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Sample records for 747-400 747 400d

  1. 75 FR 27966 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400 and 747-400D Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... 12866, 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... certain Model 747-400 and 747-400D series airplanes. This proposed AD would ] require installing aluminum... November 4, 2009. The service bulletin describes procedures for installing aluminum gutter...

  2. 75 FR 47245 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400, 747-400D, and 747-400F Series...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    .... Related AD 2009-13- 03, Amendment 39-15942 (74 FR 31169, June 30, 2009), applies to Boeing Model 747-400... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or... performance and consequent collision with terrain and obstacles or forced landing of the airplane. DATES:...

  3. 75 FR 906 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400, -400D, and -400F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... as of January 22, 2010. On June 12, 2008 (73 FR 25990, May 8, 2008), the Director of the Federal..., Amendment 39-15512 (73 FR 25990, May 8, 2008). That AD applied to certain Model 747-400, - 400D, and -400F... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3....

  4. 75 FR 74663 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400 and -400D Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... AD 92-27-13, amendment 39-8448 (58 FR 5920, January 25, 1993), on December 17, 1992, for Model 747... Order 12866, 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR...-driven hydraulic pump wire bundle, which could lead to arcing from the exposed wire to the fuel feed...

  5. Flight test of ARINC 741 configuration low gain SATCOM system on Boeing 747-400 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Timothy A.; Stapleton, Brian P.

    1990-01-01

    The Boeing company conducted a flight test of a SATCOM system similar to the ARINC 741 configuration on a production model 747-400. A flight plan was specifically designed to test the system over a wide variety of satellite elevations and aircraft attitudes as well as over land and sea. Interface bit errors, signal quality and aircraft position and navigational inputs were all recorded as a function of time. Special aircraft maneuvers were performed to demonstrate the potential for shadowing by aircraft structures. Both a compass rose test and the flight test indicated that shadowing from the tail is insignificant for the 747-400. However, satellite elevation angles below the aircraft horizon during banking maneuvers were shown to have a significant deleterious effect on SATCOM communications.

  6. 75 FR 38397 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400, 747-400D, and 747-400F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ..., 2009 (74 FR 26317). That NPRM proposed to require installing new pump control and time delay relays... consistent with the AFM certificate limitations contained in AD 2007- 13-04, Amendment 39-15108 (72 FR 33859... Executive Order 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44...

  7. 75 FR 6821 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400, 747-400D, and 747-400F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-11

    ...), would protect the fuel densitometer for the horizontal stabilizer tank (HST) and the center wing tank...) For all airplanes: Install the HSP in the center wing tank, in accordance with the Accomplishment... system (FQIS) of the center fuel tank and, for certain airplanes, the horizontal stabilizer fuel...

  8. 75 FR 60614 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400, 747-400D, and 747-400F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    .... (1) For all airplanes: Install the HSP in the center wing tank, in accordance with the Accomplishment... the fuel quantity indicating system (FQIS) of the center fuel tank and, for certain airplanes, the... source inside the center or horizontal stabilizer fuel tanks. An ignition source, in combination...

  9. 76 FR 27244 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400, 747-400D, and 747-400F Series...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... Register on August 5, 2010 (75 FR 47245). That NPRM proposed to require modifying certain thrust reverser... Executive Order 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR... performance and consequent collision with terrain and obstacles or forced landing of the airplane. DATES:...

  10. 75 FR 1533 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-200F, 747-200C, 747-400, 747-400D, and 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... certain fuselage internal structure (i.e., Sections 42 and 46 fuselage frames, upper deck floor beams... (i.e., Section 41 fuselage frames where they connect to upper deck floor beams, and Section 41... where fatigue cracks can occur. We are issuing this AD to prevent the loss of structural integrity...

  11. 75 FR 38404 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100B, 747-200B, 747-200F, 747-300, 747-400...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... 2010-01-10, Amendment 39-16168 (75 FR 3150, January 20, 2010), applicable to certain Model 747-100, 747... Executive Order 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR... upper link load path and consequent fracture of the diagonal brace, which could result in in-...

  12. Piloted Simulation Tests of Propulsion Control as Backup to Loss of Primary Flight Controls for a B747-400 Jet Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, John; Mah, Robert; Hardy, Gordon; Sullivan, Barry; Jones, Jerry; Williams, Diane; Soukup, Paul; Winters, Jose

    1997-01-01

    Partial failures of aircraft primary flight control systems and structural damages to aircraft during flight have led to catastrophic accidents with subsequent loss of lives (e.g. DC-10, B-747, C-5, B-52, and others). Following the DC-10 accident at Sioux City, Iowa in 1989, the National Transportation Safety Board recommended 'Encourage research and development of backup flight control systems for newly certified wide-body airplanes that utilize an alternate source of motive power separate from that source used for the conventional control system.' This report describes the concept of a propulsion controlled aircraft (PCA), discusses pilot controls, displays, and procedures; and presents the results of a PCA piloted simulation test and evaluation of the B747-400 airplane conducted at NASA Ames Research Center in December, 1996. The purpose of the test was to develop and evaluate propulsion control throughout the full flight envelope of the B747-400 including worst case scenarios of engine failures and out of trim moments. Pilot ratings of PCA performance ranged from adequate to satisfactory. PCA performed well in unusual attitude recoveries at 35,000 ft altitude, performed well in fully coupled ILS approaches, performed well in single engine failures, and performed well at aft cg. PCA performance was primarily limited by out-of-trim moments.

  13. 76 FR 41673 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400 and -400D Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... December 1, 2010 (75 FR 74663). That NPRM proposed to require a general visual inspection to determine the... stated in AD 92-27- 13, Amendment 39-8448 (58 FR 5920, January 25, 1993), and is not necessary in this... Executive Order 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44...

  14. Pilot noise exposure during a Boeing 747-400 round trip: Judgement of noise and analysis in respect to hearing impairment of pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooman, Hans Juergen

    1992-01-01

    Noise level measurements are made on Boeing 747 aircraft to determine the potential hazards to airline pilots. Measuring results have shown that most pilots work under conditions that where noise constitutes a health hazard. Long and short term effects of noise exposure in pilots is examined as well as the legal ramifications of this potential hazard.

  15. 75 FR 3147 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100B SUD, -200B, -300, -400, and -400D...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... 26, 2003, as of August 30, 2005 (70 FR 43020, July 26, 2005). ADDRESSES: For service information..., amendment 39-14197 (70 FR 43020, July 26, 2005). The existing AD applies to certain Model 747-100B SUD... 14, 2009 (74 FR 33928). That NPRM proposed to require repetitive inspections for cracking in...

  16. 75 FR 69612 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-200B, -300, -400, -400D, and -400F Series...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... General Electric CF6-80C2 Series Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... General Electric CF6-80C2 series engines, as identified in Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 747-54A2232... under the authority described in ``Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701:...

  17. 76 FR 62603 - Special Conditions: The Boeing Company, Model 747-8; Upper Deck Occupancy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... passenger airplane. The Model 747-8 is a derivative of the 747-400. The Model 747-8 is a four-engine jet... engines, and the capacity to carry 605 passengers. The Model 747-8 design offers seating capacity on...

  18. 76 FR 47427 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400 and -400F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... report of a loss of bus control unit number 1 and generator control units numbers 1 and 2 while the... systems. DATES: This AD is effective September 9, 2011. The Director of the Federal Register approved the...: Francis Smith, Aerospace Engineer, Cabin Safety & Environmental Systems Branch, ANM-150S, FAA,...

  19. 76 FR 7513 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400 and -400F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... drip shields. This proposed AD was prompted by a report of a loss of bus control unit number 1 and..., which could result in the loss of flight critical systems. DATES: We must receive comments on this... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Marcia Smith, Aerospace Engineer, Cabin Safety & Environmental Systems...

  20. 76 FR 36390 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747SP Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and (4) Will... Model 747SP Series Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... Model 747-400 series airplane, caused by a rudder PCM manifold cracking and separating in the area...

  1. 76 FR 38550 - Special Conditions: Boeing, Model 747-8 Series Airplanes; Door 1 Extendable Length Escape Slide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... a derivative of the 747-400. The Model 747-8 is a four-engine jet transport airplane that will have a maximum takeoff weight of 975,000 pounds, new General Electric GEnx -2B67 engines, and the...-8 airplanes was published in the Federal Register on May 10, 2011 (76 FR 26957). No comments...

  2. 78 FR 28767 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ...We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747- 200B, 747-200C, 747-200F, 747-300, 747-400, 747-400D, 747-400F, 747SR, and 747SP series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report of a disbonded doubler and a skin crack in section 41 of the fuselage, and multiple reports of cracked or missing fastener......

  3. 12 CFR 747.0 - Scope of part 747.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Scope of part 747. 747.0 Section 747.0 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS, ADJUDICATIVE HEARINGS, RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS § 747.0 Scope of...

  4. 12 CFR 747.28 - Interlocutory review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interlocutory review. 747.28 Section 747.28... of Practice and Procedure § 747.28 Interlocutory review. (a) General rule. The NCUA Board may review... only in accordance with the procedures set forth in this section and § 747.23. (b) Scope of review....

  5. 12 CFR 747.36 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Evidence. 747.36 Section 747.36 Banks and... Procedure § 747.36 Evidence. (a) Admissibility. (1) Except as is otherwise set forth in this section, relevant, material, and reliable evidence that is not unduly repetitive is admissible to the fullest...

  6. 12 CFR 747.36 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evidence. 747.36 Section 747.36 Banks and... Procedure § 747.36 Evidence. (a) Admissibility. (1) Except as is otherwise set forth in this section, relevant, material, and reliable evidence that is not unduly repetitive is admissible to the fullest...

  7. 12 CFR 747.36 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evidence. 747.36 Section 747.36 Banks and... Procedure § 747.36 Evidence. (a) Admissibility. (1) Except as is otherwise set forth in this section, relevant, material, and reliable evidence that is not unduly repetitive is admissible to the fullest...

  8. 12 CFR 747.36 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evidence. 747.36 Section 747.36 Banks and... Procedure § 747.36 Evidence. (a) Admissibility. (1) Except as is otherwise set forth in this section, relevant, material, and reliable evidence that is not unduly repetitive is admissible to the fullest...

  9. 12 CFR 747.603 - Prevailing party.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prevailing party. 747.603 Section 747.603 Banks... in NCUA Board Adjudications § 747.603 Prevailing party. An eligible applicant may be a “prevailing party” if the applicant wins an action after a full hearing or trial on the merits, if a settlement...

  10. 12 CFR 747.603 - Prevailing party.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Prevailing party. 747.603 Section 747.603 Banks... in NCUA Board Adjudications § 747.603 Prevailing party. An eligible applicant may be a “prevailing party” if the applicant wins an action after a full hearing or trial on the merits, if a settlement...

  11. 12 CFR 747.2001 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... purposes of 12 U.S.C. 1790d(k). Section 747.2002 of this subpart provides an independent appellate process... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Scope. 747.2001 Section 747.2001 Banks and..., to facilitate prompt corrective action under section 216 of the Federal Credit Union Act, 12...

  12. 12 CFR 747.2001 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... purposes of 12 U.S.C. 1790d(k). Section 747.2002 of this subpart provides an independent appellate process... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Scope. 747.2001 Section 747.2001 Banks and..., to facilitate prompt corrective action under section 216 of the Federal Credit Union Act, 12...

  13. 12 CFR 747.2001 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... purposes of 12 U.S.C. 1790d(k). Section 747.2002 of this subpart provides an independent appellate process... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Scope. 747.2001 Section 747.2001 Banks and..., to facilitate prompt corrective action under section 216 of the Federal Credit Union Act, 12...

  14. 12 CFR 747.2001 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... purposes of 12 U.S.C. 1790d(k). Section 747.2002 of this subpart provides an independent appellate process... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Scope. 747.2001 Section 747.2001 Banks and..., to facilitate prompt corrective action under section 216 of the Federal Credit Union Act, 12...

  15. 12 CFR 747.2001 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... purposes of 12 U.S.C. 1790d(k). Section 747.2002 of this subpart provides an independent appellate process... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope. 747.2001 Section 747.2001 Banks and..., to facilitate prompt corrective action under section 216 of the Federal Credit Union Act, 12...

  16. 12 CFR 747.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Motions. 747.23 Section 747.23 Banks and... Procedure § 747.23 Motions. (a) In writing. (1) Except as otherwise provided herein, an application or request for an order or ruling must be made by written motion. (2) All written motions must state...

  17. 12 CFR 747.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Motions. 747.23 Section 747.23 Banks and... Procedure § 747.23 Motions. (a) In writing. (1) Except as otherwise provided herein, an application or request for an order or ruling must be made by written motion. (2) All written motions must state...

  18. 12 CFR 747.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Motions. 747.23 Section 747.23 Banks and... Procedure § 747.23 Motions. (a) In writing. (1) Except as otherwise provided herein, an application or request for an order or ruling must be made by written motion. (2) All written motions must state...

  19. 12 CFR 747.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 747.23 Section 747.23 Banks and... Procedure § 747.23 Motions. (a) In writing. (1) Except as otherwise provided herein, an application or request for an order or ruling must be made by written motion. (2) All written motions must state...

  20. 12 CFR 747.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motions. 747.23 Section 747.23 Banks and... Procedure § 747.23 Motions. (a) In writing. (1) Except as otherwise provided herein, an application or request for an order or ruling must be made by written motion. (2) All written motions must state...

  1. 12 CFR 747.904 - Appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appeal. 747.904 Section 747.904 Banks and... Section 212 of the Act § 747.904 Appeal. (a) Time for filing. Within 15 days after issuance of a Notice of... credit union (henceforth petitioner) may appeal by filing with the NCUA Board a written request...

  2. 12 CFR 747.904 - Appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appeal. 747.904 Section 747.904 Banks and... Section 212 of the Act § 747.904 Appeal. (a) Time for filing. Within 15 days after issuance of a Notice of... credit union (henceforth petitioner) may appeal by filing with the NCUA Board a written request...

  3. 12 CFR 747.905 - Judicial review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Judicial review. 747.905 Section 747.905 Banks... Pursuant to Section 212 of the Act § 747.905 Judicial review. (a) Failure to file an appeal within the... binding upon, the petitioner. (b) For purposes of seeking judicial review of actions taken pursuant...

  4. 76 FR 19278 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ...-15-10, Amendment 39-15139 (72 FR 41438, July 30, 2007), for all Boeing Model 747 airplanes. A correction of that AD was published in the Federal Register on September 21, 2007 (72 FR 53923), which...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not...

  5. 76 FR 24349 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-200B, -300, -400, -400D, and -400F Series...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... General Electric CF6-80C2 Series Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... airplanes; certificated in any category; equipped with Pratt and Whitney 4000 or General Electric CF6-80C2..., 2010 (75 FR 69612). That NPRM proposed to require an inspection to determine the part number of the...

  6. 12 CFR 747.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... provided herein, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k); and (4) Any provision of law referenced in section 102(f... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Scope. 747.1 Section 747.1 Banks and Banking... following statutory provisions: (a) Cease-and-desist proceedings under section 206(e) of the Act (12...

  7. 12 CFR 747.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provided herein, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k); and (4) Any provision of law referenced in section 102(f... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope. 747.1 Section 747.1 Banks and Banking... following statutory provisions: (a) Cease-and-desist proceedings under section 206(e) of the Act (12...

  8. 12 CFR 747.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provided herein, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k); and (4) Any provision of law referenced in section 102(f... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Scope. 747.1 Section 747.1 Banks and Banking... following statutory provisions: (a) Cease-and-desist proceedings under section 206(e) of the Act (12...

  9. 12 CFR 747.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... provided herein, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k); and (4) Any provision of law referenced in section 102(f... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Scope. 747.1 Section 747.1 Banks and Banking... following statutory provisions: (a) Cease-and-desist proceedings under section 206(e) of the Act (12...

  10. 12 CFR 747.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provided herein, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k); and (4) Any provision of law referenced in section 102(f... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Scope. 747.1 Section 747.1 Banks and Banking... following statutory provisions: (a) Cease-and-desist proceedings under section 206(e) of the Act (12...

  11. 15 CFR 747.2 - Eligibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Eligibility requirements. 747.2 Section 747.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL...

  12. 15 CFR 747.3 - Eligible items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Eligible items. 747.3 Section 747.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ...

  13. 15 CFR 747.3 - Eligible items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible items. 747.3 Section 747.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ...

  14. 15 CFR 747.3 - Eligible items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible items. 747.3 Section 747.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ...

  15. 15 CFR 747.3 - Eligible items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Eligible items. 747.3 Section 747.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ...

  16. 15 CFR 747.3 - Eligible items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Eligible items. 747.3 Section 747.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ...

  17. 27 CFR 19.747 - Other materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Other materials. 19.747... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Distilled Spirits for Fuel Use Materials for Making Spirits Unfit for Beverage Use § 19.747 Other materials. If a proprietor wishes to use a material...

  18. 27 CFR 19.747 - Other materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Other materials. 19.747... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Distilled Spirits for Fuel Use Materials for Making Spirits Unfit for Beverage Use § 19.747 Other materials. If a proprietor wishes to use a material...

  19. 12 CFR 747.607 - Statement of net worth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Statement of net worth. 747.607 Section 747.607... Justice Act in NCUA Board Adjudications § 747.607 Statement of net worth. (a) Each applicant (other than a... net worth of the applicant and any affiliates, as defined in § 747.602(a), when the proceeding...

  20. 78 FR 31523 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Countermeasures (LAIRCM) Systems (1 B747-400 and 1 B747-800), 11 Small Laser Transmitter Assemblies, 3 System... Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM) Systems (1 B747- 400 and 1 B747-800), 11 Small Laser Transmitter... aimed bursts of laser energy. 2. LAIRCM system software, including Operational Flight Program and...

  1. 75 FR 35356 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-200B, and 747-200F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... 3, 1990, we issued AD 90-15-06, Amendment 39-6653 (55 FR 28600, July 12, 1990), for certain Boeing...-8937 (59 FR 30285, June 13, 1994), for certain Boeing Model 747-100, 747-200B, and 747-200F series... and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic...

  2. 33 CFR 117.747 - Raritan River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 117.747 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES... New Jersey Transit Rail Operations Railroad Bridge at mile 0.5 shall open on signal; except that, from 6 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays, the...

  3. 33 CFR 117.747 - Raritan River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 117.747 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES... New Jersey Transit Rail Operations Railroad Bridge at mile 0.5 shall open on signal; except that, from 6 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays, the...

  4. 33 CFR 117.747 - Raritan River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 117.747 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES... New Jersey Transit Rail Operations Railroad Bridge at mile 0.5 shall open on signal; except that, from 6 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays, the...

  5. 33 CFR 117.747 - Raritan River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 117.747 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES... New Jersey Transit Rail Operations Railroad Bridge at mile 0.5 shall open on signal; except that, from 6 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays, the...

  6. 33 CFR 117.747 - Raritan River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 117.747 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES... New Jersey Transit Rail Operations Railroad Bridge at mile 0.5 shall open on signal; except that, from 6 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays, the...

  7. 15 CFR 747.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION LICENSE § 747.1 Scope. A Special Iraq Reconstruction License (SIRL) authorizes exports and reexports to Iraq and transfers within Iraq of items in furtherance of civil reconstruction and other...

  8. 15 CFR 747.2 - Eligibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION LICENSE § 747.2 Eligibility requirements. (a) A SIRL authorizes exports and reexports to Iraq and transfers within Iraq of items in furtherance of civil reconstruction and other projects funded by: (1)...

  9. 15 CFR 747.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION LICENSE § 747.1 Scope. A Special Iraq Reconstruction License (SIRL) authorizes exports and reexports to Iraq and transfers within Iraq of items in furtherance of civil reconstruction and other...

  10. 15 CFR 747.2 - Eligibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION LICENSE § 747.2 Eligibility requirements. (a) A SIRL authorizes exports and reexports to Iraq and transfers within Iraq of items in furtherance of civil reconstruction and other projects funded by: (1)...

  11. 15 CFR 747.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION LICENSE § 747.1 Scope. A Special Iraq Reconstruction License (SIRL) authorizes exports and reexports to Iraq and transfers within Iraq of items in furtherance of civil reconstruction and other...

  12. 15 CFR 747.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION LICENSE § 747.1 Scope. A Special Iraq Reconstruction License (SIRL) authorizes exports and reexports to Iraq and transfers within Iraq of items in furtherance of civil reconstruction and other...

  13. 15 CFR 747.2 - Eligibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION LICENSE § 747.2 Eligibility requirements. (a) A SIRL authorizes exports and reexports to Iraq and transfers within Iraq of items in furtherance of civil reconstruction and other projects funded by: (1)...

  14. 15 CFR 747.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION LICENSE § 747.1 Scope. A Special Iraq Reconstruction License (SIRL) authorizes exports and reexports to Iraq and transfers within Iraq of items in furtherance of civil reconstruction and other...

  15. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park....

  16. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park....

  17. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park....

  18. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park....

  19. 12 CFR 747.10 - Filing of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Filing of papers. 747.10 Section 747.10 Banks... Practice and Procedure § 747.10 Filing of papers. (a) Filing. Any papers required to be filed, excluding...) Delivering the papers to a reliable commercial courier service, overnight delivery service, or to the...

  20. 12 CFR 747.11 - Service of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Service of papers. 747.11 Section 747.11 Banks... Practice and Procedure § 747.11 Service of papers. (a) By the parties. Except as otherwise provided, a party filing papers shall serve a copy upon the counsel of record for all other parties to...

  1. 12 CFR 747.8 - Conflicts of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conflicts of interest. 747.8 Section 747.8... of Practice and Procedure § 747.8 Conflicts of interest. (a) Conflict of interest in representation... any stage of a proceeding to cure a conflict of interest in representation, including the issuance...

  2. 12 CFR 747.8 - Conflicts of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conflicts of interest. 747.8 Section 747.8... of Practice and Procedure § 747.8 Conflicts of interest. (a) Conflict of interest in representation... any stage of a proceeding to cure a conflict of interest in representation, including the issuance...

  3. 12 CFR 747.11 - Service of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Service of papers. 747.11 Section 747.11 Banks... Practice and Procedure § 747.11 Service of papers. (a) By the parties. Except as otherwise provided, a party filing papers shall serve a copy upon the counsel of record for all other parties to...

  4. 12 CFR 747.10 - Filing of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing of papers. 747.10 Section 747.10 Banks... Practice and Procedure § 747.10 Filing of papers. (a) Filing. Any papers required to be filed, excluding...) Delivering the papers to a reliable commercial courier service, overnight delivery service, or to the...

  5. 12 CFR 747.37 - Post-hearing filings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Post-hearing filings. 747.37 Section 747.37... of Practice and Procedure § 747.37 Post-hearing filings. (a) Proposed findings and conclusions and... must be supported by citation to any relevant portions of the record. A post-hearing brief may be...

  6. 12 CFR 747.37 - Post-hearing filings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Post-hearing filings. 747.37 Section 747.37... of Practice and Procedure § 747.37 Post-hearing filings. (a) Proposed findings and conclusions and... must be supported by citation to any relevant portions of the record. A post-hearing brief may be...

  7. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park....

  8. 12 CFR 747.11 - Service of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Service of papers. 747.11 Section 747.11 Banks... Practice and Procedure § 747.11 Service of papers. (a) By the parties. Except as otherwise provided, a party filing papers shall serve a copy upon the counsel of record for all other parties to...

  9. 12 CFR 747.10 - Filing of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Filing of papers. 747.10 Section 747.10 Banks... Practice and Procedure § 747.10 Filing of papers. (a) Filing. Any papers required to be filed, excluding...) Delivering the papers to a reliable commercial courier service, overnight delivery service, or to the...

  10. 12 CFR 747.11 - Service of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Service of papers. 747.11 Section 747.11 Banks... Practice and Procedure § 747.11 Service of papers. (a) By the parties. Except as otherwise provided, a party filing papers shall serve a copy upon the counsel of record for all other parties to...

  11. 12 CFR 747.10 - Filing of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Filing of papers. 747.10 Section 747.10 Banks... Practice and Procedure § 747.10 Filing of papers. (a) Filing. Any papers required to be filed, excluding...) Delivering the papers to a reliable commercial courier service, overnight delivery service, or to the...

  12. 12 CFR 747.11 - Service of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Service of papers. 747.11 Section 747.11 Banks... Practice and Procedure § 747.11 Service of papers. (a) By the parties. Except as otherwise provided, a party filing papers shall serve a copy upon the counsel of record for all other parties to...

  13. 12 CFR 747.10 - Filing of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Filing of papers. 747.10 Section 747.10 Banks... Practice and Procedure § 747.10 Filing of papers. (a) Filing. Any papers required to be filed, excluding...) Delivering the papers to a reliable commercial courier service, overnight delivery service, or to the...

  14. Sample of cataclysmic variables detected in the 400d X-ray survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenin, R. A.; Revnivtsev, M. G.; Tkachenko, A. Yu.; Vorob'ev, V. S.; Semena, A. N.; Meshcheryakov, A. V.; Dodonov, S. N.; Eselevich, M. V.; Pavlinsky, M. N.

    2016-04-01

    A sample of cataclysmic variables (CVs) detected among the X-ray sources of the 400 square degree (400d) survey performed based on ROSAT pointings is presented. A technique for selecting CVs among the X-ray sources using additional optical and infrared data, based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey andWISE data, is described. We present the optical observations of the selected objects carried out mainly with the Russian-Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT-150) and the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (BTA). Some observations have also been performed with the 1.6-m AZT-33IK telescope of the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, the Siberian branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Eight CVs, four of which were detected in our work, have been selected by now. Based on this sample, we have obtained preliminary constraints on the X-ray luminosity function of CVs in the solar neighborhood in the range of low luminosities, L X ~ 1029-1030 erg s-1 (0.5-2 keV). The logarithmic slope of the CV luminosity function in this luminosity range is shown to become gentler than that at L X > 1031 erg s-1. It follows from our estimates of the CV luminosity function that several thousand CVs will be detected in the SRG all-sky survey at high Galactic latitudes, which will allow much more accurate measurements of their X-ray luminosity function to be obtained.

  15. 49 CFR 192.747 - Valve maintenance: Distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valve maintenance: Distribution systems. 192.747... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.747 Valve maintenance: Distribution systems. (a) Each valve, the use of which may be necessary for the safe operation...

  16. 49 CFR 192.747 - Valve maintenance: Distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve maintenance: Distribution systems. 192.747... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.747 Valve maintenance: Distribution systems. (a) Each valve, the use of which may be necessary for the safe operation...

  17. 12 CFR 747.805 - Self-incrimination; immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Self-incrimination; immunity. 747.805 Section... Applicable to Formal Investigative Proceedings § 747.805 Self-incrimination; immunity. (a) Self-incrimination...) Immunity. (1) No officer conducting any formal investigative proceeding (or any other...

  18. 12 CFR 747.805 - Self-incrimination; immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Self-incrimination; immunity. 747.805 Section... Applicable to Formal Investigative Proceedings § 747.805 Self-incrimination; immunity. (a) Self-incrimination...) Immunity. (1) No officer conducting any formal investigative proceeding (or any other...

  19. 12 CFR 747.805 - Self-incrimination; immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Self-incrimination; immunity. 747.805 Section... Applicable to Formal Investigative Proceedings § 747.805 Self-incrimination; immunity. (a) Self-incrimination...) Immunity. (1) No officer conducting any formal investigative proceeding (or any other...

  20. 12 CFR 747.805 - Self-incrimination; immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Self-incrimination; immunity. 747.805 Section... Applicable to Formal Investigative Proceedings § 747.805 Self-incrimination; immunity. (a) Self-incrimination...) Immunity. (1) No officer conducting any formal investigative proceeding (or any other...

  1. 12 CFR 747.805 - Self-incrimination; immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Self-incrimination; immunity. 747.805 Section... Applicable to Formal Investigative Proceedings § 747.805 Self-incrimination; immunity. (a) Self-incrimination...) Immunity. (1) No officer conducting any formal investigative proceeding (or any other...

  2. 28 CFR 74.7 - Notification of eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Notification of eligibility. 74.7 Section 74.7 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CIVIL LIBERTIES ACT REDRESS PROVISION... forth in appendix A; (7) Current telephone number; (8) Social Security Number; (9) Name when...

  3. 28 CFR 74.7 - Notification of eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Notification of eligibility. 74.7 Section 74.7 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CIVIL LIBERTIES ACT REDRESS PROVISION... forth in appendix A; (7) Current telephone number; (8) Social Security Number; (9) Name when...

  4. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  5. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  6. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  7. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  8. 12 CFR 747.406 - Cancellation of charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the Federal credit union has been completed, the NCUA Board shall cancel the charter of the Federal... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cancellation of charter. 747.406 Section 747... and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings Relating to the Suspension or Revocation of Charters and...

  9. 40 CFR 747.200 - Triethanolamine salt of tricarboxylic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-1005) has been regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, at 40 CFR 747.200, as published in the... regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 747.200 published in the Federal Register of... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Triethanolamine salt of...

  10. 40 CFR 747.200 - Triethanolamine salt of tricarboxylic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-1005) has been regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, at 40 CFR 747.200, as published in the... regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 747.200 published in the Federal Register of... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Triethanolamine salt of...

  11. 40 CFR 747.200 - Triethanolamine salt of tricarboxylic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-1005) has been regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, at 40 CFR 747.200, as published in the... regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 747.200 published in the Federal Register of... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Triethanolamine salt of...

  12. 40 CFR 747.200 - Triethanolamine salt of tricarboxylic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-1005) has been regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, at 40 CFR 747.200, as published in the... regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 747.200 published in the Federal Register of... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Triethanolamine salt of...

  13. 40 CFR 747.200 - Triethanolamine salt of tricarboxylic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-1005) has been regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, at 40 CFR 747.200, as published in the... regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 747.200 published in the Federal Register of... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Triethanolamine salt of...

  14. Shuttle Discovery Mated to 747 SCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery rides atop '905,' NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, on its delivery flight from California to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, where it was prepared for its first orbital mission for 30 August to 5 September 1984. The NASA 747, obtained in 1974, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the additional weight of the orbiters. Small vertical fins have also been added to the tips of the horizontal stabilizers for additional stability due to air turbulence on the control surfaces caused by the orbiters. A second modified 747, no. 911, went in to service in November 1990 and is also used to ferry orbiters to destinations where ground transportation is not practical. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the

  15. The 747 primary flight control systems reliability and maintenance study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The major operational characteristics of the 747 Primary Flight Control Systems (PFCS) are described. Results of reliability analysis for separate control functions are presented. The analysis makes use of a NASA computer program which calculates reliability of redundant systems. Costs for maintaining the 747 PFCS in airline service are assessed. The reliabilities and cost will provide a baseline for use in trade studies of future flight control system design.

  16. 12 CFR 747.2004 - Review of order to dismiss a director or senior executive officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... be determined on the record nor the Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure (12 CFR part 747) apply... executive officer. 747.2004 Section 747.2004 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... § 747.2004 Review of order to dismiss a director or senior executive officer. (a) Service of...

  17. 40 CFR 747.195 - Triethanolamine salt of a substituted organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Agency, at 40 CFR 747.195, as published in the Federal Register of June 14, 1984. A copy of the... organic acid. 747.195 Section 747.195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Substances § 747.195 Triethanolamine salt of a substituted organic acid. This section identifies...

  18. 40 CFR 747.195 - Triethanolamine salt of a substituted organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Agency, at 40 CFR 747.195, as published in the Federal Register of June 14, 1984. A copy of the... organic acid. 747.195 Section 747.195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Substances § 747.195 Triethanolamine salt of a substituted organic acid. This section identifies...

  19. 40 CFR 747.195 - Triethanolamine salt of a substituted organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Agency, at 40 CFR 747.195, as published in the Federal Register of June 14, 1984. A copy of the... organic acid. 747.195 Section 747.195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Substances § 747.195 Triethanolamine salt of a substituted organic acid. This section identifies...

  20. 40 CFR 747.195 - Triethanolamine salt of a substituted organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Agency, at 40 CFR 747.195, as published in the Federal Register of June 14, 1984. A copy of the... organic acid. 747.195 Section 747.195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Substances § 747.195 Triethanolamine salt of a substituted organic acid. This section identifies...

  1. 40 CFR 747.195 - Triethanolamine salt of a substituted organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Agency, at 40 CFR 747.195, as published in the Federal Register of June 14, 1984. A copy of the... organic acid. 747.195 Section 747.195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Substances § 747.195 Triethanolamine salt of a substituted organic acid. This section identifies...

  2. Water Injection Feasibility for Boeing 747 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daggett, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Can water injection be offered at a reasonable cost to large airplane operators to reduce takeoff NO( sub x) emissions? This study suggests it may be possible. This report is a contract deliverable to NASA Glenn Research Center from the prime contractor, The Boeing Commercial Airplane Company of Seattle, WA. This study was supported by a separate contract to the Pratt & Whitney Engine Company of Hartford, CT (contract number NNC04QB58P). Aviation continues to grow and with it, environmental pressures are increasing for airports that service commercial airplanes. The feasibility and performance of an emissions-reducing technology, water injection, was studied for a large commercial airplane (e.g., Boeing 747 with PW4062 engine). The primary use of the water-injection system would be to lower NOx emissions while an important secondary benefit might be to improve engine turbine life. A tradeoff exists between engine fuel efficiency and NOx emissions. As engines improve fuel efficiency, by increasing the overall pressure ratio of the engine s compressor, the resulting increased gas temperature usually results in higher NOx emissions. Low-NO(sub x) combustors have been developed for new airplanes to control the increases in NO(sub x) emissions associated with higher efficiency, higher pressure ratio engines. However, achieving a significant reduction of NO(sub x) emissions at airports has been challenging. Using water injection during takeoff has the potential to cut engine NO(sub x) emissions some 80 percent. This may eliminate operating limitations for airplanes flying into airports with emission constraints. This study suggests an important finding of being able to offer large commercial airplane owners an emission-reduction technology that may also save on operating costs.

  3. Boeing 747 with Smoke Generator Installed for Vortex Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Boeing 747 used for wingtip vortex research flights sits on the ramp at NASA's Flight Research Center in Edwards, California. Note the smoke generator mounted underneath the jet's wing. Smoke from underwing smoke generators made it possible for researchers to actually see the vortices created by the 747's wings in flight. In 1974 the NASA Flight Research Center (later Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) used a Boeing 747 as part of the overall NASA study of trailing vortices. Trailing vortices are the invisible flow of spiraling air that trails from the wings of large aircraft and can 'upset' smaller aircraft flying behind them. The 747 that NASA used was on loan from the Johnson Space Center where it was part of the Space Shuttle Program. The data gathered in the 747 studies complemented data from the previous (1973-74) joint NASA Flight Research Center and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Boeing727 wake vortices study. Six smoke generators were installed under the wings of the 747 to provide a visual image of the trailing vortices. The object of the experiments was to test different configurations and mechanical devices on the747 that could be used to break up or lessen the strength of the vortices. The results of the tests could lead to shorter spacing between landings and takeoffs, which, in turn, could alleviate air-traffic congestion. For approximately 30 flights the 747 was flown using various combinations of wing air spoilers in an attempt to reduce wake vortices. To evaluate the effectiveness of the different configurations, chase aircraft were flown into the vortex sheets to probe their strengths and patterns at different times. Two of the chase planes used were the Flight Research Center's Cessna T-37 and the NASA Ames Research Center's Learjet. These aircraft represented the types of smaller business jets and other small aircraft that might encounter large passenger aircraft on approach or landings around major airports or in

  4. 30 CFR 74.7 - Design and construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Design and construction requirements. 74.7... Design and construction requirements. (a) General requirement. Continuous Personal Dust Monitors (CPDMs) shall be designed and constructed for coal miners to wear and operate without impeding their ability...

  5. 30 CFR 74.7 - Design and construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Design and construction requirements. 74.7... Design and construction requirements. (a) General requirement. Continuous Personal Dust Monitors (CPDMs) shall be designed and constructed for coal miners to wear and operate without impeding their ability...

  6. 12 CFR 747.9 - Ex parte communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of Practice and Procedure § 747.9 Ex parte communications. (a) Definition—(1) Ex parte communication means any material oral or written communication relevant to the merits of an adjudicatory proceeding... communications (or, if the communication is oral, a memorandum stating the substance of the communication) to...

  7. 12 CFR 747.204 - Notice of intention to terminate insured status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of intention to terminate insured status. 747.204 Section 747.204 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING... Status § 747.204 Notice of intention to terminate insured status. Unless correction of the...

  8. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of inflation. 747.1001 Section 747.1001 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties § 747.1001 Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil...

  9. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of inflation. 747.1001 Section 747.1001 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties § 747.1001 Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil...

  10. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of inflation. 747.1001 Section 747.1001 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties § 747.1001 Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil...

  11. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of inflation. 747.1001 Section 747.1001 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties § 747.1001 Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil...

  12. Restoration of performance, models 727, 737, and 747

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, J.C.; Staab, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Existing fleets of jet transports, such as the 727, 737, and 747 have useful lives which will extend into the 1990s. Because of this longevity and the impact of escalating fuel prices, improvements in the airplanes' operating economics are imperative. Studies have shown a number of changes to be cost effective. Among those being implemented are: improved flight operations, weight reductions, drag reduction packages, more fuel-efficient engines, and new flight management systems. 1 ref.

  13. 76 FR 31451 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Airplanes; Stairway Between the Main Deck and Upper Deck

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Airplanes; Stairway... special conditions. SUMMARY: These special conditions are issued for Boeing Model 747-8 airplanes. This... Number A20WE to include the new Model 747-8 series passenger airplane. The Model 747-8 is a derivative...

  14. Aircraft cabin ozone measurements on B747-100 and B747-SP aircraft: Correlations with atmospheric ozone and ozone encounter statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, P. J.; Holdeman, J. D.; Gauntner, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of atmospheric (outside) ozone concentration and ozone levels in the cabin of the B747-100 and B747-SP airliners were made by NASA to evaluate the aircraft cabin ozone contamination problem. Instrumentation on these aircraft measured ozone from an outside probe and at one point in the cabin. Average ozone in the cabin of the B747-100 was 39 percent of the outside. Ozone in the cabin of the B747-SP measured 82 percent of the outside, before corrective measures. Procedures to reduce the ozone in this aircraft included changes in the cabin air circulation system, use of the high-temperature 15th stage compressor bleed, and charcoal filters in the inlet cabin air ducting, which as separate actions reduced the ozone to 58, 19 and 5 percent, respectively. The potential for the NASA instrumented B747 aircraft to encounter high levels of cabin ozone was derived from atmospheric oxone measurements on these aircraft. Encounter frequencies for two B747-100's were comparable even though the route structures were different. The B747-SP encountered high ozone than did the B747-100's.

  15. 50 CFR 600.747 - Guidelines and procedures for determining new fisheries and gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... anticipated bycatch species associated with the gear, including protected species, such as marine mammals, sea turtles, sea birds, or species listed as endangered or threatened under the ESA. (H) How the gear will be... new fisheries and gear. 600.747 Section 600.747 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION...

  16. 50 CFR 600.747 - Guidelines and procedures for determining new fisheries and gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... anticipated bycatch species associated with the gear, including protected species, such as marine mammals, sea turtles, sea birds, or species listed as endangered or threatened under the ESA. (H) How the gear will be... new fisheries and gear. 600.747 Section 600.747 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION...

  17. 50 CFR 600.747 - Guidelines and procedures for determining new fisheries and gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... anticipated bycatch species associated with the gear, including protected species, such as marine mammals, sea turtles, sea birds, or species listed as endangered or threatened under the ESA. (H) How the gear will be... new fisheries and gear. 600.747 Section 600.747 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION...

  18. 50 CFR 600.747 - Guidelines and procedures for determining new fisheries and gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... anticipated bycatch species associated with the gear, including protected species, such as marine mammals, sea turtles, sea birds, or species listed as endangered or threatened under the ESA. (H) How the gear will be... new fisheries and gear. 600.747 Section 600.747 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION...

  19. 50 CFR 600.747 - Guidelines and procedures for determining new fisheries and gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... anticipated bycatch species associated with the gear, including protected species, such as marine mammals, sea turtles, sea birds, or species listed as endangered or threatened under the ESA. (H) How the gear will be... new fisheries and gear. 600.747 Section 600.747 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION...

  20. 76 FR 9984 - Airworthiness Directives; B/E Aerospace, Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... CONTACT: David Fairback, Aerospace Engineer, Wichita Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, 1801 Airport Road..., amendment 39-15308 (72 FR 71210, December 17, 2007), for certain Boeing Model 747-200B, 747-300, and 747-400...-08, amendment 39-15460 (73 FR 19982, April 14, 2008), for certain Boeing Model 757-200,...

  1. B-747 in Flight during Vortex Study with Learjet and T-37 Fly Through the Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    In this 1974 NASA Flight Research Center (FRC) photograph, the two chase aircraft, a Learjet and a Cessna T-37, are shown in formation off the right wing tip of the Boeing B-747 jetliner. The two chase aircraft were used to probe the trailing wake vortices generated by the airflow around the wings of the B-747 aircraft. The vortex trail behind the right wing tip was made visible by a smoke generator mounted under the wing of the B-747 aircraft. In 1974 the NASA Flight Research Center (later Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) used a Boeing 747 as part of the overall NASA study of trailing vortices. Trailing vortices are the invisible flow of spiraling air that trails from the wings of large aircraft and can 'upset' smaller aircraft flying behind them. The 747 that NASA used was on loan from the Johnson Space Center where it was part of the Space Shuttle Program. The data gathered in the 747 studies complemented data from the previous (1973-74) joint NASA Flight Research Center and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Boeing727 wake vortices study. Six smoke generators were installed under the wings of the 747 to provide a visual image of the trailing vortices. The object of the experiments was to test different configurations and mechanical devices on the747 that could be used to break up or lessen the strength of the vortices. The results of the tests could lead to shorter spacing between landings and takeoffs, which, in turn, could alleviate air-traffic congestion. For approximately 30 flights the 747 was flown using various combinations of wing air spoilers in an attempt to reduce wake vortices. To evaluate the effectiveness of the different configurations, chase aircraft were flown into the vortex sheets to probe their strengths and patterns at different times. Two of the chase planes used were the Flight Research Center's Cessna T-37 and the NASA Ames Research Center's Learjet. These aircraft represented the types of smaller business jets and

  2. Simultaneous cabin and ambient ozone measurements on two Boeing 747 airplanes, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, P. J.; Holdeman, J. D.; Nastrom, G. D.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of zone concentrations both outside and in the cabin of an airline operated Boeing 747SP and Boeing 747-100 airliner are presented. Plotted data and the corresponding tables of observations taken at altitude between the departure and destination airports of each flight are arranged chronologically for the two aircraft. Data were taken at five or ten minute intervals by automated instrumentation used in the NACA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program.

  3. The B-747 flight control system maintenance and reliability data base for cost effectiveness tradeoff studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Primary and automatic flight controls are combined for a total flight control reliability and maintenance cost data base using information from two previous reports and additional cost data gathered from a major airline. A comparison of the current B-747 flight control system effects on reliability and operating cost with that of a B-747 designed for an active control wing load alleviation system is provided.

  4. Shuttle Columbia Mated to 747 SCA with Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The crew of NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), seen mated with the Space Shuttle Columbia behind them, are from viewers left: Tom McMurtry, pilot; Vic Horton, flight engineer; Fitz Fulton, command pilot; and Ray Young, flight engineer. The SCA is used to ferry the shuttle between California and the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and other destinations where ground transportation is not practical. The NASA 747 has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the additional weight of the orbiters. Small vertical fins have also been added to the tips of the horizontal stabilizers for additional stability due to air turbulence on the control surfaces caused by the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the

  5. Shuttle Enterprise Mated to 747 SCA in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Enterprise, the nation's prototype space shuttle orbiter, departed NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, at 11:00 a.m., 16 May 1983, on the first leg of its trek to the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport, Paris, France. Carried by the huge 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), the first stop for the Enterprise was Peterson AFB, Colorado Springs, Colorado. Piloting the 747 on the Europe trip were Joe Algranti, Johnson Space Center Chief Pilot, Astronaut Dick Scobee, and NASA Dryden Chief Pilot Tom McMurtry. Flight engineers for that portion of the flight were Dryden's Ray Young and Johnson Space Center's Skip Guidry. The Enterprise, named after the spacecraft of Star Trek fame, was originally carried and launched by the 747 during the Approach and Landing Tests (ALT) at Dryden Flight Research Center. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused

  6. Shuttle Enterprise Mated to 747 SCA on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Enterprise, the nation's prototype space shuttle orbiter, before departing NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, at 11:00 a.m., 16 May 1983, on the first leg of its trek to the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport, Paris, France. Seen here atop the huge 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), the first stop for the Enterprise was Peterson AFB, Colorado Springs, Colorado. Piloting the 747 on the Europe trip were Joe Algranti, Johnson Space Center Chief Pilot, Astronaut Dick Scobee, and NASA Dryden Chief Pilot Tom McMurtry. Flight engineers for that portion of the flight were Dryden's Ray Young and Johnson Space Center's Skip Guidry. The Enterprise, named after the spacecraft of Star Trek fame, was originally carried and launched by the 747 during the Approach and Landing Tests (ALT) at Dryden Flight Research Center. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be

  7. Shuttle Enterprise Mated to 747 SCA in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Enterprise, the nation's prototype space shuttle orbiter, departed NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, at 11:00 a.m., 16 May 1983, on the first leg of its trek to the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport, Paris, France. Carried by the huge 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), the first stop for the Enterprise was Peterson AFB, Colorado Springs, Colorado. Piloting the 747 on the Europe trip were Joe Algranti, Johnson Space Center Chief Pilot, Astronaut Dick Scobee, and NASA Dryden Chief Pilot Tom McMurtry. Flight engineers for that portion of the flight were Dryden's Ray Young and Johnson Space Center's Skip Guidry. The Enterprise, named after the spacecraft of Star Trek fame, was originally carried and launched by the 747 during the Approach and Landing Tests (ALT) at Dryden Flight Research Center. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused

  8. Shuttle Enterprise Mated to 747 SCA on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Enterprise, the nation's prototype space shuttle orbiter, before departing NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, at 11:00 a.m., 16 May 1983, on the first leg of its trek to the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport, Paris, France. Seen here atop the huge 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), the first stop for the Enterprise was Peterson AFB, Colorado Springs, Colorado. Piloting the 747 on the Europe trip were Joe Algranti, Johnson Space Center Chief Pilot, Astronaut Dick Scobee, and NASA Dryden Chief Pilot Tom McMurtry. Flight engineers for that portion of the flight were Dryden's Ray Young and Johnson Space Center's Skip Guidry. The Enterprise, named after the spacecraft of Star Trek fame, was originally carried and launched by the 747 during the Approach and Landing Tests (ALT) at Dryden Flight Research Center. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be

  9. The NASA Dryden 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft crew poses in an engine inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Dryden 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft crew poses in an engine inlet; Standing L to R - aircraft mechanic John Goleno and SCA Team Leader Pete Seidl; Kneeling L to R - aircraft mechanics Todd Weston and Arvid Knutson, and avionics technician Jim Bedard NASA uses two modified Boeing 747 jetliners, originally manufactured for commercial use, as Space Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA). One is a 747-100 model, while the other is designated a 747-100SR (short range). The two aircraft are identical in appearance and in their performance as Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. The 747 series of aircraft are four-engine intercontinental-range swept-wing 'jumbo jets' that entered commercial service in 1969. The SCAs are used to ferry space shuttle orbiters from landing sites back to the launch complex at the Kennedy Space Center, and also to and from other locations too distant for the orbiters to be delivered by ground transportation. The orbiters are placed atop the SCAs by Mate-Demate Devices, large gantry-like structures which hoist the orbiters off the ground for post-flight servicing, and then mate them with the SCAs for ferry flights.

  10. Shuttle Enterprise Mated to 747 SCA for Delivery to Smithsonian

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Enterprise atop the NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft as it leaves NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Enterprise, first orbiter built, was not spaceflight rated and was used in 1977 to verify the landing, approach, and glide characteristics of the orbiters. It was also used for engineering fit-checks at the shuttle launch facilities. Following approach and landing tests in 1977 and its use as an engineering vehicle, Enterprise was donated to the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the

  11. 76 FR 14819 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Series Airplanes; Stairway Between the Main Deck and Upper...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Boeing Model... conditions for the Boeing Model 747-8 airplane. This airplane will have novel or unusual design features when... to Type Certificate Number A20WE to include the new Model 747-8 series passenger airplane. The...

  12. STS-64 and 747-SCA Ferry Flight Takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery, mated to NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), takes to the air for its ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The spacecraft, with a crew of six, was launched into a 57-degree high inclination orbit from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 3:23 p.m., 9 September 1994. The mission featured the study of clouds and the atmosphere with a laser beaming system called Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE), and the first untethered space walk in ten years. A Spartan satellite was also deployed and later retrieved in the study of the sun's corona and solar wind. The mission was scheduled to end Sunday, 18 September, but was extended one day to continue science work. Bad weather at the Kennedy Space Center on 19 September, forced a one-day delay to September 20, with a weather divert that day to Edwards. Mission commander was Richard Richards, the pilot Blaine Hammond, while mission specialists were Jerry Linenger, Susan Helms, Carl Meade, and Mark Lee. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders

  13. 77 FR 2910 - Bacillus Amyloliquefaciens Strain D747; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance; Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Federal Register of January 6, 2012, (77 FR 745). This section was inadvertently designated as Sec. 180... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Bacillus Amyloliquefaciens Strain D747; Exemption From the Requirement of a... establishment of an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of Bacillus...

  14. 75 FR 8279 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ...-06, amendment 39-14503 (71 FR 12125, March 9, 2006). The original NPRM applied to certain Model 747 airplanes. The original NPRM was published in the Federal Register on September 23, 2008 (73 FR 54751). The... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and...

  15. 75 FR 22514 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-200B Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Executive Order 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR... Model 747-200B Series Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule...-200B series airplanes. This AD requires repetitive inspections for cracking of the fuselage skin...

  16. 75 FR 77793 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Model 747 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... and 4 main fuel tanks, and of the auxiliary tank jettison pumps (if installed); replacement of...

  17. 12 CFR 747.25 - Request for document discovery from parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Request for document discovery from parties... copying rate imposed by 12 CFR 792.5(b) implementing the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). The... INVESTIGATIONS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 747.25 Request for document discovery from parties....

  18. 12 CFR 747.25 - Request for document discovery from parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Request for document discovery from parties... copying rate imposed by 12 CFR 792.5(b) implementing the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). The... INVESTIGATIONS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 747.25 Request for document discovery from parties....

  19. 12 CFR 747.25 - Request for document discovery from parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Request for document discovery from parties... copying rate imposed by 12 CFR 792.5(b) implementing the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). The... INVESTIGATIONS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 747.25 Request for document discovery from parties....

  20. 12 CFR 747.25 - Request for document discovery from parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Request for document discovery from parties... copying rate imposed by 12 CFR 792.5(b) implementing the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). The... INVESTIGATIONS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 747.25 Request for document discovery from parties....

  1. 40 CFR 747.115 - Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for product containing P-84-529) has been regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, at 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixed mono and diamides of an organic... Substances § 747.115 Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid. This section identifies activities...

  2. 40 CFR 747.115 - Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for product containing P-84-529) has been regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, at 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixed mono and diamides of an organic... Substances § 747.115 Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid. This section identifies activities...

  3. 40 CFR 747.115 - Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for product containing P-84-529) has been regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, at 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixed mono and diamides of an organic... Substances § 747.115 Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid. This section identifies activities...

  4. 2 CFR 2424.747 - Who conducts fact finding for HUD suspensions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Who conducts fact finding for HUD... § 2424.747 Who conducts fact finding for HUD suspensions? In all HUD suspensions, the official who shall conduct additional proceedings where disputed material facts are challenged shall be a hearing officer....

  5. 2 CFR 2424.747 - Who conducts fact finding for HUD suspensions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Who conducts fact finding for HUD... § 2424.747 Who conducts fact finding for HUD suspensions? In all HUD suspensions, the official who shall conduct additional proceedings where disputed material facts are challenged shall be a hearing officer....

  6. Automated system for global atmospheric sampling using B-747 airliners. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, K.Q.; Gustafsson, U.R.C.; Johnson, R.E.

    1981-10-01

    The global air sampling program utilizes commercial aircraft in scheduled service to measure atmospheric constituents. A fully automated system designed for the 747 aircraft is described. Airline operational constraints and data and control subsystems are treated. The overall program management, system monitoring, and data retrieval from four aircraft in global service is described.

  7. Selected advanced aerodynamics and active controls technology concepts development on a derivative B-747 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Analytical design and wind tunnel test evaluations covering the feasibility of applying wing tip extensions, winglets, and active control wing had alleviation to the model B747 are described. Aerodynamic improvement offered by wing tip extension and winglet individually, and the combined aerodynamic and weight improvements when wing load alleviation is combined with the tip extension or the winglet are evaluated. Results are presented in the form of incremental effects on weight mission range, fuel usage, cost, and airline operating economics.

  8. ANASORB{reg_sign} 747 - A universal sorbent for air sampling?

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, M.

    1997-12-31

    A sorbent to be used for air sampling must meet certain performance criteria including sample background, capacity, stability, and recovery. Anasorb{sup R} 747 is a proprietary 20/40 mesh beaded active carbon prepared from raw materials with a very low ash content in a process which creates a regular pore structure. The background is very low for both inorganic and organic species, and the surface is more inert and less hydrophilic than coconut charcoal, while capacity is similar. The low catalytic activity of the surface means samples of many reactive compounds remain stable for longer periods. The sorbent is compatible with most solvent systems in use (e.g. carbon disulfide, methylene chloride, methanol, dimethyformamide). Anasorb 747 can be coated with chemicals for efficient adsorption of inorganic gases, which can be analyzed at very low levels because of low background interference. A large number of validated sampling methods use Anasorb 747, including methods from OSHA and NIOSH, corporate industrial hygiene laboratories, various branches of the EPA, and international agencies. These methods refer to around fifty different gases and vapors. Although this sorbent is not compatible with some compounds (e.g. low molecular weight aldehydes) it is quite close to being of universal application.

  9. Simultaneous cabin and ambient ozone measurements on two Boeing 747 airplanes. Volume 3: October 1978 - July 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Jasperson, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of ozone concentrations at cruise altitudes both outside and in the cabin of a Boeing 747SP and Boeing 747-100 airliners in routine commercial service are presented. Plotted and tabulated data are identified by route and are arranged chronologically for each airplane. These data were taken at 5- or 10-min intervals by automated instruments used in the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP). All GASP cabin ozone data obtained from October 1978 to early July 1979 are presented.

  10. 77 FR 50411 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... the ECS. AD 2008-02-16, Amendment 39-15346 (73 FR 4061, January 24, 2008), applicable to certain Model 767-200 and 767-300 series airplanes. AD 2010-14-01, Amendment 39-16344 (75 FR 38007, July 1, 2010..., 747-400F, 747SR, and 747SP series airplanes. AD 2012-02-09, Amendment 39-16932 (77 FR 5996, February...

  11. Results of an experimental investigation to determine separation characteristics for the Orbiter/747 using a 0.0125-scale model (48-0 AX1318I-1 747) in the Ames Research Center 14-foot wind tunnel (CA23B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.

    1976-01-01

    Aerodynamic separation data obtained from a wind tunnel test of an 0.0125-scale SSV Orbiter model of a VC70-000002 Configuration and a 0.0125-scale 747 model was presented. Separation data was obtained at a Mach number of 0.6 and three incidence angles of 4, 6, and 8 degrees. The orbiter angle of attack was varied from 0 to 14 degrees. Longitudinal, lateral and normal separation increments were obtained for fixed 747 angles of attack of 0, 2, and 4 degrees while varying the orbiter angle of attack. Control surface settings on the 747 carrier included rudder deflections of 0 and 10 degrees and horizontal stabilizer deflections of -1 and +5 degrees.

  12. Auxiliary power unit noise of Boeing B737 and B747 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Jimmy S. W.; Yang, S. J. Eric

    Most modern civil aircraft have an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) which provides compressed air for engine starting and the air-conditioning system on ground and electrical power for aircraft use both on-ground and in-fligth. It is basically a gas turbine engine and it consists of a compressor section, a turbine section, and an accessory drive section. For Boeing B737 and B747 aircraft, the APU is located inside a compartment in the tail section of the aircraft and is completely enclosed by a sound-reduction fire-proof titanium shroud. APU noise is one of the major noise sources at many airports and is extremely important for a densely populated city such as Hong Kong. The noise from APU can affect many people, including ground crew aircraft maintenance staff, and people living in the vicinity of the airport. However, there is very little information available in the literature about APU noise. This paper describes the noise measurement method and presents the measurement results for APUs of one B747 and two B737 aircraft under both 'loaded' and 'no-load' conditions.

  13. Organics Characterization Of DWPF Alternative Reductant Simulants, Glycolic Acid, And Antifoam 747

    SciTech Connect

    White, T. L.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Lambert, D. P.; Crump, S. L.; Fondeur, F. F.; Papathanassiu, A. E.; Kot, W. K.; Pegg, I. L.

    2013-10-01

    The present study examines the fate of glycolic acid and other organics added in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as part of the glycolic alternate flowsheet. Adoption of this flowsheet is expected to provide certain benefits in terms of a reduction in the processing time, a decrease in hydrogen generation, simplification of chemical storage and handling issues, and an improvement in the processing characteristics of the waste stream including an increase in the amount of nitrate allowed in the CPC process. Understanding the fate of organics in this flowsheet is imperative because tank farm waste processed in the CPC is eventually immobilized by vitrification; thus, the type and amount of organics present in the melter feed may affect optimal melt processing and the quality of the final glass product as well as alter flammability calculations on the DWPF melter off gas. To evaluate the fate of the organic compounds added as the part of the glycolic flowsheet, mainly glycolic acid and antifoam 747, samples of simulated waste that was processed using the DWPF CPC protocol for tank farm sludge feed were generated and analyzed for organic compounds using a variety of analytical techniques at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). These techniques included Ion Chromatography (IC), Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy. A set of samples were also sent to the Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for analysis by NMR Spectroscopy at the University of Maryland, College Park. Analytical methods developed and executed at SRNL collectively showed that glycolic acid was the most prevalent organic compound in the supernatants of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) products examined. Furthermore, the studies suggested that commercially available glycolic acid contained minor amounts

  14. JT9D engine diagnostics. Task 2: Feasibility study of measuring in-service flight loads. [747 aircraft performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafka, P. G.; Skibo, M. A.; White, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring JT9D propulsion system flight inertia loads on a 747 airplane is studied. Flight loads background is discussed including the current status of 747/JT9D loads knowledge. An instrumentation and test plan is formulated for an airline-owned in-service airplane and the Boeing-owned RA001 test airplane. Technical and cost comparisons are made between these two options. An overall technical feasibility evaluation is made and a cost summary presented. Conclusions and recommendations are presented in regard to using existing inertia loads data versus conducting a flight test to measure inertia loads.

  15. Selected advanced aerodynamics and active controls technology concepts development on a derivative B-747

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of applying wing tip extensions, winglets, and active control wing load alleviation to the Boeing 747 is investigated. Winglet aerodynamic design methods and high speed wind tunnel test results of winglets and of symmetrically deflected ailerons are presented. Structural resizing analyses to determine weight and aeroelastic twist increments for all the concepts and flutter model test results for the wing with winglets are included. Control law development, system mechanization/reliability studies, and aileron balance tab trade studies for active wing load alleviation systems are discussed. Results are presented in the form of incremental effects on L/D, structural weight, block fuel savings, stability and control, airplane price, and airline operating economics.

  16. Effects of spoilers and gear on B-747 wake vortex velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebs, A. B.; Bradfute, J. G.; Ciffone, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Vortex velocities were measured in the wakes of four configurations of a 0.61-m span model of a B-747 aircraft. The wakes were generated by towing the model underwater in a ship model basin. Tangential and axial velocity profiles were obtained with a scanning laser velocimeter as the wakes aged to 35 span lengths behind the model. A 45 deg deflection of two outboard flight spoilers with the model in the landing configuration resulted in a 36 percent reduction in wake maximum tangential velocity, altered velocity profiles, and erratic vortex trajectories. Deployment of the landing gear with the inboard flaps in the landing position and outboard flaps retracted had little effect on the flap vortices to 35 spans, but caused the wing tip vortices to have: (1) more diffuse velocity profiles; (2) a 27 percent reduction in maximum tangential velocity; and (3) a more rapid merger with the flap vortices.

  17. 75 FR 2433 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8/-8F Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... systems and networks, which may allow access to external computer systems and networks. Connectivity to... Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8/-8F Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security--Protection of Airplane Systems and Data Networks From Unauthorized External Access...

  18. 76 FR 14794 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security-Isolation or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Boeing Model 747-8 airplane was published in the Federal Register on December 9, 2010 (75 FR 76647). No... incorporate the following novel or unusual design features: Digital systems architecture composed of several connected networks. The network architecture would be used for a diverse set of functions, including:...

  19. 76 FR 26949 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Series Airplanes; Overhead Flight Attendant Rest Compartment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ...; Overhead Flight Attendant Rest Compartment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... installation of an overhead flight attendant rest compartment. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not... Electric GEnx-2B67 engines. The Model 747-8 will have two flight crew and the capacity to carry...

  20. 75 FR 76647 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security-Isolation or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... 747-8 Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security--Isolation or Protection From Unauthorized... airplane. This airplane will have novel or unusual design features associated with connectivity of the passenger domain computer systems to the airplane critical systems and data networks. The...

  1. 78 FR 3363 - Airworthiness Directives; the Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... General Electric (GE) CF6-80C2 engines. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of failure of the electro... airplanes, certificated in any category, powered by General Electric (GE) CF6-80C2 engines, as identified in...-13269 (68 FR 51439, August 27, 2003), for Model 747-400 series airplanes equipped with GE Model...

  2. Navier-Stokes Flowfield Simulation of Boeing 747-200 as Platform for SOFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    Steady and unsteady viscous, three-dimensional flowfields are calculated using a thin layer approximation of Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with Chimera overset grids. The finite-difference numerical scheme uses structured grids and a pentadiagonal flow solver called "OVERFLOW". The configuration of Boeing 747-200 has been chosen as one of configurations to be used as a platform for the SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy). Initially, the steady flowfield of the full aircraft is calculated for the clean configuration (without a cavity to house telescope). This solution is then used to start the unsteady flowfield of a configuration containing cavity housing the observation telescope and its peripheral units. Analysis of unsteady flowfield in the cavity and its influence on the tail empennage, as well as the noise due to turbulence and optical quality of the flow are the main focus of this study. For the configuration considered here, the telescope housing cavity is located slightly downstream of the portwing. The entire flow-field is carefully constructed using 45 overset grids and consists of nearly 4 million grid points. All the computations axe done at one freestream flow condition of M(sub infinity) = 0.85, alpha = 2.5deg, and a Reynolds of Re = 1.85x10deg

  3. Simultaneous measurements of ozone outside and inside cabins of two B-747 airliners and a Gates Learjet business jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, P. J.; Briel, D.

    1978-01-01

    The average amount of ozone measured in the cabins of two B-747 airliners varied from 40 percent to 80 percent of the atmospheric concentrations without special ozone destruction systems. A charcoal filter in the cabin air inlet system of one B-747 reduced the ozone to about 5 percent of the atmospheric concentration. A Learjet 23 was also instrumented with monitors to measure simultaneously the atmospheric and ozone concentrations. Results indicate that a significant portion of the atmospheric ozone is not destroyed in the pressurization system and remains in the aircraft cabin of the Learjet. For the two cabin configurations tested, the ozone retentions were 63 and 41 percent of the atmospheric ozone concentrations. Ozone concentrations measured in the cabin near the conditioned-air outlets were reduced only slightly from atmospheric ozone concentrations. It is concluded that a constant difference between ozone concentrations inside and outside the cabin does not exist.

  4. FXR Agonist INT-747 Upregulates DDAH Expression and Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in High-Salt Fed Dahl Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghebremariam, Yohannes T.; Yamada, Keisuke; Lee, Jerry C.; Johnson, Christine L. C.; Atzler, Dorothee; Anderssohn, Maike; Agrawal, Rani; Higgins, John P.; Patterson, Andrew J.; Böger, Rainer H.; Cooke, John P

    2013-01-01

    Aims Genetic and pharmacological studies have shown that impairment of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) pathway is associated with hypertension and insulin-resistance (IR). In addition, inhibition of NOS by the endogenous inhibitor, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), may also result in hypertension and IR. On the other hand, overexpression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), an enzyme that metabolizes ADMA, in mice is associated with lower ADMA, increased NO and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Since DDAH carries a farnesoid X receptor (FXR)-responsive element, we aimed to upregulate its expression by an FXR-agonist, INT-747, and evaluate its effect on blood pressure and insulin sensitivity. Methods and Results In this study, we evaluated the in vivo effect of INT-747 on tissue DDAH expression and insulin sensitivity in the Dahl rat model of salt-sensitive hypertension and IR (Dahl-SS). Our data indicates that high salt (HS) diet significantly increased systemic blood pressure. In addition, HS diet downregulated tissue DDAH expression while INT-747 protected the loss in DDAH expression and enhanced insulin sensitivity compared to vehicle controls. Conclusion Our study may provide the basis for a new therapeutic approach for IR by modulating DDAH expression and/or activity using small molecules. PMID:23593273

  5. Shuttle Discovery Being Unloaded from SCA-747 at Palmdale, California, Maintenance Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Space Shuttle Discovery being unloaded from NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) at Rockwell Aerospace's Palmdale facility for nine months of scheduled maintenance. Discovery and the 747 were completing a two-day flight from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, that began at 7:04 a.m. Eastern Standard Time on 27 September and included an overnight stop at Salt Lake City International Airport, Utah. At the conclusion of this mission, Discovery had flown 21 shuttle missions, totaling more than 142 days in orbit. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide

  6. Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Taxi to Runway for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, taxies to the runway to begin the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay

  7. Shuttle in Mate-Demate Device being Loaded onto SCA-747 - Rear View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Evening light begins to fade at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, as technicians begin the task of mounting the Space Shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (NASA 911) for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., following its STS-44 flight 24 November-1 December 1991. Post-flight servicing of the orbiters, and the mating operation is carried out at Dryden at the Mate-Demate Device, the large gantry-like structure that hoists the spacecraft to various levels during post-spaceflight processing and attachment to the 747. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle

  8. Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, begins the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission

  9. Shuttle in Mate-Demate Device being Loaded onto SCA-747 - Side View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Evening light begins to fade at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, as technicians begin the task of mounting the Space Shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (NASA #911) for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., following its STS-44 flight 24 November-1 December 1991. Post-flight servicing of the orbiters, and the mating operation, is carried out at Dryden at the Mate-Demate Device (MDD), the large gantry-like structure that hoists the spacecraft to various levels during post-space flight processing and attachment to the 747. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space

  10. Shuttle in Mate-Demate Device being Loaded onto SCA-747

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    At NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, technicians begin the task of mounting the Space Shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (NASA #911) for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, following its STS-44 flight 24 November - 1 December 1991. Post-flight servicing of the orbiters, and the mating operation, is carried out at Dryden at the Mate-Demate Device (MDD), the large gantry-like structure that hoists the spacecraft to various levels during post-space flight processing and attachment to the 747. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and

  11. Unique sleep disorders profile of a population-based sample of 747 Hmong immigrants in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Young, Eric; Xiong, Se; Finn, Laurel; Young, Terry

    2013-02-01

    Concerns regarding sleep disorders in Hmong immigrants in the US emerged when an astonishingly high mortality rate of Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome (SUNDS) was documented in Hmong men. Stress, genetics, and cardiac abnormalities interacting with disordered sleep were hypothesized as contributing factors to SUNDS. Most recently, sleep apnea has been implicated in nighttime deaths of Brugada Syndrome. This syndrome is thought to comprise a spectrum of sudden cardiac death disorders, including SUNDS. However, little research since has placed SUNDS in its context of Hmong cultural beliefs, health, or the prevalence of other sleep disorders. Because the epidemiology of sleep disorders and terrifying nighttime experiences in Hmong is poorly documented, we investigated the prevalence and correlates of sleep apnea, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep stage related disorders, and insomnia in 3 population-based samples (collected from 1996 to 2001) comprising 747 Hmong immigrants in Wisconsin. Participants were questioned on sleep problems, cultural beliefs, health, and other factors. A random subsample (n = 37) underwent in-home polysomnography to investigate sleep apnea prevalence. Self-report and laboratory findings were compared with similarly collected data from the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort (WSC) study (n = 1170), a population-based longitudinal study of sleep. The results inform a unique Hmong sleep disorder profile of a high prevalence of sleep apnea, sleep paralysis, and other REM-related sleep abnormalities as well the interaction of culturally related nighttime stressors with these sleep problems. For example, experiences of dab tsog (frightening night spirit pressing on chest) was prevalent and related to sleep apnea indicators, sleep paralysis, nightmares, hypnogogic hallucinations, and insomnia. Understanding the role of sleep disorders and the cultural mechanisms that may trigger or condition response to them could ultimately provide a basis for

  12. Unique sleep disorders profile of a population-based sample of 747 Hmong immigrants in Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Young, Eric; Xiong, Se; Finn, Laurel; Young, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Concerns regarding sleep disorders in Hmong immigrants in the US emerged when an astonishingly high mortality rate of Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome (SUNDS) was documented in Hmong men. Stress, genetics, and cardiac abnormalities interacting with disordered sleep were hypothesized as contributing factors to SUNDS. Most recently, sleep apnea has been implicated in nighttime deaths of Brugada Syndrome. This syndrome is thought to comprise a spectrum of sudden cardiac death disorders, including SUNDS. However, little research since has placed SUNDS in its context of Hmong cultural beliefs, health, or the prevalence of other sleep disorders. Because the epidemiology of sleep disorders and terrifying nighttime experiences in Hmong is poorly documented, we investigated the prevalence and correlates of sleep apnea, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep stage related disorders, and insomnia in 3 population-based samples (collected from 1996 to 2001) comprising 747 Hmong immigrants in Wisconsin. Participants were questioned on sleep problems, cultural beliefs, health, and other factors. A random subsample (n = 37) underwent in-home polysomnography to investigate sleep apnea prevalence. Self-report and laboratory findings were compared with similarly collected data from the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort (WSC) study (n = 1170), a population-based longitudinal study of sleep. The results inform a unique Hmong sleep disorder profile of a high prevalence of sleep apnea, sleep paralysis, and other REM-related sleep abnormalities as well the interaction of culturally related nighttime stressors with these sleep problems. For example, experiences of dab tsog (frightening night spirit pressing on chest) was prevalent and related to sleep apnea indicators, sleep paralysis, nightmares, hypnogogic hallucinations, and insomnia. Understanding the role of sleep disorders and the cultural mechanisms that may trigger or condition response to them could ultimately provide a basis for

  13. Unique sleep disorders profile of a population-based sample of 747 Hmong immigrants in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Young, Eric; Xiong, Se; Finn, Laurel; Young, Terry

    2013-02-01

    Concerns regarding sleep disorders in Hmong immigrants in the US emerged when an astonishingly high mortality rate of Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome (SUNDS) was documented in Hmong men. Stress, genetics, and cardiac abnormalities interacting with disordered sleep were hypothesized as contributing factors to SUNDS. Most recently, sleep apnea has been implicated in nighttime deaths of Brugada Syndrome. This syndrome is thought to comprise a spectrum of sudden cardiac death disorders, including SUNDS. However, little research since has placed SUNDS in its context of Hmong cultural beliefs, health, or the prevalence of other sleep disorders. Because the epidemiology of sleep disorders and terrifying nighttime experiences in Hmong is poorly documented, we investigated the prevalence and correlates of sleep apnea, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep stage related disorders, and insomnia in 3 population-based samples (collected from 1996 to 2001) comprising 747 Hmong immigrants in Wisconsin. Participants were questioned on sleep problems, cultural beliefs, health, and other factors. A random subsample (n = 37) underwent in-home polysomnography to investigate sleep apnea prevalence. Self-report and laboratory findings were compared with similarly collected data from the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort (WSC) study (n = 1170), a population-based longitudinal study of sleep. The results inform a unique Hmong sleep disorder profile of a high prevalence of sleep apnea, sleep paralysis, and other REM-related sleep abnormalities as well the interaction of culturally related nighttime stressors with these sleep problems. For example, experiences of dab tsog (frightening night spirit pressing on chest) was prevalent and related to sleep apnea indicators, sleep paralysis, nightmares, hypnogogic hallucinations, and insomnia. Understanding the role of sleep disorders and the cultural mechanisms that may trigger or condition response to them could ultimately provide a basis for

  14. STS-76 - SCA 747 Aircraft Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft leaves the runway with the Shuttle Atlantis on its back. Following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified 747's, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis aboard only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the

  15. STS-76 - SCA 747 Aircraft Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft leaves the runway with the Shuttle Atlantis on its back. Following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified 747's, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis aboard only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the

  16. Mated aerodynamic characteristics investigation for the 0.04 scale model TE 1065 (Boeing 747-100) of the 747 CAM and the 0.0405 scale model (43-0) of the space shuttle orbiter in the NASA Langley V/STOL transition research wind tunnel (CA8), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Aerodynamic force data are presented in tables and graphs for the NASA Langley V/STOL Transition Research Wind Tunnel tests on a 0.04 scale model of the 747 with a 0.0405 scale Orbiter space shuttle. The investigation included the effects of flap setting, stabilizer angle, elevator angle, ground proximity, and Orbiter tailcone fairing. Data were obtained in the pitch plane only. The test was run at M = 0.15, with a dynamic pressure of 35 psf. Six static pressures were measured on each side of the 747 CAM nose to determine the effects of the Orbiter on the 747 airspeed and altitude indicators.

  17. Survival of insects in the wheel bays of a Boeing 747B aircraft on flights between tropical and temperate airports

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    Mosquitos (Culex quinquefasciatus), house flies (Musca domestica), and flour beetles (Tribolium confusum) located in cages within the wheel bays of a Boeing 747B aircraft, survived travel on the following normal commercial routes: Sydney—Melbourne; Melbourne—Singapore; Singapore—Bangkok; Bangkok—Singapore; and Singapore—Melbourne. Survival of all three species was high, averaging 84% for mosquitos and higher for flies (93%) and beetles (>99%). Although external temperatures were -42 °C to -54 °C for aircraft cruising at 10 700-11 900 m, minimum temperatures within the wheel bays ranged from +8 °C to +25 °C. PMID:3501345

  18. STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Moonrise over Atlantis: the space shuttle Atlantis receives post-flight servicing in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD), following its landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, 31 March 1996. Once servicing was complete, one of NASA's two 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, No. 905, was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged, and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart 11 April for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside

  19. STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Moonrise over Atlantis following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis attached only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the

  20. STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Moonrise over Atlantis: following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996, NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth

  1. STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Moonrise over Atlantis: the space shuttle Atlantis receives post-flight servicing in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD), following its landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, 31 March 1996. Once servicing was complete, one of NASA's two 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, No. 905, was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged, and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart 11 April for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside

  2. STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Moonrise over Atlantis following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis attached only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the

  3. STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Moonrise over Atlantis: following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996, NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth

  4. Expanded study of feasibility of measuring in-flight 747/JT9D loads, performance, clearance, and thermal data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.; Martin, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The JT9D jet engine exhibits a TSFC loss of about 1 percent in the initial 50 flight cycles of a new engine. These early losses are caused by seal-wear induced opening of running clearances in the engine gas path. The causes of this seal wear have been identified as flight induced loads which deflect the engine cases and rotors, causing the rotating blades to rub against the seal surfaces, producing permanent clearance changes. The real level of flight loads encountered during airplane acceptance testing and revenue service and the engine's response in the dynamic flight environment were investigated. The feasibility of direct measurement of these flight loads and their effects by concurrent measurement of 747/JT9D propulsion system aerodynamic and inertia loads and the critical engine clearance and performance changes during 747 flight and ground operations was evaluated. A number of technical options were examined in relation to the total estimated program cost to facilitate selection of the most cost effective option. It is concluded that a flight test program meeting the overall objective of determining the levels of aerodynamic and inertia load levels to which the engine is exposed during the initial flight acceptance test and normal flight maneuvers is feasible and desirable. A specific recommended flight test program, based on the evaluation of cost effectiveness, is defined.

  5. Effect of temperature and O-ring gland finish on sealing ability of Viton V747-75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lach, Cynthia L.

    1993-01-01

    As a part of the redesign project of the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) following the Challenger accident, the field joint was redesigned to minimize the relative joint motion caused by internal motor pressurization during ignition. The O-ring seals and glands for the field joint were designed both to accommodate structural deflections and to promote pressure-assisted sealing. Tests were conducted in various face seal fixtures to evaluate the ability of Viton V747-75 O-rings to seal for a range of temperatures and surface finishes of the redesigned O-ring gland. The effect of surface finish on the sealing performance and wear characteristics of the O-rings was evaluated during simulated launch conditions that included low-frequency vibrations, gap openings, and rapid pressurizations. The effect of contamination on the sealing performance was also investigated. The O-rings sealed throughout the 75 deg F leak check test and for the seal tests from 50 deg F to 120 deg F for the range of surface finishes investigated. Although abrasions were found in the O-rings from pressurization against the rougher finishes, these abrasions were not detrimental to sealing. Below 50 deg F, Viton V747-75 O-rings were insufficiently resilient to track the test gap opening.

  6. STS-35 Leaves Dryden on 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) Bound for Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The first rays of the morning sun light up the side of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, with the orbiter from STS-35 attached to its back. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other

  7. STS Challenger Mated to 747 SCA for Initial Delivery to Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger atop NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), NASA 905, after leaving the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, for the ferry flight that took the orbiter to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for its first launch. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy

  8. STS-68 747 SCA Ferry Flight Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia, atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), taking off for the Kennedy Space Center shortly after its landing on 12 October 1994, at Edwards, California, to complete mission STS-68. Columbia was being ferried from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it will undergo six months of inspections, modifications, and systems upgrades. The STS-68 11-day mission was devoted to radar imaging of Earth's geological features with the Space Radar Laboratory. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab

  9. STS-66 Atlantis 747 SCA Ferry Flight Morning Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) during takeoff for a return ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center from Edwards, California. The STS-66 mission was dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the

  10. A flight test investigation of the rolling moments induced on a T-37B airplane in the wake of a B-747 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    A flight test investigation of the B-747 vortex wake characteristics was conducted using a T-37B as a probe aircraft. The primary purpose of the program was the validation of the results of B-747 model tests which predicted significant alleviation of the vortex strength when only the inboard flaps were deflected. Measurements of the vortex-induced rolling moments of the probe aircraft showed that the predicted alleviation did occur. The effects of landing gear extension, increased lift coefficient, idle thrust, and sideslip were investigated, and all had an adverse effect on the alleviated condition as evidenced by increased induced rolling moments of the T-37B probe aircraft. Idle thrust also increased the strength of the B-747 wake vortexes with both inboard and outboard flaps extended.

  11. Results of an experimental investigation to determine separation characteristics for the Orbiter/747 using a 0.0125-scale model (48-0 AX1318I-1 747) in the Ames Research center 14-foot wind tunnel (CA23B), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.

    1976-01-01

    Separation data were obtained at a Mach number of 0.6 and three incidence angles of 4 deg, 6 deg, and 9 deg. The orbiter angle of attack was varied from 0 to 14 degrees. Longitudinal, lateral and normal separation increments were obtained for fixed 747 angles of attack of 0 deg, 2 deg, and 4 deg while varying orbiter angle of attack. Control surface settings on the 747 carrier included rudder deflections of 0 deg and 10 deg and horizontal stabilizer deflections of -1 deg and +5 deg. Photographs of tested configurations are shown.

  12. Testosterone and farnesoid X receptor agonist INT-747 counteract high fat diet-induced bladder alterations in a rabbit model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Annamaria; Comeglio, Paolo; Filippi, Sandra; Sarchielli, Erica; Cellai, Ilaria; Vignozzi, Linda; Yehiely-Cohen, Ravit; Maneschi, Elena; Gacci, Mauro; Carini, Marco; Adorini, Luciano; Vannelli, Gabriella B; Maggi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In the male, metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated to an increased risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). A recently established rabbit model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced MetS showed hypogonadism and the presence of prostate gland alterations, including inflammation, hypoxia and fibrosis. The present study investigated whether HFD-induced MetS might also alter bladder structure and function. Testosterone and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist INT-747, were evaluated for possible effects on HFD bladder. MetS rabbits develop bladder alterations, including fibrosis (reduced muscle/fiber ratio), hypoxia [2-fold increase as compared to regular diet (RD) group], low-grade inflammation (increased leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory markers) and RhoA/ROCK hyperactivity. Bladder strips from HFD rabbits, pre-contracted with carbachol, showed an overactive response to the selective ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. All these HFD-induced bladder alterations were partially blunted by testosterone and almost completely reverted by INT-747. Both treatments prevented some MetS features (glucose intolerance and visceral fat increase), thus suggesting that their effects on bladder could be ascribed to an improvement of the metabolic and/or hypogonadal state. However, a pathogenetic role for hypogonadism has been ruled out as GnRH analog-induced hypogonadal rabbits, fed a regular diet, did not show any detectable bladder alterations. In addition, INT-747 did not revert the MetS-induced hypogonadal state. FXR mRNA was highly expressed in rabbit bladder and positively associated with visceral fat increase. A direct effect of INT-747 on bladder smooth muscle was further suggested by inhibition of RhoA/ROCK-mediated activity by in vitro experiments on isolated cells. In conclusion, HFD-related MetS features are associated to bladder derangements, which are ameliorated by testosterone or INT-747 administration. INT-747 showed the most marked

  13. Incidental findings during routine pathological evaluation of gallbladder specimens: review of 1,747 elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy cases.

    PubMed

    Basak, F; Hasbahceci, M; Canbak, T; Sisik, A; Acar, A; Yucel, M; Bas, G; Alimoglu, O

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Cholecystectomy for benign gallbladder diseases can lead to previously undiagnosed gallbladder cancer during histopathological evaluation. Despite some controversy over its usefulness, histopathological evaluation of all gallbladder specimens is common in most hospitals. We evaluated the results of routine pathology of the gallbladder after cholecystectomy for benign gallbladder diseases with regard to unexpected primary gallbladder cancer (UPGC). Methods Patients undergoing cholecystectomy because of benign gallbladder diseases between 2009 and 2013 were enrolled in this study. All gallbladder specimens were sent to the pathology department, and histopathological reports were examined in detail. The impact of demographic features on pathological diagnoses and prevalence of UPGC assessed. Data on additional interventions and postoperative survival for patients with UPGC were collected. Results We enrolled 1,747 patients (mean age, 48.7±13.6 years). Chronic cholecystitis was the most common diagnosis (96.3%) and was associated significantly with being female (p=0.001). Four patients had UPGC (0.23%); one was stage T3 at the time of surgery, and the remaining three cases were stage T2. Conclusions Routine histopathological examination of the gallbladder is valuable for identification of cancer that requires further postoperative management.

  14. Mated aerodynamic characteristics investigation for 0.04-scale model Boeing 747 CAM/external tank (model AX1284 E-5) combination in the University of Washington Aeronautical Laboratory F. K. Kirsten Wind Tunnel (CA11)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.04-scale external tank (ET) force model in combination with a 0.04-scale Boeing 747 force model were conducted. Test purposes were: (1) to determine ET airloads for selected configurations and (2) to determine the effectiveness of ET position, incidence, and support structure and 747 vertical stabilizing surfaces on stability, control, and performance of 747/ET combinations. The 747 was tested alone to establish baseline data and to verify test results. Six-component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded for the 747 CAM and ET combination. Six-component force and moment data were also recorded for the ET, which was mounted on an internal balance supported by the 747. Data were recorded for angles of attack from -4 deg to +24 deg in 2 deg increments and angles of sideslip of - deg to + or - 20 deg. Testing was conducted at Mach 0.15 with dynamic pressure deg at 36 psf and unit Reynolds number of 1.3 million per foot. Photographs of test configurations are shown.

  15. Computer graphic of Lockheed Martin X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) mounted on NASA 747 ferry air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is an artist's conception of the NASA/Lockheed Martin X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator being carried on the back of the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. This was a concept for moving the X-33 from its landing site back to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The X-33 was a technology demonstrator vehicle for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). The RLV technology program was a cooperative agreement between NASA and industry. The goal of the RLV technology program was to enable significant reductions in the cost of access to space, and to promote the creation and delivery of new space services and other activities that will improve U.S. economic competitiveness. NASA Headquarter's Office of Space Access and Technology oversaw the RLV program, which was being managed by the RLV Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located in Huntsville, Alabama. Responsibilities of other NASA Centers included: Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, guidance navigation and control technology, manned space systems, and health technology; Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA., thermal protection system testing; Langley Research Center, Langley, Virginia, wind tunnel testing and aerodynamic analysis; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida, RLV operations and health management. Lockheed Martin's industry partners in the X-33 program are: Astronautics, Inc., Denver, Colorado, and Huntsville, Alabama; Engineering & Science Services, Houston, Texas; Manned Space Systems, New Orleans, LA; Sanders, Nashua, NH; and Space Operations, Titusville, Florida. Other industry partners are: Rocketdyne, Canoga Park, California; Allied Signal Aerospace, Teterboro, NJ; Rohr, Inc., Chula Vista, California; and Sverdrup Inc., St. Louis, Missouri.

  16. East Antarctic Ice Sheet fluctuations during the Middle Miocene Climatic Transition inferred from faunal and biogeochemical data on planktonic foraminifera (ODP Hole 747A, Kerguelen Plateau)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verducci, M.; Foresi, L.M.; Scott, G.H.; ,; Sprovieri, M.; Lirer, F.

    2007-01-01

    This research focuses on a detailed study of faunal and biogeochemical changes that occurred at ODP Hole 747A in the Kerguelen Plateau region of the Southern Ocean during the middle Miocene (14.8-11.8 Ma). Abundance fluctuations of several planktonic foraminiferal taxa, stable oxygen isotope and Mg/Ca ratios have been integrated as a multi-proxy approach to reach a better understanding of the growth modality and fluctuations of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) during this period. A 7°C decrease in Sea Surface Temperature (SST), an abrupt turnover in the planktonic foraminiferal assemblage, a 1.5‰ shift towards heavier δ18O values (Mi3 event) and a related shift towards heavier seawater δ118O values between 13.9 and 13.7 Ma, are interpreted to reflect rapid surface water cooling and EAIS expansion. Hole 747A data suggest a major change in the variability of the climate system fostered by EAIS expansion between 13.9 and 13.7 Ma. Ice sheet fluctuations were greater during the interval 14.8-13.9 Ma compared with those from 13.7 to 11.8 Ma, whereas the latter interval was characterized by a more stable EAIS. In our opinion, the middle Miocene ice sheet expansion in Antarctica represents a first step towards the development of the modern permanent ice sheet

  17. Shuttle Atlantis in Mate-Demate Device Being Loaded onto SCA-747 for Return to Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a night view of the orbiter Atlantis being loaded onto one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields

  18. Results of an aerodynamic investigation of a space shuttle orbiter/747 carrier vehicle configuration to establish a free-stream data base for ALT separation investigations, utilizing a 0.0125-scale model (48-0/AX1318I-1) in the ARC 14-foot wind tunnel (CA23A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillins, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Force and moment data are presented which were obtained for each vehicle separately at a Mach number of 0.6, and for the mated orbiter/747 configuration at Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7. Orbiter angles of attack from 0 degrees to +12 degrees and 747/Carrier angles of attack from -3 degrees to +7 degrees were investigated at angles of sideslip of 0 degrees and -5 degrees. Model variables include orbiter elevon and rudder deflections, orbiter tail cone-on and off, various orbiter/747 attach structure configurations, 747 stabilizer and rudder deflections, and 747 CAM modification components-on and off. Photographs of test configurations are included.

  19. B747/JT9D flight loads and their effect on engine running clearances and performance deterioration; BCAC NAIL/P and WA JT9D engine diagnostics programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsson, W. J.; Martin, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Flight loads on the 747 propulsion system and resulting JT9D blade to outer airseal running clearances during representative acceptance flight and revenue flight sequences were measured. The resulting rub induced clearance changes, and engine performance changes were then analyzed to validate and refine the JT9D-7A short term performance deterioration model.

  20. Results of a carrier aircraft (model AX13191-4) verification test in the Boeing transonic wind tunnel using a 0.03-scale 747 CAM/orbiter model 45-0 (CA6), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Force and moment data were obtained on each vehicle both mated and separated. The investigation included the effects of orbiter incidence, orbiter tail cone, orbiter strut fairings, elevon, and body flap settings. Analysis of the data indicated the 747 is suitable as a carrier of the orbiter in both the ALT launch and ferry mode. The effect of configuration changes on drag and stability was determined.

  1. RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by methyltransferase RlmAII in 23S rRNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae; interplay between two rRNA methylations responsible for telithromycin susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuma; Takaya, Akiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Adenine at position 752 in a loop of helix 35 from positions 745 to 752 in domain II of 23S rRNA is involved in binding to the ribosome of telithromycin (TEL), a member of ketolides. Methylation of guanine at position 748 by the intrinsic methyltransferase RlmAII enhances binding of telithromycin (TEL) to A752 in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have found that another intrinsic methylation of the adjacent uridine at position 747 enhances G748 methylation by RlmAII, rendering TEL susceptibility. U747 and another nucleotide, U1939, were methylated by the dual-specific methyltransferase RlmCD encoded by SP_1029 in S. pneumoniae. Inactivation of RlmCD reduced N1-methylated level of G748 by RlmAII in vivo, leading to TEL resistance when the nucleotide A2058, located in domain V of 23S rRNA, was dimethylated by the dimethyltransferase Erm(B). In vitro methylation of rRNA showed that RlmAII activity was significantly enhanced by RlmCD-mediated pre-methylation of 23S rRNA. These results suggest that RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by RlmAII, thereby facilitating TEL binding to the ribosome. PMID:26365244

  2. Nitrogen Oxides and Ozones from B-747 Measurements (NOXAR) during POLINAT 2 and SONEX: Overview and Case-Studies on Continental and Marine Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeker, Dominique; Pfister, Lenny; Brunner, Dominik; Boccippio, Dennis J.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Wernli, Heini; Selkirk, Rennie B.; Kondo, Yutaka; Koike, Matoke; Zhao, Yongjing; Staehelin, Johannes

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the project POLINAT 2 (Pollution in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor) we measured NO(x) (NO and NO2) and ozone on 98 flights through the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC) with a fully automated system permanently installed aboard an in-service Swissair B-747 airliner in the period of August to November 1997. The averaged NO, concentrations both in the NAFC and at the U.S. east coast were similar to that measured in autumn 1995 with the same system. The patchy occurrence of NO(x), enhancements up to 3000 pptv over several hundred kilometers (plumes), predominately found over the U.S. east coast lead to a log-normal NO(x) probability density function. In three case-studies we examine the origins of such plumes by combining back-trajectories with brightness temperature enhanced (IR) satellite imagery, with lightning observations from the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) or with the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) satellite. For frontal activity above the continental U.S., we demonstrate that the location of NO(x) plumes can be well explained with maps of convective influence. For another case we show that the number of lightning flashes in a cluster of marine thunderstorms is proportional to the NO(x) concentrations observed several hundred kilometers downwind of the anvil outflows and suggest that lightning was the dominant source. From the fact that in autumn the NO, maximum was found several hundred kilometers off the U.S. east coast, it can be inferred that thunderstorms triggered over the warm Gulf Stream current are an important source for the regional upper tropospheric NO(x) budget in autumn.

  3. Nitrogen Oxides and Ozone from B-747 Measurements (NOXAR) During POLINAT-2 and SONEX: Overview and Case Studies on Continental and Marine Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeker, Dominique P.; Pfister, Lenny; Brunner, Dominik; Boccippio, Dennis J.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Wernli, Heini; Selkirk, Rennie B.; Kondo, Yutaka; Koike, Matoke

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of the project POLINAT 2 (Pollution in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor) we measured NO(x) (NO and NO2) and ozone on 85 flights through the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC) with a fully automated system permanently installed aboard an in-service Swissair B-747 airliner in the period of August to November 1997. The averaged NO(x) concentrations both in the NAFC and at the U.S. east coast were similar to that measured in autumn 1995 with the same system. The patchy occurrence of NO(x) enhancements up to 3000 pptv over several hundred kilometers (plumes), predominately found over the U.S. east coast lead to a log-normal NO(x) probability density function. In three case studies we examine the origins of such plumes by combining back-trajectories with brightness temperature enhanced (IR) satellite imagery, lightning observations from the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) satellite. We demonstrate that the location of NO(x) plumes can be well explained with maps of convective influence. We show that the number of lightning flashes in cluster of marine thunderstorms is proportional to the NO(x) concentrations observed several hundred kilometers downwind of the anvil outflows. From the fact that in autumn the NO(x) maximum was found several hundred kilometers off the U.S. east coast, it can be inferred that thunderstorms triggered over the warm Gulf Stream current are major sources for the regional upper tropospheric NO(x) budget in autumn.

  4. Crew Factors in Flight Operations XII: A Survey of Sleep Quantity and Quality in On-Board Crew Rest Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Co, Elizabeth L.; Miller, Donna L.; Dinges, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Many aircraft operated on long-haul commercial airline flights are equipped with on-board crew rest facilities, or bunks, to allow crewmembers to rest during the flight. The primary objectives of this study were to gather data on how the bunks were used, the quantity and quality of sleep obtained by flight crewmembers in the facilities, and the factors that affected their sleep. A retrospective survey comprising 54 questions of varied format addressed demographics, home sleep habits, and bunk sleep habits. Crewmembers from three airlines with long-haul fleets carrying augmented crews consisting of B747-100/200, B747-400, and MD-11 aircraft equipped with bunks returned a total of 1404 completed surveys (a 37% response rate). Crewmembers from the three carriers were comparable demographically, although one carrier had older, more experienced flight crewmembers. Each group, on average, rated themselves as "good" or "very good" sleepers at home, and all groups obtained about the same average amount of sleep each night. Most were able to sleep in the bunks, and about two thirds indicated that these rest opportunities benefited their subsequent flight deck alertness and performance. Comfort, environment, and physiology (e.g., being ready for sleep) were identified as factors that most promoted sleep. Factors cited as interfering with sleep included random noise, thoughts, heat, and the need to use the bathroom. These factors, in turn, suggest potential improvements to bunk facilities and their use. Ratings of the three aircraft types suggested differences among facilities. Bunks in the MD-11 were rated significantly better than either of the B747 types, and the B747-400 bunks received better ratings than did the older, B747-100/200 facilities.

  5. Results of an aerodynamic investigation of a space shuttle orbiter/747 carrier flight test configuration to determine separation characteristics utilizing 0.0125-scale models (48-0/AX1318I-1) in the LTV 4 x 4 foot high speed wind tunnel (CA26), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillins, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Results of tests conducted on a 0.0125-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter and a 0.0125-scale model of the 747 CAM configuration in a 4 x 4-foot High Speed Wind Tunnel were presented. Force and moment data were obtained for each vehicle separately at a Mach number of 0.6 and for each vehicle in proximity to the other at Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7. The proximity effects of each vehicle on the other at separation distances (from the mated configuration) ranging from 1.5 feet to 75 feet were presented; 747 Carrier angles of attack from 0 deg to 6 deg and angles of sideslip of 0 deg and -5 deg were tested. Model variables included orbiter elevon, aileron and body flap deflections, orbiter tailcone on and off, and 747 stabilizer and rudder deflections.

  6. 75 FR 38007 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... foam insulation, a material of which the fire retardant properties deteriorate with age. We are issuing... wrapped with BMS 8-39 polyurethane foam insulation, a material of which the fire retardant properties... on the duct assemblies of the ECS, which could propagate a small fire and lead to a larger fire...

  7. 76 FR 34625 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... AD 2010-23-13 Amendment 39-16502 (75 FR 68688, November 9, 2009), for Model 757 airplanes, and are... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and (4) Will... the products listed above. This proposed AD would require modification of the fluid drain path in...

  8. 75 FR 3150 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... as of February 24, 2010. On January 29, 2007 (72 FR 1427, January 12, 2007), the Director of the... 39 to include an AD that supersedes AD 2007-01-15, amendment 39-14887 (72 FR 1427, January 12, 2007... on September 18, 2009 (74 FR 47897). That NPRM proposed to continue to require repetitive...

  9. 75 FR 61337 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... inspections to find cracking of the web, strap, inner chords, and inner chord angle of the forward edge frame... inner chord of the forward edge frame of the number 5 main entry door cutouts, between stringers 16 and... flight. DATES: This AD becomes effective November 9, 2010. The Director of the Federal Register...

  10. 75 FR 9760 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... cracks in the wing and horizontal stabilizer side-of-body joints and the fuselage skin circumferential... from Boeing analysis indicating that the wing and horizontal stabilizer side-of-body joints, and the... FR 42807). That NPRM proposed to require one-time detailed and high frequency eddy...

  11. 76 FR 38074 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-200B, 747-200C, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... for other airplanes. This proposed AD results from reports of multiple adjacent cracks on an airplane..., environmental, and energy aspects of this proposed AD. We will consider all comments received by the closing... post a report summarizing each substantive verbal contact we receive about this proposed AD....

  12. 75 FR 78591 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... the left and right override/jettison pumps of the center wing tanks. This AD also requires replacing... uncommanded operation of the override/jettison pumps of the center wing tanks, and failure to manually shut... inside the center wing tank. This condition, in combination with flammable fuel vapors, could result in...

  13. 75 FR 60661 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... right override/jettison pumps of the center wing tanks. The original NPRM would also have required.../ jettison pumps of the center wing tanks, and failure to manually shut off the override/jettison pumps at the correct time, either of which could lead to an ignition source inside the center wing tank....

  14. 75 FR 3658 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... through due to inadvertent electrical current from a short circuit in the audio select panel. We are proposing this AD to prevent inadvertent electrical current, which can cause the low-pressure flex-hoses of... inadvertent electrical current from a short circuit in the audio select panel on a Model 757 airplane....

  15. 75 FR 47208 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ...-pressure flex- hoses of the crew oxygen system that burned through due to inadvertent electrical current... electrical current, which can cause the low-pressure flex-hoses of the crew oxygen system to melt or burn... that burned through due to inadvertent electrical current from a short circuit in the audio...

  16. 75 FR 70868 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... connection will overheat with electrical current passing through it. An overheated connector can degrade the... electrical terminal at the left and right flightdeck window 1, and corrective actions if necessary. This... equipped with different electrical connections, which would terminate the repetitive inspections for...

  17. 75 FR 20792 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... Engineer, Airframe Branch, ANM-120S, FAA, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO), 1601 Lind Avenue, SW... that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), and 3....

  18. 75 FR 18446 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... installation, air distribution system Humidifier duct installation Heat exchanger installation, air... proposed AD, contact Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management, P. O. Box 3707, MC... CONTACT: Sue McCormick, Aerospace Engineer, Cabin Safety and Environmental Systems Branch, ANM-150S,...

  19. 75 FR 52907 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ..., which can develop into fatigue cracks in the skin and cause sudden decompression of the airplane. DATES..., environmental, and energy aspects of this proposed AD. We will consider all comments received by the closing... airplanes. That original NPRM was published in the Federal Register on January 31, 2008 (73 FR 5768)....

  20. 75 FR 27424 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... joint that is modified. This AD results from a structural review of affected skin lap joints for... listed in the AD as of June 21, 2010. On July 13, 1994 (59 FR 30277, June 13, 1994), the Director of the... 39 to include an AD that supersedes AD 94-12-04, Amendment 39- 8932 (59 FR 30277, June 13, 1994)....

  1. 76 FR 13067 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ..., amendment 39-15210 (72 FR 53939, September 21, 2007). That AD applies to the specified products. The NPRM was published in the Federal Register on July 8, 2010 (75 FR 39185). That NPRM proposed to continue to... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in...

  2. 75 FR 39818 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... was published in the Federal Register on April 21, 2010 (75 FR 20792). That NPRM proposed to require... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), and (3) Will... in a rapid loss of cabin pressure. DATES: This AD is effective August 17, 2010. The Director of...

  3. 75 FR 39185 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... holidays. For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Boeing Commercial Airplanes... on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov ; or in person at the Docket Management Facility... for the Docket Office (telephone 800-647-5527) is in the ADDRESSES section. Comments will be...

  4. 75 FR 37997 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal Register on October 13, 2009 (74 FR 52431). That NPRM proposed to require replacing the power... requirements of AD 97-26-07, Amendment 39-10250 (62 FR 65352, December 12, 1997). JAL states that AD 97-26-07... 39-15512 (73 FR 25990, May 8, 2008), already requires incorporation of AWLs 28-AWL-24 through 28-...

  5. X-ray scaling relations of 400d low-mass galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Siwei; Ben, Maughan; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2015-08-01

    This work investigated X-ray scaling relations of 24 galaxy clusters and groups selected from the 400 deg² survey (Burenin et al. 2007), with redshift ranges from 0.02 to 0.15. The significant advance of this work over previous studies is that the sample is complete above a flux limit of 5 × 10^(-13) erg s^(-1) cm^(-2), allowing us to correct our results for selection biases. These 24 clusters are in the low-redshift and low-mass regime. We derived the luminosity-temperature scaling relations of these 24 clusters and compared it with measurements from other samples of groups and clusters. We found that the L-T relation has deviations with respect to the self-similar model which suggests the non-gravitational process effects are important. To determine if this could be due to AGN feedback or the presence of cool-cores, we considered three factors: cuspiness, core flux ratio and X-ray morphology to divide the sample into relaxed-cool-core subsample containing 5 clusters and non-cool-core subsample containing 19 clusters, we found the cool-core factor is not as important as REXCESS data (Pratt et al. 2009) and Maughan's data (Maughan et al. 2012), thus the steepening of L-T relation is likely to come from the AGN feedback.In our analysis, we followed the methods in Mantz et al. (2010) using a Tinker mass-function (Tinker et al. 2008) and the mass-temperature relation from Sun et al.(2009) to model the selection biases in the L-T relation, and found the slope 3.13±0.44 did not change significantly compared with the L-T relation without correction 2.93±0.88, while the normalisation decreased from 1.40±0.24 to 0.39±0.14 as expected due to the Malmquist bias. We also compared the bias-corrected relation with other published works (Eckmiller et al. 2011, Lovisari et al. 2014, Bharadwaj et al. 2014), and found that their bias-corrected L-T slops are flatter than ours but normalisation are slightly larger. As a consistency check, the number of clusters predicted by our best-fitting model was compared with the number observed, and found to be consistent.

  6. Aerodynamic results of a separation test (CA20) conducted at the Boeing transonic wind tunnel using 0.030-scale models of the configuration 140A/B (modified) SSV orbiter (model no. 45-0) and the Boeing 747 carrier (model no. AX 1319 I-1), volume 1. [wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dziubala, T.; Esparza, V.; Gillins, R. L.; Petrozzi, M.

    1975-01-01

    A Rockwell built 0.030-scale 45-0 modified Space Shuttle Orbiter Configuration 14?A/B model and a Boeing built 0.030-scale 747 carrier model were tested to provide six component force and moment data for each vehicle in proximity to the other at a matrix of relative positions, attitudes and test conditions (angles of attack and sideslip were varied). Orbiter model support system tare effects were determined for corrections to obtain support-free aerodynamics. In addition to the balance force data, pressures were measured. Pressure orifices were located at the base of the Orbiter, on either side of the vertical blade strut, and at the mid-root chord on either side of the vertical tail. Strain gages were installed on the Boeing 747 vertical tail to indicate buffet onset. Photographs of aerodynamic configurations tested are shown.

  7. Results of tests CS4 and CS5 to investigate dynamic loads and pressures on 0.03-scale models (Ax1319-3/4 and 45-0) of mated 747 cam and space shuttle orbiter in the Boeing transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A 0.03-scale model of the 747 CAM/Orbiter was tested in an 8 x 12 foot transonic wind tunnel. Dynamic loads, pressure, and empennage flow field data were obtained using pressure transducers, strain gages, and a split film anemometer. The test variables included Mach number, angle of attack, sideslip angle, orbiter tailcone on and off, orbiter partial tailcone, orbiter nozzle air scoops, orbiter body flap angle, and orbiter elevon angle.

  8. Effect of amino acids residues 323-433 and 628-747 in Nsp2 of representative porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains on inflammatory response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Bai, Juan; Wang, Haiyan; Fan, Baochao; Li, Yufeng; Jiang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an important pathogen that is responsible for large economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. In PRRSV strains, many genetic variations occur in the central hypervariable region (HV2) of the Nsp2 gene, which encodes non-structural protein 2. For example, PRRSV strains VR2332, Em2007, MN184C, and TJM-F92 contained variations in the Nsp2 sequences and exhibited differing levels of virulence in adult pigs. However, the role of HV2 with respect to PRRSV immunity is unclear. In this study, four recombinant PRRSV strains (rBB/+30aa, rBB/Δ68aa, rBB/Δ111aa, and rBB/Δ120aa) were rescued using a highly pathogenic type 2 PRRSV cDNA clone (pBB). All rescued strains displayed similar growth characteristics to the parental rBB virus in pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Expression levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-β, IL-6, and TNF-α were significantly lower, at the mRNA and protein level, for groups infected with rBB/Δ111aa and rBB/Δ120aa than those in the rBB group. Levels of these inflammatory cytokines in the rBB/+30aa and rBB/Δ68aa groups were not significantly different with those in the rBB group. Phosphorylation levels of IκB were decreased to a greater extent in the rBB/Δ111aa and rBB/Δ120aa groups compared with those in the rBB/+30aa, rBB/Δ68aa, and rBB groups. Our results indicate that amino acids 323-433 and 628-747 of Nsp2 failed to exert significant effects on PRRSV replication in PAMs, but modulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines in vitro.

  9. 15 CFR 747.2 - Eligibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... United States Government; (2) The United Nations, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund... Finance Corporation, and United Nations Development Programme); and (3) Any other entities that the...

  10. 75 FR 10669 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-200B, 747-300, and 747SR Series...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ...) This AD results from a report of water contamination in the electrical and electronic units in the main... closeout panel and moisture curtains for the main equipment center. This AD results from a report of water contamination in the electrical and electronic units in the main equipment center. We are issuing this AD...

  11. 12 CFR 747.901 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., ADJUDICATIVE HEARINGS, RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Local Procedures and Standards... union either has been chartered less than 2 years; or is in “troubled condition,” as defined in §...

  12. 12 CFR 747.29 - Summary disposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) The moving part is entitled to a decision in its favor as a matter of law. (b) Filing of motions and... that he or she is entitled to a decision as a matter of law may move at any time for summary... material facts as to which the moving party contends there is no genuine issue. Such motion must...

  13. Ecological assessment of the environmental impacts of the kerosene burning in jet turbines and its improvement assessment.

    PubMed

    Geldermann, J; Gabriel, R; Rentz, O

    1999-01-01

    The burning of kerosene in jet turbines is investigated for two reference flights with a Boeing 747-400 and an Airbus A320-200, representing the typical Lufthansa planes for long and middle distance. The ecological evaluation is performed by Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Formation of condensation trails, which is a specific environmental impact caused by air traffic, has to be considered in addition to established LCA impact categories. Based on the ecological assessment, an improvement assessment is performed. Environmental performance of diesel fuel during the combustion in car engines is analysed based on available publications. The relevant parameters for the environmental impact of the combustion of diesel (aromatics content, reduction of sulphur content, the reduction of the density and raising of the cetane number) are discussed with regard to improvements of the exhaust qualities of kerosene. A reduction of the aromatics content promises to improve the emission of soot which should be further investigated. PMID:19009417

  14. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.

  15. Numerical simulation of deformation and fracture of space protective shell structures from concrete and fiber concrete under pulse loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between aircraft Boeing 747-400 and protective shell of nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as complex multilayered cellular structure comprising layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was held three-dimensionally using the author's algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. The dynamics of stress-strain state and fracture of structure were studied. Destruction is described using two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of shell cellular structure—cells start to destruct in unloading wave, originating after output of compression wave to the free surfaces of cells.

  16. Satellite and slow-scan-television observations of the rise and dispersion of ash-rich eruption clouds from Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kienle, J.; Woods, A.W.; Estes, S.A.; Ahlnaes, K.

    1992-03-01

    Polar-orbiting NOAA 10 and 11 weather satellites with their Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imaging sensors and the Landsat 4 and 5 satellites have provided over 30 images of the 1989/90 eruptions of Redoubt Volcano. Between December 14 and April 21, about 20 major explosive eruptions occurred with ash plumes rising to heights of 10 km or more, most of them penetrating the tropopause. The ash severely impacted domestic and international air traffic in Alaska with a near disaster on December 15, 1989, when a KLM 747-400 jet aircraft with 247 people aboard intercepted an ash plume and temporarily lost all four engines. Fortunately, the engines were eventually restarted after several attempts and the plane landed safely in Anchorage. The authors have used satellite and also slow-scan television (TV) observations to study the dynamics and thermodynamics of rising eruption plumes in order to better understand plume dispersal.

  17. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    SciTech Connect

    Radchenko, P. A. Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-10-27

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.

  18. A Flight Deck Perspective of Self-Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandra; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    I will be participating on a Free Flight Human Factors Panel at the Ninth International Symposium on Aviation Psychology in Columbus, Ohio. My representation is related to the work that our group has conducted on flight deck issues associate with free flight. Our group completed a full-mission simulation study investigating procedural issues associated with airborne self-separation. Ten crews flew eight scenarios each in the B747-400 simulator at Ames. Each scenario had a representation of different conflict geometries with intruder aircraft. New alerting logic was created and integrated into the simulator to enable self-separation. In addition, new display features were created to help provide for enhanced information to the flight crew about relevant aircraft, The participants were asked to coordinate maneuvers for self-separation with the intruder aircraft. Data analyses for the many of the crew procedures have been completed.

  19. Control Reallocation Strategies for Damage Adaptation in Transport Class Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Krishnakumar, K.; Limes, Greg; Bryant, Don

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the feasibility, potential benefits and implementation issues associated with retrofitting a neural-adaptive flight control system (NFCS) to existing transport aircraft, including both cable/hydraulic and fly-by-wire configurations. NFCS uses a neural network based direct adaptive control approach for applying alternate sources of control authority in the presence of damage or failures in order to achieve desired flight control performance. Neural networks are used to provide consistent handling qualities across flight conditions, adapt to changes in aircraft dynamics and to make the controller easy to apply when implemented on different aircraft. Full-motion piloted simulation studies were performed on two different transport models: the Boeing 747-400 and the Boeing C-17. Subjects included NASA, Air Force and commercial airline pilots. Results demonstrate the potential for improving handing qualities and significantly increased survivability rates under various simulated failure conditions.

  20. Joint ASRS and NASA Callback on FANS-1 Datalink Operational Incidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, John; Smith, Nancy; Morrison, Rowena; Palmer, Everett; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The recent certification and implementation of the Future Air Navigation System (FANS- 1) was based on the benefits of reduced separation minima, ability to optimize flight plans enroute, and the prompt transmission and reception of messages between oceanic controllers and 747-400 aircraft transiting the Pacific. In addition, FANS was intended to supersede High Frequency (HF) radio which has been the staple, yet problematic, long distance communication link for years. However, in the three initial years of operation, FANS has revealed its own unique operational issues. Although some technical and engineering problems have been studied and addressed, little research has been conducted on human factors issues associated with the use of FANS on the flight deck. This lack of prior data on the operational use of FANS prompted a joint NASA/Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) inquiry into FANS datalink. In addition, two foreign air carriers and their respective safety agencies were recruited to participate. This international FANS research effort consisting of three aviation safety agencies and three international commercial air-carriers has provided a unique opportunity for conducting human factors research in an operational environment. An ASRS 'callback' format was chosen for the study as a practical and viable method for capturing FANS events on the flight deck. Initially, 747-400 pilots were encouraged to submit reports to their respective safety agencies if they had experienced any positive or negative incidents with the use of FANS. Upon receipt of a report, it was evaluated and if deemed pertinent to the study, a telephone interview or 'callback' was conducted on the FANS incident to elicit further details, capture the key events, and gather contextual information. Once the operational data collection phase was completed, the reports and interviews were analyzed with two purposes in mind: primarily to identify and address problematic human factors issues with

  1. Line Pilots' Attitudes about and Experience with Flight Deck Automation: Results of an International Survey and Proposed Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudisill, Marianne

    1995-01-01

    A survey of line pilots' attitudes about flight deck automation was conducted by the Royal Air Force Institute of Aviation Medicine (RAF IAM, Farnborough, UK) under the sponsorship of the United Kingdom s Civil Aviation Authority and in cooperation with IATA (the International Air Transport Association). Survey freehand comments given by pilots operating 13 types of commercial transports across five manufacturers (Airbus, Boeing, British Aerospace, Lockheed, and McDonnell-Douglas) and 57 air carriers/organizations were analyzed by NASA. These data provide a "lessons learned" knowledge base which may be used for the definition of guidelines for flight deck automation and its associated crew interface within the High Speed Research Program. The aircraft chosen for analysis represented a progression of levels of automation sophistication and complexity, from "Basic" types (e.g., B727, DC9), through "Transition" types (e.g., A300, Concorde), to two levels of glass cockpits (e.g., Glass 1: e.g., A310; Glass 2: e.g., B747-400). This paper reports the results of analyses of comments from pilots flying commercial transport types having the highest level of automation sophistication (B757/B767, B747-400, and A320). Comments were decomposed into five categories relating to: (1) general observations with regard to flight deck automation; comments concerning the (2) design and (3) crew understanding of automation and the crew interface; (4) crew operations with automation; and (5) personal factors affecting crew/automation interaction. The goal of these analyses is to contribute to the definition of guidelines which may be used during design of future aircraft flight decks.

  2. 78 FR 60670 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 747-100, -100B, -100B SUD, -200B, -200C, - 200F, -300, -400, -400D, -400F, and 747SR series airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of cracking at the aft upper corner of the main entry door (MED) 5 cutout. This AD requires inspecting for the presence of repairs and measuring the edge margin at certain......

  3. 75 FR 61977 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-200B, and 747-200F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ..., Amendment 39- 6653 (55 FR 28600, July 12, 1990), and AD 94-12-09, Amendment 39-8937 (59 FR 30285, June 13... NPRM was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35356). That NPRM proposed to... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have a significant...

  4. The Integrated Mode Management Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    1996-01-01

    Mode management is the processes of understanding the character and consequences of autoflight modes, planning and selecting the engagement, disengagement and transitions between modes, and anticipating automatic mode transitions made by the autoflight system itself. The state of the art is represented by the latest designs produced by each of the major airframe manufacturers, the Boeing 747-400, the Boeing 777, the McDonnell Douglas MD-11, and the Airbus A320/A340 family of airplanes. In these airplanes autoflight modes are selected by manipulating switches on the control panel. The state of the autoflight system is displayed on the flight mode annunciators. The integrated mode management interface (IMMI) is a graphical interface to autoflight mode management systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The interface consists of a vertical mode manager and a lateral mode manager. Autoflight modes are depicted by icons on a graphical display. Mode selection is accomplished by touching (or mousing) the appropriate icon. The IMMI provides flight crews with an integrated interface to autoflight systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The current version is modeled on the Boeing glass-cockpit airplanes (747-400, 757/767). It runs on the SGI Indigo workstation. A working prototype of this graphics-based crew interface to the autoflight mode management tasks of glass cockpit airplanes has been installed in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator of the CSSRF of NASA Ames Research Center. This IMMI replaces the devices in FMCS equipped airplanes currently known as mode control panel (Boeing), flight guidance control panel (McDonnell Douglas), and flight control unit (Airbus). It also augments the functions of the flight mode annunciators. All glass cockpit airplanes are sufficiently similar that the IMMI could be tailored to the mode management system of any modern cockpit. The IMMI does not replace the

  5. 27 CFR 19.747 - Records of manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... shall be summarized showing (1) the spirits received from storage or production at the same plant, (2..., and other ingredients used in the manufacture of a distilled spirits products showing the serial..., showing the serial numbers of the bottling and packaging records covering such bottling or packaging....

  6. 12 CFR 747.12 - Construction of time limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Federal holiday. When the last day is a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday, the period runs until the end of the next day that is not a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays are included in the computation of time. However, when the time...

  7. 40 CFR 60.747 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring only the carbon adsorption system outlet concentration levels of organic compounds, the periods.... (i) For carbon adsorption systems with a common exhaust stack for all the individual adsorber vessels, all periods of three consecutive system rotations through the adsorption cycles of all the...

  8. 12 CFR 747.604 - Standards for award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... for NCUA. To avoid an award, counsel for NCUA must show that its position was reasonable in law and in... segregation of costs is not practicable, the award may be based on a fair proration of those fees and...

  9. 12 CFR 747.604 - Standards for award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for NCUA. To avoid an award, counsel for NCUA must show that its position was reasonable in law and in... segregation of costs is not practicable, the award may be based on a fair proration of those fees and...

  10. 12 CFR 747.604 - Standards for award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... for NCUA. To avoid an award, counsel for NCUA must show that its position was reasonable in law and in... segregation of costs is not practicable, the award may be based on a fair proration of those fees and...

  11. 40 CFR 60.747 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... monitoring only the carbon adsorption system outlet concentration levels of organic compounds, the periods.... (i) For carbon adsorption systems with a common exhaust stack for all the individual adsorber vessels... recent performance test that demonstrated compliance. (ii) For carbon adsorption systems with...

  12. 40 CFR 60.747 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... monitoring only the carbon adsorption system outlet concentration levels of organic compounds, the periods.... (i) For carbon adsorption systems with a common exhaust stack for all the individual adsorber vessels... recent performance test that demonstrated compliance. (ii) For carbon adsorption systems with...

  13. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... an accuracy of 1% into the heat transfer medium within 1/8 inch of, but not touching, the sample. (4... sample at the point of loading as the temperature of the medium is increased at a uniform rate of...

  14. 30 CFR 74.7 - Design and construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz) and 47 CFR... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Persons may obtain a copy from: American...) and 1 CFR part 51. (i) Persons may obtain a copy from the International Electrotechnical Commission...

  15. 12 CFR 747.2005 - Enforcement of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... worth restoration plan under subpart B of part 702 of this chapter or a revised business plan under subpart C of part 702, regardless whether the plan was published. (c) Other enforcement action. In... such violation or noncompliance. (2) Failure to implement plan. Pursuant to 12 U.S.C....

  16. 78 FR 747 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...: ] Douglas Unincorporated The Honorable Jack Douglas County http:// January 11, 2013 080049 areas of Douglas Hilbert, Department of www.bakeraecom.c County (12-08- Chairman, Douglas Public Works, om/index.php/ 0727P). County Board of Engineering colorado/douglas- Commissioners, Division, 100 2/. 100 3rd Street, 3rd...

  17. 40 CFR 60.747 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adsorption cycles of all the individual adsorber vessels during which the average carbon adsorption system... monitoring only the carbon adsorption system outlet concentration levels of organic compounds, the periods.... (i) For carbon adsorption systems with a common exhaust stack for all the individual adsorber...

  18. 40 CFR 60.747 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adsorption cycles of all the individual adsorber vessels during which the average carbon adsorption system... monitoring only the carbon adsorption system outlet concentration levels of organic compounds, the periods.... (i) For carbon adsorption systems with a common exhaust stack for all the individual adsorber...

  19. 12 CFR 747.24 - Scope of document discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... purposes of a request to produce documents, the term “documents” may be defined to include drawings, graphs... delivered to the requesting party and fails to include the requester's written agreement to pay in advance... discoverable. Privileges include the attorney-client privilege, work-product privilege, any government's...

  20. 12 CFR 747.24 - Scope of document discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... purposes of a request to produce documents, the term “documents” may be defined to include drawings, graphs... delivered to the requesting party and fails to include the requester's written agreement to pay in advance... discoverable. Privileges include the attorney-client privilege, work-product privilege, any government's...

  1. 12 CFR 747.24 - Scope of document discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... purposes of a request to produce documents, the term “documents” may be defined to include drawings, graphs... delivered to the requesting party and fails to include the requester's written agreement to pay in advance... discoverable. Privileges include the attorney-client privilege, work-product privilege, any government's...

  2. 12 CFR 747.24 - Scope of document discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... purposes of a request to produce documents, the term “documents” may be defined to include drawings, graphs... delivered to the requesting party and fails to include the requester's written agreement to pay in advance... discoverable. Privileges include the attorney-client privilege, work-product privilege, any government's...

  3. 12 CFR 747.24 - Scope of document discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... purposes of a request to produce documents, the term “documents” may be defined to include drawings, graphs... delivered to the requesting party and fails to include the requester's written agreement to pay in advance... discoverable. Privileges include the attorney-client privilege, work-product privilege, any government's...

  4. 30 CFR 74.7 - Design and construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz) and 47 CFR... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Persons may obtain a copy from: American...) and 1 CFR part 51. (i) Persons may obtain a copy from the International Electrotechnical Commission...

  5. 28 CFR 74.7 - Notification of eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... legal guardian, and a request for documentation of identity. (b) The declaration and submitted documents... include a request for the following information: (1) Current legal name; (2) Proof of name change if the... certificate or other evidence of the name change as described in appendix A; (3) Date of birth; (4) Proof...

  6. 30 CFR 74.7 - Design and construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz) and 47 CFR... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Persons may obtain a copy from: American...) and 1 CFR part 51. (i) Persons may obtain a copy from the International Electrotechnical Commission...

  7. 15 CFR 747.5 - SIRL application review process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ... contribute to the reconstruction of Iraq; (iii) If the proposed transaction could contribute to the design... potential impact of the proposed transaction on the security situation in Iraq; and (v) The reliability...

  8. 15 CFR 747.5 - SIRL application review process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ... contribute to the reconstruction of Iraq; (iii) If the proposed transaction could contribute to the design... potential impact of the proposed transaction on the security situation in Iraq; and (v) The reliability...

  9. 15 CFR 747.5 - SIRL application review process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ... contribute to the reconstruction of Iraq; (iii) If the proposed transaction could contribute to the design... potential impact of the proposed transaction on the security situation in Iraq; and (v) The reliability...

  10. 15 CFR 747.5 - SIRL application review process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ... contribute to the reconstruction of Iraq; (iii) If the proposed transaction could contribute to the design... potential impact of the proposed transaction on the security situation in Iraq; and (v) The reliability...

  11. 15 CFR 747.5 - SIRL application review process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL IRAQ... contribute to the reconstruction of Iraq; (iii) If the proposed transaction could contribute to the design... potential impact of the proposed transaction on the security situation in Iraq; and (v) The reliability...

  12. STS-68 on Runway with 747 SCA - Columbia Ferry Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Endeavour receives a high-flying salute from its sister shuttle, Columbia, atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, shortly after Endeavor's landing 12 October 1994, at Edwards, California, to complete mission STS-68. Columbia was being ferried from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it will undergo six months of inspections, modifications, and systems upgrades. The STS-68 11-day mission was devoted to radar imaging of Earth's geological features with the Space Radar Laboratory. The orbiter is surrounded by equipment and personnel that make up the ground support convoy that services the space vehicles as soon as they land. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttl

  13. Flight-Deck Strategies and Outcomes When Flying Schedule-Matching Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneshige, John T.; Sharma, Shivanjli; Martin Lynne; Lozito, Sandra; Dulchinos, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies at NASA Ames Research Center have investigated the development and use of ground-based (air traffic controller) tools to manage and schedule air traffic in future terminal airspace. An exploratory study was undertaken to investigate the impacts that such tools (and concepts) could have on the flight-deck. Ten Boeing 747-400 crews flew eight optimized profile descents in the Los Angeles terminal airspace, while receiving scripted current day and futuristic speed clearances, to ascertain their ability to fly schedulematching descents without prior training. Although the study was exploratory in nature, four variables were manipulated: route constraints, winds, speed changes, and clearance phraseology. Despite flying the same scenarios with the same events and timing, there were significant differences in the time it took crews to fly the approaches. This variation is the product of a number of factors but highlights potential difficulties for scheduling tools that would have to accommodate this amount of natural variation in descent times. The focus of this paper is the examination of the crews' aircraft management strategies and outcomes. This includes potentially problematic human-automation interaction issues that may negatively impact arrival times, speed and altitude constraint compliance, and energy management efficiency.

  14. Advanced Configurations for Very Large Subsonic Transport Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMasters, John H.; Paisley, David J.; Hubert, Richard J.; Kroo, Ilan; Bofah, Kwasi K.; Sullivan, John P.; Drela, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Recent aerospace industry interest in developing a subsonic commercial transport airplane with 50 percent greater passenger capacity than the largest existing aircraft in this category (the Boeing 747-400 with approximately 400-450 seats) has generated a range of proposals based largely on the configuration paradigm established nearly 50 years ago with the Boeing B-47 bomber. While this basic configuration paradigm has come to dominate subsonic commercial airplane development since the advent of the Boeing 707/Douglas DC-8 in the mid-1950's, its extrapolation to the size required to carry more than 600-700 passengers raises several questions. To explore these and a number of related issues, a team of Boeing, university, and NASA engineers was formed under the auspices of the NASA Advanced Concepts Program. The results of a Research Analysis focused on a large, unconventional transport airplane configuration for which Boeing has applied for a patent are the subject of this report. It should be noted here that this study has been conducted independently of the Boeing New Large Airplane (NLA) program, and with the exception of some generic analysis tools which may be common to this effort and the NLA (as will be described later), no explicit Boeing NLA data other than that published in the open literature has been used in the conduct of the study reported here.

  15. Teaching Cockpit Automation in the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casner, Stephen M.

    2003-01-01

    This study explores the idea of teaching fundamental cockpit automation concepts and skills to aspiring professional pilots in a classroom setting, without the use of sophisticated aircraft or equipment simulators. Pilot participants from a local professional pilot academy completed eighteen hours of classroom instruction that placed a strong emphasis on understanding the underlying principles of cockpit automation systems and their use in a multi-crew cockpit. The instructional materials consisted solely of a single textbook. Pilots received no hands-on instruction or practice during their training. At the conclusion of the classroom instruction, pilots completed a written examination testing their mastery of what had been taught during the classroom meetings. Following the written exam, each pilot was given a check flight in a full-mission Level D simulator of a Boeing 747-400 aircraft. Pilots were given the opportunity to fly one practice leg, and were then tested on all concepts and skills covered in the class during a second leg. The results of the written exam and simulator checks strongly suggest that instruction delivered in a traditional classroom setting can lead to high levels of preparation without the need for expensive airplane or equipment simulators.

  16. Re-Examination of Mixed Media Communication: The Impact of Voice, Data Link, and Mixed Air Traffic Control Environments on the Flight Deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, Melisa; McGann, Alison; Mackintosh, Margaret-Anne; Lozito, Sandra; Ashford, Rose (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A simulation in the B747-400 was conducted at NASA Ames Research Center that compared how crews handled voice and data link air traffic control (ATC) messages in a single medium versus a mixed voice and data link ATC environment The interval between ATC messages was also varied to examine the influence of time pressure in voice, data link, and mixed ATC environments. For messages sent via voice, transaction times were lengthened in the mixed media environment for closely spaced messages. The type of environment did not affect data link times. However, messages times were lengthened in both single and mixed-modality environments under time pressure. Closely spaced messages also increased the number of requests for clarification for voice messages in the mixed environment and review menu use for data link messages. Results indicated that when time pressure is introduced, the mix of voice and data link does not necessarily capitalize on the advantages of both media. These findings emphasize the need to develop procedures for managing communication in mixed voice and data link environments.

  17. Demonstration of a Probabilistic Technique for the Determination of Economic Viability of Very Large Transport Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri N.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, modem aircraft design has experienced a paradigm shift from designing for performance to designing for affordability. This report contains a probabilistic approach that will allow traditional deterministic design methods to be extended to account for disciplinary, economic, and technological uncertainty. The probabilistic approach was facilitated by the Fast Probability Integration (FPI) technique; a technique which allows the designer to gather valuable information about the vehicle's behavior in the design space. This technique is efficient for assessing multi-attribute, multi-constraint problems in a more realistic fashion. For implementation purposes, this technique is applied to illustrate how both economic and technological uncertainty associated with a Very Large Transport aircraft concept may be assessed. The assessment is evaluated with the FPI technique to determine the cumulative probability distributions of the design space, as bound by economic objectives and performance constraints. These distributions were compared to established targets for a comparable large capacity aircraft, similar in size to the Boeing 747-400. The conventional baseline configuration design space was determined to be unfeasible and marginally viable, motivating the infusion of advanced technologies, including reductions in drag, specific fuel consumption, wing weight, and Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation costs. The resulting system design space was qualitatively assessed with technology metric "k" factors. The infusion of technologies shifted the VLT design into regions of feasibility and greater viability. The study also demonstrated a method and relationship by which the impact of new technologies may be assessed in a more system focused approach.

  18. Air Launch: Examining Performance Potential of Various Configurations and Growth Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Eric D.; Creech, Dennis M.; Philips, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a high-level analysis of various air launch vehicle configurations, objectively determining maximum launch vehicle payload while considering carrier aircraft capabilities and given dimensional constraints. With the renewed interest in aerial launch of low-earth orbit payloads, referenced by programs such as Stratolaunch and Spaceship2, there existed a need to qualify the boundaries of the trade space, identify performance envelopes, and understand advantages and limiting factors of designing for maximum payload capability. Using the NASA/DARPA Horizontal Launch Study (HLS) Point Design 2 (PD-2) as a point-of-departure configuration, two independent design actions were undertaken. Both configurations utilized a Boeing 747-400F as the carrier aircraft, LOX/RP-1 first stage and LOX/LH2 second stage. Each design was sized to meet dimensional and mass constraints while optimizing propellant loads and stage delta V (?V) splits. All concepts, when fully loaded, exceeded the allowable Gross Takeoff Weight (GTOW) of the aircraft platform. This excess mass was evaluated as propellant/fuel offload available for a potential in-flight refueling scenario. Results indicate many advantages such as large, relative payload delivery of approximately 47,000 lbm and significant mission flexibility, such as variable launch site inclination and launch window; however, in-flight cryogenic fluid transfer and carrier aircraft platform integration are substantial technical hurdles to the realization of such a system configuration.

  19. A Survey of Flight Crew Experience with FANS-1 ATC Datalink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nancy; Moses, John; Polson, Peter,; Romahn, Stephen; Palmer, Everett; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A survey was used to collect data from Boeing 747-400 pilots who fly with three international carriers about their operational experience using FANS-1 CPDLC (controller-pilot datalink communication) for oceanic communication with air traffic control (ATC). The survey provides data characterizing the operators' experiences performing all routine datalink communication tasks, with the goal of determining how well the FANS-1 CPDLC system supports task performance, the problems flight crews experience when using the system, and the possible operational consequences of those problems. Survey questions were developed from an analysis of activities performed by pilots when using FANS-1 CPDLC. Seven routine tasks were identified: (1) preflight initialization; (2) ATC facility logon; (3) monitoring ATC facility handoffs; (4) monitoring integrity of FANS- 1 CPDLC connection; (5) responding to ATC communications; (6) sending ATC requests; and (7) sending ATC position reports. A decomposition of each task described its information requirements, task timing requirements, user interface actions, company procedures and documentation, and the available cues and feedback provided by the interface. This analysis was used to determine where the system might provide poor support for task performance, and survey questions were developed to determine whether operator experience reflected problems in these areas.

  20. An Evaluation of Aircraft Emissions Inventory Methodology by Comparisons with Reported Airline Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daggett, D. L.; Sutkus, D. J.; DuBois, D. P.; Baughcum, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides results of work done to evaluate the calculation methodology used in generating aircraft emissions inventories. Results from the inventory calculation methodology are compared to actual fuel consumption data. Results are also presented that show the sensitivity of calculated emissions to aircraft payload factors. Comparisons of departures made, ground track miles flown and total fuel consumed by selected air carriers were made between U.S. Dept. of Transportation (DOT) Form 41 data reported for 1992 and results of simplified aircraft emissions inventory calculations. These comparisons provide an indication of the magnitude of error that may be present in aircraft emissions inventories. To determine some of the factors responsible for the errors quantified in the DOT Form 41 analysis, a comparative study of in-flight fuel flow data for a specific operator's 747-400 fleet was conducted. Fuel consumption differences between the studied aircraft and the inventory calculation results may be attributable to several factors. Among these are longer flight times, greater actual aircraft weight and performance deterioration effects for the in-service aircraft. Results of a parametric study on the variation in fuel use and NOx emissions as a function of aircraft payload for different aircraft types are also presented.

  1. Free Flight Simulation: An Initial Examination of Air-Ground Integration Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandra; McGann, Alison; Cashion, Patricia; Dunbar, Melisa; Mackintosh, Margaret; Dulchinos, Victoria; Jordan, Kevin; Remington, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The concept of "free flight" is intended to emphasize more flexibility for operators in the National Airspace System (RTCA, 1995). This may include the potential for aircraft self-separation. The purpose of this simulation was to begin examining some of the communication and procedural issues associated with self-separation in an integrated air-ground environment. Participants were 10 commercial U.S. flight crews who flew the B747-400 simulator and 10 Denver ARTCC controllers who monitored traffic in an ATC simulation. A prototypic airborne alerting logic and flight deck display features were designed to allow for increased traffic and maneuvering information. Eight different scenarios representing different conflict types were developed. The effects of traffic density (high and low) and different traffic convergence angles (obtuse, acute, and right) were assessed. Conflict detection times were found to be lower for the flight crews in low density compared to high density scenarios. For the controllers, an interaction between density and convergence angle was revealed. Analyses on the controller detection times found longer detection times in the obtuse high density compared to obtuse low density, as well as the shortest detection times in the high density acute angle condition. Maneuvering and communication events are summarized, and a discussion of future research issues is provided.

  2. Engine Company Evaluation of Feasibility of Aircraft Retrofit Water-Injected Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    This study supports the NASA Glenn Research Center and the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory in their efforts to evaluate the effect of water injection on aircraft engine performance and emissions. In this study, water is only injected during the takeoff and initial climb phase of a flight. There is no water injection during engine start or ground operations, nor during climb, cruise, descent, or landing. This study determined the maintenance benefit of water injection during takeoff and initial climb and evaluated the feasibility of retrofitting a current production engine, the PW4062 (Pratt & Whitney, East Hartford, CT), with a water injection system. Predicted NO(x) emissions based on a 1:1 water-tofuel ratio are likely to be reduced between 30 to 60 percent in Environmental Protection Agency parameter (EPAP). The maintenance cost benefit for an idealized combustor water injection system installed on a PW4062 engine in a Boeing 747-400ER aircraft (The Boeing Company, Chicago, IL) is computed to be $22 per engine flight hour (EFH). Adding water injection as a retrofit kit would cost up to $375,000 per engine because of the required modifications to the fuel system and addition of the water supply system. There would also be significant nonrecurring costs associated with the development and certification of the system that may drive the system price beyond affordability.

  3. The Cognitive Consequences of Patterns of Information Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    1999-01-01

    The flight deck of a modern commercial airliner is a complex system consisting of two or more crew and a suite of technological devices. The flight deck of the state-of-the-art Boeing 747-400 is shown. When everything goes right, all modern flight decks are easy to use. When things go sour, however, automated flight decks provide opportunities for new kinds of problems. A recent article in Aviation Week cited industry concern over the problem of verifying the safety of complex systems on automated, digital aircraft, stating that the industry must "guard against the kind of incident in which people and the automation seem to mismanage a minor occurrence or non-routine situation into larger trouble." The design of automated flight deck systems that flight crews find easy to use safely is a challenge in part because this design activity requires a theoretical perspective which can simultaneously cover the interactions of people with each other and with technology. In this paper, some concepts that can be used to understand the flight deck as a system that is composed of two or more pilots and a complex suite of automated devices is introduced.

  4. Can Water-Injected Turbomachines Provide Cost-Effective Emissions and Maintenance Reductions?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Daggett, David L.; Shouse, Dale T.; Roquemore, William M.; Brankovic, Andreja; Ryder, Robert C., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    An investigation has been performed to evaluate the effect of water injection on the performance of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB)) experimental trapped vortex combustor (TVC) over a range of fuel-to-air and water-to-fuel ratios. Performance is characterized by combustor exit quantities: temperature and emissions measurements using rakes, and overall pressure drop, from upstream plenum to combustor exit. Combustor visualization is performed using gray-scale and color still photographs and high-frame-rate videos. A parallel investigation evaluated the performance of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool for the prediction of the reacting flow in a liquid fueled combustor (e.g., TVC) that uses water injection for control of pollutant emissions and turbine inlet temperature. Generally, reasonable agreement is found between data and NO(x) computations. Based on a study assessing the feasibility and performance impact of using water injection on a Boeing 747-400 aircraft to reduce NO(x) emissions during takeoff, retrofitting does not appear to be cost effective; however, an operator of a newly designed engine and airframe might be able to save up to 1.0 percent in operating costs. Other challenges of water injection will be discussed.

  5. Air Launch: Examining Performance Potential of Various Configurations and Growth Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Eric D.; Creech, Dennis M.; Philips, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a high-level analysis of various air launch vehicle configurations, objectively determining maximum launch vehicle payload while considering carrier aircraft capabilities and given dimensional constraints. With the renewed interest in aerial launch of low-earth orbit payloads, referenced by programs such as Stratolaunch and Spaceship2, there exists a need to qualify the boundaries of the trade space, identify performance envelopes, and understand advantages and limiting factors of designing for maximum payload capability. Using the NASA/DARPA Horizontal Launch Study (HLS) Point Design 2 (PD-2) as a pointof- departure configuration, two independent design actions were undertaken. Both designs utilized a Boeing 747-400F as the carrier aircraft, LOX/RP-1 first stage and LOX/LH2 second stage. Each design was sized to meet dimensional and mass constraints while optimizing propellant loads and stage delta V splits. All concepts, when fully loaded, exceeded the allowable Gross Takeoff Weight (GTOW) of the aircraft platform. This excess mass was evaluated as propellant/fuel offload available for a potential in-flight propellant loading scenario. Results indicate many advantages such as payload delivery of approximately 47,000 lbm and significant mission flexibility including variable launch site inclination and launch window. However, in-flight cryogenic fluid transfer and carrier aircraft platform integration are substantial technical hurdles to the realization of such a system configuration.

  6. Experimental Evaluation of an Integrated Datalink and Automation-Based Strategic Trajectory Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Eric

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents research on the interoperability of trajectory-based automation concepts and technologies with modern Flight Management Systems and datalink communication available on many of today s commercial aircraft. A tight integration of trajectory-based ground automation systems with the aircraft Flight Management System through datalink will enable mid-term and far-term benefits from trajectory-based automation methods. A two-way datalink connection between the trajectory-based automation resident in the Center/TRACON Automation System and the Future Air Navigation System-1 integrated FMS/datalink in NASA Ames B747-400 Level D simulator has been established and extensive simulation of the use of datalink messages to generate strategic trajectories completed. A strategic trajectory is defined as an aircraft deviation needed to solve a conflict or honor a route request and then merge the aircraft back to its nominal preferred trajectory using a single continuous trajectory clearance. Engineers on the ground side of the datalink generated lateral and vertical trajectory clearances and transmitted them to the Flight Management System of the 747; the airborne automation then flew the new trajectory without human intervention, requiring the flight crew only to review and to accept the trajectory. This simulation established the protocols needed for a significant majority of the trajectory change types required to solve a traffic conflict or deviate around weather. This demonstration provides a basis for understanding the requirements for integration of trajectory-based automation with current Flight Management Systems and datalink to support future National Airspace System operations.

  7. Integration of Multiple Non-Normal Checklist Procedures into a Single Checklist Procedure for Transport Aircraft: A Preliminary Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foernsler, Lynda J.

    1996-01-01

    Checklists are used by the flight crew to properly configure an aircraft for safe flight and to ensure a high level of safety throughout the duration of the flight. In addition, the checklist provides a sequential framework to meet cockpit operational requirements, and it fosters cross-checking of the flight deck configuration among crew members. This study examined the feasibility of integrating multiple checklists for non-normal procedures into a single procedure for a typical transport aircraft. For the purposes of this report, a typical transport aircraft is one that represents a midpoint between early generation aircraft (B-727/737-200 and DC-10) and modern glass cockpit aircraft (B747-400/777 and MD-11). In this report, potential conflicts among non-normal checklist items during multiple failure situations for a transport aircraft are identified and analyzed. The non-normal checklist procedure that would take precedence for each of the identified multiple failure flight conditions is also identified. The rationale behind this research is that potential conflicts among checklist items might exist when integrating multiple checklists for non-normal procedures into a single checklist. As a rule, multiple failures occurring in today's highly automated and redundant system transport aircraft are extremely improbable. In addition, as shown in this analysis, conflicts among checklist items in a multiple failure flight condition are exceedingly unlikely. The possibility of a multiple failure flight condition occurring with a conflict among checklist items is so remote that integration of the non-normal checklists into a single checklist appears to be a plausible option.

  8. Controlled breaks as a fatigue countermeasure on the flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neri, David F.; Oyung, Raymond L.; Colletti, Laura M.; Mallis, Melissa M.; Tam, Patricia Y.; Dinges, David F.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A major challenge for flight crews is the need to maintain vigilance during long, highly automated nighttime flights. No system currently exists to assist in managing alertness, and countermeasure options are limited. Surveys reveal many pilots use breaks as an in-flight countermeasure, but there have been no controlled studies of their effectiveness. HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized that brief, regular breaks could improve alertness and performance during an overnight flight. METHOD: A 6-h, uneventful, nighttime flight in a Boeing 747-400 flight simulator was flown by fourteen two-man crews. The 14 subjects in the treatment group received 5 short breaks spaced hourly during cruise; the 14 subjects in the control group received 1 break in the middle of cruise. Continuous EEG/EOG, subjective sleepiness, and psychomotor vigilance performance data were collected. RESULTS: During the latter part of the night, the treatment group showed significant reductions for 15 min post-break in slow eye movements, theta-band activity, and unintended sleep episodes compared with the control group. The treatment group reported significantly greater subjective alertness for up to 25 min post-break, with strongest effects near the time of the circadian trough. There was no evidence of objective vigilance performance improvement at 15-25 min post-break, with expected performance deterioration occurring due to elevated sleep drive and circadian time. CONCLUSIONS: The physiological and subjective data indicate the breaks reduced nighttime sleepiness for at least 15 min post-break and may have masked sleepiness for up to 25 min, suggesting the potential usefulness of short-duration breaks as an in-flight fatigue countermeasure.

  9. Flying Schedule-Matching Descents to Explore Flight Crews' Perceptions of Their Load and Task Feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lynne Hazel; Sharma, Shivanjli; Lozito, Sharon; Kaneshige, John; Hayashi, Miwa; Dulchinos, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies have investigated the development and use of ground-based (controller) tools to manage and schedule traffic in future terminal airspace. No studies have investigated the impacts that such tools (and concepts) could have on the flight-deck. To begin to redress the balance, an exploratory study investigated the procedures and actions of ten Boeing-747-400 crews as they flew eight continuous descent approaches in the Los Angeles terminal airspace, with the descents being controlled using speed alone. Although the study was exploratory in nature, four variables were manipulated: speed changes, route constraints, clearance phraseology, and winds. Despite flying the same scenarios with the same events and timing, there was at least a 50 second difference in the time it took crews to fly the approaches. This variation is the product of a number of factors but highlights potential difficulties for scheduling tools that would have to accommodate this amount of natural variation in descent times. The primary focus of this paper is the potential impact of ground scheduling tools on the flight crews performance and procedures. Crews reported "moderate to low" workload, on average; however, short periods of intense and high workload were observed. The non-flying pilot often reported a higher level of workload than the flying-pilot, which may be due to their increased interaction with the Flight Management Computer, when using the aircraft automation to assist with managing the descent clearances. It is concluded that ground-side tools and automation may have a larger impact on the current-day flight-deck than was assumed and that studies investigating this impact should continue in parallel with controller support tool development.

  10. The 1989-1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska: impacts on aircraft operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    The December 1989-June 1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano affected commercial and military air operations in the vicinity of Anchorage, Alaska. These effects were due to the direct impact of volcanic ash on jet aircraft, as well as to the rerouting and cancellations of flight operations owing to eruptive activity. Between December and February, five commercial jetliners were damaged from ash encounters. The most serious incident took place on December 15, 1989 when a Boeing 747-400 aircraft temporarily lost power of all four engines after encountering an ash cloud as the airplane descended for a landing in Anchorage. While there were no injuries to passengers, the damage to engines, avionics, and aircraft structure from this encounter is estimated at $80 million. Four additional encounters between jet aircraft and Redoubt ash clouds occurred in the Anchorage area on December 15 and 16, 1989 and February 21, 1990; none resulted in engine failure. Two additional encounters took place on December 17, 1989 when jet airliners encountered the Redoubt cloud over west Texas. At the time of these encounters, the cloud was up to 55 hours old and had traveled in excess of 2,900 nautical miles (5,300 km). Following the December 15 encounters, Anchorage International Airport remained open, however, most airline companies canceled operations for up to several days. As communications between Federal agencies and airlines improved, and as a better understanding of the nature and behavior of ash-rich eruption clouds was achieved, most airlines resumed normal service by early January 1990. The resulting loss of revenue at Anchorage International Airport during several months following the eruption is estimated to total $2.6 million. The impact on general aviation and military operations consisted mostly of cancellation and rerouting of flights. ?? 1994.

  11. 75 FR 27662 - Special Conditions: Boeing 747-468, Installation of a Medical Lift

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    .... ADDRESSES: You must mail two copies of your comments to: Federal Aviation Administration, Transport Airplane...-3356. You may deliver two copies to the Transport Airplane Directorate at the above address. You must... Federal holidays, between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jayson Claar,...

  12. 76 FR 15798 - Special Conditions: Boeing 747-468, Installation of a Medical Lift

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ..., Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington... transport-category airplane that is limited to 660 passengers or fewer, depending on the interior... deck. The lift allows the transport of a single occupant between the decks during cruise or...

  13. 75 FR 38001 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... certain publications listed in the AD as of August 5, 2010. On April 13, 2006 (71 FR 12125, March 9, 2006... publications listed in the AD. ] On October 27, 2003 (68 FR 54990, September 22, 2003), the Director of the.... On August 16, 2001 (66 FR 36443, July 12, 2001), the Director of the Federal Register approved...

  14. 75 FR 46868 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes and Model 767 Airplanes Equipped...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ..., June 6, 2007), to require a much earlier compliance time for the software update required by that AD... to update the software, as required by that AD, before the required compliance date specified in that... airplanes. That original NPRM was published in the Federal Register on April 7, 2008 (73 FR 18721)....

  15. 76 FR 41659 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... directive (AD) 97-26-07, Amendment 39-10250 (62 FR 65352, December 12, 1997). That AD applies to the specified products. The NPRM published in the Federal Register on December 14, 2010 (75 FR 77793). That NPRM... Executive Order 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44...

  16. 75 FR 81430 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... July 8, 2010 (75 FR 39189). That NPRM proposed to require repetitive inspections for cracking in the..., dated December 2000, Item F-4, remains as given in AD 2004-07-22 R1 (73 FR 1052, January 7, 2008) (A correction to AD 2004-07-22 R1 was published in the Federal Register on February 14, 2008 (73 FR...

  17. 15 CFR 747.4 - Steps you must follow to apply for a SIRL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... specifically describe, on Form BIS-748P-A, Item Appendix, all items subject to the EAR to be exported or... entity, the contract or work order which formed the basis of the transaction, and any identification number or project code for that contract or work order; (3) Explanation of how the project...

  18. 15 CFR 747.4 - Steps you must follow to apply for a SIRL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... specifically describe, on Form BIS-748P-A, Item Appendix, all items subject to the EAR to be exported or... entity, the contract or work order which formed the basis of the transaction, and any identification number or project code for that contract or work order; (3) Explanation of how the project...

  19. 15 CFR 747.4 - Steps you must follow to apply for a SIRL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... specifically describe, on Form BIS-748P-A, Item Appendix, all items subject to the EAR to be exported or... entity, the contract or work order which formed the basis of the transaction, and any identification number or project code for that contract or work order; (3) Explanation of how the project...

  20. 15 CFR 747.4 - Steps you must follow to apply for a SIRL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... specifically describe, on Form BIS-748P-A, Item Appendix, all items subject to the EAR to be exported or... entity, the contract or work order which formed the basis of the transaction, and any identification number or project code for that contract or work order; (3) Explanation of how the project...

  1. 15 CFR 747.4 - Steps you must follow to apply for a SIRL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... specifically describe, on Form BIS-748P-A, Item Appendix, all items subject to the EAR to be exported or... entity, the contract or work order which formed the basis of the transaction, and any identification number or project code for that contract or work order; (3) Explanation of how the project...

  2. Analysis of atmospheric ozone measurements made from a B-747 airliner during March 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Falconer, P. D.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric ozone in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere made during March 1975 as part of the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program are reported and analyzed. The interrelationships between the ozone mixing ratio and geographical and meteorological parameters are examined in several case studies. The ozone data correlate well with the difference between the flight altitude and the height of the tropopause, as obtained from National Meteorological Center gridded data. The distribution of ozone mixing ratios with latitude at an altitude of 11 + or - 0.5 km shows a poleward increase and large variability at latitudes greater than 30 deg N in agreement with published mean ozone levels from the North American ozone sonde network.

  3. Measurements of atmospheric ozone made from a GASP-equipped 747 airliner Mid-March, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, P. D.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents data on the ozone mixing ratio, static air temperature, wind speed, and wind direction obtained at altitudes from 8 to 12 km during several flights of a commercial airliner equipped with a fully automated air-sampling system developed for the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP). The objectives of GASP are reviewed, and the data-gathering techniques are described. Two data sets are discussed which illustrate variations of the upper-tropospheric and lower-stratospheric ozone mixing ratios as a function of geographical location and aircraft altitude. Good agreement is found between the GASP data and the tropopause height obtained from National Meteorological Center gridded data.

  4. 40 CFR 63.747 - Standards: Chemical milling maskant application operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... by 81% or greater, taking into account capture and destruction or removal efficiencies, as determined using the procedures in § 63.750(g) when a carbon adsorber is used and in § 63.750(h) when a control device other than a carbon adsorber is used. (e) Compliance methods. Compliance with the organic HAP...

  5. 40 CFR 63.747 - Standards: Chemical milling maskant application operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... by 81% or greater, taking into account capture and destruction or removal efficiencies, as determined using the procedures in § 63.750(g) when a carbon adsorber is used and in § 63.750(h) when a control device other than a carbon adsorber is used. (e) Compliance methods. Compliance with the organic HAP...

  6. 40 CFR 63.747 - Standards: Chemical milling maskant application operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... by 81% or greater, taking into account capture and destruction or removal efficiencies, as determined using the procedures in § 63.750(g) when a carbon adsorber is used and in § 63.750(h) when a control device other than a carbon adsorber is used. (e) Compliance methods. Compliance with the organic HAP...

  7. 40 CFR 63.747 - Standards: Chemical milling maskant application operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... by 81% or greater, taking into account capture and destruction or removal efficiencies, as determined using the procedures in § 63.750(g) when a carbon adsorber is used and in § 63.750(h) when a control device other than a carbon adsorber is used. (e) Compliance methods. Compliance with the organic HAP...

  8. 76 FR 15814 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... to prevent electrical current from flowing through an MOV actuator into a fuel tank, which could... Administration is issuing this AD to prevent electrical current from flowing through a motor operated valve (MOV... measuring the electrical bond resistance between the motor operated valve (MOV) actuators and...

  9. 75 FR 70863 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... structure, as applicable. We are proposing this supplemental NPRM to prevent electrical current from flowing... the electrical bond resistance between the motor operated valve (MOV) actuators and airplane structure... original NPRM was published in the Federal Register on January 31, 2008 (73 FR 5773). That original...

  10. 76 FR 44458 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes and Model 767 Airplanes Equipped...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 46868). The original NPRM (73 FR 18721, April 7, 2008) proposed to require revising the... AFM revision. Other Relevant Rulemaking Related AD 2010-16-03, Amendment 39-16379 (75 FR 47203, August... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in...

  11. 40 CFR 747.115 - Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the substance when distributed in commerce. (a) Chemical substance subject to this section. The..., commerce, importer, impurity, Inventory, manufacturer, person, process, processor, and small quantities..., or tertiary amine to form the corresponding nitrosamine. (4) Process or distribute in commerce...

  12. 40 CFR 747.115 - Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., commerce, importer, impurity, Inventory, manufacturer, person, process, processor, and small quantities... control of the processor. (ii) Distribution in commerce is limited to purposes of export. (iii) The processor or distributor may not use the substance except in small quantities solely for research...

  13. 75 FR 39189 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... would also require repetitive surface high frequency eddy current (HFEC) inspections of a certain... inspections for cracking of the bulkhead frame web and body skin; and corrective actions if necessary. This... fasteners common to the bulkhead outer chord, and a surface HFEC inspection or penetrant inspection...

  14. 40 CFR 63.747 - Standards: Chemical milling maskant application operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Chemical milling maskant... Standards: Chemical milling maskant application operations. (a) Each owner or operator of a new or existing chemical milling maskant operation subject to this subpart shall comply with the requirements specified...

  15. 12 CFR 747.403 - Notice of intent to suspend or revoke charter; notice of suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of intent to suspend or revoke charter... to suspend or revoke charter; notice of suspension. (a) Upon its determination that one or more of... a notice of intent to suspend or revoke charter and of intent to place into involuntary...

  16. STS-68 on Runway with 747 SCA/Columbia Ferry Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Endeavour receives a high-flying salute from its sister shuttle, Columbia, atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, shortly after Endeavor's landing 12 October 1994, at Edwards, California, to complete mission STS-68. Columbia was being ferried from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it will undergo six months of inspections, modifications, and systems upgrades. The STS-68 11-day mission was devoted to radar imaging of Earth's geological features with the Space Radar Laboratory. The orbiter is surrounded by equipment and personnel that make up the ground support convoy that services the space vehicles as soon as they land. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

  17. 77 FR 32064 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... 7, 1989, we issued AD 89-15-07, amendment 39-6267 (54 FR 30009, July 18, 1989), for certain Model... gear beam. ] Actions Since Existing AD Was Issued Since we issued AD 89-15-07, amendment 39-6267 (54 FR... Information Since the issuance of AD 89-15-07, amendment 39-6267 (54 FR 30009, July 18, 1989), Boeing...

  18. Using Engine Thrust for Emergency Flight Control: MD-11 and B-747 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Burken, John J.; Bull, John

    1998-01-01

    With modern digital control systems, using engine thrust for emergency flight control to supplement or replace failed aircraft normal flight controls has become a practical consideration. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has developed a propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system in which computer-controlled engine thrust provides emergency flight control. An F-15 and an MD-11 airplane have been landed without using any flight control surfaces. Preliminary studies have also been conducted that show that engines on only one wing can provide some flight control capability if the lateral center of gravity can be shifted toward the side of the airplane that has the operating engine(s). Simulator tests of several airplanes with no flight control surfaces operating and all engines out on the left wing have all shown positive control capability within the available range of lateral center-of-gravity offset. Propulsion-controlled aircraft systems that can operate without modifications to engine control systems, thus allowing PCA technology to be installed on less capable airplanes or at low cost, are also desirable. Further studies have examined simplified 'PCA Lite' and 'PCA Ultralite' concepts in which thrust control is provided by existing systems such as auto-throttles or a combination of existing systems and manual pilot control.

  19. 76 FR 54405 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and (4) Will... fracture were initiated by fatigue and propagated by a combination of fatigue and stress corrosion. We are... subsequent fracture were initiated by fatigue and propagated by a combination of fatigue and stress...

  20. Comparison of Dow Corning 544 antifoam to IIT747 antifoam in the 1/240 SRAT

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.C.

    2000-05-12

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility requested that the Immobilization Technology Section compare the relative foaming tendencies of sludge simulant during simulated Chemical Processing Cell operations (HLW-DWPF-TTR-99-0012). Dow Corning 544 antifoam, currently used in DWPF, was compared to a new antifoam formulation developed at the Illinois Institute of Technology. A task plan was written and approved. The task plan deliverables included a recommendation on the choice of antifoam, an evaluation of the influence of solids concentration on foaming, an evaluation on the effect of boil-up rate on foaming, an estimate of the mass of steam stripped to remove 90 percent of the mercury, and a determination of the fate of mercury. Additional parameters to be investigated during experimentation included the maximum foam height observed, hydrogen generation rates, and nitrite destruction rates.

  1. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate... civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil Penalties... adjust the maximum amount of each civil money penalty within its jurisdiction by the rate of...

  2. The Afterschool Experience in "Salsa, Sabor y Salud": Evaluation, 2007-2008. CRESST Report 747

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Denise; La Torre, Deborah; Oh, Christine; Harven, Aletha; Huber, Lindsay; Leon, Seth; Mostafavi, Sima

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, there is an alarming trend toward obesity and inactivity among children. Minorities and economically disadvantaged children are at an even higher risk. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention one in two Latino children will become diabetic. As a result, there is a dire need for tailored intervention…

  3. Preliminary study of tug-glider freight systems utilizing a Boeing 747 as the tug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyson, H. H.; Foss, W. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Performance of the tug-glider system was severely limited by ground run. In most cases studied, additional engines were necessary. Except at short ranges for which additional payload were carried in the tow plane, the productivity of the basic aircraft was degraded by a reduction in cruise speed necessitated by the glider drag. Excessive aspect ratios did not improve system performance because of the increase in glider wing weight. Powered gliders using a tow plane only for takeoff and climb had the potential for a major reduction in fuel consumption. Uncertainty of restrictive regulatory action and the apparently increased airborne investment per unit productivity are obstacles to commercial development.

  4. 77 FR 745 - Bacillus Amyloliquefaciens Strain D747; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... because bacterial spores take longer to be cleared by healthy immune systems than the vegetative form of... cleared by healthy immune systems. 5. Acute dermal toxicity (OCSPP Guideline 870.1200; MRID No. 481657-08... Classification System (NAICS) codes have been provided to assist readers in determining whether this action...

  5. STS-49 Shuttle Endevour in Mate-Demate Device being Loaded onto SCA-747 - Front View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour being loaded onto NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD) at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, shortly before being ferried back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Endeavour landed at 1:57 p.m. (PDT) 16 May 1992, marking the completion of the new orbiter's first mission in space during which the crew of seven rendevoused with the Intelsat VI satellite, attached a booster motor, and redeployed it into a high geosynchronous orbit. Endeavour and its crew was launched on a planned 7-day mission 7 May 1992, but the landing was delayed two days to allow extra time to rescue Intelsat and complete space station assembly techniques originally planned. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden

  6. STS-68 on Runway with 747 SCA/Columbia Ferry Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Endeavour receives a high-flying salute from its sister shuttle, Columbia, atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, shortly after Endeavor's landing 12 October 1994, at Edwards, California, to complete mission STS-68. Columbia was being ferried from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it will undergo six months of inspections, modifications, and systems upgrades. The STS-68 11-day mission was devoted to radar imaging of Earth's geological features with the Space Radar Laboratory. The orbiter is surrounded by equipment and personnel that make up the ground support convoy that services the space vehicles as soon as they land. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttl

  7. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight over NASA Dryden center with SCA 747 on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The DC-8 aircraft is seen making a banking turn high above the NASA Dryden ramp. This view of the DC-8's left side reveals some of the modifications necessary for particular on-board experiments. To the right of the DC-8 is the edge of Rogers Dry Lake. Above the aircraft's forward fuselage is the Dryden Flight Research Center headquarters building, while other NASA facilities extend down the flightline to the right. Below the DC-8 is the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), on which are visible attachment points for the Shuttle Orbiter.

  8. Simulator Evaluation of a New Cockpit Descent Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Barry; Palmer, Everett; Smith, Nancy; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate flight crew performance of the "Precision Descent," a new cockpit procedure designed to support the Descent Advisor (DA), one of the components in a new air traffic control advisory system called the "Center-TRACON Automation System" (CTAS). The DA predicts when aircraft will reach a specific waypoint on the arrival route, and presents controllers with clearance advisories designed to improve the sequencing of arriving aircraft. The effectiveness of the DA depends on the aircraft's descent trajectory: where it begins descent, what speed it maintains, how fast and at what altitude it crosses the bottom-of-descent waypoint. The Precision Descent allows controllers to assign these descent parameters to the flight crew. A Field Evaluation of the DA was conducted in Denver in 1995. Three separate clearances using standard ATC phraseology were used to support the cockpit descent procedure during this evaluation. The number and length of these clearances caused problems for both controllers and flight crews, causing readback errors, repeat requests and procedure misunderstandings. These observations led to a focus group meeting in which controller and pilot participants in the 1995 FE assisted in the redesign of the procedure. The Precision Descent eliminates one clearance used in the earlier study, and greatly reduces the length of the remaining clearances. This was accomplished by using non-standard clearance phraseology that relies on a published procedure chart for correct interpretation. Eight type-rated flight crews flew eight Precision Descents in a Boeing 747-400 simulator. No training was provided: crews received either a procedure chart or a procedure chart with a flight manual bulletin describing procedure techniques. Video and digital data were recorded for each descent. Preliminary results indicate that moving information from the verbal clearance to the chart was successful: the shorter clearances and the procedure

  9. Remote sensing of nitric oxide emissions from planes, trains and automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Peter John

    Remote sensing has been proven as an effective method for measuring in-use mobile source emissions. This document describes the development of a remote sensor for mobile source nitric oxide, based on an instrument previously developed at the University of Denver for measuring carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions. The new remote sensor makes use of a high-speed ultraviolet spectrometer to quantify nitric oxide by absorption spectroscopy at 226 nm in the ultraviolet region. The high-speed spectrometer is coupled to an existing FEAT remote sensor, for the simultaneous measurement of CO, CO2 and hydrocarbons by non-dispersive infrared absorption spectroscopy. The utility of the instrument was demonstrated in the measurement of nitric oxide emissions from automobiles, commercial aircraft, and railroad locomotives. The remote sensor was used to measure nitric oxide emissions from motor vehicles in Chicago in 1997 and 1998, as part of a five-year study to characterize motor vehicle emissions and deterioration in that city. Emissions data were collected for over 19,000 vehicles in 1997 and almost 23,000 vehicles in 1998. All of these records contained valid measurements for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, in addition to nitric oxide. In September of 1997, a study was conducted with the cooperation of British Airways and the British Airports Authority to demonstrate the capability of the remote sensor in measuring nitric oxide emissions from in-use commercial aircraft. In two days of sampling at London Heathrow Airport, a total of 122 measurements were made of 90 different aircraft, ranging in size from Gulfstream executive jets to Boeing 747-400s. The measured nitric oxide emission indices were not inconsistent with commercial aircraft emission indices published by the International Civil Aviation Organization. The utility of the remote sensor in measuring nitric oxide emissions from railroad locomotives was demonstrated in January of 1999, in a study conducted with

  10. Results of the Low Speed Aeroelastic Buffet Test with a 0.046-scale Model (747-ax1322-d-3/orbiter 8-0) of the 747 Cam/orbiter in the University of Washington Wind Tunnel (CS 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillins, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A series of wind tunnel studies designed to assess the potential buffet problems resulting from orbiter wake characteristics with its tailcone removed are presented to provide design loads and acceleration environments, and to develop data on buffet sensitivity to various aerodynamic configurations and flight parameters. Data are intended to support subsequent analyses of structural fatigue life, crew efficiency, and equipment vibrations.

  11. 76 FR 26957 - Special Conditions: Boeing, Model 747-8 Series Airplanes; Door 1 Extendable Length Escape Slide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... most critical angle, escape slides usually exceed 25 knot performance at other than the critical angle... wind velocity is appropriate since the slide will be in an abnormal condition. Available data indicate... critical angle, with the airplane on all its landing gear, with the assistance of one person on the...

  12. 75 FR 5692 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-200C and -200F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... published in the Federal Register on July 6, 2009 (74 FR 31894). That NPRM proposed to require a high... 2005- 07-21, Amendment 39-14046 (70 FR 18277, April 11, 2005), is required during the accomplishment of... alternative method of compliance (AMOC) for paragraphs (f) and (g) of AD 2006-08-02, Amendment 39-14556 (71...

  13. 76 FR 14341 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8/-8F Airplanes, Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... originally issued July 29, 2009, and published in the Federal Register on August 12, 2009 (74 FR 40479). Type... failure, uncontained engine, or APU rotor burst, or other failures not shown to be extremely...

  14. 76 FR 30523 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8/-8F Airplanes, Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... the Federal Register on August 12, 2009 (74 FR 40479). Type Certification Basis Under the provisions... Register on March 16, 2011 (76 FR 14341). The standards in Section A were modified to incorporate the... failure, uncontained engine, or APU rotor burst, or other failures not shown to be extremely...

  15. 75 FR 16651 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-200C and -200F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... supersedes AD 2006-08-02, amendment 39-14556 (70 FR 18618, April 12, 2006). The existing AD applies to... August 12, 2009 (74 FR 40529). That NPRM proposed to continue to require repetitive inspections to find...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have...

  16. 76 FR 17334 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-2G4B Airplane; Certification of Cooktops

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... changes to increase its strength and fuel capacity. The modification incorporates the installation of an... with this requirement are as follows: a. The materials must be constructed of materials that comply... addition to the flammability requirements typically required of the materials in these galley...

  17. 75 FR 2434 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8/-8F Series Airplanes; Design Roll Maneuver Requirement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... airplanes was published in the Federal Register on October 8, 2009 (74 FR 51813). No comments were received... acceleration must be investigated. For the angular acceleration conditions, zero rolling velocity may...

  18. 76 FR 44246 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Series Airplanes; Overhead Flight Attendant Rest Compartment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... the Federal Register on May 10, 2011 (76 FR 26949). No comments were received and the special...; Overhead Flight Attendant Rest Compartment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... overhead flight attendant rest compartment. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not...

  19. Mercury and Hazardous Chemicals in Schools: A Manual for Students in Southeast Asia. EPA 747-R-08-002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Children and adolescents, up to approximately age 20, are more susceptible than adults to potential health risks from chemicals and environmental hazards. Hazardous chemicals can interrupt or alter the normal development of a child's body, leading to lasting damage. Since children are smaller than adults, similar levels of exposure to toxic…

  20. 75 FR 8554 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, -200B, and -200F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... August 4, 1994, we issued AD 94-17-01, Amendment 39-8996 (59 FR 41653, August 15, 1994), for certain... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3... Amendment 39-8996 (59 FR 41653, August 15, 1994) and adding the following new AD: The Boeing Company:...

  1. 75 FR 38394 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-100, -200B, and -200F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... could lead to the rapid decompression of the airplane and the inability of the structure to carry fail... and the inability of the structure to carry fail-safe loads. Compliance (f) You are responsible for...: Data & Services Management, P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; telephone 206-...

  2. Shuttle Endevour Loaded onto SCA-747 Exiting the Mate-Demate Device for Return to Kennedy Space Cent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavout rests atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD) at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, shortly before being ferried back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Endeavour landed at 1:57 p.m. (PDT) May 16, 1992, marking the completion of the new orbiter's first mission in space during which the crew of seven rendezvoused with the Intelsat VI satellite, attached a booster motor, and redeployed it into a high geosynchronous orbit. Endeavour and its crew were launched on a planned 7-day mission 7 May 1992, but the landing was delayed two days to allow extra time to rescue Intelsat and complete space station assembly techniques originally planned. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden

  3. 78 FR 19424 - Service Rules for the 698-746, 747-762 and 777-792 MHz Bands; Revision of the Commission's Rules...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... spectrum aggregation limits at the initial licensing stages of the 700 MHz Band. Further, the Commission...-792 MHz Bands; Revision of the Commission's Rules To Ensure Compatibility With Enhanced 911 Emergency..., relating to the 698-806 MHz Band, including decisions regarding performance requirements, the auction...

  4. Global measurements of gaseous and aerosol trace species in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere from daily flights of 747 airliners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Extensive measurements include ozone, carbon monoxide, water vapor, and aerosol and condensation nuclei number density. Less extensive measurements include chlorofluoromethanes, sulfates and nitrates. Certain meteorological and flight information are also recorded at the time of these measurements. World routes range in latitude from about 60 deg N near North America to about 40 deg S over Australia and 23 deg S over South America. Typical data show significant changes in ozone, carbon monoxide, and water vapor when crossing the tropopause either during changes in altitude or at cruise altitude. These gases as well as light scattering particles and condensation nuclei exhibit considerable variability along a flight route.

  5. Mercury and Chemical Management in Schools: An Instructor's Guide for Trainers in Schools in Southeast Asia. EPA 747-R-08-003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This instructor's guide is a tool to help instructors promote the concepts of safe mercury and chemical management in schools. It contains three types of materials: (1) Guidance for the instructor/facilitator on conducting the training course (Section I); (2) A copy of all presentations with talking points as appropriate (Section II); and (3)…

  6. Mercury and Chemical Management in Schools: Teachers and School Administrators Participant's Manual in Southeast Asia. EPA 747-R-08-001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Designed as a "Participant's Manual" to be used as part of a "Chemical and Mercury Management in Schools Training," this document focuses on the policies and programs needed at the school and district level for safe and sustainable chemical and mercury management practices. This document is designed primarily for school administrators (principals…

  7. Does the circadian clock drift when pilots fly multiple transpacific flights with 1- to 2-day layovers?

    PubMed

    Gander, Philippa; Mulrine, Hannah M; van den Berg, Margo J; Wu, Lora; Smith, Alexander; Signal, Leigh; Mangie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    On trips with multiple transmeridian flights, pilots experience successive non-24 h day/night cycles with circadian and sleep disruption. One study across a 9-day sequence of transpacific flights (no in-flight sleep, 1-day layovers between flights) reported an average period in the core body temperature rhythm of 24.6 h (circadian drift). Consequently, pilots were sometimes flying through the circadian performance nadir and had to readapt to home base time at the end of the trip. The present study examined circadian drift in trip patterns with longer flights and in-flight sleep. Thirty-nine B747-400 pilots (19 captains, 20 first officers, mean age = 55.5 years) were monitored on 9- to 13-day trips with multiple return flights between East Coast USA and Japan (in 4-pilot crews) and between Japan and Hawaii (in 3-pilot crews), with 1-day layovers between each flight. Measures included total in-flight sleep (actigraphy, log books) and top of descent (TOD) measures of sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale), fatigue (Samn-Perelli Crew Status Check) and psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance. Circadian rhythms of individual pilots were not monitored. To detect circadian drift, mixed-model analysis of variance examined whether for a given flight, total in-flight sleep and TOD measures varied according to when the flight occurred in the trip sequence. In addition, sleep propensity curves for pre-trip and post-trip days were examined (Chi-square periodogram analyses). Limited data suggest that total in-flight sleep of relief crew at landing may have decreased across successive East Coast USA-Japan (flights 1, 3, 5 or 7; median arrival 03:45 Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). However, PVT response speed at TOD was faster on East Coast USA-Japan flights later in the trip. On these flights, circadian drift would result in flights later in the trip landing closer to the evening wake maintenance zone, when sleep is difficult and PVT response speeds are fastest. On Japan

  8. Does the circadian clock drift when pilots fly multiple transpacific flights with 1- to 2-day layovers?

    PubMed

    Gander, Philippa; Mulrine, Hannah M; van den Berg, Margo J; Wu, Lora; Smith, Alexander; Signal, Leigh; Mangie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    On trips with multiple transmeridian flights, pilots experience successive non-24 h day/night cycles with circadian and sleep disruption. One study across a 9-day sequence of transpacific flights (no in-flight sleep, 1-day layovers between flights) reported an average period in the core body temperature rhythm of 24.6 h (circadian drift). Consequently, pilots were sometimes flying through the circadian performance nadir and had to readapt to home base time at the end of the trip. The present study examined circadian drift in trip patterns with longer flights and in-flight sleep. Thirty-nine B747-400 pilots (19 captains, 20 first officers, mean age = 55.5 years) were monitored on 9- to 13-day trips with multiple return flights between East Coast USA and Japan (in 4-pilot crews) and between Japan and Hawaii (in 3-pilot crews), with 1-day layovers between each flight. Measures included total in-flight sleep (actigraphy, log books) and top of descent (TOD) measures of sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale), fatigue (Samn-Perelli Crew Status Check) and psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance. Circadian rhythms of individual pilots were not monitored. To detect circadian drift, mixed-model analysis of variance examined whether for a given flight, total in-flight sleep and TOD measures varied according to when the flight occurred in the trip sequence. In addition, sleep propensity curves for pre-trip and post-trip days were examined (Chi-square periodogram analyses). Limited data suggest that total in-flight sleep of relief crew at landing may have decreased across successive East Coast USA-Japan (flights 1, 3, 5 or 7; median arrival 03:45 Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). However, PVT response speed at TOD was faster on East Coast USA-Japan flights later in the trip. On these flights, circadian drift would result in flights later in the trip landing closer to the evening wake maintenance zone, when sleep is difficult and PVT response speeds are fastest. On Japan

  9. 77 FR 70362 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ..., Amendment 39-16157 (75 FR 1533, January 12, 2010)), AD 2010-01-01 requires accomplishing the main entry door... new airworthiness directive (AD) for all The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747.... This AD was prompted by reports of cracks in the main entry door number 1 upper main sill outer...

  10. GAO Review of LEA Controls over and Uses of Recovery Act Education Funds (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools). Monitoring of Recovery Act Education Funds. GAO-10-747R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Cornelia M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a transcript of a letter written by the author, Cornelia M. Ashby, Director, Education, Workforce, and Income Security Issues, to June St. Clair Atkinson, State Superintendent of the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. In this letter, the author reports that she and her colleagues have examined the efforts of selected…

  11. Results of a 0.03- scale aerodynamic characteristics investigation of Boeing 747 carrier (model no. AX 1319 I-1) mated with a space shuttle orbiter (model 45-0) conducted in the Boeing transonic wind tunnel (CA5), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver, D.; Mulkey, T. L.; Lindahl, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    The performance, stability, and control characteristics of various carrier aircraft configurations are presented. Aerodynamic characteristics of the carrier mated with the Orbiter, carrier alone, and Orbiter alone were investigated. Carrier support system tare and interference effects were determined. Six-component force and moment data were recorded for the carrier and Orbiter. Buffet onset characteristics of the carrier vertical tail and horizontal tail were recorded. Angles of attack from -3 deg through 26 deg and angles of slideslip between +12 deg and -12 deg were investigated at Mach numbers from 0.15 through 0.70. Photographs are included.

  12. 10 CFR 431.443 - Materials incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... this section for incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Any....ca/onlinestore/welcome.asp. (1) CAN/CSA-C747-94 (“CAN/CSA-C747”) (Reaffirmed 2005), Energy...

  13. 10 CFR 431.443 - Materials incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... this section for incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Any....ca/onlinestore/welcome.asp. (1) CSA C747-09 (“CSA C747”), Energy efficiency test methods for...

  14. 10 CFR 431.443 - Materials incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... this section for incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Any....ca/onlinestore/welcome.asp. (1) CSA C747-09 (“CSA C747”), Energy efficiency test methods for...

  15. 75 FR 67301 - Antidisruptive Practices Authority Contained in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... Exchange Act (``CEA'') in section 747 to expressly prohibit certain trading practices deemed disruptive of... the Dodd-Frank Act amends section 4c(a) of the CEA to add a new section entitled ``Disruptive...). II. Solicitation for Comments About Disruptive Practices Pursuant to Dodd-Frank Act Section 747...

  16. 78 FR 4051 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ...-16059 (74 FR 55763, October 29, 2009). (c) Applicability This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model 747... Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 747-100,...

  17. 75 FR 13079 - Action Affecting Export Privileges; MAHAN AIRWAYS; Mahan Airways, Mahan Tower, No. 21, Azadegan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... Tower, No. 21, Azadegan St., M.A. Jenah Exp. Way, Tehran, Iran, Respondent; Order Renewing Order... to Iran three U.S.-origin aircraft, specifically Boeing 747s (``Aircraft 1-3''), items subject to the... involved in the attempted re-export of three additional U.S.-origin Boeing 747s (``Aircraft 4-6'') to...

  18. High resistance to thermal decomposition in brown cotton is linked to tannis and sodium content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fibers (SA-1 and MC-BL) studied were inferior to white cotton fiber Sure-Grow 747 (SG747) in fiber quality, i.e., shorter length, fewer twists, and lower crystallinity, but exhibited superior thermal properties in thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermogravime...

  19. 46 CFR 115.630 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... party examiner using the criteria established in 46 CFR 114.400; (d) A signed statement from your vessel...) The name of the participating diving contractor and underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)...

  20. 46 CFR 115.630 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... party examiner using the criteria established in 46 CFR 114.400; (d) A signed statement from your vessel...) The name of the participating diving contractor and underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)...

  1. 46 CFR 115.630 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... party examiner using the criteria established in 46 CFR 114.400; (d) A signed statement from your vessel...) The name of the participating diving contractor and underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)...

  2. 46 CFR 115.630 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... party examiner using the criteria established in 46 CFR 114.400; (d) A signed statement from your vessel...) The name of the participating diving contractor and underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)...

  3. 46 CFR 115.630 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... party examiner using the criteria established in 46 CFR 114.400; (d) A signed statement from your vessel...) The name of the participating diving contractor and underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)...

  4. The 12th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Mechanisms developed for various aerospace applications are discussed. Specific topics covered include: boom release mechanisms, separation on space shuttle orbiter/Boeing 747 aircraft, payload handling, spaceborne platform support, and deployment of spaceborne antennas and telescopes.

  5. Endeavour Leaves NASA Dryden for LAX

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, carrying space shuttle Endeavour, departed Edwards Air Force Base at 8:17 a.m. PDT on Sept. 21 to begin a four-and-a-half hour flyover of northern California an...

  6. NASA's SCAs--Birds of a Feather Flock Together

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft briefly flew in formation for the first time ever over the Edwards Air Force Base test range on Aug. 2, 2011. NASA 911 was on a pilot profici...

  7. 76 FR 65500 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA747 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements; Public Workshops AGENCY: National Marine...

  8. 12 CFR 702.1 - Authority, purpose, scope and other supervisory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of this chapter, 12 CFR 747.2001 et seq. (d) Other supervisory authority. Neither § 1790d nor this... according to a credit union's net worth ratio, designed primarily to restore and improve the net worth...

  9. Space Shuttle Endeavour Heads West

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified 747, flew retired shuttle Endeavour from Kennedy Space Center in Florida to Houston on Sept. 19, 2012, to complete the first leg of Endeavour's trip to L...

  10. SOFIA Team Prepares for Southern Hemisphere Science Flights

    NASA Video Gallery

    SOFIA maintenance chief Daryl Townsend discusses how the team prepares the modified 747SP for science missions. The aircraft is flying from a base in Christchurch, New Zealand, for science investig...

  11. 50 CFR 82.16 - Reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES FOR GRANTS-IN-AID... prescribed by FMC 74-7 or other appropriate referenced Federal Management Circulars cited in § 82.3 of...

  12. NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft 911's Final Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA 911, one of NASA's two modified Boeing 747 space shuttle carrier aircraft, flew its final flight Feb. 8, a short hop from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base to the ...

  13. Performance of a commercial transport under typical MLS noise environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of a 747-200 automatic flight control system (AFCS) subjected to typical Microwave Landing System (MLS) noise is discussed. The performance is then compared with the results from a previous study which had a B747 AFCS subjected to the MLS standards and recommended practices (SARPS) maximum allowable noise. A glide slope control run with Instrument Landing System (ILS) noise is also conducted. Finally, a linear covariance analysis is presented.

  14. 78 FR 21571 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and ] (4...-400, -400D, and -400F series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report of water leakage... proposed AD. Discussion We received a report indicating that water leakage into the main deck cargo WIU...

  15. Vortex attenuation flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, M. R.; Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Champine, R. A.; Tymczyszyn, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Flight tests evaluating the effects of altered span loading, turbulence ingestion, combinations of mass and turbulence ingestion, and combinations of altered span loading turbulance ingestion on trailed wake vortex attenuation were conducted. Span loadings were altered in flight by varying the deflections of the inboard and outboard flaps on a B-747 aircraft. Turbulence ingestion was achieved in flight by mounting splines on a C-54G aircraft. Mass and turbulence ingestion was achieved in flight by varying the thrust on the B-747 aircraft. Combinations of altered span loading and turbulence ingestion were achieved in flight by installing a spoiler on a CV-990 aircraft and by deflecting the existing spoilers on a B-747 aircraft. The characteristics of the attenuated and unattenuated vortexes were determined by probing them with smaller aircraft. Acceptable separation distances for encounters with the attenuated and unattenuated vortexes are presented.

  16. Utilization of CAD/CAE for concurrent design of structural aircraft components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, William C.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of installing the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy telescope (named SOFIA) into an aircraft for NASA astronomy studies is investigated using CAD/CAE equipment to either design or supply data for every facet of design engineering. The aircraft selected for the platform was a Boeing 747, chosen on the basis of its ability to meet the flight profiles required for the given mission and payload. CAD models of the fuselage of two of the aircraft models studied (747-200 and 747 SP) were developed, and models for the component parts of the telescope and subsystems were developed by the various concurrent engineering groups of the SOFIA program, to determine the requirements for the cavity opening and for design configuration. It is noted that, by developing a plan to use CAD/CAE for concurrent engineering at the beginning of the study, it was possible to produce results in about two-thirds of the time required using traditional methods.

  17. A tow concept for the space shuttle orbiter approach and landing test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, T. F., Jr.; Pride, J. D., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The tow concept provides the means for evaluating the orbiter aerodynamic performance and handling qualities in the same configuration as expected in actual space shuttle flight operation. A Boeing 747-100 aircraft has engine-out capability to tow the orbiter to an altitude that permits a safe orbiter approach and landing. The tow concept also provides a means for conducting a comprehensive ground test program before proceeding into the actual ALT flight operations. The implementation of the tow concept requires only a minor structural modification in the nose section of the orbiter vehicle; requires minor modifications in the 747 cargo bay; and makes use of those orbiter onboard systems installed in the ALT orbiter vehicle. The 747 wake turbulence does not constitute a problem for the orbiter during take-off or climb to altitude. The impact that the tow concept would have on the cost and schedule of the space shuttle program was not evaluated in this study.

  18. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) data report for tape VL0006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, D. J.; Holdeman, J. D.; Humenik, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is obtaining measurements of atmospheric trace constituents in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere using fully automated air sampling systems on board several commercial B-747 aircraft in routine airline service. Atmospheric ozone, and related flight and meteorological data were obtained during 245 flights of a Qantas Airways of Australia B-747 and two Pan American World Airways B-747s from July 1976 through September 1976. In addition, whole air samples, obtained during three flights, were analyzed for trichlorofluoromethane, and filter samples, obtained during four flights, were analyzed for sulfates, nitrates, fluorides, and chlorides. Flight routes and dates, instrumentation, data processing procedures, data tape specifications, and selected analyses are discussed.

  19. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) data report for tape VL0004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Humenik, F. M.; Lezberg, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    The NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is obtaining measurements of atmospheric trace constituents in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere using fully automated air sampling systems on board several commercial B-747 aircraft in routine airline service. Atmospheric ozone, water vapor, and related flight and meteorological data were obtained during 139 flights of a United Airlines B-747 and a Pan American World Airways B-747 from December 1975 through March 1976. In addition, sample bottles were exposed during three flights and analyzed for trichlorofluoromethane, and filter samples were exposed during five flights and analyzed for sulfates, nitrates, and chlorides. Flight routes and dates, instrumentation, data processing procedures, data tape specifications, and selected analyses are discussed.

  20. Recent wake turbulence flight test programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tymczyszyn, J. J.; Barber, M. R.

    1974-01-01

    In early flight tests the size and intensity of the wake vortexes generated by aircraft ranging in size from the Learjet to the C-5A and the B-747 were studied to determine the effects of aircraft configuration, weight, and speed. Early problems were related to vortex marking, the measurement of separation distance, and test techniques. Recent tests conducted with B-747 showed that vortexes were alleviated by reducing the deflection of the outboard flaps. It was found that a more rapid dissipation of the vortex system can be obtained through alterations in the span lift distribution.

  1. Computation of the radiation amplitude of oscillons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Gyula; Forgács, Péter; Horváth, Zalán; Mezei, Márk

    2009-03-01

    The radiation loss of small-amplitude oscillons (very long-living, spatially localized, time-dependent solutions) in one-dimensional scalar field theories is computed in the small-amplitude expansion analytically using matched asymptotic series expansions and Borel summation. The amplitude of the radiation is beyond all orders in perturbation theory and the method used has been developed by Segur and Kruskal in Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 747 (1987)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.58.747. Our results are in good agreement with those of long-time numerical simulations of oscillons.

  2. Hedging, Inflating, and Persuading in L2 Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkel, Eli

    2005-01-01

    This study analyzes the types and frequencies of hedges and intensifiers employed in NS and NNS academic essays included in a corpus of L1 and L2 student academic texts (745 essays/220,747 words). The overarching goal of this investigation is to focus on these lexical and syntactic features of written discourse because they effectively lend…

  3. Energy conservation and air transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Air transportation demand and passenger energy demand are discussed, in relation to energy conservation. Alternatives to air travel are reviewed, along with airline advertising and ticket pricing. Cargo energy demand and airline systems efficiency are also examined, as well as fuel conservation techniques. Maximum efficiency of passenger aircraft, from B-747 to V/STOL to British Concorde, is compared.

  4. 78 FR 47235 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Electric Company (GE) model GEnx-2B67 and GEnx-2B67B turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by the... in Boeing 747-8 flight tests had consumed more cyclic life than they would have in revenue flight cycles. These parts were then installed into engines and introduced into revenue service...

  5. 12 CFR 701.14 - Change in official or senior executive officer in credit unions that are newly chartered or are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... appeal pursuant to 12 CFR part 747 subpart J, of NCUA's Regulations. ... treasurer/manager) and the chief financial officer (controller). The term “senior executive officer” also... information submitted must include the identity, personal history, business background, and experience of...

  6. 76 FR 34918 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 767 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Model 757 and Model 747 airplanes. We have issued AD 2010-23-13, Amendment 39-16502 (75 FR 68688... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... above. This proposed AD would require modification of the fluid drain path in the leading edge area...

  7. Internet Gambling and Problem Gambling among 13 to 18 Year Old Adolescents in Iceland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olason, Daniel Thor; Kristjansdottir, Elsa; Einarsdottir, Hafdis; Haraldsson, Haukur; Bjarnason, Geir; Derevensky, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports findings on Internet gambling and problem gambling among Icelandic youth. Participants were 1.537 13-18 year-old students, 786 boys and 747 girls. Results revealed that 56.6% had gambled at least once in the past 12 months and 24.3% on the Internet. Gender and developmental differences were found for Internet gambling, as boys…

  8. 40 CFR 82.5 - Apportionment of baseline production allowances for class I controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Inc 7,873,615 Degussa Corporation 26,546 Dow Chemical Company, USA 18,987,747 E.I. DuPont de Nemours... Company, USA 168,030,117 E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co 2 PPG Industries, Inc 57,450,719 Vulcan Chemicals...

  9. Development of aircraft lavatory compartments with improved fire resistance characteristics, phase 1: Fire containment test of a wide body aircraft lavatory module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. A.; Arnold, D. B.; Johnson, G. A.; Tustin, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    A test was conducted to evaluate the fire containment characteristics of a Boeing 747 lavatory module. Results showed that the fire was contained within the lavatory during the 30-minute test period with the door closed. The resistance of the lavatory wall and ceiling panels and general lavatory construction to burn-through under the test conditions was demonstrated.

  10. 78 FR 26720 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ...-18-07, Amendment 39-15664 (73 FR 56960, October 1, 2008), for certain The Boeing Company Model 747... during an emergency evacuation. Actions Since Existing AD (73 FR 56960, October 1, 2008) Was Issued Since we issued AD 2008-18-07, Amendment 39-15664 (73 FR 56960, October 1, 2008), an operator reported...

  11. Predicted airframe noise levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    Calculated values of airframe noise levels corresponding to FAA noise certification conditions for six aircraft are presented. The aircraft are: DC-9-30; Boeing 727-200; A300-B2 Airbus; Lockheed L-1011; DC-10-10; and Boeing 747-200B. The prediction methodology employed is described and discussed.

  12. Working Smarter Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Gordon A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Educators commonly compare their restructuring efforts to rebuilding a 747 while in flight. Working smarter means monitoring the efficiency of faculty work from two standpoints: productivity in reaching desired student outcomes and depletion of important resources, including human energy. This article presents a five-stage model of the progress…

  13. SOFIA's Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors: An External Evaluation of Cycle 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) represents a partnership between NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The observatory itself is a Boeing 747 SP that has been modified to serve as the world's largest airborne research observatory. The SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors (AAA) program is a component of SOFIA's…

  14. 77 FR 50553 - Fresh Tomatoes from Mexico: Notice of Initiation of Changed Circumstances Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... (LTFV). See Initiation of Antidumping Duty Investigation: Fresh Tomatoes From Mexico, 61 FR 18377 (April... Investigation, Investigation No. 731-TA-747 (Preliminary), 61 FR 28891 (June 6, 1996). On October 10, 1996, the... Less Than Fair Value and Postponement of Final Determination: Fresh Tomatoes from Mexico, 61 FR...

  15. A Cost-Effective Analysis and Follow Up Study on a Multi-Level Mathematics Instruction System at Antelope Valley College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Frank C.

    Between the spring of 1970 and the summer of 1974, 1,747 students enrolled in Math X, a multilevel PSI (Personalized System of Instruction) type of open-ended mathematics instruction system at Antelope Valley College. Results of a study designed to evaluate the course by comparing it with the more conventional mathematics lecture course indicated…

  16. Young Managers' Drive to Thrive: A Personal Work Goal Approach to Burnout and Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyvonen, Katriina; Feldt, Taru; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Kinnunen, Ulla; Makikangas, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This study approaches young managers' occupational well-being through their work-related goal pursuit. The main aim was to identify content categories of personal work goals and investigate their associations with background factors, goal appraisals, burnout, and work engagement. The questionnaire data consisted of 747 young Finnish managers…

  17. Pupil and Parent Attitudes towards Bullying in Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslea, Mike; Smith, Peter K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an investigation of student and parent attitudes towards bullying by comparing attitudes with bullying behavior. States that parents (n=747) completed the Parental Attitudes to Bullying Scale and children (n=326), aged six to eleven, in primary schools completed the Children's Attitudes to Bullying Scale. Includes references. (CMK)

  18. Comparison of Obesity, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behaviors between Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Without

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Stephanie M.; Jakicic, John M.; Barone Gibbs, Bethany

    2016-01-01

    Body mass index classification, physical activity (PA), and sedentary behaviors were compared in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to typically developing adolescents. Participants included 42,747 adolescents (ASD, n = 915) from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. After controlling for covariates, adolescents were…

  19. 78 FR 11265 - Petition for Exemption; Summary of Petition Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... (65 FR 19477-78). Docket: To read background documents or comments received, go to http://www... October 30, 2012 (77 FR 65763), that incorrectly specified 747-8 airplanes. BILLING CODE 4910-13-P ... from the requirements of fuel-tank structural lightning protection for the fuel tanks on Boeing...

  20. Outlook. Number 295

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for American Private Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This May 2004 issue of "Outlook," a monthly publication published by the Council for American Private Education (CAPE), describes the findings of the 2000 High School Transcript Study (HSTS), which examined the transcripts of 19,747 public school students and 1,184 private school students in order to provide a comprehensive look at the high school…

  1. State Strategies to Improve Low-Performing Schools: California's High Priority School Grants Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timar, Thomas; Rodriguez, Gloria; Simon, Virginia Adams; Ferrario, Kim; Kim, Kris

    2006-01-01

    Central to California's school accountability system are programs to engage low-performing schools in improvement efforts. One of these is the High Priority Schools Program (HPSGP), created by Assembly Bill 961 (Chapter 747, "Statutes of 2001") to provide funds to the lowest performing schools in the state. To be eligible for funding, schools must…

  2. 77 FR 27625 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY..., Prevention Department, Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI at (414) 747-7188, email Jon.K.Grob....935, Safety Zone, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, at the following time for the following events:...

  3. 75 FR 49848 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY..., WI at 414-747-7154, e-mail Adam.D.Kraft@uscg.mil . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Coast Guard will enforce the safety zone listed in 33 CFR 165.935, Safety Zone, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, for...

  4. 75 FR 22234 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY... BM1 Adam Kraft, Prevention Department, Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI at 414-747-7154... zone listed in 33 CFR 165.935, Safety Zones, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, for the following...

  5. 78 FR 37456 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI at (414) 747-7148, email joseph.p.mccollum@uscg.mil . SUPPLEMENTARY... Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, at the following times for the following events: (1) Polish Fest fireworks...

  6. 75 FR 44141 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY... Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI at 414-747-7154, e-mail Adam.D.Kraft@uscg.mil . SUPPLEMENTARY... Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, for the following events: (1) Arab World Festival fireworks display on August...

  7. Evaluation of Materials and Concepts for Aircraft Fire Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. A.; Price, J. O.; Mcclure, A. H.; Tustin, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    Woven fiberglass fluted-core simulated aircraft interior panels were flame tested and structurally evaluated against the Boeing 747 present baseline interior panels. The NASA-defined panels, though inferior on a strength-to-weight basis, showed better structural integrity after flame testing, due to the woven fiberglass structure.

  8. Childhood Sexual Abuse Moderates the Association between Sexual Functioning and Sexual Distress in Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Kyle R.; Hughan, Corey P.; Meston, Cindy M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the degree to which a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) moderates the association between sexual functioning and sexual distress in women. Method: Women with (n = 105, M age = 33.71, 66.1% Caucasian) and without (n = 71, M age = 32.63, 74.7% Caucasian) a history of CSA taking part in a larger clinical trial completed…

  9. Space shuttle orbiter test flight series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, D.; Gordon, R.; Jackson, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    The proposed studies on the space shuttle orbiter test taxi runs and captive flight tests were set forth. The orbiter test flights, the approach and landing tests (ALT), and the ground vibration tests were cited. Free flight plans, the space shuttle ALT crews, and 747 carrier aircraft crew were considered.

  10. Mapping "StrengthsQuest" Themes to Holland's Vocational Personality Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Andrew D.; Evans, Karen; Gitin, Elena; Eads, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    A sample of 1,747 students attending undergraduate classes in legal education at an online university completed the "StrengthsQuest" assessment as part of a larger investigation; of this number, 117 students also completed the "Kuder Career Search". Exploratory factor analysis (principal components followed varimax rotation) of 34 "StrengthsQuest"…

  11. 77 FR 54649 - Petition for Exemption; Summary of Petition Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... (65 FR 19477-78). Docket: To read background documents or comments received, go to http://www... requirements that lavatories must have ``No-Smoking'' placards located on or adjacent to each side of the lavatory door and ashtrays outside lavatory doors on the Boeing model 747-8 airplanes designated for use...

  12. 77 FR 58210 - Petition for Exemption; Summary of Petition Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ..., 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). Docket: To read background documents or comments received, go to http://www..., no-smoking placards, security considerations, interior doors between passenger compartments (some... large interior panels, for executive interiors on Boeing Model 747-8 airplanes designated for...

  13. 75 FR 73000 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... to parts 702, 703, 709, and 747). Final Rule, 75 FR 64786 (October 20, 2010) (September Rulemaking... sound audit, reporting, and audit committee practices from the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (FDI Act... the recent past, some NPCUs ``rate shopped'' among corporates for the highest deposit rates and...

  14. Studio in Sculpture, Ceramics, Jewelry. Advanced Elective Courses in Art for Grades 10, 11, or 12: Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This is the second volume in a series that includes the syllabi for the advanced elective courses in the New York state art program for grades 10, 11, and 12. The first volume is described in ED 100 747. The guide consists of the following three sections: (1) Studio in Ceramics, (2) Studio in Sculpture, and (3) Studio in Jewelry and…

  15. 40 CFR 82.5 - Apportionment of baseline production allowances for class I controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Inc 7,873,615 Degussa Corporation 26,546 Dow Chemical Company, USA 18,987,747 E.I. DuPont de Nemours...,358 Vulcan Chemicals 21,931,987 (e) For Group V controlled substances: Methyl Chloroform Dow Chemical...Pont de Nemours & Co 4,176,000 (b) For Group II controlled substances: Halon-1211 Great Lakes...

  16. The Reading Habits and Literacy Attitudes of Inservice and Prospective Teachers: Results of a Questionnaire Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Steven; Pruslow, John; Levitt, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a questionnaire survey of 747 students enrolled in a graduate school of education, who are currently teachers or prospective teachers. The Literacy Habits Questionnaire, developed by Applegate and Applegate, was administered in September 2006. Findings suggest a high prevalence of aliteracy, the ability to read but a…

  17. 40 CFR 60.744 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... an affected facility controlled by a carbon adsorption system and demonstrating compliance by the... of paragraph (c)(1) or (2) of this section, as appropriate. (1) For carbon adsorption systems with a... device efficiency is used as the basis for reporting, as described in § 60.747(d)(2)(i). (2) For...

  18. 40 CFR 60.744 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... an affected facility controlled by a carbon adsorption system and demonstrating compliance by the... of paragraph (c)(1) or (2) of this section, as appropriate. (1) For carbon adsorption systems with a... device efficiency is used as the basis for reporting, as described in § 60.747(d)(2)(i). (2) For...

  19. 40 CFR 63.751 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the system is in operation. (b) Incinerators and carbon adsorbers—initial compliance demonstrations... using a carbon adsorber to comply with the requirements in this subpart shall comply with the... compliance with § 63.745(d), § 63.746(c), or § 63.747(d). (iii) When a nonregenerative carbon adsorber...

  20. Space shuttle separation mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The development of space shuttle separation devices is reviewed to illustrate the mechanisms involved in separating the Orbiter from the Boeing 747 carrier aircraft and from the externally mounted propellant tank. Other aspects of the separation device development discussed include design evolution, operational experience during the orbiter approach and landing tests, and the work required to produce an operational system.

  1. Understanding Mathematics Achievement: An Analysis of the Effects of Student and Family Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goforth, Kate; Noltemeyer, Amity; Patton, Jon; Bush, Kevin R.; Bergen, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Educators are increasingly recognising the importance of improving students' mathematics achievement. Much of the current research focuses on the impact of instructional variables on mathematics achievement. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of less researched variables--family and student factors. Participants were 747

  2. Assessment of risk to Boeing commerical transport aircraft from carbon fibers. [fiber release from graphite/epxoy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, C. A.; Brown, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible effects of free carbon fibers on aircraft avionic equipment operation, removal costs, and safety were investigated. Possible carbon fiber flow paths, flow rates, and transfer functions into the Boeing 707, 727, 737, 747 aircraft and potentially vulnerable equipment were identified. Probabilities of equipment removal and probabilities of aircraft exposure to carbon fiber were derived.

  3. 77 FR 34383 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Open Commission Meeting; Wednesday, June 13, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... spectrum efficiency and greater use of the 4940-4990 MHz (4.9 GHz) band. The meeting site is fully..., Broadband, Interoperable Public Safety Network in the 700 MHz Band (PS Docket No. 06-229) and Service Rules for the 698-746, 747-762 and 777-792 MHz Bands (WT Docket No. 06-150) Summary: The Commission...

  4. Internet Access, Use and Sharing Levels among Students during the Teaching-Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutkun, Omer F.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the awareness among students and levels regarding student access, use, and knowledge sharing during the teaching-learning process. The triangulation method was utilized in this study. The population of the research universe was 21,747. The student sample population was 1,292. Two different data collection…

  5. 76 FR 23861 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... 702, 703, 709, and 747). 75 FR 64786 (Oct. 20, 2010) (September Rulemaking). These amendments... proposal with further revisions to the corporate rule. 75 FR 73000 (Nov. 29, 2010). The seven amendments... 30 days, but the Board extended the comment period to 60 days. 75 FR 75648 (Dec. 6, 2010). During...

  6. 76 FR 14052 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    .... No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a baked clay net sinker... funerary objects are 2 bone awls, 22 bags of baked clay, 2,747 beads, 1 bone tube, 3 bags of carbonized.... Thirty-two additional associated funerary objects (4 bone awls, 2 bags of baked clay, 2 beads, 1...

  7. Suicide Notes in Mexico: What Do They Tell Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez-Hernandez, Ana-Maria; Paramo, Daniel; Leenaars, Antoon A.; Leenaars, Lindsey

    2006-01-01

    According to international and Mexican official statistics, there is a dramatic rise in suicide in Mexico; however, research in this area is severely limited. This is the first study of suicide notes from Mexico in the international literature. From a population of 747 registered suicides, a sample of 106 note-writers and 106 nonnote writers was…

  8. 78 FR 31890 - Antidisruptive Practices Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ...) creating robust recordkeeping and real-time reporting regimes; and (4) enhancing the Commission's... intermediaries subject to the Commission's oversight. \\1\\ See Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer... 2010.'' \\3\\ 7 U.S.C. 1 et seq. Section 747 of the Dodd-Frank Act amends section 4c(a) of the...

  9. 33 CFR 117.261 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway from St. Marys River to Key Largo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Broad Causeway bridge, mile 1081.4 at Bay Harbor Islands. The draw shall open on signal; except that..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117... this section at anytime. (b) McCormick Bridge, mile 747.5 at Jacksonville Beach. The draw shall open...

  10. Space Shuttle separation mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, W. F.

    1979-01-01

    The development of space shuttle separation devices is reviewed to illustrate the mechanisms involved in separating the orbiter from the Boeing 747 carrier aircraft and from the externally mounted propellant tank. Other aspects of the separation device development discussed include design evolution, operational experience during the orbiter approach and landing tests, and the work to be accomplished before an operational system becomes a reality.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10046 - Polyaromatic amine phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyaromatic amine phosphate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10046 Polyaromatic amine phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... amine phosphate (PMN P-02-747) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10046 - Polyaromatic amine phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polyaromatic amine phosphate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10046 Polyaromatic amine phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... amine phosphate (PMN P-02-747) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  13. 77 FR 47267 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... as of November 28, 2007 (72 FR 65655, November 23, 2007). ADDRESSES: For service information... AD 2007-23-18, Amendment 39-15266 (72 FR 65655, November 23, 2007). The SNPRM published in the Federal Register on February 2, 2012 (77 FR 5195). The SNPRM applied to all Boeing Model 747-100B SUD,...

  14. 76 FR 53051 - Safety Zone; ISAF Nations Cup Grand Final Fireworks Display, Sheboygan, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Sector Lake Michigan, at 414-747-7148 or Adam.D.Kraft@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing the... and contrary to the public interest because it would inhibit the Captain of the Port, Sector Lake... will be launched from 8 to 8:30 p.m. on September 13, 2011. The Captain of the Port, Sector...

  15. 77 FR 25133 - Order Temporarily Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... notices, the most recent being that of August 12, 2011 (76 FR 50661 (Aug. 16, 2011)), has continued the..., covert and/ or likely to occur again, rather than technical or negligent '' Id. A ``lack of information... operations under the lease began on or about March 15, 2012, with the leased 747 (MSN 23408) to be...

  16. Familiarity, Availability, and Use of Manipulative Devices in Mathematics at the Primary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Robert K.; Bush, William S.

    1988-01-01

    Surveyed were 220 teachers in grades one-three in 11 states on their use of 11 devices for teaching mathematics. The percent of teachers who never or seldom used the listed manipulatives ranged from 40.8 to 74.7. (MNS)

  17. A new biflavonoid from Ochna beddomei.

    PubMed

    Jayakrishna, G; Reddy, M Kesava; Jayaprakasam, B; Gunasekar, D; Blond, A; Bodo, B

    2003-06-01

    A new biflavonoid, 2,3-dihydroochnaflavone 7,4',7"-tri-O-methyl ether (1) together with two known biflavonoids namely, 2,3-dihydroochnaflavone (2) and ochnaflavone (3) were isolated from the stem bark of Ochna beddomei. The structures were determined by means of spectral and chemical studies.

  18. 40 CFR 60.744 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... an affected facility controlled by a carbon adsorption system and demonstrating compliance by the... of paragraph (c)(1) or (2) of this section, as appropriate. (1) For carbon adsorption systems with a... device efficiency is used as the basis for reporting, as described in § 60.747(d)(2)(i). (2) For...

  19. 40 CFR 60.744 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... an affected facility controlled by a carbon adsorption system and demonstrating compliance by the... of paragraph (c)(1) or (2) of this section, as appropriate. (1) For carbon adsorption systems with a... device efficiency is used as the basis for reporting, as described in § 60.747(d)(2)(i). (2) For...

  20. 40 CFR 63.751 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the system is in operation. (b) Incinerators and carbon adsorbers—initial compliance demonstrations... using a carbon adsorber to comply with the requirements in this subpart shall comply with the... compliance with § 63.745(d), § 63.746(c), or § 63.747(d). (iii) When a nonregenerative carbon adsorber...

  1. 40 CFR 63.751 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the system is in operation. (b) Incinerators and carbon adsorbers—initial compliance demonstrations... using a carbon adsorber to comply with the requirements in this subpart shall comply with the... compliance with § 63.745(d), § 63.746(c), or § 63.747(d). (iii) When a nonregenerative carbon adsorber...

  2. 40 CFR 63.751 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the system is in operation. (b) Incinerators and carbon adsorbers—initial compliance demonstrations... using a carbon adsorber to comply with the requirements in this subpart shall comply with the... compliance with § 63.745(d), § 63.746(c), or § 63.747(d). (iii) When a nonregenerative carbon adsorber...

  3. 26 CFR 1.9001-4 - Adjustments required in computing excess-profits credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... invested capital, see 26 CFR (1941 Supp.) 30.718-2, as amended by Treasury Decision 5299, approved October 1, 1943, 8 FR 13451, C.B. 1943, 747 (Regulations 109); 26 CFR (1943 Cum. Supp.) 35.718-2 (Regulations 112); and 26 CFR (1939) 41.458-4 (Regulations 130). (c) Equity capital. (1) Pursuant to...

  4. 78 FR 46540 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ...). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 747... fasteners, which can lead to cracking and loss of load carrying capacity, resulting in a possible..., Attention: Data & Services Management, P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, WA 98124-2207; telephone...

  5. 26 CFR 1.9001-4 - Adjustments required in computing excess-profits credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... invested capital, see 26 CFR (1941 Supp.) 30.718-2, as amended by Treasury Decision 5299, approved October 1, 1943, 8 FR 13451, C.B. 1943, 747 (Regulations 109); 26 CFR (1943 Cum. Supp.) 35.718-2 (Regulations 112); and 26 CFR (1939) 41.458-4 (Regulations 130). (c) Equity capital. (1) Pursuant to...

  6. Dishonesty and Cheating in a Federal Service Academy: Toleration Is the Main Ingredient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmstrom, Frederick V.; Mullin, R. David

    2013-01-01

    Formal anonymous exit surveys were administered to 747 former cadets at the U.S. Air Force Academy from years 2002 to 2011. The cadet honor code specifically states, "We will not lie, steal or cheat, nor tolerate among us anyone who does." Nevertheless, survey results indicated there was a significant, measurable toleration of dishonesty…

  7. 78 FR 25898 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ...; 55 FR 46652, November 6, 1990), and adding the following new AD: The Boeing Company: Docket No. FAA...-6801 (55 FR 46652, November 6, 1990). (c) Applicability This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model 747...-23-14, Amendment 39-6801 (Docket No. 90-NM-110-AD; 55 FR 46652, November 6, 1990), for certain...

  8. 50 CFR 82.3 - Supplementary information and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES... governments these regulations are intended to implement and be read as consistent with Federal Management... 74-7) 34 CFR part 256, 39 FR 35787-35796, October 4, 1974, unless specifically noted otherwise....

  9. 50 CFR 82.13 - Ownership of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES FOR GRANTS-IN-AID... assignment of title and any compensations consistent with the terms of Federal Management Circular 74-7 or other appropriate referenced Federal Management Circulars cited in § 82.3 of this part....

  10. Pathways to Third-Grade Calculation versus Word-Reading Competence: Are They More Alike or Different?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Geary, David C.; Fuchs, Douglas; Compton, Donald L.; Hamlett, Carol L.

    2016-01-01

    Children (n = 747; 6.5 years) were assessed on domain-general processes and mathematics and reading-related competencies (start of first grade), addition retrieval (end of second grade), and calculations and word reading (end of third grade). Attentive behavior, reasoning, visuospatial memory, and rapid automatized naming (RAN) indirectly…

  11. 31. Photographic copy of original construction drawing (dated 1959, in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Photographic copy of original construction drawing (dated 1959, in possession of the Grissom Air Force Baase Conversion Agency, Grissom Air Reserve Base, Peru, Indiana. This source is the same for views 32-36). Plan of northern section of lower level - Grissom Air Force Base, Building No. 747, Peru, Miami County, IN

  12. 77 FR 55192 - New England Fishery Management Council (NEFMC); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... Plymouth Harbor, 180 Water Street, Plymouth, MA 02360; telephone: (508) 747- 4900; fax: (508) 746-2609; or... Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA 01950; telephone: (978) 465-0492. FOR FURTHER... request that the Council consider splitting the deep-sea coral alternatives off from the Omnibus...

  13. Assembly and annotation of full mitochondrial genomes for the corn rootworm species, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera and D. barberi (Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), using Next Generation Sequence data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete mitochondrial genomes for two corn rootworm species, Diabrotica v. virgifera (16,747 bp) and D. barberi (16,632; Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), were assembled from Illumina HiSeq2000 read data. Annotation indicated that the order and orientation of 13 protein coding genes (PCGs), and...

  14. Improvement in aircraft performance reduces operating costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The escalation of jet transport fuel prices has altered traditional economic formulas for commercial airplane operators. This economic change has provided the impetus to develop improvements for existing production run transports such as the Boeing 727, 737, and 747 airplanes. Improvements have been made in drag reduction, propulsion system, weight reduction, and operation.

  15. 76 FR 19973 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ...: Automated Export System (AES). OMB Control Number: 0607-0152. Form Number(s): AES, AESDirect, AESWeblink... Respondents: 288,747. Average Hours per Response: 3 minutes per AES record. Needs and Uses: The Census Bureau requires mandatory filing of all export information via the Automated Export System (AES). This...

  16. Anatomic Characteristics Associated with Head Splitting in Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.).

    PubMed

    Pang, Wenxing; Kim, Yoon-Young; Li, Xiaonan; Choi, Su Ryun; Wang, Yunbo; Sung, Chang-Keun; Im, Subin; Ramchiary, Nirala; Zhou, Guangsheng; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Cabbage belonging to Brassicaceae family is one of the most important vegetables cultivated worldwide. The economically important part of cabbage crop is head, formed by leaves which may be of splitting and non-splitting types. Cabbage varieties showing head splitting causes huge loss to the farmers and therefore finding the molecular and structural basis of splitting types would be helpful to breeders. To determine which anatomical characteristics were related to head-splitting in cabbage, we analyzed two contrasting cabbage lines and their offspring using a field emission scanning electron microscope. The inbred line "747" is an early head-splitting type, while the inbred line "748" is a head-splitting-resistant type. The petiole cells of "747" seems to be larger than those of "748" at maturity; however, there was no significant difference in petiole cell size at both pre-heading and maturity stages. The lower epidermis cells of "747" were larger than those of "748" at the pre-heading and maturity stages. "747" had thinner epidermis cell wall than "748" at maturity stage, however, there was no difference of the epidermis cell wall thickness in the two lines at the pre-heading stage. The head-splitting plants in the F1 and F2 population inherited the larger cell size and thinner cell walls of epidermis cells in the petiole. In the petiole cell walls of "747" and the F1 and F2 plants that formed splitting heads, the cellulose microfibrils were loose and had separated from each other. These findings verified that anomalous cellulose microfibrils, larger cell size and thinner-walled epidermis cells are important genetic factors that make cabbage heads prone to splitting.

  17. Anatomic Characteristics Associated with Head Splitting in Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.).

    PubMed

    Pang, Wenxing; Kim, Yoon-Young; Li, Xiaonan; Choi, Su Ryun; Wang, Yunbo; Sung, Chang-Keun; Im, Subin; Ramchiary, Nirala; Zhou, Guangsheng; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Cabbage belonging to Brassicaceae family is one of the most important vegetables cultivated worldwide. The economically important part of cabbage crop is head, formed by leaves which may be of splitting and non-splitting types. Cabbage varieties showing head splitting causes huge loss to the farmers and therefore finding the molecular and structural basis of splitting types would be helpful to breeders. To determine which anatomical characteristics were related to head-splitting in cabbage, we analyzed two contrasting cabbage lines and their offspring using a field emission scanning electron microscope. The inbred line "747" is an early head-splitting type, while the inbred line "748" is a head-splitting-resistant type. The petiole cells of "747" seems to be larger than those of "748" at maturity; however, there was no significant difference in petiole cell size at both pre-heading and maturity stages. The lower epidermis cells of "747" were larger than those of "748" at the pre-heading and maturity stages. "747" had thinner epidermis cell wall than "748" at maturity stage, however, there was no difference of the epidermis cell wall thickness in the two lines at the pre-heading stage. The head-splitting plants in the F1 and F2 population inherited the larger cell size and thinner cell walls of epidermis cells in the petiole. In the petiole cell walls of "747" and the F1 and F2 plants that formed splitting heads, the cellulose microfibrils were loose and had separated from each other. These findings verified that anomalous cellulose microfibrils, larger cell size and thinner-walled epidermis cells are important genetic factors that make cabbage heads prone to splitting. PMID:26536356

  18. 9 CFR 317.313 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... minimum height, except as permitted by § 317.400(d)(2). (e)(1) Because the use of a “free” or “low” claim... attaches (e.g., “lard, a sodium free food”). (f) A nutrient content claim shall be in type size and style.... (4) “Percent fat free” claims are not authorized by this paragraph. Such claims shall comply...

  19. IMPROVED ANTIFOAM AGENT STUDY END OF YEAR REPORT, EM PROJECT 3.2.3

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Koopman, D.; Newell, J.

    2011-09-30

    Antifoam 747 is added to minimize foam produced by process gases and water vapor during chemical processing of sludge in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This allows DWPF to maximize acid addition and evaporation rates to minimize the cycle time in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). Improvements in DWPF melt rate due to the addition of bubblers in the melter have resulted in the need for further reductions in cycle time in the CPC. This can only be accomplished with an effective antifoam agent. DWPF production was suspended on March 22, 2011 as the result of a Flammable Gas New Information/(NI) Potential Inadequacy in the Safety Analysis (PISA). The issue was that the DWPF melter offgas flammability strategy did not take into account the H and C in the antifoam, potentially flammable components, in the melter feed. It was also determined the DWPF was using much more antifoam than anticipated due to a combination of longer processing in the CPC due to high Hg, longer processing due to Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) additions, and adding more antifoam than recommended. The resolution to the PISA involved and assessment of the impact of the antifoam on melter flammability and the implementation of a strategy to control additions within acceptable levels. This led to the need to minimize the use of Antifoam 747 in processing beginning in May 2011. DWPF has had limited success in using Antifoam 747 in caustic processing. Since starting up the ARP facility, the ARP product (similar chemically to caustic sludge) is added to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) at boiling and evaporated to maintain a constant SRAT volume. Although there is very little offgas generated during caustic boiling, there is a large volume of water vapor produced which can lead to foaming. High additions and more frequent use of antifoam are used to mitigate the foaming during caustic boiling. The result of these three

  20. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) data report for tape VL0005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Humenik, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    Atmospheric ozone, water vapor, and related flight and meteorological data were obtained during 214 flights of a United Airlines B-747 and two Pan American World Airways B-747's from March through June 1976. In addition, trichlorofluoromethane data obtained from laboratory analysis of two whole air samples collected in flight are reported. These data are available on GASP tape VL0005 from the National Climatic Center, Asheville, North Carolina. In addition to the GASP data, tropopause pressure fields obtained from NMC archives for the dates of the GASP flights are included on the data tape. Flight routes and dates, instrumentation, data processing procedures, and data tape specifications are described in this report. Selected analyses including ozone and sample bottle data are also presented.

  1. Replacement of charcoal sorbent in the VOST

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.D.; Fuerst, R.G.; Foster, A.L.; Bursey, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    EPA Method 0030, the Volatile Organic Sampling Train (VOST), for sampling volatile organics from stationary sources, specifies the use of petroleum-base charcoal in the second sorbent tube. Charcoal has proven to be a marginal performer as a sampling sorbent, partly due to inconsistency in analyte recovery. In addition, commercial availability of petroleum charcoal for VOST tubes has been variable. Lack of data on comparability and variability of charcoals for VOST application has created uncertainty when other charcoals are substituted. Five potential sorbent replacements for charcoal in Method 0030 were evaluated along with a reference charcoal. Two of the sorbents tested, Ambersorb XE-340 and Tenax GR, did not perform well enough to qualify as replacements. Three candidates, Anasorb 747, Carbosieve S-III and Kureha Beaded Activated Charcoal, performed adequately, and produced statistically equivalent results. Anasorb 747 appears to be an acceptable replacement for petroleum charcoal, based on a combination of performance, availability, and cost.

  2. Strong electroluminescence from direct band and defects in Ge n+/p shallow junctions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guangyang; Wang, Chen; Li, Cheng; Chen, Chaowen; Huang, Zhiwei; Huang, Wei; Chen, Songyan; Lai, Hongkai; Jin, Chunyan; Sun, Jiaming

    2016-05-01

    Strong room temperature electroluminescence with two emission peaks at around 0.786 eV and 0.747 eV from Ge n+/p shallow junctions was reported. The peak at around 0.786 eV comes from direct band luminescence (DBL) in n + Ge regions, while the peak fixing at 0.747 eV is resulted from defects induced by ion implantation. Heavy n-type doping in Ge renders realization of strong defect-related luminescence (DRL) feasible. The peak intensity ratio of DRL/DBL decreases with increase of injection current since more electrons are filled in Γ valley. Above all, the Ge n+/p shallow junction is fully compatible with the source and drain in Ge metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors.

  3. Analysis and design of shingled magnetic recording systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keng Teo, Kim; Elidrissi, Moulay Rachid; Chan, Kheong Sann; Kanai, Yasushi

    2012-04-01

    Shingled magnetic recording (SMR) is an upcoming technology that will extend the life of conventional granular magnetic recording (CGMR). SMR differs from conventional recording in that the tracks are written in a raster scan format, in one direction only, leaving tracks that are overlapped like the shingles on a roof. This simple change means that adjacent track overwrite only occurs from one side, and tracks need to survive this overwrite only once. In contrast, conventional recording needs to survive thousands of overwrites from both sides. This work performs analysis of SMR from three perspectives. First, an analysis of how much gain one might expect for SMR based on the assumptions for the magnetic write width (MWW), magnetic read width (MRW), and erase bandwidth (EBW) is performed. Second, this analysis is corroborated via simulated 747 curves using the grain flipping probability (GFP) model. The third part validates the 747 curves from the model with results from the spinstand.

  4. [Chemical synthesis of lactococcin B and functional evaluation of the N-terminal domain using a truncated synthetic analogue].

    PubMed

    Lasta, S; Fajloun, Z; Mansuelle, P; Sabatier, J M; Boudabous, A; Sampieri, F

    2008-01-01

    The lactococcin B (LnB) is a hydrophobic, positively charged bacteriocin, produced by Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris 9B4. It consists of a peptidic chain made up of 47 amino acid residues, and inhibits Lactococcus exclusively. In order to study its biological activity a synthetic lactococcin B (LnBs) was obtained by solid-phase chemical synthesis using a Fmoc strategy. LnBs was shown to be indistinguishable from the natural peptide. In addition, a synthetic (7-47) LnBst analogue was obtained by withdrawal of peptidyl-resin after the 41 cycle of LnBs peptide chain assembly. The synthetic N-terminal truncated (7-47) LnBst analogue was found to be inactive on indicator strains. Our results strongly suggest that the first six N-terminal amino acid residues are involved in the bactericidal activity of LnB.

  5. Inflight data collection for ride quality and atmospheric turbulence research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadlec, P. W.; Buckman, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A flight test program to investigate the effects of atmospheric turbulence on passenger ride quality in large, wide-body commercial aircraft was conducted. Data were collected on a series of flight on a Boeing 747 aircraft. Atmospheric and aircraft performance data were obtained from special sensors, as well as conventional instruments and avionics systems normally available. Visual observations of meteorlogical conditions encountered were manually recorded during the flights.

  6. The SOFIA telescope mounting on a large segment air-bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Hans J.; Lautner, H.

    1990-11-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) telescope concepts are briefly discussed, and a new air-bearing design philosophy is presented. The telescope mounting system inside the hull of a Boeing 747 SP aircraft encompasses a large spherical air-bearing which supports the telescope in the rear bulkhead of the aircraft cavity in order to make it independent of the rotary movements of the airplane and to isolate it from aircraft vibrations through an additional vibration isolation system.

  7. 14 CFR 125.505 - Repairs assessment for pressurized fuselages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 707, 720, 727, 737 or 747, McDonnell Douglas Model DC-8, DC-9/MD-80 or DC-10, Fokker Model F28, or...,000 flights. (ii) Model B4-100 (including Model B4-2C): 30,000 flights above the window line, and 36,000 flights below the window line. (iii) Model B4-200: 25,500 flights above the window line, and...

  8. 14 CFR 91.1505 - Repairs assessment for pressurized fuselages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., 707, 720, 727, 737 or 747, McDonnell Douglas Model DC-8, DC-9/MD-80 or DC-10, Fokker Model F28, or.... (ii) Model B4-100 (including Model B4-2C): 30,000 flights above the window line, and 36,000 flights below the window line. (iii) Model B4-200: 25,500 flights above the window line, and 34,000...

  9. 14 CFR 129.107 - Repairs assessment for pressurized fuselages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., or 747, McDonnell Douglas Model DC-8, DC-9/MD-80 or DC-10, Fokker Model F28, or Lockheed Model L-1011... (including Model B4-2C): 30,000 flights above the window line, and 36,000 flights below the window line. (iii) Model B4-200: 25,500 flights above the window line, and 34,000 flights below the window line. (2)...

  10. 14 CFR 121.1107 - Repairs assessment for pressurized fuselages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., 727, 737, or 747, McDonnel Douglas Model DC-8, DC-9/MD-80 or DC-10, Fokker Model F28, or Lockheed...,000 flights. (ii) Model B4-100 (including Model B4-2C): 30,000 flights above the window line, and 36,000 flights below the window line. (iii) Model B4-200: 25,500 flights above the window line, and...

  11. SOFIA: Aircraft system, aft telescope cavity configuration, phase 2. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-02-01

    This volume summarizes the tasks performed by E-Systems during Phase 2 of a study evaluating the structural modifications required to install the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, SOFIA in the Boeing 747 airplane. An optimal structural modification concept for installation of the Infrared telescope is identified, and the concept is validated by analysis of the static and dynamic characteristics of the modified structure.

  12. Incorporating English Language Teaching through Science for K-2 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Therese; Shea, Lauren M.

    2012-01-01

    English learners are faced with the dual challenge of acquiring English while learning academic content through the medium of the new language (Lee et al. in "J Res Sci Teach" 45(6):726-747, 2008; Stoddart et al. in "J Res Sci Teach" 39(8):664-687, 2002) and therefore need specific accommodations to achieve in both English and the content areas.…

  13. 33 CFR 117.261 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway from St. Marys River to Key Largo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 117.261, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... this section at anytime. (b) McCormick Bridge, mile 747.5 at Jacksonville Beach. The draw shall open on... Daytona Beach. The draw shall open on signal; except that, from 7:45 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. to...

  14. The Fact Book 1996-97. A Statistical Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    This handbook presents statistics about public and private schools in Maryland in the 1996-97 school year. In 1996, Maryland schools had an average daily membership of 800,610.4 students, with an average daily attendance of 747,468.4 students. These students, who attended 1,284 public schools and 1,105 nonpublic schools, were served by 88,465…

  15. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) data report for tape VL0003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Atmospheric ozone, and related flight and meteorological data for May 1975, obtained during 49 flights of a Pan American World Airways 747, are available as GASP tape VL0003 from the National Climatic Center, Asheville, North Carolina. In addition to the GASP data, tropopause pressure fields obtained from NMC archives for the dates of the GASP flights are included on the data tape. Flight routes and dates, instrumentation, data processing procedures, and data tape specifications are described.

  16. Lockheed L-1011 in flight - Wing vortex study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, conducted extensive wake vortice tests beginning in the 1970's. These wake vortex problems first became a serious concern when large jetliners were first introduced. The aircraft's trailing vortices, created by any large-bodied aircraft, were powerful enough to cause problems for business jets and even other airliners. Dryden became interested in vortex research both for safety and as a matter of aerodynamics. A wingtip vortex seriously reduces efficency, causing drag, and therefore a consequent penalty in fuel consumption and performance. The majority of the tests were conducted using spoilers on a Boeing 747-100, which NASA had just acquired for the Space Shuttle Approach and Landing (ALT) tests. With the two spoilers on the outer panels of each wing extended, the vortices were greatly reduced and the chase aircraft could safely fly five kilometers behind the large aircraft, compared to 15 kilometers with no spoilers. Dryden's 747 wake vortex studies clearly indicated that the use of spoilers could reduce the severity of wake vortices. In July, 1977, the center began a brief series of tests on a Lockheed L-1011 Tristar to determine if the spoiler that worked so well on the 747 could be applied to other wide-body aircraft as well. The test showed that while spoilers on the Tristar could reduce wake vortices, they were not as effective in doing so as the spoilers on the 747. NASA is continuing wake vortex studies to this day. These projects can be expected to improve the operational safety of many future aircraft. This photo demonstrates the L-1011 with smoke generators operating, to visualize the vortex flows.

  17. Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1981-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1980 totaled 6,747,719,000 bbl or an average rate of 18,436,390,000 bbl/d, down 13.9% from 1979. Increases were in Saudi Arabia and Syria. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, and Turkey. New discoveries were made in Abu Dhabi, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sharjah, and Oman. New areas were explored in Bahrain, Oman, Syria, and Yemen. 9 figures, 16 tables.

  18. The Dynairship. [structural design criteria and feasibility analysis of an airplane - airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A feasibility analysis for the construction and use of a combination airplane-airship named 'Dynairship' is undertaken. Payload capacities, fuel consumption, and the structural design of the craft are discussed and compared to a conventional commercial aircraft (a Boeing 747). Cost estimates of construction and operation of the craft are also discussed. The various uses of the craft are examined (i.e, in police work, materials handling, and ocean surveillance), and aerodynamic configurations and photographs are shown.

  19. 14 CFR 91.1505 - Repairs assessment for pressurized fuselages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., 707, 720, 727, 737 or 747, McDonnell Douglas Model DC-8, DC-9/MD-80 or DC-10, Fokker Model F28, or... models of the McDonnell Douglas DC-8, the flight cycle implementation time is 30,000 flights. (9) For all models of the McDonnell Douglas DC-9/MD-80, the flight cycle implementation time is 60,000 flights....

  20. 14 CFR 129.107 - Repairs assessment for pressurized fuselages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., or 747, McDonnell Douglas Model DC-8, DC-9/MD-80 or DC-10, Fokker Model F28, or Lockheed Model L-1011... Douglas DC-8, the flight cycle implementation time is 30,000 flights. (9) For all models of the McDonnell Douglas DC-9/MD-80, the flight cycle implementation time is 60,000 flights. (10) For all models of the...