on Earth) is restricted to rare locations where recurring slope lineae are best explained as flow of brines. The seasonal frost cycle has been studied for decades; however, a wealth of new detail has emerged through recent spacecraft monitoring. Frost sinters into semi-transparent slabs in some locations allowing spring sunlight to penetrate to the base. Basal sublimation produces pressurized gas that jets from weak locations, scours channels in underlying terrain, erodes polar dunes and is responsible for a plethora of transient albedo features. In the mid-latitudes, CO2 frost is now thought to be the driver of mass movements within gullies both in crater walls and dunes. Many examples of mass transport from gully alcoves, through channels and onto debris aprons have been observed to occur at the coldest times when CO2 frost is present. Liquid water may have played a role in gully formation in the past, but it does not in today's activity. Other active slope processes include rock falls, dust avalanching, and perhaps other, slower processes. A small CO2 ice cap precariously persists throughout southern summer buffering atmospheric pressure. Pits litter this cap and observations over 8 Mars years have shown them to expand by several m/yr from ablation. This erosion has prompted speculation of current climate change; however, models exist where ice cap surfaces may regrow in a cyclic manner. Observations suggest that it is climatic variability associated with late-summer global dust storms that allows this regrowth. Although less volatile than CO2, water ice deposits are also changing. Steep cliffs that bound the polar layered deposits (PLD) have been observed to retreat from failure of sections up to 70m across. Avalanches on those scarps are so common in some seasons that several can be seen in progress in a single HiRISE image. New impact craters in the mid-latitudes expose sub-surface ice whose geographic extent implies that it is currently retreating, while infill of craters on the PLD confirm polar accumulation. This poleward transport of water ice is only the most recent chapter in PLD accumulation, but provides a link to this historical record. Wind is also a powerful agent of surface change. Migration of dunes and ripples is now monitored at many sites. Dark ejecta blankets of newly formed impact craters change over time as fallout of atmospheric dust gradually obscures them. Regional albedo boundaries shift episodically in response to dust storms while seasonal frost appears to reset surface albedo at high latitudes each year. The episodic nature and interannual variability of surface changes make extrapolation from short-term records perilous. Long-term monitoring increases the value of all datasets and is the means by which we can understand the nature and rates of many geologic processes on Mars today.

  10. The Titmouse Effect. Occasional Paper #3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    What happens when standards, teaching for understanding, research based strategies for improving student achievement, and teacher inquiry become a whole? Power Teaching results. A prototype in development at an urban, elementary school in the South, power teaching connects the dots of state standards, Harvard Project Zero's teaching for…

  11. The Nature of Contemporary History. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaddis, John Lewis

    This document addresses the importance of teaching contemporary history. The failure to teach contemporary history leaves students ill equipped to deal with the present and the future, and also ensures that they will have little interest in the history of other times. Because memory is the central organizing principle in peoples minds, the…

  12. Management matters.

    PubMed

    Gould, Rebecca A; Canter, Deborah

    2012-05-01

    Fewer than 50% of registered dietitians (RDs) supervise personnel and 76% have no budget authority. Because higher salaries are tied to increasing levels of authority and responsibility, RDs must seek management and leadership roles to enjoy the increased remuneration tied to such positions. Advanced-level practice in any area of dietetics demands powerful communication abilities, proficiency in budgeting and finance, comfort with technology, higher-order decision-making/problem-solving skills, and well-honed human resource management capabilities, all foundational to competent management practice. As RDs envision the future of the dietetics profession, practitioners must evaluate management competence in both hard and soft skills. Just as research is needed to support evidenced-based clinical practice, the same is needed to support management practice across the profession. Dietetics educators and preceptors should be as enthusiastic about management practice as they are clinical practice when educating and mentoring future professionals. Such encouragement and support can mean that new RDs and dietetic technicians, registered, will understand what it takes to advance to higher levels of responsibility, authority, and subsequent enhanced remuneration. In the ever-changing social, legal, ethical, political, economic, technological, and ecological environments of work, food and nutrition professionals who are willing to step forward and assume the risks and responsibilities of management also will share in the rewards, and propel the profession to new heights of recognition and respect. PMID:22709899

  13. Management matters.

    PubMed

    Gould, Rebecca A; Canter, Deborah

    2008-11-01

    Fewer than 50% of registered dietitians (RDs) supervise personnel and 76% have no budget authority. Because higher salaries are tied to increasing levels of authority and responsibility, RDs must seek management and leadership roles to enjoy the increased remuneration tied to such positions. Advanced-level practice in any area of dietetics demands powerful communication abilities, proficiency in budgeting and finance, comfort with technology, higher-order decision-making/problem-solving skills, and well-honed human resource management capabilities, all foundational to competent management practice. As RDs envision the future of the dietetics profession, practitioners must evaluate management competence in both hard and soft skills. Just as research is needed to support evidenced-based clinical practice, the same is needed to support management practice across the profession. Dietetics educators and preceptors should be as enthusiastic about management practice as they are clinical practice when educating and mentoring future professionals. Such encouragement and support can mean that new RDs and dietetic technicians, registered, will understand what it takes to advance to higher levels of responsibility, authority, and subsequent enhanced remuneration. In the ever-changing social, legal, ethical, political, economic, technological, and ecological environments of work, food and nutrition professionals who are willing to step forward and assume the risks and responsibilities of management also will share in the rewards, and propel the profession to new heights of recognition and respect. PMID:18954571

  14. Operation Windshield and the simplification of emergency management.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Large, complex, multi-stakeholder exercises are the culmination of years of gradual progression through a comprehensive training and exercise programme. Exercises intended to validate training, refine procedures and test processes initially tested in isolation are combined to ensure seamless response and coordination during actual crises. The challenges of integrating timely and accurate situational awareness from an array of sources, including response agencies, municipal departments, partner agencies and the public, on an ever-growing range of media platforms, increase information management complexity in emergencies. Considering that many municipal emergency operations centre roles are filled by staff whose day jobs have little to do with crisis management, there is a need to simplify emergency management and make it more intuitive. North Shore Emergency Management has accepted the challenge of making emergency management less onerous to occasional practitioners through a series of initiatives aimed to build competence and confidence by making processes easier to use as well as by introducing technical tools that can simplify processes and enhance efficiencies. These efforts culminated in the full-scale earthquake exercise, Operation Windshield, which preceded the 2015 Emergency Preparedness and Business Continuity Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia.

  15. Operation Windshield and the simplification of emergency management.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Large, complex, multi-stakeholder exercises are the culmination of years of gradual progression through a comprehensive training and exercise programme. Exercises intended to validate training, refine procedures and test processes initially tested in isolation are combined to ensure seamless response and coordination during actual crises. The challenges of integrating timely and accurate situational awareness from an array of sources, including response agencies, municipal departments, partner agencies and the public, on an ever-growing range of media platforms, increase information management complexity in emergencies. Considering that many municipal emergency operations centre roles are filled by staff whose day jobs have little to do with crisis management, there is a need to simplify emergency management and make it more intuitive. North Shore Emergency Management has accepted the challenge of making emergency management less onerous to occasional practitioners through a series of initiatives aimed to build competence and confidence by making processes easier to use as well as by introducing technical tools that can simplify processes and enhance efficiencies. These efforts culminated in the full-scale earthquake exercise, Operation Windshield, which preceded the 2015 Emergency Preparedness and Business Continuity Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia. PMID:26897621

  16. Managing Oneself.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Peter F.

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge workers must take responsibility for managing their own careers. They are challenged to gain a better understanding of themselves so that they will know how and when to change the work they do. (Author/JOW)

  17. Managing Rosacea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for Patients All About Rosacea Faces of Rosacea Treatment Photos Rosacea FAQ Management Options Medical Therapy When ... or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, ...

  18. Managed Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... three types of managed care plans: Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO) usually only pay for care within the ... who coordinates most of your care. Preferred Provider Organizations (PPO) usually pay more if you get care ...

  19. Budget management.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G

    1997-05-01

    Budgetary responsibility gives you more control. Take time to master the fine detail, ask questions of your management and finance colleagues about anything you do not understand (you will not lose face), and develop the skills of lateral thinking and creative accountancy. Even if your budget is repeatedly overspent do not take it personally, ensure that management are aware of it and have a good night's sleep. Do not worry about it.

  20. Conservative management.

    PubMed

    Kruis, W; Leifeld, L; Pfützer, R

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of diverticulitis comprises at least two options: conservative or surgical management. There is a recent trend to limit surgical treatment of acute diverticulitis and to favor conservative management. This review addresses general aspects of conservative patient care with special focus on the treatment of patients with a first attack of diverticulitis. The presentation does not include a discussion of specific drugs which is given in other sections of this issue.

  1. Resource Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Summit Envirosolutions of Minneapolis, Minnesota, used remote sensing images as a source for groundwater resource management. Summit is a full-service environmental consulting service specializing in hydrogeologic, environmental management, engineering and remediation services. CRSP collected, processed and analyzed multispectral/thermal imagery and aerial photography to compare remote sensing and Geographic Information System approaches to more traditional methods of environmental impact assessments and monitoring.

  2. Risk management.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Every plan contains risk. To proceed without planning some means of managing that risk is to court failure. The basic logic of risk is explained. It consists in identifying a threshold where some corrective action is necessary, the probability of exceeding that threshold, and the attendant cost should the undesired outcome occur. This is the probable cost of failure. Various risk categories in dentistry are identified, including lack of liquidity; poor quality; equipment or procedure failures; employee slips; competitive environments; new regulations; unreliable suppliers, partners, and patients; and threats to one's reputation. It is prudent to make investments in risk management to the extent that the cost of managing the risk is less than the probable loss due to risk failure and when risk management strategies can be matched to type of risk. Four risk management strategies are discussed: insurance, reducing the probability of failure, reducing the costs of failure, and learning. A risk management accounting of the financial meltdown of October 2008 is provided. PMID:21314051

  3. Medical management after managed care.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C; Yegian, Jill M

    2004-01-01

    Health insurers are under conflicting pressures to improve the quality and moderate the costs of health care yet to refrain from interfering with decision making by physicians and patients. This paper examines the contemporary evolution of medical management, drawing on examples from UnitedHealth Group, WellPoint Health Networks, and Active Health Management. It highlights the role of claims data, predictive modeling, notification requirements, and online enrollee self-assessments; the choice between focusing on behavior change among patients or among physicians; and the manner in which medical management is packaged and priced to accommodate the diversity in willingness to pay for quality initiatives in health care.

  4. Management of chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Saußele, S; Silver, Richard T

    2015-04-01

    Due to the high efficacy of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibition (TKI) in chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the frequency of blast crisis (BC) is greatly reduced compared to the pre-TKI era. However, TKI treatment of BC has only marginally improved the number of favorable responses, including remissions, which for the most part have only been transitory. Occasionally, they provide a therapeutic window to perform an allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). The challenge remains to improve management of BC with the limited options available. We review and summarize articles pertaining to the treatment of BC CML published after 2002. Additionally, we will discuss whether there is a need for a new definition of BC and/or treatment failure. PMID:25814082

  5. Occupational asthma: a challenge in patient management and community care

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.E.

    1981-08-01

    Occupational exposure to irritants accounts for 2% to 15% of all cases of asthma. Most of the offending agents evoke an IgE allergic reaction, but some seem to act through pharmacologic rather than immunologic pathways. Usually, symptoms are worse during working hours and improve in the evening and over the weekend, but in some cases onset is delayed. Symptoms may persist for weeks after exposure ceases. Skin tests or serologic tests for IgE antibody are helpful in diagnosis. Bronchial challenge with the suspected agent is valuable research procedure that occasionally is clinically useful in diagnosis. Management requires the cooperation of the medical and industrial communities. It consists of identifying asthmatic workers, removing them from exposure to the affecting environment, and treating their symptoms; preventing exposure of susceptible people through preemployment screening; and setting and adhering to reasonable occupational safety standards.

  6. Knowledge Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariq, Syed Z.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The emergence of rapidly expanding technologies for distribution and dissemination of information and knowledge has brought to focus the opportunities for development of knowledge-based networks, knowledge dissemination and knowledge management technologies and their potential applications for enhancing productivity of knowledge work. The challenging and complex problems of the future can be best addressed by developing the knowledge management as a new discipline based on an integrative synthesis of hard and soft sciences. A knowledge management professional society can provide a framework for catalyzing the development of proposed synthesis as well as serve as a focal point for coordination of professional activities in the strategic areas of education, research and technology development. Preliminary concepts for the development of the knowledge management discipline and the professional society are explored. Within this context of knowledge management discipline and the professional society, potential opportunities for application of information technologies for more effectively delivering or transferring information and knowledge (i.e., resulting from the NASA's Mission to Planet Earth) for the development of policy options in critical areas of national and global importance (i.e., policy decisions in economic and environmental areas) can be explored, particularly for those policy areas where a global collaborative knowledge network is likely to be critical to the acceptance of the policies.

  7. Managing Change

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Nancy M.; Riley, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    As increasingly powerful informatics systems are designed, developed, and implemented, they inevitably affect larger, more heterogeneous groups of people and more organizational areas. In turn, the major challenges to system success are often more behavioral than technical. Successfully introducing such systems into complex health care organizations requires an effective blend of good technical and good organizational skills. People who have low psychological ownership in a system and who vigorously resist its implementation can bring a “technically best” system to its knees. However, effective leadership can sharply reduce the behavioral resistance to change—including to new technologies—to achieve a more rapid and productive introduction of informatics technology. This paper looks at four major areas—why information system failures occur, the core theories supporting change management, the practical applications of change management, and the change management efforts in informatics. PMID:10730594

  8. Management Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Manugistics, Inc. (formerly AVYX, Inc.) has introduced a new programming language for IBM and IBM compatible computers called TREES-pls. It is a resource management tool originating from the space shuttle, that can be used in such applications as scheduling, resource allocation project control, information management, and artificial intelligence. Manugistics, Inc. was looking for a flexible tool that can be applied to many problems with minimal adaptation. Among the non-government markets are aerospace, other manufacturing, transportation, health care, food and beverage and professional services.

  9. Want collaboration? Accept--and actively manage--conflict.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jeff; Hughes, Jonathan

    2005-03-01

    Companies try all kinds of ways to improve collaboration among different parts of the organization: cross-unit incentive systems, organizational restructuring, teamwork training. While these initiatives produce occasional success stories, most have only limited impact in dismantling organizational silos and fostering collaboration. The problem? Most companies focus on the symptoms ("Sales and delivery do not work together as closely as they should") rather than on the root cause of failures in cooperation: conflict. The fact is, you can't improve collaboration until you've addressed the issue of conflict. The authors offer six strategies for effectively managing conflict: Devise and implement a common method for resolving conflict. Provide people with criteria for making trade-offs. Use the escalation of conflict as an opportunity for coaching. Establish and enforce a requirement of joint escalation. Ensure that managers resolve escalated conflicts directly with their counterparts. Make the process for escalated conflict-resolution transparent. The first three strategies focus on the point of conflict; the second three focus on escalation of conflict up the management chain. Together they constitute a framework for effectively managing discord, one that integrates conflict resolution into day-to-day decision-making processes, thereby removing a barrier to cross-organizational collaboration.

  10. 41 CFR 102-74.280 - Are privately owned vehicles converted for propane carburetion permitted in underground parking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 102-74.280 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Parking... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Are privately...

  11. 41 CFR 102-74.270 - Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Parking Facilities § 102-74.270 Are vehicles required... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are vehicles required...

  12. 41 CFR 102-74.270 - Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Parking Facilities § 102-74.270 Are vehicles required... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Are vehicles required...

  13. 41 CFR 102-74.280 - Are privately owned vehicles converted for propane carburetion permitted in underground parking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 102-74.280 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Parking... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Are privately...

  14. 41 CFR 102-74.270 - Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Parking Facilities § 102-74.270 Are vehicles required... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Are vehicles required...

  15. 41 CFR 102-74.180 - What illumination levels must Federal agencies maintain on Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.180 What... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What illumination...

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.200 - What information are Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What information...

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.165 - What energy standards must Federal agencies follow for existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What energy standards... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.165...

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.170 - May exceptions to the energy conservation policies in this subpart be granted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.170 May... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false May exceptions to...

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.180 - What illumination levels must Federal agencies maintain on Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.180 What... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What illumination...

  20. 41 CFR 102-74.200 - What information are Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What information...

  1. 41 CFR 102-74.200 - What information are Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What information...

  2. 41 CFR 102-74.180 - What illumination levels must Federal agencies maintain on Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.180 What... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What illumination...

  3. 41 CFR 102-74.180 - What illumination levels must Federal agencies maintain on Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.180 What... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What illumination...

  4. 41 CFR 102-74.160 - What actions must Federal agencies take to promote energy conservation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.160 What... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What actions...

  5. 41 CFR 102-74.180 - What illumination levels must Federal agencies maintain on Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.180 What... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What illumination...

  6. 41 CFR 102-74.200 - What information are Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What information...

  7. 41 CFR 102-74.160 - What actions must Federal agencies take to promote energy conservation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.160 What... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What actions...

  8. 41 CFR 102-74.165 - What energy standards must Federal agencies follow for existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What energy standards... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.165...

  9. 41 CFR 102-74.170 - May exceptions to the energy conservation policies in this subpart be granted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.170 May... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May exceptions to...

  10. 41 CFR 102-74.160 - What actions must Federal agencies take to promote energy conservation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.160 What... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What actions...

  11. 41 CFR 102-74.200 - What information are Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What information...

  12. 41 CFR 102-74.170 - May exceptions to the energy conservation policies in this subpart be granted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.170 May... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false May exceptions to...

  13. 41 CFR 102-74.160 - What actions must Federal agencies take to promote energy conservation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.160 What... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What actions...

  14. 41 CFR 102-74.170 - May exceptions to the energy conservation policies in this subpart be granted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.170 May... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false May exceptions to...

  15. 41 CFR 102-74.170 - May exceptions to the energy conservation policies in this subpart be granted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.170 May... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May exceptions to...

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.160 - What actions must Federal agencies take to promote energy conservation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.160 What... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What actions...

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.165 - What energy standards must Federal agencies follow for existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What energy standards... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.165...

  18. Oracle Management Tool Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Rivenes, Any

    2007-06-01

    The Oracle Management Tool Suite is used to automatically manage Oracle based systems. This includes startup and shutdown of databases and application servers as well as backup, space management, workload management and log file management.

  19. Adaptive Management of Ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management. As such, management may be treated as experiment, with replication, or management may be conducted in an iterative manner. Although the concept has resonated with many...

  20. Case management.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, A H; Propotnik, T

    1997-03-01

    Providing cost-effective high quality healthcare services ranks as the number one concern for anyone involved with the healthcare delivery system. While quality of care should always be the number one priority, controlling healthcare costs receives most of the attention. With limited healthcare dollars and providers assuming more of the financial risk for services rendered, a whole assortment of cost-containment strategies are being introduced in an effort to maintain some semblance of financial viability. Healthcare providers can approach cost control from two different angles. On the fixed-cost operational overhead side, traditional cost-containment techniques have focused on downsizing, maximizing productivity, staffing redesign, improved purchasing contracts, standardization, inventory control, and other more individualized restructured service models. On the variable-cost clinical side, cost control has been approached by introducing a variety of cost-containment strategies designed to improve efficiency and effectiveness of provider performance. While many of these strategies, previously discussed in the Journal of Healthcare Resource Management have stressed the importance of education, guidelines, pathways, and other clinical "tools for improvement," the success of many of these tools resides in the ability to provide real-time intervention. Real-time intervention rather than the more passive retrospective variance analysis has the greatest potential for producing cost savings by actually making a recommendation that prevents the unwanted event from occurring. In many institutions, the case manager bears the responsibility for monitoring and managing these programs. This article describes various case management models currently used by different institutions.

  1. Database Manager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    It is normal practice today for organizations to store large quantities of records of related information as computer-based files or databases. Purposeful information is retrieved by performing queries on the data sets. The purpose of DATABASE MANAGER is to communicate to students the method by which the computer performs these queries. This…

  2. Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollak, Ave

    This guide is intended for use in conducting a three-session course that will help employees in the manufacturing and service industries acquire necessary stress management skills. The instructional materials presented are designed to help students learn to accomplish the following: recognize good and bad stress and understand the physical,…

  3. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  4. Nutrient management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management has been defined as “the science and art directed to link soil, crop, weather and hydrologic factors with cultural, irrigation and soil and water conservation practices to achieve the goals of optimizing nutrient use efficiency, yields, crop quality, and economic returns, while r...

  5. Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deepak

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge Management (KM) is the process through which organizations generate value from their intellectual and knowledge-based assets. Frequently generating value from such assets means sharing them among employees, divisions and even with other companies in order to develop best practices. This article discusses three basic aspects of…

  6. Managing Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Linda; Della Corte, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter issue discusses time management techniques for parents of special needs children. Techniques include changing one's attitudes about perfection, prioritizing tasks, having a back-up plan, learning to say "no," asking for help, keeping things simple, hiring others, using waiting time wisely, and doing two things at once. Household…

  7. Managing Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maag, John W.

    2000-01-01

    This article presents some considerations and ideas for managing students' resistance. They are organized around four topics: the impact of context on behavior, the importance of being comprehensive and nonrestrictive in behavior, the adaptive function of resistant behavior, and the benefit of joining children in their frame of reference.…

  8. Managing Consultants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinconico, S. Michael

    1983-01-01

    Guidelines for managing library consulting engagements effectively cover the decision to use a consultant, definition of the problem area, finding the consultant, interviewing and evaluating the consultant, the psychological contract, the formal contract, and abdication of responsibility for the consulting project by the client. Seventeen sources…

  9. Biodiversity Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiversity management is summarized for the global chickpea (Cicer arietinum) crop germplasm held in genebanks as ex situ collections. Morphological diversity is presented with the range of variation reported from the global collections. The largest collections are held at international agricult...

  10. Manage Yourself.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how the school library media specialist (SLMS) must assume leadership in establishing and nurturing administrative partnerships and to take the risk of leading when the opportunity arises. Offers tips for managing your professional partnerships: be professional at all times, learn your job, do your job to the very best of your ability,…

  11. Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find a pressing…

  12. Management Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on management assessment. In "The Air Force ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corps) Selection System as a Predictor of Leadership" (Orlando V. Griego, George A. Morgan, Gary D. Geroy), 102 ROTC cadets rated their own leadership characteristics and were rated by subordinates; leaders and…

  13. Cyclical vomiting syndrome: Recognition, assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Tan, Michelle Ln; Liwanag, Maria Janelle; Quak, Seng Hock

    2014-08-01

    Cyclical vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a functional, debilitating disorder of childhood frequently leading to hospitalization. Affected children usually experience a stereotypical pattern of vomiting though it may vary between different individuals. The vomiting is intense often bilious, and accompanied by disabling nausea. Identifiable precipitating factors for CVS include psychosocial stressors, infections, lack of sleep and occasionally even food triggers. Often, it may be difficult to distinguish episodes of CVS from other causes of acute abdomen and altered consciousness. Thus, the diagnosis of CVS remains largely one of exclusion. Investigations routinely done during the work-up of a child with suspected CVS include both blood and imaging modalities. Plasma lactate, ammonia, amino acid and acylcarnitine profiles as well as urine organic acid profile are indicated to exclude inborn errors of metabolism. The treatment remains challenging and targeted at prevention or shortening of the attacks and can be considered as abortive, supportive and prophylactic. Use of non-pharmacological therapy is also part of the management of CVS. The prognosis of CVS is variable. More insight into the pathogenesis of this disorder as well as role of non-pharmacological therapy is needed. PMID:25254185

  14. The management of ocular herpesvirus infections.

    PubMed

    Ostler, H B

    1976-01-01

    The many treatment methods in current use for every known complaint only seem to aggravate the difficulty of treating ocular herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, which are generally self-limited in the immunocompetent host. The cornea is already a somewhat immune-deficient tissue since its lack of blood vessels separates it partially from the host, and treatment with glucocorticoids, which are immunosuppressive, increases the risk of damaging complications such as scarring, prolonged morbidity, bacterial or fungal superinfection, and the occasional corenal perforation. Accepted methods of treatment of specific lesions, are discussed, as are some methods that are not yet accepted, but which seem promising. Herpes zoster may result in scarring and significant loss of vision even without the use of glucocorticoids, the disease often manifesting itself in the already compromised host. The major complication is postherpetic neuralgia. None of the available treatment methods has been fully satisfactory, and every effort should be made to prevent eye lesions in patients with early infection of the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve. Stimulation of cellular immunity by various means appears to offer some new promise for control of the disease. Management of varicella, cytomegalovirus, and infectious mononucleosis are also discussed.

  15. Postoperative management of Vim DBS for tremor.

    PubMed

    Dowsey-Limousin, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Stimulation of the ventralis intermedius (Vim) is a treatment of severe tremor from various origins. The adjustment of electrical parameters is done when the lesion-like effects of the implant disappear. Each contact is assessed successively, by using a constant pulse width of 60 microsec and a frequency of 130 Hz or above and progressively increasing the voltage. At the same time, the tremor and possible side effects are monitored. The most frequent side effects are paresthesias, dysarthria, muscle contractions related to stimulation of the pyramidal tract, and cerebellar syndrome. Medications have to be adjusted slowly, and often, particularly in case of Parkinson's disease, it is difficult to decrease the dosage. It is important to teach the patient to switch the stimulator on or off and check that it is working. Patients need to be seen within the 3 months after implant, then occasionally according to the effect. In the long-term, some patients will develop some rebound of tremor when they switch off and/or some tolerance to the effect of the stimulator, which can be difficult to manage. In case of Parkinson's disease, motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, that does not respond to Vim stimulation, can occur. PMID:11948778

  16. Managing change.

    PubMed

    Atchison, T A

    1999-01-01

    Manage change or react to change. This option describes the full spectrum of choices available to healthcare leaders today. The continued volume and complexity of changes creates unique and, many times, frustrating challenges to those who wish to move their healthcare delivery system forward. For all involved in healthcare, from trustees to direct service providers, the pressures to anticipate, adapt, or at the very least, cope are accelerating. Added to the mix of service and payment problems is the explosion of innovations in information technology as well as clinical advances. The resultant picture could easily become overwhelming. In fact, the healthcare landscape is littered with failed attempts to manage change. However, several healthcare leaders continue to excel within this environment. This article presents the concepts and behaviors that seem to underpin their success.

  17. Managing diversity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, M

    1991-09-30

    One look at projections for the U.S. work force through the year 2000 shows why healthcare administrators will be facing some new challenges. With the majority of new workers belonging to minority groups, "managing diversity" has become the newest catch phrase as executives work to reduce tensions resulting from race, gender or culture-based differences among workers, while also learning to understand and value those differences.

  18. Reputation management.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ron; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Patients with a computer and access to social media can now easily and effortlessly comment on your practice and your services. Most comments about physicians are positive. However, a negative one may be posted by a disgruntled patient and can severely impact your practice with a mere mouse click. A physician's most valuable asset is his or her reputation. This article will discuss how to manage and protect your online reputation.

  19. Reputation management.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ron; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Patients with a computer and access to social media can now easily and effortlessly comment on your practice and your services. Most comments about physicians are positive. However, a negative one may be posted by a disgruntled patient and can severely impact your practice with a mere mouse click. A physician's most valuable asset is his or her reputation. This article will discuss how to manage and protect your online reputation. PMID:25108985

  20. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Prairie Falcon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, John P.; Steenhof, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 4,000 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the breeding, year-round, and nonbreeding ranges in the United States and southern Canada. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates of cowbird parasitism, host responses to parasitism, and

  1. Environmental Management

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

  2. Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-12

    Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

  3. [Role and integration of technical prevention figures in the management system].

    PubMed

    Bartolucci, G B; Santantonio, P; Casciani, M; Dagazzini, I

    2010-01-01

    The multifarious issues of health and safety at work require multi-disciplinary skills, both in the risk assessment and in the subsequent definition and management of preventive measures, and this requires a renewed operational protocol that supports integration and co-operation between the technical prevention figures. Thus, between occupational physicians and technical advisers there should be a concrete and fruitful interaction, which should not be episodic or occasional, but a modus operandi systematic and constant. In this contribution is discussed as the technical prevention figures should be included in the Health and Safety Management System and should make a specific contribution in defining corporate policies on prevention. In particular it is outlined the role that the occupational physician may play in the development of prevention and health promotion activities within the strategies of corporate social responsibility. PMID:21086691

  4. 41 CFR 102-74.370 - What items are subject to inspection by Federal agencies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What items are subject to inspection by Federal agencies? 102-74.370 Section 102-74.370 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Conduct on...

  5. 41 CFR 102-74.195 - What ventilation policy must Federal agencies follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.195 What ventilation policy must... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What ventilation...

  6. 41 CFR 102-74.195 - What ventilation policy must Federal agencies follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.195 What ventilation policy must... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What ventilation...

  7. 41 CFR 102-74.195 - What ventilation policy must Federal agencies follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.195 What ventilation policy must... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What ventilation...

  8. 41 CFR 102-74.195 - What ventilation policy must Federal agencies follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.195 What ventilation policy must... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What ventilation...

  9. 41 CFR 102-74.195 - What ventilation policy must Federal agencies follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.195 What ventilation policy must... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What ventilation...

  10. Management: A bibliography for NASA managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This bibliography lists 731 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information System in 1990. Items are selected and grouped according to their usefulness to the manager as manager. Citations are grouped into ten subject categories: human factors and personnel issues; management theory and techniques; industrial management and manufacturing; robotics and expert systems; computers and information management; research and development; economics, costs and markets; logistics and operations management; reliability and quality control; and legality, legislation, and policy.

  11. Management: A bibliography for NASA Managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This bibliography lists 707 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technology information system in 1985. Items are selected and grouped according to their usefulness to the manager as manager. Citations are grouped into ten subject categories: human factors and personnel issues; management theory and techniques; industrial management and manufacturing; robotics and expert systems; computers and information management; research and development; economics, costs, and markets; logistics and operations management; reliability and quality control; and legality, legislation, and policy.

  12. Management: A bibliography for NASA managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography lists 653 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in 1987. Items are selected and grouped according to their usefulness to the manager as manager. Citiations are grouped into ten subject categories; human factors and personnel issues; management theory and techniques; industrial management and manufacturing; robotics and expert systems; computers and information management; research and development; economics, costs and markets; logistics and operations management, reliability and quality control; and legality, legislation, and policy.

  13. Management: A bibliography for NASA managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography lists 822 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information System in 1988. Items are selected and grouped according to their usefulness to the manager as manager. Citations are grouped into ten subject categories: human factors and personnel issues; management theory and techniques; industrial management and manufacturing; robotics and expert systems; computers and information management; research and development; economics, costs and markets; logistics and operations management; reliability and quality control; and legality, legislation, and policy.

  14. Management: A bibliography for NASA managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This bibliography lists 755 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information System in 1989. Items are selected and grouped according to their usefulness to the manager as manager. Citations are grouped into ten subject categories: human factors and personnel issues; management theory and techniques; industrial management and manufacturing; robotics and expert systems; computers and information management; research and development; economics, costs and markets; logistics and operations management; reliability and quality control; and legality, legislation, and policy.

  15. Management: A bibliography for NASA managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This bibliography lists 630 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information System in 1991. Items are selected and grouped according to their usefulness to the manager as manager. Citations are grouped into ten subject categories: human factors and personnel issues; management theory and techniques; industrial management and manufacturing; robotics and expert systems; computers and information management; research and development; economics, costs and markets; logistics and operations management; reliability and quality control; and legality, legislation, and policy.

  16. The management of incidental findings of reduction mammoplasty specimens.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Jessica T; Decroff, Chantelle; Dauway, Emilia; Sybenga, Amelia; Mahabir, Raman C

    2013-01-01

    Reduction mammoplasty is one of the most commonly performed procedures in plastic surgery. Occasionally, there are findings reported by pathologists that are unfamiliar to the treating surgeon. The aim of the present study was to determine the types of pathologies encountered in reduction mammoplasty specimens. From this list of diagnoses, a best practice guideline for management will be organized to better assist plastic surgeons in the management of patients with incidental findings on pathology reports. A total of 441 pathology reports from patients who underwent bilateral or unilateral reduction mammoplasty in the past three years were identified. A list of 21 different pathologies was generated from the pathology reports, along with supplemental data from recent texts and articles. Occult carcinomas were encountered in two cases (0.45%) and high-risk lesions were found in three cases (0.68%) at the authors' institution. An algorithm was then constructed to organize the pathologies according to risk of malignancy and assign them to a management guideline. There are many different lesions encountered incidentally in reduction mammoplasty specimens that may or may not confer some cancer risk. It is important for plastic surgeons to know which lesions need closer follow-up to provide the best care for their patients. PMID:24497763

  17. The management of incidental findings of reduction mammoplasty specimens

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Jessica T; DeCroff, Chantelle; Dauway, Emilia; Sybenga, Amelia; Mahabir, Raman C

    2013-01-01

    Reduction mammoplasty is one of the most commonly performed procedures in plastic surgery. Occasionally, there are findings reported by pathologists that are unfamiliar to the treating surgeon. The aim of the present study was to determine the types of pathologies encountered in reduction mammoplasty specimens. From this list of diagnoses, a best practice guideline for management will be organized to better assist plastic surgeons in the management of patients with incidental findings on pathology reports. A total of 441 pathology reports from patients who underwent bilateral or unilateral reduction mammoplasty in the past three years were identified. A list of 21 different pathologies was generated from the pathology reports, along with supplemental data from recent texts and articles. Occult carcinomas were encountered in two cases (0.45%) and high-risk lesions were found in three cases (0.68%) at the authors’ institution. An algorithm was then constructed to organize the pathologies according to risk of malignancy and assign them to a management guideline. There are many different lesions encountered incidentally in reduction mammoplasty specimens that may or may not confer some cancer risk. It is important for plastic surgeons to know which lesions need closer follow-up to provide the best care for their patients. PMID:24497763

  18. Managing Middlescence.

    PubMed

    Morison, Robert; Erickson, Tamara; Dychtwald, Ken

    2006-03-01

    They make up more than half your workforce. They work longer hours than anyone else in your company. From their ranks come most of your top managers. They're your midcareer employees, the solid citizens between the ages of 35 and 55 whom you bank on for their loyalty and commitment. And they're not happy. In fact, they're burned out, bored, and bottlenecked, new research reveals. Only 33% of the 7700 workers the authors surveyed feel energized by their work; 36% say they're in dead-end jobs. One in three is not satisfied with his or her job. One in five is looking for another. Welcome to middlescence. Like adolescence, it can be a time of frustration, confusion, and alienation. But it can also be a time of self-discovery, new direction, and fresh beginnings. Today, millions of midcareer men and women are wrestling with middlescence-looking for ways to balance work, family, and leisure while hoping to find new meaning in theirjobs. The question is, Will they find it in your organization or elsewhere? Companies are ill prepared to manage middlescence because it is so pervasive, largely invisible, and culturally uncharted. That neglect is bad for business: Many companies risk losing some of their best people or-even worse-ending up with an army of disaffected people who stay. The best way to engage middlescents is to tap into their hunger for renewal and help them launch into more meaningful roles. Perhaps managers can't grant a promotion to everyone who merits one in today's flat organizations, but you may be able to offer new training, fresh assignments, mentoring opportunities, even sabbaticals or entirely new career paths within your own company. Millions of midcareer men and women would like nothing better than to convert their restlessness into fresh energy. They just need the occasion-and perhaps a little assistance-to unleash and channel all that potential.

  19. Managing oneself.

    PubMed

    Drucker, P F

    1999-01-01

    Throughout history, people had little need to manage their careers--they were born into their station in life or, in the recent past, they relied on their companies to chart their career paths. But times have drastically changed. Today, we must all learn to manage ourselves. What does that mean? According to Peter Drucker, it means we have to learn to develop ourselves. We have to place ourselves where we can make the greatest contribution to our organizations and communities. And we have to stay mentally alert and engaged during a 50-year working life, which means knowing how and when to change the work that we do. It may seem obvious that people achieve results by doing what they are good at and by working in ways that fit their abilities. But, Drucker says, very few people actually know--let alone take advantage of--their unique strengths. He challenges each of us to ask ourselves fundamental questions: What are my strengths? How do I perform? What are my values? Where do I belong? What should my contribution be? Don't try to change yourself, cautions Drucker. Instead, concentrate on improving the skills you have and accepting assignments that are tailored to your individual way of working. If you do that, you can transform yourself from an ordinary worker into an outstanding performer. Successful careers today are not planned out in advance. They develop when people are prepared for opportunities because they have asked themselves those questions, and they have rigorously assessed their unique characteristics. This article challenges readers to take responsibility for managing their futures, both in and out of the office.

  20. Making Connections: Four Educational Perspectives. Occasional Paper Series. AEL Occasional Paper 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Maryrita G., Ed.

    This symposium was designed to promote the formation of an instructional system that would incorporate the best instructional methodologies. Four papers were presented, each dealing with an acknowledged approach to teaching. The first paper emphasizes the importance of effective curriculum design, a facet of direct instruction that assists…

  1. Energy management

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, J.

    1991-10-01

    This paper is a review of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Purchasing System Review (CPSR) Program, which oversees the extensive subcontracting activities of the Department's management and operating (M and O) contractors. This review is part of a special GAO audit effort to help ensure that areas vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement are identified and that adequate corrective actions are taken. This effort focuses on 16 areas, one of which is DOE contractor oversight. This report describes the subcontracting deficiencies occurring at DOE, identifies shortcomings in DOE's CPSR Program, and discusses the corrective actions that DOE has committed to take in its CPSR Program in response to these findings.

  2. Managing up.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole; Pressler, Jana L; Klepper, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Many new nursing leaders assuming deanships or assistant or interim deanships have limited education, experience, or background to prepare them for the job. To assist new deans and those aspiring to be deans, the authors of this department, 2 deans, offer survival tips based on their personal experiences and insights. They address common issues, challenges, and opportunities that face academic executive teams, such as negotiating an executive contract, obtaining faculty lines, building effective work teams, managing difficult employees, and creating a nimble organizational structure to respond to changing consumer, healthcare delivery, and community needs. The authors welcome counterpoint discussions with readers.

  3. Do Managers Clone Themselves?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    A recent questionnaire survey provides statistics on male managers' views of female managers. The author recommends that male managers break out of their cloning behavior and that the goal ought to be a plurality in management. (Author/WD)

  4. Managing for resilience

    EPA Science Inventory

    Early efforts in wildlife management focused on reducing population variability and maximizing yields of select species. Aldo Leopold proposed the concept of habitat management as superior to population management. More recently, ecosystem management, whereby ecological processes...

  5. Managing the Sneezing Season

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Managing Allergies Managing the Sneezing Season Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents Seasonal ... Read More "Managing Allergies" Articles Managing the Sneezing Season / A Pollen Primer / Seasonal Allergies: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and ...

  6. Waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Dworschak, H.; Mannone, F.; Rocco, P.

    1995-03-01

    The presence of tritium in tritium-burning devices to be built for large scale research on thermonuclear fusion poses many problems especially in terms of occupational and environmental safety. One of these problems derives from the production of tritiated wastes in gaseous, liquid and solid forms. All these wastes need to be adequately processed and conditioned to minimize tritium releases to an acceptably low occupational and environmental level and consequently to protect workers and the public against the risks of unacceptable doses from exposure to tritium. Since all experimental thermonuclear fusion devices of the Tokomak type to be built and operated in the near future as well as all experimental activities undertaken in tritium laboratories like ETHEL will generate tritiated wastes, current strategies and practices to be applied for the routine management of these wastes need to be defined. Adequate background information is provided through an exhaustive literature survey. In this frame alternative tritiated waste management options so far investigated or currently applied to this end in Europe, USA and Canada have been assessed. The relevance of tritium in waste containing gamma-emitters, originated by the neutron activation of structural materials is assessed in relation to potential final disposal options. Particular importance has been attached to the tritium retention efficiency achievable by the various waste immobilization options. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Managing investors.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Sam; Fox, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Managers and academics often lament that Wall Street's shortterm focus makes it impossible for corporations to plan for the long run. Palmisano disagrees. Yes, there are some on Wall Street, such as the sell-side analysts who dominate quarterly earnings conference calls, who can't see more than a few months out. But CEOs shouldn't participate in those calls anyway, he believes. They should instead focus their energies on the institutional investors who will embrace the long view if they are given ways to judge a company's progress. In this edited interview with one of HBR's executive editors, Palmisano describes how IBM's top management made significant changes to how the firm set goals and communicated them to investors. "The model," a rolling multi-year road map for earnings growth and cash generation, included an emphasis on R&D investment even during downturns, a plan for execution that involved every unit in the organization, and a shift toward long-term compensation. Transparency and open dialogues with large shareholders were also key. The CEO is a steward, Palmisano argues, charged with protecting a company and its returns for decades to come. But that vision need not clash with success on the visible horizon; during Palmisano's tenure, IBM's stock price soared. PMID:25051856

  8. Managing investors.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Sam; Fox, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Managers and academics often lament that Wall Street's shortterm focus makes it impossible for corporations to plan for the long run. Palmisano disagrees. Yes, there are some on Wall Street, such as the sell-side analysts who dominate quarterly earnings conference calls, who can't see more than a few months out. But CEOs shouldn't participate in those calls anyway, he believes. They should instead focus their energies on the institutional investors who will embrace the long view if they are given ways to judge a company's progress. In this edited interview with one of HBR's executive editors, Palmisano describes how IBM's top management made significant changes to how the firm set goals and communicated them to investors. "The model," a rolling multi-year road map for earnings growth and cash generation, included an emphasis on R&D investment even during downturns, a plan for execution that involved every unit in the organization, and a shift toward long-term compensation. Transparency and open dialogues with large shareholders were also key. The CEO is a steward, Palmisano argues, charged with protecting a company and its returns for decades to come. But that vision need not clash with success on the visible horizon; during Palmisano's tenure, IBM's stock price soared.

  9. The Arizona Farm Labor Law: In the Fields and in the Courts. A Review of the Arizona Farm Labor Law and a Review of Industrial Relations in Arizona Agriculture. Occasional Paper Number 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Harold C.; Gibney, William

    Agricultural labor and management relations in Arizona were reviewed from the time of the passage of the Arizona Agricultural Relations Act in May 1972 until the ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court in August 1979 that the act was constitutional. Viewing the act as antilabor, the United Farm Workers (UFW) Union fought its passage. Church and Indian…

  10. Energy management

    SciTech Connect

    Dingell, J.D.

    1991-10-01

    In January 1990 GAO began implementing a special audit effort to help ensure that areas vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement are identified and that appropriate corrective actions are taken. This effort focuses on 16 areas, one of which is the Department of Energy's (DOE) contracting practices. As part of this effort, the authors determined if contract audits for monitoring and overseeing DOE's contracting process were being performed and that we identify the impact or potential impact to the government when contract audits were not performed. Specifically, this paper discusses audit coverage of DOE's management and operating (M and O) contractors and DOE contracts, the problems that may occur when contract audit activity is not performed, and factors that have impeded contract audit coverage.

  11. Review of crisis resource management (CRM) principles in the setting of intraoperative malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Isaak, Robert Scott; Stiegler, Marjorie Podraza

    2016-04-01

    The practice of medicine is characterized by routine and typical cases whose management usually goes according to plan. However, the occasional case does arise which involves rare catastrophic emergencies, such as intraoperative malignant hyperthermia (MH), which require a comprehensive, coordinated, and resource-intensive treatment plan. Physicians are expected to provide expert quality care for routine, typical cases, but is it reasonable to expect the same standard of expertise and comprehensive management when the emergency involves a rare entity? Although physicians would like to say yes to this question, the reality is that no physician will ever amass the amount of experience in patient care needed to truly qualify as an expert in the management of a rare emergency entity, such as MH. However, physicians can become expert in the global process of managing emergencies by using the principles of crisis resource management (CRM). In this article, we review the key concepts of CRM, using a real life example of a team who utilized CRM principles to successfully manage an intraoperative MH crisis, despite there being no one on the team who had ever previously encountered a true MH crisis.

  12. Review of crisis resource management (CRM) principles in the setting of intraoperative malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Isaak, Robert Scott; Stiegler, Marjorie Podraza

    2016-04-01

    The practice of medicine is characterized by routine and typical cases whose management usually goes according to plan. However, the occasional case does arise which involves rare catastrophic emergencies, such as intraoperative malignant hyperthermia (MH), which require a comprehensive, coordinated, and resource-intensive treatment plan. Physicians are expected to provide expert quality care for routine, typical cases, but is it reasonable to expect the same standard of expertise and comprehensive management when the emergency involves a rare entity? Although physicians would like to say yes to this question, the reality is that no physician will ever amass the amount of experience in patient care needed to truly qualify as an expert in the management of a rare emergency entity, such as MH. However, physicians can become expert in the global process of managing emergencies by using the principles of crisis resource management (CRM). In this article, we review the key concepts of CRM, using a real life example of a team who utilized CRM principles to successfully manage an intraoperative MH crisis, despite there being no one on the team who had ever previously encountered a true MH crisis. PMID:26679497

  13. Disaster Management and the Role of Oral Maxillofacial Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rahul Vinaychandra; Pandi, Srinivas Chakravarthi; Meka, Sridhar; Lingamaneni, Krishna Prasad

    2015-01-01

    “Disaster” the word itself suggests an event resulting in great loss and misfortune. In this developing world, India is becoming more powerful and is shining across the world. But we are still left to deal with various disasters, so that no harm comes to mankind. India has the occasional national disaster to which we have to promptly respond. Like the rest of the world, India has become a terror prone nation and recent attacks since the last decades affected not only the function but also it made citizens insecure. As we are in a large nation so, no matter how large a disaster it may be; we have to overcome it. The oral and maxillofacial region in a human body is very delicate with complicated anatomy, which decides the life of a human being. The management of disaster is a multitask approach, in which maxillofacial surgeon plays an important role. It is a very difficult task to operate in disaster zone. It is essential for a surgeon to make quick and important decisions under stressful conditions. Usually the surgeries are performed in a well-equipped hospital but, when it comes to disaster zone the surgeon have to treat the patient with a minimal armamentarium available within a fraction of time. The surgical competence in a disaster field is an alarming situation. Disaster management itself is not an alarming situation but the time management is important for better outcomes. A surgeon however should be trained, so that he should not miss injuries for better outcomes along with personal safety. The article discusses about disaster management strategy and guidelines for both oral maxillofacial surgeons and the statuary body to make maxillofacial surgeon as part of disaster management team for better outcomes. PMID:26816920

  14. Disaster Management and the Role of Oral Maxillofacial Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Kattimani, Vivekanand Sabanna; Tiwari, Rahul Vinaychandra; Pandi, Srinivas Chakravarthi; Meka, Sridhar; Lingamaneni, Krishna Prasad

    2015-12-01

    "Disaster" the word itself suggests an event resulting in great loss and misfortune. In this developing world, India is becoming more powerful and is shining across the world. But we are still left to deal with various disasters, so that no harm comes to mankind. India has the occasional national disaster to which we have to promptly respond. Like the rest of the world, India has become a terror prone nation and recent attacks since the last decades affected not only the function but also it made citizens insecure. As we are in a large nation so, no matter how large a disaster it may be; we have to overcome it. The oral and maxillofacial region in a human body is very delicate with complicated anatomy, which decides the life of a human being. The management of disaster is a multitask approach, in which maxillofacial surgeon plays an important role. It is a very difficult task to operate in disaster zone. It is essential for a surgeon to make quick and important decisions under stressful conditions. Usually the surgeries are performed in a well-equipped hospital but, when it comes to disaster zone the surgeon have to treat the patient with a minimal armamentarium available within a fraction of time. The surgical competence in a disaster field is an alarming situation. Disaster management itself is not an alarming situation but the time management is important for better outcomes. A surgeon however should be trained, so that he should not miss injuries for better outcomes along with personal safety. The article discusses about disaster management strategy and guidelines for both oral maxillofacial surgeons and the statuary body to make maxillofacial surgeon as part of disaster management team for better outcomes. PMID:26816920

  15. 41 CFR 102-74.330 - What smoking restrictions apply to outside areas under Executive branch control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What smoking... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.330 What smoking restrictions apply to outside areas under Executive branch control? Effective June 19,...

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.330 - What smoking restrictions apply to outside areas under Executive branch control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What smoking... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.330 What smoking restrictions apply to outside areas under Executive branch control? Effective June 19,...

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.330 - What smoking restrictions apply to outside areas under Executive branch control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What smoking... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.330 What smoking restrictions apply to outside areas under Executive branch control? Effective June 19,...

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.330 - What smoking restrictions apply to outside areas under Executive branch control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What smoking... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.330 What smoking restrictions apply to outside areas under Executive branch control? Effective June 19,...

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.330 - What smoking restrictions apply to outside areas under Executive branch control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What smoking... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.330 What smoking restrictions apply to outside areas under Executive branch control? Effective June 19,...

  20. Managing osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shirley P; Hunter, David J

    2015-08-01

    Management of osteoarthritis should be based on a combination of non-drug and drug treatments targeted towards prevention, modifying risk and disease progression. Obesity is the most important modifiable risk factor, so losing weight in addition to land- and water-based exercise and strength training is important. While paracetamol can be tried, guidelines recommend non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as first-line treatment for osteoarthritis. If there are concerns about the adverse effects of oral treatment, particularly in older patients or those with comorbidities, topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be used. Glucosamine does not appear to be any better than placebo for pain. Its effect on the structural progression of disease when taken alone or in combination with chondroitin is uncertain. Fish oil has not been found to reduce the structural progression of knee arthritis. Surgical interventions should be avoided in the first instance, with arthroscopic procedures not showing benefit over sham procedures or optimised physical and medical therapy. Joint replacement surgery should be considered for severe osteoarthritis.

  1. Anaesthetic perioperative management of patients with pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Pietri, Lesley; Montalti, Roberto; Begliomini, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a significant and unresolved therapeutic challenge. Currently, the only curative treatment for pancreatic cancer is surgical resection. Pancreatic surgery represents a technically demanding major abdominal procedure that can occasionally lead to a number of pathophysiological alterations resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Systemic, rather than surgical complications, cause the majority of deaths. Because patients are increasingly referred to surgery with at advanced ages and because pancreatic surgery is extremely complex, anaesthesiologists and surgeons play a crucial role in preoperative evaluations and diagnoses for surgical intervention. The anaesthetist plays a key role in perioperative management and can significantly influence patient outcome. To optimise overall care, patients should be appropriately referred to tertiary centres, where multidisciplinary teams (surgical, medical, radiation oncologists, gastroenterologists, interventional radiologists and anaesthetists) work together and where close cooperation between surgeons and anaesthesiologists promotes the safe performance of major gastrointestinal surgeries with acceptable morbidity and mortality rates. In this review, we sought to provide simple daily recommendations to the clinicians who manage pancreatic surgery patients to make their work easier and suggest a joint approach between surgeons and anaesthesiologists in daily decision making. PMID:24605028

  2. Clinical applications of magnets on cardiac rhythm management devices.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sony; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Maheshwari, Rahul; Haddad, John W; Padanilam, Benzy J; John, Sinoj K

    2011-09-01

    The growing indications for permanent pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation have increased the number of patients with these cardiac rhythm management devices (CRMDs). Cardiac rhythm management devices occasionally perform inappropriately in response to electromagnetic interference (e.g. surgical electrocautery) or lead noise over-sensing (e.g. lead fracture). Temporary reprogramming of the CRMDs using device programmers can prevent these untoward device responses. However, these programmers are device manufacturer specific and require technically qualified personnel to operate. This could cause delayed patient care and increased use of resources in certain clinical situations. Alternatively, clinical magnets, when appropriately positioned over the device site, can change the pacing to an asynchronous mode in pacemakers and suspend tachycardia therapies in ICDs. Although readily available, clinical magnets have not been widely used for this purpose, perhaps due to the unfamiliarity with the variable responses of CRMDs to magnet application. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current literature on the mechanism of action and the specific responses of various CRMDs to clinical magnets.

  3. Button Battery Foreign Bodies in Children: Hazards, Management, and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Thabet, Mohammed Hossam; Basha, Waleed Mohamed; Askar, Sherif

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The demand and usage of button batteries have risen. They are frequently inadvertently placed by children in their ears or noses and occasionally are swallowed and lodged along the upper aerodigestive tract. The purpose of this work is to study the different presentations of button battery foreign bodies and present our experience in the diagnosis and management of this hazardous problem in children. Patients and Methods. This study included 13 patients. The diagnostic protocol was comprised of a thorough history, head and neck physical examination, and appropriate radiographic evaluation. The button batteries were emergently extracted under general anesthesia. Results. The average follow-up period was 4.3 months. Five patients had a nasal button battery. Four patients had an esophageal button battery. Three patients had a button battery in the stomach. One patient had a button battery impacted in the left external ear canal. Apart from a nasal septal perforation and a tympanic membrane perforation, no major complications were detected. Conclusion. Early detection is the key in the management of button battery foreign bodies. They have a distinctive appearance on radiography, and its prompt removal is mandatory, especially for batteries lodged in the esophagus. Physicians must recognize the hazardous potential and serious implications of such an accident. There is a need for more public education about this serious problem. PMID:23936851

  4. The Johnson Space Center Management Information Systems (JSCMIS): An interface for organizational databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.; Erickson, Lloyd

    1990-01-01

    The Management Information and Decision Support Environment (MIDSE) is a research activity to build and test a prototype of a generic human interface on the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Information Network (CIN). The existing interfaces were developed specifically to support operations rather than the type of data which management could use. The diversity of the many interfaces and their relative difficulty discouraged occasional users from attempting to use them for their purposes. The MIDSE activity approached this problem by designing and building an interface to one JSC data base - the personnel statistics tables of the NASA Personnel and Payroll System (NPPS). The interface was designed against the following requirements: generic (use with any relational NOMAD data base); easy to learn (intuitive operations for new users); easy to use (efficient operations for experienced users); self-documenting (help facility which informs users about the data base structure as well as the operation of the interface); and low maintenance (easy configuration to new applications). A prototype interface entitled the JSC Management Information Systems (JSCMIS) was produced. It resides on CIN/PROFS and is available to JSC management who request it. The interface has passed management review and is ready for early use. Three kinds of data are now available: personnel statistics, personnel register, and plan/actual cost.

  5. Managing Conflict in Temporary Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilemon, David L.

    1973-01-01

    As organizational tasks have grown more complex, several innovative temporary management systems such as matrix management have been developed. The Apollo space program has been an important contribution to the development of matrix management techniques. Discusses the role of conflict within the matrix, its determinants, and the process of…

  6. Children and Money Management. Money Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Nancy H., Ed.; Tarrant, Sharon M., Ed.

    This boolet on children and money management, 1 in a series of 12, covers all the basic aspects of personal- and family-money management. Suitable for use by high school and college students as well as adults, this handbook offers guidelines for teaching money-managing skills to children, from preschoolers to high school seniors. The first two…

  7. Conflict Management Styles of Turkish Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkalp, Enver; Sungur, Zerrin; Ozdemir, Aytul Ayse

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine Turkish managers conflict styles in different sectors, namely durable consumer goods, aviation, automotive and banking. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 130 managers conflict management styles were assessed by applying the Rahim's 1983 Organizational Conflict Inventory-II. Findings: First,…

  8. An Analysis of the Effectiveness of Various Management Strategies of Small Urban Reservoirs for Improving Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, L. K.; Faul, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    Small urban reservoirs, some more than 100 years old, are scattered throughout the San Francisco Bay (SFB) area. Because of the small size of these reservoirs, many of them are locally managed and provide an opportunity to investigate various management strategies on in-lake and downstream water quality. We studied three small, urban reservoir-watershed systems in the SFB subjected to differing water quality impairments to determine which management strategies might be most effective for improving water quality. The three study reservoir-watershed systems were monitored biweekly for water quality at the reservoir inlets and outlets and in the lakes through surface to bottom depth profiles. Measurements included pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, nutrients, and metal concentrations. In addition, sediment cores were collected and analyzed for metal and nutrient concentrations, with chronologies assigned based on Pb-210 and Cs-137 data. One watershed-reservoir system is managed with the reservoir cyclically empty (during winter months) and full (during summer months), whereas the other two watershed-reservoir systems are managed with the reservoir always full, albeit to varying levels. Results indicate the ideal management strategy depends upon the primary pollutant of interest and may not be the same in all urban reservoir-watershed systems. However, overall water quality may generally be improved with continuously full reservoirs with occasional, controlled drawdown. Continuing experiments are investigating the role of microbes in pollutant cycling in these reservoirs it their relation to reservoir full versus reservoir cyclically empty management strategies.

  9. Overview of Knowledge Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serban, Andreea M.; Luan, Jing

    2002-01-01

    Defines knowledge management, its components, processes, and outcomes. Addresses the importance of knowledge management for higher education in general and for institutional research in particular. (EV)

  10. Unemployment Insurance Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Daniel C.

    1979-01-01

    An insurance management system has the goal of minimizing unemployment insurance costs. Components of a model system should include general administration, claims management, and appeals process. (Author)

  11. Management Training, Yes! Excellence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Gary E.

    1990-01-01

    Management training programs are a necessity for transportation supervisors. Basic and advanced training programs are available through associations for business officials and university fleet management training programs. (MLF)

  12. Endowment Management Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how, struggling to regain investment momentum, college and university endowment managers are adjusting portfolios, investigating new methods of asset management, and researching new giving programs. (EV)

  13. Asthma management programs in managed care organizations.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christine W; Maio, Vittorio; Goldfarb, Neil I; Cobb, Nicole; Nash, David B

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate how managed care organizations (MCOs) currently approach asthma treatment and management and to determine factors affecting asthma outcomes. A Web-based survey was administered to a national sample of 351 medical directors of MCOs to investigate the asthma management program components in their organizations as well as gaps and barriers in the management of patients with asthma. All 134 (38.2%) responding medical directors reported that their organizations monitor asthma patients. Plans use a variety of asthma management activities, including general member education (90%), member education by mail (87%), self-management education (85%), and provider education (82%). Educational resources (89%) and telephone advice nurse (77%) were the most common self-management strategies offered. Among factors impeding the provision of effective asthma care, noncompliance with asthma treatment, the inappropriate use of medications, and the need for multiple medications were cited by virtually all respondents. Health plans rely on an array of strategies to manage asthma patients. Education encouraging patient self-management is a key component of asthma management programs. However, a considerable number of treatment approach barriers are impeding the achievement of proper asthma care. Without innovative approaches to care, it appears that current MCOs' asthma management efforts may not result in substantial improvements in asthma outcomes.

  14. What's new with the flu? Reflections regarding the management and prevention of influenza from the 2nd New Zealand Influenza Symposium, November 2015.

    PubMed

    Charania, Nadia A; Mansoor, Osman D; Murfitt, Diana; Turner, Nikki M

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a common respiratory viral infection. Seasonal outbreaks of influenza cause substantial morbidity and mortality that burdens healthcare services every year. The influenza virus constantly evolves by antigenic drift and occasionally by antigenic shift, making this disease particularly challenging to manage and prevent. As influenza viruses cause seasonal outbreaks and also have the ability to cause pandemics leading to widespread social and economic losses, focused discussions on improving management and prevention efforts is warranted. The Immunisation Advisory Centre (IMAC) hosted the 2nd New Zealand Influenza Symposium (NZiS) in November 2015. International and national participants discussed current issues in influenza management and prevention. Experts in the field presented data from recent studies and discussed the ecology of influenza viruses, epidemiology of influenza, methods of prevention and minimisation, and experiences from the 2015 seasonal influenza immunisation campaign. The symposium concluded that although much progress in this field has been made, many areas for future research remain. PMID:27607085

  15. 41 CFR 102-74.345 - Does the smoking policy in this part apply to the judicial branch?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does the smoking policy... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.345 Does the smoking policy in this part apply to the judicial branch? This smoking policy applies to the judicial branch...

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.325 - Are designated smoking areas authorized in interior space?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Are designated smoking... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.325 Are designated smoking areas....320(d). A previous exception for designated smoking areas is being eliminated. All designated...

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.315 - What is the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Employees and the Public From Exposure to Tobacco Smoke in the Federal Workplace” (3 CFR, 1997 Comp., p. 216... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What is the smoking... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.315 What is the...

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.320 - Are there any exceptions to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities? 102-74.320 Section 102-74.320 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.320 Are there any exceptions to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities? Yes, the smoking...

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.320 - Are there any exceptions to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities? 102-74.320 Section 102-74.320 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.320 Are there any exceptions to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities? Yes, the smoking...

  20. 41 CFR 102-74.345 - Does the smoking policy in this part apply to the judicial branch?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Does the smoking policy... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.345 Does the smoking policy in this part apply to the judicial branch? This smoking policy applies to the judicial branch...

  1. 41 CFR 102-74.325 - Are designated smoking areas authorized in interior space?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are designated smoking... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.325 Are designated smoking areas....320(d). A previous exception for designated smoking areas is being eliminated. All designated...

  2. 41 CFR 102-74.345 - Does the smoking policy in this part apply to the judicial branch?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Does the smoking policy... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.345 Does the smoking policy in this part apply to the judicial branch? This smoking policy applies to the judicial branch...

  3. 41 CFR 102-74.345 - Does the smoking policy in this part apply to the judicial branch?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Does the smoking policy... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.345 Does the smoking policy in this part apply to the judicial branch? This smoking policy applies to the judicial branch...

  4. 41 CFR 102-74.315 - What is the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Employees and the Public From Exposure to Tobacco Smoke in the Federal Workplace” (3 CFR, 1997 Comp., p. 216... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What is the smoking... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.315 What is the...

  5. 41 CFR 102-74.315 - What is the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Employees and the Public From Exposure to Tobacco Smoke in the Federal Workplace” (3 CFR, 1997 Comp., p. 216... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the smoking... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.315 What is the...

  6. 41 CFR 102-74.320 - Are there any exceptions to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities? 102-74.320 Section 102-74.320 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.320 Are there any exceptions to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities? Yes, the smoking...

  7. 41 CFR 102-74.315 - What is the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Employees and the Public From Exposure to Tobacco Smoke in the Federal Workplace” (3 CFR, 1997 Comp., p. 216... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What is the smoking... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.315 What is the...

  8. 41 CFR 102-74.320 - Are there any exceptions to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities? 102-74.320 Section 102-74.320 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.320 Are there any exceptions to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities? Yes, the smoking...

  9. 41 CFR 102-74.320 - Are there any exceptions to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities? 102-74.320 Section 102-74.320 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.320 Are there any exceptions to the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities? Yes, the smoking...

  10. 41 CFR 102-74.345 - Does the smoking policy in this part apply to the judicial branch?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Does the smoking policy... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.345 Does the smoking policy in this part apply to the judicial branch? This smoking policy applies to the judicial branch...

  11. 41 CFR 102-74.315 - What is the smoking policy for interior space in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Employees and the Public From Exposure to Tobacco Smoke in the Federal Workplace” (3 CFR, 1997 Comp., p. 216... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the smoking... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.315 What is the...

  12. 41 CFR 102-74.325 - Are designated smoking areas authorized in interior space?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Are designated smoking... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.325 Are designated smoking areas....320(d). A previous exception for designated smoking areas is being eliminated. All designated...

  13. 41 CFR 102-74.325 - Are designated smoking areas authorized in interior space?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Are designated smoking... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.325 Are designated smoking areas....320(d). A previous exception for designated smoking areas is being eliminated. All designated...

  14. Management of acute asthma in Canada: an assessment of emergency physician behaviour.

    PubMed

    Grunfeld, A; Beveridge, R C; Berkowitz, J; FitzGerald, J M

    1997-01-01

    The study objective was to assess Canadian emergency physicians for their management preferences and their compliance with recently developed guidelines for treatment of acute asthma in adults. The design was a cross-sectional survey sent to members of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) and to the emergency department (ED) directors of all Canadian hospitals with more than 25 beds in November 1992. ED directors who had not responded were sent a second survey in January 1993. The response rates for the survey were 60.1% (362/602) for ED directors and 53.4% (302/586) for CAEP members. Respondents were more likely to be from larger hospitals and to have completed some training beyond general practice level (CCFP, CCFP-EM, ABEM, FRCPC). There were wide variations among respondents in the use of objective measurements of asthma severity (forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1] and peak expiratory flow rates [PEFR]), dosing of bronchodilators, and utilization of systemic corticosteroids. Forty-six percent of respondents used the FEV1 "occasionally" (22.3%) or "never" (23.8%), and 26.7% used PEFR "occasionally" (15.8%) or "never" (10.9%) in asthma management. Ninety-seven percent used nebulized beta agonist "always" (71.3%) or "often" (25.6%), but only 48.5% used the metered dose inhaler (MDI) "always" (11%) or "often" (37.5%). More than a quarter of respondents (27.2%) used doses of beta agonists that were less than those recommended (> every 30-60 min). Oral corticosteroids were prescribed at discharge only "occasionally" (51.1%), "seldom" (18.9%), or "never" (6.5%) in 76.6% of physicians. Physicians with more training were more likely to assess and treat patients according to current asthma treatment guidelines. The survey shows that many Canadian emergency physicians did not follow published recommendations for the care of patients with acute asthma. This finding was especially so with regard to objective evaluation of airflow, aggressive use of

  15. Information resource management concepts for records managers

    SciTech Connect

    Seesing, P.R.

    1992-10-01

    Information Resource Management (ERM) is the label given to the various approaches used to foster greater accountability for the use of computing resources. It is a corporate philosophy that treats information as it would its other resources. There is a reorientation from simply expenditures to considering the value of the data stored on that hardware. Accountability for computing resources is expanding beyond just the data processing (DP) or management information systems (MIS) manager to include senior organization management and user management. Management`s goal for office automation is being refocused from saving money to improving productivity. A model developed by Richard Nolan (1982) illustrates the basic evolution of computer use in organizations. Computer Era: (1) Initiation (computer acquisition), (2) Contagion (intense system development), (3) Control (proliferation of management controls). Data Resource Era: (4) Integration (user service orientation), (5) Data Administration (corporate value of information), (6) Maturity (strategic approach to information technology). The first three stages mark the growth of traditional data processing and management information systems departments. The development of the IRM philosophy in an organization involves the restructuring of the DP organization and new management techniques. The three stages of the Data Resource Era represent the evolution of IRM. This paper examines each of them in greater detail.

  16. Space Management. Accommodation Management Module. Operational Management Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Andrew; Dobbs, John

    This module on space management is intended to help supervisors or managers make more profitable use of existing areas in their establishment. An imaginary licensed house is used as a case study to show the steps involved. The material is presented in a self-instructional format in five sections. At the beginning of each section is a statement of…

  17. Task Management. Supervisory Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Jan; And Others

    This module on task management is intended to help the hospitality manager or supervisor meet all the demands of the position and at the same time keep the customer happy. The material is presented in a self-instructional format in eight sections. At the beginning of each section is a statement of the objectives that will be achieved as a result…

  18. Management Data Base Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dan, Robert L.

    1975-01-01

    A management data base is seen as essential for a management information system, program budgeting, program costing, management by objectives, program evaluation, productivity measures, and accountability in institutions of higher education. The necessity of a management data base is addressed, along with the benefits and limitations it may have…

  19. Total Water Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will investigate total water management (TWM) as a way of improving water resource management and reducing waste streams. This project will also improve management of potable water, wastewater and wet-weather flow through combined management, reuse and recycling wil...

  20. Educating todays engineering manager

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, N.H. Jr.

    1986-04-01

    The issues addressed in this paper are: needed management skills/knowledge in concert with the definitions of management and leadership; suggested timing for behavioral management training, that is, undergraduate, graduate, or continuing education programs; and adequacy of management courses typically offered in traditional undergraduate/graduate engineering curricula.

  1. Project management skills.

    PubMed

    Perce, K H

    1998-08-01

    1. Project management skills are important to develop because occupational and environmental health nurses are increasingly asked to implement and manage health related projects and programs. 2. Project management is the process of planning and managing project tasks and resources, and communicating the progress and results. This requires the coordination of time, tasks, equipment, people, and budget. 3. Three main critical skill areas are needed to be an effective project manager: behavioral skills such as negotiation, conflict resolution, and interpersonal problem solving; use of project management tools to manage project tasks and resources; and effective communication skills. PMID:9748920

  2. Adaptive management: Chapter 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  3. Project Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jr., R. F. Miles

    1995-01-01

    Project risk management is primarily concerned with performance, reliability, cost, and schedule. Environmental risk management is primarily concerned with human health and ecological hazards and likelihoods. This paper discusses project risk management and compares it to environmental risk management, both with respect to goals and implementation. The approach of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to risk management is presented as an example of a project risk management approach that is an extension to NASA NHB 7120.5: Management of Major System Programs and Projects.

  4. NASA's Risk Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, Jeevan S.

    2011-01-01

    Leadership is key to success. Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks -- risk office personnel. Each group is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk reporting and communication is an essential element of risk management and will combine both qualitative and quantitative elements. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

  5. Total Quality Management in a Knowledge Management Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav

    2000-01-01

    Presents theoretical considerations on both similarities and differences between information management and knowledge management and presents a conceptual model of basic knowledge management processes. Discusses total quality management and quality control in the context of information management. (Author/LRW)

  6. Manager`s views of public involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, K.M.; Heerwagen, J.; Bradbury, J.

    1995-12-01

    Four issues commonly form the framework for debates about the acceptability of proposed projects or technologies--the substantive decision or technological choice; the treatment of the community by the proponent organization; the way the decision-making process has been structured and managed; and the status of institutional safeguards and protection. One of the clear messages of cultural theory is that differences in perspectives are a normal and inevitable part of society, and that attempts to resolve differences by persuasion are not likely to work. These findings are useful when considering the goals and possibilities of public involvement as a decision-making tool, and when designing or evaluating public involvement training programs for managers. The research reported here examines the viewpoints and concerns of managers and decision-makers about the four issues identified above, with particular emphasis on their perspectives and concerns about opening decision-making processes to the public and about managers` roles and responsibilities for structuring and managing open decision-making processes. Implications of these findings for public involvement training for managers is also discussed. The data presented in this paper were obtained from face-to-face interviews with managers and decision-makers with experience managing a variety of hazardous waste management decision-making processes. We conducted these interviews in the course of four separate research projects: needs assessments to support the design and development of a public involvement training program for managers; a study of community residents` and managers` perspectives on the chemical stockpile disposal program; an evaluation of the effectiveness of public involvement training for managers in the Department of Energy; and a study to develop indicators of the benefits and costs of public involvement.

  7. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Sedge Wren

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Parkin, Barry D.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1998-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  8. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: American Bittern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  9. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Western Meadowlark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  10. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Bobolink

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  11. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Field Sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Parkin, Barry D.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  12. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Lark Bunting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  13. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Willet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Parkin, Barry D.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  14. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Upland Sandpiper

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Dinkins, Meghan F.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Parkin, Barry D.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  15. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Lark Sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Parkin, Barry D.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  16. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Dickcissel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  17. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Horned Lark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinkins, Meghan F.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Dechant, Jill A.; Parkin, Barry D.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  18. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Vesper Sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Dinkins, Meghan F.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  19. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Loggerhead Shrike

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Nenneman, Melvin P.; Zimmerman, A.L.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1998-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  20. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Marbled Godwit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Nenneman, Melvin P.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1998-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  1. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Burrowing Owl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Rabie, Paul A.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  2. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Baird's Sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Nenneman, Melvin P.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1998-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  3. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Ferruginous Hawk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  4. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Swainson's Hawk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Dinkins, Meghan F.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  5. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Grasshopper Sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Nenneman, Melvin P.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1998-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  6. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Golden eagle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, John P.

    2004-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 4,000 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to the breeding, year-round, and nonbreeding ranges in the United States and southern Canada. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates of cowbird parasitism, host responses to parasitism, and factors that

  7. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Brewer's sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, Brett L.

    2004-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  8. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Merlin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the breeding, year-round, and nonbreeding ranges in the United States and southern Canada. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates of cowbird parasitism, host responses to parasitism, and

  9. Management: A bibliography for NASA managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This bibliography lists 706 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in 1984. Entries, which include abstracts, are arranged in the following categories: human factors and personnel issues; management theory and techniques; industrial management and manufacturing; robotics and expert systems; computers and information management; research and development; economics, costs, and markets; logistics and operations management; reliability and quality control; and legality, legislation, and policy. Subject, personal author, corporate source, contract number, report number, and accession number indexes are included.

  10. Knowledge management: an innovative risk management strategy.

    PubMed

    Zipperer, Lorri; Amori, Geri

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge management effectively lends itself to the enterprise risk process. The authors introduce the concept of knowledge management as a strategy to drive innovation and support risk management. They align this work with organizational efforts to improve patient safety and quality through the effective sharing of experience and lessons learned. The article closes with suggestions on how to develop a knowledge management initiative at an organization, who should be on the team, and how to sustain this effort and build the culture it requires to drive success.

  11. Information resource management concepts for records managers

    SciTech Connect

    Seesing, P.R.

    1992-10-01

    Information Resource Management (ERM) is the label given to the various approaches used to foster greater accountability for the use of computing resources. It is a corporate philosophy that treats information as it would its other resources. There is a reorientation from simply expenditures to considering the value of the data stored on that hardware. Accountability for computing resources is expanding beyond just the data processing (DP) or management information systems (MIS) manager to include senior organization management and user management. Management's goal for office automation is being refocused from saving money to improving productivity. A model developed by Richard Nolan (1982) illustrates the basic evolution of computer use in organizations. Computer Era: (1) Initiation (computer acquisition), (2) Contagion (intense system development), (3) Control (proliferation of management controls). Data Resource Era: (4) Integration (user service orientation), (5) Data Administration (corporate value of information), (6) Maturity (strategic approach to information technology). The first three stages mark the growth of traditional data processing and management information systems departments. The development of the IRM philosophy in an organization involves the restructuring of the DP organization and new management techniques. The three stages of the Data Resource Era represent the evolution of IRM. This paper examines each of them in greater detail.

  12. Knowledge management: an innovative risk management strategy.

    PubMed

    Zipperer, Lorri; Amori, Geri

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge management effectively lends itself to the enterprise risk process. The authors introduce the concept of knowledge management as a strategy to drive innovation and support risk management. They align this work with organizational efforts to improve patient safety and quality through the effective sharing of experience and lessons learned. The article closes with suggestions on how to develop a knowledge management initiative at an organization, who should be on the team, and how to sustain this effort and build the culture it requires to drive success. PMID:21506198

  13. NASA's Risk Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, Jeevan S.

    2013-01-01

    Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks - not just risk office personnel. Each group/department is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. ? Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

  14. Guidelines for Project Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Arieh, David

    2001-01-01

    Project management is an important part of the professional activities at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Project management is the means by which many of the operations at KSC take shape. Moreover, projects at KSC are implemented in a variety of ways in different organizations. The official guidelines for project management are provided by NASA headquarters and are quite general. The project reported herein deals with developing practical and detailed project management guidelines in support of the project managers. This report summarizes the current project management effort in the Process Management Division and presents a new modeling approach of project management developed by the author. The report also presents the Project Management Guidelines developed during the summer.

  15. Effects of management practices on wetland birds: American Avocet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Jamison, Brent E.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2002-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on wetland birds were summarized from information in more than 500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although the BBS may not capture the presence of elusive waterbird species, the BBS is a standardized survey and the range maps, in many cases, represent the most consistent information available on species’ distributions. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The section on brood parasitism summarizes

  16. Effects of management practices on wetland birds: Black tern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Amy L.; Dechant, Jill A.; Johnson, Douglas A.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Jamison, Brent E.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2002-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on wetland birds were summarized from information in more than 500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although the BBS may not capture the presence of elusive waterbird species, the BBS is a standardized survey and the range maps, in many cases, represent the most consistent information available on species’ distributions. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The section on brood parasitism summarizes

  17. Effects of management practices on wetland birds: Virginia rail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Amy L.; Dechant, Jill A.; Jamison, Brent E.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Church, James O.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2002-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on wetland birds were summarized from information in more than 500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although the BBS may not capture the presence of elusive waterbird species, the BBS is a standardized survey and the range maps, in many cases, represent the most consistent information available on species’ distributions. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The section on brood parasitism summarizes

  18. Effects of management practices on wetland birds: Yellow Rail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldade, Christopher M.; Dechant, Jill A.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Jamison, Brent E.; Church, James O.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2002-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on wetland birds were summarized from information in more than 500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although the BBS may not capture the presence of elusive waterbird species, the BBS is a standardized survey and the range maps, in many cases, represent the most consistent information available on species’ distributions. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The section on brood parasitism summarizes

  19. Time Management and the Woman Library Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothberg, Helen M.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses how women library managers can use efficient time management techniques to help them make the best of both career and home work environments. Nine basic steps to greater efficiency are presented, and external and internal time wasters are listed. (EM)

  20. Project Management Methodology in Human Resource Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josler, Cheryl; Burger, James

    2005-01-01

    When charged with overseeing a project, how can one ensure that the project will be completed on time, within budget, and to the satisfaction of everyone involved? In this article, the authors examine project management methodology as a means of ensuring that projects are conducted in a disciplined, well-managed and consistent manner that serves…

  1. Managing Management Training Programs in Gerontology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowy, Louis; And Others

    A graduate-level management training program in gerontology is presented through a description of a consortium of two universities (Boston University and Brandeis University) and consisting of three types of training (gerontology and aging, sociology and social work, and management techniques). The areas of interest described in these materials…

  2. Managing Your Credit. [Revised.] Money Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Nancy H., Ed.; Tarrant, Sharon M., Ed.

    This booklet on managing credit, 1 in a series of 12, covers all the basic aspects of personal- and family-money management. Suitable for use by high school and college students as well as adults, this handbook tells how to establish credit, determine credit limits, and maintain a favorable credit history. Section 1 on understanding consumer…

  3. When management gets serious about managing software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansma, Patti A. 'Trisha'

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes JPL's approach to improving the management of software. It discusses the various products, services and training that were developed, describes the deployment approach used, and concludes with several 'lessons learned' about changing how software is managed, developed and acquired.

  4. Monitoring and managing microbes in aquaculture - Towards a sustainable industry.

    PubMed

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Gram, Lone

    2016-09-01

    Microorganisms are of great importance to aquaculture where they occur naturally, and can be added artificially, fulfilling different roles. They recycle nutrients, degrade organic matter and, occasionally, they infect and kill the fish, their larvae or the live feed. Also, some microorganisms may protect fish and larvae against disease. Hence, monitoring and manipulating the microbial communities in aquaculture environments hold great potential; both in terms of assessing and improving water quality, but also in terms of controlling the development of microbial infections. Using microbial communities to monitor water quality and to efficiently carry out ecosystem services within the aquaculture systems may only be a few years away. Initially, however, we need to thoroughly understand the microbiomes of both healthy and diseased aquaculture systems, and we need to determine how to successfully manipulate and engineer these microbiomes. Similarly, we can reduce the need to apply antibiotics in aquaculture through manipulation of the microbiome, i.e. by the use of probiotic bacteria. Recent studies have demonstrated that fish pathogenic bacteria in live feed can be controlled by probiotics and that mortality of infected fish larvae can be reduced significantly by probiotic bacteria. However, the successful management of the aquaculture microbiota is currently hampered by our lack of knowledge of relevant microbial interactions and the overall ecology of these systems.

  5. Monitoring and managing microbes in aquaculture - Towards a sustainable industry.

    PubMed

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Gram, Lone

    2016-09-01

    Microorganisms are of great importance to aquaculture where they occur naturally, and can be added artificially, fulfilling different roles. They recycle nutrients, degrade organic matter and, occasionally, they infect and kill the fish, their larvae or the live feed. Also, some microorganisms may protect fish and larvae against disease. Hence, monitoring and manipulating the microbial communities in aquaculture environments hold great potential; both in terms of assessing and improving water quality, but also in terms of controlling the development of microbial infections. Using microbial communities to monitor water quality and to efficiently carry out ecosystem services within the aquaculture systems may only be a few years away. Initially, however, we need to thoroughly understand the microbiomes of both healthy and diseased aquaculture systems, and we need to determine how to successfully manipulate and engineer these microbiomes. Similarly, we can reduce the need to apply antibiotics in aquaculture through manipulation of the microbiome, i.e. by the use of probiotic bacteria. Recent studies have demonstrated that fish pathogenic bacteria in live feed can be controlled by probiotics and that mortality of infected fish larvae can be reduced significantly by probiotic bacteria. However, the successful management of the aquaculture microbiota is currently hampered by our lack of knowledge of relevant microbial interactions and the overall ecology of these systems. PMID:27452663

  6. Lymphaticovenular bypass surgery for lymphedema management in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, D W

    2012-12-01

    Historically, the reported incidence of upper extremity lymphedema in breast cancer survivors who have undergone axillary lymph node dissection has ranged from 9% to 41%. In the past 2 decades, sentinel lymph node biopsy has become popular as a way to minimize the morbidity associated with axillary dissection without compromising the cure rate for breast cancer patients. However, even with sentinel node biopsy, the postoperative incidence of upper limb lymphedema in breast cancer patients remains at 4-10%. Lymphedema occasionally emerges immediately after surgery but most often appears after a latent period. Obesity, postoperative seroma, and radiation therapy have been reported as major risk factors for upper extremity lymphedema, but the etiology of lymphedema is still not fully understood. Common symptoms of upper limb lymphedema are increased volume and weight of the affected limb and increased skin tension. The increased volume of the affected limb not only causes physical impairments in wearing clothes and in dexterity but also affects patients' emotional and mental status. Surgical management of lymphedema can be broadly categorized into physiologic methods and reductive techniques. Physiologic methods such as flap interposition, lymph node transfers, and lymphatic bypass procedures aim to decrease lymphedema by restoring lymphatic drainage. In contrast, reductive techniques such as direct excision or liposuction aim to remove fibrofatty tissue generated as a consequence of sustained lymphatic fluid stasis. Currently, microsurgical variations of lymphatic bypass, in which excess lymph trapped within the lymphedematous limb is redirected into other lymphatic basins or into the venous circulation, have gained popularity.

  7. Management and outcome of brain abscess in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Arunkumar, M; Rajshekhar, V.; Chandy, M.; Thomas, P.; Jacob, C. K.

    2000-01-01

    Although infection is the commonest central nervous system complication following renal transplantation, brain abscess is uncommon. Over the last 11 years, five renal transplant recipients who had brain abscesses were treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic aspiration. Three patients had a fungal abscess, one a tuberculous abscess and the other had a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus abscess. One patient required a craniotomy for the excision of a fungal abscess which was persistent after two CT-guided stereotactic aspirations. The survivors in this group are the patient with a tuberculous abscess who is alive and well 5 years after diagnosis, and another with a dematiaceous fungal abscess (phaeohyphomycosis). CT-guided stereotactic surgery is minimally invasive, and can safely be performed in these patients. It often leads to an aetiological diagnosis in renal transplant recipients with brain abscesses. Specific antibiotic management directed towards the causative organism rather than empirical treatment can be instituted following the procedure. Although the ultimate prognosis in these patients is bleak even with specific antibiotic therapy, an occasional patient might have a good outcome with prompt and appropriate therapy.


Keywords: brain abscess; computed tomography guided stereotaxy; renal transplant recipients PMID:10727562

  8. Management of failed rotator cuff repair: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Importance Recurrent tear after rotator cuff repair (RCR) is common. Conservative, and open and arthroscopic revisions, have been advocated to treat these failures. Aim or objective The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the different options for managing recurrent rotator cuff tears. Evidence review A search was conducted of level I through 4 studies from January 2000 to October 2015, to identify studies reporting on failed RCR. 10 articles were identified. The overall quality of evidence was very low. Findings Mid-term to long-term follow-up of patients treated conservatively revealed acceptable results; a persistent defect is a well-tolerated condition that only occasionally requires subsequent surgery. Conservative treatment might be indicated in most patients, particularly in case of posterosuperior involvement and poor preoperative range of motion. Revision surgery might be indicated in a young patient with a repairable lesion, a 3 tendon tear, and in those with involvement of the subscapularis. Conclusions and relevance The current review indicates that arthroscopic revision RCR can lead to improvement in functional outcome despite a high retear rate. Further studies are needed to develop specific rehabilitation in the case of primary rotator cuff failure, to better understand the place of each treatment option, and, in case of repair, to optimise tendon healing. PMID:27134759

  9. 14 CFR 91.1017 - Amending program manager's management specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1017 Amending program manager's management specifications. (a... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Amending program manager's management... specifications; or (2) The program manager applies for the amendment of any management specifications, and...

  10. Machines that Manage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2003-01-01

    Describes how facilities-management systems use technology to help schools and universities operate their buildings more efficiently, reduce energy consumption, manage inventory more accurately, keep track of supplies and maintenance schedules, and save money. (EV)

  11. Manage Energy with Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Computerized energy management at Drew University (New Jersey) is accomplished by direct digital control in which microprocessor controllers control, monitor, and carry out energy management functions at the equipment level. (Author/MLF)

  12. Research Management in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benneh, George

    2002-01-01

    Examines research management, particularly within higher education institutions, in Africa including, research and current trends in knowledge production, institutional aspects, research funding, and good practice in research management. (EV)

  13. Principles of project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The basic principles of project management as practiced by NASA management personnel are presented. These principles are given as ground rules and guidelines to be used in the performance of research, development, construction or operational assignments.

  14. IT Problem Management

    NASA Video Gallery

    IT Problem Management – process responsible for managing Lifecycle of all IT problems. The primary objective is to prevent incidents from occurring and to minimize impact of incidents that cannot...

  15. Total Water Management - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total Water Management (TWM) examines urban water systems in an interconnected manner. It encompasses reducing water demands, increasing water recycling and reuse, creating water supply assets from stormwater management, matching water quality to end-use needs, and achieving envi...

  16. Regional Sustainable Environmental Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional sustainable environmental management is an interdisciplinary effort to develop a sufficient understanding of the interactions between ecosystems, the economy, law, and technology to formulate effective long-term management strategies on a regional scale. Regional sustai...

  17. Polymyositis: Medical Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Polymyositis (PM) is a highly treatable disease. ... Polymyositis (PM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research Find MDA in your Community Grants ...

  18. Dermatomysitis: Medical Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Dermatomysitis (DM) is a highly treatable disease. ... Dermatomyositis (DM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research Living With Dermatomyositis (DM) News Not ...

  19. Managing customer service.

    PubMed

    Paget, Zoe

    2015-02-28

    Zoe Paget is the customer services manager at YourVets. Her role includes managing the company's call centre, social media marketing, working with the marketing department to develop customer care initiatives and reporting service levels to the company's directors.

  20. 41 CFR 102-74.400 - What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs? 102-74.400 Section 102-74.400 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Conduct on Federal Property Narcotics and Other Drugs § 102-74.400 What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other...

  1. 41 CFR 102-74.400 - What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs? 102-74.400 Section 102-74.400 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Conduct on Federal Property Narcotics and Other Drugs § 102-74.400 What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other...

  2. 41 CFR 102-74.400 - What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs? 102-74.400 Section 102-74.400 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Conduct on Federal Property Narcotics and Other Drugs § 102-74.400 What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other...

  3. 41 CFR 102-74.400 - What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs? 102-74.400 Section 102-74.400 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Conduct on Federal Property Narcotics and Other Drugs § 102-74.400 What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other...

  4. 41 CFR 102-74.230 - Who is responsible for establishing an occupant emergency program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... establishing an occupant emergency program? 102-74.230 Section 102-74.230 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Occupant Emergency Program § 102-74.230 Who is responsible for establishing an occupant emergency program? The Designated Official (as defined in §...

  5. 41 CFR 102-74.230 - Who is responsible for establishing an occupant emergency program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... establishing an occupant emergency program? 102-74.230 Section 102-74.230 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Occupant Emergency Program § 102-74.230 Who is responsible for establishing an occupant emergency program? The Designated Official (as defined in §...

  6. 41 CFR 102-74.335 - Who is responsible for furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the building, and in and around building... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.335 Who is responsible for furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the building, and in and around...

  7. 41 CFR 102-74.335 - Who is responsible for furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the building, and in and around building... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.335 Who is responsible for furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the building, and in and around...

  8. 41 CFR 102-74.335 - Who is responsible for furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the building, and in and around building... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.335 Who is responsible for furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the building, and in and around...

  9. 41 CFR 102-74.351 - If a state or local government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking policy for Federal facilities... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.351 If a state or local government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking policy for Federal...

  10. 41 CFR 102-74.351 - If a state or local government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking policy for Federal facilities... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.351 If a state or local government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking policy for Federal...

  11. 41 CFR 102-74.335 - Who is responsible for furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the building, and in and around building... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.335 Who is responsible for furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the building, and in and around...

  12. 41 CFR 102-74.351 - If a state or local government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking policy for Federal facilities... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.351 If a state or local government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking policy for Federal...

  13. 41 CFR 102-74.351 - If a state or local government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking policy for Federal facilities... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.351 If a state or local government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking policy for Federal...

  14. 41 CFR 102-74.335 - Who is responsible for furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the building, and in and around building... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.335 Who is responsible for furnishing and installing signs concerning smoking restrictions in the building, and in and around...

  15. 41 CFR 102-74.351 - If a state or local government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking policy for Federal facilities... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Smoking § 102-74.351 If a state or local government has a smoke-free ordinance that is more strict than the smoking policy for Federal...

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.420 - What is the policy concerning photographs for news, advertising or commercial purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concerning photographs for news, advertising or commercial purposes? 102-74.420 Section 102-74.420 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Conduct on Federal Property Photographs for News, Advertising Or Commercial Purposes § 102-74.420 What is the policy concerning photographs for...

  17. The management of acute pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Wells, T A; Curzen, N P

    2005-01-01

    Acute pericarditis is usually a benign self-limiting condition, often of unexplained or viral aetiology, involving inflammation of the pericardial layers. It is often part of the differential diagnosis in patients admitted with acute chest pain and can be confused with acute myocardial infarction, acute pulmonary embolism and pleurisy. Occasionally it can result in cardiac tamponade and, if associated with myocarditis, in heart failure. This article sets out how to diagnose acute pericarditis, the common underlying causes, the possible treatment options and outcomes. PMID:21655516

  18. Mast cell sarcoma: clinical management.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Catherine R; Butterfield, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Mast cell sarcoma is a disorder that results in abnormal mast cells as identified by morphology, special stains, and in some publications, c-kit mutation analysis. It affects animal species such as canines more commonly than humans. In humans it is a very rare condition, with variable clinical presentation. There is no standard therapy for the disorder. It can affect any age group. It is occasionally associated with systemic mastocytosis and/or urticaria pigmentosa. The prognosis of mast cell sarcoma in published literature is very poor in humans.

  19. Managed care: the challenge for nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, K; Freeman, M

    1993-01-01

    Health care reform is upon us even though the final legislative processes have not been enacted. Nurse managers cannot wait for health care reform. A revolution is happening all around us in many ways with large payers, our customers, aggressively negotiating new models of reimbursement. The nurse manager's challenge is to develop a responsive organization that can change quickly to meet the needs of this new environment in the shortest period of time. The successful nurse manager of the future will take the leadership role in making these changes.

  20. Data management in engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    An introduction to computer based data management is presented with an orientation toward the needs of engineering application. The characteristics and structure of data management systems are discussed. A link to familiar engineering applications of computing is established through a discussion of data structure and data access procedures. An example data management system for a hypothetical engineering application is presented.

  1. Management Development at Douglas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Robert D.

    1974-01-01

    A study by the McDonnell Douglas Corporation reveals that time will erode the ranks of promotable managers unless action is taken long in advance of need of them. To meet this problem, the Douglas Management Institute was formed, a two-year middle-management developmental program. (Author/DS)

  2. International waste management conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the international waste management conference. Topics covered include: Quality assurance in the OCR WM program; Leading the spirit of quality; Dept. of Energy hazardous waste remedial actions program; management of hazardous waste projects; and System management and quality assurance.

  3. Personnel Management. Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus. Management Improvement Program.

    This manual is one of 10 completed in the Ohio Management Improvement Program (MIP) during the 1971-73 biennium. In this project, Ohio's 34 public universities and colleges, in an effort directed and staffed by the Ohio Board of Regents, have developed manuals of management practices, in this case, concerning personnel management. Emphasis in this…

  4. Organizational Knowledge Management Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walczak, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To propose and evaluate a novel management structure that encourages knowledge sharing across an organization. Design/methodology/approach: The extant literature on the impact of organizational culture and its link to management structure is examined and used to develop a new knowledge sharing management structure. Roadblocks to…

  5. The manager as coach.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R

    1990-01-01

    The concept of "coach" is relatively new to nursing literature this term is not uncommon in management. The coaching concept has applications for nursing management. The role of coach, coaching in one-to-one vs. group situations, and the benefits of coaching for nursing management have been considered.

  6. Talent Management for Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores human resource management practices in the university sector with a specific focus on talent pools and talent management more generally. The paper defines talent management in the context of the university sector and then explores its interdependence with organisational strategy, the metrics used to measure academic performance…

  7. Effective Public Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Joseph L.

    1977-01-01

    Argues that public management differs from private management not just in degree but in quality, so that American business is an inappropriate analogy for evaluating public management. In particular, "purpose,""organization," and "people" have different meaning and significance in public agencies and private businesses. (JG)

  8. General Management Training Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC. Bureau of Training.

    A description of the courses and seminars given by the General Management Training Center of the U. S. Civil Service Commission to provide training opportunity for managers working in Washington metropolitan area at all levels of government is given. Categories of courses are: Entry Level Training; Supervisory Training; Management Training;…

  9. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  10. Sports Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marcia L., Ed.; Stotlar, David K., Ed.

    The numbers of both sports facility management college courses and sport and exercise facilities are increasing, along with the need for an understanding of the trends and management concepts of these facilities. This book focuses exclusively on managing facilities where sporting events occur and includes examples in physical education, athletics,…

  11. Multicultural Classroom Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the harmful effects of culturally inappropriate, prejudicial, and disempowering classroom management techniques often employed with students who are not Euro-American or middle class. Teachers need to adapt classroom management techniques to their student population, eliminate prejudicial classroom management, and replace techniques that…

  12. Database Searching by Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Stephen E.

    Managers and executives need the easy and quick access to business and management information that online databases can provide, but many have difficulty articulating their search needs to an intermediary. One possible solution would be to encourage managers and their immediate support staff members to search textual databases directly as they now…

  13. Managing for Equal Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marianne

    This document is a chapter in "The Principles and Practice of Educational Management," which aims to provide a systematic and analytical introduction to the study of educational management. The structure of the book reflects the main substantive areas of educational leadership and management, and most of the major themes are covered in the…

  14. Time Management in College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranney, A. Garr; Kirby, Alan F.

    Time management may be the most important study skill. The effects of a specific teaching technique designed to alter the time management skills of undergraduate students in a voluntary study skills course were assessed. Of the 95 subjects, 34 were enrolled in the course and were exposed to time management instruction, 31 were future course…

  15. Managing Time and Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffstutter, Sandra

    Chapter 10 in a volume on school leadership, this chapter lists practical suggestions from many diverse sources for managing time and reducing stress. The author begins by noting attitudes and concepts that block or facilitate time or stress management. A number of time management strategies are suggested, including goal-setting, using a daily…

  16. Management Training for Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaptinchay, Karen

    1998-01-01

    Describes a management program for Head Start directors called the Head Start-Johnson & Johnson Management Fellows program that focuses on issues and problems encountered by directors in implementing and operating programs at the local level. Notes that the management program represents a response to increasing need for cost-effective and…

  17. Identification and management of chronic shoulder pain in the presence of an MRA-confirmed humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) lesion

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Arif; McLeod, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present the assessment and conservative management of chronic shoulder pain in the presence of a humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) lesion in an active individual. Clinical Features: A 47 year-old female office-worker with constant, deep, right shoulder pain with occasional clicking and catching claimed to have “tore something” in her right shoulder five years ago while performing reverse bicep curls. A physical exam led to differential diagnoses of a Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) lesion, Bankart lesion, and bicipital tendinopathy. A Magnetic Resonance Arthrogram revealed a HAGL lesion. Intervention and Outcome: A conservative chiropractic treatment plan in addition to physical therapy was initiated. The patient reported 75% improvement in symptoms after 4 treatments over a four-week duration. Summary: This case demonstrates the successful implementation of a conservative plan of management suggesting that the treatment provided to this patient should be considered and attempted prior to arthroscopic surgery. PMID:27385837

  18. How to manage without being a manager

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1997-06-01

    In the author`s current position at Sandia National Laboratories within the Pulsed Power Sciences Center, much of the author`s time is spent in composing short (one page) technical reports and long (> 20 page) technical contracts and program plans for transmission to the Department of Energy and to upper management and also in reviewing long technical documents for accuracy. A major requirement of these efforts is to complete them on a timely basis, often within a few hours or a few days. In this talk, the author reveals some communication {open_quotes}secrets{close_quotes} that have been learned. The idea behind these twelve {open_quotes}secrets{close_quotes} is to get the answers you, as a nonmanager, need quickly from a manager without creating stress either on your part or the manager`s part.

  19. Managing to Speak by Managing the Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Lyle

    1988-01-01

    The essence of giving a good speech is to view it as a managerial problem/opportunity and apply the four management functions to resolve it. These four functions are (1) planning; (2) organizing; (3) motivating; and (4) controlling. (JOW)

  20. AIPRC--BIA Management Study: Personnel Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Continuing the American Indian Policy Review Commission's (AIPRC) Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Management Study, this article reviews the divisions of responsibility, Indian preference, recruitment and hiring problems, training, labor relations, and internal communication. (NQ)

  1. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  2. Multimedia environmental management

    SciTech Connect

    Soesilo, J.A.; Wiley, W.D.

    1999-09-01

    This book explores and supports the argument that effective environmental management must be based on a multimedia approach, which focuses simultaneously on air, water, and waste and enables managers to assess the resulting financial, operation, and management benefits. The multimedia approach, which can be used to design an effective compliance program, includes proper waste and material handling management, systematic monitoring, and record keeping requirements. This approach integrates a wide array of environmental requirements and decision processes, which the authors examine in sixteen chapters, organized into four parts: the role of environmental management; environmental aspects of business operation, environmental processes; and environmental management trends. Within these parts, the authors highlight the development of modern environmental management and provide an overview of federal laws pertinent to multimedia environmental management. They examine such issues as chemical storage and transportation, tank system operations and requirements, waste determination, spill response procedures, and employee training. Environmental processes addressed in the book include the management of solid and hazardous waste, wastewater treatment systems, stormwater management, air emission control, and site remediation. The authors also briefly discuss significant initiatives in US environmental management and look toward corporate sustainable development.

  3. Productivity of local chickens under village management conditions.

    PubMed

    Mwalusanya, N A; Katule, A M; Mutayoba, S K; Mtambo, M M A; Olsen, J E; Minga, U M

    2002-09-01

    The productivity of local chickens under village management conditions was studied in six villages situated in three climatic zones within Morogoro District in Tanzania. Two villages were picked in each climatic zone (warm and wet, warm and dry, cool and wet) for the study. The data were obtained by actual measurement, qualitative observations and interview of members of the households directly responsible for the care of chickens. In addition, data sheets were given to selected farmers to record the performance of their chickens. The mean flock size for the three zones was 16.2, with a range of 2 to 58. The overall mean clutch size, egg weight and hatchability were 11.8, 44.1 g and 83.6%, respectively. The overall mean chick survival rate to 10 weeks of age was 59.7%. The mean live weights for cocks and hens were 1948 g and 1348 g, respectively. The mean growth rates to the age of 10 weeks were 4.6 g/day and 5.4 g/day, while those from 10 to 14 weeks of age were 8.4 g/day and 10.2 g/day for female and male birds, respectively. The age at first lay ranged between 6 and 8 months, and the average hen had three laying cycles per year. Most of the chickens were left to scavenge during the day and were provided with simple housing at night (95.2% of the owners). Only small amounts of supplementary feeds were occasionally given and minimal health care was provided. It was concluded that the low productivity of chickens was partly due to the prevailing poor management practices, in particular the lack of proper health care, poor nutrition and housing.

  4. Overview: the state of head lice management and control.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ronald C

    2004-09-01

    Head lice infestations affect millions of people in the United States. Children become infested more often than adults and account for the largest percentage of infestations. Head lice have not been shown to transfer disease, and they are not associated with serious morbidity. The most common effect of lice infestation is pruritus of the scalp with occasional cutaneous infection caused by scratching. Nevertheless, many schools have "no-nit" policies, which require the dismissal of children from school if nits or lice are found. These policies are ineffective in preventing infestations and result in many missed days of school. Lice infestations are most effectively managed with pediculicides. Pyrethroids are the mainstay of over-the-counter products. Prescription pediculicides include OVIDE (malathion) Lotion, 0.5% and lindane (formerly marketed as Kwell). Resistance to pyrethroids due to misuse and overuse has been documented. Lindane resistance also has been reported, and serious safety issues about lindane have been raised by the Food and Drug Administration. Lindane labeling now includes warnings and several restrictions in its use. Malathion is not associated with major systemic safety issues or the development of resistance within the United States. A contributor to pediculicide resistance is misdiagnosis of lice infestations. Survey data reveal frequent misdiagnosis of infestations in children who do not have live lice. Physicians generally are more likely to misdiagnose infestations than nonhealthcare providers. Misdiagnosis contributes to resistance by causing overuse, and consequently overexposure, of pediculicides. These agents should be used only if live lice or viable nits are discovered. Head lice infestations generally do not contribute to health risks for individuals or the public. The most serious consequence is the social cost of missed school days and the associated cost of lost productivity and wages of parents who must care for children sent

  5. Socioeconomic impacts and management ciguatera in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J

    1992-01-01

    The inshore fisheries resource is important to the health and culture of many of the inhabitants of Pacific Island countries (PIC). Ciguateric fishes (mainly demersal reef fishes) cause a range of distressing and often debilitating gastrointestinal neurological and cardiovascular disturbances. Consequently, ciguatera limits the utilisation of this otherwise over-exploited resource. For many victims, the symptoms suffered during the chronic phase of ciguatera (lasting weeks, months and occasionally years) are exacerbated upon consumption of certain foods, particularly non-toxic fishes. After each outbreak, victims and members of their social-network experience a transient increase in perception of the risk of eating reef fish. The impact of ciguatera is greatest in atoll island countries where fish is the primary source of protein (it also has a major impact and to facilitate the management of ciguatera in PIC, regular information is required that quantifies: (i) the true incidence of ciguatera; (ii) the extent and way in which different communities avoid ciguatera; and (iii) the adverse impact ciguatera has on health, the workforce, trade and tourism. Over the last 15 years (based on SPEHIS data to 1990), some countries recorded a decrease in the ciguatera problem (New Caledonia, Marshall Is.), other countries an increase (Kirbati, Tuvalu, French Polynesia), while still other countries recorded an increase followed by a decrease in ciguatera (Tokelau, American Samoa, Western Samoa, Fiji and Vanuatu). There may also be seasonal trends in the incidence of ciguatera in some countries e.g. Fiji. Management options presently implementable in PIC include: (i) treatment with i.v. mannitol; (ii) provision of timely advise on the location and status of ciguatera "hot spots" in each country that would allow affected communities to react objectively to the risk posed by ciguatera; and (iii) modification of human behaviour and aspirations to reduce the impact of increasing

  6. Pharmacological management of anticholinergic delirium - theory, evidence and practice.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andrew H; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2016-03-01

    The spectrum of anticholinergic delirium is a common complication following drug overdose. Patients with severe toxicity can have significant distress and behavioural problems that often require pharmacological management. Cholinesterase inhibitors, such as physostigmine, are effective but widespread use has been limited by concerns about safety, optimal dosing and variable supply. Case series support efficacy in reversal of anticholinergic delirium. However doses vary widely and higher doses commonly lead to cholinergic toxicity. Seizures are reported in up to 2.5% of patients and occasional cardiotoxic effects are also recorded. This article reviews the serendipitous path whereby physostigmine evolved into the preferred anticholinesterase antidote largely without any research to indicate the optimal dosing strategy. Adverse events observed in case series should be considered in the context of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of physostigmine which suggest a much longer latency before the maximal increase in brain acetylcholine than had been previously assumed. This would favour protocols that use lower doses and longer re-dosing intervals. We propose based on the evidence reviewed that the use of cholinesterase inhibitors should be considered in anticholinergic delirium that has not responded to non-pharmacological delirium management. The optimal risk/benefit would be with a titrated dose of 0.5 to 1 mg physostigmine (0.01-0.02 mg kg(-1) in children) with a minimum delay of 10-15 min before re-dosing. Slower onset and longer acting agents such as rivastigmine would also be logical but more research is needed to guide the appropriate dose in this setting.

  7. An update of clinical management of acute intermittent porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Pischik, Elena; Kauppinen, Raili

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is due to a deficiency of the third enzyme, the hydroxymethylbilane synthase, in heme biosynthesis. It manifests with occasional neuropsychiatric crises associated with overproduction of porphyrin precursors, aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The clinical criteria of an acute attack include the paroxysmal nature and various combinations of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, autonomic dysfunction, hyponatremia, muscle weakness, or mental symptoms, in the absence of other obvious causes. Intensive abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, acute peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy usually with seizures or psychosis are the key symptoms indicating possible acute porphyria. More than fivefold elevation of urinary porphobilinogen excretion together with typical symptoms of an acute attack is sufficient to start a treatment. Currently, the prognosis of the patients with AIP is good, but physicians should be aware of a potentially fatal outcome of the disease. Mutation screening and identification of type of acute porphyria can be done at the quiescent phase of the disease. The management of patients with AIP include following strategies: A, during an acute attack: 1) treatment with heme preparations, if an acute attack is severe or moderate; 2) symptomatic treatment of autonomic dysfunctions, polyneuropathy and encephalopathy; 3) exclusion of precipitating factors; and 4) adequate nutrition and fluid therapy. B, during remission: 1) exclusion of precipitating factors (education of patients and family doctors), 2) information about on-line drug lists, and 3) mutation screening for family members and education about precipitating factors in mutation-positive family members. C, management of patients with recurrent attacks: 1) evaluation of the lifestyle, 2) evaluation of hormonal therapy in women, 3) prophylactic heme therapy, and 4) liver transplantation in patients with severe recurrent attacks. D, follow-up of the AIP

  8. Management of Landau-Kleffner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Mohamad A; Shamseddine, Alhan N

    2005-01-01

    Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is an acquired epileptic aphasia disorder in which children, usually 3-8 years of age who have developed age-appropriate speech, experience language regression with verbal auditory agnosia, abnormal epileptiform activity, behavioral disturbances, and sometimes overt seizures. There are no controlled clinical trials investigating the therapeutic options for LKS. Only open-label data are available. Early diagnosis and initiation of prompt medical treatment appear to be important to achieving better long-term prognosis.Several antiepileptic drugs have been reported to be beneficial in treating this syndrome. These include valproic acid (valproate sodium), diazepam, ethosuximide, clobazam, and clonazepam. Reports on the efficacy of lamotrigine, sultiame, felbamate, nicardipine, vigabatrin, levetiracetam, vagal nerve stimulation, and a ketogenic diet are few and more experience is needed. Carbamazepine and possibly phenobarbital and phenytoin have been reported to occasionally exacerbate the syndrome. As initial therapy, valproic acid or diazepam is often empirically chosen. Subsequently, other antiepileptic drugs, corticosteroids, or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy are often used. Corticosteroid therapy should probably not be delayed more than 1-2 months after the initial diagnosis. Various corticosteroid regimens including oral prednisone and, recently, high doses of intravenous pulse corticosteroids, as well as corticotropin (adrenocorticotropic hormone) have been reported to be effective in LKS. Oral corticosteroids are used more often and usually need to be maintained for a long period of time to prevent relapses. The use of IVIG has been associated with an initial dramatic response in only a few patients. In our experience, a long-term worthwhile improvement has been noted in only 2 of 11 patients. These two patients had an immediate response to IVIG initially and after relapses before eventually achieving a long

  9. Managed care aspects of managing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gary M

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system usually diagnosed in the second or third decade of life; MS is more common among women than men by a ratio of 3 to 1. With its relatively early age of onset and symptoms that impair patients' quality of life, MS requires lifelong, dynamic treatment, and places a substantial economic burden on individuals, healthcare systems, and society. The costs associated with providing benefits for MS therapy are growing rapidly and the increasing complexity of the MS market is impacting disease management for payers. Employers are also increasingly aware of the costs associated with MS and are asking health plans to advise on the most appropriate and cost-effective ways to manage both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies for MS. Health plans, by necessity, must therefore balance appropriate access to treatments for MS with the need to manage rising treatment costs. To meet this goal, payers require population-based solutions, guidelines, and treatment algorithms for the management of MS that can be used in clinical and formulary management decision making in the context of an evolving therapeutic landscape. Further, comparative studies are necessary for payers to determine which agents may work best on a population basis. Due to the current lack of appropriate clinical guidance and insufficient head-to-head data on disease-modifying drugs, strategies for health plans and clinical management have been designed using the best available evidence. Undoubtedly, management of this class will continue to evolve with the launch of newer agents. PMID:24494620

  10. Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium, held at the NASA Lewis Research Center, September 9 to 10, 1986, focused on future research in the microgravity fluid management field. The symposium allowed researchers and managers to review space applications that require fluid management technology, to present the current status of technology development, and to identify the technology developments required for future missions. The 19 papers covered three major categories: (1) fluid storage, acquisition, and transfer; (2) fluid management applications, i.e., space power and thermal management systems, and environmental control and life support systems; (3) project activities and insights including two descriptions of previous flight experiments and a summary of typical activities required during development of a shuttle flight experiment.

  11. [Global risk management].

    PubMed

    Sghaier, W; Hergon, E; Desroches, A

    2015-08-01

    Risk management is a fundamental component of any successful company, whether it is in economic, societal or environmental aspect. Risk management is an especially important activity for companies that optimal security challenge of products and services is great. This is the case especially for the health sector institutions. Risk management is therefore a decision support tool and a means to ensure the sustainability of an organization. In this context, what methods and approaches implemented to manage the risks? Through this state of the art, we are interested in the concept of risk and risk management processes. Then we focus on the different methods of risk management and the criteria for choosing among these methods. Finally we highlight the need to supplement these methods by a systemic and global approach including through risk assessment by the audits.

  12. 76 FR 21877 - Environmental Management Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... expertise in project management, acquisition management, human capital management, environmental management... Environmental Management on a broad range of programmatic issues, including project management and oversight... Environmental Management Advisory Board AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of call for nominations......

  13. Protected area management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fagre, Daniel B.; Prato, Tony; Wang, Yeqiao

    2014-01-01

    Designated protected areas are diverse in scope and purpose and have expanded from Yellowstone National Park in the United States, the world’s first national park, to 157,897 parks and protected areas distributed globally. Most are publicly owned and serve multiple needs that reflect regional or national cultures. With ever-increasing threats to the integrity of protected areas, managers are turning to flexible management practices such as scenario planning and adaptive management.

  14. National fire management policy

    SciTech Connect

    Wakimoto, R.H. )

    1990-10-01

    A Fire Management Policy Review Team was established in 1988, with representatives from the US Forest Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs and the US Fish and Wildlife Service, with the purpose of reviewing current policies governing national park and wilderness fire management. The author outlines the goals of the review team and discusses the seven final issues that summarized the team's findings.

  15. Practical management of hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, M.S.; Hay, I.D. )

    1990-03-01

    There are several causes of hyperthyroidism, and correct diagnosis is essential for management. Graves' disease is most commonly managed with radioactive iodine therapy ({sup 131}I), antithyroid drugs or surgery. Toxic adenomas (single or multiple) may be treated with {sup 131}I or surgery. Most types of thyroiditis are managed expectantly. Pregnant women, children and the elderly deserve special consideration. Follow-up is vital to identify the later development of hypothyroidism.18 references.

  16. Managing bundled payments.

    PubMed

    Draper, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Results of Medicare's ACE demonstration project and Geisinger Health System's ProvenCare initiative provide insight into the challenges hospitals will face as bundled payment proliferates. An early analysis of these results suggests that hospitals would benefit from bringing full automation using clinical IT tools to bear in their efforts to meet these challenges. Other important factors contributing to success include board and physician leadership, organizational structure, pricing methodology for bidding, evidence-based medical practice guidelines, supply cost management, process efficiency management, proactive and aggressive case management, business development and marketing strategy, and the financial management system. PMID:21548437

  17. Risk Management in EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jonathan; Lutomski, M.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of risk management in Extravehicular Activities (EVA). The contents include: 1) EVA Office at NASA - JSC; 2) EVA Project Risk Management: Why and When; 3) EVA Office Risk Management: How; 4) Criteria for Closing a Risk; 5) Criteria for Accepting a Risk; 6) ISS IRMA Reference Card Data Entry Requirement s; 7) XA/ EVA Office Risk Activity Summary; 8) EVA Significant Change Summary; 9) Integrated Risk Management Application (XA) Matrix, March 31, 2004; 10) ISS Watch Item: 50XX Summary Report; and 11) EVA Project RM Usefulness

  18. Managing your blood sugar

    MedlinePlus

    Hyperglycemia - control; Hypoglycemia - control; Diabetes - blood sugar control; Blood glucose - managing ... Know how to: Recognize and treat low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Recognize and treat high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) ...

  19. Case Management Directors

    PubMed Central

    Bankston White, Cheri; Birmingham, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives: Case management directors are in a dynamic position to affect the transition of care of patients across the continuum, work with all levels of providers, and support the financial well-being of a hospital. Most importantly, they can drive good patient outcomes. Although the position is critical on many different levels, there is little to help guide a new director in attending to all the “moving parts” of such a complex role. This is Part 2 of a two-part article written for case management directors, particularly new ones. Part 1 covered the first 4 of 7 tracks: (1) Staffing and Human Resources, (2) Compliance and Accreditation, (3) Discharge Planning and (4) Utilization Review and Revenue Cycle. Part 2 addresses (5) Internal Departmental Relationships (Organizational), (6) External Relationships (Community Agency), and (7) Quality and Program Outcomes. This article attempts to answer the following questions: Are case management directors prepared for an expanded role that affects departments and organizations outside of their own?How does a case management director manage the transition of care of patients while managing required relationships outside the department?How does the director manage program outcomes in such a complex department? Primary Practice Setting: The information is most meaningful to those case management directors who work in either stand-alone hospitals or integrated health systems and have frontline case managers (CMs) reporting to them. Findings/Conclusions: Part 1 found that case management directors would benefit from further research and documentation of “best practices” related to their role, particularly in the areas of leadership and management. The same conclusion applies to Part 2, which addresses the director's responsibilities outside her immediate department. Leadership and management skills apply as well to building strong, productive relationships across a broad spectrum of external organizations

  20. Wildlife Management Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, M.B.

    1992-08-01

    This report details activities in administering Savannah River Site public lands for wildlife management. Accomplishments in administering hunts, gathering biological data, and in coordinating land use are described.

  1. Group key management

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  2. Managing hybrid marketing systems.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, R T; Moran, U

    1990-01-01

    As competition increases and costs become critical, companies that once went to market only one way are adding new channels and using new methods - creating hybrid marketing systems. These hybrid marketing systems hold the promise of greater coverage and reduced costs. But they are also hard to manage; they inevitably raise questions of conflict and control: conflict because marketing units compete for customers; control because new indirect channels are less subject to management authority. Hard as they are to manage, however, hybrid marketing systems promise to become the dominant design, replacing the "purebred" channel strategy in all kinds of businesses. The trick to managing the hybrid is to analyze tasks and channels within and across a marketing system. A map - the hybrid grid - can help managers make sense of their hybrid system. What the chart reveals is that channels are not the basic building blocks of a marketing system; marketing tasks are. The hybrid grid forces managers to consider various combinations of channels and tasks that will optimize both cost and coverage. Managing conflict is also an important element of a successful hybrid system. Managers should first acknowledge the inevitability of conflict. Then they should move to bound it by creating guidelines that spell out which customers to serve through which methods. Finally, a marketing and sales productivity (MSP) system, consisting of a central marketing database, can act as the central nervous system of a hybrid marketing system, helping managers create customized channels and service for specific customer segments.

  3. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  4. Nekton community response to a large-scale Mississippi River discharge: Examining spatial and temporal response to river management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piazza, Bryan P.; La Peyre, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater flow is generally held to be one of the most influential factors affecting community structure and production in estuaries. In coastal Louisiana, the Caernarvon Freshwater Diversion (CFD) is managed to control freshwater discharge from the Mississippi River into Breton Sound basin. Operational since 1991, CFD has undergone several changes in management strategy including pulsed spring flooding, which was introduced in 2001. We used a 20-yr time series of fisheries-independent data to investigate how variation in freshwater inflow (i.e., pre- and post-CFD, and pre and post spring pulsing management) influences the downstream nekton community (abundance, diversity, and assemblage). Analyses of long-term data demonstrated that while there were effects from the CFD, they largely involved subtle changes in community structure. Spatially, effects were largely limited to the sites immediately downstream of the diversion and extended only occasionally to more down-estuary sites. Temporally, effects were 1) immediate (detected during spring diversion events) or 2) delayed (detected several months post-diversion). Analysis of river management found that pulsed spring-time inflow resulted in more significant changes in nekton assemblages, likely due to higher discharge rates that 1) increased marsh flooding, thus increasing marsh habitat accessibility for small resident marsh species, and 2) reduced salinity, possibly causing displacement of marine pelagic species down estuary. ?? 2010.

  5. Tubal ectopic pregnancy: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Nama, Vivek; Manyonda, Isaac

    2009-04-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is the gynaecological emergency par excellence and remains the leading cause of pregnancy-related first trimester deaths in the UK. Its prevalence continues to rise because of increases in the incidence of the risk factors predisposing to ectopic pregnancy. Classically, the diagnosis is based on a history of pelvic pain associated with amenorrhoea, a positive pregnancy test with or without slight vaginal bleeding. While the immediate differential diagnosis includes threatened or inevitable miscarriage, the likelihood of ectopic pregnancy is increased if transvaginal sonography (TVS) reveals an empty uterine cavity, and is confirmed if an adnexal mass with or without an embryo is seen. However, the diagnosis is often not that simple, especially when the patient presents early, has minimal pain, is haemodynamically stable, and TVS shows an empty uterus but no obvious adnexal mass. This could then be an early intrauterine pregnancy, or could indeed be an ectopic-a diagnosis of pregnancy of unknown location is made while additional investigations are made. The latter usually include serial measurements of serum beta human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta-hCG) and repeat TVS. Changes in beta-hCG levels in normal, failing and ectopic pregnancy are now reasonably well characterised, and at early stages of presentation where the risk of rupture of an ectopic are minimal, the patient can often be managed as an outpatient while the diagnosis is pursued. In the patient who presents with pain and haemodynamic instability, the diagnosis is often obvious, and the management is immediate laparotomy. However, in modern gynaecological practice in the developed world the vast majority of ectopic pregnancies present early, and the general consensus is that laparoscopic management offers both economic and aesthetic advantages, and should be used whenever possible. Salpingectomy (excision of the fallopian tube containing the ectopic) is performed if the contra

  6. Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of invasive versus conservative management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Simon G A; Ball, Emma L; Perrin, Kyle; Read, Catherine A; Asha, Stephen E; Beasley, Richard; Egerton-Warburton, Diana; Jones, Peter G; Keijzers, Gerben; Kinnear, Frances B; Kwan, Ben C H; Lee, Y C Gary; Smith, Julian A; Summers, Quentin A; Simpson, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Current management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is variable, with little evidence from randomised controlled trials to guide treatment. Guidelines emphasise intervention in many patients, which involves chest drain insertion, hospital admission and occasionally surgery. However, there is evidence that conservative management may be effective and safe, and it may also reduce the risk of recurrence. Significant questions remain regarding the optimal initial approach to the management of PSP. Methods and analysis This multicentre, prospective, randomised, open label, parallel group, non-inferiority study will randomise 342 participants with a first large PSP to conservative or interventional management. To maintain allocation concealment, randomisation will be performed in real time by computer and stratified by study site. Conservative management will involve a period of observation prior to discharge, with intervention for worsening symptoms or physiological instability. Interventional treatment will involve insertion of a small bore drain. If drainage continues after 1 hour, the patient will be admitted. If drainage stops, the drain will be clamped for 4 hours. The patient will be discharged if the lung remains inflated. Otherwise, the patient will be admitted. The primary end point is the proportion of participants with complete lung re-expansion by 8 weeks. Secondary end points are as follows: days in hospital, persistent air leak, predefined complications and adverse events, time to resolution of symptoms, and pneumothorax recurrence during a follow-up period of at least 1 year. The study has 95% power to detect an absolute non-inferiority margin of 9%, assuming 99% successful expansion at 8 weeks in the invasive treatment arm. The primary analysis will be by intention to treat. Ethics and dissemination Local ethics approval has been obtained for all sites. Study findings will be disseminated by publication in a high

  7. Risk Management Implementation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Shayla L.

    2004-01-01

    Continuous Risk Management (CM) is a software engineering practice with processes, methods, and tools for managing risk in a project. It provides a controlled environment for practical decision making, in order to assess continually what could go wrong, determine which risk are important to deal with, implement strategies to deal with those risk and assure the measure effectiveness of the implemented strategies. Continuous Risk Management provides many training workshops and courses to teach the staff how to implement risk management to their various experiments and projects. The steps of the CRM process are identification, analysis, planning, tracking, and control. These steps and the various methods and tools that go along with them, identification, and dealing with risk is clear-cut. The office that I worked in was the Risk Management Office (RMO). The RMO at NASA works hard to uphold NASA s mission of exploration and advancement of scientific knowledge and technology by defining and reducing program risk. The RMO is one of the divisions that fall under the Safety and Assurance Directorate (SAAD). I worked under Cynthia Calhoun, Flight Software Systems Engineer. My task was to develop a help screen for the Continuous Risk Management Implementation Tool (RMIT). The Risk Management Implementation Tool will be used by many NASA managers to identify, analyze, track, control, and communicate risks in their programs and projects. The RMIT will provide a means for NASA to continuously assess risks. The goals and purposes for this tool is to provide a simple means to manage risks, be used by program and project managers throughout NASA for managing risk, and to take an aggressive approach to advertise and advocate the use of RMIT at each NASA center.

  8. Management that Constrains and Management that Liberates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, John

    Community college administrators have the unenviable role of attempting to stimulate change in an organizational structure that focuses on control and the acquisition of power to maintain control. The theme of control runs through management theory, suggesting that the ability to exercise control over situations and events enables one to fulfill…

  9. Managing Corporate Risk through Better Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neef, Dale

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To explain how progressive companies are using a combination of knowledge and risk management (KRM) systems and techniques in order to help them to prevent, or respond most effectively to, ethical or reputation-damaging incidents. Design/methodology/approach: The paper explains KRM, develops a corporate integrity framework, and then…

  10. Energy Management Guide for Building Management. Electricity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consolidated Edison Co., Brooklyn, NY.

    This guide is intended for use by commercial building management and operating staffs to encourage energy conservation. The measures suggested are meant to allow building operation at optimum efficiency while minimizing energy waste. Though mainly applicable to multistory buildings, the suggested energy conservation measures are also adaptable to…

  11. A Program Management Framework for Facilities Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The challenge faced by senior facility leaders is not how to execute a single project, but rather, how to successfully execute a large program consisting of hundreds of projects. Senior facilities officers at universities, school districts, hospitals, airports, and other organizations with extensive facility inventories, typically manage project…

  12. "DOS for Managers." Management Training Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion County Schools, Fairmont, WV.

    A plan is provided for a lesson on disk operating systems (DOS) for managers. Twenty-five lesson objectives are listed, followed by suggestions for learning activities and special resources. In the presentation section, key points and content are provided for 25 instructional topics that correspond to the 25 lesson objectives. The topics are as…

  13. Managing Your Credit. Money Management. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Nancy H., Ed.

    This booklet is designed to help consumers understand and manage credit. It is suitable for personal use by adults or for classroom use in junior high through adult consumer education classes. The booklet is organized in two parts. The first part explains consumer credit: what it is, pros and cons, cost of credit, establishing credit, types of…

  14. Managing Projects for Change: Contextualised Project Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynan, Belinda; Adlington, Rachael; Stewart, Cherry; Vale, Deborah; Sims, Rod; Shanahan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper will detail three projects which focussed on enhancing online learning at a large Australian distance education University within a School of Business, School of Health and School of Education. Each project had special funding and took quite distinctive project management approaches, which reflect the desire to embed innovation and…

  15. Doctoral Women: Managing Emotions, Managing Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitchison, Claire; Mowbray, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of women doctoral students and the role of emotion during doctoral candidature. The paper draws on the concept of emotional labour to examine the two sites of emotional investment students experienced and managed during their studies: writing and family relationships. Emotion is perceived by many dominant…

  16. The management of musculoskeletal problems in hemophilia. Part I. Principles of medical management of hemophilia.

    PubMed

    McMillan, C W; Greene, W B; Blatt, P M; White, G C; Roberts, H R

    1983-01-01

    Musculoskeletal bleeding in general and arthropathy in particular are the central problems among many in the two major forms of hemophilia: classic hemophilia, caused by factor VIII deficiency, and Christmas disease, caused by factor IX deficiency. Currently available replacement therapy, if properly used in a multidisciplinary setting, should provide significant benefit to hemophilic patients despite its cost and occasional complications.

  17. Korea as a World Order Issue. Occasional Paper Number Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakamoto, Yoshikazu

    This paper discusses the Korean problem, not as an aspect of the East-West conflict, but as a world order problem. The paper is one of a series commissioned by the World Order Models Project in its effort to stimulate research, education, dialogue, and political action which will contribute to a movement for a just world order. The first part of…

  18. Romantic Knowledge. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.5.15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelfrey, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    While British Romantic literature provides ample evidence of the pleasures of knowledge, it also reveals strong counter-evidence of its power to inflict a sense of intellectual impairment and diminution. This Romantic ambivalence sprang from a complex of ideas and anxieties about the potentially corrosive effects of certain kinds of education and…

  19. A Nembe-English Dictionary. Occasional Publication No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaliai, M.H.I.

    The author, of Reclamation House in Okpoma Brass, Nigeria, has attempted to "arrange Nembe words in an alphabetical order to form the basis of a dictionary." The introductory section of this two-volume dictionary presents a short description of the phonological and morphological features of Nembe, as well as a guide to the pronunciation of the…

  20. New Horizons 20 Years On. Occasional Papers Series: No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Margaret

    New Horizons is a course offered by the University of Edinburgh's Centre for Continuing Education that is aimed at first-time returners to education. In the 20 years since New Horizons was developed for women returners to education and/or employment, it has retained its original developmental outcomes but broadened its target group in response to…

  1. A Notional Approach to Writing. CATESOL Occasional Papers, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Sandra Lee

    Sample notional writing materials for use with advanced level ESL students are presented. The basic assumption is that effective writing demands a feel for one's audience and a sense of purpose, integrating function (what is being said), situation (to whom it is being said), and grammar (how it is being said). The functions selected are those that…

  2. Perestroyka in the Soviet Union. Occasional Paper No. 128.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makhmoutov, Mirza Ismail

    This document presents the point of view that although socialism has produced benefits for the USSR, Soviet society has undertaken its own radical reconstruction. History shows that the natural basis of changes in every society tends to be objective technological revolutions. The first technological revolution was agrarian. The second was…

  3. Help Wanted: Job & Career Information Resources. RUSA Occasional Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gary W., Ed.

    This book highlights techniques that can be implemented to build library collections on jobs and careers. The authors explore demographic and economic changes that influence the job market and the future of the workforce. They also examine how resources have shifted from books to collections incorporating Web pages, CD-ROMs, and audiovisual…

  4. Asian-Pacific Papers. Occasional Papers Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Brian, Ed.

    Sixteen papers are presented. Topics covered include language teaching, discourse analysis, code switching, phonetics, language and cultural identity, and descriptive and comparative studies. All presenters were from the Asia-Pacific area of the world. Papers include: "The Baba Malay Lexicon: Hokkien Loanwords in Baba Malay" (Anne Pakir);…

  5. The Intercultural Traveler: A Teacher's Guide. Occasional Paper No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinger, Marion C., Ed.

    This handbook is designed to assist teachers in obtaining a degree of awareness and sensitivity to another culture. It was specifically developed for the teacher traveling in a foreign country. The introduction examines the role of the teacher in traveling, identifies some of the reasons for teacher travel abroad, and looks at the impact of the…

  6. The Lay of the Law (An Occasional Note)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    The Americans With Disabilities Act (the "ADA"), enacted by Congress in 1990, was greeted with great celebration by persons with disabilities, their families, and advocates. The idea was broadminded and straightforward: Congress intended that the ADA protect those with disabilities (including those who were simply perceived as having a disability)…

  7. Determining Goals for Vocational Education. Occasional Paper No. 96.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    Education is constantly criticized for its "failures"--its "failure" to produce literate graduates, its "failure" to prepare students for the jobs of future technology, and its "failure" to reduce unemployment and establish equity for all students. However, these "failures" are not solely those of the schools, but of the larger society--a problem…

  8. Ecology: A Teaching Module. Occasional Paper No. 94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehm, Shirley; And Others

    Designed to address conceptual problems associated with ecology, this module can be used with high school students or college nonscience majors including those in elementary education. The materials offer guidance to teachers in diagnosing student deficiencies, in creating dissatisfaction with misconceptions, and in providing opportunities for…

  9. Alternative Routes to Teacher Certification. Occasional Paper Series 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silin, Jonathan G., Ed.; Snyder, Jon; Barry, Miranda; Samuels, Sarah; Sacks, Ariel; Ellenzweig, Allen

    2008-01-01

    Alternative routes to teacher preparation are clearly here to stay. A growing research literature on non-traditional pathways suggests the complexity of the task ahead. This report offers new teachers the opportunity to tell their own stories in their own words. In "Alternative Certification and Alternative Pathways: A Personal Take on a Core…

  10. Pathways: Developing the Skills of Australia's Workforce. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Hugh; Stanwick, John; Karmel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This paper was originally developed to help the Training and Skills Commission in South Australia consider the pathways between elements of the vocational education and training (VET) system, how they are working and what improvements can be made. It has been revised to make it national in scope. The authors reveal that quite substantial numbers…

  11. Disadvantaged Learners and VET to Higher Education Transitions. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Tabatha

    2014-01-01

    The vocational education and training (VET) system can provide an entry point to the education sector for people who have experienced disadvantage in their lives. Participation in VET can provide personal benefits as well as lead to further study and/or employment. How disadvantaged learners participate in vocational education and training is an…

  12. Options for Improving the Military Child Care System. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellman, Gail; Gates, Susan M.; Cho, Michelle; Shaw, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    The evidence presented in this paper questions whether the current U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) system of in-kind subsidies for child care is meeting DoD recruitment, readiness, and retention goals or service member needs in an optimal way. DoD appears to be reaping limited benefits from the substantial subsidies provided to families that use…

  13. Apprenticeships and Traineeships in the Downturn. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Tom; Misko, Josie

    2009-01-01

    Apprenticeships have a very long history in Australia, building on the traditions of the medieval guilds. The essence of the apprenticeship is the contract of training--a legal contract between an individual, an employer and a training provider. The defining characteristic is the combination of employment and training. The purpose of this paper is…

  14. Aligning Educational Outcomes and Practices. Occasional Paper #26

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchings, Pat

    2016-01-01

    The notion of alignment has become increasingly prominent in efforts to improve student learning today. The term, as used in this paper, refers to the linking of intended student learning outcomes with the processes and practices needed to foster those outcomes. Alignment is not a new idea, but it has become more salient as increasing numbers of…

  15. The Internet and the French Language. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tattersall, Alex

    This paper examines the influence of the Internet on the French language from a predominantly sociolinguistic perspective, noting the main areas of debate between francophone businesses, governments, and "Institutions de la Francophonie," while considering theories of language in contact and language policy. It analyzes a number of…

  16. Light: A Teaching Module. Occasional Paper No. 92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Janet; And Others

    Designed to address the major conceptual problems associated with light and vision, appearances of surfaces, and color, this module can be used with high school students or college nonscience majors including those in elementary education. It is one in a series developed by the project "Overcoming Critical Barriers to Learning in Nonmajors'…

  17. Work, Employment, and the New Economics. Occasional Paper No. 70.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marvin

    We are witnessing an historic shift in our approach to employment policy that will have profound implications for vocational educators. This shift is most recognizable in the waning influence of demand-side economics and the ascendence of supply-side economics. Recent indications are that public policy is no longer firmly committed to maintaining…

  18. Effective Use of Classroom Time. AEL Occasional Paper 013.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, Jane

    An outline is presented of organizational procedures that teachers can use to maximize the use of classroom time. Specific guidelines are given on how to give homework assignments, how to communicate expectations regarding student work, how to distribute instructional materials, and how to allocate time among various classroom activities. Brief…

  19. UNESCO and Environmental Education. UNESCO Occasional Paper 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Commission for UNESCO, Ottawa, (Ontario).

    This overview of the International Environmental Education Programme (IEEP) begins with an introduction which outlines IEEP objectives and goes on to provide, in section 2, a working definition of environmental education (EE). This is followed by three reports, on the Belgrade Workshop on Environmental Education, regional conferences, and the…

  20. Respiration and Photosynthesis: A Teaching Module. Occasional Paper No. 90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Beth A.; And Others

    Designed to address the major conceptual problems associated with respiration and photosynthesis, this module can be used with high school students or college nonscience majors including those in elementary education. It is one in a series developed by the project Overcoming Critical Barriers to Learning in Nonmajors' Science Courses. The…